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Sample records for rn detectors operated

  1. Performance of wire-type Rn detectors operated with gas gain in ambient air in view of its possible application to early earthquake predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Charpak, Georges; Breuil, P; Nappi, E; Martinengo, P; Peskov, V

    2010-01-01

    We describe a detector of alpha particles based on wire type counters (single-wire and multiwire) operating in ambient air at high gas gains (100-1000). The main advantages of these detectors are: low cost, robustness and ability to operate in humid air. The minimum detectable activity achieved with the multiwire detector for an integration time of 1 min is 140 Bq per m3, which is comparable to that featured by commercial devices. Owing to such features the detector is suited for massive application, for example for continuous monitoring of Rn or Po contaminations or, as discussed in the paper, its use in a network of Rn counters in areas affected by earth-quakes in order to verify, on a solid statistical basis, the envisaged correlation between the sudden Rn appearance and a forthcoming earthquake.

  2. Simultaneous determination of Rn-220 and Rn-222 concentrations in atmospheres by cellulose nitrate ionographic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobao, N.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the indoor determination of airborne radon and radon daughters is described, based in the utilization of cellulose nitrate (CN) ionographic detectors (LR-115-Kodak-Pathe) These track-etching detectors are coupled to an air sample and to a difusion chamber respectively. In the first system ambient air is pulled through a fiber glass filter for collection of airborne radon daughters (Flow: 230 ml/min). In the second system, the cellulose nitrate detectors is coupled/min). In the second system, the cellulose nitrate detectors is coupled to a difusion chamber electrostatic precipitator arrangement. Here the CN detector will register only the alpha particles given off by the decay products of Rn-222 formed within the sensitive volume of electrostatic precipitator. The construction of calibration curves for the two systems using adequate steady-state concentrations of Rn-220 and Rn-222 in an exposure chamber (1 cubic meter), will allow the use of the system for measurement of measurement of averaged integrated radon concentrations. The CN attached to the CN attached to the air sampler is exposed in the reference atmosphere with and without a mylar filter for discrimination of alpha particles with different energies Field sampling indicated however, that efficiency of the two systems are still low for the measurement of environmental levels of Rn-220 and Rn-222 within houses of the AENR, recommendations for efficienty improvement of the system are proposed [pt

  3. A micromegas detector for {sup 222}Rn emanations measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, J. A.; Garza, J. G.; Irastorza, I. G.; Mirallas, H. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Altas Energías, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-08-08

    The {sup 222}Rn emanation has significant contribution in the overall background for rare event searches experiments. In order to measure this emanations a high sensitivity detector has been designed. The detection method is based on the electrostatic collection of the {sup 222}Rn daughters on a Micromegas detector. Using a chamber with a volume of 21.2 l for the collection of {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po progeny of {sup 222}Rn and a 12 × 12cm{sup 2} pixelized Micromegas for the α detection. The advantages of the Micromegas detectors are the low intrinsic radioactivity and the track reconstruction of the α’s, having excellent capabilities for event discrimination.

  4. A novel design of a personal nuclear track detector for ambient Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaliot, M.; Even, O.; Herman, R.

    1997-01-01

    In some occupations, workers spend a part of their time underground, in closed and unventilated spaces, while most of their time is spent in the open air. The case in hand is a group of the 'Bezek' telephone technicians, whose work includes spending a few hours daily in small, coarsely finished and unventilated tunnels in which telephone branching boxes are located. The rest of their time they work outdoors, and a small part of it is spent in offices. The Rn levels in a few telephone branching tunnels were measured and were found to be rather high (levels of 3000 - 5000 Bq/m 3 are common). The average exposure of the workers is however much lower, due to short time spent in the tunnels, versus the longer time spent outdoors, and the low Rn level there. To obtain a well founded estimation of their actual commutative Rn exposure, a new integrative Rn detector was designed, which is attached to the workers clothing during the whole working day, and serves as a personal Rn detector, rather than as the a conventional area monitor. The detector element itself consists of a Nuclear Track Detector made of dosimetry grade CR-39. The function of the detector is how ever dependent mainly on the geometrical design of the housing of the detector. The properties of these detectors are, however, highly dependent on the design of the detectors housing.The design itself, it's theoretical efficiency, it's actual calibration process and it's calibration factor are presented. Mechanical reliability has been established in some 3 years of operation both as a fixed area monitor and as a personal portable detector. (authors)

  5. Calibration factor determination for solid nuclear track detectors CR-39 type exposed to Rn-222

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazula, Camila Dias; Campos, Marcia Pires de; Mazzilli, Barbara Paci

    2014-01-01

    In the detection method with solid nuclear track detector, when a heavy particle rests on the detector surface, causes a breakdown in their molecular structure forming a trace. One of the typical applications of these detectors is the measurement of the concentration of Rn -222 in air, a noble radioactive gas, part of the U-238 series, emitting alpha particles and important in epidemiological studies to protect individuals from natural radiation. To determine the concentration of Rn -222 in the air in a room is necessary to know the density of lines (traces / cm 2 ) on the detector surface, the exposure time and the calibration factor. The determination of the calibration factor for CR-39 detectors was taken from the exposure of these to a known concentration of Rn-222. Therefore, the detectors were placed inside a cell of Lucas adapted and subsequently exposed to a concentration of Rn-222 15 kBq / m 3 , by means of the apparatus RN-150 Pylon Electronics Incorporation, which has a source of Ra-226 and releases known concentrations of Rn-222. Six calibration factor determinations were performed, the average value obtained was 0.0534 ±0.0021 (traces / cm 2 per Bq / m 3 day). The results are consistent with literature values for the same type of detector and showed good reproducibility

  6. Cape Point GAW Station Rn-222 detector: factors affecting sensitivity and accuracy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brunke, EG

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific factors of a baseline Rn-222 detector installed at Cape Point, South Africa, were studied with the aim of improving its performance. Direct sunlight caused air turbulence within the instrument, resulting in 13.6% variability...

  7. Design and operation of an automated beta-particle counting system for the measurement of 220Rn (and 222Rn) progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1992-01-01

    A fully automated system of the continuous (active) type has been designed for the unattended quantification of 222 Rn progeny and 220 Rn progeny in calibration and test facilities, as well as working and living environments. The system uses a β-particle detector and associated electronic circuitry, in conjunction with an in-house microprocessor-based processing interface card and a personal computer, operated by specially developed in-house software. The system represents a significant improvement over systems using α-particle detectors because of its enhanced flexibility of design and virtual elimination of plate-out effects in the sampling head, and of self-absorption phenomena in the sampling filter. The β-particle system was tested and calibrated in a Radon and Thoron Test Facility of the walk-in type under a variety of experimental conditions. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of semiconductor detector response to "2"2"2Rn and "2"2"0Rn environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irlinger, J.; Trinkl, S.; Wielunksi, M.; Tschiersch, J.; Rühm, W.

    2016-01-01

    A new electronic radon/thoron monitor employing semiconductor detectors based on a passive diffusion chamber design has been recently developed at the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU). This device allows for acquisition of alpha particle energy spectra, in order to distinguish alpha particles originating from radon and radon progeny decays, as well as those originating from thoron and its progeny decays. A Monte-Carlo application is described which uses the Geant4 toolkit to simulate these alpha particle spectra. Reasonable agreement between measured and simulated spectra were obtained for both "2"2"0Rn and "2"2"2Rn, in the energy range between 1 and 10 MeV. Measured calibration factors could be reproduced by the simulation, given the uncertainties involved in the measurement and simulation. The simulated alpha particle spectra can now be used to interpret spectra measured in mixed radon/thoron atmospheres. The results agreed well with measurements performed in both radon and thoron gas environments. It is concluded that the developed simulation allows for an accurate prediction of calibration factors and alpha particle energy spectra. - Highlights: • A method was developed to simulate alpha particle spectra from radon/thoron decay. • New monitor features alpha-particle-spectroscopy based on silicon detectors. • A method is presented to quantify radon/thoron concentrations in mixed atmospheres. • The calibration factor can be simulated for various environmental parameters.

  9. Analysis of international intercomparisons results organized by Japan for integrating 222Rn-220Rn detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yunyun; Cui Hongxing; Zhang Qingzhao; Shang Bing; Su Xu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To guarantee the quality of measurements with the radon-thoron discriminative detectors of our laboratory. Methods: LD-P radon-thoron discriminative detector participated in the international intercomparison for integrating radon/thoron detectors organized by National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS, Japan). Detectors were sent to NIRS for exposure. Radon intercomparison was conducted with radon chamber providing three levels of exposure: low, medium and high levels. Thoron intercomparison was carried out at thoron chamber, which also provided three levels of exposure: low, medium and high levels. Detectors were posted back to our laboratory for etching and analysis after exposure. Then the measured values were submitted to NIRS. Finally the reference values were informed of us. Results: The relative percent difference (RPD) between the measured value and the reference value for radon was -13.8%, -14.4% and -17.1% at low, medium and high levels respectively, and that of thoron were -14.4%, 8.9% and -3.2% at three levels respectively. Conclusions: Both radon and thoron measurement of our detectors rank as 'Category Ⅰ' in the 4th international intercomparisons for integrating radon/thoron detectors with the NIRS radon/thoron chambers. (authors)

  10. Development of an aerosol chamber for calibration of 220Rn progeny detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes an aerosol chamber system that can be used for calibrations and performance experiments of passive 220Rn progeny detectors. For the purpose of this study, an aerosol generation system using carnauba wax as the aerosol material was mounted into the 220Rn chamber. We used the chamber to measure characteristics of the equilibrium factor (F) of 220Rn and unattached fraction (fp) of 220Rn progeny, which are important parameters for dose estimation. The first experiment showed that continuous and stable generation of the unattached and aerosol-attached 220Rn progeny concentrations was obtained. We observed that the spatial distributions in the chamber of the vertical profiles of the unattached and aerosol-attached 220Rn progeny concentrations were homogeneous, as were the particle number concentration and count median diameter. The values of F and fp and their characteristics observed in this study were in the same range as the values reported from indoor measurements. We found that the characteristics of F and fp were dependent on the aerosol conditions (particle diameter and particle number concentration).

  11. Measurement uncertainties of long-term 222Rn averages at environmental levels using alpha track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    More than 250 replicate measurements of outdoor Rn concentration integrated over quarterly periods were made to estimate the random component of the measurement uncertainty of Track Etch detectors (type F) under outdoor conditions. The measurements were performed around three U mill tailings piles to provide a range of environmental concentrations. The measurement uncertainty was typically greater than could be accounted for by Poisson counting statistics. Average coefficients of variation of the order of 20% for all measured concentrations were found. It is concluded that alpha track detectors can be successfully used to determine annual average outdoor Rn concentrations through the use of careful quality control procedures. These include rapid deployment and collection of detectors to minimize unintended Rn exposure, careful packaging and shipping to and from the manufacturer, use of direct sunlight shields for all detectors and careful and secure mounting of all detectors in as similar a manner as possible. The use of multiple (at least duplicate) detectors at each monitoring location and an exposure period of no less than one quarter are suggested

  12. A multi-detector continuous monitor for assessment of 222Rn in the coastal ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulaiova, H.; Peterson, R.; Burnett, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    Radon-222 is a good natural tracer of groundwater discharge and other physical processes in the coastal ocean. Unfortunately, its usefulness is limited by the time consuming nature of collecting individual samples and traditional analysis schemes. An automated multi-detector system is demonstrated that can be used in a continuous survey basis to assess radon activities in coastal ocean waters. The system analyses 222 Rn from a constant stream of water delivered by a submersible pump to an air-water exchanger where radon in the water phase equilibrates with radon in a closed air loop. The air stream is fed to 3 commercial radon-in-air monitors connected in parallel to determine the activity of 222 Rn. By running the detectors out of phase, it is possible to obtain as many as 6 readings per hour with a precision of approximately ±5-15% for typical coastal seawater concentrations. (author)

  13. Study of gel materials as radioactive 222Rn gas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Rickards, J.; Gammage, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Commercial hair gel material (polyvinyl pyrolidone triethanolamine carbo-pol in water) and bacteriological agar (phycocolloid extracted from a group of red-purple algae, usually Gelidium sp.) have been studied as radioactive radon gas detectors. The detection method is based on the diffusion of the radioactive gas in the gel material, and the subsequent measurement of trapped products of the natural decay of radon by gamma spectrometry. From the several radon daughters with gamma radiation emission ( 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 214 Po, 210 Pb, 210 Po), two elements, 214 Pb (0.352 MeV) and 214 Bi (0.609 MeV), were chosen for the analysis in this work; in order to determine the best sensitivity, corrections were made for the short half-life of the analysed isotopes. For the gamma spectrometry analysis, a hyper-pure germanium solid state detector was used, associated with a PC multichannel analyser card with Maestro R and Microsoft R Excel R software. The results show the viability of the method: a linear response in a wide radon concentration range (450-10,000 Bq m -3 ), reproducibility of data, easy handling and low cost of the gel material. This detection methodology opens new possibilities for measurements of radon and other radioactive gases. (authors)

  14. ATLAS Pixel Detector Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.9% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  15. Results from prototypes of environmental and health alarm devices based on gaseous detectors operating in air in counting mode

    CERN Document Server

    Martinengo, P; Peskov, V; Benaben, P; Charpak, G; Breuil, P

    2011-01-01

    We have developed and successfully tested two prototypes of detectors of dangerous gases based on wire-type counters operating in air in avalanche mode: one is for radon (Rn) detection whereas the other one is for the detection of gases with an ionization potential less than the air components. Due to the operation in pulse counting mode these prototypes have sensitivities comparable to (in the case of the Rn detector) or much higher than (in the case of the detector for low ionization gases) the best commercial devices currently available on the market. We believe that due to their high sensitivity, simplicity and low cost such new detectors will find massive applications. One of them, discussed in this paper, could be the on-line monitoring of Rn for the prediction of earthquakes. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development Of Protocols For Simultaneous Measurements Of Rn, Tn Using Nuclear Track Detectors And Trial Application In Mining Areas Of Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Dac Dung; Trinh Van Giap; Le Dinh Cuong; Tran Khanh Minh; Nguyen Huu Quyet; Nguyen Van Khanh; Tran Ngoc Toan

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive gases Radon (Rn) and Thoron (Tn) contribute of more than 50% of natural radiation dose. However, separate measurements of Rn and Tn have not been paid enough attention. An Intergovernmental Cooperation Project was conducted at the Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology with the help from Hungarian experts. The main tasks of the project were to finalize 02 protocols for simultaneous measurements of Rn and Tn using nuclear track detectors and to test these protocols in investigating the concentrations of Rn and Tn, calculating the natural dose due to Rn and Tn, and evaluating the increased radiation dose and radiation safety due to mining activities. Main results of the project include 02 protocols for simultaneous measurements of Rn and Tn and the test results in the mining areas. Rn and Tn concentrations inside the coal mining tunnels are in the average level of Vietnam and the world. Tn concentration inside the factory for separating Zircon at the Ha Tinh Zircon Processing Plant was found to be very high, up to 2931 Bq/m 3 . Based on annual effective dose calculation, workers inside the factory for separating Zircon at the Ha Tinh Zircon Processing Plant could receive an annual effective dose due to Rn and Tn of 4.890 mSv/year, and the increasing dose of 4.710 mSv/year is for higher than 1 mSv/year recommended by the IAEA. (author)

  17. 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations measured in various natural honey samples by using nuclear track detectors and resulting radiation doses to the members of the rural populations in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M. A.; Mortassim, A.

    2008-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) concentrations were measured in sixteen natural honey material samples collected from different regions in Morocco by using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The concentrations of these radionuclides were also measured in nectar solutions corresponding to the studied honey samples. The measured concentrations of 222 Rn and 220 Rn in honey samples ranged from (2.3 ± 0.2) to (8.1 ± 0.6) Bq.l -1 and (1.8 ± 0.1) to (3.9 ± 0.3) Bq.l -1 , respectively. Committed equivalent doses due to annual intakes of 222 Rn were evaluated in the human gastrointestinal tract compartments of adult members of the Moroccan populations from the ingestion of studied honey samples. The influence of the target tissue mass and activities due to 222 Rn on the annual committed equivalent doses in the compartments of the human gastrointestinal tract was investigated. (authors)

  18. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  19. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marcisovsky, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  20. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost element of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  1. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC collider sets new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction because of its higher energy, pileup and luminosity. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector. Therefore, in view of Run 2, the ATLAS collaboration has constructed the first 4-layer pixel detector in Particle Physics by installing a new pixel layer, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Operational experience and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector during Run 2 are presented.

  2. The influence of the nature of soil and plant and pollution on the 238U, 232Th, 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations in various natural honey samples using nuclear track detectors: impact on the adult consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M.A.; Mortassim, A.

    2009-01-01

    238 U and 232 Th concentrations as well as 222 Rn and 220 Rn α-activities per unit volume were measured in various natural honey samples collected from different regions in Morocco using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). These radionuclides were also measured in soils, plant flowers and nectar solutions corresponding to the honey samples studied. In addition, these radionuclides were measured in different imported honey samples. The measured 238 U, 232 Th, 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations ranged from (1.5 ± 0.1) mBq kg -1 to (10.6 ± 0.6) mBq kg -1 , (1.1 ± 0.1) mBq kg -1 to (4.2 ± 0.2) mBq kg -1 , (1.5 ± 0.1) Bq kg -1 to (10.6 ± 0.6) Bq kg -1 and (1.1 ± 0.1) Bq kg -1 to (4.2 ± 0.2) Bq kg -1 for the honey samples studied, respectively. Annual 238 U, 232 Th and 222 Rn intakes by Moroccan adults from the consumption of honey were assessed. The influence of the nature of soil and plant on the 238 U and 232 Th contents of the studied honey samples was investigated. These measurements were completed by an investigation of the 238 U and 232 Th transfer between soils and plant flowers and that between plant flowers and honey, and also by the investigation of the influence of pollution due to different material dusts on 238 U, 232 Th and 222 Rn in the honey samples studied. Committed equivalent doses due to the annual intake of 238 U, 232 Th and 222 Rn were evaluated in the organs of adult members of the Moroccan rural population from the ingestion of the honey samples. The maximum total committed effective dose due to 238 U, 232 Th and 222 Rn from the ingestion of natural honey by the Moroccan rural population was found to be equal to 0.64 μSνy -1 . (author)

  3. Operational Experience with the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00205212

    2015-05-15

    In the first LHC running period the CMS-pixel detector had to face various operational challenges and had to adapt to the rapidly changing beam conditions. In order to maximize the physics potential and the quality of the data, online and offline calibrations were performed on a regular basis. The detector performed excellently with an average hit efficiency above 99\\% for all layers and disks. In this contribution the operational challenges of the silicon pixel detector in the first LHC run and the current long shutdown are summarized and the expectations for 2015 are discussed.

  4. Operational issues of present ATLAS strip detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yacoob, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Current results from the successful operation of the Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation is presented. This note reports on the operation of the detector including an overview of the issues we encountered and the observation of significant increases in leakage currents from bulk damage due to non-ionising radiation, there have been a small number of significant changes effecting detector operation since the contribution to the previous conference in the series [1]. The main emphasis is given to the tracking performance of the SCT and the data quality during the many months of data-taking (the LHC delivered 47 pb

  5. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lantzsch, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with new service quarter panels to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run 1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning, operation and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector will be presented.

  6. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  7. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76 Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76 Ge was set (T- 0ν 1/2 > 2.1 · 10 25 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats. (paper)

  8. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector, therefore, in view of Run-2 of LHC, the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and an additional optical link per module was added to overcome in some layers the readout bandwidth limitation when LHC will exceed the nominal peak luminosity by almost a factor of 3. The key features and challenges met during the IBL project will be presented, as well as its operational experience and Pixel Detector performance in LHC.

  9. The ATLAS Pixel Detector operation and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately $80 imes 10^6$~electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region. The complete Pixel Detector has been taking part in cosmic-ray data-taking since 2008. Since November 2009 it has been operated with LHC colliding beams at $sqrt{s}=900$~GeV, 2.36~TeV and 7 TeV. The detector operated with an active fraction of 97.2% at a threshold of 3500~$e$, showing a noise occupancy rate better than $10^{-9}$~hit/pixel/BC and a track association efficiency of 99%. The Lorentz angle for electrons in silicon is measured to be $ heta_mathrm{L}=12.11^circ pm 0.09^circ$ and its temperature dependence has been verified. The pulse height information from the time-over-threshold technique allows to improve the point resolution using charge sharing and to perform parti...

  10. Operational experience of ATLAS SCT and Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kocian, Martin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector based on silicon sensors is consisting of a strip detector (SCT) and a pixel detector. It is the crucial component for vertexing and tracking in the ATLAS experiment. With the excellent performance of the LHC well beyond the original specification the silicon tracking detectors are facing substantial challenges in terms of data acquisition, radiation damage to the sensors, and SEUs in the readout ASICs. The approaches on how the detector systems cope with the demands of high luminosity operation while maintaining excellent performance through hardware upgrades, software and firmware algorithms, and operational settings, are presented.

  11. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented, including calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: ~96 % of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency e...

  12. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  13. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.7% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  14. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lapoire, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  15. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lapoire, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as B-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification.

  16. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: approximately 97% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  17. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.8% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  18. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deluca, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5\\% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, ...

  19. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump- bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, a...

  20. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deluca, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  1. The BaBar detector: Upgrades, operation and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Gaillard, J. -M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Garra Tico, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Clark, A. R.; Day, C. T.; Furman, M.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Merchant, A. M.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Suzuki, A.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zisman, M.; Barrett, M.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; O' Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Smith, D.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Fella, A.; Antonioli, E.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Walker, D.; Abe, K.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Randle-Conde, A.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Telnov, V. I.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Atmacan, H.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Wang, K.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, L.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Echenard, B.; Erwin, R. J.; Fang, F.; Flood, K.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Narsky, I.; Oyang, J.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Antillon, E. A.; Barillari, T.; Becker, J.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Clifton, Z. C.; Derrington, I. M.; Destree, J.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Gilman, J. D.; Hachtel, J.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Wagner, S. R.; West, C. G.; Zhang, J.; Ayad, R.; Blouw, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q. L.; Altenburg, D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kaiser, S.; Kobel, M. J.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Mader, W. F.; Maly, E.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Dohou, F.; Ferrag, S.; Latour, E.; Mathieu, A.; Renard, C.; Schrenk, S.; T' Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Clark, P. J.; Lavin, D. R.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Swain, J. E.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Landi, L.; Luppi, E.; Malaguti, R.; Negrini, M.; Padoan, C.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Sarti, A.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; de Sangro, R.; Santoni, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musico, P.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Bailey, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Wu, J.; Adametz, A.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Taylor, G. P.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Grenier, G. J.; Hamilton, R.; Lee, S. -J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Fischer, P. -A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Schott, G.; Albert, J. N.; Arnaud, N.; Beigbeder, C.; Breton, D.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Dû, S.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Nief, J. Y.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Tocut, V.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wang, L. L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Bellodi, G.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; Cormack, C. M.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dixon, P.; George, K. A.; Menges, W.; Potter, R. J. L.; Sacco, R.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Sigamani, M.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Allison, J.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Jackson, G.; Kelly, M. P.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Naisbit, M. T.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; West, T. J.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S. Y.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Koeneke, K.; Lang, M. I.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yi, M.; Zhao, M.; Zheng, Y.; Klemetti, M.; Lindemann, D.; Mangeol, D. J. J.; Mclachlin, S. E.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Cerizza, G.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Pellegrini, R.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Godang, R.; Brunet, S.; Cote, D.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Brau, B.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Smith, D. S.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Iwasaki, M.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Borsato, E.; Castelli, G.; Colecchia, F.; Crescente, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Fanin, C.; Furano, F.; Gagliardi, N.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Solagna, P.; Stevanato, E.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Akar, S.; Bailly, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Lebbolo, H.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Marchiori, G.; Martin, L.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Pivk, M.; Prendki, J.; Roos, L.; Sitt, S.; Stark, J.; Thérin, G.; Vallereau, A.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Pennazzi, S.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Fernholz, R. E.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Sands, W. R.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Bulfon, C.; Buccheri, E.; Cavoto, G.; D' Orazio, A.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Li Gioi, L.; Lunadei, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; del Re, D.; Renga, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Bünger, C.; Christ, S.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Bly, M.; Brew, C.; Condurache, C.; De Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Ricciardi, S.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Bourgeois, P.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P. -F.; Georgette, Z.; Graziani, G.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Akre, R.; Aston, D.; Azemoon, T.; Bard, D. J.; Bartelt, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Becla, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Berger, N.; Bertsche, K.; Boeheim, C. T.; Bouldin, K.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Browne, M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Burgess, W.; Cai, Y.; Cartaro, C.; Ceseracciu, A.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Craddock, W. W.; Crane, G.; Cristinziani, M.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F. J.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Donald, M.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fan, S.; Field, R. C.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gaponenko, I.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Haller, G.; Hamilton, J.; Hanushevsky, A.; Hasan, A.; Hast, C.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Hryn' ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Iverson, R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kharakh, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Krasnykh, A.; Krebs, J.; Kroeger, W.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Libby, J.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lüth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; McCulloch, M.; McDonald, J.; Melen, R.; Menke, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Messner, R.; Moss, L. J.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nelson, S.; Nordby, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; O' Grady, C. P.; O' Neill, F. G.; Ofte, I.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Piemontese, M.; Pierson, S.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Ratkovsky, S.; Reif, R.; Rivetta, C.; Rodriguez, R.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwarz, H.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Smith, D.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stanek, M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Teytelman, D.; Thompson, J. M.; Tinslay, J. S.; Trunov, A.; Turner, J.; van Bakel, N.; van Winkle, D.; Va' vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Weber, T.; West, C. A.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wittmer, W.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yan, Y.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Yocky, G.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Meyer, T. I.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Liu, J.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.; Soffer, A.; De Silva, A.; Lund, P.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Rashevskaya, I.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Agarwal, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Brown, C. M.; Choi, H. H. F.; Fortin, D.; Fransham, K. B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hollar, J. J.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Tan, P.; Vuosalo, C. O.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Greene, M. G.; Kordich, T. M. B.

    2013-11-01

    The BaBar detector operated successfully at the PEP-II asymmetric e+e- collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory from 1999 to 2008. This report covers upgrades, operation, and performance of the collider and the detector systems, as well as the trigger, online and offline computing, and aspects of event reconstruction since the beginning of data taking.

  2. Alpha-particle dosimetry using solid state nuclear track detectors. Application to 222Rn and its daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillon, R.; Chambaudet, A.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology for the determination of the detection efficiency of a solid state nuclear track detector for radon and its short-lived daughters was presented. First, particular attention is paid to the α-particles having energies and angles of incidence that lead to observable tracks after an adapted chemical etching. The results are then incorporated in a mathematical model to determine the theoretical radon detection efficiency of a polymeric detector placed in a cylindrical cell. When applied to LR115 and CR39 detectors, the model reveals the influence of the position of the radon daughters inside the cell. Radon daughters tend to link up with natural atmospheric aerosols and then settle on the cell's inside wall. This model allows to determine, among other things, the cell size for which the detector response is independent of the fraction daughters plated out. (author)

  3. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: construction, operation, and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Shreyasi; Adam, Jaroslav; Ahmad, Nazeer; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Bhom, Jihyun

    2018-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 G...

  4. Tracking with heavily irradiated silicon detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, L.; Barnett, B.M.; Bartalina, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, the authors show that a heavily irradiated double-sided silicon microstrip detector recovers its performance when operated at cryogenic temperatures. A DELPHI microstrip detector, irradiated to a fluence of ∼4 x 10 14 p/cm 2 , no longer operational at room temperature, cannot be distinguished from a non-irradiated one when operated at T < 120 K. Besides confirming the previously observed Lazarus effect in single diodes, these results establish, for the first time, the possibility of using standard silicon detectors for tracking applications in extremely demanding radiation environments

  5. The LHCb RICH system; detector description and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanestis, A., E-mail: antonis.papanestis@stfc.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    Two RICH detectors provide positive charged hadron identification in the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. RICH 1 covers the full acceptance of the spectrometer and contains two radiators: aerogel and C{sub 4}F{sub 10}. RICH 2 covers half the acceptance and uses CF{sub 4} as a Cherenkov radiator. Photon detection is performed by the Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs), with silicon pixel sensors and bump-bonded readout encapsulated in a vacuum tube for efficient, low-noise single photon detection. The LHCb RICH detectors form a complex system of three radiators, 120 mirrors and 484 photon detectors operating in the very challenging environment of the LHC. The high performance of the system in pion and kaon identification in the momentum range of 2–100 GeV/c is reached only after careful calibration of many parameters. Operational efficiency above 99% was achieved by a high level of automatization in the operation of the detectors, from switching-on to error recovery. The challenges of calibrating and operating such a system will be presented. - Highlights: • This paper describes the operation and calibration of the LHCb RICH detectors. • The scintillation of CF{sub 4} was successfully suppressed with CO{sub 2}. • The refractive index of the gas radiators was calibrated with data to an accuracy better than 0.1%. • The Hybrid Photons Detectors were calibrated for operation in a magnetic field without loss of resolution.

  6. Reliability studies of high operating temperature MCT photoconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Jintong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2010-10-01

    This paper concerns HgCdTe (MCT) infrared photoconductor detectors with high operating temperature. The near room temperature operation of detectors have advantages of light weight, less cost and convenient usage. Their performances are modest and they suffer from reliable problems. These detectors face with stability of the package, chip bonding area and passivation layers. It's important to evaluate and improve the reliability of such detectors. Defective detectors were studied with SEM(Scanning electron microscope) and microscopy. Statistically significant differences were observed between the influence of operating temperature and the influence of humidity. It was also found that humility has statistically significant influence upon the stability of the chip bonding and passivation layers, and the amount of humility isn't strongly correlated to the damage on the surface. Considering about the commonly found failures modes in detectors, special test structures were designed to improve the reliability of detectors. An accelerated life test was also implemented to estimate the lifetime of the high operating temperature MCT photoconductor detectors.

  7. Enhanced operator interface for hand-held landmine detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Herman; McMahill, Jeffrey D.; Kantor, George

    2001-10-01

    As landmines get harder to detect, the complexity of landmine detectors has also been increasing. To increase the probability of detection and decrease the false alarm rate of low metallic landmines, many detectors employ multiple sensing modalities, which include radar and metal detector. Unfortunately, the operator interface for these new detectors stays pretty much the same as for the older detectors. Although the amount of information that the new detectors acquire has increased significantly, the interface has been limited to a simple audio interface. We are currently developing a hybrid audiovisual interface for enhancing the overall performance of the detector. The hybrid audiovisual interface combines the simplicity of the audio output with the rich spatial content of the video display. It is designed to optimally present the output of the detector and also to give the proper feedback to the operator. Instead of presenting all the data to the operator simultaneously, the interface allows the operator to access the information as needed. This capability is critical to avoid information overload, which can significantly reduce the performance of the operator. The audio is used as the primary notification signal, while the video is used for further feedback, discrimination, localization and sensor fusion. The idea is to let the operator gets the feedback that he needs and enable him to look at the data in the most efficient way. We are also looking at a hybrid man-machine detection system which utilizes precise sweeping by the machine and powerful human cognitive ability. In such a hybrid system, the operator is free to concentrate on discriminant task, such as manually fusing the output of the different sensing modalities, instead of worrying about the proper sweep technique. In developing this concept, we have been using the virtual mien lane to validate some of these concepts. We obtained some very encouraging results form our preliminary test. It clearly

  8. Computerized operation of a multi detector spectrometry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, S; Messing, M; Gilad, Y; Ballon, I; Peled, O; German, U [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev

    1996-12-01

    A spectrometry System consisting of a PCA-II (Personal Computer Analyzer) and a DEAR (Digital Mixer Router) of Nucleus Inc. is operated to collect spectra from 8 NaI(Tl) detectors. As most of the functions including calibration, counting and data handling are similar for all the detectors, the option of automatic tasks is a natural choice. An external computer program which controls tile operation and data handling of tile 8 spectrometer system was developed (authors).

  9. Micro controller based system for characterizing gas detector operating parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Vaishali M.; Verma, Amit K.; Anilkumar, S.; Babu, D.A.R.; Sharma, D.N.; Harikumar, M.

    2011-01-01

    The estimation and analysis of radioactivity levels in samples from environment and from various stages of nuclear fuel cycle operations has become a matter of concern for the implementation of radiological safety procedures. Gas filled/ flow detectors play crucial role in achieving this objective. Since these detectors need high voltage for their operation, the operating characteristics of each detector for optimum performance has to be determined before incorporating into the systems. The operating voltages of these detectors are ranging from few hundred volts to few kilo volts. Present paper describes the design of microcontroller based system to control two HV modules (Electron tubes make: PS2001/12P) independently and acquire data from different gas filled radiation detectors simultaneously. The system uses Philips 80C552 microcontroller based Single Board Computer (SBC). The inbuilt DAC and ADC of microcontroller were used to control HV from 0-2000 with less than ± 1 %, error 1000V. The starting HV, HV step size, decision making intelligence to terminate HV increment (for preset plateau slope) and data acquisition (for preset time), data acquisition time etc., can be programmed. Nearly 200 detectors data (20 data points per detector) can be stored and transferred to PC on request. Data collected by the system for LND 719 GM detectors with starting voltage from 500 V, HV step size of 24 V and 100 seconds counting time to find out the plateau length. The plateau slope and length obtained with this system for LND 719 GM detectors are 3-5%/100V and ∼ 150V respectively. (author)

  10. Selection of the optimum condition for electron capture detector operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, J.; Korus, A.

    1974-01-01

    A method of determination of the optimal work conditions for the electron capture detector is presented in the paper. Physical phenomena which occur in the detector, as well as the energetic dependence of the electron attachment process are taken into consideration. The influence of the kind of carrier gas, temperature, and the parameters of the supplied voltage in both direct and pulse methods on average values of electron energy is described. Dependence of the sensitivity of the electron capture detector on the carrier gas and the polarizing voltage is illustrated for the Model DNW-300 electron capture detector produced in Poland. Practical indications for selecting optimal conditions of electron capture detector operation are given at the end of the paper. (author)

  11. Nuclear detectors. Physical principles of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochet, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear detection is used in several domains of activity from the physics research, the nuclear industry, the medical and industrial sectors, the security etc. The particles of interest are the α, β, X, γ and neutrons. This article treats of the basic physical properties of radiation detection, the general characteristics of the different classes of existing detectors and the particle/matter interactions: 1 - general considerations; 2 - measurement types and definitions: pulse mode, current mode, definitions; 3 - physical principles of direct detection: introduction and general problem, materials used in detection, simple device, junction semiconductor device, charges generation and transport inside matter, signal generation; 4 - physical principles of indirect detection: introduction, scintillation mechanisms, definition and properties of scintillators. (J.S.)

  12. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus crucial for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via front-end chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-on-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including calibration procedures, detector performance and measurements of radiation damage. The detector performance is excellent: more than 95% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the des...

  13. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Christopher Blake; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of $1.3\\times10^{34}\\text{cm}^{{-2}}\\text{s}^{{-1}}$ recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarized, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  14. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Christopher Blake; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of 1.3 x 10^34 cm-2 s-1 recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  15. Singular equivariant spectral asymptotics of Schroedinger operators in Rn and resonances of Schottky surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weich, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This work consists of four self-containedly presented parts. In the first part we prove equivariant spectral asymptotics for h-pseudo-differential operators for compact orthogonal group actions generalizing results of El-Houakmi and Helffer (1991) and Cassanas (2006). Using recent results for certain oscillatory integrals with singular critical sets (Ramacher 2010) we can deduce a weak equivariant Weyl law. Furthermore, we can prove a complete asymptotic expansion for the Gutzwiller trace formula without any additional condition on the group action by a suitable generalization of the dynamical assumptions on the Hamilton flow. In the second and third part we study resonance chains which have been observed in many different physical and mathematical scattering problems. In the second part we present a mathematical rigorous study of the resonance chains on three funneled Schottky surfaces. We prove the analyticity of the generalized zeta function which provide the central mathematical tool for understanding the resonance chains. Furthermore we prove for a fixed ratio between the funnel lengths and in the limit of large lengths that after a suitable rescaling the resonances in a bounded domain align equidistantly along certain lines. The position of these lines is given by the zeros of an explicit polynomial which only depends on the ratio of the funnel lengths. In the third part we provide a unifying approach to these resonance chains by generalizing dynamical zeta functions. By means of a detailed numerical study we show that these generalized zeta functions explain the mechanism that creates the chains of quantum resonance and classical Ruelle resonances for 3-disk systems as well as geometric resonances on Schottky surfaces. We also present a direct system-intrinsic definition of the continuous lines on which the resonances are strung together as a projection of an analytic variety. Additionally, this approach shows that the existence of resonance chains is

  16. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hongtao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In this presentation, I will discuss the operation of ATLAS Pixel Detector during Run 2 proton-proton data-taking at √s=13 TeV in 2017. The topics to be covered include 1) the bandwidth issue and how it is mitigated through readout upgrade and threshold adjustment; 2) the auto-corrective actions; 3) monitoring of radiation effects.

  17. Software-aided operation of modern industrial leak detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse Bley, W. [INFICON GmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    When leak-testing parts with the tracer gas method, the ''no-indication'' response of the leak detector leaves the operator with the question whether there is really no leak present or the test instrument may be in a faulty (= insensitive) condition. Moreover, an operator being absent-minded or distracted may easily move the sniffer tip to the wrong spot on the test object or at least not to all required test areas. To make sure that the uncertainty about sensitivity is avoided specific artificial leaks (''test leaks'') are routinely used for frequent verification of the correct function and calibration of the leak detector. However, absent-minded, distracted or even lazy operators are not detected in this way. Recent software features implemented into INFICON leak detectors can help prevent mistakes of the above kind. Such features include intelligent filtering of the signal (preventing spurious noise), suppression of interfering gas effects, dynamic zeroing of the signal, simple on-site function tests with a built-in test leak, a complete spectrum of indications (optical, acoustical, tactile,..) if the trigger for leaky objects is exceeded and more. As an example of the latest achievements in this field the operator-controlling features of the new ECOTEC E3000 refrigerant leak detector from INFICON are described in some detail. It will become quite clear that product quality (in this case of refrigerators and air conditioners) is greatly enhanced by such supervising functions. (orig.)

  18. Operation, optimisation, and performance of the DELPHI RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Battaglia, Marco; Bloch, D; Boudinov, E; Brunet, J M; Carrié, P; Cavalli, P; Christophel, E; Davenport, M; Dracos, M; Eklund, L; Erzen, B; Fischer, P A; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Gracco, Valerio; Hallgren, A; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P M; Lenzen, G; Liko, D; Mahon, J R; Maltezos, S; Markou, A; Neufeld, N; Nielsen, B S; Petrolini, A; Podobnik, T; Polok, G; Sajot, G; Sannino, M; Schyns, E; Strub, R; Tegenfeldt, F; Thadome, J; Tristram, G; Ullaland, O; Vulpen, I V

    1999-01-01

    The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of DELPHI represent a large-scale particle identification system which covers almost the full angular acceptance of DELPHI. The combination of liquid and gas radiators (C sub 4 F sub 1 sub 0 , C sub 5 F sub 1 sub 2 , and C sub 6 F sub 1 sub 4) provides particle identification over the whole secondary particle momentum spectrum at LEP I and LEP II. Continuing optimisation on the hardware as well as on the online and offline software level have resulted in a stable operation of the complete detector system for more than five years at full physics performance.

  19. The KLOE-2 Inner Tracker: Detector commissioning and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balla, A.; Bencivenni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Branchini, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Ciambrone, P. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Czerwinski, E. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Cicco, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica dell' Università di “Roma Tre”, Roma (Italy); Di Domenici, D.; Felici, G.; Morello, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    The KLOE-2 experiment started its data taking campaign in November 2014 with an upgraded tracking system including an Inner Tracker built with the cylindrical GEM technology, to operate together with the Drift Chamber improving the apparatus tracking performance. The Inner Tracker is composed of four cylindrical triple-GEM, each provided with an X–V strips-pads stereo readout and equipped with the GASTONE ASIC developed inside the KLOE-2 collaboration. Although GEM detectors are already used in high energy physics experiment, this device is considered a frontier detector due to its cylindrical geometry: KLOE-2 is the first experiment to use this novel solution. The results of the detector commissioning, detection efficiency evaluation, calibration studies and alignment, both with dedicated cosmic-ray muon and Bhabha scattering events, will be reported.

  20. Flame detector operable in presence of proton radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. J.; Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A detector of ultraviolet radiation for operation in a space vehicle which orbits through high intensity radiation areas is described. Two identical ultraviolet sensor tubes are mounted within a shield which limits to acceptable levels the amount of proton radiation reaching the sensor tubes. The shield has an opening which permits ultraviolet radiation to reach one of the sensing tubes. The shield keeps ultraviolet radiation from reaching the other sensor tube, designated the reference tube. The circuitry of the detector subtracts the output of the reference tube from the output of the sensing tube, and any portion of the output of the sensing tube which is due to proton radiation is offset by the output of the reference tube. A delay circuit in the detector prevents false alarms by keeping statistical variations in the proton radiation sensed by the two sensor tubes from developing an output signal.

  1. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: Construction, operation, and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alice Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 GeV/ c in p-Pb collisions and the resolution at high transverse momentum improves by about 40% when including the TRD information in track reconstruction. The triggering capability is demonstrated both for jet, light nuclei, and electron selection.

  2. Field and laboratory tests of etched track detectors for 222Rn: summer-vs-winter variations and tightness effects in Maine houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, C.T.; Fleischer, R.L.; Turner, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of tightness of homes of bedrock character on indoor 222 Rn concentrations were sought in 70 homes in the state of Maine by means of four 6- to 8-month-long surveys over a 1.5-yr period. Laboratory experiments were also performed that document the reliability of the track etching system used for the measurements. In this survey the Rn in tight homes was on the average 3.5 times that in drafty ones, and areas with granitic bedrock led to homes having 2.3 times the Rn as for homes on chlorite-biotite-rich bedrock. Winter-to-summer ratios ranged from 0.5-7, and averaged 1.5, implying that surveys of individual homes require a full year of monitoring

  3. ATLAS Detector Operation 2011 
Muon System

    CERN Document Server

    Iakovidis, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the 2011 LHC Data taking period the ATLAS Detector recorded 5.22 fb-1 which is 96.5% of the delivered data from proton-proton collisions. The Muon Spectrometer was improved to 100% operational fraction at the Level 1 trigger and more than 98.7% operational fraction of trigger and precision chambers. The recorded data with Muon Spectrometer was at a level of more than 99% good for physics analysis. This illustrates an excellent performance. This poster presents performance of the Muon Spectrometer trigger chambers as well as precision chambers. In addition a combined Muon Spectrometer performance is presented.

  4. Silicon detectors operating beyond the LHC collider conditions: scenarios for radiation fields and detector degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, I.; Lazanu, S.

    2004-01-01

    Particle physics makes its greatest advances with experiments at the highest energies. The way to advance to a higher energy regime is through hadron colliders, or through non-accelerator experiments, as for example the space astroparticle missions. In the near future, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be operational, and beyond that, its upgrades: the Super-LHC (SLHC) and the hypothetical Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). At the present time, there are no detailed studies for future accelerators, except those referring to LHC. For the new hadron collider LHC and some of its updates in luminosity and energy, the silicon detectors could represent an important option, especially for the tracking system and calorimetry. The main goal of this paper is to analyse the expected long-time degradation of the silicon as material and for silicon detectors, during continuous radiation, in these hostile conditions. The behaviour of silicon in relation to various scenarios for upgrade in energy and luminosity is discussed in the frame of a phenomenological model developed previously by the authors and now extended to include new mechanisms, able to explain and give solutions to discrepancies between model predictions and detector behaviour after hadron irradiation. Different silicon material parameters resulting from different technologies are considered to evaluate what materials are harder to radiation and consequently could minimise the degradation of device parameters in conditions of continuous long time operation. (authors)

  5. PLATEAUING COSMIC RAY DETECTORS TO ACHIEVE OPTIMUM OPERATING VOLTAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoff, E.N.; Peterson, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Through QuarkNet, students across the country have access to cosmic ray detectors in their high school classrooms. These detectors operate using a scintillator material and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A data acquisition (DAQ) board counts cosmic ray hits from the counters. Through an online e-Lab, students can analyze and share their data. In order to collect viable data, the PMTs should operate at their plateau voltages. In these plateau ranges, the number of counts per minute remains relatively constant with small changes in PMT voltage. We sought to plateau the counters in the test array and to clarify the plateauing procedure itself. In order to most effectively plateau the counters, the counters should be stacked and programmed to record the number of coincident hits as well as their singles rates. We also changed the threshold value that a signal must exceed in order to record a hit and replateaued the counters. For counter 1, counter 2, and counter 3, we found plateau voltages around 1V. The singles rate plateau was very small, while the coincidence plateau was very long. The plateau voltages corresponded to a singles rate of 700–850 counts per minute. We found very little effect of changing the threshold voltages. Our chosen plateau voltages produced good performance studies on the e-Lab. Keeping in mind the nature of the experiments conducted by the high school students, we recommend a streamlined plateauing process. Because changing the threshold did not drastically affect the plateau voltage or the performance study, students should choose a threshold value, construct plateau graphs, and analyze their data using a performance study. Even if the counters operate slightly off their plateau voltage, they should deliver good performance studies and return reliable results.

  6. Thoron (RN-220) interference in the determination of RN-222 exhalation rate of soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Déric S.; Farias, Emerson E.G.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Silva, Karolayne E.M.; Hazin, Clovis A.; França, Elvis J., E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Souza Neto, João A., E-mail: adauto@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia

    2017-07-01

    The transport of Rn-222 from the soil to the atmosphere known as exhalation is influenced by meteorological conditions and soil geophysical parameters. In closed and poorly ventilated rooms, this radioactive gas can reach high activity concentrations, in which the energy of alpha particles released by this radionuclide and its progeny is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Soil exhalation rate is an important parameter for assessing human health risks associated with radon. For radon determination using an exhalation chamber, an ionization chamber detector is used to count the electrical pulses generated by the interaction between the alpha particles produced by Rn-222 and its progeny and the air inside the chamber. In this work, the interference of thoron (Rn-220) in the determination of soil exhalation rate of Rn-222 was studied. For this, the RadonBOX exhalation chamber and the AlphaGuard ionization chamber detector were utilized for analyzing the same soil during two hours on different days under similar meteorological conditions. From zero up to approximately 2,400 s, the radon activity concentrations decreased. After 40 minutes, the radon concentrations started to increase, thereby allowing the calculation of soil exhalation rate. This initial decreasing could be explained by a high Rn-220 than Rn-222 presence in the soil, in which, because of its short half-life, after 40 minutes, most thoron present in the chamber has undergone so that the main alpha emitter become Rn-222. In order to confirm this, Rn-220 activity was estimated by the Ra-228 concentration in the soil determined after 30 days using High Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry with HPGe detectors. Therefore, the thoron interference in the determination of soil radon exhalation rate was considered negligible after 40 minutes of measurement time for the analyzed soil. (author)

  7. A Study of the Operation of Especially Designed Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Lund-Jensen, B; Pavlopoulos, P; Peskov, Vladimir; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2006-01-01

    In some experiments and applications there is need for large-area photosensitive detectors to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Nowadays, vacuum PMs are usually used for this purpose. We have developed special designs of planar photosensitive gaseous detectors able to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Such detectors are much cheaper PMs and are almost insensitive to magnetic fields. Results of systematic measurements of their quantum efficiencies, the maximum achievable gains and long-term stabilities will be presented. The successful operation of these detectors open realistic possibilities in replacing PMs by photosensitive gaseous detectors in some applications dealing with cryogenic liquids; for example in experiments using noble liquid TPCs or noble liquid scintillating calorimeters.

  8. 222Rn in wine cellars in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csige, I.; Hunyadi, I.; Szerbin, P.; Juhasz, L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured seasonal average 222 Rn activity concentrations in the air of 60 wine cellars in the Tokajhegyalja and Villany wine regions of Hungary using Radamon type etched track radon detectors. The exposure period was 3 months, matching the seasons of 2003-2004. We also used an ionization chamber-type continuous 222 Rn-monitor (AlphaGUARD PQ222, Genitron Instruments, Germany) to study temporal variations of 222 Rn activity concentration in a selected wine cellar in the Tokajhegyalja wine region. This instruments also recorded temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity data. The etched track detector data revealed that the 222 Rn activity concentrations in the air of wine cellars spread over a wide range, from the ambient outdoor concentration of 6 Bq.m -3 up to 6 kBq.m -3 characteristic of natural caves. The temporal variation of 222 Rn activity concentration in the air of the selected cellar varied inversely with the variation of the atmospheric pressure. Earlier we observed similar phenomena in natural karstic caves connected to the surface with vertical shafts only. This suggests that relatively large volume of pore space of the embedding rock communicates with the volume of the cellar induced by the variation of the atmospheric pressure

  9. Energy-dependent etching-related impacts on CR-39 alpha detection efficiency for the Rn-222 and Rn-220 decay chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y.; Yuan, H.; Kearfott, K. J.

    2018-04-01

    CR-39 detectors are widely used to measure environmental levels of Rn-222, Rn-220 and their progeny. Prior research reported the CR-39 detection efficiency for alpha particles from Rn-222, Rn-220 and their progeny under a variety of etching conditions. This paper provides an explanation for interesting observations included in that work, namely that the critical incidence angle decreases with the increasing particle energy and the detection efficiency for 8.78 MeV alpha particles is zero. This paper explains these phenomena from a consideration of the interaction of alpha particles with the CR-39 detectors and the physics of etching dynamics. The proposed theory provides a rationale for an approach to optimizing the etching conditions of CR-39 detector for measuring Rn-222, Rn-220 and their progenies.

  10. Soil as a source of indoor 220Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Schery, S.D.; Turk, B.

    1992-01-01

    Two suggestions for sources of indoor 220Rn (thoron) have appeared in the literature: (1) building materials and outside air, and (2) soil beneath the house. Due to the difficulty of 220Rn measurement and limited data, both suggestions lack sufficient supporting evidence. We have investigated sources of indoor 220Rn in seven occupied houses in northern New Mexico, U.S. A two-filter system was used to measure indoor 220Rn levels continuously, and 220Rn progeny were measured with single filters and specialized alpha-track detectors. The amount of 220Rn entry from soil was curtailed by cutting off soil gas flow to the indoor air with subfloor depressurization mitigation systems. Four of the houses showed significant reductions in 220Rn with mitigation systems on. The average effect for these houses was to reduce indoor 220Rn levels by 70%. The other three houses had no clear reductions but in one of these houses, the mitigation system was not effective for stopping soil gas flow. Our results provide some of the most clear evidence to date supporting soil as an important source of indoor 220Rn

  11. Refinement of a thoron insensitive alpha track detector for environmental radon monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Olympic Dam Operations, a Copper/Uranium mine in the north of South Australia, currently monitors environmental radon (Rn 222) concentrations at a total of 17 sites in the area surrounding the mining lease and Roxby Downs township. During 1990 a commercial alpha track radon detector service was replaced with an on-site system resulting in lower costs, greater confidence in detector calibration, and reduction in processing time. Alpha track detectors (ATD's) are placed in triplicate at each of the 17 sites. Flow-through scintillation cell continuous radon monitors are also operated at two of these sites. Comparison of results from the two different types of monitor has raised the question of a possible thoron (Rn 220) contribution in the alpha track detectors. Laboratory experiments revealed that the diffusion membranes used in the ATD's were in fact 'transparent' to thoron. A new membrane was tested which effectively excluded thoron from the detector cup without affecting the sensitivity to radon. Field comparisons of the different membranes revealed that the thoron component was significant. Since there is only a very minor Rn220 emission from the mining operation, it is important that the monitoring be specific only to Rn222, the primary source term. The use of the new membrane will result in more accurate measurements of Rn222. 4 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  12. Performance and operation experience of the Atlas Semiconductor Tracker and Pixel Detector at the LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Stanecka, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    After more than 3 years of successful operation at the LHC, we report on the operation and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector and Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) functioning in a high luminosity, high radiation environment.

  13. Measurements of Rn-222, Rn-220 and their decay products in the environmental air of the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yongling; Shen Tong; Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Wei Luxin; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    For the renewal of dose estimation from internal irradiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang, the measurements of radon, thoron and their decay products in the environmental air were conducted, including: integrating measurements of Rn-222 and Rn-220 concentrations; equilibrium factor F for Rn-222 and alpha-potential energy value of Rn-220; external gamma radiation in places where radon measurements were undertaken; cumulative exposure to indoor radon for each family in a case-control study on lung cancer. The Rn-Tn cup monitor method was used for the integrating measurement of Rn-222 and Rn-220 concentration. An alpha track detector was used for the integration measurement of Rn-222 concentration in the case-control study on lung cancer. The results of measurements show that although the investigated areas are located between the Equator and the Tropic of Cancer, and that people live in well-ventilated dwellings, the concentrations of radon, especially of Rn-220 are significantly higher in the indoor air of HBRA than those in the control area. The value of equilibrium factors for Rn-222, the alpha potential energy of decay products from Rn-222 and Rn-220 are determined. (author)

  14. Operation of heavily irradiated silicon detectors in non-depletion mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Li, Z.; Haerkoenen, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Luukka, P.

    2006-01-01

    The non-depletion detector operation mode has generally been disregarded as an option in high-energy physics experiments. In this paper, the non-depletion operation is examined by detailed analysis of the electric field distribution and the current pulse response of heavily irradiated silicon (Si) detectors. The previously reported model of double junction in heavily irradiated Si detector is further developed and a simulation of the current pulse response has been performed. It is shown that detectors can operate in a non-depletion mode due to the fact that the value of the electric field in a non-depleted region is high enough for efficient carrier drift. This electric field originates from the current flow through the detector and a consequent drop of the potential across high-resistivity bulk of a non-depleted region. It is anticipated that the electric field in a non-depleted region, which is still electrically neutral, increases with fluence that improves the non-depleted detector operation. Consideration of the electric field in a non-depleted region allows the explanation of the recorded double-peak current pulse shape of heavily irradiated Si detectors and definition of the requirements for the detector operational conditions. Detailed reconstruction of the electric field distribution gives new information on radiation effects in Si detectors

  15. On the operation of a cryostat for Ge(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donde, A.L.; L'vov, A.N.

    1974-01-01

    Operating experience with cryostats for Ge(Li) detectors developed at the FTI of the Academy of Science of the Ukrainian SSR, and used in several laboratories for 5 years is reported. It is shown that the spectrometric properties of all cryostat-mounted detectors operating since 1969 have not been affected and up to now the detectors are operating successfully. Nitrogen consumption has not increased and is at a level of 0.5 l/d. During five-year continuous operation the cryostat pressure has varied from 6.10 -7 to 8.10 -6 torr

  16. The CT-PPS project detector hardware and operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    Ravera, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer allows extending the LHC physics program by measuring protons in the very forward regions of CMS. Tracking and timing detectors have been installed along the beam pipe at $\\sim 210$~m from the CMS interaction point on both sides of the LHC tunnel. The tracking system consists of a station of silicon strip detectors and one of silicon pixel detectors on each side. The latter is composed of six planes of 3D silicon pixel sensors bump-bonded to the PSI46dig ROC developed for the CMS Phase I Pixel Tracker upgrade. A track resolution of $\\sim 10$~$\\mu$m is obtained. The future goal is to replace the present strip stations with pixel ones in order to ensure better multi-track reconstruction. Each timing station is made of three planes of diamond detectors and one plane equipped with an Ultra-Fast Silicon Detector (UFSD). A timing resolution of a few tens of picoseconds can be achieved with the present detector; a large R\\&D effort is ongoing to reach the $10$~ps targ...

  17. Use of Activated Charcoal for 220Rn Adsorption for Operations Associated with the Uranium Deposit in the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements have been collected with the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of activated charcoal for the removal of 220 Rn from process off-gas at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A series of bench-scale tests were performed at superficial flow velocities of 10, 18, 24, and 33 cm/s (20, 35, 47, and 65 ft/min) with a continuous input concentration of 220 Rn in the range of 9 x 10 3 pCi/L. In addition, two tests were performed at the MSRE facility by flowing helium through the auxiliary charcoal bed uranium deposit. These tests were performed so that the adsorptive effectiveness could be evaluated with a relatively high concentration of 220 Rn. In addition to measuring the effectiveness of activated charcoal as a 220 Rn adsorption media, the source term for available 220 Rn in the deposit is actually available for removal and that the relative activity of fission gases is very small when compared to 220 Rn. The measurement data were then used to evaluate the expected effectiveness of a proposed charcoal adsorption bed consisting of a right circular cylinder having a diameter of 43 cm and a length of 91 cm (17 in. I.D. x 3 ft.). The majority of the measurement data predicts an overall 220Rn activity reduction factor of about 1 x 10 9 for such a design; however, two measurements collected at a flow velocity of 18 cm/s (35 ft/min) indicated that the reduction factor could be as low as 1 x 10 6 . The adsorptive capacity of the proposed trap was also evaluated to determine the expected life prior to degradation of performance. Taking a conservative vantage point during analysis, it was estimated that the adsorption effectiveness should not begin to deteriorate until a 220 Rn activity on the order of 10 10 Ci has been processed. It was therefore concluded that degradation of performance would likely occur as the result of causes other than filling by radon progeny

  18. Single Wire Detector Performance Over One Year of Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hervas Aguilar, David Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract When ionizing radiation passes through gas chambers in single wire detectors gas molecules separate into ions and electrons. By applying a strong localized electric field near the single wire an avalanche of electrons is created and it can be collected. The current produced in the wire is then proportional to the energy of the particle detected. Nevertheless, many factors can contribute to detector aging effects which are visible in a loss of gain caused by deposition of contaminants on the collecting wire. This study consists on novel data analysis techniques used to process large amounts of data produced by two simultaneously running single wire detectors. Aging effects are analyzed while environmental fluctuations are corrected for. A series of scripts carry out data filtering, data matching, corrections, and finally trend plotting by using ROOT’s extensive libraries developed at CERN.

  19. The Successful Operation of Hole-type Gaseous Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Pereiale, L.; Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Tokanai, F.

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated that hole-type gaseous detectors, GEMs and capillary plates, can operate up to 77 K. For example, a single capillary plate can operate at gains of above 10E3 in the entire temperature interval between 300 until 77 K. The same capillary plate combined with CsI photocathodes could operate perfectly well at gains (depending on gas mixtures) of 100-1000. Obtained results may open new fields of applications for capillary plates as detectors of UV light and charge particles at cryogenic temperatures: noble liquid TPCs, WIMP detectors or LXe scintillating calorimeters and cryogenic PETs.

  20. Operation of a hemispherical detector for LET measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, M.C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    A hemispherical ΔE/E detector has been constructed and tested for the measurement of linear-energy-transfer distributions of charged particles induced by fast neutrons. The initial performance test results and LET distributions from 14.8-MeV monoenergetic neutron irradiation in free space of carbon, lead, and Al50-plastic are presented

  1. Operation and performance of the silicon vertex detector (SVX') at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.P.

    1994-10-01

    The authors describe the operation and performance of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX'), which replaced the CDF SVX detector for run lb of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The new features of the SVX' include AC coupled readout, Field OXide Field Effect Transistor (FOXFET) biasing and radiation hard front end electronics. The authors expect the detector to survive beyond the 100 pb -1 of data taking anticipated for the present CDF physics run. Preliminary results from the collider data show that the detector has a resolution of about 12 μm. This provides a powerful tool to do top and bottom physics

  2. ATLAS strip detector: Operational Experience and Run1 → Run2 transition

    CERN Document Server

    NAGAI, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS SCT operational experience and the detector performance during the RUN1 period of LHC will be reported. Additionally the preparation outward to RUN2 during the long shut down 1 will be mentioned.

  3. Fast current amplifier for background-limited operation of photovoltaic InSb detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmann, J; Koehler, S; Lahmann, W

    1981-01-01

    A fast current amplifier for use with photovoltaic indium antimonide detectors is described which was designed for detection of lidar return signals. Near background-limited operation was possible for bandwidths up to 0.8 MHz.

  4. Operation and radiation resistance of a FOXFET biasing structure for silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, M [Particle Detector Group, Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Research Inst. for High Energy Physics (SEFT), Helsinski (Finland); Singh, P; Engels, E Jr; Shepard, J; Shepard, P F [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    AC-coupled strip detectors biased with a FOXFET transistor structure have been studied. Measurement results for the basic operational characteristics of the FOXFET are presented together with a brief description of the physics underlying its operation. Radiation effects were studied using photons from a [sup 137]Cs source. Changes in the FOXFET characteristics as a function of radiation dose up to 1 Mrad are reported. Results about the effect of radiation on the noise from a FOXFET biased detector are discribed. (orig.).

  5. Passivation of gas microstrip detectors and stability of long-term operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.; Armitage, J.; Chapman, G.; Dixit, M.; Dubeau, J.; Faszer, W.; Hamel, L.A.; Oakham, G.

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the long-term operation of gas microstrip detectors which have been passivated with a layer of nickel oxide. We have used as the active gas CF 4 /isobutane (80 : 20) and three different types of substrates: Tedlar, glass and Upilex. In all three cases we found that the detectors are stable after passivation and can operate for a month without changes in gain at rates of MHz. The total accumulated charge was approximately 100 mC. ((orig.))

  6. Operation and radiation resistance of a FOXFET biasing structure for silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, M.; Helsinki Univ.; Singh, P.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.

    1992-02-01

    AC-coupled strip detectors biased with a FOXFET transistor structure have been studied. Measurement results for the basic operational characteristics of the FOXFET are presented together with a brief description of the physics underlying its operation. Radiation effects were studied using photons from a 137 Cs source. Changes in the FOXFET characteristics as a function of radiation dose up to 1 MRad are reported. Results about the effect of radiation on the noise from a FOXFET biased detector are described. 13 refs

  7. Strategies for reducing the environmental impact of gaseous detector operation at the CERN LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capeans, M.; Guida, R.; Mandelli, B., E-mail: beatrice.mandelli@cern.ch

    2017-02-11

    A wide range of gas mixtures is used for the operation of different gaseous detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. Nowadays some of these gases, as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}F{sub 4}, CF{sub 4} and SF{sub 6}, are indicated as greenhouse gases (GHG) and dominate the overall GHG emission from particle detectors at the LHC experiments. The release of GHG is an important subject for the design of future particle detectors as well as for the operation of the current experiments. Different strategies have been adopted at CERN for reducing the GHG emissions. The standard approach is the recirculation of the gas mixture with complex gas systems where system stability and the possible accumulation of impurities need to be attentively evaluated for the good operation and safety of the detectors. A second approach is based on the recuperation of the gas mixture exiting the detectors and the separation of its gas components for re-use. At long-term, the use of less invasive gases is being investigated, especially for the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) systems. Operation of RPC with environmentally friendly gas mixtures is demonstrated for streamer mode while avalanche mode operation needs more complex gas mixtures. - Highlights: • Greenhouse gases (GHG) emission in the LHC experiments and detectors. • Strategies to reduce the GHG emissions: gas recirculation and recuperation systems. • GHG emission: achievements from LHC Run1 to Run2. • Resistive Plate Chambers operation with new environmentally friendly gases.

  8. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: Construction, operation, and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acharya, S.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Brož, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Horák, D.; Křížek, Filip; Kučera, Vít; Kushpil, Svetlana; Lavička, R.; Mareš, Jiří A.; Petráček, V.; Šumbera, Michal; Vaňát, Tomáš; Závada, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 881, č. 2 (2018), s. 88-127 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15052 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : fibre/foam sendwich radiator * transition radiation detector * multi-wire proportional drift chamber * Xenon-based gas micture * tracking * lonisation energy loss Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics ; Particles and field physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2016

  9. A preliminary investigation of 222Rn and 220Rn levels in non-uranium mines in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Bing; Cui Hongxing; Wu Yunyun; Zhang Qingzhao; Su Xu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To measure levels of 222 Rn and 220 Rn in typical non-uranium mines, China, and to estimate dose from the occupational radon exposure in the miners. Methods: Using typical sampling scheme, 44 mines were selected in 12 provinces, which can be classified into 4 categories and 17 types of mines. The radon-thoron discriminative detectors were used to measure 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations in mines. Result: The concentration of 222 Rn or 220 Rn was log-normally distributed. The arithmetic mean (AM) concentration and geometric mean (GM) concentration of 222 Rn and 220 Rn in 25 metal mines (n=147) were estimated to be (1211 ±2359) Bq/m 3 (AM) and (311 ± 5.5) Bq/m 3 (GM), and (269 ±700) Bq/m 3 (AM) and (71 ± 4.4)Bq/m 3 (GM), respectively. The mean concentrations of 222 Rn and 220 Rn in 18 non-metal mines (n=118) were (98 ± 207) Bq/m 3 (AM) and(55 ± 2.5) Bq/m 3 (GM), and (60 ± 76) Bq/m 3 (AM) and (38 ± 2.4) Bq/m 3 (GM) respectively. In total, we measured 222 Rn concentration in 44 underground mines, 6 of them, accounted for 15%, with the mean radon concentration exceeding 1000 Bqm -3 (limit of workplace in China). Approximately 7% of radon concentration in mines measured were higher than 3700 Bq/m 3 (current limit in uranium mine in China), some points even exceeded 10 000 Bq/m 3 . Based on this typical measurements, the equilibrium factor for 222 Rn was estimated to be 0.33 ± 0.15 in underground mines and 0.47 ±0.18 in nearby houses. Equilibrium factor for 220 Rn ranged from 0.001 to 0.032. Using the data obtained in this typical survey, the average annual effective dose of underground miners exposed to radon and thoron was estimated to be 8.15 mSv/a. Conclusions: High levels of 222 Rn exists in metal mines, such as copper, tin, lead and zinc, gold, and aluminum mines among others. More study and administrative measures are needed to address the radiation protection of workers occupationally exposed to high radon in mines. (authors)

  10. Etched track technique to measure sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn and sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn fluxes on soil surface

    CERN Document Server

    Csige, I

    2003-01-01

    sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn and sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn in the human environment are considered to be a risk factor because of the radiation dose due to the inhalation of their short-lived daughters. Main source of radon is usually the soil; therefore the measurement of fluxes of sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn and sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn on soil surfaces is often a relevant parameter to characterise building site radon potential. An etched track detector technique was developed to measure long-time average sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn and sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn fluxes. (R.P.)

  11. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  12. Aging measurements on triple-GEM detectors operated with $CF_{4}$-based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonsi, M; De Simone, P; Murtas, F; Poli Lener, M P; Bonivento, W; Cardini, A; Raspino, D; Saitta, B; Pinci, D; Baccaro, S; 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2005.03.054

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a global irradiation test of full size triple-GEM detectors operated with CF/sub 4/-based gas mixtures. This study has been performed in the framework of an R&D activity on detectors for the innermost region of the first muon station of the LHCb experiment. The prototypes have been irradiated at the Calliope facility of the ENEA-Casaccia with a high intensity 1.25 MeV detectors performances have been measured with X-rays and with a 3 Ge V pion beam at CERN. A SEM analysis on several samples of the detectors has been performed to complete the understanding of the physical processes occurring in a GEM detector during a strong irradiation.

  13. Aging measurements on triple-GEM detectors operated with $CF_{4}$- based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonsi, M; Bencivenni, G; Bonivento, W; Cardini, A; Lener, M P; Murtas, F; Pinci, D; Raspino, D; Saitta, B; De Simone, P

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a global irradiation test of full size triple-GEM detectors operated with CF/sub 4/-based gas mixtures. This study has been performed in the framework of an R&D activity on detectors for the innermost region of the first muon station of the LHCb experiment. The prototypes have been irradiated at the Calliope facility of the ENEA-Casaccia with a high intensity 1.25 MeV gamma from a /sup 60/Co source. After the irradiation test the detectors performances have been measured with X-rays and with a 3 GeV pion beam at CERN. A SEM analysis on several samples of the detectors has been performed to complete the understanding of the physical processes occurring in the GEM detector during the strong irradiation.

  14. Status of the ATLAS Pixel Detector and its performance after three years of operation

    CERN Document Server

    Favareto, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is very important for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. The detector performance is excellent: ~96 % of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, and a good alignment allows high quality track resolution

  15. Status of the ATLAS Pixel Detector and its performance after three years of operation

    CERN Document Server

    Favareto, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is very important for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. The detector performance is excellent: ~96% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, and a good alignment allows high quality track resolution.

  16. Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector with electroluminescence gap operated in argon doped with nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Lavrentiev avenue 11, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Dolgov, A. [Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nosov, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Lavrentiev avenue 11, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-11

    A two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with electroluminescence (EL) gap, operated in argon doped with a minor (49±7 ppm) admixture of nitrogen, has been studied. The EL gap was optically read out using cryogenic PMTs located on the perimeter of the gap. We present the results of the measurements of the N{sub 2} content, detector sensitivity to X-ray-induced signals, EL gap yield and electron lifetime in the liquid. The detector sensitivity, at a drift field in liquid Ar of 0.6 kV/cm, was measured to be 9 and 16 photoelectrons recorded at the PMTs per keV of deposited energy at 23 and 88 keV respectively. Such two-phase detectors, with enhanced sensitivity to the S2 (ionization-induced) signal, are relevant in the field of argon detectors for dark matter search and low energy neutrino detection.

  17. Contribution of 222Rn in domestic water supplies to 222Rn in indoor air in Colorado homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, E.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Nyberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of 222Rn from domestic water wells to indoor air was investigated in a study of 28 houses near Conifer, CO. Air concentrations determined by alpha-track detectors (ATDs) and continuous radon monitors were compared with the predictions of a single-cell model. In many of the houses, the water supply was shown to contribute significantly to levels of indoor 222Rn. The data from the ATD study were augmented with a continuous monitoring study of a house near Lyons, CO. The well water in that house has the highest known concentration of 222Rn in water yet reported (93 MBq m-3). The temporal pattern in the indoor 222Rn concentration corresponds to water-use records. In general, it is difficult to quantify the proportion of indoor radon attributable to water use. Several lines of evidence suggest that the single-cell model underestimates this proportion. Continuous-monitoring data, although useful, are impractical due to the cost of the equipment. We propose a protocol for 222Rn measurement based on three simultaneous integrating radon detectors that may help estimate the proportion of indoor 222Rn derived from the water supply

  18. LHCb: Installation and operation of the LHCb Silicon Tracker detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Esperante Pereira, D

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons. The construction and installation phases of the Silicon Tracker (ST) of the experiment were completed by early summer 2008. The LHCb Silicon Tracker sums up to a total sensitive area of about 12 m^2 using silicon micro-strip technology and withstands charged particle fluxes of up to 5 x 10^5cm^−2s^−1. We will report on the preparation of the detectors for the first LHC beams. Selected results from the commissioning in LHCb are shown, including the first beam-related events accumulated during LHC injection tests in September 2008. Lessons are drawn from the experience gathered during the installation and commissioning.

  19. Comparison of methods and instruments for 222Rn/220Rn progeny measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanyang; Shang Bing; Wu Yunyun; Zhou Qingzhi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, comparisons were made among three methods of measurement (grab measurement, continuous measurement and integrating measurement) and also measurement of different instruments for a radon/thoron mixed chamber. Taking the optimized five-segment method as a comparison criterion, for the equilibrium-equivalent concentration of 222 Rn, measured results of Balm and 24 h integrating detectors are 31% and 29% higher than the criterion, the results of Wl x, however, is 20% lower; and for 220 Rn progeny, the results of Fiji-142, Kf-602D, BWLM and 24 h integrating detector are 86%, 18%, 28% and 36% higher than the criterion respectively, except that of WLx, which is 5% lower. For the differences shown, further research is needed. (authors)

  20. Operational experience with the CMS pixel detector in LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Karancsi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector was repaired successfully, calibrated and commissioned for the second run of Large Hadron Collider during the first long shutdown between 2013 and 2015. The replaced pixel modules were calibrated separately and show the expected behavior of an un-irradiated detector. In 2015, the system performed very well with an even improved spatial resolution compared to 2012. During this time, the operational team faced various challenges including the loss of a sector in one half shell which was only partially recovered. In 2016, the detector is expected to withstand instantaneous luminosities beyond the design limits and will need a combined effort of both online and offline teams in order to provide the high quality data that is required to reach the physics goals of CMS. We present the operational experience gained during the second run of the LHC and show the latest performance results of the CMS pixel detector.

  1. The ATLAS Inner Detector operation,data quality and tracking performance.

    CERN Document Server

    Stanecka, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector comprises silicon and gas based detectors. The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) and the Pixel Detector are the key precision tracking silicon devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. And the the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT), the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector is made of thin-walled proportional-mode drift tubes (straws). The Pixel Detector consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. The SCT is a silicon strip detector and is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. The TRT is made...

  2. Operational Experience of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker and Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Dave; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on the silicon and gaseous tracking subsystems that form the ATLAS Inner Detector. Those subsystems have undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the LHC during Run2. The key status and performance metrics of the Pixel Detector and the Semi Conductor Tracker are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described.

  3. Operational Experience with and Performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Grummer, Aidan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency with the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel Detector are discussed. The detector has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the fact that the Large Hadron Collider is exceeding expectations for instantaneous luminosity by more than a factor of two (more than $2 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$). Emphasizing radiation damage effects, the key status and performance metrics are described.

  4. Limited Data Problems for the Generalized Radon Transform in Rn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikel, Jürgen; Quinto, Eric Todd

    2016-01-01

    We consider the generalized Radon transform (defined in terms of smooth weight functions) on hyperplanes in Rn. We analyze general filtered backprojection type reconstruction methods for limited data with filters given by general pseudodifferential operators. We provide microlocal characterizations...

  5. Multiplication on Rn -A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    topology can be used to prove the results in the first article. While the discussion ... {O}) x (JRn \\ {O}) ~ JRn \\ {O} with an element e E ]Rn \\ {O} such that m(e, ... in 1966, using sophisticated methods from topology. To state this ... If G is a finite group then G is a ... (Topology on Sn is of course the induced topology from. JRn+1.) ...

  6. Operating Instructions for the Cryogenics in the Liquid Argon Detector at CIEMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, L.; Leal, M. D.; Prado, M. del; Ramirez, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Ciemat has wide experience in designing and developing gaseous particle detectors. It has taken part in the building of experiments for CERN accelerators, constructing shares of the muon chambers for L3 experiment in LEP and CMS experiment in LHC. Recently, new concepts for particle detectors have been developed, as a natural evolution from the ones built at Ciemat. These new radiation detectors use liquefied noble gases as active media. A testing system for these kind of liquefied argon detectors has been built at Ciemat, and includes a supporting cryogenic system for the liquefaction and maintenance of the liquid argon needed for operating the detector. This document describes the technical features of this cryogenic system. Besides the documentation of the cryogenic system, this technical report can be of help for the management and upgrading of the detector. As well as an introduction, the report includes the following chapters: The second one is a description of the cryogenics and gas systems. The third chapter shows the controlling electronics. The fourth chapter deals with the important topic that is security, its systems and protocols. The fifth describes the cryogenic operations possible in this equipment. The report is completed with diagrams, schemes, pictures and tables for the easier management of the setup. (Author)

  7. Foil cycling technique for the VESUVIO spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Mayers, J.; Rhodes, N. J.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports a novel experimental technique, namely, the foil cycling technique, developed on the VESUVIO spectrometer (ISIS spallation source) operating in the resonance detector configuration. It is shown that with a proper use of two foils of the same neutron absorbing material it is possible, in a double energy analysis process, to narrow the width of the instrumental resolution of a spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration and to achieve an effective subtraction of the neutron and gamma backgrounds. Preliminary experimental results, obtained from deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements on lead, zirconium hydride, and deuterium chloride samples, are presented

  8. Foil cycling technique for the VESUVIO spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Mayers, J.; Rhodes, N. J.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.

    2006-09-01

    This article reports a novel experimental technique, namely, the foil cycling technique, developed on the VESUVIO spectrometer (ISIS spallation source) operating in the resonance detector configuration. It is shown that with a proper use of two foils of the same neutron absorbing material it is possible, in a double energy analysis process, to narrow the width of the instrumental resolution of a spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration and to achieve an effective subtraction of the neutron and gamma backgrounds. Preliminary experimental results, obtained from deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements on lead, zirconium hydride, and deuterium chloride samples, are presented.

  9. Improved automated analysis of radon (222Rn) and thoron (220Rn) in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Natasha; Burnett, William C; Lane-Smith, Derek

    2009-11-15

    Natural radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) can be used as tracers of various chemical and physical processes in the environment. We present here results from an extended series of laboratory experiments intended to improve the automated analysis of (222)Rn and (220)Rn in water using a modified RAD AQUA (Durridge Inc.) system. Previous experience with similar equipment showed that it takes about 30-40 min for the system to equilibrate to radon-in-water concentration increases and even longer for the response to return to baseline after a sharp spike. While the original water/gas exchanger setup was built only for radon-in-water measurement, our goal here is to provide an automated system capable of high resolution and good sensitivity for both radon- and thoron-in-water detections. We found that faster water flow rates substantially improved the response for both isotopes while thoron is detected most efficiently at airflow rates of 3 L/min. Our results show that the optimum conditions for fastest response and sensitivity for both isotopes are at water flow rates up to 17 L/min and an airflow rate of 3 L/min through the detector. Applications for such measurements include prospecting for naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in pipelines and locating points of groundwater/surface water interaction.

  10. Single-photon detector operating under extremely high background photon flux conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Sopko, Bruno; Blazej, Josef

    2009-01-01

    We are reporting our results in research and development in the field of avalanche semiconductor single-photon detectors and their application. Our goal was a development of a solid-state photon-counting detector capable of high-precision photon arrival time tagging in extremely harsh operating conditions. The background photon flux exceeding 10 9 photons per second hitting the detector active area should not avoid the useful signal detection and recognition on the signal level of units of photons per second. This is background photon flux about two orders of magnitude higher than what the conventional solid-state photon counters accept. The detection timing resolution should be better than 100 ps and the delay stability should be on picosecond level. We have developed and tested the active quenched and gated avalanche structure on silicon providing the required features in connection with the K14 detection chips. The detector is capable of gated operation under the conditions of background photon flux of 5x10 9 photons per second. The operational detector tolerates long term exposures to the input photon flux exceeding 10 15 photons (>1 mW) per second without damage.

  11. Assembly, characterization, and operation of large-scale TES detector arrays for ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine Goodwin

    2016-01-01

    The Polarization-sensitive Receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACTPol) is designed to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies on small angular scales. Measurements of the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies have produced arguably the most important cosmological data to date, establishing the LambdaCDM model and providing the best constraints on most of its parameters. To detect the very small fluctuations in the CMB signal across the sky, ACTPol uses feedhorn-coupled Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) detectors. A TES is a superconducting thin film operated in the transition region between the superconducting and normal states, where it functions as a highly sensitive resistive thermometer. In this thesis, aspects of the assembly, characterization, and in-field operation of the ACTPol TES detector arrays are discussed. First, a novel microfabrication process for producing high-density superconducting aluminum/polyimide flexible circuitry (flex) designed to connect large-scale detector arrays to the first stage of readout is presented. The flex is used in parts of the third ACTPol array and is currently being produced for use in the AdvACT detector arrays, which will begin to replace the ACTPol arrays in 2016. Next, we describe methods and results for the in-lab and on-telescope characterization of the detectors in the third ACTPol array. Finally, we describe the ACTPol TES R(T,I) transition shapes and how they affect the detector calibration and operation. Methods for measuring the exact detector calibration and re-biasing functions, taking into account the R(T,I) transition shape, are presented.

  12. The gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS operating at T = 0.1 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P.; Bassan, M.; Bonifazi, P.

    1997-02-01

    They report on the ultralow-temperature resonant-mass gravitational-wave detector NAUTILUS operating at the Frascati INFN Laboratories. The present aim of this detector is to achieve a sensitivity sufficient to detect bursts of gravitational radiation from sources located in our Galaxy and in the local group. Progress in transducer technology is likely to lead to sensitivities that will enable them to observe events from sources as far away as the Virgo cluster of galaxies. They describe the cryogenic apparatus, readout system cosmic-ray veto system, and give first results obtained during one year of continuous operation at T = 0.1 K. In particular the Brownian noise of the detector at T = 0.1 K was measured. The measured strain sensitivity was h-tilde ∼ 6 10 -22 Hz -1/2 at the frequencies of the two modes, 908 Hz and 924 Hz, with bandwidths of about 1 Hz

  13. Online {sup 222}Rn removal by cryogenic distillation in the XENON100 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. v. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Meng, Y.; Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Lavina, L.S. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Cristescu, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-06-15

    We describe the purification of xenon from traces of the radioactive noble gas radon using a cryogenic distillation column. The distillation column was integrated into the gas purification loop of the XENON100 detector for online radon removal. This enabled us to significantly reduce the constant {sup 222}Rn background originating from radon emanation. After inserting an auxiliary {sup 222}Rn emanation source in the gas loop, we determined a radon reduction factor of R > 27 (95% C.L.) for the distillation column by monitoring the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration inside the XENON100 detector. (orig.)

  14. Status of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC and its performance after three years of operation

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: ~96 % of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit ...

  15. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F.; Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M.; Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Yao, W.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.R.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Skarha, J.; Snider, F.D.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.F.; Song, T.Y.; Dunn, A.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Azzi, P.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given

  16. The paradox of characteristics of silicon detectors operated at temperature close to liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, V.; Shepelev, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zamantzas, C.; Galkin, A.

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study is to give characterization of silicon p+/n/n+ detectors for the monitoring systems of the Large Hadron Collider machine at CERN with the focus on justifying the choice of silicon resistivity for the detector operation at the temperature of 1.9-10 K. The detectors from n-type silicon with the resistivity of 10, 4.5, and 0.5 kΩ cm were investigated at the temperature from 293 up to 7 K by the Transient Current Technique with a 660 nm pulse laser and alpha-particles. The shapes of the detector current pulse response allowed revealing a paradox in the properties of shallow donors of phosphorus, i.e., native dopants in the n-type Si. There was no carrier freeze-out on the phosphorus energy levels in the space charge region (SCR), and they remained positively charged irrespective of temperature, thus limiting the depleted region depth. As for the base region of a partially depleted detector, the levels became neutral at T < 28 K, which transformed silicon to an insulator. The reduction of the activation energy for carrier emission in the detector SCR estimated in the scope of the Poole-Frenkel effect failed to account for the impact of the electric field on the properties of phosphorus levels. The absence of carrier freeze-out in the SCR justifies the choice of high resistivity silicon as the only proper material for detector operation in a fully depleted mode at extremely low temperature.

  17. Performance, operation and detector studies with the ATLAS Resistive Plate Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aielli, G; Bindi, M; Polini, A

    2013-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers provide the barrel region of the ATLAS detector with an independent muon trigger and a two-coordinate measurement. The chambers, arranged in three concentric double layers, are operated in a strong magnetic toroidal field and cover a surface area of about 4000 m 2 . During 2011 the LHC has provided proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV in the center-of-mass frame with a steady increase in instantaneous luminosity, summing up to about 5 fb −1 . The operational experience for this running period is presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of luminosity, environmental conditions and working point settings. Non-event based information including in particular the large number of gas gap currents, individually monitored with nA accuracy, have been used to study the detector behavior with growing luminosity and beam currents. These data are shown to provide, when calibrated, an independent luminosity measurement and a crucial handle for understanding the ATLAS backgrounds well beyond the scope of muon triggering and detection. The measurements presented here allow to plan a strategy for the data taking in the next years and make some predictions about the detector performance at higher luminosities. They also improve the knowledge on RPC detector physics.

  18. Autonomous Cryogenic Leak Detector for Improving Launch Site Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Kisholoy

    2013-01-01

    NASA, military, and commercial satellite users need launch services that are highly reliable, less complex, easier to test, and cost effective. This project has developed a tapered optical fiber sensor for detecting hydrogen. The invention involves incorporating chemical indicators on the tapered end of an optical fiber using organically modified silicate nanomaterials. The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and qualify various mission-critical chemicals. Historically, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are the first five gases of HGDL focus. The use of these cryogenic fluids in the area of propulsion offers challenges. Due to their extreme low temperatures, these fluids induce contraction of the materials they contact, a potential cause of leakage. Among them, hydrogen is of particular concern. Small sensors are needed in multiple locations without adding to the structural weight. The most vulnerable parts of the engine are the connection flanges on the transfer lines, which have to support cycles of large thermal amplitude. The thermal protection of the engine provides a closed area, increasing the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere. Thus, even a small leak represents an unacceptable hazardous condition during loading operations, in flight, or after an aborted launch. Tapered fibers were first fabricated from 1/1.3-mm core/cladding (silica/ plastic) optical fibers. Typically a 1-ft (approx. 30- cm) section of the 1-mm fiber is cut from the bundle and marked with a pen into five 2-.-in. (.5.7-cm) sections. A propane torch is applied at every alternate mark to burn the jacket and soften the glass core. While the core is softening, the two ends of the fiber are pulled apart slowly to create fine tapers of .- to .-in. (.6- to 12-mm) long on the 1-mm optical fiber. Following this, the non-tapered ends of the fibers are polished to a 0.3-micron finish

  19. Spectroscopy of 212Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Poletti, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    Excited states of 212 Rn have been studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy following the reactions 208 Pb( 9 Be, 5n) and 204 Hg( 13 C,5n). With the exception of the energy of the yrast 8 + → 6 + transition, the previously proposed level scheme has been verified. New transitions have been placed in the level scheme and new lifetime and g-factor results obtained. The level scheme and electromagnetic properties of selected isomeric states are compared with the results of shell model and semi-empirical shell-model calculations, including coupling to octupole vibrations. (orig.)

  20. Spectroscopy of 212Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Poletti, A.R.

    1988-06-01

    Excited states of 212 Rn have been studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy following the reactions 208 Pb ( 9 Be,5n) and 204 Hg( 13 C,5n). With the exception of the energy of the yrast 8 + → 6 + transition, the previously proposed level scheme has been verified. New transitions have been placed in the level scheme and new lifetime and g-factor results obtained. The level scheme and electromagnetic properties of selected isomeric states are compared with the results of shell model and semi-empirical shell-model calculations, including coupling to octupole vibrations

  1. Operation of an InGrid based X-ray detector at the CAST experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Christoph; Desch, Klaus; Kaminski, Jochen; Lupberger, Michael

    2018-02-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for axions and other particles which could be candidates for DarkMatter and even Dark Energy. These particles could be produced in the Sun and detected by a conversion into soft X-ray photons inside a strong magnetic field. In order to increase the sensitivity for physics beyond the Standard Model, detectors with a threshold below 1 keV as well as efficient background rejection methods are required to compensate for low energies and weak couplings resulting in very low detection rates. Those criteria are fulfilled by a detector utilizing the combination of a pixelized readout chip with an integrated Micromegas stage. These InGrid (Integrated Grid) devices can be build by photolithographic postprocessing techniques, resulting in a close to perfect match of grid and pixels facilitating the detection of single electrons on the chip surface. The high spatial resolution allows for energy determination by simple electron counting as well as for an event-shape based analysis as background rejection method. Tests at an X-ray generator revealed the energy threshold of an InGrid based X-ray detector to be well below the carbon Kα line at 277 eV. After the successful demonstration of the detectors key features, the detector was mounted at one of CAST's four detector stations behind an X-ray telescope in 2014. After several months of successful operation without any detector related interruptions, the InGrid based X-ray detector continues data taking at CAST in 2015. During operation at the experiment, background rates in the order of 10-5 keV-1 cm-2 s-1 have been achieved by application of a likelihood based method discriminating the non-photon background originating mostly from cosmic rays. For continued operation in 2016, an upgraded InGrid based detector is to be installed among other improvements including decoupling and sampling of the signal induced on the grid as well as a veto scintillator to further lower the

  2. Artificial neural network based pulse-shape analysis for cryogenic detectors operated in CRESST-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, Andreas [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: CRESST-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    In this talk we report on results of a pulse-shape analysis of cryogenic detectors based on artificial neural networks. To train the neural network a large amount of pulses with known properties are necessary. Therefore, a data-driven simulation used to generate these sets will be explained. The presented analysis shows an excellent discrimination performance even down to the energy threshold. The method is applied to several detectors, among them is the module with the lowest threshold (307eV) operated in CRESST-II phase 2. The performed blind analysis of this module confirms the substantially enhanced sensitivity for light dark matter published in 2015.

  3. Stressede børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonseberg, Signe

    2016-01-01

    Stressede børn får det bedre, når deres krop får lov at tale. Fysioterapeut Pernille Thomsen lærer børn at bruge kroppen, så de trives bedre. Og der er ingen hokuspokus, for det hele bygger på naturvidenskabelig forskning i kroppens hormoner og stress....

  4. Operational Experience, Improvements, and Performance of the CDF Run II Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Calancha, C; Carron, S.; Cihangir, S.; Corbo, M.; Clark, D.; Di Ruzza, B.; Eusebi, R.; Fernandez, J.P.; Freeman, J.C.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Grinstein, S.; Hartz, M.; Herndon, M.; Hill, C.; Hocker, A.; Husemann, U.; Incandela, J.; Issever, C.; Jindariani, S.; Junk, T.R.; Knoepfel, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.; Merkel, P; Mondragon, M.N.; Moore, R.; Mumford, J.R.; Nahn, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nelson, T.K.; Pavlicek, V.; Pursley, J.; Redondo, I.; Roser, R.; Schultz, K.; Spalding, J.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Stuart, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Tesarek, R.; Treptow, K.; Wallny, R.; Worm, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) pursues a broad physics program at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Between Run II commissioning in early 2001 and the end of operations in September 2011, the Tevatron delivered 12 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. Many physics analyses undertaken by CDF require heavy flavor tagging with large charged particle tracking acceptance. To realize these goals, in 2001 CDF installed eight layers of silicon microstrip detectors around its interaction region. These detectors were designed for 2--5 years of operation, radiation doses up to 2 Mrad (0.02 Gy), and were expected to be replaced in 2004. The sensors were not replaced, and the Tevatron run was extended for several years beyond its design, exposing the sensors and electronics to much higher radiation doses than anticipated. In this paper we describe the operational challenges encountered over the past 10 years of running the CDF silicon detectors, the preventive measures undertaken, an...

  5. Mitigation of {sup 222}Rn induced background in the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, Stefan A.

    2017-07-05

    {sup 222}Rn is a major source of background in many rare-event experiments such as the XENON1T dark matter search. The noble gas radon is created by radioactive decay inside all detector materials and emanates into the sensitive liquid xenon target disabling any detector shielding. Subsequent beta-decays of radon progenies are the dominant source of background in the XENON1T experiment. In order to mitigate radon induced background the detector's construction materials have been selected according to dedicated {sup 222}Rn emanation measurements. In the first part of this thesis, we summarize the results of the XENON1T radon screening campaign and present the measurement of the integral radon emanation rate of the fully assembled detector. The development of a radon removal system which continuously purifies the liquid xenon target from the emanated radon is the topic of the second part of this thesis. In order to demonstrate the suitability of cryogenic distillation as a technique to separate radon from xenon, we developed an experimental setup to measure the depletion of radon in xenon boil-off gas after a single distillation step. In the last part of the thesis, we demonstrate the operation of a radon removal system for the XENON100 experiment. For this first test employing a running dark matter detector, we integrated a multiple stage, cryogenic distillation column in the XENON100 gas purification loop. From the evolution of the radon concentration in XENON100, we investigate the distillation column's radon removal capability and discuss the design and application of a radon removal system for XENON1T and the upcoming XENONnT experiment.

  6. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Grummer, Aidan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of 2 x 10^34 cm-2 s-1 recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency will be described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience. In particular, radiation damage effects will be showed and signs of degradation which are visible but which are not impacting yet the tracking performance (but will): dE/dX, occupancy reduction with integrated luminosity, under-depletion effects with IBL in 2016, effects of annealing that is not insignificant for the inner-most layers. Therefore the offline software strat...

  7. Operating characteristics of radiation-hardened silicon pixel detectors for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hyosung, Cho

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will have forward silicon pixel detectors as its innermost tracking device. The pixel devices will be exposed to the harsh radiation environment of the LHC. Prototype silicon pixel detectors have been designed to meet the specification of the CMS experiment. No guard ring is required on the n/sup +/ side, and guard rings on the p/sup +/ side are always kept active before and after type inversion. The whole n/sup +/ side is grounded and connected to readout chips, which greatly simplifies detector assembling and improves the stability of bump-bonded readout chips on the n/sup +/ side. Operating characteristics such as the leakage current, the full depletion voltage, and the potential distributions over guard rings were tested using standard techniques. The tests are discussed in this paper. (9 refs).

  8. Experience from the construction and operation of the STAR PXL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, L.; Anderssen, E.C.; Contin, G.; Silber, J.; Stezelberger, T.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.H.; Woodmansee, S.; Schambach, J.; Sun, X.; Szelezniak, M.

    2015-01-01

    A new silicon based vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed at the Soleniodal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 2014 heavy ion run to improve the vertex resolution and extend the measurement capabilities of STAR in the heavy flavor domain. The HFT consists of four concentric cylinders around the STAR interaction point composed of three different silicon detector technologies based on strips, pads and for the first time in an accelerator experiment CMOS monolithic active pixels (MAPS) . The two innermost layers at a radius of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line are constructed with 400 high resolution MAPS sensors arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors giving a total silicon area of 0.16 m 2 . Each sensor consists of a pixel array of nearly 1 million pixels with a pitch of 20.7 μm with column-level discriminators, zero-suppression circuitry and output buffer memory integrated into one silicon die with a sensitive area of ∼ 3.8 cm 2 . The pixel (PXL) detector has a low power dissipation of 170 mW/cm 2 , which allows air cooling. This results in a global material budget of 0.5% radiation length per layer for detector used in this run. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows for the installation and integration of the pixel sub detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going STAR run. The detector specifications, experience from the construction and operation, lessons learned and initial measurements of the PXL performance in the 200 GeV Au-Au run will be presented

  9. Experience from the construction and operation of the STAR PXL detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, L.; Anderssen, E. C.; Contin, G.; Schambach, J.; Silber, J.; Stezelberger, T.; Sun, X.; Szelezniak, M.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H. H.; Woodmansee, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new silicon based vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed at the Soleniodal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 2014 heavy ion run to improve the vertex resolution and extend the measurement capabilities of STAR in the heavy flavor domain. The HFT consists of four concentric cylinders around the STAR interaction point composed of three different silicon detector technologies based on strips, pads and for the first time in an accelerator experiment CMOS monolithic active pixels (MAPS) . The two innermost layers at a radius of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line are constructed with 400 high resolution MAPS sensors arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors giving a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor consists of a pixel array of nearly 1 million pixels with a pitch of 20.7 μm with column-level discriminators, zero-suppression circuitry and output buffer memory integrated into one silicon die with a sensitive area of ~ 3.8 cm2. The pixel (PXL) detector has a low power dissipation of 170 mW/cm2, which allows air cooling. This results in a global material budget of 0.5% radiation length per layer for detector used in this run. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows for the installation and integration of the pixel sub detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going STAR run. The detector specifications, experience from the construction and operation, lessons learned and initial measurements of the PXL performance in the 200 GeV Au-Au run will be presented.

  10. Electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source: operating parameters vs. analytical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bunert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatographs with electron capture detectors are widely used for the analysis of electron affine substances such as pesticides or chlorofluorocarbons. With detection limits in the low pptv range, electron capture detectors are the most sensitive detectors available for such compounds. Based on their operating principle, they require free electrons at atmospheric pressure, which are usually generated by a β− decay. However, the use of radioactive materials leads to regulatory restrictions regarding purchase, operation, and disposal. Here, we present a novel electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source that shows similar detection limits compared to radioactive detectors but that is not subject to these limitations and offers further advantages such as adjustable electron densities and energies. In this work we show first experimental results using 1,1,2-trichloroethane and sevoflurane, and investigate the effect of several operating parameters on the analytical performance of this new non-radioactive electron capture detector (ECD.

  11. Theoretical study of the diffusion 222Rn gas on activated charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Fabio O.; Canoba, Analia C.

    2001-01-01

    The 222 Rn adsorption coefficient is the fundamental parameter characterizing activated carbon's ability to adsorb 222 Rn . In this work, it has been determined the 222 Rn coefficient adsorption for 222 Rn activated carbon detectors. Scintillation vials were used as detectors. The measurement of the 222 Rn activity adsorbed in activated carbon was made by a liquid scintillation measurement of its alpha-beta progeny decay. On the other hand, in this work a diffusion and adsorption model has been developed for the transport of 222 Rn in an activated carbon porous bed. The equation that describes these processes is a partial differential equation, of the second order with respect to axial coordinate, and the first order with respect to time. The equation was numerically solved using a finites differences method. With this model the 222 Rn activity adsorbed in the detector, for several situations, was calculated. The results were tested with the data obtained from series of experiences made in our laboratories. (author)

  12. The ICARUS T600 Liquid Argon Detector Operation in the Underground Gran Sasso Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Vignoli, C

    2014-01-01

    The ICARUS T600 Module is the largest liquid argon detector (760 t LAr mass) ever realized to study neutrino oscill ations and matter stability in the deep underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. One of t he key elements for the detector performance is the liquid argon purity: residual electronegative compounds in argon have to be kept as low as 0.1 part s per billion all over the detector run. The T600 Module design was finalized by the ICARUS Collaboration after years of R&D studies that brought to the viable and scalable industrial solutions necessary for sized experiments with severe safety prescriptions for the underground operation . We present the T600 Module successful commissioning and the 3-years efficient, stable and continuous operation with extraordinary LAr purity, high performance and zero dead time data taking . This result demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of activation and long-term run in safe conditions of sized cryogenic detectors even in a confined underground location and r...

  13. Operation of CdZnTe Semiconductor Detectors in Liquid Scintillator for the COBRA Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldorf, Christian

    2015-08-01

    COBRA, the Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride O-neutrino double-Beta Research Apparatus, is an experiment aiming for the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay with several isotopes, in particular 116 Cd, 106 Cd and 130 Te. A highly granular large scale experiment with about 400 kg of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors is currently under development. To provide evidence for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 116 Cd, a background rate in the order of 10 -3 counts/keV/kg/a is needed to achieve the required half-life sensitivity of at least 2 . 10 26 years. To reach this target, the detectors have to be operated in a highly pure environment, shielded from external radiation. Liquid scintillator is a promising candidate as a circum fluent replacement for the currently used lacquer. Next to the function as highly pure passivation material, liquid scintillator also acts as a neutron shield and active veto for external gammas. Within this thesis, the design, construction and assembly of a test set-up is described. The operation of four CdZnTe detectors after several years of storage in liquid scintillator is demonstrated. Next to extensive material compatibility tests prior to the assembly, the commissioning of the set-up and the characterization of the detectors are shown. Finally, results concerning the background reduction capability of liquid scintillator and the detection of cosmic muons are presented and compared to a Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. Study of the performance of HPGe detectors operating in very high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnello, M.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bruschi, M.; Bufalino, S.; De Napoli, M.; Feliciello, A.; Fontana, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Lavezzi, L.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Rotondi, A.; Sbarra, C.; Sfienti, C.; Zoccoli, A.

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of high-resolution hypernuclear γ-spectroscopy experiments using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors is presently designed for the FINUDA spectrometer at DAΦNE, the Frascati Φ-factory, and for PANDA, the p-p-bar hadron spectrometer at the future FAIR facility. In both spectrometers the HPGe detectors have to be operated in strong magnetic fields. In this paper we report on a series of measurements performed on a HPGe detector inserted in a magnetic field of intensity up to 2.5 T, the highest ever reached for operations with a HPGe, and with different orientations of the detector's axis with respect to field direction. A significant worsening of the energy resolution was found, but with a moderate loss of the efficiency. The most relevant features of the peak shapes, described by bi-Gaussian functions, are parametrized in terms of field intensity and energy: this allows to correct the spectra measured in magnetic field and to recover the energy resolution almost completely.

  15. Exposure of burrowing mammals to {sup 222}Rn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N.A., E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.uk [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av. Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Barnett, C.L. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av. Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, J. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Potter, E.D. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av. Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Ibrahimi, Z.-F. [Health Protection Agency, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Barlow, T.S.; Schieb, C.; Jones, D.G. [British Geological Survey, Environmental Science Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D. [School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Estimates of absorbed dose rates to wildlife from exposure to natural background radionuclides are required to put estimates of dose rates arising from regulated releases of radioactivity and proposed benchmarks into context. Recent review papers have estimated dose rates to wildlife from {sup 40}K, and {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series radionuclides. However, only one study previous has considered the potential dose rates to burrowing animals from inhaled {sup 222}Rn and its daughter products. In this paper we describe a study conducted at seven sites in northwest England. Passive track etch detectors were used to measure the {sup 222}Rn concentrations in artificial burrows over a period of approximately one year. Results suggest that absorbed dose rates to burrowing mammals as a consequence of exposure to {sup 222}Rn are likely to be at least an order of magnitude higher than those suggested in previous evaluations of natural background exposure rates which had omitted this radionuclide and exposure pathway. Dose rates in some areas of Great Britain will be considerably in excess of incremental no-effects benchmark dose rates suggested for use as screening levels. Such advised benchmark dose rates need to be better put into context with background dose rates, including exposure to {sup 222}Rn, to ensure credibility; although the context will be determined by the purpose of the benchmark and the assessment level. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined {sup 222}Rn concentrations in artificial burrows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated dose rates to burrowing mammals from inhaled {sup 222}Rn and daughter products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 222}Rn likely to dominate exposure of burrowing mammals due to natural radionuclides.

  16. Selection of design parameters of diffusion barrier in a passive 222Rn sampler based on activated charcoal adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Suxia

    1992-01-01

    A method concerning selection of design parameters of diffusion barrier in a passive 222 Rn sampler based on activated charcoal adsorption. The proper parameter value of diffusion barrier is obtained by means of linearization of 222 Rn adsorption versus the exposure time. Thus, the influence of temperature on measured results may be greatly decreased, and higher sensitivity of the detector may be maintained

  17. Operation of Resistive Plate Chamber Detectors with a New Environmentally Friendly Freon

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Helen Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    RPC particle gas detectors at CERN provide a vital element to the physics experiments carried out on the LHC. While their current operation and working gas mixtures are successful, environ- mental and economic factors force a revision of the mixture, specifically the eventual replacement of the current Freon gas R134-a with a newer, less environmentally harmful formulation, namely R1234-yf. The methods and results presented here outline the detector response to the introduction of the new Freon and its behavior under various mixtures. The electronegativity and hence impact on RPC parameters was investigated. It was found that the new Freon gas is indeed electroneg- ative, and suppresses the RPC signal. The mixture was modified to include Argon to increase ionization, and the final results of the operation of the RPC were satisfactory. Further work to refine the mixture for future implementation is necessary.

  18. Prototyping and performance study of a single crystal diamond detector for operation at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita@barc.gov.in; Das, D.

    2017-06-21

    Prototype single crystal diamond detectors with different types of metallization and post metallization treatment were fabricated for the applications requiring fast neutron measurements in the Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Experiment. The detectors were characterized by leakage current measurements to ascertain that the leakage currents are low and breakdown voltages are higher than the voltage required for full charge collection. The detector response to charged particles was evaluated using a {sup 238+239} Pu dual energy alpha source. The detectors showed an energy resolution of about 2% at 5.5 MeV. In order to study their suitability for the operation at higher temperatures, leakage current variation and alpha response were studied up to 300 °C. At 300 °C, peaks corresponding to 5.156 MeV and 5.499 MeV alphas could be separated and there was no significant degradation of energy resolution. Finally, the detector response to fast neutrons was evaluated using a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron generator. The observed spectrum showed peaks corresponding to various channels of n-C interactions with a clear isolated peak corresponding to ~8.5 MeV alphas. The detectors also showed high sensitivity of 3.4×10{sup −2} cps/n/(cm{sup 2} s)–4.5×10{sup −2} cps/n/(cm{sup 2} s) and excellent linearity of response in terms of count rate at different neutron flux in the observed range of 3.2×10{sup 5} n/(cm{sup 2} s) to 2.0×10{sup 6} n/(cm{sup 2} s).

  19. Prototyping and performance study of a single crystal diamond detector for operation at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Das, D.

    2017-06-01

    Prototype single crystal diamond detectors with different types of metallization and post metallization treatment were fabricated for the applications requiring fast neutron measurements in the Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Experiment. The detectors were characterized by leakage current measurements to ascertain that the leakage currents are low and breakdown voltages are higher than the voltage required for full charge collection. The detector response to charged particles was evaluated using a 238+239 Pu dual energy alpha source. The detectors showed an energy resolution of about 2% at 5.5 MeV. In order to study their suitability for the operation at higher temperatures, leakage current variation and alpha response were studied up to 300 °C. At 300 °C, peaks corresponding to 5.156 MeV and 5.499 MeV alphas could be separated and there was no significant degradation of energy resolution. Finally, the detector response to fast neutrons was evaluated using a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron generator. The observed spectrum showed peaks corresponding to various channels of n-C interactions with a clear isolated peak corresponding to 8.5 MeV alphas. The detectors also showed high sensitivity of 3.4×10-2 cps/n/(cm2 s)-4.5×10-2 cps/n/(cm2 s) and excellent linearity of response in terms of count rate at different neutron flux in the observed range of 3.2×105 n/(cm2 s) to 2.0×106 n/(cm2 s).

  20. Performance comparison for modes of operation and suppression cases of the clover detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2014-01-01

    Peak-to-total ratios have been extracted for a segmented clover detector for various modes of operation and suppression cases. Based on absorption and scattering of gamma-rays, a formalism has been presented for quantifying the advantages of using addback mode and active suppression. Further investigations have been performed to find if the reduction of background counts is caused more by active suppression or by addback process

  1. A streamer tube detector for operation at high rates in the CPLEAR experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennet, J.M.; Carroll, M.; Cawley, E.L.; Dodgson, M.; Fry, J.R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Harrison, P.; Harrison, P.F.; Haselden, A.R.; Hayman, P.J.; King, D.; Maley, P.D.; Sacks, L.E.; Sanders, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The design and instrumentation of a streamer tube detector for operation in the high rate environment of the CPLEAR experiment at CERN is described. A study of gas mixtures for use in the streamer tube is discussed. The final mixture of 46% argon, 50% isobutane, 4% methylal and 0.01% freon produces an axial resolution of 1.5 cm with an efficiency of 98% per layer. (orig.)

  2. Noise and optimum filtering in spectrometers with semiconductor detectors operating at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, W.; Korbel, K.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of the excess noise in the semiconductor detectors operating at the elevated temperature is discussed. Under the assumption of a conventional CR-RC type filtration the variancy of the noise output is determined. The new term ''second noise-corner time constant'' was proposed. The expression for relative signal-to-noise ratio as the dependence on the noise as well as circuits time constants was derived. It was also presented in a graphical form. 12 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  3. Assessing RN-to-RN peer review on clinical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Judith A; Wickline, Mary A; Deetz, Jill; Berry, Elise S

    2012-04-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to measure informal registered nurse (RN)-to-RN peer review (defined as collegial communication about the quality of nursing care) at the work-unit level. Survey design with cluster sampling of 28 hospital or ambulatory care units (n = 541 respondents). Results were compared with existing patient safety and satisfaction data. A chi-squared test was used to compare responses against nurse characteristics. Nurses agreed that RN-to-RN peer review takes place on their units, but no correlation with patient safety and satisfaction data was found. Misunderstandings about the meaning of peer review were evident. Open-ended comments revealed barriers to peer review: fear of retribution, language barriers and lack of professionalism. Nurses need clarification of peer review. Issues with common language in a professional environment need to be addressed and nurses can learn collaboration from each other's cultures. Managers should support RN-to-RN peer review on clinical units. Methods used here may be useful to assess current departmental nurse peer review. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Operation of an InGrid based X-ray detector at the CAST experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krieger Christoph

    2018-01-01

    During operation at the experiment, background rates in the order of 10−5 keV−1 cm−2 s−1 have been achieved by application of a likelihood based method discriminating the non-photon background originating mostly from cosmic rays. For continued operation in 2016, an upgraded InGrid based detector is to be installed among other improvements including decoupling and sampling of the signal induced on the grid as well as a veto scintillator to further lower the observed background rates and improving sensitivity.

  5. Recent operational performance of the CERN Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsimon, R.J.; Flower, P.S.; Freeston, K.A.

    1985-10-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the Time Projection chambers (TPCs) of the Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH). Details are given of the TPC high voltage system and its monitoring and control. In addition, the operation and monitoring of the readout is described together with results of tests on the performance of the front end amplifiers. The operation of the RICH TPCs and electronics during the first data run of WA69, in 1984, is discussed together with relevant results from laboratory tests. Results from the preliminary analysis of a sample of data from the 1984 run are also presented

  6. A gravitational wave detector operating beyond the quantum shot-noise limit: Squeezed light in application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Roman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reviews our recent progress on the generation of squeezed light [1], and also the recent squeezed-light enhancement of the gravitational wave detector GEO 600 [2]. GEO 600 is currently the only GW observatory operated by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in its search for gravitational waves. With the help of squeezed states of light it now operates with its best ever sensitivity, which not only proves the qualification of squeezed light as a key technology for future gravitational wave astronomy but also the usefulness of quantum entanglement.

  7. Operating Instructions for the Cryogenics in the Liquid Argon Detector at CIEMAT; Operacion de la Criogenia del Detector de Argon Liquido del CIEMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L; Leal, M D; Prado, M del; Ramirez, J L

    2009-12-19

    Ciemat has wide experience in designing and developing gaseous particle detectors. It has taken part in the building of experiments for CERN accelerators, constructing shares of the muon chambers for L3 experiment in LEP and CMS experiment in LHC. Recently, new concepts for particle detectors have been developed, as a natural evolution from the ones built at Ciemat. These new radiation detectors use liquefied noble gases as active media. A testing system for these kind of liquefied argon detectors has been built at Ciemat, and includes a supporting cryogenic system for the liquefaction and maintenance of the liquid argon needed for operating the detector. This document describes the technical features of this cryogenic system. Besides the documentation of the cryogenic system, this technical report can be of help for the management and upgrading of the detector. As well as an introduction, the report includes the following chapters: The second one is a description of the cryogenics and gas systems. The third chapter shows the controlling electronics. The fourth chapter deals with the important topic that is security, its systems and protocols. The fifth describes the cryogenic operations possible in this equipment. The report is completed with diagrams, schemes, pictures and tables for the easier management of the setup. (Author)

  8. Thermophysics modeling of an infrared detector cryochamber for transient operational scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Mayank; Singhal, Gaurav; Verma, Avinash C.; Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Manmohan

    2016-05-01

    An infrared detector (IR) is essentially a transducer capable of converting radiant energy in the infrared regime into a measurable form. The benefit of infrared radiation is that it facilitates viewing objects in dark or through obscured conditions by detecting the infrared energy emitted by them. One of the most significant applications of IR detector systems is for target acquisition and tracking of projectile systems. IR detectors also find widespread applications in the industry and commercial market. The performance of infrared detector is sensitive to temperatures and performs best when cooled to cryogenic temperatures in the range of nearly 120 K. However, the necessity to operate in such cryogenic regimes increases the complexity in the application of IR detectors. This entails a need for detailed thermophysics analysis to be able to determine the actual cooling load specific to the application and also due to its interaction with the environment. This will enable design of most appropriate cooling methodologies suitable for specific scenarios. The focus of the present work is to develop a robust thermo-physical numerical methodology for predicting IR cryochamber behavior under transient conditions, which is the most critical scenario, taking into account all relevant heat loads including radiation in its original form. The advantage of the developed code against existing commercial software (COMSOL, ANSYS, etc.), is that it is capable of handling gas conduction together with radiation terms effectively, employing a ubiquitous software such as MATLAB. Also, it requires much smaller computational resources and is significantly less time intensive. It provides physically correct results enabling thermal characterization of cryochamber geometry in conjunction with appropriate cooling methodology. The code has been subsequently validated experimentally as the observed cooling characteristics are found to be in close agreement with the results predicted using

  9. Development of a PIN diode based on-line measurement system for Radon (222Rn) and Thoron (220Rn) in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashokkumar, P.; Chaudhury, Probal; Sumesh, C.G.; Sahoo, B.K.; Gaware, J.J.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2014-01-01

    Radon, thoron and their progenies are universally present in outdoor air, and can reach higher levels in indoor air due to poor ventilation. Several instruments have been developed for accurate measurement of radon and thoron in the environment. Semiconductor detector based system employing spectroscopic method has been proved to be the best among them. A PIN diode based electrostatic collection type online real-time instrument has been developed in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron in an environment while both 222 Rn and 220 Rn are present. This system can be used for determination of radon and thoron concentrations at residence or workplace. Furthermore, since the 222 Rn and 220 Rn are differentiated from each other through spectroscopy, this monitor can be used even in a mixed radon/thoron environment

  10. The Design and Research of the Operation Status Detector for Marine Engine Room Power Plant Based on Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Designed in this paper, based on the noise of ship engine room power plant running status of detector, is mainly used in the operation of the power plant of acoustic shell size to determine when the machine running state, this device is composed of signal disposal and alarm display adjustment part of two parts. Detector that can show the size of the voice, if exceed the set limit alarm value, the detector can sound an alarm, to remind staff equipment fails, it shall timely inspection maintenance, improve the safety of the operation of the ship.

  11. rn Utzon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime J. Ferrer Forés

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza el proyecto del arquitecto danés Jørn Utzon (1918-2008 para la construcción de la Escuela de la Unión de trabajadores daneses en Højstrup, Helsingør (1958-1962, desde las dos propuestas presentadas al concurso, que obtienen el primer y segundo premio, a las versiones del proyecto que desarrolla simultáneamente al proyecto de la Ópera de Sídney (1956-1973. El análisis de la evolucióndel proyecto de Højstrup permite aproximarse al talento plástico y al universo de extraordinario lirismo del arquitecto, a través de la exploración formal que desarrolla en torno a las plataformas y los recintos, a la relación entre los dos elementos de la escala tipológica, la torre y el cuerpo bajo, al estudio de los mecanismos de acceso mediante la porte-cochère, al sistema de agregación de las casas patio o el papel que desempeña la estructura en el proyecto, en un ejercicio de exploración arquitectónica que fluye desde los concursos, entendidos como laboratorios de experiencias formales, al desarrollo lento y gradual de los proyectos sucesivos atendiendo a la vez el sitio y la pieza tipológica, en una cuidada innovación plástica que reivindica la experimentación constructiva y la integración en el paisaje.

  12. Real-time operating system for a multi-laser/multi-detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, G.

    1980-01-01

    The laser-one hazard detector system, used on the Rensselaer Mars rover, is reviewed briefly with respect to the hardware subsystems, the operation, and the results obtained. A multidetector scanning system was designed to improve on the original system. Interactive support software was designed and programmed to implement real time control of the rover or platform with the elevation scanning mast. The formats of both the raw data and the post-run data files were selected. In addition, the interface requirements were selected and some initial hardware-software testing was completed.

  13. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 08-2-188 Chemical Point Detector Vapor Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-27

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 08-2-188 Chemical Point Detector Vapor Testing 5a. CONTRACT...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Dugway Proving Ground West Desert Test Center (TEDT-DPW) Dugway, UT 84022-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  14. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  15. The acetone bandpass detector for inverse photoemission: operation in proportional and Geiger–Müller modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiede, Christian; Niehues, Iris; Schmidt, Anke B.; Donath, Markus

    2018-06-01

    Inverse photoemission is the most versatile experimental tool to study the unoccupied electronic structure at surfaces of solids. Typically, the experiments are performed in the isochromat mode with bandpass photon detectors. For gas-filled counters, the bandpass behavior is realized by the combination of the photoionization threshold of the counting gas as the high-pass filter and the ultraviolet transmission cutoff of an alkaline earth fluoride entrance window as the low-pass filter. The transmission characteristics of the entrance window determine the optical bandpass. The performance of the counter depends on the composition of the detection gas and the fill-gas pressure, the readout electronics and the counter geometry. For the well-known combination of acetone and CaF2, the detector can be operated in proportional and Geiger–Müller modes. In this work, we review aspects concerning the working principles, the counter construction and the read-out electronics. We identify optimum working parameters and provide a step-by-step recipe how to build, install and operate the device.

  16. The SEVAN Worldwide network of particle detectors: 10 years of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, A.; Babayan, V.; Karapetyan, T.; Mailyan, B.; Sargsyan, B.; Zazyan, M.

    2018-05-01

    The Space Environment Viewing and Analysis Network (SEVAN) aims to improve the fundamental research on particle acceleration in the vicinity of the sun, on space weather effects and on high-energy physics in the atmosphere and lightning initiation. This new type of a particle detector setup simultaneously measures fluxes of most species of secondary cosmic rays, thus being a powerful integrated device for exploration of solar modulation effects and electron acceleration in the thunderstorm atmosphere. The SEVAN modules are operating at the Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC) in Armenia, in Croatia, Bulgaria, Slovakia, the Czech Republic (from 2017) and in India. In this paper, we present the most interesting results of the SEVAN network operation during the last decade. We present this review on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the International Heliophysical Year in 2007.

  17. Congenital heart diseases: post-operative appearance on multi-detector CT - a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasian, Anderanik; Malik, Sachin; Shamsa, Kamran; Krishnam, Mayil S. [UCLA Medical Center, Department of Radiological Science, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Echocardiography is considered as an initial imaging modality of choice in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is preferred for detailed functional information. Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in clinical practice in assessing post-operative morphological and functional information of patients with complex CHD when echocardiography and MR imaging are not contributory. Radiologists should understand and become familiar with the complex morphology and physiology of CHD, as well as with various palliative and corrective surgical procedures performed in these patients, to obtain CT angiograms with diagnostic quality and promptly recognise imaging features of normal post-operative anatomy and complications of these complex surgeries. (orig.)

  18. Thoron (220Rn) in the indoor atmospheric environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, T.V.

    2006-01-01

    rate arising from 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short-lived progenies. This survey has been carried out using a twin cup radon-thoron dosimeter with solid state nuclear track based dosimeter developed and standardized at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai using LR- 115 Type - II, of 12 μm thick cellulose nitrate film as a detector. In this paper the contribution from 220 Rn and its progenies to the inhalation component is presented. Measurements in dwellings spread over 45 location, covering 1425 houses of different types of concentration were carried out using the above dosimeter. Estimated 220 Rn levels varied from 5.7 to 42.4 Bq.m -3 at with a GM of 12.2 Bq.m -3 (GSD 3.22). Annual inhalation dose rate due to 220 Rn and its progeny vary from 0.047 to 0.39 mSv.y -1 with a GM of 0.14 mSv.y -1 (GSD 1.36). Present study reveals that 220 Rn and its progeny contributes nearly 20% of the total dose rate due to radon, thoron and their progenies Paper presents the method of measurements and the results obtained. Data available in literature is also compared. (author)

  19. Do cosmic rays perturb the operation of a large resonant spherical detector of gravitational waves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzella, G.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of resonant gravitational wave detectors is reviewed. The effect of cosmic rays on a large spherical detector is considered. It is shown that the sensibility to short bursts, to monochromatic and to stochastic GW is not significantly degraded by cosmic rays. For a two-detector experiment, only one detector needs to be installed in an underground laboratory. This supports the idea to install a resonant detector at sea-level near a GW interferometer

  20. Do cosmic rays perturb the operation of a large resonant spherical detector of gravitational waves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzella, G. [Rome Univ. Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy). Physics Dept.; Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Frascati, RM (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    The sensitivity of resonant gravitational wave detectors is reviewed. The effect of cosmic rays on a large spherical detector is considered. It is shown that the sensibility to short bursts, to monochromatic and to stochastic GW is not significantly degraded by cosmic rays. For a two-detector experiment, only one detector needs to be installed in an underground laboratory. This supports the idea to install a resonant detector at sea-level near a GW interferometer.

  1. Investigation of the operational quality of germanium gamma detectors. Estimation of Ge:Li detector survival rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbib, J.-C.

    1980-01-01

    A working group has produced tables of information on gamma semiconductor Ge detectors: Ge(Li) or intrinsic Ge. The information was obtained as a result of enquirres addressed to various laboratories, and concerns 228-sources in France and Belgium [fr

  2. Matérn thinned Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ina Trolle; Hahn, Ute

    2016-01-01

    and hard core behaviour can be achieved by applying a dependent Matérn thinning to a Cox process. An exact formula for the intensity of a Matérn thinned shot noise Cox process is derived from the Palm distribution. For the more general class of Matérn thinned Cox processes, formulae for the intensity...

  3. Matérn thinned Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ina Trolle; Hahn, Ute

    of clustering and hard core behaviour can be achieved by applying a dependent Matérn thinning to a Cox process. An exact formula for the intensity of a Matérn thinned shot noise Cox process is derived from the Palm distribution. For the more general class of Matérn thinned Cox processes, formulae...

  4. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M.R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Griesmayer, E. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Verbitskaya, E., E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Egorov, N. [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-05-11

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} proton/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage. - Highlights: • Silicon and diamond detectors are proposed for beam loss monitoring at LHC. • The first in situ radiation test of Si and diamond detectors at 1.9 K is described. • Both diamond and silicon detectors survived after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation at 1.9 K. • The rate of Si detectors degradation depends on bias polarity and is larger at V{sub forw}. • Sensitivity of Si detectors irradiated to 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} is independent on resistivity.

  5. 222Rn Measurements in Dwellings of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnoni, G.; Canoba, A.; Czerniczyniec, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radon gas ( 222 Rn) is responsible of about fifty per cent of the world population dose due to natural sources, being the most important pathway the inhalation of radon progeny, specially indoors. Radon concentration has been measured in dwellings at different locations in Argentina. The places selected to be evaluated are representative of the different geologic zones of the country. Near 3000 dwellings have been analyzed since 1983 up today. The measuring methods used in this case were track etched detectors, electrets and detectors based on activated charcoal adsorption. Two different methods with track etched detectors were used: a simple one, which determines only the average radon concentration, and a second one that measures both radon concentration and the equilibrium factor (F) between radon and its daughters. The last one is a method that uses two Makrofol passive track detectors in the same device. The average radon concentration value obtained from all the dwellings evaluated was 44.2 Bq.m-3. The annual effective dose calculated from this average concentration, using a dosimetric factor of 25 μSv.a- 1. (Bq.m -3 ) -1 , which assumes an equilibrium factor of 0.4, was 1.11 mSv. The average value obtained from the 222 dwellings evaluated by the second method was 49.3 Bq.m -3 and 0,37 the equilibrium factor, resulting the annual effective dose estimated 1,44 mSv. The measured equilibrium factor of 0,37 allows us to verify the assumed equilibrium factor of 0,4. Finally, radon levels in dwellings of Argentina are within the acceptable values for population, not being necessary to implement remedial actions, except in isolate cases that are still under study. (authors)

  6. Safety analyses in support of neutron detector calibration operations at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankunas, G., E-mail: gediminas@mail.lei.lt [EURATOM-LEI Association, Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Breslaujos Str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Syme, D.B.; Popovichev, S. [EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conroy, S. [EURATOM-VR Association, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Batistoni, P. [JET-EFDA Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-ENEA Association, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Neutron calculations to evaluate the dose rate leakage from the shields which contain the neutron source. •The differences on calculated dose rates using different flux-to-dose conversion factors have been investigated. •The experimental values were compared to the MCNPX calculations. -- Abstract: Neutron detectors in fusion devices need to be calibrated to provide the absolute neutron yield and the fusion power produced in fusion reactions. A new in situ calibration of the JET neutron detectors was recently performed using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source with intensity of about 2.7 × 10{sup 8} n/s. The source was delivered to the JET facility within a transport flask and the surface radiation levels must fall within transport regulations. Some contingency scenarios required transfer of the source into special shields: the operational shield and the auxiliary shield. In this paper we describe the neutron calculations that have been carried out to evaluate the dose rate leakage from the shields which may contain the neutron source. The calculations have been performed using accurate modelling of the neutron and gamma ray emission from the {sup 252}Cf source, and from the three shields. The differences on calculated dose rates deriving from the use of different flux-to-dose conversion factors have also been investigated. A comparison of dose rates calculated and measured is presented from the bare source (in cell) and with the source within its transport flask.

  7. Characterization of a pixelated CdTe Timepix detector operated in ToT mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billoud, T.; Leroy, C.; Papadatos, C.; Roux, J.S.; Pichotka, M.; Pospisil, S.

    2017-01-01

    A 1 mm thick CdTe sensor bump-bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode has been characterized in view of possible applications in particle and medical physics. The CdTe sensor layer was segmented into 256 × 256 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 55  μm. This CdTe Timepix device, of ohmic contact type, has been exposed to alpha-particles and photons from an 241 Am source, photons from a 137 Cs source, and protons of different energies (0.8–10 MeV) delivered by the University of Montreal Tandem Accelerator. The device was irradiated on the negatively biased backside electrode. An X-ray per-pixel calibration commonly used for this type of detector was done and its accuracy and resolution were assessed and compared to those of a 300  μm thick silicon Timepix device. The electron mobility-lifetime product (μ e τ e ) of CdTe for protons of low energy has been obtained from the Hecht equation. Possible polarization effects have been also investigated. Finally, information about the homogeneity of the detector was obtained from X-ray irradiation.

  8. Indoor 222Rn measurements in the region of Beijing, People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, T.S.; Lin, L.Q.; Chen, Z.P.; Li, G.Y.; Chen, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Passive integrating activated C detectors were used to study the regional distribution and temporal variation of 222 Rn in indoor air in dwellings in the Beijing region. Measurements were made in 537 dwellings, which were either detached houses or multi-family apartments. The city-wide study was completed in 1985. The distributions are approximately log-normal with 90% of the dwellings having 222 Rn levels less than 60 Bq m-3. The weighted average 222 Rn concentration has been found to be 22.4 Bq m-3. Averages for detached houses and multi-family dwellings are 25.9 and 15.2 Bq m-3, respectively. Assuming an equilibrium factor of 0.5 and an occupancy factor of 0.8, the average equilibrium equivalent concentration of 222 Rn progeny is 11.2 Bq m-3 and the annual average effective dose equivalent is 1.1 mSv

  9. Indoor {sup 22}Rn and {sup 222}Rn concentration measurements inside the Teotihuacan pyramids using NTD and E-PERM methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx; Golzarri, J.I. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, T. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Edificio D, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Navarrete, M. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Edificio D, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bogard, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6480 (United States); Martinez, G. [Coordinacion Nacional de Conservacion del Patrimonio Cultural, Xicotencatl y General Anaya s/n, 04120 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Juarez, F. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-11-15

    Measurements of {sup 22}Rn (Thoron) and {sup 222}Rn (Radon) concentrations, inside the Sun and Moon pyramids of Teotihuacan's archeological zone in Mexico, are reported in this work. Two well-established methods, nuclear track detectors (NTDs), using open-close end cups with internal and external detectors of CR-39 polymer, and electret-passive environmental radon monitoring (E-PERM) were used for the measurements. This experiment had two objectives: to obtain better confidence in the {sup 22}Rn and {sup 222}Rn measurements inside the archeological tunnels, and to compare the data obtained in each one of the two methods. This experiment is specially interesting because of the very peculiar conditions where the measurements are made: high humidity, labyrinths with air currents, but almost constant temperature inside of the pyramid tunnels and galleries, notwithstanding of the temperature changes between the day and the night outside of the pyramid body. The {sup 222}Rn concentrations found in both the pyramids were lower than the action level proposed by the ICRP-65. These tunnels are not open to the public, but researchers from the Anthropology Institutions spend part of their time working there, in periods varying from 3 to 5 months.

  10. The 640 × 512 LWIR type-II superlattice detectors operating at 110 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bi-Song; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhou, Wen-Hong; Yang, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Guo-Wei; Li, Yun-Tao; Ding, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Zhou; Lei, Hua-Wei; Liu, Wei-Hua; Du, Yu; Zhang, Li-Fang; Liu, Bin; Wang, Li-Bao; Huang, Li

    2018-03-01

    The type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices (T2SLs)-based 640 × 512 long wavelength infrared (LWIR) Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector with15 μm pitch and 50% cut-off wavelength of 10.5 μm demonstrates a peak quantum efficiency of 38.6% and peak detectivity of 1.65 × 1011 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 8.1 μm, high pixel operability of 99.5% and low responsivity non-uniformity of 2.69% at 80 K. The FPA exhibits clear infrared imaging at 110 K and diffusion-limited dark current densities below Tennant's 'Rule07' at temperature above 100 K, which is attributed to the efficient suppression of diffusion dark current and surface leak current by introducing M-structure barrier and double hetero-structure passivation layers.

  11. The outer tracker detector of the HERA-B experiment. Pt. 3. Operation and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Bauer, T.S.; Utrecht Univ.; Beck, M.

    2006-12-01

    In this paper we describe the operation and performance of the HERA-B Outer Tracker, a 112674 channel system of planar drift tube layers. The performance of the HERA-B Outer Tracker system fullfilled all requirements for stable and efficient operation in a hadronic environment, thus confirming the adequacy of the honeycomb drift tube technology and of the front-end readout system. The detector was stably operated with a gas gain of 3 . 10 4 in an Ar/CF 4 /CO 2 (65:35:5) gas mixture, yielding a good efficiency for triggering and track reconstruction, larger than 95 % for tracks with momenta above 5 GeV/c. The hit resolution of the drift cells was 300 to 320 μm and the relative momentum resolution can be described as: σ(p)/p(%) = (1.61 ± 0.02) + (0.0051 ± 0.0006) . p. At the end of the HERA-B running no aging effects in the Outer Tracker cells were observed. (orig.)

  12. Technical design of a detector to be operated at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Soleoidal Detector Collaboration: Summary and overview of the detector; physics and detector requirements; central tracking system; superconducting magnet; calorimetry; muon system; electronics; online computing; offline computing; safety; experimental facilities; installation; test and calibration beam plan; and cost and schedule summary

  13. Technical design of a detector to be operated at the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Soleoidal Detector Collaboration: Summary and overview of the detector; physics and detector requirements; central tracking system; superconducting magnet; calorimetry; muon system; electronics; online computing; offline computing; safety; experimental facilities; installation; test and calibration beam plan; and cost and schedule summary.

  14. An investigation of the performance of a coaxial HPGe detector operating in a magnetic resonance imaging field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, L.J., E-mail: ljh@ns.ph.liv.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cole, P.; Cresswell, J.R.; Filmer, F.; Jones, M.; Judson, D.S.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Sampson, J.A.; Scraggs, D.P.; Slee, M.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Bimson, W.E.; Kemp, G.J. [MARIARC, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE (United Kingdom); Groves, J.; Headspith, J.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Cooper, R.J. [Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States)

    2011-05-11

    Nuclear medical imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography are used to probe physiological functions of the body by detecting gamma rays emitted from biologically targeted radiopharmaceuticals. A system which is capable of simultaneous data acquisition for nuclear medical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging is highly sought after by the medical imaging community. Such a device could provide a more complete medical insight into the functions of the body within a well-defined structural context. However, acquiring simultaneous nuclear/MRI sequences are technically challenging due to the conventional photomultiplier tube readout employed by most existing scintillator detector systems. A promising solution is a nuclear imaging device composed of semiconductor detectors that can be operated with a standard MRI scanner. However, the influence of placing a semiconductor detector such as high purity germanium (HPGe) within or close to the bore of an MRI scanner, where high magnetic fields are present, is not well understood. In this paper, the performance of a HPGe detector operating in a high strength static (B{sub S}) MRI field along with fast switching gradient fields and radiofrequency from the MRI system has been assessed. The influence of the B{sub S} field on the energy resolution of the detector has been investigated for various positions and orientations of the detector within the magnetic field. The results have then been interpreted in terms of the influence of the B{sub S} field on the charge collection properties. MRI images have been acquired with the detector situated at the entrance of the MRI bore to investigate the effects of simultaneous data acquisition on detector performance and MRI imaging.

  15. Study on a charcoal-based monitor for Rn-220 in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yiqiao; Solomon, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    Activated charcoal has been used in both passive monitors (Cohen, Pondy et al. 1987) and active monitors (Solomon and Gan, 1989) for the measurements of 222 Rn in air. Cooled, charcoal-impregnated filters, viewed in-situ by a solid state alpha detector, have been used for 220 Rn-in-breath studies. In general, γ ray counting of 220 Rn samples collected on activated charcoal has not been used. This paper describes the development and calibration of a charcoal based monitor designed to measure 220 Rn levels down to a lower limit of 10 Bq m -3 over sampling periods of 4 to 15 h. The activity of 212 Pb (10.6 h) produced from 220 Rn (55.6 s) collected in an activated charcoal-based sampler is 1/700 the total 220 Rn activity. A typical Hp-Ge detector has a MDL for a two-hours count of approximately 0.1 Bq of 212 Pb for the 239 keV γ-ray. For a MDL of 10 Bq·m -3 of 220 Rn in air, a volume of at least 7 m 3 must be sampled, assuming no breakthrough. The present charcoal-based 220 Rn monitor is designed to maximize the path length through the activated charcoal while sufficient cross-sectional area is retained to allow flow rates up to 0.03 m 3 ·kg -1 is packed into a specially designed aluminum container. The container is modeled on a Marinelli beaker to maximize the counting efficiency, while the sample flow through the chambers of the monitor is optimized to maintain radial symmetry. experiments demonstrated that 94% of 220 Rn was adsorbed by the charcoal in the monitor under a flow rate of 0.03 m 3 ·min -1 at 25 degree C and 85%. RH in 15 h. The monitor is designed to fit over a 70 mm diameter Hp-Ge detector. Preliminary measurements of 220 Rn in two buildings and a cave, using the active monitors and 'grabing' samples under a flow rate of 0.03 m 3 ·min -1 and a period of 4 h, indicated concentrations of between 18.6 and 142.0 Bq·m 3

  16. rn af veteraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Signe; Lausten, Mette

    Siden starten af 1990’erne har Danmark sendt over 30.000 soldater og andet personel på internationale missioner – langt de fleste til Eks-Jugoslavien, Afghanistan og Irak. Denne undersøgelse handler om de børn, hvis fædre har været udsendt på militære missioner i udlandet. For hvordan håndterer...... spørgsmål er fokus for undersøgelsen. Undersøgelsen bygger på en spørgeskemaundersøgelse blandt børn af veteraner på henholdsvis 7, 11 og 15 år. Undersøgelsen er gennemført for og i samarbejde med Veterancentrets Videncenter, som er en del af Forsvarsministeriets Personalestyrelse....

  17. Scintillation detectors for radon-222 in air and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastinu, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    A scintillation detector and an emanation circuit that enable sensitive measurements of 222 Rn in water, in field practice, and in laboratory routine have been developed. Activities as low as 0.1 pCi per sample can be measured with a very simple procedure. The detector is also well suited to measure 222 Rn in air at concentrations down to 0.001 pCi/liter if a large-size detector is used

  18. Retirement Financial Planning and the RN: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2015-10-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability.

  19. Design, construction, and operation of SciFi tracking detector for K2K experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, A.; Park, H.; Aoki, S.; Echigo, S.; Fujii, K.; Hara, T.; Iwashita, T.; Kitamura, M.; Kohama, M.; Kume, G.; Onchi, M.; Otaki, T.; Sato, K.; Takatsuki, M.; Takenaka, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tashiro, K.; Inagaki, T.; Kato, I.; Mukai, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Sasao, N.; Shima, A.; Yokoyama, H.; Chikamatsu, T.; Hayato, Y.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ishino, H.; Jeon, E.J.; Kobayashi, T.; Lee, S.B.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakai, A.; Sakuda, M.; Tumakov, V.; Fukuda, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Ishizuka, M.; Itow, Y.; Kajita, T.; Kameda, J.; Kaneyuki, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Koshio, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Obayashi, Y.; Okada, A.; Sakurai, N.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Toshito, T.; Yamada, S.; Miyano, K.; Nakamura, M.; Tamura, N.; Nakano, I.; Yoshida, M.; Kadowaki, T.; Kishi, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Maruyama, T.; Etoh, M.; Nishijima, K.; Bhang, H.C.; Khang, B.H.; Kim, B.J.; Kim, H.I.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.B.; So, H.; Yoo, J.H.; Choi, J.H.; Jang, H.I.; Jang, J.S.; Kim, J.Y.; Lim, I.T.; Pac, M.Y.; Kearns, E.; Scholberg, K.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Walter, C.W.; Casper, D.; Gajewski, W.; Kropp, W.; Mine, S.; Sobel, H.; Vagins, M.; Matsuno, S.; Hill, J.; Jung, C.K.; Martens, K.; Mauger, C.; McGrew, C.; Sharkey, E.; Yanagisawa, C.; Berns, H.; Boyd, S.; Wilkes, J.; Kielczewska, D.; Golebiewska, U.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the construction and performance of a scintillating fiber detector used in the near detector for the K2K (KEK to Kamioka, KEK E362) long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The detector uses 3.7 m long and 0.692 mm diameter scintillating fiber coupled to image-intensifier tubes (IIT), and a CCD camera readout system. Fiber sheet production and detector construction began in 1997, and the detector was commissioned in March 1999. Results from the first K2K runs confirm good initial performance: position resolution is estimated to be about 0.8 mm, and track finding efficiency is 98±2% for long tracks (i.e., those which intersect more than 5 fiber planes). The hit efficiency was estimated to be 92±2% using cosmic-ray muons, after noise reduction at the offline stage. The possibility of using the detector for particle identification is also discussed

  20. Noninvasive Quantum Measurement of Arbitrary Operator Order by Engineered Non-Markovian Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülte, Johannes; Bednorz, Adam; Bruder, Christoph; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2018-04-01

    The development of solid-state quantum technologies requires the understanding of quantum measurements in interacting, nonisolated quantum systems. In general, a permanent coupling of detectors to a quantum system leads to memory effects that have to be taken into account in interpreting the measurement results. We analyze a generic setup of two detectors coupled to a quantum system and derive a compact formula in the weak-measurement limit that interpolates between an instantaneous (text-book type) and almost continuous—detector dynamics-dependent—measurement. A quantum memory effect that we term "system-mediated detector-detector interaction" is crucial to observe noncommuting observables simultaneously. Finally, we propose a mesoscopic double-dot detector setup in which the memory effect is tunable and that can be used to explore the transition to non-Markovian quantum measurements experimentally.

  1. First operation of a hybrid photon detector prototype with electrostatic cross-focussing and integrated silicon pixel readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alemi, M.; Campbell, M.; Gys, T.; Mikulec, B.; Piedigrossi, D.; Puertolas, D.; Rosso, E.; Schomaker, R.; Snoeys, W.; Wyllie, K.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the first operation of a hybrid photon detector prototype with integrated silicon pixel readout for the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 4. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The prototype has been characterized using a low-intensity light-emitting diode operated in pulsed mode. Its performance in terms of single-photoelectron detection efficiency and imaging properties is presented. A model of photoelectron detection is proposed, and is shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data. It includes an estimate of the charge signal generated in the silicon detector, and the combined effects of the comparator threshold spread of the pixel readout chip, charge sharing at the pixel boundaries and back-scattering of the photoelectrons at the silicon detector surface

  2. First operation of a hybrid photon detector prototype with electrostatic cross-focussing and integrated silicon pixel readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alemi, M.; Campbell, M.; Gys, T. E-mail: thierry.gys@cern.ch; Mikulec, B.; Piedigrossi, D.; Puertolas, D.; Rosso, E.; Schomaker, R.; Snoeys, W.; Wyllie, K

    2000-07-11

    We report on the first operation of a hybrid photon detector prototype with integrated silicon pixel readout for the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 4. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The prototype has been characterized using a low-intensity light-emitting diode operated in pulsed mode. Its performance in terms of single-photoelectron detection efficiency and imaging properties is presented. A model of photoelectron detection is proposed, and is shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data. It includes an estimate of the charge signal generated in the silicon detector, and the combined effects of the comparator threshold spread of the pixel readout chip, charge sharing at the pixel boundaries and back-scattering of the photoelectrons at the silicon detector surface.

  3. Primary measuring of equipment factor of 222Rn/220Rn indoor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanyang; Liu Fudong; Wang Chunhong; Sheng Mingwei

    2010-01-01

    The activity concentration of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their progenies of certain working places and dwellings in Baotou city were measured simultaneously. Based on these results, the equipment factor of 222 Rn is 0.35 for working places and 0.43 for dwellings, while equipment factor of 220 Rn measured at 20 cm distance from wall is 0.030 for both working places and dwellings. Preliminary results show that the temporal change of 220 Rn equilibrium equivalent concentration is same as 222 Rn which is high in midnight and low in afternoon,and significant difference between instant and accumulated measure result of 222 Rn, 220 Rn activity concentration is found, with the factor of 2.1 and 1.7. (authors)

  4. Production, characterization and operation of {sup 76}Ge enriched BEGe detectors in GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Bode, T.; Budjas, D.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Lazzaro, A.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Allardt, M.; Barros, N.; Domula, A.; Lehnert, B.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Andreotti, E. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Bakalyarov, A.M.; Belyaev, S.T.; Lebedev, V.I.; Zhukov, S.V. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Balata, M.; D' Andrea, V.; Ioannucci, L.; Junker, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Macolino, C.; Nisi, S.; Zavarise, P. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, Assergi (Italy); Barabanov, I.; Bezrukov, L.; Gurentsov, V.; Inzhechik, L.V.; Kazalov, V.; Kuzminov, V.V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Yanovich, E. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baudis, L.; Benato, G.; Walter, M. [Physik Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauer, C.; Heisel, M.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.; Kirsch, A.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Salathe, M.; Schreiner, J.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Strecker, H.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Caldwell, A.; Liao, H.Y.; Majorovits, B.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulz, O.; Vanhoefer, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bellotti, E.; Pessina, G. [Universita Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Belogurov, S.; Kornoukhov, V.N. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bettini, A.; Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Hemmer, S.; Sada, C.; Von Sturm, K. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy); INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Borowicz, D. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Kochetov, O.; Nemchenok, I.; Rumyantseva, N.; Shevchik, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zinatulina, D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Cattadori, C.; Gotti, C. [INFN Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Chernogorov, A.; Demidova, E.V.; Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Vasenko, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Falkenstein, R.; Freund, K.; Grabmayr, P.; Hegai, A.; Jochum, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schuetz, A.K. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Frodyma, N.; Misiaszek, M.; Pelczar, K.; Wojcik, M.; Zuzel, G. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Hult, M.; Lutter, G. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Lippi, I.; Stanco, L.; Ur, C.A. [INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Pandola, L. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN Milano (Italy); Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors made of material with an enriched {sup 76}Ge fraction act simultaneously as sources and detectors for this decay. During Phase I of the experiment mainly refurbished semi-coaxial Ge detectors from former experiments were used. For the upcoming Phase II, 30 new {sup 76}Ge enriched detectors of broad energy germanium (BEGe)- type were produced. A subgroup of these detectors has already been deployed in GERDA during Phase I. The present paper reviews the complete production chain of these BEGe detectors including isotopic enrichment, purification, crystal growth and diode production. The efforts in optimizing the mass yield and in minimizing the exposure of the {sup 76}Ge enriched germanium to cosmic radiation during processing are described. Furthermore, characterization measurements in vacuum cryostats of the first subgroup of seven BEGe detectors and their long-term behavior in liquid argon are discussed. The detector performance fulfills the requirements needed for the physics goals of GERDA Phase II. (orig.)

  5. Production, characterization and operation of {sup 76}Ge enriched BEGe detectors in GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M. [Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Allardt, M. [Institut für Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Andreotti, E. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Bakalyarov, A. M. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Balata, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, Assergi (Italy); and others

    2015-02-03

    The GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors made of material with an enriched {sup 76}Ge fraction act simultaneously as sources and detectors for this decay. During Phase I of theexperiment mainly refurbished semi-coaxial Ge detectors from former experiments were used. For the upcoming Phase II, 30 new {sup 76}Ge enriched detectors of broad energy germanium (BEGe)-type were produced. A subgroup of these detectors has already been deployed in Gerda during Phase I. The present paper reviews the complete production chain of these BEGe detectors including isotopic enrichment, purification, crystal growth and diode production. The efforts in optimizing the mass yield and in minimizing the exposure of the {sup 76}Ge enriched germanium to cosmic radiation during processing are described. Furthermore, characterization measurements in vacuum cryostats of the first subgroup of seven BEGe detectors and their long-term behavior in liquid argon are discussed. The detector performance fulfills the requirements needed for the physics goals of Gerda Phase II.

  6. Production, characterization and operation of Ge enriched BEGe detectors in GERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Andreotti, E.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Domula, A.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Misiaszek, M.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Palioselitis, D.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pessina, G.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Strecker, H.; Ur, C. A.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-02-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array ( Gerda) at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay () of Ge. Germanium detectors made of material with an enriched Ge fraction act simultaneously as sources and detectors for this decay. During Phase I of theexperiment mainly refurbished semi-coaxial Ge detectors from former experiments were used. For the upcoming Phase II, 30 new Ge enriched detectors of broad energy germanium (BEGe)-type were produced. A subgroup of these detectors has already been deployed in Gerda during Phase I. The present paper reviews the complete production chain of these BEGe detectors including isotopic enrichment, purification, crystal growth and diode production. The efforts in optimizing the mass yield and in minimizing the exposure of the Ge enriched germanium to cosmic radiation during processing are described. Furthermore, characterization measurements in vacuum cryostats of the first subgroup of seven BEGe detectors and their long-term behavior in liquid argon are discussed. The detector performance fulfills the requirements needed for the physics goals of Gerda Phase II.

  7. Estimating the relation between groundwater and river water by measuring the concentration of Rn-222

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Minoru; Morisawa, Shinsuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01

    This study aimed to estimate the relationship between groundwater in shallow layer and river water by determining the concentrations of {sup 222}Rn and nitric nitrogen along with water temperature. The region around ca. 20 km along river A in a certain basin was chosen as a test area. The Rn concentration of groundwater was determined by Rn extracting with toluene and counting in liquid scintillation counter, whereas for river water, it was determined by activated charcoal passive collector method developed by the authors, by which the amount of Rn adsorbed on activated charcoal was estimated by Ge-solid state detector. In addition, water temperature and nitric nitrogen concentration were measured at various points in the test area. Thus, a distribution map of the three parameters was made on the basis of the data obtained in December, 1989. Since Rn concentration is generally higher in ground water than river water and the water temperature in December is higher in the former, it seems likely that the concentrations of Rn and nitric nitrogen would become higher in the area where ground water soaks into river water. Thus, the directions of ground water flow at the respective sites along river A were estimated from the data regarding the properties of ground water. (M.N.)

  8. Mere Musik til Byens Børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Finn

    Førsteårsrapport på København Kommunes treårige projekt Mere Musik til Byens Børn - et pilotprojekt med henblik på at sikre, at flere børn i København får mulighed for at deltage i forskellige former for frivillig musikundervisning. Særligt fokuseres der på at fremme, at alle børn i hele byen...

  9. Delebørn i tal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Mai Heide; Mathilde Hansen Stage, Sofie

    Hvordan påvirker samværsordninger børns hverdagsliv? Fungerer forældresamarbejdet anderledes, når der er en deleordning, og trives børn med udstrakt samvær bedre eller dårligere end andre skilsmissebørn? Med udgangspunkt i SFI’s Børneforløbsundersøgelse, som følger 6000 børn fra 1995, bliver der ...

  10. Minoritetsdanske børn i dagtilbud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Üzeyir

    2015-01-01

    Dagtilbud skal fremme børns trivsel, sundhed, udvikling og læring, Dette er et lovmæssig krav, som gælder for alle børn i Danmark. Minoritetsdanske børn anderledes grundvilkår giver dog store udfordringer for dagtilbuddene - for hvordan sikrer man, at også børn fra kulturelle minoriteter får opti...

  11. Interview med børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Interview med børn handler om børneinterview i forbindelse med forskning. Bogen er tænkt som inspiration til og afsæt for metodiske refleksioner i forbindelse med inddragelse af børn som informanter.......Interview med børn handler om børneinterview i forbindelse med forskning. Bogen er tænkt som inspiration til og afsæt for metodiske refleksioner i forbindelse med inddragelse af børn som informanter....

  12. Operation of bare HPGe detectors in LAr/LN{sub 2} for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heider, M Barnabe; Chkvorets, O; Schoenert, S [MPI fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cattadori, C [INFN-Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Vacri, A di [INFN-LNGS, L' Aquila (Italy); Gusev, K; Shirchenko, M [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia and JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: assunta.divacri@lngs.infn.it

    2008-11-01

    refurbishment technology on long term stability and spectroscopy performance. The study started on prototype 1 (fully passivated on the borehole side). {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiation of the detector in LAr resulted in an increase of the leakage current (LC), depending on the rate of LAr ionization which however is reversible. The radiation induced LC is believed to produce pairs of Ar{sup +}/e{sup -} that are drifted towards the passivation layer by the diode bias electric field (E) dispersed in LAr. In fact, E, numerically calculated by the Maxwell 2D code, resulted strong enough to drift charges before recombination, in the volume surrounding the passivation layer. Charges collected and trapped at the passivation layer cause a decrease of the its resistivity, i.e. an increase of the surface LC. The increase rate depends on the charge collection rate, on the density of trapped charge and on the starting value of the passivation layer resistivity. To study this mechanism two other detector configurations were tested. They have been irradiated in LAr to investigate the influence of both geometry and extension of the passivation layer and measurements with prototype 1 have been also repeated in LN{sub 2}: prototype 2 (passivation layer only in the groove) shows a {approx}30 times lower LC increase rate than the case of prototype 1; prototype 3 (no passivation layer) does not show any increase of LC and prototype 1 operated in LN{sub 2} does not show any increase. The observed LC is cured by irradiation without HV, explained either by {gamma} ionization of the passivation layer or by effect of the UV LAr scintillation light.

  13. Development of an integrated sampler based on direct 222Rn/220Rn progeny sensors in flow-mode for estimating unattached/attached progeny concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    A flow-mode integrated sampler consisting of a wire-mesh and filter-paper array along with passive solid state nuclear track detectors has been developed for estimating unattached and attached fraction of 222 Rn/ 220 Rn progeny concentration. The essential element of this sampler is the direct 222 Rn/ 220 Rn progeny sensor (DRPS/DTPS), which is an absorber-mounted-LR115 type nuclear track detector that selectively registers the alpha particles emitted from the progeny deposited on its surface. During sampling at a specified flow-rate, the unattached progeny is captured on the wire-mesh; while the attached progeny gets transmitted and is captured on the filter-paper. The alpha particles emitted by the deposited progeny atoms are registered on the sensors placed at a specified distance facing the wire-mesh and the filter-paper, respectively. The various steps involved in the development of this flow-mode direct progeny sampler such as the optimization of the sampling rate and the distance between the sensor and the deposition substrate are discussed. The sensitivity factor of the DTPS-loaded sampler for 220 Rn progeny deposited on the wire-mesh and filter-paper is found to be 23.77 ± 0.64 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 and 22.30 ± 0.18 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 , respectively; while that of DRPS-loaded sampler for 222 Rn progeny deposition, is 3.03 ± 0.14 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 and 2.08 ± 0.07 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 , respectively. The highlight of this flow-mode sampler is its high sensitivity and that it utilizes the passive technique for estimating the unattached and attached progeny concentration, thus doing away with the alpha counting procedures.

  14. Testing of self-triggered nXYTER electronics for integrating with GEM detector for high frequency operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, J.; Dubey, A.K.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Singaraju, R.N.

    2013-01-01

    A GEM-based tracking system is planned to be used for muon tracking in the proposed CBM experiment at FAIR. The peak hit density in the central region of the chamber is expected to reach 1 MHz/cm 2 . For a detector to be operational at high intensity (upto MHz), it is useful to know the compatibility of the readout electronics with the detector. At very high rates and sufficiently large signal amplitude, there is a possibility of preamplifier saturation resulting in zero or distorted amplitude of the output signal

  15. Self-Sustained Operation of Radiation Detectors Based on Embedded Signal Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnishnikh, Elena; Paganini, Lucia; Stegenga, Jan; Woertche, Heinrich; Limburgy, Han

    2013-06-01

    Radiation detectors featuring long term stability, self-sustained operation and low power consumption are crucial for long-term environmental monitoring (e.g. nuclear waste disposals and mining activities) and provide enhanced applications of nuclear fingerprinting e.g. in farming and geological surveying. INCAS3 is developing a compact modular system consisting of four functional modules, namely analogue conditioning and signal digitalization, dead-time-free real-time signal processing, embedded high level analysis of the processed signal, and wireless communication. The modules are organized such that they can be interchanged and modified independently. For the input module one can choose an ADC sampling frequency to be either 100 MHz with 14 bit precision or 1 GHz with reduced precision (10 bit). The main focus of the signal processing section, based on an FPGA, is on providing dead-time-free signal handling in real time. Other useful features such as base line correction, pulse shape analysis (energy, decay and arrival time) are being developed as (VHDL) library functions. Additional modules, e.g. anomaly detection in the incoming signal, pile-up correction if operated at high rates and advanced signal shape processing, can be included in the processing if required and can be applied to autonomously generate the information necessary to control the sensor parameters and stabilize energy spectra and sensitivity. At present we operate the system in conjunction with inorganic scintillators (NaI, CsI) read out by a photomultiplier in order to provide a system capable of long term quantification of nuclear contaminations in natural environments. The underlying technology is based on detecting natural or anthropogenic gamma radiation and generating corresponding energy spectra in real time. The generated spectra are analyzed either in a standard way by any suitable desktop software in a lab or, as it is described in this work, by the ENSA (Embedded Nuclear Spectra

  16. Operational experience with the GEM detector assembly lines for the CMS forward muon upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Vai, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Collaboration has been developing large-area Triple-GEM detectors to be installed in the muon endcap regions of the CMS experiment in 2019 to maintain forward muon trigger and tracking performance at the HL-LHC. Ten pre-production detectors were built at CERN to commission the first assembly line and the quality controls. These were installed in the CMS detector in early 2017 and are currently participating in the 2017 LHC run. The collaboration has prepared several additional assembly and quality control lines for distributed mass production of 160 GEM detectors at various sites worldwide. During 2017, these additional production sites have been optimizing construction techniques and quality control procedures and validating them against common specifications by constructing additional pre-production detectors. Using the specific experience from one production site as an example, we discuss how the quality controls make use of independent hardware and trained personnel to ensure fast and reliable pro...

  17. Application of the A/E pulse shape discrimination method to first Ge-76 enriched BEGe detectors operated in GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea; Agostini, Matteo; Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    In 2013 the Gerda experiment will be upgraded to its second phase with more than double of the current {sup 76}Ge mass. The additional diodes are custom made Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors. This design has been chosen to enhance the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability, with respect to the Phase I coaxial detectors. The goal of Phase II is to improve by one order of magnitude the current background index; the PSD will bring a major contribution to this result. Since summer 2012 the first set of five enriched BEGe detectors are operated in Gerda Phase I. This offers us the possibility to test the PSD performances and the signal analysis in an environment as close as possible to the Gerda Phase II configuration. In this talk I present the A/E analysis, the calibration of the cut parameters and the results in terms of background reduction for the data taken with these enriched BEGe.

  18. Environmental thoron (220Rn): a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, T.V.

    2013-01-01

    Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222 Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222 Rn in the environment and considerable data is generated on the levels of 222 Rn in the environment across the worlds and is periodically reported by UNSCEAR. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220 Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scare due to the general perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. Many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products like radon ( 222 Rn), and thoron ( 220 Rn) in the environment. It is estimated inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54 % of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. This component is not adequately estimated for any country so far on a national level. 220 Rn problem will also be a problem in industries which uses thorium nitrate. Including India lamps using thoriated gas mantles are being still used for indoor and outdoor lighting and hawkers in rural as well as urban areas. Considering the fact that large amount of thorium nitrate is being handled by these industries, contribution to the inhalation dose of workers from 220 Rn gas emanated and build up of the progeny in ambient air may also be quite significant. In this article current status of 220 Rn levels in the indoor environment workplaces as well as in other industries where large amount of 232 Th is being handled are being summarized. (author)

  19. Geodesics in (Rn, d1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KILIÇ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The notion of geodesic, which may be regarded as an extension of the line segment in Euclidean geometry to the space we study in, has an important place in many branches of geometry, such as Riemannian geometry, Metric geometry, to name but a few. In this article, the concept of geodesic in a metric space will be introduced, then geodesics in the space (Rn, d1 will be characterized. Furthermore, some examples will be presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the main result.

  20. Stability issues of high-energy resolution diode type CdTe nuclear radiation detectors in a long-term operation

    CERN Document Server

    Niraula, M; Aoki, T; Tomita, Y; Hatanaka, Y

    2002-01-01

    High-energy resolution diode type CdTe detectors were fabricated by growing an n-type epitaxial layer on high resistivity p-like crystal wafers, and their stability issues during a long-term operation were studied. Room temperature stability of the detectors was not good at low operating biases of around 200 V. However, it could be improved significantly by operating them at higher biases under full depletion conditions. On the other hand, detectors exhibited excellent stability by cooling them slightly below room temperature down to 0 deg. C. The effect of this low level of cooling on detector stability was found to be more significant than that of applying high biases at room temperature. By using the detector type presented here, stable operation could be obtained at moderate operating voltages of around 400 V and with a modest degree of cooling.

  1. Study of long-term operation of triple-GEM detectors for the high rate environment in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The CMS GEM collaboration is working on the possible instrumentation of the high-eta region of the CMS Endcap with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, a technology capable to sustain the hostile environment that will be encountered at the high-luminosity LHC. To ensure the long-term operation of large triple-GEM detectors in the CMS experiment, we are performing a set of studies in order to measure and understand the aging effect of triple-GEM Muon chambers. The aging includes all the processes that lead to a significant degradation of the performances of the detector gain drop, non-uniformity, dark current, discharges and resolution loss. The project is focused on monitoring continuously the response of the detector when irradiated by a source of Cs 137 at CERN in the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF). Moreover, the new technology employed for stretching the GEM foils, so called NS2, introduces new, carefully chosen materials and components in the detectors. Outgassing tests are performed in order to va...

  2. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn) and radon progeny concentrations for a radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, D J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in dose assessment. Studies of glass exposed in radon chambers and in a home show that radon progeny deposited on, and implanted in, glass hold promise for reconstructing past radon concentrations in a variety of atmospheres. We developed an inexpensive track registration detector for the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study (IRLCS) that simultaneously measures contemporary airborne radon concentrations, surface deposited alpha activity density, and implanted sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity density. The implanted activity is used to reconstruct the cum...

  3. Measurement of Rn-222 concentrations in building materials used in jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, A.M.; Abumyrad, K.M.; Kullab, M.K.; Albataina, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    In this work, the concentrations of the radiative inert gas Rn-222 emanated from the building materials that are commonly in jordan have been studied. For this purpose, samples of ten jordanian building materials of different masses were prepared in plastic cans sealed to passive integrated dosimeters containing CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors which are very sensitive to alpha-particles. The Rn-222 concentrations in these samples range from 137 Bq/m 3 to 267 Bq/m 3 with an average of 189 Bq/m 3 . These levels were found to be consistent with those measured by other workers in other countries. 4 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Charge collection efficiency and resolution of an irradiated double-sided silicon microstrip detector operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borer, K.; Janos, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Buytaert, J.; Chabaud, V.; Chochula, P.; Collins, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Lourenco, C.; Parkes, C.; Saladino, S.; Ruf, T.; Granata, V.; Pagano, S.; Vitobello, F.; Bell, W.; Bartalini, P.; Dormond, O.; Frei, R.; Casagrande, L.; Bowcock, T.; Barnett, I.B.M.; Da Via, C.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Schmitt, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Stavitski, I.; Esposito, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results on the measurement of the cluster shapes, resolution and charge collection efficiency of a double-sided silicon microstrip detector after irradiation with 24 GeV protons to a fluence of 3.5x10 14 p/cm 2 and operated at cryogenic temperatures. An empirical model is presented which describes the expected cluster shapes as a function of depletion depth, and is shown to agree with the data. It is observed that the clusters on the p-side broaden if the detector is under-depleted, leading to a degradation of resolution and efficiency. The model is used to make predictions for detector types envisaged for the LHC experiments. The results also show that at cryogenic temperature the charge collection efficiency varies depending on the operating conditions of the detector and can reach values of 100% at unexpectedly low bias voltage. By analysing the cluster shapes it is shown that these variations are due to changes in depletion depth. This phenomenon, known as the 'Lazarus effect', can be related to similar recent observations on diode behaviour

  5. Relationship of 220Rn and 222Rn progeny levels in Canadian underground U mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1988-01-01

    Radon-222 and 220 Rn progeny are found in some Canadian underground U mines. Because both can contribute to lung dose, their experimental determinations are important. The relationship between 222 Rn progeny Working Level [WL(Rn)] and 220 Rn progeny Working Level [WL(Tn)] has been investigated in U mines. Experimental measurements extended from 1981 to 1986 and consisted of about 700 measurements of each WL(Rn) and WL(Tn). The data were analyzed by standard linear and power-function regression analysis. A power-function relationship between WL(Rn) and WL(Tn) seemed to fit the experimental data best. The relationship obtained permits the calculation of WL(Tn) from experimental values of WL(Rn). The relationship is useful for lung-dose-calculation purposes and in mine-ventilation-engineering calculations

  6. Fremtidens biblioteksbetjening af børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Helene

    2008-01-01

    Rapporten er resultatet af et tværministerielt udvalgsarbejde nedsat af Kulturministeriet.  Kommissoriet har været at nytænke biblioteksbetjeningen af børn, så den passer til vidensamfundet.  Udvalgsarbejdet munder ud i ti bud for fremtidens biblioteksbetjening af børn....

  7. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  8. Performance test of passive radon–thoron discriminative detectors on environmental parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how humidity, wind and ambient aerosols in air influence the detection responses of passive detectors. Two types of alpha track detectors based on a passive radon ( 222 Rn)–thoron ( 220 Rn) discriminative measurement technique were used: the Raduet and Radopot detectors that were developed and calibrated by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The initial experiment showed that the infiltration rate of 220 Rn onto sponges with a high air exchange rate for the Raduet detectors was one third lower than that onto filters for the Radopot detectors. Little distinct dependence on humidity was observed for the 222 Rn detection responses of both detectors. For 220 Rn, the detection responses of both detectors for the high air exchange rate seemed to decrease slightly at high humidity conditions. The 220 Rn detection responses of the Radopot detectors had little influence from wind speed. The 220 Rn detection responses of the Raduet detectors for the high air exchange rate seemed to decrease at low wind speeds. Furthermore, there was little difference between the detection responses in the presence and absence of ambient aerosol particles because the ambient aerosols were filtered out during their passive diffusion through the sponges and filters for the Raduet and Radopot detectors, respectively.

  9. On selecting a sensitive region thickness of a silicon semiconductor detector for operation under counting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronkin, N.S.; Khakhalin, V.V.

    1972-01-01

    The paper discusses the selection of a thickness of a sensitive area of a silicon semiconductor detector, used in the count regime based on the signal to noise ratio and β-radiation registration efficiency. (author)

  10. Valence configurations in 214Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Bark, R.A.; Poletti, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Excited states of 214 Rn, up to spins of ≅ 24 ℎ have been studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy following the 208 Pb( 9 Be,3n) 214 Rn reaction. The level scheme (which differs substantially from earlier work) is compared with the results of a semi-empirical shell model calculation. The availability of high-spin orbitals for the four valence protons and two valence neutrons, and the effect of the attractive proton-neutron interaction, leads to the prediction of high-spin states at an unusually low excitation energy. Experimentally, the high level density leads to difficulties in the level scheme assignments at high spin. Nevertheless, configuration assignments, supported by transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes (in the nanosecond region) are suggested for the main yrast states. The decay properties also suggest that configuration mixing is important. The possibility of a gradual transition to octupole deformation, implied by the decay properties of the 11 - and 10 + yrast states is also discussed. (orig.)

  11. Measurements of indoor 222Rn concentration in two art galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Luana Gomes; Braz, Delson; Jesus, Edgar Francisco de; Cunha, Kenya Dias da; Medeiros, Geiza; Zouain, Felipe; Pitassi, Gabriel; Leite, Carlos Barros; Cardoso, Katia

    2009-01-01

    It is point out that radon and their decay products in environment give high dose to human lung. Studies indicate that the indoor radon inhalation by humans has been considered probably the second most important cause of lung cancer after of smoking. A passive-type radon detector was used for measuring indoor radon concentration in two art galleries at Rio de Janeiro city during 90 days January to March, 2009. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occupational and public radon exposure in art galleries and museums. This paper shows the preliminary results of samples collected at two art galleries located in Gavea, Rio de Janeiro city. 30 LEXAN (GE) track detectors were exposed in the air (indoor as well as outdoor). The samples were collected in the same building which is a construction of XIX century. The analysis of the results suggests that the 222 Rn concentration levels are different in both sampling site, in closed environmental, demonstrating that, although the construction materials are the same the absence of circulating air is a factor very important to increase the concentration of indoor Rn. (author)

  12. The ventilation influence on the spatial distribution of Rn-222 and its decay products in human inhabited environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, S.N.M.; Hadler, J.C.; Paulo, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    For the determination of the ventilation influence (directional flux of air induced by a fan) on the spatial distribution of Rn-222 and its decay products (daughters) present in human inhabited environments, a group of experimental results were obtained by means of the fission nuclear tracks left by α-particles over adequate plastic detectors CR-39). The exposure of these detectors was done in a closed environment considering the influence of ventilation for different angles, velocities and distances from fan. The results show that a relative quantity of daughters of Rn-222 are pulled out of the environment due to the effects of ventilation and plat-out

  13. Reducing RN Vacancy Rate: A Nursing Recruitment Office Process Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisgen, Stephanie A; Page, Nancy E; Thornlow, Deirdre K; Merwin, Elizabeth I

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the RN vacancy rate at an academic medical center by improving the hiring process in the Nursing Recruitment Office. Inability to fill RN positions can lead to higher vacancy rates and negatively impact staff and patient satisfaction, quality outcomes, and the organization's bottom line. The Model for Improvement was used to design and implement a process improvement project to improve the hiring process from time of interview through the position being filled. Number of days to interview and check references decreased significantly, but no change in overall time to hire and time to fill positions was noted. RN vacancy rate also decreased significantly. Nurse manager satisfaction with the hiring process increased significantly. Redesigning the recruitment process supported operational efficiencies of the organization related to RN recruitment.

  14. An application of 222Rn alpha particle's tracks to uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar H, F.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium exploration method is based on the register of 222 Rn alpha particles; 222 Rn gas is generated in the chain 238 U desintegration. The detection of alpha particles was performed with cellulose nitrate films (NTC), located in a grid at the region in study. The alpha particles produce latent tracks in the NTC films; these tracks may be enlarged by chemical etching and are observed with an ordinary optic microscope, ninety seven NTC films were used, these were distributed in an area of approximately seventeen square kilometers, located in the municipalities of Granados and Huasabas in Sonora Mexico, the detectors remain in the ground for a thirty days mean period. The results obtained show an area with high 222 Rn concentration, this can be related with an underground uranium ore deposit. The more important conclusion is that the results obtained in this work can be used as preliminary results for other prospection methods in this particular area. (author)

  15. Analysis and operation of DePFET X-ray imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The latest active pixel sensor for X-ray imaging spectroscopy developed at the Max-Planck-Halbleiterlabor (HLL) is the Depleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DePFET). This detector type unites detector and first stage amplification and has excellent energy resolution, low noise readout at high speed and low power consumption. This is combined with the possibility of random accessibility of pixels and on-demand readout. In addition it possesses all advantages of a sidewards depleted device, i.e. 100% fill factor and very good quantum efficiency. In the course of the development of DePFET detectors the need of a data analysis software for DePFET devices became apparent. A new tool was developed within the scope of this thesis, which should enable scientists to analyze DePFET data, but also be flexible enough so it can be adapted to new device variants and analysis challenges. A modular concept was thus implemented: a base program running an analysis by individual steps encapsulating algorithms, which can be interchanged. The result is a flexible, adaptable, and expandable analysis software. The software was used to investigate and qualify different structural variants of DePFET detectors. Algorithms to examine detector effects and methods to correct them were developed and integrated into the software. This way, a standard analysis suite for DePFET data was built up which is used at the HLL. Beside the planned use as detector for the wide field imager in the space X-ray observatory IXO, DePFET matrices will be used as focal plane array on the Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer on board the Mercury probe BepiColombo which is scheduled for launch in 2014. The developed analysis software was used in the detector development for this mission to qualify test structures, analyze detector effects and study experimental results. In the course of this development, detector prototypes were studied in respect of linearity, charge collection and detection efficiency in an

  16. Analysis and operation of DePFET X-ray imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauf, Thomas

    2011-04-28

    The latest active pixel sensor for X-ray imaging spectroscopy developed at the Max-Planck-Halbleiterlabor (HLL) is the Depleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DePFET). This detector type unites detector and first stage amplification and has excellent energy resolution, low noise readout at high speed and low power consumption. This is combined with the possibility of random accessibility of pixels and on-demand readout. In addition it possesses all advantages of a sidewards depleted device, i.e. 100% fill factor and very good quantum efficiency. In the course of the development of DePFET detectors the need of a data analysis software for DePFET devices became apparent. A new tool was developed within the scope of this thesis, which should enable scientists to analyze DePFET data, but also be flexible enough so it can be adapted to new device variants and analysis challenges. A modular concept was thus implemented: a base program running an analysis by individual steps encapsulating algorithms, which can be interchanged. The result is a flexible, adaptable, and expandable analysis software. The software was used to investigate and qualify different structural variants of DePFET detectors. Algorithms to examine detector effects and methods to correct them were developed and integrated into the software. This way, a standard analysis suite for DePFET data was built up which is used at the HLL. Beside the planned use as detector for the wide field imager in the space X-ray observatory IXO, DePFET matrices will be used as focal plane array on the Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer on board the Mercury probe BepiColombo which is scheduled for launch in 2014. The developed analysis software was used in the detector development for this mission to qualify test structures, analyze detector effects and study experimental results. In the course of this development, detector prototypes were studied in respect of linearity, charge collection and detection efficiency in an

  17. Occurrence of 222Rn and progeny in natural gas processing plants in western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, I.; Boucher, P.; Bradford, B.; Evans, H.; McLean, J.; Reczek, E.; Thunem, H.

    1990-01-01

    In Western Canada, there are many plants that process natural gas to remove impurities (CO 2 , H 2 S, H 2 O) and recover natural gas liquids (propane, butane, etc.). Trace quantities of 222 Rn present in the inlet stream are concentrated in streams rich with propane. Potential hazards to plant operators include direct inhalation of 222 Rn and progeny; exposure to gamma radiation from short-lived progeny deposited inside equipment; or inhalation of 210 Pb when contaminated equipment is opened for repair. Twenty-four plants operated by seven companies cooperated to assess these potential hazards. The findings indicate a substantial flux of 222 Rn and progeny passing through the plants, but little accumulation of radionuclides. In no case was there evidence of significant exposure of plant operators or maintenance personnel to ionizing radiation. Further investigation of pipeline operations, and chemical operations using natural gas liquids as feed stock, is recommended

  18. 222Rn Determination In Drinking Waters - RAD7 And LSC Technique Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, N.; Stojkovic, I.; Nikolov, J.; Tenjovic, B.

    2015-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of 222Rn in environmental water samples using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was applied and optimized. For radon determination in drinking water from groundwater and surface water sources by LSC, the EPA Method 913.0 was used. A minimum detectable activity of 0.029 Bq L-1 in a 20 mL glass vial (10 mL water sample mixed with 10 mL of liquid scintillation cocktail) has been achieved during 300 minutes of measurement time. The procedure was compared with RAD7 radon detector measurements. Factors that affect the measurement accuracy and precision of RAD7 radon detector are the sampling technique, sample concentration, sample size, counting time, temperature, relative humidity and background effects. The minimal detectable activity (MDA) for RAD7 technique was found to be 0.1 Bq/L. From obtained results of 222Rn measurements in 15 water samples with different 222Rn activities, correlation between the two techniques applied for measurements of 222Rn in water samples (A less than 400 Bq/L) was determined. There is reasonable agreement (within statistical uncertainties) between the various techniques in most cases, while disagreements most likely come from systematic uncertainties associated with sampling procedures. Discrepancy in determined activities between the two techniques becomes more evident with increased 222Rn activities in water. LSC technique gives in general higher activity concentrations for about 30 percent than RAD7 spectrometer. The interpretation of shown results could be that RAD7 is not properly calibrated for higher activities, since USA reference level of 222Rn concentrations in water is only 11.1 Bq/L (US EPA, Proposed Radon in Drinking Water Regulation). (author).

  19. Multilayer detector for operative estimation of spectral composition of neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Dedenko, G L; Kaplun, A A; Kolesnikov, S V; Samosadnyj, A V; Samosadnyj, V T

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes measuring and control equipment to detect and to identify neutron sources. The equipment comprises two multilayer detectors based on sup 3 He-counters of slow neutron and poly ethylene moderator of fast neutrons, as well as, intensifiers-signal shapers, power multichannel intensifies, power unit, 8-bit microprocessor base information acquisition and processing system. Paper contains the results of measurements of energy dependence of sensitivity of neutron recording by detector layers with application of monoenergetic neutron fluxes. Difference of the experimental data and the Monte Carlo method base calculation results is 10% maximum

  20. Charge collection efficiency of irradiated silicon detector operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borer, K.; Janos, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Collins, P.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Lourenco, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S.; Granata, V.; Pagano, S.; Chapuy, S.; Dimcovski, Z.; Grigoriev, E.; Bell, W.; Devine, S.R.H.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Jungermann, L.; Casagrande, L.; Cindro, V.; Mikuz, M.; Zavartanik, M.; Via, C. da; Esposito, A.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Schmitt, L.; Buontempo, S.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Pagano, S.; Ruggiero, G.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2000-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of heavily irradiated silicon diode detectors was investigated at temperatures between 77 and 200 K. The CCE was found to depend on the radiation dose, bias voltage value and history, temperature, and bias current generated by light. The detector irradiated to the highest fluence 2x10 15 n/cm 2 yields a MIP signal of at least 15000 e - both at 250 V forward bias voltage, and at 250 V reverse bias voltage in the presence of a light-generated current. The 'Lazarus effect' was thus shown to extend to fluences at least ten times higher than was previously studied

  1. Activated charcoal adsorber bed as a 222Rn hold up system for application in uranium mining industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudeep Kumara, K.; Karunakara, N.; Sahoo, B.K.; Gaware, J.J.; Sapra, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2018-01-01

    222 Rn, produced due to the decay of 226 Ra, can accumulate to high concentrations, and if adequate ventilation is not provided the workers may inhale the 222 Rn laden air, which would result in elevated inhalation dose in Uranium mining and milling operations. Similarly, in thorium mining and processing plants, the 220 Rn generated during monazite processing and thorium handling facility is of concern. In a previous publication it has been shown that adsorption in a flow-through charcoal bed offers an excellent method of alleviating the release of 220 Rn into occupational and public domain. In this paper we examine the utility of TMS as a 222 Rn hold up/delay system by evaluating its performance parameters such as breakthrough time (τ) and adsorption coefficient (K) at different flow rates

  2. Optimizing measurement sensitivity to facilitate monitoring environmental levels of Rn-daughter concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.J.; McDowell, W.P.; Groer, P.G.; Witek, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    In the measurement of environmental levels of radioactivity, the primary problem is the accumulation of a statistically meaningful number of counts within a reasonable period of time. In the case of measurements of airborne 222 Rn-daughter concentrations, the problem is further complicated by the particularly short half-life, 3.05 minutes, of RaA (Po 218 ). Since the Rn-daughters, (RaA, RaB [Pb 214 ] and RaC [Bi 214 ]) are of interest, the equations interrelating these Rn-daughter concentrations were derived from the laws of radioactive-series decay. These equations, although straightforward, are cumbersome to solve. To facilitate the efficient use of these equations, a computer program has been written which permits the calculation of Rn-daughter concentrations or expected counts for a given set of measurement parameters (flow rate and detector efficiencies). A subroutine then calculates the optimum pumping and counting times required to provide the number of counts necessary for acceptable statistics at environmental levels of 222 Rn-daughter concentrations. This subroutine contains a set of parameters, flow rate and efficiencies, that are fixed using realistic restrictions. The use of these optimized pumping and counting times results in maximum measurement sensitivity under realistic constraints

  3. Radiological risk of actinon (/sup 219/Rn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.J.

    1981-12-01

    The research reported was designed to provide information on the following subjects: (1) development of the functional relations between exposure to the /sup 219/Rn decay chain and pertinent health effects; (2) specification of the circumstances under which a significant concentration of the decay chain may occur; (3) recommendation of an exposure standard which will provide protection of the public from significant elevation of health effects; and (4) an assessment of the impact of /sup 219/Rn on determinations of the concentration of the /sup 222/Rn decay chain and/or its precursors.

  4. Radiological risk of actinon (219Rn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, D.J.

    1981-12-01

    The research reported was designed to provide information on the following subjects: (1) development of the functional relations between exposure to the 219 Rn decay chain and pertinent health effects; (2) specification of the circumstances under which a significant concentration of the decay chain may occur; (3) recommendation of an exposure standard which will provide protection of the public from significant elevation of health effects; and (4) an assessment of the impact of 219 Rn on determinations of the concentration of the 222 Rn decay chain and/or its precursors

  5. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode and/or with gas amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Charpak, Georges; Breuil, P; Peskov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and cetera. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification. . To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of 1. The second type alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 10E4). A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as comparison with the commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible ap...

  6. Development and operational performance of a single calibration chamber for radon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Coto, I.; Bolivar, J.P.; Mas, J.L.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vargas, A.

    2007-01-01

    This work shows the design, setup and performance of a new single radon detector calibration chamber developed at the University of Huelva (Environmental Radioactivity Group). This system is based on a certified radon source and a traceable reference radon detector, which allows radon concentrations inside the chamber radon to be obtained in steady-state conditions within a range of 400-22 000 Bq m -3 with associated uncertainties in the range of 4%. In addition, the development of a new ad hoc calibration protocol (UHU-RC/01/06 'Rachel'), which is based on the modelling of radon concentration within the chamber, allows it to be used without the reference detector. To do that, a complete characterization and calibration of the different leakage constants and the flow meter reading have been performed. The accuracy and general performance of both working methods for the same chamber (i.e., with and without the reference detector) have been tested by means of their participation in an intercomparison exercise involving five active radon monitors

  7. Operation of a high-purity silicon diode alpha particle detector at 1.4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoff, C.J.; Kaczanowicz, E.; Neuhauser, B.J.; Lopez, E.; Zhang, Y.; Ziemba, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Detection of alpha particles at temperatures as low as 1.4 K was demonstrated using a specially fabricated Si diode. The diode was 475 mm 2 by 0.280 mm thick, fabricated from high-purity silicon with degenerately doped contacts. This is an important step toward development of dual-mode (ionization plus phonon) silicon detectors for low energy radiation. (orig.)

  8. Development and operation of tracking detectors in silicon technology for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Adeva, Bernardo

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It uses the energy density provided by the LHC to attempt to probe asymmetries between particles and antiparticles that can not be explained by the Standard Model, and thus provide evidence that would allow us to build a new model of fundamental physics. This thesis covers the author's work in the Silicon Tracker $(\\textit{ST})$ and VErtex LOcator $(\\textit{VELO})$ detectors of the LHCb experiment. The thesis explains the installation and commissioning of the $ST$, as well as the development of the slow control for the detector. The $ST$ is a silicon micro-strip detector which provides precise momentum measurements of ionizing particles coming from the collisions. The $ST$consists of two sub-detectors: the Tracker Turicensis $ (TT)$, located upstream of the 4 Tm dipole magnet covering the full acceptance of the experiment, and the Inner Tracker $(IT)$, which covers the region of highest particle density closest...

  9. System tests, initial operation and first data of the AMIGA muon detector for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontz, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Investigating the energy region between 10{sup 17} eV and 4 x 10{sup 18} eV for primary cosmic particles will lead to a deeper understanding of the origin of cosmic rays. Effects of the transition from galactic to extragalactic origin are expected to be visible in this region. The knowledge of the composition of cosmic rays strongly depends on the hadronic interaction models, which are applied in the air shower reconstruction. Directly determining the number of muons from an air shower on ground level will improve the precision of the composition measurements by reducing the dependence on the models. The Pierre Auger Observatory is facing these challenges with an upgrade of the original detector setup. A denser sub-array of water Cherenkov detectors and a dedicated muon detector (MD) array constitute the AMIGA enhancement (Auger Muon and Infill for the Ground Array). Additional fluorescence telescopes constitute HEAT (High Elevation Auger Telescopes). Seven MD modules have been installed until mid 2012 in a first hexagon at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Malarguee, Argentina. The corresponding readout electronics, and 19 more of these setups, were assembled and tested in Siegen to assure correct functionality. The detectors were incorporated in the trigger structure of the original surface detector (SD) array of the Pierre Auger Observatory and are now taking data synchronously. In the framework of this thesis, system tests have been developed, a pre-unitary cell (PUC) of seven modules has been successfully operated and their trigger has been synchronised with the SD trigger. First data from the MD have been analysed and have been combined with data from the SD.

  10. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode or/and with gas amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G; Benaben, P; Breuil, P; Peskov, V

    2008-01-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are attractive due to their simplicity and low cost and are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and so on. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification which potentially offers the highest possible sensitivity in applications like alpha particle detection or high energy X-ray photon or electron detection. To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of one (pulse ionization chamber). This detector was readout by a custom made wide -band charge sensitive amplifier able to deal with slow induced signals generated by slow motion of negative and positive ions. The multiwire detector was able to detect alpha particles with an efficiency close to 22%. The second type of an alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 10 4 ). This detector can also operate in a cascaded mode or being combined with other detectors, for example with MICROMEGAS. This detector was readout by a conventional charge -sensitive amplifier and was able to detect alpha particles with 100% efficiency. This detector could also detect X-ray photons or fast electrons. A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as a comparison with commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible applications of these new detectors is alpha particle background monitors which, due to their low cost can find wide application not only in houses, but

  11. Prototype readout system for a multi Mpixels UV single-photon imaging detector capable of space flight operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, A.; Cumming, H. S.; Varner, G.; Vallerga, J.; Raffanti, R.; Virta, V.

    2018-02-01

    Our collaboration works on the development of a large aperture, high resolution, UV single-photon imaging detector, funded through NASA's Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program. The detector uses a microchannel plate for charge multiplication, and orthogonal cross strip (XS) anodes for charge readout. Our target is to make an advancement in the technology readiness level (TRL), which enables real scale prototypes to be tested for future NASA missions. The baseline detector has an aperture of 50×50 mm and requires 160 low-noise charge-sensitive channels, in order to extrapolate the incoming photon position with a spatial resolution of about 20 μm FWHM. Technologies involving space flight require highly integrated electronic systems operating at very low power. We have designed two ASICs which enable the construction of such readout system. First, a charge sensitive amplifier (CSAv3) ASIC provides an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of around 600 e-, and a baseline gain of 10 mV/fC. The second, a Giga Sample per Second (GSPS) ASIC, called HalfGRAPH, is a 12-bit analog to digital converter. Its architecture is based on waveform sampling capacitor arrays and has about 8 μs of analog storage memory per channel. Both chips encapsulate 16 measurement channels. Using these chips, a small scale prototype readout system has been constructed on a FPGA Mezzanine Board (FMC), equipped with 32 measurement channels for system evaluation. We describe the construction of HalfGRAPH ASIC, detector's readout system concept and obtained results from the prototype system. As part of the space flight qualification, these chips were irradiated with a Cobalt gamma-ray source, to verify functional operation under ionizing radiation exposure.

  12. Measurement of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rate from soil samples of Kumaun Hills, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Poonam; Singh, Kuldeep; Agarwal, T. K.; Joshi, Manish; Pant, Preeti; Kandari, Tushar; Ramola, R. C.

    2018-03-01

    The source terms, i.e., exhalation and emanation from soil and building materials are the primary contributors to the radon (222Rn)/thoron (220Rn) concentration levels in the dwellings, while the ecological constraints like ventilation rate, temperature, pressure, humidity, etc., are the influencing factors. The present study is focused on Almora District of Kumaun, located in Himalayan belt of Uttarakhand, India. For the measurement of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates, 24 soil samples were collected from different locations. Gamma radiation level was measured at each of these locations. Chamber technique associated with Smart Rn Duo portable monitor was employed for the estimation of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates. Radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) concentrations were also measured in soil samples using NaI(Tl) scintillation based gamma ray spectrometry. The mass exhalation rate for 222Rn was varying between 16 and 54 mBq/kg/h, while the 220Rn surface exhalation rate was in the range of 0.65-6.43 Bq/m2/s. Measured gamma dose rate for the same region varied from 0.10 to 0.31 µSv/h. Inter-correlation of exhalation rates and intra-correlation with background gamma levels were studied.

  13. High-spin yrast isomers in 211Rn and 212Rn with enhanced E3 decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Fabricius, B.

    1990-01-01

    New isomeric states with J π =69/2 + ,τ m = 13 (1) ns in 211 Rn and J π =33 - ,τ m = 7(1) ns in 212 Rn have been identified. They decay by enchanced E3 transitions with strengths of 33(3) and 43(6) single particle units to the known 63/2 - and 30 + isomers 211 Rn and 212 Rn, respectively. The excitation energies and transition strengths agree well with predictions of the multi-particle, octupole-vibration coupled model. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  14. Intercomparison of Rn-222 determination from groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterbacka, P.; Pettersson, H.; Hanste, U.-M.

    2010-01-01

    An intercomparison exercise on Rn-222 determination in groundwater was organized between eight Nordic laboratories. The individual laboratory results were in most cases within 20% of the median value and within reported uncertainties. Considering the particular difficulties in preparing, transpor......An intercomparison exercise on Rn-222 determination in groundwater was organized between eight Nordic laboratories. The individual laboratory results were in most cases within 20% of the median value and within reported uncertainties. Considering the particular difficulties in preparing...

  15. Operation of a high-purity silicon diode alpha particle detector at 1. 4 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martoff, C.J.; Kaczanowicz, E. (Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Neuhauser, B.J.; Lopez, E.; Zhang, Y. (San Francisco State Univ., CA (USA)); Ziemba, F.P. (Quantrad Corp. (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Detection of alpha particles at temperatures as low as 1.4 K was demonstrated using a specially fabricated Si diode. The diode was 475 mm{sup 2} by 0.280 mm thick, fabricated from high-purity silicon with degenerately doped contacts. This is an important step toward development of dual-mode (ionization plus phonon) silicon detectors for low energy radiation. (orig.).

  16. Absolute calibration of TFTR neutron detectors for D-T plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1995-03-01

    The two most sensitive TFTR fission-chamber detectors were absolutely calibrated in situ by a D-T neutron generator (∼5 x 10 7 n/s) rotated once around the torus in each direction, with data taken at about 45 positions. The combined uncertainty for determining fusion neutron rates, including the uncertainty in the total neutron generator output (±9%), counting statistics, the effect of coil coolant, detector stability, cross-calibration to the current mode or log Campbell mode and to other fission chambers, and plasma position variation, is about ±13%. The NE-451 (ZnS) scintillators and 4 He proportional counters that view the plasma in up to 10 collimated sightlines were calibrated by scanning. the neutron generator radially and toroidally in the horizontal midplane across the flight tubes of 7 cm diameter. Spatial integration of the detector responses using the calibrated signal per unit chord-integrated neutron emission gives the global neutron source strength with an overall uncertainty of ±14% for the scintillators and ±15% for the 4 He counters

  17. Background reduction at low energies with BEGe detector operated in liquid argon using the GERDA-LArGe facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjas, Dusan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    LArGe is a low background test facility used for proving innovative approaches to background reduction in support of the neutrinoless double beta decay experiment Gerda. These approaches include an anti-Compton veto using scintillation light detection from liquid argon, as well as a novel pulse shape discrimination method exploiting the characteristic electrical field distribution inside BEGe detectors. The latter technique can identify single-site events (typical for double beta decays) and efficiently reject multi-site events (typical for backgrounds from gamma-ray interactions), as well as different types of background events from detector surfaces. While the main focus of the LArGe facility is to assist with reaching the goal of Gerda - improving the sensitivity for {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double beta decay search, reducing the background at low energies and lowering the energy threshold is also of interest. In particular such efforts can be potentially relevant for search of dark matter or low energy neutrino interactions. In this talk I present the experimental measurement of the low energy region with a BEGe detector operated in LArGe with the application of powerful background suppression methods. The performance will be compared to that of some dedicated dark matter detection experiments.

  18. ATLAS Strip Detector: Operational Experience and Run1-> Run2 Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, Koichi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Large hadron collider was operated very successfully during the Run1 and provided a lot of opportunities of physics studies. It currently has a consolidation work toward to the operation at $\\sqrt{s}=14 \\mathrm{TeV}$ in Run2. The ATLAS experiment has achieved excellent performance in Run1 operation, delivering remarkable physics results. The SemiConductor Tracker contributed to the precise measurement of momentum of charged particles. This paper describes the operation experience of the SemiConductor Tracker in Run1 and the preparation toward to the Run2 operation during the LS1.

  19. High-operating temperature MWIR photon detectors based on type II InAs/GaSb superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, Manijeh; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Delaunay, Pierre-Yves; Abdollahi Pour, Siamak; Huang, Edward Kwei-wei; Manukar, Paritosh; Bogdanov, Simeon; Chen, Guanxi

    2010-01-01

    Recent efforts have been paid to elevate the operating temperature of Type II InAs/GaSb superlattice Mid Infrared photon detectors. Optimized growth parameters and interface engineering technique enable high quality material with a quantum efficiency above 50%. Intensive study on device architecture and doping profile has resulted in almost one order of magnitude of improvement to the electrical performance and lifted up the 300K-background BLIP operation temperature to 166K. At 77K, the ~4.2 μm cut-off devices exhibit a differential resistance area product in excess of the measurement system limit (106 Ohm.cm2) and a detectivity of 3x1013cm.Hz1/2/W. High quality focal plane arrays were demonstrated with a noise equivalent temperature of 10mK at 77K. Uncooled camera is capable to capture hot objects such as soldering iron.

  20. Dependence of indoor 222Rn level on building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, M.W.; Ng, C.; Leung, J.K.C.

    1993-01-01

    The radionuclide contents of typical building materials used in Hong Kong were studied by γ spectroscopic analysis. The physical properties of these building materials affecting the production and transportation of 222 Rn to the surrounding air were examined; these include the emanation coefficient of 2 '2 2 Rn of the material, the diffusion coefficient of 222 Rn in the material and the effect of surface coating and temperature on the rate of 222 Rn exhalation. Results obtained in this study explain the indoor 222 Rn concentration observed in our previous surveys and also suggest that the main source of indoor 222 Rn in Hong Kong is building material. (3 figs., 4 tabs.)

  1. Higher operation temperature quadrant photon detectors of 2-11 μm wavelength radiation with large photosensitive areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluczyk, J.; Sosna, A.; Wojnowski, D.; Koźniewski, A.; Romanis, M.; Gawron, W.; Piotrowski, J.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the quadrant photon HgCdTe detectors optimized for 2-11 μm wavelength spectral range and Peltier or no cooling, and photosensitive area of a quad-cell of 1×1 to 4×4 mm. The devices are fabricated as photoconductors or multiple photovoltaic cells connected in series (PVM). The former are characterized by a relatively uniform photosensitive area. The PVM photovoltaic cells are distributed along the wafer surface, comprising a periodical stripe structure with a period of 20 μm. Within each period, there is an insensitive gap/trench spot of size close to the period, but becomes negligible for the optimal spot size comparable to a quadrant-cell area. The photoconductors produce 1/f noise with about 10 kHz knee frequency, due to bias necessary for their operation. The PVM photodiodes are typically operated at 0 V bias, so they generate no 1/f noise and operation from DC is enabled. At 230 K, upper corner frequency of 16 to 100 MHz is obtained for photoconductor and 60 to 80 MHz for PVM, normalized detectivity D* 6×107 cm×Hz1/2/W to >1.4×108 cm×Hz1/2/W for photoconductor and >1.7×108 cm·Hz1/2/W for PVM, allowing for position control of the radiation beam with submicron accuracy at 16 MHz, 10.6 μm wavelength of pulsed radiation spot of 0.8 mm dia at the close-to-maximal input radiation power density in a range of detector linear operation.

  2. Environmental thoron (220Rn): a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, T.V.

    2008-01-01

    Studies on natural background radiation is a topic, which evoked curiosity and concern between the scientist and layman alike in recent years due to the shift in focus of health effects due to exposure of radiation from acute high level to chronic low level. Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222 Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222 Rn in the environment. Subsequently, considerable data is being generated on the levels of 222 Rn in the environment across the worlds and is being periodically reported by UNSCEAR reports. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220 Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scare due to the general perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. This may not be true from the recent studies resulted in observing high 220 Rn levels in living environments and work places in various countries and it is increasingly felt that it may be necessary to have data on 220 Rn levels in environment for obtaining a complete picture of inhalation dose. Globally many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products, like radon ( 222 Rn), and thoron ( 220 Rn) in the environment. Of late, technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material has also contributed to the burden of background radiation. It is estimated inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54 % of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. Due to this it was necessary to supplement the external component with inhalation component. This component is not

  3. Recent Swedish experiences in 222Rn control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.; Maekitalo, A.

    1990-01-01

    Swedish local authorities are responsible for decreasing 222 Rn progeny concentrations in homes in their municipalities. To obtain an overall view of their experiences, concerned national authorities sent a questionnaire in 1986 to local authorities. The results were intended to form one basis for decisions by the government regarding revised statements on financial contributions, limits, etc. The results were also intended to be of use to national authorities in determining limits and recommendations and to local authorities in their field work. One result of the survey was an enhanced interest in the Rn problem among Swedish politicians and the mass media. This increased attention resulted in new plans for continued work to decrease Rn levels indoors during 1987-1989, on both a national and a local level. The experiences of the local authorities show that Rn progeny concentrations decreased to below the design level in 95% of newly built houses investigated. It was also found that Rn progeny concentrations were below the limit for reconstruction in 53% of existing homes that previously had levels exceeding the limit

  4. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koestner, Stefan [CERN (Switzerland)], E-mail: koestner@mpi-halle.mpg.de

    2009-09-11

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  5. Charge collection efficiency recovery in heavily irradiated silicon detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Da Vià, C; Berglund, P; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, Mara; Buontempo, S; Casagrande, L; Chapuy, S; Cindro, V; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; D'Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Dezillie, B; Esposito, A P; Granat, V; Grigoriev, E; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Janos, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Konotov, I; Li, Z; Lourenço, C; Mikuz, M; Niinikoski, T O; Pagano, S; Palmieri, V G; Paul, S; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Ropotar, I; Ruggiero, G; Salmi, J; Seppä, H; Suni, I; Smith, K; Sonderegger, P; Valtonen, M J; Zavrtanik, M

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of high resistivity silicon detectors, previously neutron irradiated up to 2*10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/, was measured at different cryogenic temperatures and different bias voltages. In order to $9 study reverse annealing (RA) effects, a few samples were heated to 80 degrees C and kept at room temperature for several months after irradiation. For comparison other samples (NRA) where kept at -10 C after irradiation. The RA and $9 NRA samples, measured at 250 V forward and reverse bias voltage, present a common temperature threshold at 150 K. Below 120 K the CCE is constant and ranges between 55and 65 0.000000or the RA and NRA sample respectively. Similar CCE $9 was measured for a device processed with low resistivity contacts (OHMIC), opening the prospect for a consistent reduction of the cost of large area particle tracking. (7 refs).

  6. Theoretical determination of spectrum-exposure rate conversion operator of HPGe detector and its application to the measurement of environmental gamma-ray exposure rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ch.M.; Choi, B.I.; Kwak, S.S.; Ji, P.K.; Kim, T.W.; Park, Y.W.; Yoon, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    A conversion operator between spectrum and exposure rate, using a portable HPGe detector for environmental radiation monitoring, was determined theoretically under the assumption of uniform distribution of radiation source on the ground surface. The measurement results were compared with those of a pressurized ionization chamber. The results obtained with the HPGe detector were slightly lower. The method can be easily applied to any gamma ray detector to obtain a spectrum - exposure-rate conversion factor for computing the exposure rate of environmental gamma radiation. (N.T.) 15 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. A Gamma Scanner Using a Ge(Li) Semi-Conductor Detector, with the Possibility of Operation in the Anti-Coincidence Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R S; Blackadder, W H

    1970-04-15

    A fuel element transport flask has been modified as a facility for gamma scanning irradiated fuel elements up to a length of 75 cm. By means of a Ge(Li) semi-conductor detector, satisfactory activity profiles along the specimens have been obtained, permitting the location of individual fuel pellets. An annular plastic detector surrounding the Ge(Li) detector allows operation of the spectrometer in the anti-coincidence mode, and reduction of the Compton continuum by about 50% has been obtained.

  8. A Gamma Scanner Using a Ge(Li) Semi-Conductor Detector, with the Possibility of Operation in the Anti-Coincidence Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, R.S.; Blackadder, W.H.

    1970-04-01

    A fuel element transport flask has been modified as a facility for gamma scanning irradiated fuel elements up to a length of 75 cm. By means of a Ge(Li) semi-conductor detector, satisfactory activity profiles along the specimens have been obtained, permitting the location of individual fuel pellets. An annular plastic detector surrounding the Ge(Li) detector allows operation of the spectrometer in the anti-coincidence mode, and reduction of the Compton continuum by about 50% has been obtained

  9. Operation of the Electronics for the AMS-02RICH Detector Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, P.; Aguilar, M.; Berdugo, J.; Casaus, J.; Delgado, C.; Diaz, C.; Fernandez, C.; Garcia-Tabares, L.; Lanciotti, E.; Mana, C.; Marin, J.; Martinez, G.; Palomares, C.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla, I.; Torrento, A.; Wilmott, C.; Yanez, J.

    2002-07-01

    The operation and behaviour of the RICH prototype electronics developed for the AMS-02 experiment is presented. It includes results and conclusions obtained from experimental tests data with cosmic rays. (Author)

  10. Dosimetry of Rn-222 in the air in environments located above and below ground level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazula, Camila Dias

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of the general population to ionizing radiation comes mainly from natural sources. The main contribution is due to inhalation of radon (Rn-222), a gas that occurs naturally (UNSCEAR, 2000). The Rn-222 concentration in the environment is controlled by factors such as soil permeability and water content, the weather variability, materials used in the foundation and the usual positive pressure differential between the soil and the internal environment. Studies indicate that the concentration of radon shows a wide variation in the basement, ground floor and upper floors of buildings. The objective of this study is to determine radon levels in basements, ground floor and floors above ground level, at a university in the city of Sao Paulo and in one residential building in the city of Peruibe. Rn-222 measurements were performed using the method with nuclear track of solid state detectors (CR-39). The studied environments present Rn-222 concentration well below the values recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, published in the 2009 document, of 300 Bq/m 3 for homes and 1000 Bq/m 3 for the workplace. In the residential building, the concentration of Ra-266, Th-232 and K-40 in the materials used in the building construction was also analyzed, by gamma spectrometry. The effective total dose for the resident due to external exposure was 0.8 mSv y -1 , lower than the annual dose limit for the general public of 1 mSv y -1 . (author)

  11. Distribution Log Normal of 222 Rn in the state of Zacatecas, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.L.; Mireles, F.; Quirino, L.; Davila, I.; Rios, C.; Pinedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the evaluation of the concentration of 222 Rn in air for Zacatecas is shown. The Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors were used as the technique for the realization of the measurements in large scale with cellulose nitrate LR-115, type 2, in open chambers of 222 Rn. The measurements were carried out during three months in different times of the year. In the results it is presented the log normal distribution, arithmetic mean and geometric media for the concentration at indoor and outdoor of residence constructions, the concentration at indoor of occupational constructions and in the 57 municipal heads of the state of Zacatecas. The statistics of the values in the concentration showed variation according to the time of the year, obtaining high quantities in winter seasons for both cases. The distribution of the concentration of 222 Rn is presented in the state map for each one of the municipalities, representing the measurement places in the entire state of Zacatecas. Finally the places where the values in the concentration of 222 Rn in air are near to the one limit settled down by the EPA of 148 Bq/m 3 are presented. (Author)

  12. Background level of natural radioactivities in a giant water Cherenkov detector and its surrounding environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Sakanoue, Masanobu; Komura, Kazuhisa; Ueno, Kaoru

    1989-01-01

    The KAMIOKANDE-II water Cherenkov detector for the measurement of nucleon decay and/or solar neutrino has been operating in the underground laboratory at a depth of 2,700 m.w.e. (meter water equivalent) in Kamioka mine of Gifu Prefecture. Concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 222 Rn as the major background sources have been measured for various kinds of rocks, mine water, mine air and high purity water used as a detector during the period from August 1986 to December 1987. The concentration levels of these radionuclides and their seasonal variation have become clear. Some of these results have provided useful informations for decreasing the background level of water Cherenkov detector. (author)

  13. Rn 222 in the Black Sea waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzova, A.P.; Batrakov, G.F.; Eremeev, V.N.; Zemlyanoj, A.D.; Ivanova, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Results of Rn 222 concentration measurements in the Black Sea waters obtained in the summer of 1986 during the expedition of the Akademik Vernadskij research ship are presented. It is ascertained that the intensity of vertical turbulent exchange produces the main effect on Rn 222 distribution in the sea surface waters. The vertical distribution in a 200 m layer is characterized by the growth of concentration with depth, which is caused by the presence of Ra 226 increased concentration region, that coincides with the boundary layer between oxygen and hydrogen sulfide

  14. rn Utzon -Influences and Reinterpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The Paper presents a study of Jørn Utzon's architecture, in terms of its response to both local context and transcultural influences. The paper shows Utzon to have been a precursor and direct influence upon subsequent developments within contemporary regional architecture.......The Paper presents a study of Jørn Utzon's architecture, in terms of its response to both local context and transcultural influences. The paper shows Utzon to have been a precursor and direct influence upon subsequent developments within contemporary regional architecture....

  15. Low-power operation of a barometric pressure sensor for use in an automatic fall detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Lu; Changhong Wang; Stevens, Michael C; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2016-08-01

    The use of a barometric pressure sensor in a wearable fall detector has been shown to improve the detection accuracy by determining the altitude change associated with the fall event. However, the barometer is a high-power-consuming sensor. This paper proposes a fall detection approach using a hermetically sealed and waterproof enclosure incorporating a small window covered by a semi-permeable membrane (SPM) to delay the equilibrium of internal and external pressures. This feature can be utilized to limit the time the barometer is powered but still capturing critical pressure information to discriminate fall and non-fall events. The proposed fall detection system is evaluated with an existing data set of simulated fall and activities of daily living in which the barometric pressure data are delayed using a mathematical model of the enclosure and SPM assembly. Also, a benchtop test is performed to estimate the power and battery life. The proposed fall detection system achieves 94.0% sensitivity and 90.0% specificity with an estimated battery life of 995.7 days.

  16. Pyroelectric detectors with integrated operational amplifier for high modulation frequencies; Pyroelektrische Detektoren mit integriertem Operationsverstaerker fuer hohe Modulationsfrequenzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, N.; Saenze, H.; Heinze, M. [InfraTec GmbH Dresden (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    In order to use the advantages of the current mode operation a pyroelectric detector family with integrated transimpedance amplifier (TIA) was developed particularly for modulation frequencies up to the kHz range with a simplified external circuitry for new application fields, e.g. absorption spectroscopy using quantum-cascade-laser. The essential advantages of the TIA arise from the small electrical time constant {tau}{sub E} and the short-circuiting of the pyroelectric element. A flat amplitude response up to some kHz was aimed at for a sufficiently high response of 7500 V/W, appr., also at high modulation frequencies. This can be achieved through a electrical time constant of 1 ms or less and a wide bandwidth of the op amp. The article describes in detail how these demands were accomplished and which compromises had to be accepted. (orig.)

  17. Machine-operated low temperature system for cooling a germanium detector at great depths of the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruederle, F.; Hain, K.; Huebener, J.; Schloss, F.

    1978-07-01

    The report outlines the conceptual design and technical implementation phases of a very reliable low temperature system for long-time cooling of a germanium detector at great depths of the sea. The approach chosen as the solution involves the choise of a proven commercial small-scale refrigeration unit operation by the Gifford-Mc Mahon process, which is modified so as to suit special requirements. Testing for the severe conditions of use is carried out on a jarring table for the critical components and on a rolling test rig for the whole low temperature machine so as to simulate the stresses imposed by ships and high seas. The cooling system designed in this way has demonstrated its full functioning capability in a test conducted at sea. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  18. Detector evaluation for improved situational awareness: Receiver operator characteristic curve based

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    In military and civilian operations good situational awareness is a prerequisite to make proper decisions. The situational awareness is among others based upon intelligence, threat analysis and detection, altogether element of the so-called DIM (detection, identification, monitoring) system. In case

  19. Passive Rn dose meters - measuring methods appropriate for large measurement series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, M.; Kiefer, H.

    1985-01-01

    Passive integrating measuring methods can be classified in several groups by their functioning principle, e.g. spray chambers or open chambers with nuclear trace detectors or TL detectors, open detectors, activated carbon dose meters with or without TL detectors. According to the functioning principle, only radon or radon and fission products can be detected. The lecture gives a survey of the present state of development of passive Rn dose meters. By the example of the Ra dose meter developed at Karlsruhe which was used in inquiry measurements carried out in Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium and Austria, etching technology, estimation of measuring uncertainties, reproducibility and fading behaviour shall be discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Determination of Rn concentration in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shigeru; Handa, Madoka; Okano, Yasuhiro; Saito, Masaaki; Suzuki, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    The method of prediction of earthquakes by the change of concentration of Rn in groundwater was developed by U.S.S.R. and People's Republic of China, and was not known clearly. Since 1975, the research works on this subject were commenced by University of Tokyo, Geological Survey of Agency of Industrial Science and Technology and Tokyo Metropolitan Isotopic Research Center. Along with the development of an automatic continuous measuring apparatus with high reliability, the systems for the measurement of the Rn concentration in groundwater were established. At the time of the earthquake off Izu-Oshima on January 14, 1978, clear precursor was found in an artesian flowing well in Nakaizu 0f Izu Peninsula, and the unusual phenomena which seemed be the precursor of an earthquake were recognized in other districts of Izu and Tokai. On August 8, 1983, an earthquake of magnitude 6 occurred in the boundary region of Yamanashi and Kanagawa Prefectures. Preceding the earthquake, the unusual change of the concentration of Rn was recognized at several observation wells in Tokyo, and the unusual change was observed after the earthquake also. The possibility that the unusual change of the Rn concentration in groundwater is the precursor of earthquakes is high, and this phenomenon is expected to make contribution for the prediction of earthquakes, though there remain many problems to be solved. Further works are scheduled to establish the practical method of predicting earthquakes. (Isimitsu, A.)

  1. Dynamical Symmetry Breaking in RN Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Kotvytskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that in the RN gravitation model, there is no dynamical symmetry breaking effect in the formalism of the Schwinger-Dyson equation (in flat background space-time. A general formula for the second variation of the gravitational action is obtained from the quantum corrections hμν (in arbitrary background metrics.

  2. Vold mod børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Else; Agerlund Sloth Larsen, Dorthe

    er der gennemført en interviewundersøgelse, hvor i alt 14 sagsbehandlere fra fire forskellige store kommuner er interviewet om deres erfaringer fra sager med (mistanke om) fysisk vold mod børn, om hvordan sådanne sager sædvanligvis starter i socialforvaltningen, om undersøgelsesforløbet, om...

  3. The JADE muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-01-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.)

  4. Variations of Rn-222 concentration in the Bratislava air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Bohm, R.; Polaskova, A.

    1996-01-01

    222 Rn is produced by alpha decay of 222 Ra in roil. A small fraction of totally produced 222 Rn escapes from coil particles into soil air. Then 222 Rn is transported predominantly by molecular diffusion into outdoor atmosphere. The radon concentration in the outdoor atmosphere is not stable. It varies irregularly depending on meteorological conditions. However there were found out regular daily and remand variations of 222 Rn concentration in outdoor atmosphere. These variations were measured in numerous works and results are summarized f.e. in work of Gesell. A simple model described the annual variations of 222 Rn concentration war published by Minato. A mathematical analysis of daily course of 222 Rn concentration in outdoor atmosphere was realized by Garzon et al. Some results of our study of 222 Rn variations in outdoor atmosphere of Bratislava are shown in this report. (author)

  5. Measurement of Rn-222 concentrations in building materials used in jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, A M; Abumyrad, K M; Kullab, M K; Albataina, B A [Physics Dept., Yarmouk University, 219-10 Irbid, (Jordan)

    1995-10-01

    In this work, the concentrations of the radiative inert gas Rn-222 emanated from the building materials that are commonly in jordan have been studied. For this purpose, samples of ten jordanian building materials of different masses were prepared in plastic cans sealed to passive integrated dosimeters containing CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors which are very sensitive to alpha-particles. The Rn-222 concentrations in these samples range from 137 Bq/m{sup 3} to 267 Bq/m{sup 3} with an average of 189 Bq/m{sup 3}. These levels were found to be consistent with those measured by other workers in other countries. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of 222Rn levels in homes and offices in two different regions in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Hushari, M.A.; Raja, G.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation of Rn levels was carried out in homes and offices in Damascus and phosphate mining areas near Palmyra city in Syria. The AEOI radon diffusion dosimeters were used in this study. Electrochemical etching of polycarbonate detectors was used to develop the tracks. A standard source of radon was used for calibration. Radon levels were measured in 98 homes of workers in the phosphate mining areas and 29 homes in the Damascus region. The radon diffusion chambers were placed in offices and laboratories of AEC for about four months in average. The results gave an indication of Rn level in Damascus dwellings in spite of the necessity for further comprehensive studies for the city. The radon levels were high in some offices and laboratories where phosphate analyses are carried out or buildings near phosphate storage areas or near surface phosphate rocks occurrence, in comparison with homes. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Intrinsic backgrounds from Rn and Kr in the XENON100 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; Perio, P. de; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Galloway, M.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B.; Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Moraa, K.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Rosso, A.G.; Molinario, A.; Wang, Z. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. von [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Reichard, S. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, IMT Atlantique, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Lombardi, F.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Vargas, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Messina, M. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Pienaar, J. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); University of Chicago, Department of Physics, Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Ramirez Garcia, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Reuter, C. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lavina, L.S. [Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics, Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Weber, M. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Wei, Y. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2018-02-15

    In this paper, we describe the XENON100 data analyses used to assess the target-intrinsic background sources radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn) and krypton ({sup 85}Kr). We detail the event selections of high-energy alpha particles and decay-specific delayed coincidences. We derive distributions of the individual radionuclides inside the detector and quantify their abundances during the main three science runs of the experiment over a period of ∝ 4 years, from January 2010 to January 2014. We compare our results to external measurements of radon emanation and krypton concentrations where we find good agreement. We report an observed reduction in concentrations of radon daughters that we attribute to the plating-out of charged ions on the negatively biased cathode. (orig.)

  8. Intrinsic backgrounds from Rn and Kr in the XENON100 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; Perio, P. de; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y.; Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M.; Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Galloway, M.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wulf, J.; Bauermeister, B.; Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Moraa, K.; Pelssers, B.; Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C.; Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.; Bruno, G.; Rosso, A.G.; Molinario, A.; Wang, Z.; Budnik, R.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N.; Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. von; Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Reichard, S.; Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D.; Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M.; Fei, J.; Lombardi, F.; Ni, K.; Ye, J.; Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Vargas, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C.; Fulgione, W.; Lindemann, S.; Messina, M.; Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P.; Pienaar, J.; Ramirez Garcia, D.; Reuter, C.; Lavina, L.S.; Stein, A.; Wang, H.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Weber, M.; Wei, Y.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the XENON100 data analyses used to assess the target-intrinsic background sources radon ( 222 Rn), thoron ( 220 Rn) and krypton ( 85 Kr). We detail the event selections of high-energy alpha particles and decay-specific delayed coincidences. We derive distributions of the individual radionuclides inside the detector and quantify their abundances during the main three science runs of the experiment over a period of ∝ 4 years, from January 2010 to January 2014. We compare our results to external measurements of radon emanation and krypton concentrations where we find good agreement. We report an observed reduction in concentrations of radon daughters that we attribute to the plating-out of charged ions on the negatively biased cathode. (orig.)

  9. Design and construction of a system for determination of Radon-222 by a surface-barrier detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifacio M, J.; Iturbe, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work the design and construction of a system for the determination of 222 Rn is described, which utilizes silicon surface-barrier detectors. The 222 Rn gas was obtained a source of 226 Ra electrodeposited on stainless-steel discs. The well separated energies with this system makes possible the measurement and identification of alpha particles of 222 Rn, and its daughters 210 Po, 218 Po and 214 Po. (Author) 3 figs, 19 refs

  10. The activity concentrations of 222Rn and corresponding health risk in groundwater samples from basement and sandstone aquifer; the correlation to physicochemical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurabu, Wedad Ali; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Heryansyah, Arien

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the activity concentrations of 222 Rn and to assess the corresponding health risk in groundwater samples obtained in Juban District, Ad Dali’ Governorate, Yemen. The measurements were performed by RAD 7 radon detector manufactured by DURRIDGE COMPANY Inc. The activity concentrations of 222 Rn ranged from 1.0±0.2 Bq l −1 to 896.0±0.8 Bq l −1 . 57% of the groundwater samples were above the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recommended value for Rn in water. Induced coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to determine the concentrations of uranium in groundwater samples. The measured concentration of U ranged from 0.33±0.01 μg l −1 to 24.6±0.6 μg l −1 . The results were comparable to internationally recommended values. The highest concentration of U and 222 Rn were found to be in the basement aquifer, while the lowest concentrations of both radionuclides were in the sandstone aquifer. High concentrations of Rn are found along fault zones. The relationship between the activity concentration of 222 Rn, concentration of U and physicochemical parameters were investigated. The results showed a very strong relationship between activity concentrations of 222 Rn with concentrations of U and the salinity of water. - Highlights: • The highest concentration of U and 222 Rn was found to be in the basement aquifer. • A 57% of the groundwater samples were above the USEPA recommended value. • Mean annual effective dose for ingestion was 24 times the world average. • Mean annual effective dose for inhalation was 23 times the world. • Strong relationship between 222 Rn with concentration of U in the basement aquifer.

  11. Measurements of indoor 222RN activity in dwellings and workplaces of Curitiba (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrêa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Del Claro, Flávia; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Denyak, Valeriy

    2014-01-01

    The present work describes the results of systematic measurements of radon ( 222 Rn) in residential environments and workplaces in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba (Paraná State, Brazil) during the period 2004–2012. For radon in air activity measurements, polycarbonate Track Etch Detectors CR-39, mounted in diffusion chambers protected by borosilicate glass fiber filters, were used. After being exposed in air, the CR-39 detectors were submitted to a chemical etching in a 6.25 M NaOH solution at 70 °C for 14 h. The alpha particle tracks were identified and manually counted with an optical microscope, and with the results of previously performed calibrations, the indoor activity concentration of 222 Rn was calculated. The calibration of CR-39 and the alpha particle tracks chemical development procedures were performed in collaboration the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS, Japan). The major part of indoor 222 Rn concentration in residences was found to be below 100 Bq/m 3 . In the case of working places, all measurements of 222 Rn concentrations were below 100 Bq/m 3 . These values are considered within the limits set by international regulatory agencies, such as the US EPA and ICRP, which adopt up to 148 and 300 Bq/m 3 as upper values for the reference levels for radon gas activity in dwellings, respectively. The latest value of 300 Bq/m 3 for radon activity in air is proposed by ICRP considering the upper value for the individual dose reference level for radon exposure of 10 mSv/yr. - Highlights: • Radon activity in air of dwellings was measured. • Radon activity in air of workplaces was measured. • Obtained experimental results are compared with International Norms and Regulations

  12. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  13. Seasonal and spatial variations in Rn-222 and Rn-220 in soil gas, and implications for indoor radon levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharman, G.

    1992-01-01

    Rn-222 enters dwellings as a component of soil gas drawn from the soil by mass flow driven by the pressure difference between the house and soil beneath. In a site on Northampton Sand Ironstone (Aalenian), a preferred path of emanation (hotspot) was found. A difference of 63 Bq L -1 Rn-222 was recorded in July between this point and another 3 m away. Rn-222 in this hotspot shows 12% less variation annually than the surrounding rock. During winter, Rn-222 values within 1.6 m of the house were 44% lower than those at more than 4 m away. Rn-222 showed a 99.5% negative correlation with wind run, showing that on this soil wind pressure can significantly reduce radon in the soil at 500 mm depth. Rn-220 in soil gas correlated positively at the 99.5% level with grass and air temperatures. Rn-220 was not associated with the hotspot. (Author)

  14. Effects of air conditioning, dehumidification and natural ventilation on indoor concentrations of 222Rn and 220Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Thomas K.C.; Yu, K.N.

    2000-01-01

    A bedroom was selected for detailed measurements on 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental parameters including CO 2 concentration, temperature and relative humidity. To simulate different sealing conditions, five conditions were artificially created in the sampling period of 25 consecutive days. It was concluded that natural ventilation is the most efficient way to lower the 222 Rn levels, while air conditioning is the next. Dehumidification provides only a marginal reduction of 222 Rn levels. The 220 Rn concentrations are not affected by natural ventilation, air conditioner or dehumidification, and were all around 10 Bq m -3 . There are no significant correlations between the 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental conditions such as CO 2 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity and pressure

  15. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user's manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water

  16. Superconducting single-photon detectors designed for operation at 1.55-μm telecommunication wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milostnaya, I; Korneev, A; Rubtsova, I; Seleznev, V; Minaeva, O; Chulkova, G; Okunev, O; Voronov, B; Smirnov, K; Gol'tsman, G; Slysz, W; Wegrzecki, M; Guziewicz, M; Bar, J; Gorska, M; Pearlman, A; Kitaygorsky, J; Cross, A; Sobolewski, Roman

    2006-01-01

    We report on our progress in development of superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs), specifically designed for secure high-speed quantum communications. The SSPDs consist of NbN-based meander nanostructures and operate at liquid helium temperatures. In general, our devices are capable of GHz-rate photon counting in a spectral range from visible light to mid-infrared. The device jitter is 18 ps and dark counts can reach negligibly small levels. The quantum efficiency (QE) of our best SSPDs for visible-light photons approaches a saturation level of ∼30-40%, which is limited by the NbN film absorption. For the infrared range (1.55μm), QE is ∼6% at 4.2 K, but it can be significantly improved by reduction of the operation temperature to the 2-K level, when QE reaches ∼20% for 1.55-μm photons. In order to further enhance the SSPD efficiency at the wavelength of 1.55 μm, we have integrated our detectors with optical cavities, aiming to increase the effective interaction of the photon with the superconducting meander and, therefore, increase the QE. A successful effort was made to fabricate an advanced SSPD structure with an optical microcavity optimized for absorption of 1.55 μm photons. The design consisted of a quarter-wave dielectric layer, combined with a metallic mirror. Early tests performed on relatively low-QE devices integrated with microcavities, showed that the QE value at the resonator maximum (1.55-μm wavelength) was of the factor 3-to-4 higher than that for a nonresonant SSPD. Independently, we have successfully coupled our SSPDs to single-mode optical fibers. The completed receivers, inserted into a liquid-helium transport dewar, reached ∼1% system QE for 1.55 μm photons. The SSPD receivers that are fiber-coupled and, simultaneously, integrated with resonators are expected to be the ultimate photon counters for optical quantum communications

  17. Attached, unattached fraction of progeny concentrations and equilibrium factor for dose assessments from {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Parminder; Saini, Komal; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh [Guru Nanak Dev University, Department of Physics, Amritsar, Punjab (India); Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Mumbai (India)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, measurements of indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn) and their equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) were carried out in 96 dwellings from 22 different villages situated in Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh, India, by using LR-115 type II-based pinhole twin cup dosimeters and deposition-based progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). The annual average indoor {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn concentrations observed in these dwellings were 63.82 and 89.59 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively, while the average EEC (attached + unattached) for {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn was 29.28 and 2.74 Bq/m{sup 3}. For {sup 222}Rn (f{sub Rn}) and {sup 220}Rn (f{sub Tn}), the average values of unattached fraction were 0.11 and 0.09, respectively. The equilibrium factors for radon (F{sub Rn}) and thoron (F{sub Tn}) varied from 0.12 to 0.77 with an average of 0.50, and from 0.01 to 0.34 with an average of 0.05, respectively. The annual inhalation dose due to mouth and nasal breathing was calculated using dose conversion factors and unattached fractions. The indoor annual effective doses for {sup 222}Rn (AEDR) and {sup 220}Rn (AEDT) were found to be 1.92 and 0.83 mSv a{sup -1}, respectively. The values of {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn concentrations and annual effective doses obtained in the present study are within the safe limits as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for indoor dwelling exposure conditions. (orig.)

  18. Selected Issues of Legislation with regard to Operating Pharmacies in the Slovak Republic / Vybrané problémy právnej úpravy prevádzkovania lekární v podmienkach Slovenskej republiky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capandová Petra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Medzi základné práva a slobody, upravené v druhej hlave Ústavy Slovenskej republiky patrí aj právo na ochranu zdravia, bezplatnú zdravotnú starostlivosť na základe zdravotného poistenia, právo na zdravotnícke pomôcky za zákonom stanovených podmienok. Tieto práva sú garantované v ustanovení Čl. 40 Ústavy Slovenskej republiky v rámci ekonomických, sociálnych a kultúrnych práv a vzťahujú sa na každú fyzickú osobu, t. j. na človeka. Keďže sú tieto práva považované za ľudské práva v zmysle medzinárodného práva, sú garantované aj v mnohostranných medzinárodných zmluvách, ktorých signatárom je aj Slovenská republika, ako napríklad Medzinárodný pakt o hospodárskych, sociálnych a kultúrnych právach. Právna úprava prevádzkovania lekární v Slovenskej republike zahŕňa široké spektrum otázok a je pomerne rozsiahla. Snahou zákonodarcu bolo nastaviť také pravidlá, ktoré by stransparentnili a zjednodušili právne prostredie v tomto sektore. V niektorých oblastiach sú pravidlá dané legislatívou Európskej únie a slovenský právny poriadok ich iba prevzal. Najdôležitejším prvokom v tejto sfére, ktorý nie je priamo upravovaný legislatívou EÚ, je poskytovanie lekárenskej starostlivosti a využívanie systému verejného zdravotného poistenia v tejto oblasti. Hlavným cieľom príspevku je poukázať na vybrané problémy, ktoré sa spájajú s postavením prevádzkovateľa lekárne a jeho povinnosťami, ktoré mu vyplývajú zo zákona o liekoch a s ktorými sa musí ako prevádzkovateľ lekárne vysporiadať. Táto oblasť podnikania je pomerne prísne regulovaná a preto je potrebné byť oboznámený s príslušnými právnymi predpismi. Príspevok z právno-teoretického hľadiska rieši viaceré otázky upravené v zákone o liekoch, či vyhláške o správnej lekárenskej praxi.

  19. Detection of intracranial aneurysms using multi-detector row CT 3D-angiography: comparison with operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, You Mie; Lim, Soo Mee; Seo, Eui Kyo; Kim, Yoo Kyung [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    To assess the efficacy of three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) using multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in the evaluation of intracranial aneurysms in patients with non-traumatic acute subarachnoid hemorrhage and to describe those aneurysms which were not found 3D-CTA. 3D-CTA was done in 40 patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage by using a 16-slice MDCT; conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was done in 36 of those patients within 12 hours. The CT and DSA images were reviewed by two radiologists and the site, size and neck of the aneurysms were evaluated. The results from these two modalities were then compared with the operative findings. We calculated the detection rates by 3D-CTA and DSA and evaluated the size differences of aneurysms diagnosed with 3D-DTA and those found at surgery. We also analyzed the locations and sizes of aneurysms missed by 3D-CTA and attempted to explain these false negatives. A total of 55 aneurysms were surgically confirmed in 40 patients. 48 of these were detected pre-operatively by 3D-CTA. Thus, the detection rate by 3D-CTA was 87%. The size difference of aneurysms as calculated by 3-D CTA and found operatively was as follows: less than 1 mm in 17 cases, within 1-2 mm in 15 cases, and more than 2 mm in 16 cases. Seven aneurysms were not detected by 3D-CTA. The major cause of these missed aneurysms was their small size. The undetected aneurysms were less than 2 mm in size, except for 2 instances of PCoA aneurysms. One case was not detected due to difficult image evaluation. A possible explanation of the one remaining missed aneurysms was the filling of the aneurismal sac by thrombosis. Though there were some limitations in the detection of aneurysms, 3D-CTA using 16-channel MDCT may provide sufficient pre-operative information for the management of patients with intracranial aneurysms in cases of emergency operations or DSA-failure.

  20. Detection of intracranial aneurysms using multi-detector row CT 3D-angiography: comparison with operative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, You Mie; Lim, Soo Mee; Seo, Eui Kyo; Kim, Yoo Kyung

    2006-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) using multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in the evaluation of intracranial aneurysms in patients with non-traumatic acute subarachnoid hemorrhage and to describe those aneurysms which were not found 3D-CTA. 3D-CTA was done in 40 patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage by using a 16-slice MDCT; conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was done in 36 of those patients within 12 hours. The CT and DSA images were reviewed by two radiologists and the site, size and neck of the aneurysms were evaluated. The results from these two modalities were then compared with the operative findings. We calculated the detection rates by 3D-CTA and DSA and evaluated the size differences of aneurysms diagnosed with 3D-DTA and those found at surgery. We also analyzed the locations and sizes of aneurysms missed by 3D-CTA and attempted to explain these false negatives. A total of 55 aneurysms were surgically confirmed in 40 patients. 48 of these were detected pre-operatively by 3D-CTA. Thus, the detection rate by 3D-CTA was 87%. The size difference of aneurysms as calculated by 3-D CTA and found operatively was as follows: less than 1 mm in 17 cases, within 1-2 mm in 15 cases, and more than 2 mm in 16 cases. Seven aneurysms were not detected by 3D-CTA. The major cause of these missed aneurysms was their small size. The undetected aneurysms were less than 2 mm in size, except for 2 instances of PCoA aneurysms. One case was not detected due to difficult image evaluation. A possible explanation of the one remaining missed aneurysms was the filling of the aneurismal sac by thrombosis. Though there were some limitations in the detection of aneurysms, 3D-CTA using 16-channel MDCT may provide sufficient pre-operative information for the management of patients with intracranial aneurysms in cases of emergency operations or DSA-failure

  1. Configurations and level structure of 219Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, R.K.; Liang, C.F.; Paris, P.

    1998-01-01

    The level structure of 219 Rn has been studied using the alpha decay of 223 Ra and coincident gamma rays. While only modest changes are required in the level structure, and only above 342.8 keV, severe changes are required throughout the level scheme in the spin assigments. These changes allow the assignment of two sets of anomalous bands with K=5/2 ± and K=3/2 ± . The K=5/2 ± bands have configurations intermediate between the reflection asymmetric configuration and the g 9/2 shell model configuration, while the K=3/2 ± bands have configurations intermediate between the mixed reflection asymmetric configuration and the i 11/2 shell model configuration. Comparison of the systematics of 219 Rn with neighboring isotones, isobars, and isotopes shows clearly the collapse of the quadrupole-octupole-type configurations into the less degenerate shell model configurations. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  2. Background level of natural radioactivities in a giant water Cherenkov detector and its surrounding environment; KAMIOKANDE-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Sakanoue, Masanobu; Komura, Kazuhisa; Ueno, Kaoru [Kanazawa Univ., Tatsunokuchi, Ishikawa (Japan). Low Level Radioactivity Lab.

    1989-12-01

    The KAMIOKANDE-II water Cherenkov detector for the measurement of nucleon decay and/or solar neutrino has been operating in the underground laboratory at a depth of 2,700 m.w.e. (meter water equivalent) in Kamioka mine of Gifu Prefecture. Concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn as the major background sources have been measured for various kinds of rocks, mine water, mine air and high purity water used as a detector during the period from August 1986 to December 1987. The concentration levels of these radionuclides and their seasonal variation have become clear. Some of these results have provided useful informations for decreasing the background level of water Cherenkov detector. (author).

  3. Martin Pärn Kunstihoone salongis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    15. 03 Martin Pärna mööbligrupi "Martin" presentatsioon. 1998. a. pälvis M. Pärn Euroopa disainipreemia Best in the Best Rote Punkt, mida jagab Design Zentrum Nordrhein Westfalen. 1999. a. parim on M. Pärna Martela OY-le projekteeritud klapplaud. Aasta Design Team - Philipsi disaini meeskond. Äramärgitud tooted on näitusel Nordrhein Westfaleni Design Zentrumis

  4. Resolution, efficiency and stability of HPGe detector operating in a magnetic field at various gamma-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanska, K.; Achenbach, P.; Agnello, M.; Botta, E.; Bracco, A.; Bressani, T.; Camera, F.; Cederwall, B.; Feliciello, A.; Ferro, F.; Gerl, J.; Iazzi, F.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Saito, T.R.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Tegner, P.-E.; Wieland, O.

    2008-01-01

    The use of High Purity Germanium detectors (HPGe) has been planned in some future experiments of hadronic physics. The crystals will be located close to large spectrometers where the magnetic fringing field will not be negligible and their performances might change. Moreover high precision is required in these experiments. The contribution of magnetic field presence and long term measurements is unique. In this paper the results of systematic measurements of the resolution, stability and efficiency of a crystal operating inside a magnetic field of 0.8 T, using radioactive sources in the energy range from 0.08 to 1.33 MeV, are reported. The measurements have been repeated during several months in order to test if any permanent damage occurred. The resolution at 1.117 and 1.332 MeV gamma-rays from a 60 Co source has been measured at different magnetic fields in the range of 0-0.8 T and the results are compared with the previous data

  5. Development and operation of a 6LiF:ZnS(Ag)-scintillating plastic capture-gated detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the design, construction, and operation of a capture-gated neutron detector based on a heterogeneous scintillating structure comprising two scintillator types. A flat, 500 μm thick sheet composed of a mixture of lithium-6-fluoride capture agent, 6LiF, and zinc sulfide phosphor, ZnS(Ag), is wrapped around scintillating polyvinyl toluene (PVT) in a form of cylinder. The 6LiF: ZnS(Ag) sheet uses an aluminum foil backing as a support for the scintillating material and as an optical reflector, and its optical properties have been characterized independently. The composite scintillator was tested using 252Cf, DD fusion, 137Cs, and 60Co sources. The intrinsic detection efficiency for neutrons from an unmoderated 252Cf source and rejection of gammas from 137Cs were measured to be 3.6 % and 10-6, respectively. A figure of merit for pulse shape discrimination of 4.6 was achieved, and capture-gated spectroscopic analysis is demonstrated.

  6. RN students need to tell their stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecke, J; Flatt, M M

    1993-04-01

    Finally, what is it about RN students' experiences in the transition process in nursing education that makes their stories need to be told? Actually this question is asked from both the side of the RN students who are the learners and need to tell the stories, and the side of the educator/advisor who needs to have the stories told. In short, the answer to both is that these stories reveal very graphically and meaningfully what is happening in the learning and professional development processes and, simultaneously, they facilitate the progression of those processes. The RN students seem to have an innate sense about what telling their stories will do for them in relation to their learning and professional development processes. They require very little encouragement to prompt their story telling. For the educators/advisors, no other strategy is as adaptable and achieves as much in relation to facilitating the learning and development processes. For both parties, the graphic revelations in stories paint a picture of how past, present, and future blend together to form a meaningful, coherent view of a position in the world. According to Antonovsky's (1979) work on stress and coping, such a view is necessary if stress is to be resisted and health maintained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  7. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  8. Recent advances with a hybrid micro-pattern gas detector operated in low pressure H2 and He, for AT-TPC applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortesi Marco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of a possible application as a charge-particle track readout for an Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC, the operational properties and performances of a hybrid Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD were investigated in pure low-pressure Hydrogen (H2 and Helium (He. The detector consists of a MICROMEsh GAseous Structure (MICROMEGAS coupled to a two-cascade THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM as a pre-amplification stage. This study reports the effective gain dependence of the hybrid-MPGD at relevant pressure (in the range of 200-760 torr for different detector arrangements. The results of this work are relevant in the field of avalanche mechanism in low-pressure, low-mass noble gases, in particularly for applications of MPGD end-cap readout for active-target Time Projection Chambers (TPC in the field of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics.

  9. Relations between bilinear multipliers on Rn,Tn Rn,Tn Rn,Tn and Zn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since then the study of bilinear multiplier operators which commute with simultaneous translations have attracted a great deal of ... Unlike in the linear case, the boundedness of the symbol ψC is not known. In this article we will be dealing with .... For the converse, let ψ ∈ M p3 p1,p2 (Z). For f, g ∈ C∞ c (R), we have.

  10. Assessment of 222Rn occupational exposure at IPEN nuclear materials storage site, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caccuri, Lilian Saueia

    2007-01-01

    In this study it was assessed the occupational exposure to 222 Rn at IPEN, SP, Brazil, nuclear materials storage site through the committed effective dose received by workers exposed to this radionuclide. The radiation dose was calculated through the radon concentrations at nuclear materials storage site. Radon concentrations were determined by passive detection method with solid state nuclear detectors (SSNTD). The SSNTD used in this study was the polycarbonate Makrofol E; each detector is a small square plastic of 1 cm 2 , placed into a diffusion chamber type KFK. It was monitored 14 points at nuclear materials storage site and one external point, over a period of 21 months, changing the detectors every three months, from December 2004 to September 2006. The 222 Rn concentrations varied from 196 ± 9 and 2048 ± 81 Bq·m -3 . The committed effective dose due to radon inhalation at IPEN nuclear materials storage site was obtained from radon activity incorporated and dose conversion factor, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection procedures. The effective committed dose received by workers is below 20 mSv·y -1 . This value is suggested as an annual effective dose limit for occupational exposure by ICRP 60. (author)

  11. On the 221 Rn → 221 Fr decay scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, K.Ya.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Samatov, Zh.K.; Fominykh, V.I.; Chumin, V.G.; Kudrya, S.A.; Sergienko, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigating the 221 Rnβ - - decay and the 225 Ac α-decay are compared. It is shown that 221 Fr levels at 145.9 and 393.2 keV are excited at the 221 Rn decay. Intensities and reduced probabilities of the β - - decay to the 221 Fr levels are determined. A conclusion is drawn that the parity of the 221 Rn ground state is positive

  12. Blinde børn - integration eller isolation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Steen; Cayuelas Mateu, Nuria; Høst, Anders

    Blinde børn har i de senere årtier været integreret i den almindelige skole. Men betyder det, at de bliver bedre forberedt til et integreret liv som voksne? Det er langt fra sikkert, viser denne undersøgelse af blinde børn. Skolen sørger for, at de blinde børn har en støttelærer, så de får det he...

  13. Rn-222 concentrations in private well water and in river water around Ningyo Toge area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunoki, Eiji [Okayama, Prefectural Inst. for Environmental Science and Public Health (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    The Ningyo-Toge Works of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation have started the pilot plant for uranium refining and conversion in 1984 and thereafter been producing 6-uranium fluoride, which is a raw material for an uranium concentration plant. The operation of prototype reactor has started since 1989. In this study, radioactive contamination around the works under these circumstances has been monitored in the respects of Rn concentrations in well water and river one for more than 10 years. The radioactivities of well water sampled at 4 points in this area were in a range of 0.6-82.9 Bq/l. The differences in the activities seemed to be depending on petrological properties. For the river water, the Rn concentration was determined at 13 points in the area. Seasonal changes in the Rn concentrations were not significant (p<0.05) but there were significant changes among years during 1985-1995. Further, the radioactive levels of soils collected from riverbed at 5 points were significantly different both for {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra, but the ratios of {sup 238}U/{sup 226}Ra were consistent. Furthermore, there was no correlation between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the river water. (M.N.)

  14. Evolution of 222 Rn and chemical species related with eruptive processes of the Popocatepetl volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranda, P.; Ceballos, S.; Cruz, D.; Hernandez, A.; Lopez, R.; Pena, P.; Salazar, S.; Segovia, N.; Tamez, E.

    1997-01-01

    The 222 Rn monitoring in the Popocatepetl volcano was initiated on 1993. At December 21, 1994 it is initiated an eruptive stage in the volcano with gas emission, ashes and the lava dome formation on the crater at middle 1996. During all this time it has been determined radon concentrations on soils with active and passive detectors. In this work the changes in radon contents are reported also the physicochemical parameters in spring water related with the volcanic building associated to the recent activity of the volcano. (Author)

  15. Effect of crystal shape, size and reflector type on operation characteristics of gamma-radiation detectors based on CsI(Tl) and CsI(Na) scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Globus, M.E.; Grinyov, B.V.; Ratner, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Operation characteristics of CsI(Tl) and CsI(Na) scintillation detectors, to a large degree connected with light collection in crystals, are calculated for various shapes, sizes and reflecting surface types. Allowance is made for the true light reflection indicatrix which is characterized by the effective mirror constituent of the reflected light, p. Its value , averaged over incidence angle, is used for the classification of reflecting surfaces. Operation characteristics (in particular, spectrometric ones) are found to be essentially dependent on . Tables of operation characteristics, given below, permit one to make inferential conclusions on an optimal combination of the shape, sizes an the reflecting surface version

  16. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting.

  17. The GENIUS-test-facility--first results on background from {sup 222}Rn daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V. E-mail: H.Klapdor@mpi-hd.mpg.dehttp://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de.non_acc; Tomei, C.; Krivosheina, I.V.; Chkvorets, O

    2004-09-11

    GENIUS-TF (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 511 (2003) 341; Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 481 (2002) 149.) is a test-facility for the GENIUS project (GENIUS-Proposal, 20 November 1997; Z. Phys. A 359 (1997) 351; CERN Courier, November 1997, 16; J. Phys. G 24 (1998) 483; Z. Phys. A 359 (1997) 361; in: H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. Pas. (Eds.), First International Conference on Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model, Castle Ringberg, Germany, 8-14 June 1997, IOP Bristol (1998) 485 and in Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 13 (1998) 3953; in: H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, I.V. Krivosheina (Eds.), Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model BEYOND' 99, Castle Ringberg, Germany 6-12 June 1999, IOP Bristol (2000) 915), a proposed large scale underground observatory for rare events which is based on operation of naked germanium detectors in liquid nitrogen for an extreme background reduction. Operation of naked Ge crystals in liquid nitrogen has been applied routinely already for more than 20 years by the CANBERRA Company for technical functions tests (CANBERRA Company, private communication, 5 March 2004.), but it never had found entrance into basic research. Only in 1997 first tests of application of this method for nuclear spectroscopy have been performed, successfully, in Heidelberg (Klapdor-Kleingrothaus et al., 1997, 1998; J. Hellmig and H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, 1997). On May 5, 2003 the first four naked high-purity germanium detectors (total mass 10.52 kg) were installed in liquid nitrogen in the GENIUS Test Facility at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. Since then the experiment has been running continuously, testing for the first time the novel technique in an underground laboratory and for a long-lasting period. In this work, we present the first analysis of the GENIUS-TF background after the completion of the external shielding, which took place in December 2003. We focus especially on the background coming from {sup 222

  18. The GENIUS-test-facility--first results on background from 222Rn daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.; Tomei, C.; Krivosheina, I.V.; Chkvorets, O.

    2004-01-01

    GENIUS-TF (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 511 (2003) 341; Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 481 (2002) 149.) is a test-facility for the GENIUS project (GENIUS-Proposal, 20 November 1997; Z. Phys. A 359 (1997) 351; CERN Courier, November 1997, 16; J. Phys. G 24 (1998) 483; Z. Phys. A 359 (1997) 361; in: H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. Pas. (Eds.), First International Conference on Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model, Castle Ringberg, Germany, 8-14 June 1997, IOP Bristol (1998) 485 and in Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 13 (1998) 3953; in: H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, I.V. Krivosheina (Eds.), Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model BEYOND' 99, Castle Ringberg, Germany 6-12 June 1999, IOP Bristol (2000) 915), a proposed large scale underground observatory for rare events which is based on operation of naked germanium detectors in liquid nitrogen for an extreme background reduction. Operation of naked Ge crystals in liquid nitrogen has been applied routinely already for more than 20 years by the CANBERRA Company for technical functions tests (CANBERRA Company, private communication, 5 March 2004.), but it never had found entrance into basic research. Only in 1997 first tests of application of this method for nuclear spectroscopy have been performed, successfully, in Heidelberg (Klapdor-Kleingrothaus et al., 1997, 1998; J. Hellmig and H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, 1997). On May 5, 2003 the first four naked high-purity germanium detectors (total mass 10.52 kg) were installed in liquid nitrogen in the GENIUS Test Facility at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. Since then the experiment has been running continuously, testing for the first time the novel technique in an underground laboratory and for a long-lasting period. In this work, we present the first analysis of the GENIUS-TF background after the completion of the external shielding, which took place in December 2003. We focus especially on the background coming from 222 Rn

  19. Economical stabilized scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshakov, O.M.; Chudakov, V.A.; Gurinovich, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    An economical scintillation detector with the stabilization system of an integral type is described. Power consumed by the photomultiplier high-voltage power source is 40 mW, energy resolution is not worse than 9%. The given detector is used in a reference detector of a digital radioisotope densimeter for light media which is successfully operating for several years

  20. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M; Kumasaka, T; Sato, K; Toyokawa, H; Aries, I F; Jerram, P A; Ueki, T

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance.

  1. An assessment method of dose equivalent due to indoor 220Rn progeny by using 220Rn concentration measured at a 20 cm distance from wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, T.; Ikebe, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Guo, Q.; Yamasaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    A pair of passive cup monitors with a different air exchange openings was developed for measuring simultaneously 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations. Indoor 220 Rn concentrations were very high in traditional Japanese dwellings with soil walls. The 220 Rn concentration decreases exponentially with the distance from wall. The effective diffusion coefficient of 220 Rn in dwelling and the exhalation rate of 220 Rn from wall were evaluated from the distribution of the 220 Rn concentrations. Then, indoor 220 Rn progeny concentration could be estimated from the 220 Rn concentration at a 20 cm distance from wall. From the results of the surveys. the average annual effective dose equivalent due to 220 Rn progeny was expected to be 0.67 mSv/year in the traditional Japanese dwellings. (author)

  2. rnävaaran koiraurheilukeskuksen markkinatutkimus

    OpenAIRE

    Primetta, Jaana

    2017-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön aiheena oli Pärnävaaran koiraurheilukeskuksen markkinatutkimus, jonka tavoitteena oli saada tietoa pohjoiskarjalaisten koiraharrastajien aktiivisuudesta ja kiinnostuksesta käyttää maakunnan alueella sijaitsevia koiraharrastushalleja. Lisäksi haluttiin selvittää, mitkä tekijät vaikuttavat harrastajien päätöksiin harrastustilaa valittaessa ja mitä toiveita ja odotuksia harrastajilla on koiraharrastushalleja kohtaan. Opinnäytetyössä toteutettiin kaksi erillistä kvantitati...

  3. Determination of the characteristic limits and responses of nuclear track detectors in mixed radon and thoron atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Röttger, Annette; Honig, Anja; Schrammel, Dieter; Strauss, Heinrich F.

    2016-01-01

    Closed nuclear track detectors are widely used for the determination of Rn-222 exposures. There are also partial open systems available, which are specially designed for the determination of the exposure to Rn-220, which is a relevant exposure in special workplaces or in specific regions of the world. This paper presents data and a detail analysis of how to determine the cross-correlation by calibration in pure Rn-222 and pure Rn-220 atm. By these means calibration coefficients for the analysis of real mixed atmospheres can be obtained. The respective decision threshold, detection limit and limits of the confidence interval were determined according to ISO 11929 (ISO 11929:2010, 2010). The exposure of detectors was performed at the radon reference chamber and the thoron progeny chamber of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The analysis of track response was done at Parc RGM, while the analytical routines were developed in the Leibniz University Hanover, Institute Radioökologie und Strahlenschutz IRS at the working Group AK SIGMA (Arbeitskreis Nachweisgrenzen). - Highlights: • Analysis of exposure in reference atmospheres according ISO 11929. • Calibration of nuclear track detectors for 222 Rn and 220 Rn. • Calculation of cross-correlation by calibration in pure 222 Rn and 220 Rn atmospheres. • Thoron activity concentration should not be omitted in radon exposure determinations.

  4. Radon detectors for continuous environmental monitoring applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisoutham, O.; Werczynski, S.; Chambers, S.; Zahorowski, W.

    2003-01-01

    The two-filter method is presently the best technique available for real-time low-level counting of atmospheric 222 Rn. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has developed and deployed a range of dual flow loop, two-filter radon detectors around the world for various applications. The detectors have a response time of 45 minutes, and can be custom built for specific purposes. The largest detectors have a lower limit of detection of ∼10 mBq m -3

  5. Assessing the risks of Rn exposure: the influence of cigarette smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginevan, M.E.; Mills, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The principal hazard associated with exposure to Rn progeny is lung cancer. However, most lung cancer is caused by smoking, which raises a dual problem of deriving Rn-progeny cancer risk estimates from miner populations who, in large part, are smokers and applying these estimates to the general population whose lung cancer risk, in large part, is determined by smoking habits. We examine current risk estimates for Rn-progeny-induced lung cancer using a cohort life table methodology. Estimates of lifetime probability of dying of lung cancer, average loss in life expectancy due to premature lung cancer death, and loss in life expectancy per premature lung cancer death are calculated for the general population for 1969 and 1978, nonsmokers, and smokers. These calculations demonstrate that such risk estimates are affected by smoking, and by trends in smoking habits, in several ways. Major smoking-related factors in this interaction are the proportion of smokers in the mining population used to derive lung cancer risk estimates, the proportion of smokers in the ''general'' population, and the assumed interaction (additive or multiplicative) between lung cancer risk, Rn-progeny exposure, and smoking history. At this time the data are not sufficient to recommend one particular modeling approach. However, our evaluation demonstrates that broad statements about Rn-progeny lung cancer risk such as x cancers/10(6) person working level month, while informative, are incomplete without further specification. Any risk assessment must clearly state the population assumed to be at risk and the risk model assumed to be operating. Finally, the caveats appropriate to these assumptions should also be enunciated

  6. Extremal RN/CFT in both hands revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, En-Jui; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study RN/CFT correspondence for four dimensional extremal Reissner–Nordstrom black hole. We uplift the 4d RN black hole to a 5d rotating black hole and make a geometric regularization of the 5d space–time. Both hands central charges are obtained correctly at the same time by Brown–Henneaux technique.

  7. Factors affecting radon removal from Rn-222 enriched water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Mamoon, A.

    1994-01-01

    Continued use of potable well water that has elevated levels of Rn-222 is harmful to human health. activated carbon, aeration and heating can remove radon from treated water. Water artificially enriched with Rn-222 using a pitchblende source was studied in a laboratory scale model under controlled conditions. (author), 3 figs., 3 refs

  8. Design and operation of a 2-D thin-film semiconductor neutron detector array for use as a beamport monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, Troy C.; Bellinger, Steven L.; Huddleston, David E.; McNeil, Walter J.; Patterson, Eric; Sobering, Tim J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon-based diodes coated with a thin film of neutron reactive materials have been shown to produce excellent low-efficiency neutron detectors. This work employs the same technology, but groups 25 equally sized and spaced diodes on a single 29 mm by 29 mm substrate. A 5x5 array was fabricated and coated with a thin film of 6 LiF for use as a low-efficiency neutron beam monitor. The 5x5 neutron detector array is coupled to an array of amplifiers, allowing the response to be interpreted using a LabVIEW FPGA. The 5x5 array has been characterized in a diffracted neutron beam. This work is a part of on-going research to develop various designs of high- and low-efficiency semiconductor neutron detectors.

  9. A long range transport model of Rn-222

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Shimo, M.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we propose an analytical treatment about temporal variation of 222 Rn concentration in the atmosphere with an aim to clarify origin and transport of 222 Rn. Based on the results of numerical simulation of radon, we separate the 222 Re concentration measured at Nagoya into the following two components : (1) 222 Rn atom originated near from the measuring site, which is denoted by 'diurnal variation component'. From numerical simulation of radon, it has been shown that the measured diurnal variation can be explained by this component. (2) 222 Rn atoms originated far from the measuring site (including Chinese Continent), which is denoted by 'background component'. For this component, we propose here a one layer transport model using air mass trajectory technique. By this model we can explain the temporal variation of background component and seasonal variation of 222 Rn at Nagoya. (3 figs.)

  10. Transforming RN education: clinical learning and clinical knowledge development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, P

    1993-04-01

    Transforming RN education has the potential for transforming clinical teaching and learning for all students. The returning RN student offers possibilities for clinical learning that the generic student does not have, but this should not cause us to limit the returning RN student to the generic level. Where possible innovative programs should be developed to move the RN student from baccalaureate level to the Master's level. As educators, we should take the opportunity to increase the numbers of nurses who are educationally prepared to move into advanced levels of practice. The returning RN student offers a rich human resource for the profession, and a rich resource for improving our clinical teaching as well as our practice.

  11. Measurement of 222Rn in soil concentrations in interstitial air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duenas, C.; Fernandez, M.C.; Carretero, J.; Liger, E.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of 222 Rn soil concentrations were made by inserting stainless-steel sampling tubes into the soil. The samples of the soil interstitial air were taken in to pre-evacuated 1 L glass flasks. The glass flasks are cylindrical and coated with a film of ZnS(Ag). 222 Rn was measured by counting the alpha particles emitted by 222 Rn and its daughter products, 218 Po and 214 Bi, when they reached radioactive equilibrium. Measurements of 222 Rn gas concentrations in the soil air interstices by the method at different depths were used to calculate the diffusion coefficient of the 222 Rn in the soil air. This study has been carried out for diverse soils. (Author)

  12. Operational comparison of TLD albedo dosemeters and etched-track detectors in the PuO2-UO2 mixed oxide fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, N.; Takada, C.; Yoshida, T.; Momose, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The authors carried out an operational study that compared the use of TLD albedo dosemeters with etched-track detector in plutonium environments of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works. A selected group of workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX (PuO 2 -UO 2 mixed oxide) fuel wore both TLD albedo dosemeters and etched-track detectors over a period from 1991 to 1993. The TLD albedo dosemeter is the Panasonic model UD-809P and the etched-track detector is the NEUTRAK (polyallyl diglycol carbonate + 1mm-t polyethylene radiator) commercially available from Nagase-Landauer Ltd. Both dosemeters were issued and read monthly. It was found that the TL readings were generally proportional to the counted etch-pits, and thus the dose equivalent results obtained from TLD albedo dosemeter agreed with those from etched-track detector within a factor of 1.5. This result indicates that, in the workplaces of the MOX plants, the neutron spectrum remained almost constant in terms of time and space, and the appropriate range of field-specific correction with spectrum variations could be small in albedo dosimetry. In addition, the calibrations of both dosemeters in the workplaces and in a bare and moderated 252 Cf calibration field were performed for quantitative validation for the results from the operational comparison. In the former experiments, locations were selected that were representative of typical neutron measurements according to the prior neutron spectra measurements with the multi-sphere spectrometer. In the latter experiments, the workplace environments were simulated by using a 252 Cf source surrounded with cylindrical steel/PMMA moderators. From both experiments, the relationship between TL readings and counted etch-pits with neutron spectrum variation was determined. As expected, the relationship obtained from the simulated workplace field calibration reproduced that from the operational comparison. (author)

  13. Using {sup 222}Rn as a tracer of geodynamical processes in underground environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladares, D.L. [GEA, Instituto de Matemática Aplicada San Luis (IMASL), Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Ej. de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); Silva, A.A.R. da [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, P.O.Box 66318, 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Serviço Especializado em Engenharia de Segurança e Medicina do Trabalho, Departamento de Saúde, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua da Reitoria, 109, 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lacerda, T. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n" o, Gragoatá, 24210-340, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Anjos, R.M., E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n" o, Gragoatá, 24210-340, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Rizzotto, M.; Velasco, H.; Rosas, J.P. de [GEA, Instituto de Matemática Aplicada San Luis (IMASL), Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Ej. de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); Tognelli, G. [Departamento de Geología, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ej. de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); and others

    2014-01-01

    Radon levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina, were measured and analyzed, with the aim to assess the potential use of this radioactive noble gas as a tracer of geological processes in underground environments. La Carolina gold mine and Los Cóndores tungsten mine are today used as tourism mines. CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used for this purpose. Measurements were performed during both winter and summer seasons. The findings show that in these environments, significant radon concentrations are subject to large seasonal fluctuations, due to the strong dependence on natural ventilation with the outside temperature variations. For both mines, higher concentration values of {sup 222}Rn were observed in summer than in winter; with an extreme ratio of 2.5 times between summer and winter seasons for Los Cóndores mine. The pattern of radon transport inside La Carolina mine revealed, contrary to what was believed, that this mine behaves as a system with two entrances located at different levels. However, this feature can only be observed in the winter season, when there is a marked difference between the inside and outside temperatures of the mine. In the case of Los Cóndores mine, the radon concentration pattern distribution is principally established by air current due to chimney-effect in summer and winter seasons. In both cases, the analyses of radon pattern distribution appear as a good method to trace air currents, and then localize unknown ducts, fissures or secondary tunnels in subterranean environments. - Highlights: • {sup 222}Rn levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina • CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used for this purpose • higher concentration values of {sup 222}Rn were observed in summer than in winter • radon pattern distribution appear as a good method to trace air currents • it localizes unknown ducts, fissures or secondary tunnels in subterranean environments.

  14. Using 222Rn as a tracer of geodynamical processes in underground environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valladares, D.L.; Silva, A.A.R. da; o, Gragoatá, 24210-340, Niterói, RJ (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoatá, 24210-340, Niterói, RJ (Brazil))" >Lacerda, T.; o, Gragoatá, 24210-340, Niterói, RJ (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoatá, 24210-340, Niterói, RJ (Brazil))" >Anjos, R.M.; Rizzotto, M.; Velasco, H.; Rosas, J.P. de; Tognelli, G.

    2014-01-01

    Radon levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina, were measured and analyzed, with the aim to assess the potential use of this radioactive noble gas as a tracer of geological processes in underground environments. La Carolina gold mine and Los Cóndores tungsten mine are today used as tourism mines. CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used for this purpose. Measurements were performed during both winter and summer seasons. The findings show that in these environments, significant radon concentrations are subject to large seasonal fluctuations, due to the strong dependence on natural ventilation with the outside temperature variations. For both mines, higher concentration values of 222 Rn were observed in summer than in winter; with an extreme ratio of 2.5 times between summer and winter seasons for Los Cóndores mine. The pattern of radon transport inside La Carolina mine revealed, contrary to what was believed, that this mine behaves as a system with two entrances located at different levels. However, this feature can only be observed in the winter season, when there is a marked difference between the inside and outside temperatures of the mine. In the case of Los Cóndores mine, the radon concentration pattern distribution is principally established by air current due to chimney-effect in summer and winter seasons. In both cases, the analyses of radon pattern distribution appear as a good method to trace air currents, and then localize unknown ducts, fissures or secondary tunnels in subterranean environments. - Highlights: • 222 Rn levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina • CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used for this purpose • higher concentration values of 222 Rn were observed in summer than in winter • radon pattern distribution appear as a good method to trace air currents • it localizes unknown ducts, fissures or secondary tunnels in subterranean environments

  15. Odhady absolutního kardiovaskulárního rizika v České republice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Zvárová, Jana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 5 (2008), s. 288-292 ISSN 0032-6739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : framinghamská studie * SCORE studie * odhad kardiovaskulárního rizika * validační studie Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  16. A detector module with highly efficient surface-alpha event rejection operated in CRESST-II Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Angloher, G.; Ferreiro, N.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, CIUC, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Schaeffner, K. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von; Guetlein, A.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Schoenert, S.; Stanger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Kluck, H. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Wien (Austria); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Schieck, J. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Sivers, M. von [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    The cryogenic dark matter experiment CRESSTII aims at the direct detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals. We present a new, highly improved, detector design installed in the current run of CRESST-II Phase 2 with an efficient active rejection of surface-alpha backgrounds. Using CaWO{sub 4} sticks instead of metal clamps to hold the target crystal, a detector housing with fully-scintillating inner surface could be realized. The presented detector (TUM40) provides an excellent threshold of ∝0.60 keV and a resolution of σ ∼ 0.090 keV (at 2.60 keV).With significantly reduced background levels, TUM40 sets stringent limits on the spin-independent WIMP nucleon scattering cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3GeV/c{sup 2}. In this paper, we discuss the novel detector design and the surface-alpha event rejection in detail. (orig.)

  17. Operation and calibration of the Silicon Drift Detectors of the ALICE experiment during the 2008 cosmic ray data taking period

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Bala, R; Batigne, G; Beolè, S; Biolcati, E; Bock Garcia, N; Bruna, E; Cerello, P; Coli, S; Corrales Morales, Y; Costa, F; Crescio, E; De Remigis, P; Di Liberto, S; Falchieri, D; Feofilov, G; Ferrarese, W; Gandolfi, E; Garcia, C; Gaudichet, L; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, P; Humanic, T J; Igolkin, S; Idzik, M; Kiprich, S K; Kisiel, A; Kolozhvari, A; Kotov, I; Kral, J; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Lea, R; Lisa, M A; Martinez, M I; Marzari Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masetti, M; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Montano Zetina, L M; Monteno, M; Nilsen, B S; Nouais, D; Padilla Cabal, F; Petrácek, V; Poghosyan, M G; Prino, F; Ramello, L; Rashevsky, A; Riccati, L; Rivetti, A S; Senyukov, S; Siciliano, M; Sitta, M; Subieta Vasquez, M A; Sumbera, M L; Toscano, L; Tosello, F; Truesdale, D; Urciuoli, G M; Vacchi, A; Vallero, S; Werbrouck, A; Zampa, G; Zinovjev, G

    2010-01-01

    The calibration and performance of the Silicon Drift Detector of the ALICE experiment during the 2008 cosmic ray run will be presented. In particular the procedures to monitor the running parameters (baselines, noise, drift speed) are detailed. Other relevant parameters (SOP delay, time-zero, charge calibration) were also determined.

  18. Study of factors controlling exposure dose and image quality of C-arm in operation room according to detector size of it (Mainly L-Spine AP study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chui, Sung Hyun; Jo, Hwang Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Woon Kwan; Song, Ha Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Time of operation has been reduced and accuracy of operation has been improved since C-arm, which offer real-time image of patient, was introduced in operation room. However, because of the contamination of patient, C-arm could not be used more appropriately. Therefore, this study is to know factors of controlling exposure dose, image quality and the exposed dose of health professional in operation room. Height of Wilson frame (bed for operation) was fixed at 130 cm. Then, Model 76-2 Phantom, which was set by assembling manual of Fluke Company, was set on the bed. Head/Spine Fluoroscopy AEC mode was set for exposure condition. According to detector size of C-arm, the absorbed dose per min was measured in the 7 steps OFD (cm) from 10 cm to 40 cm (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 cm). In each step of OFD, the absorbed dose per min of same diameter of collimation was measured. Moreover, using Nero MAX Model 8000, exposure dose per min was measured according to 3 step of distance from detector (20 cm, 60 cm, 100 cm). Finally, resolution was measured by CDRH Disc Phantom and magnification of each OFD was measured by aluminum stick bar. According to detector size of C-arm, difference of absorbed dose shows that the dose of 20 cm OFD is 1.750 times higher than the dose of 40 cm OFD. It means that the C-arm, which has smaller size of detector, shows the bigger difference of absorbed dose per min (p<0.05). In the difference of absorbed dose in the same step of OFD (from 20 cm to 40 cm), the absorbed dose of 9 inch detect or C-arm was 1.370 times higher than 12 inch' s (p<0.05). When OFD was set to 20 cm OFD, the absorbed dose of non-collimation case was approximately 0.816 times lower than the absorbed dose of collimation cases (p<0.05). When the distance was 20 cm from detector, exposed does includes first-ray and scatter-ray. When the distance was 60 cm and 100 cm from detector, exposed does includes just scatter-ray. So, there was the 2.200 times difference of absorbed

  19. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  20. Detector Control System for the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    Czekierda, Sabina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) is a forward detector using a Roman Pot technique, recently installed in the LHC tunnel. It is aiming at registering protons that were diffractively or electromagnetically scattered in soft and hard processes. Infrastructure of the detector consists of hardware placed both in the tunnel and in the control room USA15 (about 330 meters from the Roman Pots). AFP detector, like the other detectors of the ATLAS experiment, uses the Detector Control System (DCS) to supervise the detector and to ensure its safe and coherent operation, since the incorrect detector performance may influence the physics results. The DCS continuously monitors the detector parameters, subset of which is stored in data bases. Crucial parameters are guarded by alarm system. A detector representation as a hierarchical tree-like structure of well-defined subsystems built with the use of the Finite State Machine (FSM) toolkit allows for overall detector operation and visualization. Every node in the hierarchy is...

  1. High-spin states in 214Rn, 216Ra and a study of even-even N=128 systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnroth, T.; Horn, D.; Baktash, C.; Lister, C. J.; Young, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    High-spin states in 214Rn and 216Ra have been studied by means of the reaction 208Pb(13C, α 3n γ)214Rn and 208Pb(13C, 5n γ)216Ra at beam energies in the range 75-95 MeV. In-beam spectroscopy techniques, including γ-decay excitation functions, α-γ coincidences, γ-γ coincidences, γ-ray angular distributions, and pulsed-beam-γ timing, were utilized to establish level energies, γ-ray multipolarities, Jπ assignments, and isomeric lifetimes. Excited states with spins up to 23ℏ in 214Rn and ~30ℏ in 216Ra were observed. Isomers were found in 214Rn at 1625 keV (T12=9 ns, Jπ=8+), 1787 keV (22 ns, 10+), 3485 keV (95 ns, 16), 4509 keV (230 ns, 20), and 4738 keV (8 ns, 22), and in 216Ra at 1708 keV (8 ns, 8+) and 5868 keV (10 ns, ~24). B(EL) values were deduced and compared to previously known lead-region electric transition rates. Shell-model calculations were performed and used to make configurational assignments. The absence of major α-decay branching in the isomers is explained and the systematic behavior of N=128 even-even nuclei is discussed. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 208Pb(13C, α 3n γ)214Rn, 208Pb(13C, 5n γ) 216Ra, Elab=75-95 MeV. Measured α-γ coin, γ-γ(t) coin, I(θ), pulsed-beam-γ timing. Deduced level schemes, Jπ, T12, B(EL), multipolarities. Shell model calculations, Ge(Li) and Si detectors, enriched target.

  2. Study of a particle detector with very high spatial precision (drift chambers), and analysis of the physical phenomena governing the operation of this detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Guy.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles of drift chambers are studied and various measurements which can be performed with these chambers are described. The laws governing the passage of particles through matter are first reviewed and different transport coefficients, (velocity, scattering coefficient, characteristic energy ...) of the electrons under the influence of an electric field for different gases (argon, CO 2 , isobutane, methane, methylal) are studied. The theoretical predictions are then compared with the experimental results. The different amplification processes in the gas and the space charge effect of the positive ions on electron multiplication for large particle fluxes are also studied as well as the mobility of positive ions in different gases. After these results, the operating characteristics (efficiency, linearity of the space-time ratio, spatial resolution), with and without an external magnetic field are determined [fr

  3. Direct determination of 222Rn gas using the electret to remove daughters at formation. Annual progress report, June 1, 1981-May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.H.

    1982-01-01

    This report covers progress made from 1 June 1981 to 31 May 1982 in developing a continuous monitor which measures only 222 Rn without interference from the daughters. Five 222 Rn counters have been built which determine 222 Rn alone by alpha scintillation counting in the presence of an electret to remove the short-lived daughter products from the counting chamber. The chamber design is based on the work of Chittaporn et al., (1981) at New York University's Department of Environmental Medicine. The detection chamber is a 1.8 liter (12.7 cm diameter by 14 cm high) cylinder lined with zinc sulfide alpha phosphor. The detector sits directly on a 12.7 cm diameter phototube. The 5 units have calibration factors which range from 155 to 186 counts/hour per pCi 222 Rn/liter and an average background count of 6 counts/hour. The lower limit of detection for a one hour count is thus 0.03 pCi 222 Rn/l, well below environmental levels

  4. Experimental study to optimize time resolution and detection limit of online 222Rn-in-water measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, G.; Freyer, K.; Treutler, H.C.; Philipsborn, H. von

    2001-01-01

    The possibility to detect short-term variations of the activity concentration of 222 Rn in water by online monitoring with temporal resolutions of a few minutes and a lower limit of detection of about 1 Bq/l enhances the applicability of such measurements. New applications would be possible in the field of hydro-geology in which Rn is used as tracer gas, the monitoring of pumping procedures, for the study of exchange processes during groundwater sampling and for various applications with geophysical effects. A suitable, simple method is the measuring principle proposed by Surbeck (Fribourg) some years ago which is based on the separation of air and water by a diffusion membrane. Process parameters enhancing the time resolution of the method as well as the efficiency of different radon detectors have been studied. (orig.) [de

  5. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  6. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  7. 222Rn studies and mapping in the city of Curitiba - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Fior, Loriane; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Pecequilo, Brigitte R. S.; Paula Melo, Vicente de

    2008-01-01

    This work describes radon monitoring performed in cooperation between the Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations of the Federal University of Technology - Parana (UTFPR), the Institute of Nuclear and Energetic Researches (IPEN) and the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD), from the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), during the last two years. For 222 Rn concentration measurements related to different construction materials as well as for the studies of radon emanation and its reduction, the sealed cell chambers, of approximately 60 x 60 cm 2 , was built using ceramic and concrete blocks. This construction was performed within a protected and isolated laboratory environment to maintain the air humidity and temperature stable. These long term measurements have been performed using polycarbonate alpha track passive detectors. The exposure time was set to 15 days considering previous calibration performed at IRD, where a efficiency of 70% was obtained for the density of alpha particle tracks about 13.8 cm -2 per exposure day and per kBq/m 3 of radon activity concentration. The chemical development of the alpha tracks was achieved by electrochemical etching. The track identification and counting were done using a code based on the MATLAB Image Processing Toolbox. The cell chambers were built following four main steps: 1) assembling the walls using the blocks and mortar; 2) plaster installation; 3) wall surface finishing using lime; 4) wall surface insulation by paint. By comparison between three layers installed at the masonry walls from concrete and ceramic blocks, it was concluded that only wall painting with acrylic varnish attended the expectation and reduced the radon emanation flow by a factor of approximately 2.5. The construction materials were submitted to the instant measurements of radon concentration using a ALPHA GUARD Professional detector. The samples of the construction materials were stored inside an acrylic container (sealed up

  8. Ontologies in a project by Jørn Utzon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars Botin

    2003-01-01

    The paper has an overall theoretical and philosophical view on the actual topic: the architecture of Jørn Utzon, whereas Utzon himself often has stated that theories and hermeneutic approaches does not interest him at all. It is the aim of this paper to inscribe Jørn Utzon in a theoretical...... tradition where nature and the real is in the core of everything and furthermore to throw a light on the paradoxical non-modern and non-Cartesian aspect of the architectural practice of Jørn Utzon....

  9. Study of the physical processes involved in the operating mode of the micro-strips gas detector Micromegas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barouch, G.

    2001-04-01

    Micromegas is a micro-strip gaseous detector invented in 1996. It consists of two volumes of gas separated by a micro-mesh. The first volume of gas, 3 mm thick, is used to liberate ionization electrons from the incident charged particle. In the second volume, only 100 μm thick, an avalanche phenomenon amplifies the electrons produced in the first volume. Strips printed on an insulating substrate collect the electrons from the avalanche. The geometrical configuration of Micromegas showed many advantages. The short anode-cathode distance combined with a high granularity provide high rate capabilities due to a fast collection of ions produced during the avalanche development. Moreover, the possibility to localize the avalanche with strips printed about every hundreds of micrometers allows to measure the position of the incident particle with a good resolution. In this work, experimental tests of Micromegas are presented along with detailed Monte Carlo simulations used to understand and optimize the detector's performances. The prototypes were tested several times at the PS accelerator at CERN. The analysis of the date showed a stable and efficient behavior of Micromegas combined with an excellent space resolution. In fact, spatial resolutions of less than 15 μm were obtained. In parallel with the in-beam tests, several simulations have been developed in order to gain a better understanding of the detector's response. (author)

  10. Measurement of 222Rn, 220Rn and their decay products in high background radiation area in Yangjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yongling

    2000-01-01

    The investigators have measured concentrations of Rn-222, rn-220 and their decay products in high background radiation area (HBRA) and the neighboring control area (CA), as well as the equilibrium factor F for Rn-222. The average concentrations of Rn-222 in the air indoors and outdoors in the HBRA are 42.6 and 17.3 Bq/m 3 respectively, and CA, 13.2 and 11.7 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The average α-potential energy concentrations for daughters of Rn-222 indoors and outdoors in HBRA are 0.109 and 0.051 μJ/m 3 , CA, 0.045 and 0.041 μJ/m 3 , respectively. The average α-potential energy values for daughters of Rn-220 indoor and outdoor in HBRA are 0.249 and 0.053 μJ/m 3 , CA, 0.051 and 0.025 μJ/m 3 , respectively. With regard to equilibrium factor F for Rn-222, the authors have also measured 52 points of 10 hamlets in HBRA (indoor 31, outdoor 21), 9 points of 2 hamlets in CA (indoor 5, outdoor 4), respectively. These figures are 0.46, 0.53, 0.62 and 0.64, respectively

  11. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  12. Maximal multiplier operators in Lp(·)(Rn) spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gogatishvili, Amiran; Kopaliani, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 4 (2016), s. 86-97 ISSN 0007-4497 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14743S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : spherical maximal function * variable Lebesque spaces * boundedness result Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.750, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0007449715000329

  13. Estimation of 222Rn flux and its effect on the atmospheric 222Rn concentration at Hachijo-jima Island, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkura, Takehisa; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun; Hirao, Shigekazu; Iida, Takao

    2010-01-01

    222 Rn fluxes from the ground surface and 226 Ra contents in soil were measured on Hachijo-jima Island, which is a solitary island in the Pacific Ocean located about 200 km to the south of the main island of Japan, to evaluate fractional contributions of the locally exhaled 222 Rn and the long-range transported one to the surface air concentration measured on this island. Averages of 222 Rn flux and 226 Ra content in dry soil were evaluated to be 0.9±0.4 mBq m -2 s -1 and 6.8±0.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively. These are considerably smaller than the respective values of 9.7±0.8 mBq m -2 s -1 and 23.2±0.4 Bq kg -1 measured at Nagoya as a reference. The lower value of the 226 Ra content and the even lower 222 Rn flux on this island can be attributed to the basaltic geology and the soil's coarse texture moisture, respectively. A simple model calculation assuming a typical nocturnal condition showed that the measured 222 Rn flux would cause only a small increase in the surface air concentration by 0.035 to 0.072 Bq m -3 (relative contribution of 1 to 12%) in addition to the long-range transported 222 Rn under a typical nocturnal condition. The contribution of the local flux would be smaller than that under nocturnal condition. This local 222 Rn component is negligible as compared with the concentration of the long-range transported 222 Rn (0.6 to 3.6 Bq m -3 ). It is, therefore, concluded that Hachijo-jima Island is suitable for measuring the long-range transported atmospheric 222 Rn in East Asia region. (author)

  14. Inferring 222Rn soil fluxes from ambient 222Rn activity and eddy covariance measurements of CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. van der Laan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new methodology, which we call Single Pair of Observations Technique with Eddy Covariance (SPOT-EC, to estimate regional-scale surface fluxes of 222Rn from tower-based observations of 222Rn activity concentration, CO2 mole fractions and direct CO2 flux measurements from eddy covariance. For specific events, the regional (222Rn surface flux is calculated from short-term changes in ambient (222Rn activity concentration scaled by the ratio of the mean CO2 surface flux for the specific event to the change in its observed mole fraction. The resulting 222Rn surface emissions are integrated in time (between the moment of observation and the last prior background levels and space (i.e. over the footprint of the observations. The measurement uncertainty obtained is about ±15 % for diurnal events and about ±10 % for longer-term (e.g. seasonal or annual means. The method does not provide continuous observations, but reliable daily averages can be obtained. We applied our method to in situ observations from two sites in the Netherlands: Cabauw station (CBW and Lutjewad station (LUT. For LUT, which is an intensive agricultural site, we estimated a mean 222Rn surface flux of (0.29 ± 0.02 atoms cm−2 s−1 with values  > 0.5 atoms cm−2 s−1 to the south and south-east. For CBW we estimated a mean 222Rn surface flux of (0.63 ± 0.04 atoms cm−2 s−1. The highest values were observed to the south-west, where the soil type is mainly river clay. For both stations good agreement was found between our results and those from measurements with soil chambers and two recently published 222Rn soil flux maps for Europe. At both sites, large spatial and temporal variability of 222Rn surface fluxes were observed which would be impractical to measure with a soil chamber. SPOT-EC, therefore, offers an important new tool for estimating regional-scale 222Rn surface fluxes. Practical applications furthermore include

  15. Silicon Telescope Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurov, Yu B; Sandukovsky, V G; Yurkovski, J

    2005-01-01

    The results of research and development of special silicon detectors with a large active area ($> 8 cm^{2}$) for multilayer telescope spectrometers (fulfilled in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR) are reviewed. The detector parameters are listed. The production of totally depleted surface barrier detectors (identifiers) operating under bias voltage two to three times higher than depletion voltage is described. The possibility of fabrication of lithium drifted counters with a very thin entrance window on the diffusion side of the detector (about 10--20 $\\mu$m) is shown. The detector fabrication technique has allowed minimizing detector dead regions without degradation of their spectroscopic characteristics and reliability during long time operation in charge particle beams.

  16. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  17. Thoron (220Rn) in the indoor environment and work places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, T. V.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2009-08-01

    Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222Rn in the environment. Subsequently, considerable data is being generated on the levels of 222Rn in the environment across the worlds and is being periodically reported by UNSCEAR reports. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scaree due to the genral perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. This may not be true. Globally many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products like radon (222Rn), and thoron (220Rn) in the environment. Of late, technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material has also contributed to the burden of background radiation. It is estimated that inhalation of 222Rn, 220Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54% of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. 220Rn problem exists in industries which use thorium nitrate. Including India, lamps using thoriated gas mantles are still being used for indoor and outdoor lighting and by hawkers in rural as well as urban areas. Considering the fact that large amount of thorium nitrate is being handled by these industries, contribution to the inhalation dose of workers from 220Rn gas emanated and build up of the progeny in ambient air may also be quite significant. In this paper current status of 220Rn levels in the indoor environment and workplaces as well as in other industries where large amount of 232Th is being handled is being summarized. Methods of measurement and

  18. Thoron (220Rn) in the indoor environment and work places

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramchandran, T.V.; Sahoo, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222 Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222 Rn in the environment. Subsequently, considerable data is being generated on the levels of 222 Rn in the environment across the worlds and is being periodically reported by UNSCEAR reports. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220 Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scaree due to the general perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. This may not be true. Globally many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products like radon ( 222 Rn), and thoron ( 220 Rn) in the environment. Of late, technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material has also contributed to the burden of background radiation. It is estimated that inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54% of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. 220 Rn problem exists in industries which use thorium nitrate. Including India, lamps using thoriated gas mantles are still being used for indoor and outdoor lighting and by hawkers in rural as well as urban areas. Considering the fact that large amount of thorium nitrate is being handled by these industries, contribution to the inhalation dose of workers from 220 Rn gas emanated and build up of the progeny in ambient air may also be quite significant. In this paper current status of 220 Rn levels in the indoor environment and workplaces as well as in other industries where large amount of 232 Th is being handled is being summarized. Methods of

  19. Margus Pärn : turuliidri koht on Maximale jõukohane 4-5 aastaga / Margus Pärn ; interv. Viljar Rääsk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pärn, Margus

    2008-01-01

    Leedu jaekaubandusketi Maxima Eesti juht Margus Pärn vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad Eesti jaekaubandusturgu ja Maxima positsiooni selles, ettevõtte laienemist ning turuliidri rolli saavutamise võimalust. Lisa: Margus Pärn. Tabel: Maxima

  20. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  1. rn Utzon’s Maritime Origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Thomas Arvid

    2014-01-01

    Article about Jørn Utzons and the influence on his architecture comming from his early years with sailing, and learning about boat construction and the design principles from his father - the yacht designer Aage Utzon.......Article about Jørn Utzons and the influence on his architecture comming from his early years with sailing, and learning about boat construction and the design principles from his father - the yacht designer Aage Utzon....

  2. New aspects on the contribution of primary defects in silicon due to long-time degradation of detectors operating in high fields of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, Sorina; Lazanu, Ionel

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Silicon detectors will represent an important option for the next generation of experiments in high energy physics, for astroparticle and nuclear experiments, where the requirements to operate long time in high radiation environments will represent a major problem. After the long-time operation in high radiation fields, the bulk displacement damage produces the following effects at the device level: increase of the leakage current, decrease of the satisfactory Signal/Noise ratio, increase of the effective carrier concentration, and thus of the depletion voltage, decrease of the charge collection efficiency up to unacceptable levels. In this contribution we investigate the new perspective in understanding the fundamental phenomena in silicon and implications for the degradation of the characteristics of detectors given by the consideration of the existence of the new primary defect: fourfold coordinated defect, Si FFCD , with a lower value of the formation energy by comparison with the 'classically' known vacancies and interstitials. Predicted by Goedecker and co-workers, its characteristics were indirectly determined by Lazanu and Lazanu. The correlation between the rate of generation of primary defects, material composition and observable effects is investigated considering different growth technologies and resistivities (up to tens of kΩcm) as time and fluence dependencies. This allows to estimate the expected behaviour of the materials and detectors in concrete environments at the next generations of high energy physics experiments as SLHC or VLHC for example. This new defect could represent the elementary block for new extended defects and in principle it could generate local amorphization of the semiconductor. Its existence and characteristics in other semiconductors is also investigated. (author)

  3. Measurement of the Current Related Damage Rate at {-}50(°) C and Consequences on Macropixel Detector Operation in Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segneri, Gabriele; Brown, Craig; Carpenter, James-D.; Kuhnle, Bernd; Lauf, Thomas; Lechner, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Rummel, Stefan; Struder, Lothar; Treis, Johannes; Whitford, Chris

    2009-12-01

    A diode irradiation with 10-MeV protons was performed to measure the silicon current related damage rate at a temperature of -50°C. This measurement was fundamental to predict the performance of the detectors which will be used in the X-ray spectrometers of the Simbol-X and BepiColombo space missions. These detectors consist of arrays of large area silicon drift chambers with integrated depleted p-channel field effect transistors. The leakage current increase due to radiation damage and its consequent energy resolution degradation can be critical for these missions, specially for BepiColombo. These effects cannot be predicted because, during the whole missions, the sensors will be kept at temperatures below -40°C, and the existing models are based on measurements on structures which underwent annealing at higher temperatures. An irradiation experiment was performed to measure the current related damage rate at - 50°C, and the obtained value was (11.1 ± 0.2) X 10-17 A/cm. This result implies that it will be possible to achieve the Simbol-X energy resolution, whereas some annealing strategies will be needed for the BepiColombo mission. The annealing behaviour at 60°C was studied as well and the results are in agreement with the already available measurements.

  4. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  5. RN-BSN Students' Perceptions of the Differences in Practice of the ADN- and BSN-Prepared RN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, April D; Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study explored RN-BSN students' perceptions of practice differences between nurses prepared with an ADN and BSN. Five themes were identified in 20 students' discussion posts: "a nurse is a nurse" at the bedside, beyond the bedside, BSN wanted, digging deeper, and appraisal. Results illustrate the need for educators to assist nurses in translating the differentiated educational competencies to the practice role of the bedside RN.

  6. Assessment of {sup 222}Rn occupational exposure at IPEN nuclear materials storage site, SP, Brazil; Avaliacao da exposicao ocupacional ao {sup 222}Rn no galpao da Salvaguardas do IPEN, SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caccuri, Lilian Saueia

    2007-07-01

    In this study it was assessed the occupational exposure to {sup 222}Rn at IPEN, SP, Brazil, nuclear materials storage site through the committed effective dose received by workers exposed to this radionuclide. The radiation dose was calculated through the radon concentrations at nuclear materials storage site. Radon concentrations were determined by passive detection method with solid state nuclear detectors (SSNTD). The SSNTD used in this study was the polycarbonate Makrofol E; each detector is a small square plastic of 1 cm{sup 2}, placed into a diffusion chamber type KFK. It was monitored 14 points at nuclear materials storage site and one external point, over a period of 21 months, changing the detectors every three months, from December 2004 to September 2006. The {sup 222}Rn concentrations varied from 196 {+-} 9 and 2048 {+-} 81 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. The committed effective dose due to radon inhalation at IPEN nuclear materials storage site was obtained from radon activity incorporated and dose conversion factor, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection procedures. The effective committed dose received by workers is below 20 mSv{center_dot}y{sup -1}. This value is suggested as an annual effective dose limit for occupational exposure by ICRP 60. (author)

  7. Fra anbringelse til efterværn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer Espersen, Laila

    Når anbragte børn fylder 18 år, ophører deres anbringelse formelt set. Det betyder, at den unge som udgangspunkt skal klare sig selv. Men den nye efterværnsparagraf (§ 62a) i serviceloven giver mulighed for fortsat at støtte de unge, indtil de fylder 23 år. Det benytter man sig af på forskellig...... måde og i varierende omfang i danske kommuner. I denne rapport fremhæves gennem interview med 16 sagsbehandlere, en kommunalt ansat kontaktperson og en medarbejder ved en privat plejehjemsforening fra 10 kommuner nogle af de aspekter af efterværnsindsatsen, som kan være afgørende for, om den unge...... kommer godt ud af anbringelsen. Der er især fokuseret på de positive erfaringer, som sagsbehandlerne har haft i deres daglige arbejde med de unge i efterværnsforløb....

  8. Detectors on the drawing board

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Linear collider detector developers inside and outside CERN are tackling the next generation of detector technology. While their focus has centred on high-energy linear collider detectors, their innovative concepts and designs will be applicable to any future detector.   A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors. “While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,” says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.” The LCD team is curr...

  9. Radon monitoring using long-range alpha detector-based technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) technology is being studied for monitoring radon gas concentrations. LRAD-based instruments collect and measure the ionization produced in air by alpha decays. These ions can be moved to a collection grid via electrostatic ion-transport design collected approximately 95% of the radon produced ions, while instruments using an airflow transport design collected from 44% to 77% of these ions, depending on detector geometry. The current produced by collecting this ionization is linear with respect to 222 Rn concentration over the available test range of 0.07 to 820 pCi/L. In the absence of statistical limitations due to low radon concentrations, the speed of response of LRAD-based instruments is determined by the air exchange rate, and therefore changes in radon concentration can be detected in just a few seconds. Recent tests show that at radon concentrations below 20 pCi/L current pulses produced by individual alpha decays can be counted, thus improving detector sensitivity and stability even further. Because these detectors are simple, rugged, and do not consume much power, they are natural candidates for portable, battery operation

  10. 222Rn gas metrology in Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogucarska, T.; Lapenas, A.

    2004-01-01

    The measurements of radon gas provides in Latvia according with the State radiation monitoring program. The national standard/reference level for the protection of employees and population from exposure to radon Latvia has been accepted. The facilities for calibration of the radon gas measurement instruments and detectors have been established on basic of the Radiation Metrology and Testing Center which is the local SSDL for Baltic Region. The radon measurement instruments and detectors calibration can be performed at the 170-4000 Bq/m 3 range. (author)

  11. Study of 222Rn emanation levels present in naturally occurring radioactive materials - NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia Valeria F.E. Sa; Crispim, Verginia Reis; Lima, Clara Teresa S.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), contaminating oil and gas installations, is usual in the petroleum industry, and can be severe enough to expose the workers to elevated levels of radiation. The segregation of contaminated residues although necessary, is still a problem without a satisfactory solution. Currently, the most practical and economic option for discarding this material is to stock it in areas of the installation with controlled access. Certain equipment used in the petroleum industry has scale and sludge that could be associated to important levels of radioactivity. Typically, the scales are mixtures of carbonate and sulphate minerals, such as barite (BaSO 4 ), that easily incorporate 226 Ra and 228 Ra in their structures. The objective of this work was to measure the emanations of the radon present in NORM samples, via diffusion chambers containing a nuclear track detector (CR-39). The images of α particle tracks emanated by 222 Rn registered on CR-39 were observed with a Nikon E400 optic microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix digital camera and then stored in a database, to later count the tracks using the computational program, Image Pro plus. Since the number of those tracks resulted proportional to the emanation rate of 222 Rn this methodology allowed the comparison of contamination levels in analyzed samples. (author)

  12. 222Rn determination in some thermal baths of a central eastern Italian area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desideri, D.; Bruno, M.R.; Roselli, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some recent Italian laws, based on the Euratom Directive 26/96, introduce the obligation of monitoring the exposition to natural radioactivity in particular worksites (thermal baths, mines, basements, etc.). Results of 222 Rn measurements in some thermal baths of Rimini and Pesaro-Urbino provinces (Central Eastern Italy), by Radosys-2000, a complete set suitable to radon concentration measurements with CR-39 plastic alpha-track detectors are reported. Some areas where radon could accumulate (bathing, reaction, muddy, inhalation, insufflation rooms and swimming pools) were selected for the investigation. The dosimeters have been exposed for 98 days. The results show that 222 Rn concentrations are very low in the considered thermal baths (7-71 Bq x m -3 ). Moreover, no difference was observed between the concentrations measured in the therapy rooms (bathing, muddy, inhalation and insufflation rooms, swimming pools) and in the normal areas (passages, reaction rooms, dressing rooms, etc.). The calculated dose contribution to workers was about one tenth of the legally suggested value. (author)

  13. Study of the emanation levels of 222Rn present in Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials - NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia Valeria de Fatima da Encarnacao Sa

    2009-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), contaminating oil and gas facilities, is a common fact in the petroleum industry, and can be severe enough to expose the workers to elevated levels of radiation. Thus, contaminated residues need to be segregated but, this is still a problem without a satisfactory solution. Currently, the most practical and economic option for discarding this material is to stock it in areas of the facility whose access is controlled. Certain equipment used in the petroleum industry has scale and sludge that could be associated to important levels of radioactivity. Typically, the scale is a mixture of carbonate and sulphate minerals, such as barite (BaSO 4 ), that easily incorporates 226 Ra and 228 Ra in its structures. The objective of this work was to measure the emanations of the radon present in these NORM samples, via diffusion chambers containing a nuclear track detector (CR-39). The images of particle alpha tracks emanated by 222 Rn registered on CR-39 were observed with a Nikon E400 optic microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix digital camera and then stored in a database, to later count the tracks using the computational program, Image Pro plus. Being that the emanation rate of 222 Rn was proportional to the number of these tracks the methodology permitted the comparison of contamination levels of the analyzed samples. (author)

  14. Evolution of {sup 222} Rn and chemical species related with eruptive processes of the Popocatepetl volcano; Evolucion de {sup 222} Rn y especies quimicas relacionadas con procesos eruptivos del volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranda, P.; Ceballos, S.; Cruz, D.; Hernandez, A.; Lopez, R.; Pena, P.; Salazar, S.; Segovia, N.; Tamez, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The {sup 222} Rn monitoring in the Popocatepetl volcano was initiated on 1993. At December 21, 1994 it is initiated an eruptive stage in the volcano with gas emission, ashes and the lava dome formation on the crater at middle 1996. During all this time it has been determined radon concentrations on soils with active and passive detectors. In this work the changes in radon contents are reported also the physicochemical parameters in spring water related with the volcanic building associated to the recent activity of the volcano. (Author)

  15. Determination of committed effective doses to skin due to 238U, 232Th and 222Rn from the application of various Moroccan black soap (Saboun Beldi) samples by members of the general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M. A.; Outeqablit, K.

    2010-01-01

    238 U, 232 Th, 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations were measured inside various Moroccan black soap samples widely used by the Moroccan population in traditional baths (Hammams) by using both CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors. The measured 238 U, 232 Th, 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations, respectively, ranged from (3.7±0.2) to (11.7±0.7) mBq kg -1 , (0.11±0.01) to (0.32±0.02) mBq kg -1 , (3.8±0.2) to (11.6±0.6) Bq kg -1 and (0.10±0.01) to (0.31±0.02) Bq kg -1 for the Moroccan black soap samples studied. The influence of pollution on the concentrations of these radionuclides inside the considered Moroccan black soap was investigated. A new dosimetric model for evaluating annual committed effective doses due to 238 U, 232 Th and 222 Rn to the skin of different age groups of the Moroccan populations from the application of the black soap samples studied was developed. The maximum total committed effective dose to the skin due to 238 U, 232 Th and 222 Rn from the application of unpolluted black soap samples 20 min per week by the Moroccan populations was found to be equal to (0.88±0.05) μSv y -1 cm -2 . (authors)

  16. Preliminary experiences with 222Rn gas in Arizona homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a survey of 222Rn gas using four-day charcoal canister tests in 759 Arizona homes are reported. Although the study was not random with respect to population or land area, it was useful in identifying areas at risk and locating several homes having elevated indoor 222Rn air concentrations. Approximately 18% of the homes tested exceeded 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1), with 7% exceeding 300 Bq m-3 (8 pCi L-1). Several Arizona cities had larger fractions of homes exceeding 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1), such as Carefree and Cave Creek (23%), Paradise Valley (30%), Payson (33%), and Prescott (31%). The Granite Dells and Groom Creek areas of Prescott had in excess of 40-60% of the houses tested exceeding 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1). Elevated 222Rn concentrations were measured for a variety of home types having different construction materials. Private well water was identified as a potentially significant source of 222Rn gas in Prescott homes, with water from one well testing over 3.5 MBq m-3 (94,000 pCi L-1). A 222Rn concentration in air exceeding 410,000 Bq m-3 (11,000 pCi L-1) was measured using a four-day charcoal canister test in a house in Prescott which had a well opening into a living space. Additional measurements in this 150-m3 dwelling revealed a strikingly heterogeneous 222Rn concentration. The excessive 222Rn level in the dwelling was reduced to less than 190 Bq m-3 (5.2 pCi L-1) by sealing the well head with caulking and providing passive ventilation through a pipe

  17. Design and operation of a transistorised bridge-type detector for burn-out in boiling heat transfer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salt, K J; Wintle, C A [Reactor Development Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-04-15

    Theoretical, technical and operational details of an instrument to protect heater rods in heat transfer burn-out experiments from actual rupture under electrical heating, by a Wheatstone bridge method. (author)

  18. Design and operation of a transistorised bridge-type detector for burn-out in boiling heat transfer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salt, K.J.; Wintle, C.A.

    1964-04-01

    Theoretical, technical and operational details of an instrument to protect heater rods in heat transfer burn-out experiments from actual rupture under electrical heating, by a Wheatstone bridge method. (author)

  19. Correctness of multi-detector-row computed tomography for diagnosing mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorders using operative findings as a gold standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, I.Chen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Lin, Yung-Kai; Chang, Yen; Wang, Chung-Chi; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Wei, Hao-Ji; Tsai, Hung-Wen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Ling [Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Taichung (China); Wang, Kuo-Yang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of General Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Chung-Shan Medical University, Department of Medicine, Taichung (China); Chen, Min-Chi; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiological Technology, Taichung (China)

    2009-04-15

    The purpose was to compare the findings of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in prosthetic valve disorders using the operative findings as a gold standard. In a 3-year period, we prospectively enrolled 25 patients with 31 prosthetic heart valves. MDCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were done to evaluate pannus formation, prosthetic valve dysfunction, suture loosening (paravalvular leak) and pseudoaneurysm formation. Patients indicated for surgery received an operation within 1 week. The MDCT findings were compared with the operative findings. One patient with a Bjoerk-Shiley valve could not be evaluated by MDCT due to a severe beam-hardening artifact; thus, the exclusion rate for MDCT was 3.2% (1/31). Prosthetic valve disorders were suspected in 12 patients by either MDCT or TTE. Six patients received an operation that included three redo aortic valve replacements, two redo mitral replacements and one Amplatzer ductal occluder occlusion of a mitral paravalvular leak. The concordance of MDCT for diagnosing and localizing prosthetic valve disorders and the surgical findings was 100%. Except for images impaired by severe beam-hardening artifacts, MDCT provides excellent delineation of prosthetic valve disorders. (orig.)

  20. Measurements of {sup 222} Rn in the indoor of dwellings in the Argentinean Republic; Mediciones de {sup 222} Rn en el interior de viviendas de la Republica Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canoba, A.; Lopez, F. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250 Ciudad de Buenos Aires (1429) (Argentina)]. e-mail: acanoba@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The {sup 222} Rn is responsible for approximately half of the dose in the population resultant of the exposure to natural radiation. Most of this dose comes from the inhalation of the offspring of the {sup 222} Rn, and these doses they are specially important in set closed. The concentration of gas radon has been measured in housings of different cities of the Argentinean Republic. The elected cities are representative of the different geologic areas of our territory. For this its were used as detecting measurement method of nuclear tracks, electret detectors and detectors based on the adsorption in activated coal. Its were analyzed a total of 2689 housings from 1983 to the date. The average value of the radon concentration obtained starting from the 2689 monitored housings was of 41.6 Bq.m{sup -3}. The effective annual dose calculated starting from this radon concentration, using a dosimetric factor of 25 {mu}Sv.a{sup -1} (Bq.m{sup -3}), which assumes an equilibrium factor of 0.4, was of 1.04 mSv. Also, with the objective of determining the dose in form more exact, during the year 2000 it put on to point a passive technique for the simultaneous measurement such the radon concentration like of the equilibrium factor. This technique uses in oneself device two detectors of nuclear traces. The average value obtained starting from 204 monitored housings by this method of simultaneous measurement turns out to be 47.1 Bq.m{sup -3} and 0.36 the equilibrium factor, being obtained a value of effective annual dose of 1.38 mSv. It fits to highlight that are very few the values above 200 Bq.m{sup -3} and in any case the 300 Bq.m{sup -3} is overcome. Analyzing the average equilibrium factor measured of 0.36, it was concluded that having assumed an equilibrium factor of 0.4 was adequate, for what for great measurement campaigns it can continue using the simple method that determines only the radon concentration. Comparing the obtained results by both methods, although the first

  1. Dosimetry of Rn-222 in the air in environments located above and below ground level; Dosimetria de Rn-222 no ar em ambientes localizados acima e abaixo do nivel do solo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazula, Camila Dias

    2015-07-01

    Exposure of the general population to ionizing radiation comes mainly from natural sources. The main contribution is due to inhalation of radon (Rn-222), a gas that occurs naturally (UNSCEAR, 2000). The Rn-222 concentration in the environment is controlled by factors such as soil permeability and water content, the weather variability, materials used in the foundation and the usual positive pressure differential between the soil and the internal environment. Studies indicate that the concentration of radon shows a wide variation in the basement, ground floor and upper floors of buildings. The objective of this study is to determine radon levels in basements, ground floor and floors above ground level, at a university in the city of Sao Paulo and in one residential building in the city of Peruibe. Rn-222 measurements were performed using the method with nuclear track of solid state detectors (CR-39). The studied environments present Rn-222 concentration well below the values recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, published in the 2009 document, of 300 Bq/m{sup 3} for homes and 1000 Bq/m{sup 3} for the workplace. In the residential building, the concentration of Ra-266, Th-232 and K-40 in the materials used in the building construction was also analyzed, by gamma spectrometry. The effective total dose for the resident due to external exposure was 0.8 mSv y{sup -1}, lower than the annual dose limit for the general public of 1 mSv y{sup -1}. (author)

  2. Seasonal variations of 222Rn concentrations in the air of a tunnel located in Nagano City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, H.; Tashiro, Y.; Hasegawa, N.; Misawa, C.; Minami, M.

    2000-01-01

    The survey of 222 Rn concentrations in the air of tunnels constructed during World War II at Nagano City has been performed using a solid-state nuclear track detector technique. Concentrations of several thousands Bq m -3 were observed at inner most areas of the tunnel. A seasonal variation was clearly observed; in summer, several times higher concentrations than in winter were observed, which may be due to a stack effect induced by the temperature difference between the tunnel air and the outside air in each season. The concentrations of radon in the tunnel air decrease exponentially towards the openings of the tunnel, which indicates that the radon concentration in the tunnel is basically governed by diffusion and mixing of radon gas with air. (author)

  3. Estimation of effective dose from Rn emanating from 'the minus ion' effect wallpaper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Y.; Minowa, H.; Morita-Murase, Y.; Furuta, E.

    2006-01-01

    We have examined the wall papers which declared 'the minus ion' effect to estimate external and internal exposure dose from them. Results of gamma-ray spectrometry revealed that they contain 0.03 to 0.35 Bq·g -1 of Th-series nuclides, 208 Tl, 212 Pb, 212 Bi and 228 Ac, and U-series one, 214 Pb. Distributions of radioactive nuclides in the samples were measured using an imaging plate and a FLA-2000 (Fuji Photo Film). The radiation doses from the printed side of the wall papers were 5 to 15 times higher than that of the back side. The 222 Rn concentrations emanating from the wall papers in a sealed container of 50 liter were measured using the PICO-RAD radon detectors. One wall paper showed two to five times higher than the background value. (author)

  4. Development of a Large Area Advanced Fast RICH Detector for Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider Operated with Heavy Ions

    CERN Multimedia

    Piuz, F; Braem, A; Van beelen, J B; Lion, G; Gandi, A

    2002-01-01

    %RD26 %title\\\\ \\\\During the past two years, RD26 groups have focused their activities on the production of CsI-RICH prototypes of large area, up to a square meter, to demonstrate their application in High Energy experiments. Many large CsI-photocathodes (up to 40) were produced following the processing techniques furthermore developped in the collaboration. Taking the Quantum Efficiency (QE) measured at 180 nm as a comparative figure of merit of a CsI-PC. Figure 1 shows the increase of the performance while improvements were successively implemented in the PC processing sequence. Most efficient were the use of substrates made of nickel, the heat treatment and handling of the PCs under inert gas. Actually, three large systems based on CsI-RICH have got approval in the following HEP experiments: HADES at GSI, COMPASS/NA58 at CERN and HMPID/ALICE at LHC implying up to 14 square metres of CsI-PC. In addition, several CsI-RICH detectors have been successfully operated in the Threshold Imaging Detector at NA44 and ...

  5. 222Rn flux and soil air concentration profiles in West-Germany. Soil 222Rn as tracer for gas transport in the unsaturated soil zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, H.; Muennich, K.O.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the 222 Rn activity concentration profile in the soil and the 222 Rn flux in West-Germany are presented. The spatial pattern of the 222 Rn flux depends more on soil type than on the 226 Ra activity of the soil material. The average 222 Rn flux from sandy soils is 1000-2000 dpm m -2 h -1 and 4000-6000 dpm m -2 h -1 froam loamy and clayey soils. Weekly 222 Rn flux measurements during a period of 1 year at a sandy site show no significant temporal variations. At a clayey site, the 222 Rn flux tends to be higher in summer than in winter. The permeability coefficient P Rn , obtained from simultaneous 222 Rn flux and concentration profile measurements in various soils, can be expressed as a function of the soil parameters total porosity ε 0 , soil moisture F, tortuosity k and the molecular diffusion coefficient D 0 of 222 Rn in air: P = D 0 ((ε 0 -F)/k-const.). The flux of any other gas into or out of the soil can thus be calculated from its measured concentration profile in the soil and from the 222 Rn permeability coefficient, replacing the molecular diffusion coefficient of 222 Rn by that of the specific gas under consideration. As an example, this method of flux determination is demonstrated for the soil CO 2 flux to the atmosphere and for the flux of atmospheric CH 4 into the soil. (author) 14 refs

  6. Study of long-term sustained operation of gaseous detectors for the high rate environment in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00366989; Sharma, Archana

    The muon system of CMS aims to provide an efficient and fast identification of the muons produced in the proton-proton collisions. However, the forward region of the end-caps is only instrumented with Cathode Strip Chambers. This lack of redundancy will be problematic after the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), for which the increase of the background rate would degrade the Level-1 trigger performance and thus the selection of interesting physics channels. The goal of the CMS muon upgrade is to maintain the L1 trigger rate with maximum selection efficiency in order to fully exploit the HL-LHC. The CMS GEM Collaboration has proposed to instrument the vacant high-eta region of the muon end-caps with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, called GE1/1 chambers. The Ph.D. subject proposed by the CMS GEM Collaboration aims to demonstrate that the GE1/1 technology is the most suitable choice for the upgrade of the muon end-caps. Three main research projects were conducted in this context. The first pro...

  7. Correlation among the terrestrial gamma radiation, the indoor air 222Rn, and the tap water 222Rn in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchli, R.; Burkart, W.

    1989-01-01

    The external gamma radiation and the indoor air Rn (222Rn) concentration were measured in 55 houses of the South East Grisons, the Urseren valley, and the Upper Rhine valley (crystalline subsoils) and in 39 houses of the Molasse basin and the Helvetic nappes (sedimentary subsoils). In homes located on a crystalline subsoil, a mean cellar gamma level of 1.40 mGy y-1 was measured, which is twice the mean gamma level of 0.70 mGy y-1 found in homes built on a sedimentary subsoil. The cellar 222Rn gas concentration is about six times higher in houses with a crystalline subsoil (1232 Bq m-3) than in houses with a sedimentary subsoil (201 Bq m-3). Although a weak correlation is observed between the mean gamma radiation levels and mean cellar 222Rn gas concentrations for the five subregions investigated, the gamma levels and the 222Rn gas concentrations do not correlate for single homes. For the population living on the ground floor of a house with a crystalline subsoil, the gamma radiation and the indoor air 222Rn lead to estimated mean exposures of 1.16 mSv and 9.44 mSv effective dose equivalent per year, respectively. In houses with a sedimentary subsoil, these mean exposures lead to 0.68 mSv y-1 and 3.22 mSv y-1, respectively. A mean tap water 222Rn content of 38.3 Bq L-1 and 10.4 Bq L-1 was measured in 31 villages with a crystalline subsoil and 73 villages with a sedimentary subsoil, respectively. Radon-222 degasing from the tap water into the indoor air leads to an additional exposure of about 0.11 mSv y-1 and 0.03 mSv y-1 in homes with a crystalline subsoil and homes with a sedimentary subsoil, respectively

  8. Unit type differences in RN workgroup job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Diane K; Miller, Peggy A; Gajewski, Byron J; Hart, Sara E; Dunton, Nancy

    2006-10-01

    Using cross-sectional data from the 2004 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) RN Satisfaction Survey, differences in RN workgroup job satisfaction were examined among 10 unit types--medical-surgical, step-down, critical care, pediatric, maternal-newborn, psychiatric, emergency department, rehabilitation, surgical services, and outpatient clinics and labs. The national sample included RN workgroups in 2,900 patient care units (55,516 RNs; 206 hospitals in 44 states). Workgroup satisfaction across all unit types was moderate. RN workgroups in pediatric units were the most satisfied, whereas those in surgical services and emergency department unit types were least satisfied. A consistent finding across all unit types was high satisfaction with the specific domains of nurse-to-nurse interaction, professional status, and professional development versus much lower satisfaction with task, decision making, and pay. Findings can be used to inform and develop investigations that examine specific aspects of the work environment for RN workgroups in various unit types.

  9. Diesel oil removal by immobilized Pseudoxanthomonas sp. RN402.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopcharoenkul, Wannarak; Netsakulnee, Parichat; Pinyakong, Onruthai

    2013-06-01

    Pseudoxanthomonas sp. RN402 was capable of degrading diesel, crude oil, n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane. The RN402 cells were immobilized on the surface of high-density polyethylene plastic pellets at a maximum cell density of 10(8) most probable number (MPN) g(-1) of plastic pellets. The immobilized cells not only showed a higher efficacy of diesel oil removal than free cells but could also degrade higher concentrations of diesel oil. The rate of diesel oil removal by immobilized RN402 cells in liquid culture was 1,050 mg l(-1) day(-1). Moreover, the immobilized cells could maintain high efficacy and viability throughout 70 cycles of bioremedial treatment of diesel-contaminated water. The stability of diesel oil degradation in the immobilized cells resulted from the ability of living RN402 cells to attach to material surfaces by biofilm formation, as was shown by CLSM imaging. These characteristics of the immobilized RN402 cells, including high degradative efficacy, stability and flotation, make them suitable for the purpose of continuous wastewater bioremediation.

  10. State-of-the-art incore detector system provides operational and safety benefits: Example, Hanford N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffer, H.

    1988-08-01

    A presentation on the operational and safety benefits that can be derived from a state-of-the-art incore neutron monitoring system has been prepared for the DOE/ANL training course on ''The Potential Safety Impact of New and Emerging Technologies on the Operation of DOE Nuclear Facilities.'' Advanced incore neutron flux monitoring systems have been installed in some commercial reactors and should be considered for any new reactor designs or as backfits to existing plants. The recent installation of such a system at the Hanford N Reactor is used as an example in this presentation. Unfortunately, N Reactor has been placed in a cold standby condition and the full core incore system has not been tested under power conditions. Nevertheless, the evaluations that preceded the installation of the full core system provide interesting insight into the operational and safety benefits that could be expected

  11. Determine concentration radon 222Rn in the air inside and outside the buildings at the summer province of Baghdad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ataby, N.R.; Aisa, B.H.; Jebir, H.M.; Hatem, J.N.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, Was use of solid-state nuclear track detectors in the measurement of concentrations of radon 222 Rn inside and outside of the buildings in the summer and winter of the Baghdad province and because of the high features of the technical sensitivity and efficiency to record track of charged particles (such as protons and alpha particles and fission fragments) . Is the radon of Environmental Pollutions that is caused health problems , that was seemed the concern at the problem of pollution, radon gas 222 Rn and thoron gas 220 Rn and the considerable risk resulting from exposure to these isotopes by alpha particles emitted which have proved the relationship between exposure to emitted alpha particles with the incidence of disease of lung cancer. In this study, measured the concentration of radon 222 Rn inside and outside buildings in the summer and winter in several areas from the Baghdad province and as showed in the attached tables. Been studied the environmental radioactivity and measurement of the concentration of radon gas in the air in different parts of the city of Baghdad. the highest concentration was Found in the second Orf ali (A) (of the Sadr City) for the summer and was (37.973 Bq/m3) outside the building and ((53.400 Bq/m3 inside the building, either for the winter season was (55.773 Bq/m3) outside the building and (Bq/m3 58.148) inside the building for the same region and This is the concentration within the limits allowed

  12. Receiver operating characteristics of diagnostic efficacy of resting left ventricular performance (evaluating with a non-imaging ECG gated scintillation detector - nuclear stethoscope)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlyarov, E.V.; Reba, R.C.; Lindsay, J.

    1983-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of left ventricular performance at rest was applied to evaluate diagnostic utility of non-imaging nuclear detector (''Nuclear Stethoscope''), for screening patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirty-one patients without CAD and normal rest and stress radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) were used as a control group. Another 62 patients with abnormal left ventricular reserve and segmental wall motion abnormalities at rest were also studied. All 93 patients were studied with the Nuclear Stethoscope (30 minutes after conventional MUGA testing) both in beat-to-beat and gated equilibrium modes. ROC analysis showed that along with ejection fraction, stroke and end-diastolic volumes, evaluation of the left ventricular filling phase has a great potential for the identification of patients with a segmental wall motion abnormality and, therefore, significant CAD

  13. The AFP Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00514541; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is one of the forward detectors of the ATLAS experiment at CERN aiming at measuring momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. Silicon Tracking and Time-of-Flight detectors are located inside Roman Pot stations inserted into beam pipe aperture. The AFP detector is composed of two stations on each side of the ATLAS interaction point and is under commissioning. The detector is provided with high and low voltage distribution systems. Each station has vacuum and cooling systems, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. Monitoring of environmental parameters, like temperature and radiation, is also available. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of the detector hardware and ensures the safe and reliable operation of the detector, assuring good data quality. Comparing with DCS systems of other detectors, the AFP DCS main challenge is to cope with the large variety of AFP equipment. This paper describes t...

  14. The AFP detector control system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00514541; The ATLAS collaboration; Caforio, Davide; Czekierda, Sabina; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Olszowska, Jolanta; Sicho, Petr; Zabinski, Bartlomiej

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is one of the forward detectors of the ATLAS experiment at CERN aiming at measuring momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. Silicon Tracking and Time-of-Flight detectors are located inside Roman Pot stations inserted into beam pipe aperture. The AFP detector is composed of two stations on each side of the ATLAS interaction point and is under commissioning. The detector is provided with high and low voltage distribution systems. Each station has vacuum and cooling systems, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. Monitoring of environmental parameters, like temperature and radiation, is also available. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of the detector hardware and ensures the safe and reliable operation of the detector, assuring good data quality. Comparing with DCS systems of other detectors, the AFP DCS main challenge is to cope with the large variety of AFP equipment. This paper describes t...

  15. On-Site Determination and Monitoring of Real-Time Fluence Delivery for an Operating UV Reactor Based on a True Fluence Rate Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Qiang, Zhimin; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2017-07-18

    At present, on-site fluence (distribution) determination and monitoring of an operating UV system represent a considerable challenge. The recently developed microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD) is able to measure the approximate true fluence rate (FR) at a fixed position in a UV reactor that can be compared with a FR model directly. Hence it has provided a connection between model calculation and real-time fluence determination. In this study, an on-site determination and monitoring method of fluence delivery for an operating UV reactor was developed. True FR detectors, a UV transmittance (UVT) meter, and a flow rate meter were used for fundamental measurements. The fluence distribution, as well as reduction equivalent fluence (REF), 10th percentile dose in the UV fluence distribution (F 10 ), minimum fluence (F min ), and mean fluence (F mean ) of a test reactor, was calculated in advance by the combined use of computational fluid dynamics and FR field modeling. A field test was carried out on the test reactor for disinfection of a secondary water supply. The estimated real-time REF, F 10 , F min , and F mean decreased 73.6%, 71.4%, 69.6%, and 72.9%, respectively, during a 6-month period, which was attributable to lamp output attenuation and sleeve fouling. The results were analyzed with synchronous data from a previously developed triparameter UV monitoring system and water temperature sensor. This study allowed demonstration of an accurate method for on-site, real-time fluence determination which could be used to enhance the security and public confidence of UV-based water treatment processes.

  16. Short-term 222Rn activity concentration changes in underground spaces with limited air exchange with the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijałkowska-Lichwa, L.; Przylibski, T. A.

    2011-04-01

    The authors investigated short-time changes in 222Rn activity concentration occurring yearly in two underground tourist facilities with limited air exchange with the atmosphere. One of them is Niedźwiedzia (Bear) Cave in Kletno, Poland - a natural space equipped with locks ensuring isolation from the atmosphere. The other site is Fluorite Adit in Kletno, a section of a disused uranium mine. This adit is equipped with a mechanical ventilation system, operated periodically outside the opening times (at night). Both sites are situated within the same metamorphic rock complex, at similar altitudes, about 2 km apart. The measurements conducted revealed spring and autumn occurrence of convective air movements. In Bear Cave, this process causes a reduction in 222Rn activity concentration in the daytime, i.e. when tourists, guides and other staff are present in the cave. From the point of view of radiation protection, this is the best situation. For the rest of the year, daily concentrations of 222Rn activity in the cave are very stable. In Fluorite Adit, on the other hand, significant variations in daily 222Rn activity concentrations are recorded almost all year round. These changes are determined by the periods of activity and inactivity of mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately this is inactive in the daytime, which results in the highest values of 222Rn activity concentration at the times when tourists and staff are present in the adit. Slightly lower concentrations of radon in Fluorite Adit are recorded in the winter season, when convective air movements carry a substantial amount of radon out into the atmosphere. The incorrect usage of mechanical ventilation in Fluorite Adit results in the most unfavourable conditions in terms of radiation protection. The staff working in that facility are exposed practically throughout the year to the highest 222Rn activity concentrations, both at work (in the adit) and at home (outside their working hours). Therefore, not very well

  17. Radial fractional Laplace operators and Hessian inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Fausto; Verbitsky, Igor E.

    In this paper we deduce a formula for the fractional Laplace operator ( on radially symmetric functions useful for some applications. We give a criterion of subharmonicity associated with (, and apply it to a problem related to the Hessian inequality of Sobolev type: ∫Rn |(u| dx⩽C∫Rn -uFk[u] dx, where Fk is the k-Hessian operator on Rn, 1⩽kFerrari et al. [5] contains the extremal functions for the Hessian Sobolev inequality of X.-J. Wang (1994) [15]. This is proved using logarithmic convexity of the Gaussian ratio of hypergeometric functions which might be of independent interest.

  18. COOMET.RI(II)-S1.Rn-222 (169/UA/98): Rn-222 volume activity comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skliarov, V.; Rottger, A.; Honig, A.; Korostin, S.; Kuznetsov, S.; Lapenas, A.; Milevsky, V.; Ivaniukovich, A.; Kharitonov, I.; Sepman, S.

    2009-01-01

    According to a first program, a supplementary comparison of Rn-222 volume activity was drawn up as a bilateral supplementary comparison between NSC 'Institute of Metrology', Ukraine, and VNIIFTRI, Russia. It took place in March 2005. In April 2005, at the 5. meeting of COOMET held in Braunschweig (Germany), representatives of these institutes exchanged data which showed the comparability of the national standards of Ukraine and Russia for the check points. During the discussion of the procedure some other institutes decided to join the comparison program, which was extended to BelGIM (Belarus), PTB (Germany), VNIIM (Russia) and RMTC (Latvia). The national standards of volume activity of radon-222 were thus calibrated using one standard radon radiometer as the transfer standard. Results are shown in the Final Report of the comparison. (authors)

  19. COOMET.RI(II)-S1.Rn-222 (169/UA/98): Rn-222 volume activity comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliarov, V. [National Scientific Centre, Institute of Metrology (NSC IM), Kharkiv (Ukraine); Rottger, A.; Honig, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany); Korostin, S.; Kuznetsov, S. [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Physical, Technical and Radio Measurements (VNIIFTRI), Moscow Region, Mendeleyevo (Russian Federation); Lapenas, A. [Latvian National Metrology Centre Ltd, Radiation Metrology and Testing Centre (RMTC), Salaspils (Latvia); Milevsky, V.; Ivaniukovich, A. [Belarussian State Institute of Metrology (BelGIM), Minsk (Belarus); Kharitonov, I.; Sepman, S. [D I Mendeleyev Institute of metrology (VNIIM), Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    According to a first program, a supplementary comparison of Rn-222 volume activity was drawn up as a bilateral supplementary comparison between NSC 'Institute of Metrology', Ukraine, and VNIIFTRI, Russia. It took place in March 2005. In April 2005, at the 5. meeting of COOMET held in Braunschweig (Germany), representatives of these institutes exchanged data which showed the comparability of the national standards of Ukraine and Russia for the check points. During the discussion of the procedure some other institutes decided to join the comparison program, which was extended to BelGIM (Belarus), PTB (Germany), VNIIM (Russia) and RMTC (Latvia). The national standards of volume activity of radon-222 were thus calibrated using one standard radon radiometer as the transfer standard. Results are shown in the Final Report of the comparison. (authors)

  20. Spectroscopy of 211Rn approaching the valence limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricius, B.; Baxter, A.M.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Poletti, A.R.; Schiffer, K.J.

    1993-02-01

    High spin states in 211 Rn were populated using the reaction 198 Pt( 18 O,5n) at 96 MeV. The decay was studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy. The known level scheme is extended up to a spin of greater than 69/2 and many non-yrast states are added. Semi-empirical shell model calculations and the properties of related states in 210 Rn and 212 Rn are used to assign configurations to some of the non-yrast states. The properties of the high spin states observed are compared to the predictions of the Multi-Particle Octupole Coupling model and the semi-empirical shell model. The maximum reasonable spin available from the valence particles and holes is 77/2 and states are observed to near this limit. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  1. RN Job Satisfaction and Retention After an Interprofessional Team Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Dawon; Zierler, Brenda

    2018-04-01

    Despite continuing interest in interprofessional teamwork to improve nurse outcomes and quality of care, there is little research that focuses on nurse job satisfaction and retention after an interprofessional team intervention. This study explored registered nurse (RN) job satisfaction and retention after a purposeful interprofessional team training and structured interprofessional bedside rounds were implemented. As part of a larger study, in this comparative cross-sectional study, pre- and post-intervention data on RN job satisfaction and turnover rate were collected and analyzed. It was found that RNs had significantly higher job satisfaction after the interprofessional team intervention. The 6-month period turnover rate in the post-intervention period was slightly lower than the 6-month period turnover rate in pre-intervention period; however, the rate was too low to provide statistical evidence. Ongoing coaching and supportive work environments to improve RN outcomes should be considered to enhance quality of care and patient safety in healthcare.

  2. Mineral water 222 Rn activity decrease due to consumption habits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriani, Moacir; Taddei, Maria Helena Tirollo; Silva, Nivaldo Carlos da

    2001-01-01

    Mineral waters from the Pocos de Caldas Plateau springs, an elevated region with high natural radioactivity, in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, have significant 222 Rn concentration on site. The highest concentration in the waters are from: Fonte Villela - Aguas da Prata (∼ 1000 Bql -1 ); Fonte Grande Hotel - Pocinhos do Rio Verde (∼ 400 Brq -1 ) and Fonte CNEN Lab - Pocos de Caldas (∼ 290 Bql -1 ). These waters are used by the population as drinking water and due to consumption habits, can lead to internal doses above accepted limits for the public. This work deals with the decrease of 222 Rn activity in mineral waters fro two different popular consumption habits, and with the adult effective dose equivalent reduction due to water consumption habits. It has been found that the estimated dose based on the biokinetic Crawford-Brown model, can be one fourth of dose based on 222 Rn activity on site. (author)

  3. 222Rn alpha dose to organs other than lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.H.; Robbins, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The alpha dose to cells in tissues or organs other theft the lung has been calculated using the solubility coefficients for 222 Rn measured in human tissue. The annual alpha dose equivalent f rom 222 Rn and decay products in most tissues is a maximum of 30% of the annual average natural background dose equivalent (1 mSv) for external and internally deposited nuclides. The dose to the small population of lymphocytes located in or under the bronchial epithelium is a special case and their annual dose equivalent is essentially the same as that to basal cells in bronchial epithelium (200 mSv) for continuous exposure to 200 Bq M -3 . The significance of this dose is uncertain because the only excess cancer observed in follow up studies of underground miners with high 222 Rn exposure is bronchogenic carcinoma

  4. Spectroscopy of 211Rn approaching the valence limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricus, B.; Baxter, A.M.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Poletti, A.R.; Schiffer, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    High-spin states in 211 Rn were populated using the reaction 198 Pt( 18 O, 5n) at 96 MeV. Their decay was studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy. The known level scheme is extended up to a spin of greater than 69/2 and many non-yrast states are added. Semi-empirical shell-model calculations and the properties of related states in 210 Rn and 212 Rn are used to assign configurations to some of the non-yrast states. The properties of the high-spin states observed are compared to the predictions of the multi-particle octupole-coupling model and the semi-empirical shell model. The maximum reasonable spin available from the valence particles and holes in 77/2 and states are observed to near this limit. (orig.)

  5. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  6. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  7. Future particle detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Allan G.

    2000-01-01

    Starting with a short summary of the major new experimental physics programs, we attempt to motivate the reasons why existing general-purpose detectors at Hadron Colliders are what they are, why they are being upgraded, and why new facilities are being constructed. The CDF and ATLAS detectors are used to illustrate these motivations. Selected physics results from the CDF experiment provide evidence for limitations on the detector performance, and new physics opportunities motivate both machine and detector upgrades. This is discussed with emphasis on the improved physics reach of the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron (√(s)=2 TeV). From 2005, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will become operational at a collision energy of √(s)=14 TeV, seven times larger than at the Tevatron Collider. To exploit the physics capability of the LHC, several large detectors are being constructed. The detectors are significantly more complex than those at the Tevatron Collider because of physics and operational constraints. The detector design and technology of the aspects of the large general-purpose detector ATLAS is described

  8. Estimating Rn-induced lung cancer in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubin, J.H.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The proportion of lung cancer deaths attributable to Rn among residents of single-family homes in the U.S. (approximately 70% of the housing stock) is estimated using the log-normal distribution of Rn concentrations proposed by Nero et al. (1986) and the risk model developed by the National Academy of Sciences' BEIR IV Committee. The risk model, together with the exposure distribution, predicts that approximately 14% of lung cancer deaths among such residents (about 13,300 deaths per year, or 10% of all U.S. lung cancer deaths) may be due to indoor Rn exposure. The 95% confidence interval is 7%-25%, or approximately 6600 to 24,000 lung cancer deaths. These estimated attributable risks due to Rn are similar for males and females and for smokers and nonsmokers, but higher baseline risks of lung cancer result in much larger absolute numbers of Rn-attributable cancers among males (approximately 9000) and among smokers (approximately 11,000). Because of the apparent skewness of the exposure distribution, most of the contribution to the attributable risks arises from exposure rates below 148 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1), i.e., below the EPA action level. As a result, if all exposure rates that exceed 148 Bq m-3 (approximately 8% of homes) were eliminated, the models predict that the total annual lung cancer burden in the U.S. would drop by 4-5%, or by about 3800 lung cancer deaths, in contrast to a maximum reduction of 14% if all indoor Rn exposure above the 1st percentile were eliminated

  9. Matérn-based nonstationary cross-covariance models for global processes

    KAUST Repository

    Jun, Mikyoung

    2014-01-01

    -covariance models, based on the Matérn covariance model class, that are suitable for describing prominent nonstationary characteristics of the global processes. In particular, we seek nonstationary versions of Matérn covariance models whose smoothness parameters

  10. Characteristics of the Nursing Practice Environment Associated With Lower Unit-Level RN Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Brantley, Heather V; Park, Shin Hye; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine characteristics of the nursing practice environment associated with lower RN turnover. Identifying characteristics of the practice environment that contribute to lower RN turnover is important for meeting the national quality strategy priority of reducing healthcare costs. Data from 1002 adult care units in 162 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators participating hospitals were analyzed using multivariate linear regression. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index was used to measure practice environment characteristics. RN turnover was measured at the unit level. Nursing units with higher overall ratings of the nursing practice environment had lower rates of RN turnover. Units with higher RN perceived staffing and resource adequacy experienced significantly lower RN turnover. Unit managers and hospital administrators should consider RN perception of staffing and resource adequacy and the overall practice environment when developing targeted strategies for decreasing RN turnover.

  11. Robustní mnohorozměrná statistika v genetických aplikacích

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2011), s. 13-19 ISSN 1210-8022 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : robustní metody * vícerozměrná statistika * genetický výzkum * metoda MWCD * sekvence Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics , Operational Research

  12. Til julefrokost med Bjørn & Okay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Sivertsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    I denne artikel vises med udgangspunkt i en beskrivelse af et specifikt arrangement med det danske danseorkester Bjørn & Okay, hvordan man optræder inden for denne særlige musiktradition. Bjørn & Okays performative udgangspunkt er, at de, trods en status som landskendt orkester med mange hits, i ...... the audience and constantly telling them what to do. At the same time he and the other musicians actively bond with the audience, both onstage and offstage, which helps building the spirit of community, which is the clear goal of the musical performance....

  13. Ole Bjørn Kraft 1893-1980

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian Houlberg

    2010-01-01

    Ole Bjørn Kraft (1893-1980) var en central konservativ politiker i årene før og efter anden verdenskrig. Han markerede sig som udpræget idépolitiker og opnåede ad flere omgange at blive minister.......Ole Bjørn Kraft (1893-1980) var en central konservativ politiker i årene før og efter anden verdenskrig. Han markerede sig som udpræget idépolitiker og opnåede ad flere omgange at blive minister....

  14. History of infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  15. Development of method for quantification of 222Rn exhalation ratio at radioactive waste dam and soil study as mitigator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macacini, Jose Flavio

    2008-01-01

    The Brazilian uranium mining company (INB) processed 2.32 10 6 tons of uranium ore in its ore treatment unit (UTM - Caldas), located in the Pocos de Caldas plateau. During 16 years of operation, this unit discarded 2.39 10 6 tons of solid waste in a tailing dam, with an average activity concentration of 226 Ra of 7311 ± 184 Bq kg -1 . Most of the atoms of 222 Rn generated from the radioactive waste of the tailing dam remain bounded to the mineral structure. However, a fraction of these atoms can be released from the mineral structure and then emanate. Reaching the porous space of the waste piles, the 222 Rn moves towards the interface waste-atmosphere, exhaling into the atmosphere. The featuring properties of the 222 Rn transport and the biological damage caused by its progeny transform this small chain of radionuclides into a scourge of nature. Because of that, the dry area of the tailing dam was the scope of this work. A methodology was developed for quantifying the exhalation rate of 222 Rn. Moreover, the soil from its surroundings was experimentally evaluated as a cover material to reduce the exhalation of 222 Rn. A collector of 222 Rn was developed, being denominated 607. This collector was proved to be exact and precise after laboratory tests, when a standard for 222 Rn exhalation was prepared with caldasite, an uranium ore with high concentration of 226 Ra (26611 ± 581 Bq kg -1 ), crushed to the granulometric interval from 1.168 mm to 0.589 mm. The results of 222 Rn exhalation rate using the collector 607 were not influenced by the adsorption of water steam, considering sampling periods lower than 5 days and mass of water steam lower than 7 g. Sampling for measuring 222 Rn exhalation rates in the dry area of the tailing dam was carried out using the collector 607, following the experimental design established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The average exhalation rate in the west part of the tailing dam was 1.30 ± 1.24 Bq m

  16. Continuous 222Rn measurements in water to perform a hydrograph separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, H.; Kies, A.; Tosheva, Z.

    2004-01-01

    To get information about the different components of runoff before, during and after heavy rain events, micro catchments were selected to perform hydrograph separations using the radioactive noble gas 222 Rn and the stable isotope 18 O as natural occurring, conservative tracers. These tracers help to separate 'pre event', 'event', and 'post event' water in the total runoff. The selected micro basins are situated in the western part of Luxembourg and belong to the Attert River catchment area. Our investigations are a part of the project 'Cycleau' which is studying risk assessments in the Attert River area. By combining the databases great opportunities for comparison were realized. So far the catchment areas have been studied for two years. Continuous monitoring radon detectors were installed at selected measuring points, which were important for the different flow regimes. Along with the detectors precision thermometers, conductivity instruments, CO 2 -detectors, flow meter, v-notches, and automatic sampler for chemical analysis were set up. Besides the continuous measurements for 222 Rn, point samples were taken for liquid scintillation analysis (LCS). Single rain events will have been sampled and measured intensively for 222 Rn (LCS) and 18 O in two to three days field campaigns, for a comparison of the continuous method with the 18 O results and to strengthen our data by the end of march 2004. During the first year of this study instrument testing and evaluation was performed. Different radon monitor units were examined to find instruments that work best under field conditions. Additionally, separate units had to be constructed for a degassing of the solved gases out of the water, because the instruments for radon measuring were constructed for radon in air not for radon in water. A 'bubbler' had be developed that performs the degassing process. The techniques will be presented. Through stable results from our instrument developments, we observed different radon

  17. ST ECS error handling and detector safety

    CERN Document Server

    Esperante Pereira, D

    2010-01-01

    This note describes the automatic operation sequences that the ECS implements in order to operate the ST detector in a safe and reliable way. First, the start-up sequences to set the detector in a well known state are described. In addition the possible ST detector states based on the status of the different detector elements will be defined. The states are of crucial interest for the safe operation of the detector when the LHC beam is ready. Besides, the ECS automatic actions taken in case of abnormal status of any of the detector elements are reported. Next, the operational alarm ranges and the error recovery mechanisms are mentioned.

  18. Locating karst depressed columns by means of Rn measurement on the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Daimao; Liu Hongfu; Duan Hongjie; Duan Lindi; Sui Haichen

    1999-01-01

    The coal mining and the related surface projects are extremely harassed by the underground karst depressed columns. The author discussed the surface Rn concentration's abnormality caused by the karst depressed columns. It is concluded that different kinds of karst depressed column can cause different Rn concentration's abnormality. The α-cup Rn measuring instrument was used for detecting Rn abnormality on the surface in order to locate the underground karst depressed columns

  19. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Joram, Christian; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  20. SU-8 as a Material for Microfabricated Particle Physics Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Jiguet, Sebastien; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Several recent detector te chnologies developed for particle physics applications are based on microfabricated structures. Dete ctors built with this approach generally exhibit the overall best performance in te rms of spatial and time resolution. Many properties of the SU-8 photoepoxy make it suitable for the manufacturing of microstructured particle detectors. This arti cle aims to review some emerging detector technologies making use of SU-8 microstructu ring, namely micropatte rn gaseous detectors and microfluidic scintillation detectors. Th e general working principle and main process steps for the fabrication of each device are reported, with a focus on the advantages brought to the device functionality by the us e of SU-8. A novel process based on multiple bonding steps for the fabrication of thin multila yer microfluidic scin tillation detectors developed by the authors is presented. Finally, a brief overview of the applications for the discussed devices is given.

  1. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  2. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the {sup 222}Rn decays detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu.M.; Gangapshev, A.M.; Gezhaev, A.M.; Etezov, R.A.; Kazalov, V.V.; Kuzminov, V.V. [Baksan Neutrino Observatory,Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 361609 Neutrino (Russian Federation); Panasenko, S.I. [V.N.Karazin Kharkiv National University, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Ratkevich, S.S., E-mail: ssratk@gmail.com [V.N.Karazin Kharkiv National University, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Tekueva, D.A.; Yakimenko, S.P. [Baksan Neutrino Observatory,Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 361609 Neutrino (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-21

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the {sup 222}Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented. - Highlights: • The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. • The chamber is intended to register alpha-particles from {sup 222}Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. • The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. • An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV alpha-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure have been investigated and the results are presented.

  3. Improvement of measuring methods and instrumentation concerning 222Rn determination in drinking waters – RAD7 and LSC technique comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojković, Ivana; Tenjović, Branislava; Nikolov, Jovana; Vesković, Miroslav; Mrđa, Dušan; Todorović, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of 222 Rn in environmental water samples using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was applied and optimized. A minimum detectable activity of 0.029 Bq l −1 in a 20 ml glass vial (10 ml water sample mixed with 10 ml of liquid scintillation cocktail) has been achieved during 300 min of measurement time. The procedure was compared with RAD7 radon detector measurements. 226 Ra content in the water was determined by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Applications to drinking waters collected from public drinking fountains in the Vojvodina (Serbia) are presented with annual effective dose for ingestion and inhalation for adults calculated. - Highlights: • A procedure for the determination of 222 Rn in environmental water samples using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was applied and optimized. • The procedure was compared with RAD7 radon detector measurements. • A minimum detectable activity of 0.029 Bq l −1 in 10 ml of sample has been achieved in glass vials during 300 min of measurement time. • 226 Ra content in the water was determined by gamma-ray spectroscopy. • Applications to drinking waters collected from public drinking fountains in the Vojvodina (Serbia) are presented with annual effective dose for ingestion and inhalation for adults calculated

  4. The GDH-Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, K; Fausten, M; Menze, D; Michel, T; Nagel, A; Ryckbosch, D; Speckner, T; Vyver, R V D; Zeitler, G

    2002-01-01

    For the GDH-Experiment at ELSA, the helicity dependent total photoabsorption cross-section is to be determined. These measurements will be performed with the newly developed GDH-Detector which is presented here. The concept of the GDH-Detector is to detect at least one reaction product from all possible hadronic processes with almost complete acceptance concerning solid angle and efficiency. This is realized by an arrangement of scintillators and lead. The overall acceptance for hadronic processes is better than 99%. The electromagnetic background is suppressed by about five orders of magnitude by means of a threshold Cherenkov detector. In dedicated tests, it has been demonstrated that all individual components of the GDH-Detector fulfill the design goals. Measurements of unpolarized total photoabsorption cross-sections were performed to ensure that the complete GDH-Detector is operational.

  5. Undepleted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancoita, P.G.; Seidman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Large-size silicon detectors employing relatively low resistivity material can be used in electromagnetic calorimetry. They can operate in strong magnetic fields, under geometric constraints and with microstrip detectors a high resolution can be achieved. Low noise large capacitance oriented electronics was developed to enable good signal-to-noise ratio for single relativistic particles traversing large area detectors. In undepleted silicon detectors, the charge migration from the field-free region has been investigated by comparing the expected peak position (from the depleted layer only) of the energy-loss of relativistic electrons with the measured one. Furthermore, the undepleted detectors have been employed in a prototype of Si/W electromagnetic colorimeter. The sensitive layer was found to be systematically larger than the depleted one

  6. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  7. Rn-Gas Concentration and Working Level Measurements Using SSNTD in Uranium Exploration Galleries Allouga Mine, Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Monem, A.A.; Hassan, S.F.; Abdel-Kader, F.H.; El-Naggar, A.M.; Essia, H.M.; Abdel-Hafez, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of Rn-gas concentrations and Working Level (WL), were carried out in the U-exploration galleries at El- Allouga Mine, Sinai, Egypt by passive techniques (SSNTD) during the four seasons ( Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring) using four different detector types: CR-39, MK, CN-85 and LR-115.Twenty eight (28) stations were chosen for this purpose reflecting different environmental conditions as measurement sites within the galleries. The Rn-gas concentrations , in the summer period ranged from 25.86 to 44.2 pCi/l in the ventilated stations and from 488.98 to 611.16 pCi/l in the non-ventilated stations. In the fall period , the average Rn-gas concentrations in the ventilated stations ranged from 31.61 to 56.36 pCi/l while in the non-ventilated stations from 457.61 to 621.52 pCi/l. In the winter period, the average Rn-gas concentrations in the ventilated stations ranged from 27.59 to 66.45 pCi/l while in the non- ventilated stations from 499.09 to 603.81 pCi/l. In the spring the Rn-gas concentrations ranged from 30.8 to 46.77 pCi/l in the ventilated stations, whereas, in the non-ventilated stations from 404.06 to 445.18 pCi/l. The (WL), in the summer period, ranged from 0.143 to 0.247 in the ventilated sector and from 4.408 to 5.497 in the non-ventilated stations .In fall, the( WL) ranged from 0.166 to 0.295 in the ventilated stations and from 4.123 to 5.624 in the non-ventilated stations. In the winter, the (WL) ranged from 0.105 to 0.37 in the ventilated stations and from 4.138 to 5.26 in the non-ventilated stations. In the spring, the (WL) in the ventilated stations ranged from 0.152 to 0.241 and from 3.696 to 4.087 in the non-ventilated stations. These results indicate that: i)The low measured Rn gas and (WL) values in the ventilated stations reflect the effect of variations in meteorological conditions on (WL) determination where the air flow carries the Rn-gas before it decays and the daughters are plated onto the SSNTD . ii) The larger ranges for Rn

  8. Ex-core detector response caused by control rod misalignment observed during operation of the reactor on the nuclear ship Mutsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Gakuhari, Kazuhiko; Okada, Noboru; Sakai, Tomohiro

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected deviations of ex-core neutron detector signals were observed during a voyage of the Japanese nuclear ship, Mutsu. From detailed three-dimensional analyses, this phenomenon was determined to be caused by an asymmetrical neutron source distribution in the core due to a small misalignment between the two control rods of a control rod group. A systematic ex-core detector response experiment was performed during the Mutsu's third experimental voyage to gain some understanding of the relationship between the control rod pattern and the detector response characteristics. Results obtained from analyses of the experiment indicate that the Crump-Lee technique, using calculated three-dimensional source distributions for various control rod patterns, provides good agreement between the calculated and measured detector responses. Xenon transient analyses were carried out to generate accurate three-dimensional source distributions for predicting the time-dependent detector response characteristics. Two types of ex-core detector responses are caused by changes in the control rod pattern in the Mutsu reactor: the detector response ratio tends to decrease with the withdrawal of a group of control rods as a pair, and a difference in the positions of the control rods in a group causes signal deviations among the four ex-core detectors. Control rod misalignment does not greatly affect the mean value of the four detector signals, and the deviation can be minimized if the two rods within a group are set at the same elevation at the time of detector calibration

  9. Modeling an array of encapsulated germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2012-01-01

    A probability model has been presented for understanding the operation of an array of encapsulated germanium detectors generally known as composite detector. The addback mode of operation of a composite detector has been described considering the absorption and scattering of γ-rays. Considering up to triple detector hit events, we have obtained expressions for peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios of the cluster detector, which consists of seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. Results have been obtained for the miniball detectors comprising of three and four seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. The formalism has been extended to the SPI spectrometer which is a telescope of the INTEGRAL satellite and consists of nineteen hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. This spectrometer comprises of twelve detector modules surrounding the cluster detector. For comparison, we have considered a spectrometer comprising of nine detector modules surrounding the three detector configuration of miniball detector. In the present formalism, the operation of these sophisticated detectors could be described in terms of six probability amplitudes only. Using experimental data on relative efficiency and fold distribution of cluster detector as input, the fold distribution and the peak-to-total, peak-to-background ratios have been calculated for the SPI spectrometer and other composite detectors at 1332 keV. Remarkable agreement between experimental data and results from the present formalism has been observed for the SPI spectrometer.

  10. Two remarks on normality preserving Borel automorphisms of Rn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For any θ ∈ Rn and any real n × n positive definite matrix. , let. N(θ, ) denote the n-variate ... nonsingular matrices, positive definite matrices and diagonal matrices with entries ±1. For any matrix A, denote by A ..... In other words, the quadratic form on the right-hand side is a constant on a set of positive. Lebesgue measure.

  11. Vold mod førskolebørn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oldrup, Helene; Lindstrøm, Maia; Korzen, Sara

    Denne rapport handler om praksis og barrierer for opsporing af og underretning om vold mod førskolebørn. Rapporten er baseret på 22 kvalitative interviews med fagfolk inden for dagpasning, sundhedsvæsen og det sociale system. Undersøgelsen viser bl.a., at en del af fagfolkene ofte tøver med at un...

  12. Musikterapi med kontakt- og kommunikationssvage børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Britta Vinkler

    2009-01-01

    I artiklen beskrives, hvordan musikterapi er med til at støtte en målrettet udviklingsproces hos børn, med diagnoser som Asperger syndrom, autisme, opmærksomhedsforstyrrelser, ADHD o.lign. Musikkens kvaliteter beskrives og illustreres gennem vignetter fra terapiforløb, der alle er foregået i Klinik...

  13. New Czechoslovak detector of leaking condenser tubes usable in both shutdown and reduced output operation of power unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Klinga, J.; Varvarovsky, F.; Zachar, J.; Fratric, D.

    1986-01-01

    The main reason for penetration of undesirable admixtures from cooling water in the condensate is the inleakage of steam turbine condensers. Briefly assessed are the means and methods of detecting and locating condenser leaks used in the world and in power facilities in Czechoslovakia. Equipment was developed based on measuring the difference between the pressure in a temporarily closed condenser tube and ambient pressure, for leak testing of condenser tubes during operation and during shutdown of WWER-440 units. Two types of the equipment were tested in practice. Type VUEZ-PHN 85P meets the requirements of objective leak tests and those of leak location in condenser tubes and of leak detection in tube expansion in the tube plates of WWER-440 unit condensers, this as concerns sensitivity, the objectivity of results, the cost of tests, and minimal losses of power during the test. Type VUEZ-PHN 85P can be used for leak location in all tube type heat exchangers with access to tube outlets in which under- or overpressure can be achieved in the space between the tubes relative to ambient pressure during the test. (Z.M.) 5 figs., 4 tabs., 11 refs

  14. A prospective assessment of the sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po surface collection for estimating sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzgerald, B

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have examined the utility of measuring the embedded sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po in solid materials as an indicator of long-term sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn exposure. However, in those studies, existing surfaces were employed. In this prospective study, pairs of glass surfaces were placed in homes around the United States along with an LR-115-II-etched track radon detector for each piece of glass. A subset of these glass samples has been analyzed for sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity. The results of measurements on a subset of samples are presented. The independent sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn measurements are compared with the sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po measurements and a relationship is obtained between the two results using a model for the accumulation of activity within an enclosed space. The data are interpreted in terms of (a) the usefulness of the sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po measurements as a long-term sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn detector and (b) the value of a new interpretation scheme to make retrospective assessments of the sup ...

  15. Radiation hard cryogenic silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, L.; Abreu, M.C.; Bell, W.H.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieuri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently observed that heavily irradiated silicon detectors, no longer functional at room temperature, 'resuscitate' when operated at temperatures below 130 K. This is often referred to as the 'Lazarus effect'. The results presented here show that cryogenic operation represents a new and reliable solution to the problem of radiation tolerance of silicon detectors

  16. New SRDN-3 probes with a semi-conductor detector for measuring radon activity concentration in underground spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przylibski, T.A.; Lidia Fijalkowska-Lichwa; Elzbieta Kochowska; Krzysztof Kozak; Jadwiga Mazur

    2010-01-01

    The article presents new Polish probes SRDN-3, developed at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw, equipped with a semi-conductor detector used for continuous measurements of 222 Rn activity concentration. Due to a relatively high lower detection limit, the device is dedicated for use in underground spaces-caves, adits, mines, tourist routes in strongholds, pyramids, etc. Its structure allows for difficult conditions in which the device is transported to the measurement site, as well as hard operating conditions caused chiefly by large ambient relative humidity, reaching up to 100%. The authors present calibration results of these appliances, as well as the results of their work in a cave and an adit in the Sudetes (SW Poland). After almost 2 years of working in difficult conditions, the probes displayed high reliability. No defects of the semi-conductor detectors or the electronics were observed, which ensured problem-free communication of the probe-programmer-PC set. Thanks to this, the authors have a 2 year stock of data, recorded hourly by five probes, at their disposal. The only element that did not withstand the test of extreme operating conditions was one of the combined relative humidity and temperature sensors. No powering problems were observed either, and the batteries were replaced once a year, before the winter season. Also the programmer functioned faultlessly, enabling data transmission to a PC, which, being much more sensitive to operating conditions, had been placed away from the site of probe exposure. After using more sensitive temperature, relative humidity and pressure sensors, SRDN-3 probes will certainly prove an excellent tool for microclimate measurements (including measurement of air-atmosphere exchange) in caves and other underground sites. Even nowadays they are already a satisfactory tool for monitoring 222 Rn concentration in underground spaces. (author)

  17. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  18. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  19. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  20. The AGILE anticoincidence detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perotti, F.; Fiorini, M.; Incorvaia, S.; Mattaini, E.; Sant'Ambrogio, E.

    2006-01-01

    AGILE is a γ-ray astrophysics space mission which will operate, starting from 2006, in the 30 MeV-50 GeV energy range with imaging capability also in the 15-45 keV energy band. In order to achieve the required detection sensitivity, all AGILE detectors are surrounded by an anticoincidence detector aimed at charged particle background rejection with an inefficiency as low as 10 -4 . In this work, the design and the structure of this anticoincidence detector are presented, as well as its performances in terms of charged particles detection inefficiency as derived from extensive calibrations performed at CERN PS

  1. Characterization of a microDiamond detector in high-dose-per-pulse electron beams for intra operative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, C; Marinelli, Marco; Tonnetti, A; Verona-Rinati, G; Falco, M D; Pimpinella, M; Ciccotelli, A; De Stefano, S; Felici, G; Marangoni, F

    2015-12-01

    To characterize a synthetic diamond dosimeter (PTW Freiburg microDiamond 60019) in high dose-per-pulse electron beams produced by an Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) dedicated accelerator. The dosimetric properties of the microDiamond were assessed under 6, 8 and 9 MeV electron beams by a NOVAC11 mobile accelerator (Sordina IORT Technologies S.p.A.). The characterization was carried out with dose-per-pulse ranging from 26 to 105 mGy per pulse. The microDiamond performance was compared with an Advanced Markus ionization chamber and a PTW silicon diode E in terms of dose linearity, percentage depth dose (PDD) curves, beam profiles and output factors. A good linearity of the microDiamond response was verified in the dose range from 0.2 Gy to 28 Gy. A sensitivity of 1.29 nC/Gy was measured under IORT electron beams, resulting within 1% with respect to the one obtained in reference condition under (60)Co gamma irradiation. PDD measurements were found in agreement with the ones by the reference dosimeters, with differences in R50 values below 0.3 mm. Profile measurements evidenced a high spatial resolution of the microDiamond, slightly worse than the one of the silicon diode. The penumbra widths measured by the microDiamond resulted approximately 0.5 mm larger than the ones by the Silicon diode. Output factors measured by the microDiamond were found within 2% with those obtained by the Advanced Markus down to 3 cm diameter field sizes. The microDiamond dosimeter was demonstrated to be suitable for precise dosimetry in IORT applications under high dose-per-pulse conditions. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New detector techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Iarocci, Enzo

    1994-03-14

    The intense R&D effort being carried out in view of LHC has given rise in a relatively short time to a wide spectrum of new detector concepts and technologies. Subject of the lectures will be some of the most interesting new ideas and developments, in the field of noble liquid, crystal and scintillating fiber trackers. The emphasis will be on the basic aspects of detector operation.

  3. Effects of RN Age and Experience on Transformational Leadership Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Susan; Gish, Mary; Rosenblum, Ruth; Herman, Michael

    2017-06-01

    This study reported the evolution of transformational leadership (TL) practices and behaviors across years of age, management experience, and professional nursing practice within a professional nursing leadership organization. Recent studies of CNO TL found valuations peak near age 60 years. This study reported on a wider range of management positions, correlating years of RN practice and management experience and age to TL metrics. This study used Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practices Inventory-Self-Assessment (LPI-S) to survey a nursing leadership organization, the Association of California Nurse Leaders (ACNL). Anonymous responses were analyzed to identify leadership trends in age and years of professional service. On average, LPI-S metrics of leadership skills advance through years of management, RN experience, and age. The TL scores are statistically higher in most LPI-S categories for those with more than 30 years of RN or management experience. Decade-averaged LPI-S TL metrics in the ACNL survey evolve linearly throughout age before peaking in the decade from age 60 to 69 years. A similar evolution of TL metrics is seen in decades of either years of management experience or years of RN experience. Transformational leadership increased with nursing maturity particularly for LPI-S categories of "inspire a shared vision," "challenge the process," and "enable others to act." In the ACNL population studied, decade-averaged leadership metrics advanced. Leadership evolution with age in the broader RN population peaked in age bracket 60 to 69 years. The LPI-S averages declined when older than 70 years, coinciding with a shift from full-time work toward retirement and part-time employment.

  4. Measurements of 222 Rn in the indoor of dwellings in the Argentinean Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.; Lopez, F.

    2006-01-01

    The 222 Rn is responsible for approximately half of the dose in the population resultant of the exposure to natural radiation. Most of this dose comes from the inhalation of the offspring of the 222 Rn, and these doses they are specially important in set closed. The concentration of gas radon has been measured in housings of different cities of the Argentinean Republic. The elected cities are representative of the different geologic areas of our territory. For this its were used as detecting measurement method of nuclear tracks, electret detectors and detectors based on the adsorption in activated coal. Its were analyzed a total of 2689 housings from 1983 to the date. The average value of the radon concentration obtained starting from the 2689 monitored housings was of 41.6 Bq.m -3 . The effective annual dose calculated starting from this radon concentration, using a dosimetric factor of 25 μSv.a -1 (Bq.m -3 ), which assumes an equilibrium factor of 0.4, was of 1.04 mSv. Also, with the objective of determining the dose in form more exact, during the year 2000 it put on to point a passive technique for the simultaneous measurement such the radon concentration like of the equilibrium factor. This technique uses in oneself device two detectors of nuclear traces. The average value obtained starting from 204 monitored housings by this method of simultaneous measurement turns out to be 47.1 Bq.m -3 and 0.36 the equilibrium factor, being obtained a value of effective annual dose of 1.38 mSv. It fits to highlight that are very few the values above 200 Bq.m -3 and in any case the 300 Bq.m -3 is overcome. Analyzing the average equilibrium factor measured of 0.36, it was concluded that having assumed an equilibrium factor of 0.4 was adequate, for what for great measurement campaigns it can continue using the simple method that determines only the radon concentration. Comparing the obtained results by both methods, although the first counts with a statistic more important

  5. Levels of Rn and its daughters in houses in the northern part of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yulin; Wang Gongpeng; Yu Shui; Wang Yuping; Li Weina.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we described the levels of Rn and Rn daughters and their diurnal variation in spring and autumn in 18 typical houses in Harbin, Changchun and Jinxi. The results showed that there was no difference in levels of Rn and Rn daughters inside and outside the new and old houses in spring. The Rn concentration was 7.4∼12.5 Bq m -3 . The level of Rn daughters was 1.0-1.3 mWL. Both of them generally increased in winter and the Rn concentration was 15.1-95.1 Bq m -3 . The potential energy of Rn daughters was 4.6-21.3 mWL. The potential energy of Rn daughters in new houses were 20 and 10 times those in spring in Changchun and Harbin respectively and Rn concentrations were 10 and 4 times those in spring respectively. Rn concentrations in a few houses exceeded 200 Bq m -3 . It was lower from 12:00 to 20:00 and slightly higher from 20:00 to the next morning, and the high concentration peak can be found at morning from 4:00 to 6:00 after 24 hours continuous observation. The results was in agreement with those reported in UNSCEAR 1982 Report

  6. Preliminary evaluation of sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn level in homes and offices in two different regions in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Al-Hushari, M.; Raja, G.

    1996-01-01

    Evaluation of Rn levels was carried out in Homes and offices in Damascus and phosphate mining areas near Palmyra city in Syria. The AEOI radon diffusion dosimeters were used in this study. Electrochemical etching of polycarbonate detectors was used to develop the tracks. A standard source of radon was used for calibration. Radon levels were measured in 98 Homes of workers in the phosphate mining areas and 29 Homes in the Damascus region. The radon diffusion chambers were placed in offices and laboratories of AEC for about four months in average. The results gave an indication of Rn level in Damascus dwellings in spite of the necessity for further comprehensive studies for the city. The radon levels were high in some offices and laboratories where phosphate analyses are carried out or buildings near phosphate storage areas or near surface phosphate rocks occurrence, in comparison with Homes. (author). 7 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  7. The measurement of thoron (220Rn) concentration in indoor air continuously using pylon model WLx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnel Sofyan

    2011-01-01

    The concentration of thoron ( 220 Rn) in particular location can be higher than radon ( 220 Rn), however, its presence is always neglected. This might be due to the difficulties in calibration and discrimination between radon and thoron. From biokinetic and dosimetric model, it has been known that the dominant contribution of thoron to the effective dose is in the lungs. UNSCEAR estimates the doses contribution of thoron and its progenies is between 5-10% of the annual dose received by the general public and the risk level is 4.4 times greater than radon and progenies. Therefore, it is necessary to study the thoron concentration in indoor air and workplaces. Radon-thoron concentration in indoor air can be determined by direct methods using Pylon Model WLx device and passive methods using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTDs). In this research the measurement of thoron was carried out continuously using Pylon Model WLx equipment that is sensitive to radon for 24, 65, 72, 116 and 154 hours in different rooms. The measurement result showed that the mean value of thoron working level (WL) concentration obtained in room-1 was 2.53 ± 0.67 Bq/m 3 with maximum and minimum of thoron concentrations were 3.37 and 2.22 Bq/m 3 respectively. From the measurement in different locations, it was obtained that the largest and smallest average concentrations of thoron progenies were 0.83 ± 0.23 Bq/m 3 and 0.29 ± 0.64 Bq/m 3 , while the maximum and minimum concentration values were 7.80 Bq/m 3 and 0.01 Bq/m 3 respectively. Pylon Model WLx device is not enables to be used for longer and large scale survey area concurrently, so the SSNTDs which is sensitive to the emission of alpha particles and can measure cumulative thoron concentrations is required. (author)

  8. Development and operation of a novel PC-based high speed beam telescope for particle tracking using double sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treis, J.

    2002-08-01

    A PC based high speed silicon microstrip beam telescope consisting of several independent modules is presented. Every module contains an AC-coupled double sided silicon microstrip sensor and a complete set of analog and digital signal processing electronics. A digital bus connects the modules with the DAQ PC. A trigger logic unit coordinates the operation of all modules of the telescope. The system architecture allows easy integration of any kind of device under test into the data acquisition chain. Signal digitization, pedestal correction, hit detection and zero suppression are done by hardware inside the modules, so that the amount of data per event is reduced by a factor of 80 compared to conventional readout systems. In combination with a two level data acquisition scheme, this allows event rates up to 7.6 kHz. This is a factor of 40 faster than conventional VME based beam telescopes while comparable analog performance is maintained achieving signal to noise ratios of up to 70:1. The telescope has been tested in the SPS testbeam at CERN. It has been adopted as the reference instrument for testbeam studies for the ATLAS pixel detector development. (orig.)

  9. Radon gas inside historical buildings in the city of Cordoba; Gas {sup 222}Rn en construcciones historicas de la ciudad de Cordoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R; Germanier, A; Rubio, M [CEPROCOR, Cordoba (Argentina); Sbarato, D; Zappino, R [Observatorio Ambiental de la Municipalidad de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina)

    1998-07-01

    Full text: In this work measurements of the Radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentration in the inside of historical buildings which date back to the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th Centuries have been carried out in the city of Cordoba (Argentina). Meteorological factors such as room temperature and atmospheric pressure have not shown to affect, to a great extent, the results obtained. By comparing the concentration of {sup 222}Rn in environments at different levels we inferred that the soil underlying the buildings does not represent an important source of {sup 222}Rn. The main occurrence of the element was found in room walls, which shows that local building materials are an important source of {sup 222}Rn. Among the materials used in these buildings are granitic rocks, and to a lesser extent, lime, sand and marble. The {sup 222}Rn concentrations recorded in some of the rooms surveyed reach values which are close to the minimum intervene level set by international standards in 4pCi/l. The study of the effects of ventilation in the concentration of {sup 222}Rn allows us to conclude that its values decrease to accepted levels by means of a natural and efficient ventilation of the rooms. (author) [Spanish] Texto completo: En este trabajo se han realizado mediciones de la concentracion de radon (radon 222) en el interior de edificios de la ciudad de Cordoba que datan de finales del siglo XVII y comienzos del siglo XVIII. Las concentraciones de radon 222 se determinaron con un detector pasivo Radon Monitor 05-418, marca Victoreen. El mismo consta de una camara de difusion electrostatica y un detector de estado solido (Si) de juntura difundida. No se observo, en los resultados obtenidos, influencias causadas por factores meteorologicos como la temperatura ambiente y la presion atmosferica. Por comparacion de la concentracion de radon 222 en ambientes ubicados en distintas plantas se dedujo que el suelo subyacente bajo los edificios representa una fuente secundaria

  10. Determination of the exhalation rate of radon and thoron from building materials by detectors Cr-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasidov, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The building materials (BM) such as granite, bricks, sand, cement etc., contain uranium and thorium in various amounts. Therefore the knowledge of true value exhalation rate of Rn and Tn from BM represents scientific and practical interest in environmental radiation protection. In present work, we have used calibrated plastic cups with two detectors Cr-39. The detected surface of the cup is situated in perpendicular position surface BM and were exposed for 20-30 days. The first detector fixed the bottom on distance from surface of BM and records alpha particles from Rn-222 only. The second detector records alpha particles of the thoron and radon. After exposition, the detectors chemically etched and analyzed. The values of the exhalation rate per unit area of the granite, concrete, fired and unfired bricks, sand, cement, alabaster varied 0.091 - 0.1 Bq m -2 h -1 for the radon, 200 - 5800 Bq m -2 h - 1 for the thoron, accordingly

  11. Determination of radon concentration in spring gases with a portable semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Yanaga, M.; Yoshikawa, H.; Horiuchi, K.; Nakahara, H.; Murakami, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A portable integrating radon meter, alpha METER-400, was tested. The instrument detects α-rays of energy greater than 2.59 MeV. With this detector, the concentration of 222 Rn in spring gases at volcanic regions was determined. The results were compared with those observed by the liquid scintillation counting method. (author)

  12. Mobility and powering of large detectors. Moving large detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility is considered of moving large lepton detectors at ISABELLE for readying new experiments, detector modifications, and detector repair. A large annex (approximately 25 m x 25 m) would be built adjacent to the Lepton Hall separated from the Lepton Hall by a wall of concrete 11 m high x 12 m wide (for clearance of the detector) and approximately 3 m thick (for radiation shielding). A large pad would support the detector, the door, the cryogenic support system and the counting house. In removing the detector from the beam hall, one would push the pad into the annex, add a dummy beam pipe, bake out the beam pipe, and restack and position the wall on a small pad at the door. The beam could then operate again while experimenters could work on the large detector in the annex. A consideration and rough price estimate of various questions and proposed solutions are given

  13. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  14. Matérn-based nonstationary cross-covariance models for global processes

    KAUST Repository

    Jun, Mikyoung

    2014-07-01

    Many spatial processes in environmental applications, such as climate variables and climate model errors on a global scale, exhibit complex nonstationary dependence structure, in not only their marginal covariance but also their cross-covariance. Flexible cross-covariance models for processes on a global scale are critical for an accurate description of each spatial process as well as the cross-dependences between them and also for improved predictions. We propose various ways to produce cross-covariance models, based on the Matérn covariance model class, that are suitable for describing prominent nonstationary characteristics of the global processes. In particular, we seek nonstationary versions of Matérn covariance models whose smoothness parameters vary over space, coupled with a differential operators approach for modeling large-scale nonstationarity. We compare their performance to the performance of some existing models in terms of the aic and spatial predictions in two applications: joint modeling of surface temperature and precipitation, and joint modeling of errors in climate model ensembles. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Quantitative research on critical thinking and predicting nursing students' NCLEX-RN performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Elizabeth M

    2010-07-01

    The concept of critical thinking has been influential in several disciplines. Both education and nursing in general have been attempting to define, teach, and measure this concept for decades. Nurse educators realize that critical thinking is the cornerstone of the objectives and goals for nursing students. The purpose of this article is to review and analyze quantitative research findings relevant to the measurement of critical thinking abilities and skills in undergraduate nursing students and the usefulness of critical thinking as a predictor of National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) performance. The specific issues that this integrative review examined include assessment and analysis of the theoretical and operational definitions of critical thinking, theoretical frameworks used to guide the studies, instruments used to evaluate critical thinking skills and abilities, and the role of critical thinking as a predictor of NCLEX-RN outcomes. A list of key assumptions related to critical thinking was formulated. The limitations and gaps in the literature were identified, as well as the types of future research needed in this arena. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Practical difficulties in determining 222Rn flux density in underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1991-01-01

    Radon-222 flux density, J, has been determined in a number of locations in an underground U mine. Measurements were conducted using the Two-Point Measurement (2PM) method, consisting of measuring the 222Rn concentration at two different points a distance apart within a given section of the mine. Several mine models were used for determining J by the above method. The 2PM method is sensitive to sources and sinks of 222Rn other than mine walls, as well as mining operations and mining activities of a diverse nature, and to local variations in airflow conditions. Because of this, J obtained by the 2PM method represents an 'apparent' flux density. Significant differences were found in the flux density calculated according to different mine models. In addition, J measurements using the flux 'can' method were also carried out in mine walls and compared with the values obtained by the 2PM method. Wide discrepancies between the two methods were found. The practical and theoretical difficulties in determining J are discussed

  17. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  18. The HERMES recoil detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Belostotski, S.

    2013-02-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  19. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  20. Detectors for rare events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the possibility of combining the advantages of photographic data retrieval with the flexibility of operation of conventional gaseous or liquid detectors operated with electronic data retrieval. Possible applications of the proposed detectors to such problems as nucleon decay, neutrinoelectron interaction, and the search for magnetic monopoles are examined. Topics considered include the photography of ionization patterns, the photography of ionization tracks with the multistep avalanche chambers, and exploiting the stimulated scintillation light. Two processes which give rise to the emission of light when ionizing electrons interact in gases under the influence of an electric field are described

  1. Detector for failed fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masaru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide automatic monitor for the separation or reactor water and sampling water, in a failed fuel element detector using a sipping chamber. Constitution: A positional detector for the exact mounting of a sipping chamber on a channel box and a level detector for the detection of complete discharge of cooling water in the sipping chamber are provided in the sipping chamber. The positional detector is contacted to the upper end of the channel box and operated when the sipping chamber is correctly mounted to the fuel assemblies. The level detector comprises a float and a limit switch and it is operated when the water in the sipping chamber is discharged by a predetermined amount. Isolation of reactor water and sampling water are automatically monitored by the signal from these two detectors. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  3. Analytical FcRn affinity chromatography for functional characterization of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlothauer, Tilman; Rueger, Petra; Stracke, Jan Olaf; Hertenberger, Hubert; Fingas, Felix; Kling, Lothar; Emrich, Thomas; Drabner, Georg; Seeber, Stefan; Auer, Johannes; Koch, Stefan; Papadimitriou, Apollon

    2013-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is important for the metabolic fate of IgG antibodies in vivo. Analysis of the interaction between FcRn and IgG in vitro might provide insight into the structural and functional integrity of therapeutic IgG that may affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in vivo. We developed a standardized pH gradient FcRn affinity liquid chromatography method with conditions closely resembling the physiological mechanism of interaction between IgG and FcRn. This method allows the separation of molecular IgG isoforms, degradation products and engineered molecules based on their affinity to FcRn. Human FcRn was immobilized on the column and a linear pH gradient from pH 5.5 to 8.8 was applied. FcRn chromatography was used in comparison to surface plasmon resonance to characterize different monoclonal IgG preparations, e.g., oxidized or aggregated species. Wild-type and engineered IgGs were compared in vitro by FcRn chromatography and in vivo by PK studies in huFcRn transgenic mice. Analytical FcRn chromatography allows differentiation of IgG samples and variants by peak pattern and retention time profile. The method can distinguish: 1) IgGs with different Fabs, 2) oxidized from native IgG, 3) aggregates from monomer and 4) antibodies with mutations in the Fc part from wild-type IgGs. Changes in the FcRn chromatographic behavior of mutant IgGs relative to the wild-type IgG correlate to changes in the PK profile in the FcRn transgenic mice. These results demonstrate that FcRn affinity chromatography is a useful new method for the assessment of IgG integrity. PMID:23765230

  4. High spin states and Yrast isomers in 211Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, A.R.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Fahlander, C.; Morrison, I.

    1981-01-01

    Excited states in 211 Rn with spins up to 53/2 have been identified using (HI,xn) reactions and γ-ray techniques. A shell model calculation can reproduce the ordering of the yrast sequence up to spin 41/2 - . Several yrast isomers have been identified. Enhanced E3 transitions are observed and their systematic occurrence in this region discussed. The influence of the neutron hole, and possible core excitations on the effective moment of inertia are also pointed out

  5. High spin states and yrast isomers in 211Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, A.R.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Fahlander, C.; Morrison, I.

    1980-12-01

    Excited states in 211 Rn with spins up to 53/2 have been identified using (HI,xn) reactions and γ-ray techniques. A shell model calculation can reproduce the ordering of the yrast sequence up to spin 41/2. Several yrast isomers have been identified. Enhanced E3 transitions are observed and their systematic occurrence in this region discussed. The influence of the neutron hole, and possible core excitations on the effective moment of inertia are also pointed out

  6. Læringsmodstand hos børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    2017-01-01

    I dette kapitel beskrives dimensioner ved børns læring og med særligt fokus på Illeris’ begreb læringsmodstand. Det tages udgangspunkt i den kulturhistoriske skoles læringsteori med reference til bl.a. Vygotsky og Leontjev. Børn i såvel dagtilbud som skolen vil løbende vise modstand mod læring. D...

  7. Spilleregler i musikterapi med børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2005-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår udvalgte eksempler på anvendelse af spilleregler i musikterapi med børneklientgrupper. Efter en kort introduktion af Priestleys syn på analytisk musikterapi med børn, præsenteres læseren således for en række caseeksempler fra faglitteraturen, der giver indblik i udformning og a...

  8. Detection system for continuous 222Rn monitoring in waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Patschova, E.; Bosa, I.; Polaskova, A.; Hola, O.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution presents one of the high-sensitive systems of continuous radon monitoring in waters. The device can be used for the continual control of 222 Rn activity concentration in water sources, for a study of the daily and seasonal variations of radon activity concentration in water systems, for the determination of the infiltration time of surface water into the ground water and for the next untraditional applications. (authors)

  9. Priit Pärn ohjab Turus festivali / Tiit Tuumalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuumalu, Tiit, 1971-

    2001-01-01

    Turu Kunstiakadeemia animatsiooniosakonda juhatav Priit Pärn lükkas eile käima I Turu animafestivali Tough Eye, kus võistleb ka kolm eesti filmi. Toimub ka Eesti päev, kus näidatakse uute tööde kõrval ka Elbert Tuganovi jt. klassikaks saanud animafilme, kaasaarvatud säilinud lõik esimesest eesti joonisfilmist "Kutsu-Juku seiklused" (1931)

  10. A restructuring of RN1 package for MIDAS computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. H.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    RN1 package, which is one of two fission product-related packages in MELCOR, has been restructured for the MIDAS computer code. MIDAS is being developed as an integrated severe accident analysis code with a user-friendly graphical user interface and modernized data structure. To do this, data transferring methods of current MELCOR code are modified and adopted into the RN1 package. The data structure of the current MELCOR code using FORTRAN77 causes a difficult grasping of meaning of the variables as well as waste of memory. New features of FORTRAN90 make it possible to allocate the storage dynamically and to use the user-defined data type, which lead to an efficient memory treatment and an easy understanding of the code. Restructuring of the RN1 package addressed in this paper includes module development, subroutine modification, and treats MELGEN, which generates data file, as well as MELCOR, which is processing a calculation. The verification has been done by comparing the results of the modified code with those from the existing code. As the trends are similar to each other, it hints that the same approach could be extended to the entire code package. It is expected that code restructuring will accelerate the code domestication thanks to direct understanding of each variable and easy implementation of modified or newly developed models

  11. A restructuring of RN2 package for MIDAS computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    RN2 package, which is one of two fission product-related package in MELCOR, has been restructured for the MIDAS computer code. MIDAS is being developed as an integrated severe accident analysis code with a user-friendly graphical user interface and data structure. To do this, data transferring methods of current MELCOR code are modified and adopted into the RN2 package. The data structure of the current MELCOR code using FORTRAN77 causes a difficult grasping of meaning of the variables as well as waste of memory. New features of FORTRAN90 make it possible to allocate the storage dynamically and to use the user-defined data type, which lead to an efficient memory treatment and an easy understanding of the code. Restructuring of the RN2 package addressed in this paper includes module development, subroutine modification, and treats MELGEN, which generates data file, as well as MELCOR, which is processing a calculation. The validation has been done by comparing the results of the modified code with those from the existing code. As the trends are the similar to each other, it hints that the same approach could be extended to the entire code package. It is expected that code restructuring will accelerate the code domestication thanks to direct understanding of each variable and easy implementation of modified or newly developed models

  12. Studies of aging and HV break down problems during development and operation of MSGC and GEM detectors for the inner tracking system of HERA-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagaturia, Y.; Baruth, O.; Dreis, H.B.; Eisele, F.; Gorbunov, I.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Hausmann, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hott, T.; Keller, S.; Krauss, C.; Lomonosov, B.; Negodaev, M.; Richter, C.; Robmann, P.; Schmidt, B.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Visbeck, S.; Walter, T.; Werner, C.; Werthenbach, U.; Zech, G.; Zeuner, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2002-01-01

    The results of 5 years of development of the inner tracking system of the HERA-B experiment and first experience from the data taking period of the year 2000 are reported. The system contains 184 chambers, covering a sensitive area of about (20x20) cm 2 each. The detector is based on microstrip gas counters (MSGCs) with diamond-like coated (DLC) glass wafers and gas electron multipliers (GEMs). The main problems in the development phase were gas discharges in intense hadron beams and aging in a high radiation dose environment. The observation of gas discharges which damage the electrode structure of the MSGC led to the addition of the GEM as a first amplification step. Spurious sparking at the GEM cannot be avoided completely. It does not affect the GEM itself but can produce secondary damage of the MSGC if the electric field between the GEM and the MSGC is above a threshold depending on the operation conditions. We observed that aging does not only depend on the dose but also on the spot size of the irradiated area. Ar-DME mixtures had to be abandoned whereas a mixture of 70% Ar and 30% CO 2 showed no serious aging effects up to about 40 mC/cm deposited charge on the anodes. X-ray measurements indicate that the DLC of the MSGC is deteriorated by the gas amplification process. As a consequence, long-term gain variations are expected. The Inner Tracker has successfully participated in the data taking at HERA-B during summer 2000

  13. Studies of aging and HV break down problems during development and operation of MSGC and GEM detectors for the inner tracking system of HERA-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaturia, Y.; Baruth, O.; Dreis, H.B.; Eisele, F.; Gorbunov, I.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Hausmann, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hott, T.; Keller, S.; Krauss, C.; Lomonosov, B.; Negodaev, M.; Richter, C.; Robmann, P.; Schmidt, B.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Visbeck, S.; Walter, T.; Werner, C.; Werthenbach, U.; Zech, G. E-mail: zech@physik.uni-siegen.de; Zeuner, T.; Ziegler, M

    2002-09-01

    The results of 5 years of development of the inner tracking system of the HERA-B experiment and first experience from the data taking period of the year 2000 are reported. The system contains 184 chambers, covering a sensitive area of about (20x20) cm{sup 2} each. The detector is based on microstrip gas counters (MSGCs) with diamond-like coated (DLC) glass wafers and gas electron multipliers (GEMs). The main problems in the development phase were gas discharges in intense hadron beams and aging in a high radiation dose environment. The observation of gas discharges which damage the electrode structure of the MSGC led to the addition of the GEM as a first amplification step. Spurious sparking at the GEM cannot be avoided completely. It does not affect the GEM itself but can produce secondary damage of the MSGC if the electric field between the GEM and the MSGC is above a threshold depending on the operation conditions. We observed that aging does not only depend on the dose but also on the spot size of the irradiated area. Ar-DME mixtures had to be abandoned whereas a mixture of 70% Ar and 30% CO{sub 2} showed no serious aging effects up to about 40 mC/cm deposited charge on the anodes. X-ray measurements indicate that the DLC of the MSGC is deteriorated by the gas amplification process. As a consequence, long-term gain variations are expected. The Inner Tracker has successfully participated in the data taking at HERA-B during summer 2000.

  14. Design of real-time monitoring and control system of 222Rn/220Rn sampling for radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Rongyan; Zhao Xiuliang; Zhang Meiqin; Yu Hong

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design of 222 Rn/ 220 Rn sampling monitoring and control system based on single-chip microcomputer of series Intel51. The hardware design involves the choosing and usage of sensors-chips, A/D conversion-chip, USB interface-chip, keyboard-chip, digital display-chip, photoelectric coupling isolation-chips and drive circuit-chips of the direct current pump. Software design is composed by software of Personal Computer (PC) and software of Single Chip Microcomputer (SCM). The data acquisition and conversion and the flux control of direct current pump are realized by using soft of Visual Basic and assemble language. The program flow charts are given. Furthermore, we improved the stability of the direct current pump by means of PID Control Algorithms. (authors)

  15. Toprak Radon (222Rn Gazı Anomalilerinin ARIMA Analizi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miraç KAMIŞLIOĞLU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Özet: Zaman serileri analizi, istatistik, ekonomi, fizik ve mühendislik gibi bilim dallarında geniş uygulama alanına sahiptir. Zaman serisi analizi, değişkenlerin gelecekteki değerlerinin doğru bir şekilde tahmin edilmesi için kullanılan bir yöntemdir. Bu çalışmada, bir deprem öncüsü olarak bilinen toprak radon gazı (222Rn ölçümleri ile bir zaman serisi oluşturulmuştur. Bu veriler kullanılarak, otoregresif süreçler (ARIMA yardımıyla dinamik sistem modellemesi yapılmıştır. ARIMA; zaman serileri analizinde, zaman içerisinde rastgele gerçekleşen bir stokastik (olasılıksal sürecin veya hatalarının modellenmesidir. ARIMA modeli, temelde Box-Jenkins modeline dayanmaktadır. Box-Jenkins modeli, tek değişkenli zaman serilerinin ileriye dönük tahmin ve kontrolünde kullanılan istatistiksel tabanlı bir yöntemdir. Elde edilen sonuçlar, ARIMA modellerinin tahmin konusundaki başarısını göstermektedir. Anahtar kelimeler: Zaman Serileri Analizi, Radon Gazı (222Rn, ARIMA ARIMA Analysis of Soil Radon (222Rn Gas Anomalies Abstract: Time series analysis, has wide applications in statistics, economics, physics and engineering such disciplines. This method used for estimate correctly future values of the variables. In this study, is formed a time series with soil radon gas (222Rn measurements known as a pioneer of an earthquake. Dynamic system modelling was performed with autoregressive (ARIMA modelling process by used these measurements. ARIMA; time series analysis is modelled of the recoverable over time a random stochastic (probabilistic process or its errors. ARIMA model is based on Box-Jenkins model. Box-Jenkins model is a statistically based method which is used forward-looking forecasting and control of univariate time series. The obtained results, ARIMA model is indicating success in predict subject. Key words: Time Series Analysis, Radon Gas (222Rn, ARIMA

  16. Measurement of Rn-222 concentration in underground water in Osaka stratum group in Sennan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami; Katsurayama, Kosuke

    1977-01-01

    The Rn-222 concentration in underground water is reported as follows, which is the result obtained when the ground inspection was carried out in the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University located at Kumatori area in Osaka stratum group. Underground water, at different depth, well water and rain water were taken, and the contained Rn-222 was extracted with toluene to measure by liquid scintillation technique. Rn-222 concentration in rain water was 3.5 - 8.0 pCi/l, while the concentration in well water was 130 - 250 pCi/l, and that in underground water was 240 - 313 pCi/l. The seasonal change, geographical difference and variation according to depth of Rn-222 concentration were examined. Rn-222 behavior in soil should be investigated more in detail in reference to Rn-222 dispersion, transport and equilibrium problems in soil-water system in the future. (Kobatake, H.)

  17. The ARGUS silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, E.; Ball, S.; Ehret, K.; Geyer, C.; Hesselbarth, J.; Hoelscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Huepper, A.; Khan, S.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Brogle, M.; Horisberger, R.

    1994-01-01

    A silicon microstrip vertex detector has been built as an upgrade to the ARGUS detector for increased precision and efficiency in the reconstruction of decay vertices. This paper discusses the mechanical and electronic design of this device and presents first results from its successful test operation yielding an impact parameter resolution of about 18 μm. ((orig.))

  18. Performance of the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falaleev, V P; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Karyukhin, A N; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Perevozchikov, V; Pernegger, H; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Belokopytov, Yu; Charpentier, Ph; Gavillet, Ph; Gouz, Yu; Jarlskog, Ch

    1996-01-01

    DELPHI (DEtector with Lepton, Photon and Hadron Identification) is a detector for e^+e^- physics, designed to provide high granularity over a 4\\pi solid angle, allowing an effective particle identification. It has been operating at the LEP (Large Electron-Positron) collider at CERN since 1989. This article reviews its performance.

  19. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.

    1993-01-01

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the

  20. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  2. Investigations into the long-distance atmospheric transport in Central Europe using Rn-222

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpp, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    An measuring network was used to determine the atmospheric Rn-222 content in Central Europe (Northern and Southern Germany, Poland). Rn-222 is to serve as tracer for the long-distance atmospheric transport in central Europe. For several areas, an average Rn-222 flux density was found. The radon source 'continent' and the soil as radon source have been taken into account. (DG) [de

  3. Rn-222 release to the environment: comparison between different granite sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamoon, M.; Kamal, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work three different types of granites were studied, namely: pure granite, alkali granite and altered (hydrated) alkali granite. General radioactivity of the granites was studied along with the potential for 222 Rn emanation. The study indicated that altered alkali granite releases, relatively, the highest 222 Rn emanation to the surrounding air while alkali granite emits the more intense gamma radiation of the three granites. Hence, altered alkali granite can be used as a laboratory source for 222 Rn.

  4. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Andersen, A.; Russ, W.R.; Stuenkel, D.; Valentine, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for comprehensive test ban treaty surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. They present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. They intend for the findings presented herein to be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies

  5. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature, but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of DOE, DOD, and NRC-licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. It is the authors' intention that the findings presented herein may be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies

  6. Protecting detectors in ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechman, M.; Augustinus, A.; Chochula, P.; Di Mauro, A.; Stig Jirden, L.; Rosinsky, P.; Schindler, H.; Cataldo, G. de; Pinazza, O.; Kurepin, A.; Moreno, A.

    2012-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneva. It is composed of many sophisticated and complex detectors mounted very compactly around the beam pipe. Each detector is a unique masterpiece of design, engineering and construction and any damage to it could stop the experiment for months or even for years. It is therefore essential that the detectors are protected from any danger and this is one very important role of the Detector Control System (DCS). One of the main dangers for the detectors is the particle beam itself. Since the detectors are designed to be extremely sensitive to particles they are also vulnerable to any excess of beam conditions provided by the LHC accelerator. The beam protection consists of a combination of hardware interlocks and control software and this paper will describe how this is implemented and handled in ALICE. Tools have also been developed to support operators and shift leaders in the decision making related to beam safety. The gained experiences and conclusions from the individual safety projects are also presented. (authors)

  7. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  8. A Radon Chamber without Radium Source for Detector Calibration and Radon Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.; Karunakara, N.

    2008-01-01

    A radon chamber of volume 216 liters was designed and constructed for calibration of radon detectors and radon test measurements. The main feature of this chamber is that the active 226 Ra source, to generate the 222 Rn inside the chamber volume, is not required. Instead, 222 Rn from soil gas is utilized for this purpose. The supply of radon comes from the soil gas. Soil gas is drawn from the soil to fill the chamber with high radon concentration levels (∼ 80 kBq/m3). Desired radon concentration levels can be obtained by drawing the soil gas for different time durations and/or flow rate (author)

  9. Epidemiological analysis of the relationship between exposure to Rn progeny, smoking and bronchogenic carcinoma in the U-mining population of the Colorado Plateau--1960-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccomanno, G.; Yale, C.; Dixon, W.; Auerbach, O.; Huth, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between exposure to radioactive Rn decay products during U mining and milling operations, cigarette smoking and age, on the incidence and mortality rates of lung cancer among U workers of the Colorado Plateau during the 20-yr period from 1960-1980. A case control sample was taken from an extensive data base of 9,817 men accumulated by one author (Saccomanno). A preliminary hypothesis had been made that a possible synergistic or at least additive effect might exist when the risk factors of exposure to Rn decay products and smoking were simultaneously present. This study would seem to indicate that a synergistic effect is not present. In this work, a total of 489 cases, defined as men having a cytological diagnosis of moderate or worse atypical squamous-cell metaplasia, and a random sample of 992 ''non-cases'' were selected retrospectively from the dynamic cohort of workers. These data analyzed from three different perspectives indicate significant effects due to Rn-decay-product exposure in excess of the expected incidence due to age and smoking history. The data also indicate that Rn-decay-product accumulations of less than 300 working level months (WLM) is not carcinogenic in non-cigarette smokers

  10. Soil gas (222Rn, CO2, 4He) behaviour over a natural CO2 accumulation, Montmiral area (Drome, France): geographical, geological and temporal relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, Frederick; Joublin, Franck; Haas, Hubert; Jean-prost, Veronique; Ruffier, Veronique

    2011-01-01

    The south east basin of France shelters deep CO 2 reservoirs often studied with the aim of better constraining geological CO 2 storage operations. Here we present new soil gas data, completing an existing dataset (CO 2 , 222 Rn, 4 He), together with mineralogical and physical characterisations of soil columns, in an attempt to better understand the spatial distribution of gas concentrations in the soils and to rule on the sealed character of the CO 2 reservoir at present time. Anomalous gas concentrations were found but did not appear to be clearly related to geological structures that may drain deep gases up to the surface, implying a dominant influence of near surface processes as indicated by carbon isotope ratios. Coarse grained, quartz-rich soils favoured the existence of high CO 2 concentrations. Fine grained clayey soils preferentially favoured the existence of 222 Rn but not CO 2 . Soil formations did not act as barriers preventing gas migrations in soils, either due to water content or due to mineralogical composition. No abundant leakage from the Montmiral reservoir can be highlighted by the measurements, even near the exploitation well. As good correlation between CO 2 and 222 Rn concentrations still exist, it is suggested that 222 Rn migration is also CO 2 dependent in non-leaking areas - diffusion dominated systems.

  11. Smoke Detector Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Pamela, Ed.; Portugill, Jestyn, Ed.

    This manual, one in a series developed for public education, provides information on smoke detector selection, installation, operation, and maintenance. For the prospective buyer, the importance of looking for the seal of a recognized national testing laboratory--such as Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. (UL)--indicating adequate laboratory testing…

  12. Characterization of ceramics used in mass ceramic industry Goianinha/RN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales Junior, J.C.C.; Nascimento, R.M. do; Andrade, J.C.S.; Saldanha, K.M.; Dutra, R.P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of the the ceramic mass is one of the most important steps in the manufacture of ceramic products, since the characteristics of the raw materials used, and the proportions that they are added, directly influence the final properties of ceramic products and the operational conditions of processing. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the characterization of a ceramic mass used in the manufacture of sealing blocks by a red ceramic industry of the city of Goianinha / RN. We analyzed the chemical and mineralogical composition; thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis; granulometric analysis; evaluation of plasticity; and determining the technological properties of specimens used in test firing at 700, 900 and 1100 ° C. The results show that the ceramic body studied has characteristics that allow use in the manufacture of sealing blocks when burned at a temperature of 900 ° C. (author)

  13. The weight is over: RN first assisting techniques for laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzell, Joanne; Neff, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Obesity-related laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a common yet technically challenging bariatric procedure that requires specialized surgical knowledge and training for OR personnel. Critical components of care include an effective preoperative assessment, positioning of the patient, and operation and maintenance of laparoscopic equipment and instrumentation. The purpose of this article is to explain the steps of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and illustrate principles and surgical techniques for the RN who is first assisting during the procedure. Also provided is a perioperative nursing care plan for the patient undergoing bariatric surgery, to aid perioperative nurses in understanding the sequence of events and special considerations for this patient population. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of 222Rn in dwellings around proposed uranium mining site at Rohil, Rajasthan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, V.N.; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, M.K.; Patnaik, R.L.; Sahoo, S.K.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Prior to commissioning of uranium ore mining and processing facility baseline radiological monitoring vis-a-vis public exposure assessment is required. Such information are utilized for developing control measures during operational phases to ascertain the minimal impact on the surrounding areas. Among the various pathways the inhalation component far exceeds the other component in the natural background of a region. Further, in inhalation component also the contribution of 222 Rn is almost 50%. The main sources of indoor radon are geological features, soil characteristics, construction materials of the dwellings, water utilization pattern, use of natural cooking gas, climatological/weather variables. As part of preliminary radiological assessment exercise twenty three dwellings were selected in this region comprising of different types of construction design/materials and passive radon dosimeters were provided of evaluation of radon level and inhalation exposure. The results presented in the text are part of the said radiological assessment exercise

  15. The IMB proton decay detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, R.C.; Gajewski, W.; Kropp, W.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Smith, D.W.; Sobel, H.; Wuest, C.; Bionta, R.M.; Cortez, B.G.; Errede, S.; Foster, G.W.; Greenberg, J.; Park, H.S.; Shumard, E.; Sinclair, D.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Velde, J.C. van der; Goldhaber, M.; Blewitt, G.; Lehmann, E.; LoSecco, J.M.; Bratton, C.B.; Learned, J.; Svoboda, R.; Jones, T.W.; Ramana Murthy, P.V.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of the Irvine-Michigan-Brookhaven proton decay detector which is nearing completion in a salt mine in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. The detector is a water Cerenkov one with a fiducial volume of 4,000 tons and a threshold of 24 MeV. Initial results indicate that the detector is working according to specification and has a high potential for deep underground cosmic ray applications. I will give a brief account of the IMB detector construction and operation and also its present status and possible cosmic ray applications. (orig.)

  16. Absolute measurement of the activity of 222Rn using a proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Ingo; Greupner, Heinz; Keyser, Uwe

    2002-01-01

    A measuring set-up comprising a proportional counter of calculable 222 Rn efficiency and quantifiable active volume (δ V 222 Rn efficiency is determined by computer simulation of the measured α-spectra. The procedures necessary for absolute measurements by means of the counter are described, and the suitability of the counter for absolute measurements of the 222 Rn activity is proved by experiments. Thus, a new method for the realization of the unit of activity of 222 Rn is obtained, which is independent of the unit of activity of 226 Ra

  17. Perfect simulation and moment properties for the Matérn type III process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Huber, Mark L.; Wolpert, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    In a seminal work, Bertil Matérn introduced several types of processes for modeling repulsive point processes. In this paper an algorithm is presented for the perfect simulation of the Matérn III process within a bounded window in , fully accounting for edge effects. A simple upper bound on the m......In a seminal work, Bertil Matérn introduced several types of processes for modeling repulsive point processes. In this paper an algorithm is presented for the perfect simulation of the Matérn III process within a bounded window in , fully accounting for edge effects. A simple upper bound...

  18. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  19. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  20. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.; Howes, J.H.; Smout, D.W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector is described which provides a smoke sensing detector and an indicating device and in which a radioactive substance is used in conjunction with two ionisation chambers. The system includes an outer electrode, a collector electrode and an inner electrode which is made of or supports the radioactive substance which, in this case, is 241 Am. The invention takes advantage of the fact that smoke particles can be allowed to enter freely the inner ionisation chamber. (U.K.)

  1. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  2. Split detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederstrand, C.N.; Chism, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which provides a dual channel capability for the simultaneous determination of the presence and concentration of two gases in a stream of sample gas and which has a single infrared source, a single sample cell, two infrared bandpass filters, and two infrared detectors. A separator between the filters and detectors prevents interchange of radiation between the filters. The separator is positioned by fitting it in a slot

  3. Gas chromatography: mass selective detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapinskas, R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of mass spectrometry technique directed for detecting molecular structures is described, with some considerations about its operational features. This mass spectrometer is used as a gas chromatography detector. (author)

  4. Detector Fundamentals for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-03

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy course and provides an overview of the following concepts: detector system components, intrinsic and absolute efficiency, resolution and linearity, and operational issues and limits.

  5. Operation of Silicon, Diamond and liquid Helium Detectors in the range of Room Temperature to 1.9 K and after an Irradiation Dose of several Mega Gray

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Dehning, B; Eisel, T; Sapinski, M; Eremin, V

    2013-01-01

    At the triplet magnets, close to the interaction regions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the current Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is sensitive to the debris from the collision points. For future beams, with higher energy and intensity the expected increase in luminosity implicate an increase of the debris from interaction products covering the quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams. The investigated option is to locate the detectors as close as possible to the superconducting coil, where the signal ratio of both is optimal. Therefore the detectors have to be located inside the cold mass of the superconducting magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 Kelvin. Past measurements have shown that a liquid helium ionisation chamber, diamond and silicon detectors are promising candidates for cryogenic beam loss monitors. The carrier parameter, drift velocity, and the leakage current changes will be shown as a function of temperature. New high irradiation test beam measurements at room temperat...

  6. Measurement of the "2"2"Rn concentration in residences and workplaces in the Riobamba City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuadrado, C.; Carrasco, J.

    2016-10-01

    The "2"2"2Rn belongs to the "2"3"8U natural radioactive series, decays emitting alpha particles with a disintegration half-period of 3.82 days. Is a colorless and odorless gas that is imperceptible to people. Studies have shown that indoor radon exposure can lead to lung cancer, even for the relatively low levels of radon commonly found in residential buildings. Measurements of the radon concentration were carried out in residences, offices and university laboratories in the Riobamba City (Ecuador), characterizing the places by the building materials, their age, length of stay among other variables. A Corentium brand electronic detector was used, which gives a short reading in 24 hours and extended in 7 days. Using the radon dose conversion coefficient 0.017 mSv/y for 1 Bq/m"3, recommended by the ICRP annual doses were estimated for each site. The data obtained show that the ranges are acceptable and are within the Who recommendations, being out of range a teaching laboratory because it has natural uranium for practices. These measurements are the first to be carried out in the country and can be used to promote research of this type at local, national and regional level. (Author)

  7. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grieco, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The full two-arm setup was installed during the 2016/2017 EYETS. This allows measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. In 2017, AFP participated in the ATLAS high-luminosity data taking on the day-by-day basis. In addition, several special runs with reduced luminosity were taken. The poster will present the AFP detectors and the lessons learned from the last year operation and some performance from 2016 and 2017.

  8. Detector of Optical Vortices as the Main Element of the System of Data Transfer: Principles of Operation, Numerical Model, and Influence of Noise and Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Aksenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method is proposed of optical vortex topological charge detection along with a design of a corresponding detector. The developed technique is based on measurements of light field intensity. Mathematical model simulating performance of the detector is described in the paper, and results of numerical experiments are presented which illustrate recognition of a vortex in a turbulent medium and in the presence of amplitude and phase noise in the registered radiation. Influence of shifts of the system optical axis on precision of registration is also considered in the paper.

  9. 222Rn and decay products in outdoor and indoor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelsson, C.

    1984-05-01

    Radon-222 (radon) and radon daughter (RnD) measurement methodologies are analysed from both theoretical and experimental points of view. It is shown that exhalation from enclosed porous materials can be described in terms of the time-dependent diffusion theory. Deficiencies in the established accumulator method of radon exhalation measurement are shown. By the existing methods, the true free exhalation rate of thin samples may be underestimated by a factor of (1+α- 1 ), in radon-tight accumulators (α is the outer to inner volume ratio of the sample). The term back-diffusion is clarified and shown applicable to steady-state conditions only. The wire-screen technique is utilized to separate aerosol-attached and unattached RnD in a 3 m 3 radon cell. The effect of air-filtration on the RnDs is expressed as individual activity concentrations as well as in terms of effective dose equivalent rate, H. H has been reduced by a factor between 1.3 and 2.5 for the small-sized areosol particles used (surface area median less than 100 nm), at the filtration rate constant 5 h- 1 . The exact reduction value is dependent on initial aerosol load, type of filter, and dose model (Jacobi-Eisfeld and James-Birchall in this investigation). The concentration of radon and Pb-210 in the Arctic summer air averaged 75+-21 and 0.075+-0.028 mBq m- 3 , during the Swedish Ymer-80 expedition. It is shown that steadystate equilibrium models are unsuitable for estimation of the mean aerosol residence time in ocean air. A good qualitative agreement between radon-levels and the time since the air mass left larger land areas was found. The radon-222 and long-lived daughter (Pb-210, Po-210) measurements are insensitive to ship- and local contaminations. (author)

  10. Factors controlling temporal variability of near-ground atmospheric 222Rn concentration over central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnoch, M.; Wach, P.; Chmura, L.; Gorczyca, Z.; Rozanski, K.; Godlowska, J.; Mazur, J.; Kozak, K.; Jeričević, A.

    2014-09-01

    Concentration of radon (222Rn) in the near-ground atmosphere has been measured quasi-continuously from January 2005 to December 2009 at two continental sites in Europe: Heidelberg (south-west Germany) and Krakow (southern Poland). The atmosphere was sampled at ca. 30 and 20 m above the local ground. Both stations were equipped with identical instruments. Regular observations of 222Rn were supplemented by measurements of surface fluxes of this gas in the Krakow urban area, using two different approaches. The measured concentrations of 222Rn varied at both sites in a wide range, from less than 2.0 Bq m-3 to approximately 40 Bq m-3 in Krakow and 35 Bq m-3 in Heidelberg. The mean 222Rn content in Krakow, when averaged over the entire observation period, was 30% higher than in Heidelberg (5.86 ± 0.09 and 4.50 ± 0.07 Bq m-3, respectively). Distinct seasonality of 222Rn signal is visible in the obtained time series of 222Rn concentration, with higher values recorded generally during late summer and autumn. The surface 222Rn fluxes measured in Krakow also revealed a distinct seasonality, with broad maximum observed during summer and early autumn and minimum during the winter. When averaged over a 5-year observation period, the night-time surface 222Rn flux was equal to 46.8 ± 2.4 Bq m-2 h-1. Although the atmospheric 222Rn levels at Heidelberg and Krakow appeared to be controlled primarily by local factors, it was possible to evaluate the "continental effect" in atmospheric 222Rn content between both sites, related to gradual build-up of 222Rn concentration in the air masses travelling between Heidelberg and Krakow. The mean value of this build-up was equal to 0.78 ± 0.12 Bq m-3. The measured minimum 222Rn concentrations at both sites and the difference between them was interpreted in the framework of a simple box model coupled with HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) analysis of air mass trajectories. The best fit of experimental data was

  11. Design issues in epidemiologic studies of indoor exposure to Rn and risk of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubin, J.H.; Samet, J.M.; Weinberg, C.

    1990-01-01

    Recent data on indoor air quality have indicated that Rn (222Rn) and its decay products are frequently present in domestic environments. Their presence in indoor air raises concerns about an increase in lung cancer risk for the general population. To directly evaluate lung cancer risk from domestic exposure to Rn and its decay products, as well as to evaluate risk assessments derived from studies of Rn-exposed underground miners, several epidemiologic studies of indoor Rn exposure have been initiated or are planned. This paper calculates sample sizes required for a hypothetical case-control study to address several important hypotheses and shows the impact of difficult problems associated with estimating a subject's Rn exposure. We consider the effects of subject mobility, choice of the exposure response trend which is used to characterize an alternative hypothesis, and errors in the estimation of exposure. Imprecise estimation of Rn exposure arises from errors in the measurement device, exposure to Rn decay products from sources outside the home, inability to measure exposures over time in current as well as previous residences, and the unknown relationship between measured concentration and lung dose of alpha energy from the decay of Rn and its progeny. These methodological problems can result in large discrepancies between computed and actual study power. Failure to anticipate these problems in the design of a study can result in inaccurate estimates of power. We conclude that case-control studies of indoor Rn and lung cancer may require substantial numbers of subjects in order to address the many questions of importance that burden current risk assessments with uncertainty. We suggest pooling data from studies with the largest numbers of cases and with the most precise estimates of Rn exposure as the best approach for meeting present research needs

  12. Integrative genomic analysis of interleukin-36RN and its prognostic value in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhilei; Fan, Jinshuo; Zhang, Xiuxiu; Huang, Qi; Han, Jieli; Wu, Feng; Hu, Guorong; Guo, Mengfei; Jin, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-36RN, previously known as IL1-F5 and IL-1δ, shares a 360-kb region of chromosome 2q13 with members of IL-1 systems. IL-36RN encodes an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). In spite of IL-36Ra showing the highest homology to IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) antagonist, it differs from the latter in aspects including its binding to IL-lRrp2 but not to IL-1R1. IL-36RN is mainly expressed in epithelial cells and has important roles in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, IL-36RN was identified in the genomes of 27 species, including human, chimpanzee, mouse, horse and dolphin. Human IL-36RN was mainly expressed in the eye, head and neck, fetal heart, lung, testis, cervix and placenta; furthermore, it was highly expressed in bladder and parathyroid tumors. Furthermore, a total of 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms causing missense mutations were determined, which are considered to be the causes of various diseases, such as generalized pustular psoriasis. In addition, the link between IL-36RN and the prognosis of certain cancer types was revealed through meta-analysis. Tumor-associated transcriptional factors c-Fos, activator protein-1, c-Jun and nuclear factor κB were found to bind to the upstream region in the IL-36RN gene. This may indicate that IL-36RN is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression through the regulation of tumor-associated transcriptional factors. The present study identified IL-36RN in various species and investigated the associations between IL-36RN and cancer prognosis, which would determine whether IL-36RN drove the evolution of the various species with regard to tumorigenesis.

  13. The OPAL phase III microvertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, S.

    1997-01-01

    A description of the OPAL Phase III microvertex detector is given. Special emphasis is put on problems that have been encountered in the installation and operation of the different phases of the OPAL microvertex detector leading to the present Phase III detector and their cures. A short description of the new OPAL radiation monitoring and beam dump system is also given. (orig.)

  14. The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aad, G.; et al., [Unknown; Bentvelsen, S.; Colijn, A.P.; de Jong, P.; Doxiadis, A.; Garitaonandia, H.; Gosselink, M.; Kayl, M.S.; Koffeman, E.; Lee, H.; Mechnich, J.; Mussche, I.; Ottersbach, J.P.; Rijpstra, M.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Tsiakiris, M.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vreeswijk, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data-taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation,

  15. A mobile antineutrino detector with plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Y.; Oguri, S.; Kato, Y.; Nakata, R.; Inoue, Y.; Ito, C.; Minowa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new type segmented antineutrino detector made of plastic scintillators for the nuclear safeguard application. A small prototype was built and tested to measure background events. A satisfactory unmanned field operation of the detector system was demonstrated. Besides, a detailed Monte Carlo simulation code was developed to estimate the antineutrino detection efficiency of the detector.

  16. 222Rn in the Antarctic Peninsula during 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.; Setzer, A.W.; Cavalcanti, I.F.A.

    1988-01-01

    222 Rn was continuously measured at the Brazilian Antarctic Station (62 0 S, 58 0 W) during the year of 1986. Baseline radon concentration averaged 0.02 Bq.m -3 with surges peaking 0.4 Bq.m -3 . The data exhibited a characteristic periodicity of about 25 days and a strong positive association with short term fluctuations of atmospheric temperature. No seasonal variations of radon were observed. Interpretation of the radon surges with reference to synoptic charts and weather satellite pictures showed that the continental influence of radon at the Antarctic Peninsula is very small and comes only from the tip of the South American cone. (author)

  17. Vitali systems in R^n with irregular sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlbro, Leif; Topsøe, Flemming

    1996-01-01

    Vitali type theorems are results stating that out of a given family of sets one can select pairwise disjoint sets which fill out a "large" region. Usually one works with "regular" sets such as balls. We shall establish results with sets of a more complicated geometrical structure, e.g., Cantor......-like sets are allowed. The results are related to a generalisation of the classical notion of a differentiation basis.l They concern real n-space R^n and Lebesgue measure....

  18. Oplæsning for børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Nygaard

    2004-01-01

    Mål og Mæle 27(4):16-19. 2004 Kort beskrivelse: Om dialogisk oplæsning, børns ordforråd og sproglige opmærksomhed Abstract: Det er på mange måder godt at læse op for børn. Men hvad skal der til i oplæsningen, for at børnene lærer nye ord? I denne artikel beskrives et projekt, der har vist, at bør...

  19. Research management: the case of RN4CAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikos, Dimitrios; Mantas, John

    2011-01-01

    Successful research management requires multifunctional, equal teamwork and efficient coordination, aiming to increase the impact of the research outcomes. Aim of this paper is to present the strategies that have been followed to successfully manage the RN4CAST study, one of the largest multi country research projects ever conducted. The paper focuses on the core research strategies rather than on the administrative management activities also required for the success of this case report. Management of a multi-country nursing survey requires the use of common data collection tools, applicable to every context, research protocols supporting the scope of the research, data models for multi-country analyses and global dissemination strategies.

  20. ILC Reference Design Report Volume 4 - Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Jaros, John; Miyamoto, Akiya; Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; Amann, John; Amirikas, Ramila; An, Qi; Anami, Shozo; Ananthanarayan, B.; Anderson, Terry; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Anerella, Michael; Anfimov, Nikolai; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; Antipov, Sergei; Antoine, Claire; Aoki, Mayumi; Aoza, Atsushi; Aplin, Steve; Appleby, Rob; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Arkan, Tug; Arnold, Ned; Arnold, Ray; Arnowitt, Richard; Artru, Xavier; Arya, Kunal; Aryshev, Alexander; Asakawa, Eri; Asiri, Fred; Asner, David; Atac, Muzaffer; Atoian, Grigor; Attié, David; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustine, David B.; Ayres, Bradley; Aziz, Tariq; Baars, Derek; Badaud, Frederique; Baddams, Nigel; Bagger, Jonathan; Bai, Sha; Bailey, David; Bailey, Ian R.; Baker, David; Balalykin, Nikolai I.; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Baldy, Jean-Luc; Ball, Markus; Ball, Maurice; Ballestrero, Alessandro; Ballin, Jamie; Baltay, Charles; Bambade, Philip; Ban, Syuichi; Band, Henry; Bane, Karl; Banerjee, Bakul; Barbanotti, Serena; Barbareschi, Daniele; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Desmond P.; Barbi, Mauricio; Bardin, Dmitri Y.; Barish, Barry; Barklow, Timothy L.; Barlow, Roger; Barnes, Virgil E.; Barone, Maura; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Basu, Rahul; Battaglia, Marco; Batygin, Yuri; Baudot, Jerome; Baur, Ulrich; Elwyn Baynham, D.; Beard, Carl; Bebek, Chris; Bechtle, Philip; Becker, Ulrich J.; Bedeschi, Franco; Bedjidian, Marc; Behera, Prafulla; Bellantoni, Leo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Paul; Bentson, Lynn D.; Benyamna, Mustapha; Bergauer, Thomas; Berger, Edmond; Bergholz, Matthias; Beri, Suman; Berndt, Martin; Bernreuther, Werner; Bertolini, Alessandro; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Beteille, Andre; Bettoni, Simona; Beyer, Michael; Bhandari, R.K.; Bharadwaj, Vinod; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Bhuyan, Ruchika; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Biagini, Marica; Bialowons, Wilhelm; Biebel, Otmar; Bieler, Thomas; Bierwagen, John; Birch, Alison; Bisset, Mike; Biswal, S.S.; Blackmore, Victoria; Blair, Grahame; Blanchard, Guillaume; Blazey, Gerald; Blue, Andrew; Blümlein, Johannes; Boffo, Christian; Bohn, Courtlandt; Boiko, V.I.; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondarchuk, Eduard N.; Boni, Roberto; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boogert, Stewart; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Borras, Kerstin; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bosco, Alessio; Bosio, Carlo; Bosland, Pierre; Bosotti, Angelo; Boudry, Vincent; Boumediene, Djamel-Eddine; Bouquet, Bernard; Bourov, Serguei; Bowden, Gordon; Bower, Gary; Boyarski, Adam; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bozzi, Concezio; Brachmann, Axel; Bradshaw, Tom W.; Brandt, Andrew; Brasser, Hans Peter; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James E.; Breidenbach, Martin; Bricker, Steve; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brodsky, Stanley; Brooksby, Craig; Broome, Timothy A.; Brown, David; Brown, David; Brownell, James H.; Bruchon, Mélanie; Brueck, Heiner; Brummitt, Amanda J.; Brun, Nicole; Buchholz, Peter; Budagov, Yulian A.; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Bulyak, Eugene; Bungau, Adriana; Bürger, Jochen; Burke, Dan; Burkhart, Craig; Burrows, Philip; Burt, Graeme; Burton, David; Büsser, Karsten; Butler, John; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buzulutskov, Alexei; Cabruja, Enric; Caccia, Massimo; Cai, Yunhai; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caliier, Stephane; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cao, Jun-Jie; Cao, J.S.; Capatina, Ofelia; Cappellini, Chiara; Carcagno, Ruben; Carena, Marcela; Carloganu, Cristina; Carosi, Roberto; Stephen Carr, F.; Carrion, Francisco; Carter, Harry F.; Carter, John; Carwardine, John; Cassel, Richard; Cassell, Ronald; Cavallari, Giorgio; Cavallo, Emanuela; Cembranos, Jose A.R.; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chandez, Frederic; Charles, Matthew; Chase, Brian; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chauveau, Jacques; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chehab, Robert; Chel, Stéphane; Chelkov, Georgy; Chen, Chiping; Chen, He Sheng; Chen, Huai Bi; Chen, Jia Er; Chen, Sen Yu; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yuan Bo; Cheng, Jian; Chevallier, M.; Chi, Yun Long; Chickering, William; Cho, Gi-Chol; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Hyuk; Choi, Jong Bum; Choi, Seong Youl; Choi, Young-Il; Choudhary, Brajesh; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Rai Choudhury, S.; Christian, David; Christian, Glenn; Christophe, Grojean; Chung, Jin-Hyuk; Church, Mike; Ciborowski, Jacek; Cihangir, Selcuk; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clarke, Christine; Clarke, Don G.; Clarke, James A.; Clements, Elizabeth; Coca, Cornelia; Coe, Paul; Cogan, John; Colas, Paul; Collard, Caroline; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Comerma, Albert; Compton, Chris; Constance, Ben; Conway, John; Cook, Ed; Cooke, Peter; Cooper, William; Corcoran, Sean; Cornat, Rémi; Corner, Laura; Cortina Gil, Eduardo; Clay Corvin, W.; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Cowan, Ray; Crawford, Curtis; Cremaldi, Lucien M; Crittenden, James A.; Cussans, David; Cvach, Jaroslav; da Silva, Wilfrid; Dabiri Khah, Hamid; Dabrowski, Anne; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dadoun, Olivier; Dai, Jian Ping; Dainton, John; Daly, Colin; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daram, Sarojini; Datta, Anindya; Dauncey, Paul; David, Jacques; Davier, Michel; Davies, Ken P.; Dawson, Sally; De Boer, Wim; De Curtis, Stefania; De Groot, Nicolo; de la Taille, Christophe; de Lira, Antonio; De Roeck, Albert; de Sangro, Riccardo; De Santis,Stefano; Deacon, Laurence; Deandrea, Aldo; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Delebecque, Pierre; Delerue, Nicholas; Delferriere, Olivier; Demarteau, Marcel; Deng, Zhi; Denisov, Yu.N.; Densham, Christopher J.; Desch, Klaus; Deshpande, Nilendra; Devanz, Guillaume; Devetak, Erik; Dexter, Amos; Di benedetto, Vito; Diéguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dinh, Nguyen Dinh; Dixit, Madhu; Dixit, Sudhir; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dollan, Ralph; Dong, Dong; Dong, Hai Yi; Dorfan, Jonathan; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doucas, George; Downing, Robert; Doyle, Eric; Doziere, Guy; Drago, Alessandro; Dragt, Alex; Drake, Gary; Drásal, Zbynek; Dreiner, Herbert; Drell, Persis; Driouichi, Chafik; Drozhdin, Alexandr; Drugakov, Vladimir; Du, Shuxian; Dugan, Gerald; Duginov, Viktor; Dulinski, Wojciech; Dulucq, Frederic; Dutta, Sukanta; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Dychkant, Alexandre; Dzahini, Daniel; Eckerlin, Guenter; Edwards, Helen; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrlichman, Michael; Ehrlichmann, Heiko; Eigen, Gerald; Elagin, Andrey; Elementi, Luciano; Eliasson, Peder; Ellis, John; Ellwood, George; Elsen, Eckhard; Emery, Louis; Enami, Kazuhiro; Endo, Kuninori; Enomoto, Atsushi; Eozénou, Fabien; Erbacher, Robin; Erickson, Roger; Oleg Eyser, K.; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Fang, Shou Xian; Fant, Karen; Fasso, Alberto; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Fehlberg, John; Feld, Lutz; Feng, Jonathan L.; Ferguson, John; Fernandez-Garcia, Marcos; Luis Fernandez-Hernando, J.; Fiala, Pavel; Fieguth, Ted; Finch, Alexander; Finocchiaro, Giuseppe; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Peter; Eugene Fisk, H.; Fitton, Mike D.; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleury, Julien; Flood, Kevin; Foley, Mike; Ford, Richard; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Francis, Kurt; Frey, Ariane; Frey, Raymond; Friedsam, Horst; Frisch, Josef; Frishman, Anatoli; Fuerst, Joel; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Funk, Warren; Furletova, Julia; Furukawa, Kazuro; Furuta, Fumio; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gadow, Karsten; Gaede, Frank; Gaglione, Renaud; Gai, Wei; Gajewski, Jan; Galik, Richard; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gannaway, Fred; Gao, Jian She; Gao, Jie; Gao, Yuanning; Garbincius, Peter; Garcia-Tabares, Luis; Garren, Lynn; Garrido, Luís; Garutti, Erika; Garvey, Terry; Garwin, Edward; Gascón, David; Gastal, Martin; Gatto, Corrado; Gatto, Raoul; Gay, Pascal; Ge, Lixin; Ge, Ming Qi; Ge, Rui; Geiser, Achim; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Geng, Zhe Qiao; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerbick, Scot; Gerig, Rod; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Ghosh, Kirtiman; Gibbons, Lawrence; Giganon, Arnaud; Gillespie, Allan; Gillman, Tony; Ginzburg, Ilya; Giomataris, Ioannis; Giunta, Michele; Gladkikh, Peter; Gluza, Janusz; Godbole, Rohini; Godfrey, Stephen; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goldstein, Joel; Gollin, George D.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Goodrick, Maurice; Gornushkin, Yuri; Gostkin, Mikhail; Gottschalk, Erik; Goudket, Philippe; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gournaris, Filimon; Graciani, Ricardo; Graf, Norman; Grah, Christian; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grandjean, Damien; Grannis, Paul; Grassellino, Anna; Graugés, Eugeni; Gray, Stephen; Green, Michael; Greenhalgh, Justin; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald; Grimes, Mark; Grimm, Terry; Gris, Philippe; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groll, Marius; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Grondin, Denis; Groom, Donald; Gross, Eilam; Grunewald, Martin; Grupen, Claus; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gu, Jun; Gu, Yun-Ting; Guchait, Monoranjan; Guiducci, Susanna; Guler, Ali Murat; Guler, Hayg; Gulmez, Erhan; Gunion, John; Guo, Zhi Yu; Gurtu, Atul; Ha, Huy Bang; Haas, Tobias; Haase, Andy; Haba, Naoyuki; Haber, Howard; Haensel, Stephan; Hagge, Lars; Hagura, Hiroyuki; Hajdu, Csaba; Haller, Gunther; Haller, Johannes; Hallermann, Lea; Halyo, Valerie; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Hammond, Larry; Han, Liang; Han, Tao; Hand, Louis; Handu, Virender K.; Hano, Hitoshi; Hansen, Christian; Hansen, Jørn Dines; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hara, Kazufumi; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Hartung, Walter; Hast, Carsten; Hauptman, John; Hauschild, Michael; Hauviller, Claude; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Chris; Hawkings, Richard; Hayano, Hitoshi; Hazumi, Masashi; He, An; He, Hong Jian; Hearty, Christopher; Heath, Helen; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heifets, Samuel; Heinemeyer, Sven; Heini, Sebastien; Helebrant, Christian; Helms, Richard; Heltsley, Brian; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hermel, Richard; Herms, Atilà; Herten, Gregor; Hesselbach, Stefan; Heuer, Rolf-Dieter; Heusch, Clemens A.; Hewett, Joanne; Higashi, Norio; Higashi, Takatoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Higo, Toshiyasu; Hildreth, Michael D.; Hiller, Karlheinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen James; Himel, Thomas; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hioki, Zenro; Hirano, Koichiro; Hirose, Tachishige; Hisamatsu, Hiromi; Hisano, Junji; Hlaing, Chit Thu; Hock, Kai Meng; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hohlfeld, Mark; Honda, Yousuke; Hong, Juho; Hong, Tae Min; Honma, Hiroyuki; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hosoyama, Kenji; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Mi; Hou, Wei-Shu; Howell, David; Hronek, Maxine; Hsiung, Yee B.; Hu, Bo; Hu, Tao; Huang, Jung-Yun; Huang, Tong Ming; Huang, Wen Hui; Huedem, Emil; Huggard, Peter; Hugonie, Cyril; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huitu, Katri; Hwang, Youngseok; Idzik, Marek; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Ignatov, Fedor; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ilicheva, Tatiana; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Incagli, Marco; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Hitoshi; Inoue, Youichi; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioakeimidi, Katerina; Ishihara, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Issakov, Vladimir; Ito, Kazutoshi; Ivanov, V.V.; Ivanov, Valentin; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Iwasaki, Masako; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Jackson, David; Jackson, Frank; Jacobsen, Bob; Jaganathan, Ramaswamy; Jamison, Steven; Janssen, Matthias Enno; Jaramillo-Echeverria, Richard; Jauffret, Clement; Jawale, Suresh B.; Jeans, Daniel; Jedziniak, Ron; Jeffery, Ben; Jehanno, Didier; Jenner, Leo J.; Jensen, Chris; Jensen, David R.; Jiang, Hairong; Jiang, Xiao Ming; Jimbo, Masato; Jin, Shan; Keith Jobe, R.; Johnson, Anthony; Johnson, Erik; Johnson, Matt; Johnston, Michael; Joireman, Paul; Jokic, Stevan; Jones, James; Jones, Roger M.; Jongewaard, Erik; Jönsson, Leif; Joshi, Gopal; Joshi, Satish C.; Jung, Jin-Young; Junk, Thomas; Juste, Aurelio; Kado, Marumi; Kadyk, John; Käfer, Daniela; Kako, Eiji; Kalavase, Puneeth; Kalinin, Alexander; Kalinowski, Jan; Kamitani, Takuya; Kamiya, Yoshio; Kamiya, Yukihide; Kamoshita, Jun-ichi; Kananov, Sergey; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kanemura, Shinya; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kang, Wen; Kanjial, D.; Kapusta, Frédéric; Karataev, Pavel; Karchin, Paul E.; Karlen, Dean; Karyotakis, Yannis; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Kasley, Paul; Katagiri, Hiroaki; Kato, Takashi; Kato, Yukihiro; Katzy, Judith; Kaukher, Alexander; Kaur, Manjit; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Kazakov, Sergei; Kekelidze, V.D.; Keller, Lewis; Kelley, Michael; Kelly, Marc; Kelly, Michael; Kennedy, Kurt; Kephart, Robert; Keung, Justin; Khainovski, Oleg; Khan, Sameen Ahmed; Khare, Prashant; Khovansky, Nikolai; Kiesling, Christian; Kikuchi, Mitsuo; Kilian, Wolfgang; Killenberg, Martin; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Eun San; Kim, Eun-Joo; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Hongjoo; Kim, Hyoungsuk; Kim, Hyun-Chui; Kim, Jonghoon; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Peter; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Sun Kee; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Youngim; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimmitt, Maurice; Kirby, Robert; Kircher, François; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittel, Olaf; Klanner, Robert; Klebaner, Arkadiy L.; Kleinwort, Claus; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klinkby, Esben; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Marc; Kneisel, Peter; Ko, In Soo; Ko, Kwok; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kobayashi, Nobuko; Kobel, Michael; Koch, Manuel; Kodys, Peter; Koetz, Uli; Kohrs, Robert; Kojima, Yuuji; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolodziej, Karol; Kolomensky, Yury G.; Komamiya, Sachio; Kong, Xiang Cheng; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korbel, Volker; Koscielniak, Shane; Kostromin, Sergey; Kowalewski, Robert; Kraml, Sabine; Krammer, Manfred; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Krautscheid, Thorsten; Krawczyk, Maria; James Krebs, H.; Krempetz, Kurt; Kribs, Graham; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Kriske, Richard; Kronfeld, Andreas; Kroseberg, Jürgen; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruecker, Dirk; Krüger, Hans; Krumpa, Nicholas A.; Krumshtein, Zinovii; Kuang, Yu Ping; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Vic; Kudoh, Noboru; Kulis, Szymon; Kumada, Masayuki; Kumar, Abhay; Kume, Tatsuya; Kundu, Anirban; Kurevlev, German; Kurihara, Yoshimasa; Kuriki, Masao; Kuroda, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Hirotoshi; Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Kusano, Tomonori; Kush, Pradeep K.; Kutschke, Robert; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Kvasnicka, Peter; Kwon, Youngjoon; Labarga, Luis; Lacasta, Carlos; Lackey, Sharon; Lackowski, Thomas W.; Lafaye, Remi; Lafferty, George; Lagorio, Eric; Laktineh, Imad; Lal, Shankar; Laloum, Maurice; Lam, Briant; Lancaster, Mark; Lander, Richard; Lange, Wolfgang; Langenfeld, Ulrich; Langeveld, Willem; Larbalestier, David; Larsen, Ray; Lastovicka, Tomas; Lastovicka-Medin, Gordana; Latina, Andrea; Latour, Emmanuel; Laurent, Lisa; Le, Ba Nam; Le, Duc Ninh; Le Diberder, Francois; Dû, Patrick Le; Lebbolo, Hervé; Lebrun, Paul; Lecoq, Jacques; Lee, Sung-Won; Lehner, Frank; Leibfritz, Jerry; Lenkszus, Frank; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Levy, Aharon; Lewandowski, Jim; Leyh, Greg; Li, Cheng; Li, Chong Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Li, Da Zhang; Li, Gang; Li, Jin; Li, Shao Peng; Li, Wei Ming; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiao Ping; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yuanjing; Li, Yulan; Li, Zenghai; Li, Zhong Quan; Liang, Jian Tao; Liao, Yi; Lilje, Lutz; Guilherme Lima, J.; Lintern, Andrew J.; Lipton, Ronald; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Liu, Chun; Liu, Jian Fei; Liu, Ke Xin; Liu, Li Qiang; Liu, Shao Zhen; Liu, Sheng Guang; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Wanming; Liu, Wei Bin; Liu, Ya Ping; Liu, Yu Dong; Lockyer, Nigel; Logan, Heather E.; Logatchev, Pavel V.; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lohse, Thomas; Lola, Smaragda; Lopez-Virto, Amparo; Loveridge, Peter; Lozano, Manuel; Lu, Cai-Dian; Lu, Changguo; Lu, Gong-Lu; Lu, Wen Hui; Lubatti, Henry; Lucotte, Arnaud; Lundberg, Björn; Lundin, Tracy; Luo, Mingxing; Luong, Michel; Luth, Vera; Lutz, Benjamin; Lutz, Pierre; Lux, Thorsten; Luzniak, Pawel; Lyapin, Alexey; Lykken, Joseph; Lynch, Clare; Ma, Li; Ma, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Ma, Wen-Gan; Macfarlane, David; Maciel, Arthur; MacLeod, Allan; MacNair, David; Mader, Wolfgang; Magill, Stephen; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Maiheu, Bino; Maity, Manas; Majchrzak, Millicent; Majumder, Gobinda; Makarov, Roman; Makowski, Dariusz; Malaescu, Bogdan; Mallik, C.; Mallik, Usha; Malton, Stephen; Malyshev, Oleg B.; Malysheva, Larisa I.; Mammosser, John; Mamta; Mamuzic, Judita; Manen, Samuel; Manghisoni, Massimo; Manly, Steven; Marcellini, Fabio; Marcisovsky, Michal; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Marks, Steve; Marone, Andrew; Marti, Felix; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Victoria; Martin-Chassard, Gisèle; Martinez, Manel; Martinez-Rivero, Celso; Martsch, Dennis; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maruyama, Takashi; Masuzawa, Mika; Mathez, Hervé; Matsuda, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Shuji; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Mättig, Peter; Mattison, Thomas; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mawatari, Kentarou; Mazzacane, Anna; McBride, Patricia; McCormick, Douglas; McCormick, Jeremy; McDonald, Kirk T.; McGee, Mike; McIntosh, Peter; McKee, Bobby; McPherson, Robert A.; Meidlinger, Mandi; Meier, Karlheinz; Mele, Barbara; Meller, Bob; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Mendez, Hector; Mercer, Adam; Merkin, Mikhail; Meshkov, I.N.; Messner, Robert; Metcalfe, Jessica; Meyer, Chris; Meyer, Hendrik; Meyer, Joachim; Meyer, Niels; Meyners, Norbert; Michelato, Paolo; Michizono, Shinichiro; Mihalcea, Daniel; Mihara, Satoshi; Mihara, Takanori; Mikami, Yoshinari; Mikhailichenko, Alexander A.; Milardi, Catia; Miller, David J.; Miller, Owen; Miller, Roger J.; Milstene, Caroline; Mimashi, Toshihiro; Minashvili, Irakli; Miquel, Ramon; Mishra, Shekhar; Mitaroff, Winfried; Mitchell, Chad; Miura, Takako; Miyata, Hitoshi; Mjörnmark, Ulf; Mnich, Joachim; Moenig, Klaus; Moffeit, Kenneth; Mokhov, Nikolai; Molloy, Stephen; Monaco, Laura; Monasterio, Paul R.; Montanari, Alessandro; Moon, Sung Ik; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Mora de Freitas, Paulo; Morel, Federic; Moretti, Stefano; Morgunov, Vasily; Mori, Toshinori; Morin, Laurent; Morisseau, François; Morita, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Youhei; Morita, Yuichi; Morozov, Nikolai; Morozumi, Yuichi; Morse, William; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Moultaka, Gilbert; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Alex; Mueller, Wolfgang; Muennich, Astrid; Muhlleitner, Milada Margarete; Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Müller, Thomas; Munro, Morrison; Murayama, Hitoshi; Muto, Toshiya; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Nabhiraj, P.Y.; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Nagamine, Tadashi; Nagano, Ai; Naito, Takashi; Nakai, Hirotaka; Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Isamu; Nakamura, Tomoya; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Nakao, Katsumi; Nakao, Noriaki; Nakayoshi, Kazuo; Nam, Sang; Namito, Yoshihito; Namkung, Won; Nantista, Chris; Napoly, Olivier; Narain, Meenakshi; Naroska, Beate; Nauenberg, Uriel; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nelson, Charles; Nelson, Janice; Nelson, Timothy; Nemecek, Stanislav; Neubauer, Michael; Neuffer, David; Newman, Myriam Q.; Nezhevenko, Oleg; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nguyen, Anh Ky; Nguyen, Minh; Van Nguyen Thi,Hong; Niebuhr, Carsten; Niehoff, Jim; Niezurawski, Piotr; Nishitani, Tomohiro; Nitoh, Osamu; Noguchi, Shuichi; Nomerotski, Andrei; Noonan, John; Norbeck, Edward; Nosochkov, Yuri; Notz, Dieter; Nowak, Grazyna; Nowak, Hannelies; Noy, Matthew; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nyffeler, Andreas; Nygren, David; Oddone, Piermaria; O'Dell, Joseph; Oh, Jong-Seok; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohkuma, Kazumasa; Ohlerich, Martin; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Yukiyoshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Norihito; Oide, Katsunobu; Okada, Nobuchika; Okada, Yasuhiro; Okamura, Takahiro; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Okumi, Shoji; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliver, William; Olivier, Bob; Olsen, James; Olsen, Jeff; Olsen, Stephen; Olshevsky, A.G.; Olsson, Jan; Omori, Tsunehiko; Onel, Yasar; Onengut, Gulsen; Ono, Hiroaki; Onoprienko, Dmitry; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Will; Orimoto, Toyoko J.; Oriunno, Marco; Orlandea, Marius Ciprian; Oroku, Masahiro; Orr, Lynne H.; Orr, Robert S.; Oshea, Val; Oskarsson, Anders; Osland, Per; Ossetski, Dmitri; Österman, Lennart; Ostiguy, Francois; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ottewell, Brian; Ouyang, Qun; Padamsee, Hasan; Padilla, Cristobal; Pagani, Carlo; Palmer, Mark A.; Pam, Wei Min; Pande, Manjiri; Pande, Rajni; Pandit, V.S.; Pandita, P.N.; Pandurovic, Mila; Pankov, Alexander; Panzeri, Nicola; Papandreou, Zisis; Paparella, Rocco; Para, Adam; Park, Hwanbae; Parker, Brett; Parkes, Chris; Parma, Vittorio; Parsa, Zohreh; Parsons, Justin; Partridge, Richard; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Pásztor, Gabriella; Paterson, Ewan; Patrick, Jim; Patteri, Piero; Ritchie Patterson, J.; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paver, Nello; Pavlicek, Vince; Pawlik, Bogdan; Payet, Jacques; Pchalek, Norbert; Pedersen, John; Pei, Guo Xi; Pei, Shi Lun; Pelka, Jerzy; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pellett, David; Peng, G.X.; Penn, Gregory; Penzo, Aldo; Perry, Colin; Peskin, Michael; Peters, Franz; Petersen, Troels Christian; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Thomas; Petterson, Maureen; Pfeffer, Howard; Pfund, Phil; Phelps, Alan; Van Phi, Quang; Phillips, Jonathan; Phinney, Nan; Piccolo, Marcello; Piemontese, Livio; Pierini, Paolo; Thomas Piggott, W.; Pike, Gary; Pillet, Nicolas; Jayawardena, Talini Pinto; Piot, Phillippe; Pitts, Kevin; Pivi, Mauro; Plate, Dave; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poehler, Michael; Poelker, Matthew; Poffenberger, Paul; Pogorelsky, Igor; Poirier, Freddy; Poling, Ronald; Poole, Mike; Popescu, Sorina; Popielarski, John; Pöschl, Roman; Postranecky, Martin; Potukochi, Prakash N.; Prast, Julie; Prat, Serge; Preger, Miro; Prepost, Richard; Price, Michael; Proch, Dieter; Puntambekar, Avinash; Qin, Qing; Qu, Hua Min; Quadt, Arnulf; Quesnel, Jean-Pierre; Radeka, Veljko; Rahmat, Rahmat; Rai, Santosh Kumar; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Ramberg, Erik; Ranjan, Kirti; Rao, Sista V.L.S.; Raspereza, Alexei; Ratti, Alessandro; Ratti, Lodovico; Raubenheimer, Tor; Raux, Ludovic; Ravindran, V.; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup; Re, Valerio; Rease, Bill; Reece, Charles E.; Regler, Meinhard; Rehlich, Kay; Reichel, Ina; Reichold, Armin; Reid, John; Reid, Ron; Reidy, James; Reinhard, Marcel; Renz, Uwe; Repond, Jose; Resta-Lopez, Javier; Reuen, Lars; Ribnik, Jacob; Rice, Tyler; Richard, François; Riemann, Sabine; Riemann, Tord; Riles, Keith; Riley, Daniel; Rimbault, Cécile; Rindani, Saurabh; Rinolfi, Louis; Risigo, Fabio; Riu, Imma; Rizhikov, Dmitri; Rizzo, Thomas; Rochford, James H.; Rodriguez, Ponciano; Roeben, Martin; Rolandi, Gigi; Roodman, Aaron; Rosenberg, Eli; Roser, Robert; Ross, Marc; Rossel, François; Rossmanith, Robert; Roth, Stefan; Rougé, André; Rowe, Allan; Roy, Amit; Roy, Sendhunil B.; Roy, Sourov; Royer, Laurent; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; Royon, Christophe; Ruan, Manqi; Rubin, David; Ruehl, Ingo; Jimeno, Alberto Ruiz; Ruland, Robert; Rusnak, Brian; Ryu, Sun-Young; Sabbi, Gian Luca; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadygov, Ziraddin Y; Saeki, Takayuki; Sagan, David; Sahni, Vinod C.; Saini, Arun; Saito, Kenji; Saito, Kiwamu; Sajot, Gerard; Sakanaka, Shogo; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Salata, Zen; Salih, Sabah; Salvatore, Fabrizio; Samson, Joergen; Sanami, Toshiya; Levi Sanchez, Allister; Sands, William; Santic, John; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Sapronov, Andrey; Sarkar, Utpal; Sasao, Noboru; Satoh, Kotaro; Sauli, Fabio; Saunders, Claude; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, Lee; Saxton, Laura; Schäfer, Oliver; Schälicke, Andreas; Schade, Peter; Schaetzel, Sebastien; Scheitrum, Glenn; Schibler, Emilie; Schindler, Rafe; Schlösser, Markus; Schlueter, Ross D.; Schmid, Peter; Schmidt, Ringo Sebastian; Schneekloth, Uwe; Schreiber, Heinz Juergen; Schreiber, Siegfried; Schroeder, Henning; Peter Schüler, K.; Schulte, Daniel; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schumacher, Markus; Schumann, Steffen; Schumm, Bruce A.; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Scott, Duncan J.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Sefkow, Felix; Sefri, Rachid; Seguin-Moreau, Nathalie; Seidel, Sally; Seidman, David; Sekmen, Sezen; Seletskiy, Sergei; Senaha, Eibun; Senanayake, Rohan; Sendai, Hiroshi; Sertore, Daniele; Seryi, Andrei; Settles, Ronald; Sever, Ramazan; Shales, Nicholas; Shao, Ming; Shelkov, G.A.; Shepard, Ken; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Sheppard, John C.; Shi, Cai Tu; Shidara, Tetsuo; Shim, Yeo-Jeong; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Yuuki; Shimogawa, Tetsushi; Shin, Seunghwan; Shioden, Masaomi; Shipsey, Ian; Shirkov, Grigori; Shishido, Toshio; Shivpuri, Ram K.; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Shulga, Sergey; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Shuvalov, Sergey; Si, Zongguo; Siddiqui, Azher Majid; Siegrist, James; Simon, Claire; Simrock, Stefan; Sinev, Nikolai; Singh, Bhartendu K.; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Pitamber; Singh, R.K.; Singh, S.K.; Singini, Monito; Sinha, Anil K.; Sinha, Nita; Sinha, Rahul; Sinram, Klaus; Sissakian, A.N.; Skachkov, N.B.; Skrinsky, Alexander; Slater, Mark; Slominski, Wojciech; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smith, A J Stewart; Smith, Alex; Smith, Brian J.; Smith, Jeff; Smith, Jonathan; Smith, Steve; Smith, Susan; Smith, Tonee; Neville Snodgrass, W.; Sobloher, Blanka; Sohn, Young-Uk; Solidum, Ruelson; Solyak, Nikolai; Son, Dongchul; Sonmez, Nasuf; Sopczak, Andre; Soskov, V.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Speziali, Valeria; Spira, Michael; Sprehn, Daryl; Sridhar, K.; Srivastava, Asutosh; St. Lorant, Steve; Stahl, Achim; Stanek, Richard P.; Stanitzki, Marcel; Stanley, Jacob; Stefanov, Konstantin; Stein, Werner; Steiner, Herbert; Stenlund, Evert; Stern, Amir; Sternberg, Matt; Stockinger, Dominik; Stockton, Mark; Stoeck, Holger; Strachan, John; Strakhovenko, V.; Strauss, Michael; Striganov, Sergei I.; Strologas, John; Strom, David; Strube, Jan; Stupakov, Gennady; Su, Dong; Sudo, Yuji; Suehara, Taikan; Suehiro, Toru; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Sugiyama, Akira; Suh, Jun Suhk; Sukovic, Goran; Sun, Hong; Sun, Stephen; Sun, Werner; Sun, Yi; Sun, Yipeng; Suszycki, Leszek; Sutcliffe, Peter; Suthar, Rameshwar L.; Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Atsuto; Suzuki, Chihiro; Suzuki, Shiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Swent, Richard; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swinson, Christina; Syresin, Evgeny; Szleper, Michal; Tadday, Alexander; Takahashi, Rika; Takahashi, Tohru; Takano, Mikio; Takasaki, Fumihiko; Takeda, Seishi; Takenaka, Tateru; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Tanaka, Masami; Tang, Chuan Xiang; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tantawi, Sami; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tartaglia, Michael A.; Tassielli, Giovanni Francesco; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Tavian, Laurent; Tawara, Hiroko; Taylor, Geoffrey; Telnov, Alexandre V.; Telnov, Valery; Tenenbaum, Peter; Teodorescu, Eliza; Terashima, Akio; Terracciano, Giuseppina; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Teubner, Thomas; Teuscher, Richard; Theilacker, Jay; Thomson, Mark; Tice, Jeff; Tigner, Maury; Timmermans, Jan; Titov, Maxim; Toge, Nobukazu; Tokareva, N.A.; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomasek, Lukas; Tomovic, Savo; Tompkins, John; Tonutti, Manfred; Topkar, Anita; Toprek, Dragan; Toral, Fernando; Torrence, Eric; Traversi, Gianluca; Trimpl, Marcel; Mani Tripathi, S.; Trischuk, William; Trodden, Mark; Trubnikov, G.V.; Tschirhart, Robert; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Tsukamoto, Toshifumi; Tsunemi, Akira; Tucker, Robin; Turchetta, Renato; Tyndel, Mike; Uekusa, Nobuhiro; Ueno, Kenji; Umemori, Kensei; Ummenhofer, Martin; Underwood, David; Uozumi, Satoru; Urakawa, Junji; Urban, Jeremy; Uriot, Didier; Urner, David; Ushakov, Andrei; Usher, Tracy; Uzunyan, Sergey; Vachon, Brigitte; Valerio, Linda; Valin, Isabelle; Valishev, Alex; Vamra, Raghava; Van der Graaf, Harry; Van Kooten, Rick; Van Zandbergen, Gary; Vanel, Jean-Charles; Variola, Alessandro; Varner, Gary; Velasco, Mayda; Velte, Ulrich; Velthuis, Jaap; Vempati, Sundir K.; Venturini, Marco; Vescovi, Christophe; Videau, Henri; Vila, Ivan; Vincent, Pascal; Virey, Jean-Marc; Visentin, Bernard; Viti, Michele; Vo, Thanh Cuong; Vogel, Adrian; Vogt, Harald; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Vos, Marcel; Votava, Margaret; Vrba, Vaclav; Wackeroth, Doreen; Wagner, Albrecht; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Wagner, Stephen; Wake, Masayoshi; Walczak, Roman; Walker, Nicholas J.; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallon, Samuel; Walsh, Roberval; Walston, Sean; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walz, Dieter; Wang, Chao En; Wang, Chun Hong; Wang, Dou; Wang, Faya; Wang, Guang Wei; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Jiu Qing; Wang, Juwen; Wang, Lanfa; Wang, Lei; Wang, Min-Zu; Wang, Qing; Wang, Shu Hong; Wang, Xiaolian; Wang, Xue-Lei; Wang, Yi Fang; Wang, Zheng; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Ward, Bennie; 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Xu, Gang; Xu, Qing Jing; Yajnik, Urjit A.; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yamada, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Naoto; Yamamoto, Richard; Yamamoto, Yasuchika; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Satoru; Yamazaki, Hideki; Yan, Wenbiao; Yang, Hai-Jun; Yang, Jin Min; Yang, Jongmann; Yang, Zhenwei; Yano, Yoshiharu; Yazgan, Efe; Yeh, G.P.; Yilmaz, Hakan; Yock, Philip; Yoda, Hakutaro; Yoh, John; Yokoya, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Hirokazu; York, Richard C.; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Takuo; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Young, Andrew; Yu, Cheng Hui; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Xian Ming; Yuan, Changzheng; Yue, Chong-Xing; Yue, Jun Hui; Zacek, Josef; Zagorodnov, Igor; Zalesak, Jaroslav; Zalikhanov, Boris; Zarnecki, Aleksander Filip; Zawiejski, Leszek; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zerwas, Dirk; Zerwas, Peter; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Zhai, Ji Yuan; Zhang, Bao Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Chuang; Zhang, He; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jing Ru; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Zhige; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Ziping; Zhao, Haiwen; Zhao, Ji Jiu; Zhao, Jing Xia; Zhao, Ming Hua; Zhao, Sheng Chu; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Tong Xian; Zhao, Zhen Tang; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhou, De Min; Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Shun; Zhu, Shou Hua; Zhu, Xiong Wei; Zhukov, Valery; Zimmermann, Frank; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zisman, Michael S.; Zomer, Fabian; Zong, Zhang Guo; Zorba, Osman; Zutshi, Vishnu

    2007-01-01

    This report, Volume IV of the International Linear Collider Reference Design Report, describes the detectors which will record and measure the charged and neutral particles produced in the ILC's high energy e+e- collisions. The physics of the ILC, and the environment of the machine-detector interface, pose new challenges for detector design. Several conceptual designs for the detector promise the needed performance, and ongoing detector R&D is addressing the outstanding technological issues. Two such detectors, operating in push-pull mode, perfectly instrument the ILC interaction region, and access the full potential of ILC physics.