WorldWideScience

Sample records for risk receiving low-dose

  1. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Hou-Tai; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical organs under treatment. However, there are a lot of non-target organs at risk (OARs) occupied by low dose with underestimate in this modern rotational IMRT treatment. Herein, we report a case of a pathologic compression fracture of the T9 vertebra in a 55-year-old patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The patient underwent HT at a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions delivered to T8-T10 for symptom relief. Two weeks after the radiotherapy had been completed, the first course of chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, fluorouracil, and leucovorin was administered. After two weeks of chemotherapy, however, the patient developed progressive dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern with traction bronchiectasis, diffuse ground-glass opacities, and cystic change with fibrosis. Acute radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of radiation toxicities caused by low dose off-targets and abscopal effects even with highly conformal radiotherapy

  2. Burden of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients receiving low-dose acetylsalicylic acid for cardiovascular risk management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Pratt, Stephen; Elkin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Continuous low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin; ASA) is a mainstay of cardiovascular (CV) risk management. It is well established, however, that troublesome upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are commonly experienced among low-dose ASA users.......Continuous low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin; ASA) is a mainstay of cardiovascular (CV) risk management. It is well established, however, that troublesome upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are commonly experienced among low-dose ASA users....

  3. The risk of childhood cancer from low doses of ionizing radiation received in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, R.; Doll, R.; Bithell, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Radiological protection is based upon the assumption that any additional exposure to ionising radiation leads to an increased risk of stochastic adverse health effects. The validity of this assumption is supported by the epidemiological association between childhood cancer and X-ray exposure of the fetus in utero for diagnostic purposes. Evidence for a direct causal interpretation of this association is compelling: the association has high statistical significance, it is consistent across many case-control studies carried out worldwide, and an appropriate dose-response relationship is indicated. Evidence against bias and confounding as alternative explanations is strong. Nonetheless, objections to causality have been raised. Four grounds for controversy are examined in detail, with the conclusion that they do not provide persuasive evidence against a cause and effect relationship. We conclude that acute doses of the order of 10 mGy received by the fetus in utero cause a subsequent increase in the risk of cancer in childhood, and that, in these circumstances, the excess absolute risk coefficient for childhood cancer incidence is 6-12% per Gy. (author)

  4. LOW DOSE RISK, DECISIONS, and RISK COMMUNICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low-dose exposures. Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low-dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  5. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James

    2002-01-01

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation

  6. Low-Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James; Slovic, Paul

    2001-01-01

    To conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low dose exposures. This involves the study of existing knowledge and the evaluation of science information presented within a variety of formats, as educational information, news media stories, and alternative communication methods (personal contact, small group interaction, email and internet, etc.). Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low- dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  7. New risk estimates at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The age of molecular radiation epidemiology may be at hand. The techniques are available to establish with the degree of precision required to determine whether agent-specific mutations can be identified consistently. A concerted effort to examine radiation-induced changes in as many relevant genes as possible appears to be justified. Cancers in those exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation should be chosen for the investigation. Parallel studies of radiation-induced cancers in experimental animals would not only complement the human studies, but perhaps reveal approaches to extrapolation of risk estimates across species. A caveat should be added to this optimistic view of what molecular studies might contribute to the knotty problem of risk estimates at low doses. The suggestions are made by one with no expertise in the field of molecular biology

  8. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  9. Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI). Strategic research agenda for low dose radiation risk research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, BfS, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Auvinen, A. [University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Cardis, E. [ISGlobal, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona (Spain); Durante, M. [Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, TIFPA, Trento (Italy); Harms-Ringdahl, M. [Stockholm University, Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Jourdain, J.R. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Madas, B.G. [MTA Centre for Energy Research, Environmental Physics Department, Budapest (Hungary); Ottolenghi, A. [University of Pavia, Physics Department, Pavia (Italy); Pazzaglia, S. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Prise, K.M. [Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Quintens, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sabatier, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, Paris (France); Bouffler, S. [Public Health England, PHE, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) is a European radiation protection research platform with focus on research on health risks after exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. It was founded in 2010 and currently includes 44 members from 18 countries. A major activity of MELODI is the continuous development of a long-term European Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on low-dose risk for radiation protection. The SRA is intended to identify priorities for national and European radiation protection research programs as a basis for the preparation of competitive calls at the European level. Among those key priorities is the improvement of health risk estimates for exposures close to the dose limits for workers and to reference levels for the population in emergency situations. Another activity of MELODI is to ensure the availability of European key infrastructures for research activities, and the long-term maintenance of competences in radiation research via an integrated European approach for training and education. The MELODI SRA identifies three key research topics in low dose or low dose-rate radiation risk research: (1) dose and dose rate dependence of cancer risk, (2) radiation-induced non-cancer effects and (3) individual radiation sensitivity. The research required to improve the evidence base for each of the three key topics relates to three research lines: (1) research to improve understanding of the mechanisms contributing to radiogenic diseases, (2) epidemiological research to improve health risk evaluation of radiation exposure and (3) research to address the effects and risks associated with internal exposures, differing radiation qualities and inhomogeneous exposures. The full SRA and associated documents can be downloaded from the MELODI website (http://www.melodi-online.eu/sra.html). (orig.)

  10. Risk of cancer subsequent to low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.

    1980-01-01

    The author puts low dose irradiation risks in perspective using average background radiation doses for standards. He assailed irresponsible media coverage during the height of public interest in the Three-Mile Island Reactor incident

  11. Review of European research trends of low dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Large research projects on low dose radiation effects in Europe and US over the past decade have provided limited scientific knowledge which could underpin the validation of radiation protection systems. Recently in Europe, there have been repeated discussions and dialogues to improve the situation, and as the consequence, the circumstances surrounding low dose radiation risks are changing. In 2009, Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) was established as a trans-national organization capable of ensuring appropriate governance of research in the pursuit of a long term shared vision, and Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration (DoReMi) network was launched in 2010 to achieve fairly short term results in order to prove the validity of the MELODI approach. It is expected to be very effective and powerful activities to facilitate the reduction of uncertainties in the understanding of low dose risks, but the regulatory requests rushing the reinforcement of radiological protection regulations based on the precautional principles are more increasing. To develop reasonable radiological protection systems based on scientific evidences, we need to accelerate to collect scientific evidences which could directly underpin more appropriate radiation protection systems even in Japan. For the purpose, we Japan need to develop from an independent standpoint and share as a multidisciplinary vision a long term and holistic research strategy which enables to enhance Japanese advantages such as low dose rate facilities and animal facilities, as soon as possible. (author)

  12. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  13. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  14. Safety of ultrasound-guided transrectal extended prostate biopsy in patients receiving low-dose aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kariotis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether the peri-procedural administration of low-dose aspirin increases the risk of bleeding complications for patients undergoing extended prostate biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From February 2007 to September 2008, 530 men undergoing extended needle biopsies were divided in two groups; those receiving aspirin and those not receiving aspirin. The morbidity of the procedure, with emphasis on hemorrhagic complications, was assessed prospectively using two standardized questionnaires. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the mean number of biopsy cores (12.9 ± 1.6 vs. 13.1 ± 1.2 cores, p = 0.09. No major biopsy-related complications were noted. Statistical analysis did not demonstrate significant differences in the rate of hematuria (64.5% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.46, rectal bleeding (33.6% vs. 25.9%, p = 0.09 or hemospermia (90.1% vs. 86.9%, p = 0.45. The mean duration of hematuria and rectal bleeding was significantly greater in the aspirin group compared to the control group (4.45 ± 2.7 vs. 2.4 ± 2.6, p = < 0.001 and 3.3 ± 1.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.7, p < 0.001. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only younger patients (mean age 60.1 ± 5.8 years with a lower body mass index (< 25 kg/m2 receiving aspirin were at a higher risk (odds ratio = 3.46, p = 0.047 for developing hematuria and rectal bleeding after the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The continuing use of low-dose aspirin in patients undergoing extended prostatic biopsy is a relatively safe option since it does not increase the morbidity of the procedure.

  15. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous lymphoma : Minimal risk of acute toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Kai; Elsayad, Khaled; Moustakis, Christos; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is attracting increased interest for the effective palliative treatment of primary cutaneous T‑cell lymphoma (pCTCL). In this study, we compared toxicity profiles following various radiation doses. We reviewed the records of 60 patients who underwent TSEBT for pCTCL between 2000 and 2016 at the University Hospital of Munster. The treatment characteristics of the radiotherapy (RT) regimens and adverse events (AEs) were then analyzed and compared. In total, 67 courses of TSEBT were administered to 60 patients. Of these patients, 34 (51%) received a standard dose with a median surface dose of 30 Gy and 33 patients (49%) receivedlow dose with the median surface dose of 12 Gy (7 salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were administered to 5 patients). After a median follow-up of 15 months, the overall AE rate was 100%, including 38 patients (57%) with grade 2 and 7 (10%) with grade 3 AEs. Patients treated with low-dose TSEBT had significantly fewer grade 2 AEs than those with conventional dose regimens (33 vs. 79%, P dose regimen compared to those with the conventional dose regimens (6 vs. 15%, P = 0.78). Multiple/salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were not associated with an increased risk of acute AEs. Low-dose TSEBT regimens are associated with significantly fewer grade 2 acute toxicities compared with conventional doses of TSEBT. Repeated/Salvage low-dose TSEBT, however, appears to be tolerable and can even be applied safely in patients with cutaneous relapses.

  16. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Yan

    Full Text Available Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV and iron ion ((56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  17. Risk at Low Doses: Scientific knowledge, uncertainties and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giusssani, A.; Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Most of the applications of ionizing radiation in the medical field, for the exposed workers as well as the majority of patients undergoing diagnostic examinations, can be seen as low situations. Epidemiological information is however available for dose and dose rates higher than the values typical of most medical situation. Main source of information is the Life Span Study (LSS) of Japanese. A-bomb survivors, supplemented by studies of selected groups of exposed workers (uranium miners, radium painters) or radiotherapy patients with a detailed follow-up history. All of these group studies, however, suffer from one or more of the following limitations: - lack of adequate dosimetry - lack of a reliable control group for the necessary comparison - influence of concomitant factors (not always easy to find out) - influence of social conditions. In addition exposed study populations are different than the population of patients for which the risk estimates are needed in the medical situation. Recent studies aimed to evaluate the available data on the cohorts of the inhabitants of the Techa river settlements as well as of the workers of the Mayak nuclear facilities may provide in the future useful information on large populations chronically exposed to relatively low doses. (Author)

  18. Lung cancer risk at low doses of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, W.; Katz, R.; Zhang, C.X.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of inhabitant exposures arising from the inhalation of 222 Rn and 220 Rn progeny, and lung cancer mortality has been carried out in two adjacent areas in Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, designated as the high background and the control area. Annual exposure rates are 0.38 working level months (WLM) per year in the high background, and 0.16 WLM/yr in the control area. In 14 yr of continuous study, from 1970 to 1983, age-adjusted mortality rates were found to be 2.7 per 10(5) living persons of all ages in the high background area, and 2.9 per 10(5) living persons in the control area. From this data, we conclude that we are unable to determine excess lung cancers over the normal fluctuations below a cumulative exposure of 15 WLM. This conclusion is supported by lung cancer mortality data from Austrian and Finnish high-background areas. A theoretical analysis of epidemiological data on human lung cancer incidence from inhaled 2 ]2'' 2 Rn and 220 Rn progeny, which takes into account cell killing as competitive with malignant transformation, leads to the evaluation of a risk factor which is either a linear-exponential or a quadratic-exponential function of the alpha-particle dose. Animal lung cancer data and theoretical considerations can be supplied to support either hypothesis. Thus we conclude that at our current stage of knowledge both the linear-exponential and the quadratic-exponential extrapolation to low doses seem to be equally acceptable for Rn-induced lung cancer risk, possibly suggesting a linear-quadratic transformation function with an exponential cell-killing term, or the influence of risk-modifying factors such as repair or proliferation stimuli

  19. Total Risk Management for Low Dose Radiation Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Z.; Mikulicic, V.; Sterc, D.

    2012-01-01

    Our civilization is witnessing about century of nuclear age mixed with enormous promises and cataclysmic threats. Nuclear energy seems to encapsulate both potential for pure good and evil or at least we humans are able to perceive that. These images are continuously with us and they are both helping and distracting from making best of nuclear potentials for civilization. Today with nuclear use significantly present and with huge potential to further improve our life with energy and medical use it is of enormous importance to try to have calmed, rational, and objective view on potential risks and certain benefits. Because all use of nuclear energy proved that their immediate risks are negligible (i.e., Three Mile Island and Fukushima) or much smaller than from the other alternatives (i.e., Chernobyl) it seems that the most important issue is the amount of risk from the long term effects to people from exposure to small doses of radiation. A similar issue is present in the increased use of modern computational tomography and other radiation sources use in medicine for examination and therapy. Finally, extreme natural exposures are third such potential risk sources. Definition of low doses varies depending on the way of delivery (i.e., single, multiple or continuous exposures), and for this paper usual dose of 100 mSv is selected as yearly upper amount. There are three very different scientifically supported views on the potential risks from the low doses exposure. The most conservative theory is that all radiation is harmful, and even small increments from background levels (i.e., 2-3 mSv) present additional risk. This view is called linear no threshold theory (LNT) and it is accepted as a regulatory conservative simple approach which guarantees safety. Risk is derived from the extrapolation of the measured effects of high levels of radiation. Opposite theory to LNT is hormesis which assumes that in fact small doses of radiation are helpful and they are improving our

  20. Risk of radiation-induced cancer at low doses and low dose rates for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an updated, comprehensive review of the data available for assessing the risk of radiation-induced cancer for radiation protection purposes. Particular emphasis is placed on assessing risks at low doses and low dose rates. The review brings together the results of epidemiological investigations and fundamental studies on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in radiation damage. Additionally, this information is supplemented by studies with experimental animals which provide further guidance on the form of the dose-response relationship for cancer induction, as well as on the effect of dose rate on the tumour yield. The emphasis of the report is on cancer induction resulting from exposure to radiations with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The work was performed under contract for the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris, France, whose agreement to publish is gratefully ackowledged. It extends the advice on radiation risks given in Documents of the NRPB, 4 No. 4 (1993). (Author)

  1. Low-dose aspirin and risk of intracranial bleeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Gaist, David; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse

    2017-01-01

    cohort of nonusers of low-dose aspirin at baseline were followed (maximum 14 years, median 5.4 years) to identify incident cases of ICB, with validation by manual review of patient records or linkage to hospitalization data. Using 10,000 frequency-matched controls, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) with 95...

  2. Randomized phase 2 study of low-dose decitabine vs low-dose azacitidine in lower-risk MDS and MDS/MPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias; Short, Nicholas J; Montalban-Bravo, Guillermo; Huang, Xuelin; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Qiao, Wei; Yang, Hui; Zhao, Chong; Kadia, Tapan; Borthakur, Gautam; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Sasaki, Koji; Estrov, Zeev; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Alvarado, Yesid; Komrokji, Rami; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Steensma, David P; DeZern, Amy; Roboz, Gail; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2017-09-28

    Hypomethylating agents (HMAs) improve survival in patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) but are less well-studied in lower-risk disease. We compared the safety and efficacy of low-dose decitabine vs low-dose azacitidine in this group of patients. Adults with low- or intermediate 1-risk MDS or MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, according to the International Prognostic Scoring System, were randomly assigned using a Bayesian adaptive design to receive either azacitidine 75 mg/m 2 intravenously/subcutaneously daily or decitabine 20 mg/m 2 intravenously daily for 3 consecutive days on a 28-day cycle. The primary outcome was overall response rate (ORR). Between November 2012 and February 2016, 113 patients were treated: 40 (35%) with azacitidine and 73 (65%) with decitabine. The median age was 70 years; 81% of patients were intermediate 1-risk patients. The median number of cycles received was 9. The ORRs were 70% and 49% ( P = .03) for patients treated with decitabine and azacitidine, respectively. Thirty-two percent of patients treated with decitabine became transfusion independent compared with 16% of patients treated with azacitidine ( P = .2). Cytogenetic response rates were 61% and 25% ( P = .02), respectively. With a median follow-up of 20 months, the overall median event-free survival was 18 months: 20 and 13 months for patients treated with decitabine and azacitidine, respectively ( P = .1). Treatment was well tolerated, with a 6-week mortality rate of 0%. The use of low-dose HMAs is safe and effective in patients with lower-risk MDS and MDS/MPN. Their effect on the natural history of lower-risk disease needs to be further studied. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT01720225). © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Implications of effects ''adaptive response'', ''low-dose hypersensitivity'' und ''bystander effect'' for cancer risk at low doses and low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P

    2006-01-01

    A model for carcinogenesis (the TSCE model) was applied in order to examine the effects of ''Low-dose hypersensitivity (LDH)'' and the ''Bystander effect (BE)'' on the derivation of radiation related cancer mortality risks. LDH has been discovered to occur in the inactivation of cells after acute exposure to low LET radiation. A corresponding version of the TSCE model was applied to the mortality data on the Abomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The BE has been mainly observed in cells after exposure to high LET radiation. A Version of the TSCE model which included the BE was applied to the data on lung cancer mortality from the workers at the Mayak nuclear facilities who were exposed to Plutonium. In general an equally good description of the A-bomb survivor mortality data (for all solid, stomach and lung tumours) was found for the TSCE model and the (conventional) empirical models but fewer parameters were necessary for the TSCE model. The TSCE model which included the effects of radiation induced cell killing resulted in non-linear dose response curves with excess relative risks after exposure at young ages that were generally lower than in the models without cell killing. The main results from TSCE models which included cell killing described by either conventional survival curves or LDH were very similar. A sub multiplicative effect from the interaction of smoking and exposure to plutonium was found to result from the analysis of the Mayak lung cancer mortality data. All models examined resulted in the predominant number of Mayak lung cancer deaths being ascribed to smoking. The interaction between smoking and plutonium exposures was found to be the second largest effect. The TSCE model resulted in lower estimates for the lung cancer excess relative risk per unit plutonium dose than the empirical risk model, but this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The excess relative risk dose responses were linear in the empirical model and

  4. Second International MELODI Workshop on Low Dose Risk Research - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repussard, J.; Weiss, W.; Quintana Trias, O.; Rosario Perez, M. del; Andersen, M.; Rudiger Trott, K.; Ottolenghi, A.; Smyth, V.; Graw, J.; Little, M.P.; Yonai, S.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.; Bouffler, S.; Chevillard, S.; Jeggo, P.; Sabatier, L.; Baatout, S.; Niwa, O.; Oesch, F.; Atkinson, M.; Averbeck, D.; Lloyd, D.; O'Neill, P.

    2011-01-01

    The MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) mission is to impulse low dose risk research in Europe through a strategic research agenda (SRA) and road-map of priorities. The last presentation is dedicated to the SRA and its preference research programs. The other presentations deal principally with the low-dose exposure in medical uses of ionizing radiations, radiosensitivity, radiation-induced cataracts, or epidemiology and radiobiology of cardiovascular disease. This document is composed of the slides of the presentations

  5. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous lymphoma. Minimal risk of acute toxicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, Kai; Elsayad, Khaled; Moustakis, Christos; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is attracting increased interest for the effective palliative treatment of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (pCTCL). In this study, we compared toxicity profiles following various radiation doses. We reviewed the records of 60 patients who underwent TSEBT for pCTCL between 2000 and 2016 at the University Hospital of Munster. The treatment characteristics of the radiotherapy (RT) regimens and adverse events (AEs) were then analyzed and compared. In total, 67 courses of TSEBT were administered to 60 patients. Of these patients, 34 (51%) received a standard dose with a median surface dose of 30 Gy and 33 patients (49%) received a low dose with the median surface dose of 12 Gy (7 salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were administered to 5 patients). After a median follow-up of 15 months, the overall AE rate was 100%, including 38 patients (57%) with grade 2 and 7 (10%) with grade 3 AEs. Patients treated with low-dose TSEBT had significantly fewer grade 2 AEs than those with conventional dose regimens (33 vs. 79%, P < 0.001). A lower grade 3 AE rate was also observed in patients who had received the low-dose regimen compared to those with the conventional dose regimens (6 vs. 15%, P = 0.78). Multiple/salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were not associated with an increased risk of acute AEs. Low-dose TSEBT regimens are associated with significantly fewer grade 2 acute toxicities compared with conventional doses of TSEBT. Repeated/Salvage low-dose TSEBT, however, appears to be tolerable and can even be applied safely in patients with cutaneous relapses. (orig.) [German] Eine niedrigdosierte Ganzhautelektronenbestrahlung (TSEBT) wird vermehrt zur effektiven palliativen Behandlung von Patienten mit primaer kutanen T-Zell-Lymphomen (pCTCL) eingesetzt. In dieser Studie vergleichen wir die Toxizitaetsprofile verschiedener Dosiskonzepte. Untersucht wurden 60 zwischen 2000 und 2016 am Universitaetsklinikum Muenster mittels TSEBT

  6. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?AbstractHigh doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  7. Comfrey: assessing the low-dose health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, P J

    The regular use of comfrey as part of the diet or for medicinal purposes may be a potential health risk as a result of the presence of naturally-occurring pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The majority of these alkaloids are hepatotoxic in both animals and humans, and some have been shown to induce tumours in experimental animals. In this article, the toxic properties of pyrrolizidine alkaloids are reviewed briefly, with particular reference to their presence in comfrey. The acute and long-term health risks at the normally-low levels of comfrey consumption are evaluated and discussed. On the basis of the data that are available currently, the small but significant long-term risk that is associated with the consumption of comfrey justifies the need to limit its intake. This is being achieved by controls under various state Poisons Acts, but also requires further education on the potential dangers of naturally-occurring chemicals of plant origin.

  8. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.)

  9. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  10. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  11. The risk of low doses of ionising radiation and the linear no threshold relationship debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Masse, R.; Vathaire, F. de; Averbeck, D.; Aurengo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP and the B.E.I.R. VII reports recommend a linear no threshold (L.N.T.) relationship for the estimation of cancer excess risk induced by ionising radiations (IR), but the 2005 report of Medicine and Science French Academies concludes that it leads to overestimate of risk for low and very low doses. The bases of L.N.T. are challenged by recent biological and animal experimental studies which show that the defence against IR involves the cell microenvironment and the immunologic system. The defence mechanisms against low doses are different and comparatively more effective than for high doses. Cell death is predominant against low doses. DNA repairing is activated against high doses, in order to preserve tissue functions. These mechanisms provide for multicellular organisms an effective and low cost defence system. The differences between low and high doses defence mechanisms are obvious for alpha emitters which show several greys threshold effects. These differences result in an impairment of epidemiological studies which, for statistical power purpose, amalgamate high and low doses exposure data, since it would imply that cancer IR induction and defence mechanisms are similar in both cases. Low IR dose risk estimates should rely on specific epidemiological studies restricted to low dose exposures and taking precisely into account potential confounding factors. The preliminary synthesis of cohort studies for which low dose data (< 100 mSv) were available show no significant risk excess, neither for solid cancer nor for leukemias. (authors)

  12. On possible risks of low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, O.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Neuherberg/Muenchen

    1974-01-01

    The survey on more recent experimental and epidemiological data and newer concepts for a realistic estimation of the radiation risk leads to the conclusion that for radiation late damages and possibly also for genetic damages with a chronical radiation exposure in the order of magnitude of the natural radiation exposure and probably also in the order of magnitude of the maximum permissible radiation dose, the risk is very probably lower than is to be expected based on the findings after relatively high doses and dose rates. A few less direct comparative studies have detected a time factor of 3 to 5. Considering the analysis of the RBW demely ionizing radiation which at high doses is not greater than 3, increases with decreasing dose and according to biophysical considerations, can possibly reach a value of 30, an effectiveness reduced by a factor of 10 of small doses and dose rates of loosely ionizing radiation would be even to be expected. All radiobiological knowledge on the effect of ionizing radiation allows one to expect that even smallest radiation doses can cause cellular damages due to the linear irreversable components of the radiation effect and probably that these damages can even be the starting point of a malignant tumour. Regarding this cancer-initiating effect however, the effectiveness of loosely ionizing radiation per rad in the region of natural radiation exposure lie considerably below that existing at high doses and dose rates. Whether however this initial carcinogenic effect of very small doses is at all noticeable during the average life duration in an increase of the spontaneous age-specific tumour rate is questionable if the assumption is confirmed that with decreasing dose, the time manifestation of the radiation induced tumours is delayed. (orig./LH) [de

  13. Low-dose extrapolation of radiation health risks: some implications of uncertainty for radiation protection at low doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Charles E

    2009-11-01

    Ionizing radiation is a known and well-quantified human cancer risk factor, based on a remarkably consistent body of information from epidemiological studies of exposed populations. Typical examples of risk estimation include use of Japanese atomic bomb survivor data to estimate future risk from radiation-related cancer among American patients receiving multiple computed tomography scans, persons affected by radioactive fallout, or persons whose livelihoods involve some radiation exposure, such as x-ray technicians, interventional radiologists, or shipyard workers. Our estimates of radiation-related risk are uncertain, reflecting statistical variation and our imperfect understanding of crucial assumptions that must be made if we are to apply existing epidemiological data to particular situations. Fortunately, that uncertainty is also highly quantifiable, and can be presented concisely and transparently. Radiation protection is ultimately a political process that involves consent by stakeholders, a diverse group that includes people who might be expected to be risk-averse and concerned with plausible upper limits on risk (how bad could it be?), cost-averse and concerned with lower limits on risk (can you prove there is a nontrivial risk at current dose levels?), or combining both points of view. How radiation-related risk is viewed by individuals and population subgroups also depends very much on perception of related benefit, which might be (for example) medical, economic, altruistic, or nonexistent. The following presentation follows the lead of National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Commentary 14, NCRP Report 126, and later documents in treating radiation protection from the viewpoint of quantitative uncertainty analysis.

  14. Low dose diagnostic radiation does not increase cancer risk in cancer prone mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D., E-mail: dboreham@nosm.ca [Northern Ontario School of Medicine, ON (Canada); Phan, N., E-mail: nghiphan13@yahoo.com [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lemon, J., E-mail: lemonja@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The increased exposure of patients to low dose diagnostic ionizing radiation has created concern that these procedures will result in greater risk of carcinogenesis. However, there is substantial evidence that shows in many cases that low dose exposure has the opposite effect. We have investigated whether CT scans can modify mechanisms associated with carcinogenesis in cancer-prone mice. Cancer was induced in Trp53+/- mice with an acute high dose whole-body 4 Gy γ-radiation exposure. Four weeks following the cancer-inducing dose, weekly whole-body CT scans (10 mGy/scan, 75 kVp X-rays) were given for ten consecutive weeks adding an additional radiation burden of 0.1 Gy. Short-term biological responses and subsequent lifetime cancer risk were investigated. Five days following the last CT scan, there were no detectable differences in the spontaneous levels of DNA damage in blood cells (reticulocytes). In fact, CT scanned mice had significantly lower constitutive levels of oxidative DNA damage and cell death (apoptosis), compared to non-CT scanned mice. This shows that multiple low dose radiation exposures modified the radio response and indicates protective processes were induced in mice. In mice treated with the multiple CT scans following the high cancer-inducing 4 Gy dose, tumour latency was increased, significantly prolonging lifespan. We conclude that repeated CT scans can reduce the cancer risk of a prior high-dose radiation exposure, and delay the progression of specific types of radiation-induced cancers in Trp53+/-mice. This research shows for the first time that low dose exposure long after cancer initiation events alter risk and reduce cancer morbidity. Cancer induction following low doses does not follow a linear non-threshold model of risk and this model should not be used to extrapolate risk to humans following low dose exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  15. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  16. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case-control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000-2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75-150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of low-dose aspirin...

  17. Low-dose aspirin and risk of intracranial bleeds: An observational study in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Gaist, David; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; Bromley, Susan; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2017-11-28

    To quantify the risk of intracranial bleeds (ICBs) associated with new use of prophylactic low-dose aspirin using a population-based primary care database in the United Kingdom. A cohort of new users of low-dose aspirin (75-300 mg; n = 199,079) aged 40-84 years and a 1:1 matched cohort of nonusers of low-dose aspirin at baseline were followed (maximum 14 years, median 5.4 years) to identify incident cases of ICB, with validation by manual review of patient records or linkage to hospitalization data. Using 10,000 frequency-matched controls, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for current low-dose aspirin use (0-7 days before the index date [ICB date for cases, random date for controls]); reference group was never used. There were 1,611 cases of ICB (n = 743 for intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH], n = 483 for subdural hematoma [SDH], and n = 385 for subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]). RRs (95% CI) were 0.98 (0.84-1.13) for all ICB, 0.98 (0.80-1.20) for ICH, 1.23 (0.95-1.59) for SDH, and 0.77 (0.58-1.01) for SAH. No duration of use or dose-response association was apparent. RRs (95% CI) for ≥1 year of low-dose aspirin use were 0.90 (0.72-1.13) for ICH, 1.20 (0.91-1.57) for SDH, and 0.69 (0.50-0.94) for SAH. Low-dose aspirin is not associated with an increased risk of any type of ICB and is associated with a significantly decreased risk of SAH when used for ≥1 year. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. A long-term risk-benefit analysis of low-dose aspirin in primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, I-Chen; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Yu, Fang-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Wu, Tzung-Shiun; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2016-02-01

    The long-term risk-benefit effect of occasional and regular use of low-dose aspirin (≤ 100 mg per day) in primary prevention of vascular diseases and cancers was calculated. One representative database of 1 000 000 participants from Taiwan's National Health Insurance scheme in 1997-2000 was used. The potential study subjects were those aged 30-95 years, were found not to have been prescribed aspirin before 1 January 2000, but to have first been prescribed low-dose aspirin (≤ 100 mg per day) after that date and were followed up to 31 December 2009. Participants prescribed low-dose aspirin risk. A total of 1720 pairs were analysed. During the study period, haemorrhage and ischaemia occurred in 25 (1·45%) and 67 participants (3·90%) in occasional users and 69 (4·01%) and 100 participants (5·81%) in regular users, whereas cancer occurred in 32 participants (1·86%) in occasional users and 26 participants (1·51%) in regular users. The crude and adjusted net clinical risks of low-dose aspirin use between the two frequency of users (≥ 80% vs. prevention against major vascular diseases and cancer. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  19. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation. Artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the ‘integrate-and-fire’ algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (1) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (2) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to 239 Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation–environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking. (author)

  20. Low dose radiation and ALARA: the potential risks to patients and staff from alpha-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, N.D.

    2014-01-01

    This year a new drug containing radium-223, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer metastases. Other drugs containing short-lived alpha-emitters are on clinical trial in Europe. Commonly, these employ a radionuclide attached to an antibody that specifically targets tumor cells to produce a highly localized radio-therapeutic dose to the tumor. However, normal tissues within the body will also be irradiated, albeit sometimes at low dose, and the question arises as to whether this presents a significant additional risk to the patient. Similarly, medical staff that handle these radionuclides could receive intakes of the radionuclides. What is the risk to staff? To assess the risk resulting from small tissue alpha-doses the toxicological, both human and animal, database was re-examined. The results of 20 epidemiological and toxicological studies with alpha-emitting radionuclides were analysed. In all cases a polynomial function provided a better fit to the data than a linear, no thresholds function. Also, in 19 cases a threshold dose below which no cancer is seen was indicated. The position of this threshold varied according to cancer type, but was typically in the range 0.1 to 1.0Gy of tissue dose - with a mean of 0.5Gy. It is concluded that alpha-radiation induced tumorogenesis is a threshold response and that as long as tissue doses are kept below these thresholds no additional cancers would be seen in either patients receiving alpha-therapy or in staff exposed to 'spilt' radionuclide. The presence of thresholds questions the appropriateness of current ALARA practices that are mostly used to drive occupational alpha-radiation exposures to as close to zero as possible. (author)

  1. Low dose radiation and ALARA: the potential risks to patients and staff from alpha-therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, N.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This year a new drug containing radium-223, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer metastases. Other drugs containing short-lived alpha-emitters are on clinical trial in Europe. Commonly, these employ a radionuclide attached to an antibody that specifically targets tumor cells to produce a highly localized radio-therapeutic dose to the tumor. However, normal tissues within the body will also be irradiated, albeit sometimes at low dose, and the question arises as to whether this presents a significant additional risk to the patient. Similarly, medical staff that handle these radionuclides could receive intakes of the radionuclides. What is the risk to staff? To assess the risk resulting from small tissue alpha-doses the toxicological, both human and animal, database was re-examined. The results of 20 epidemiological and toxicological studies with alpha-emitting radionuclides were analysed. In all cases a polynomial function provided a better fit to the data than a linear, no thresholds function. Also, in 19 cases a threshold dose below which no cancer is seen was indicated. The position of this threshold varied according to cancer type, but was typically in the range 0.1 to 1.0Gy of tissue dose - with a mean of 0.5Gy. It is concluded that alpha-radiation induced tumorogenesis is a threshold response and that as long as tissue doses are kept below these thresholds no additional cancers would be seen in either patients receiving alpha-therapy or in staff exposed to 'spilt' radionuclide. The presence of thresholds questions the appropriateness of current ALARA practices that are mostly used to drive occupational alpha-radiation exposures to as close to zero as possible. (author)

  2. Risk assessment from heterogeneous energy deposition in tissue, the problem of effects from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation from external or internal sources cause heterogeneous distribution of energy deposition events in the exposed biological system. With the cell being the individual element of the tissue system, the fraction of cells hit, the dose received by the hit, and the biological response of the cell to the dose received eventually determine the effect in tissue. The hit cell may experience detriment, such as change in its DNA leading to a malignant transformation, or it may derive benefit in terms of an adaptive response such as a temporary improvement of DNA repair or temporary prevention of effects from intracellular radicals through enhanced radical detoxification. These responses are protective also to toxic substances that are generated during normal metabolism. Within a multicellular system the probability of detriment must be weighed against the probability of benefit through adaptive responses with protection against various toxic agents including those produced by normal metabolism. Because irradiation can principally induce both, detriment and adaptive responses, one type of affected cells may not be simply summed up at the expense of cells with other types of effects, in assessing risk to tissue. An inventory of various types of effects in the blood-forming system of mammals, even with large ranges of uncertainty, uncovers the possibility of benefit to the system from exposure to low doses of low-LET radiation. This experimental approach may complement epidemiological data on individuals exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation and may lead to a more rational appraisal of risk

  3. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gestaut, Matthew M.; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J.; Hasan, Salman A.; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  4. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J; Hasan, Salman A; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (Pcryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (Pcryotherapy patients was -35°C (range, -96°C to -6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Patient selection criteria for consideration of cryotherapy and brachytherapy are similar in terms of anesthesia candidacy. Therefore, cryotherapy would not be recommended as a first-line local therapy for this particular

  5. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestaut, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.Gestaut@BSWHealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Cai, Wendi [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Vyas, Shilpa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States); Patel, Belur J. [Department of Urology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Hasan, Salman A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); MunozMaldonado, Yolanda [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  6. Low-dose aspirin use and the risk of ovarian cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Kjaer, S K; Olsen, J H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A comprehensive body of evidence has shown that aspirin has cancer-preventive effects, particularly against gastrointestinal cancer, but its effects on the risk of ovarian cancer are less well established. This nationwide case-control study examined the association between low......-dose aspirin and the risk of ovarian cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified all patients in the Danish Cancer Registry aged 30-84 years old with a histologically verified first diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer during 2000-2011. Each patient was sex- and age-matched to 15 population controls using...... risk-set sampling. Prescription use, comorbidity, reproductive history, and demographic characteristics data were obtained from nationwide registries. The use of low-dose (75-150 mg) aspirin was defined according to the dose as well as the duration and consistency of use. Conditional logistic...

  7. Long term outcome and side effects in patients receiving low-dose I125 brachytherapy: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Logghe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate the disease free survival (DFS, disease specific survival (DSS,overall survival (OS and side effects in patients who received low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy with I125 stranded seeds. Materials and methods: Between july 2003 and august 2012, 274 patients with organ confined prostate cancer were treated with permanent I125 brachytherapy. The median follow-up, age and pretreatment prostate specific antigen (iPSA was 84 months (12-120, 67 years (50-83 and 7.8 ng/mL (1.14-38, respectively. Median Gleason score was 6 (3-9. 219 patients (80% had stage cT1c, 42 patients (15.3% had stage cT2a, 3 (1.1% had stage cT2b and 3 (1.1% had stage cT2c. The median D90 was 154.3 Gy (102.7-190.2. Results: DSS was 98.5%.OS was 93.5%. 13 patients (4.7% developed systemic disease, 7 patients (2.55% had local progression. In 139 low risk patients, the 5 year biochemical freedom from failure rate (BFFF was 85% and 9 patients (6.4% developed clinical progression. In the intermediate risk group, the 5 year BFFF rate was 70% and 5 patients (7.1% developed clinical progression. Median nPSA in patients with biochemical relapse was 1.58 ng/mL (0.21 – 10.46, median nPSA in patients in remission was 0.51 ng/mL (0.01 – 8.5. Patients attaining a low PSA nadir had a significant higher BFFF (p<0.05. Median D90 in patients with biochemical relapse was 87.2 Gy (51 – 143,1. Patients receiving a high D90 had a significant higher BFFF (p<0.05. Conclusion: In a well selected patient population, LDR brachytherapy offers excellent outcomes. Reaching a low PSA nadir and attaining high D90 values are significant predictors for a higher DFS.

  8. A prospective randomized evaluation of the prophylactic use of low-dose dopamine in cancer patients receiving interleukin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, J N; Hurst, R; Vasselli, J; Lee, D; Kim, C J; McKee, M; Venzon, D; White, D; Marincola, F M; Rosenberg, S A

    1997-07-01

    The administration of high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) causes tumor regression in 17-25% of patients with metastatic melanoma or renal cell carcinoma. Renal dysfunction is a common dose-limiting toxicity of IL-2 administration, limiting 26% of treatment cycles. We have conducted a prospective randomized trial to evaluate whether the prophylactic administration of low-dose dopamine (2 mg/kg/min) can minimize renal toxicity and thus affect the amount of IL-2 administered. Forty-two patients were randomly assigned to receive systemic high-dose IL-2 with standard supportive measures (group A = 21 patients) or with the addition of prophylactic dopamine (group B = 21 patients) at 2 mg/kg/min. For patients in group B, dopamine was instituted 1 h before the initiation of IL-2 administration and was discontinued 6-12 h after the maximum number of doses of IL-2 were given. There was no difference in the amount of IL-2 administered for each course of therapy for groups A and B. Despite differences in urine flow (milliliters per kilogram per day), fluid balance (liters per day), and overall weight gain, prophylactic low-dose dopamine did not significantly alter maximum plasma urea or creatinine levels in group B when compared with the control group (group A). The overall toxicity profile considering all grade 3 and 4 toxicities for patients in groups A and B was comparable. Thus, there is no evidence to support the routine use of prophylactic low-dose dopamine in patients receiving high-dose IL-2.

  9. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society: Agenda and Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigl, Martina L. [Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS), Reston, VA (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Morgan, William F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwartz, Jeffrey L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-11-11

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects. This report shows the agenda and abstracts for this symposium.

  10. Why we need new approaches to low-dose risk modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.; Seiler, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    The linear no-threshold model for radiation effects was introduced as a conservative model for the design of radiation protection programs. The model has persisted not only as the basis for such programs, but has come to be treated as a dogma and is often confused with scientific fact. In this examination a number of serious problems with the linear no-threshold model of radiation carcinogenesis were demonstrated, many of them invalidating the hypothesis. It was shown that the relative risk formalism did not approach 1 as the dose approaches zero. When morality ratios were used instead, the data in the region below 0.3 Sv were systematically below the predictions of the linear model. It was also shown that the data above 0.3 Sv were of little use in formulating a model at low doses. In addition, these data are valid only for doses accumulated at high dose rates, and there is no scientific justification for using the model in low-dose, low-dose-rate extrapolations for purposes of radiation protection. Further examination of model fits to the Japanese survivor data were attempted. Several such models were fit to the data including an unconstrained linear, linear-square root, and Weibull, all of which fit the data better than the relative risk, linear no-threshold model. These fits were used to demonstrate that the linear model systematically over estimates the risk at low doses in the Japanese survivor data set. It is recommended here that an unbiased re-analysis of the data be undertaken and the results used to construct a new model, based on all pertinent data. This model could then form the basis for managing radiation risks in the appropriate regions of dose and dose rate

  11. Relationship between dose and risk, and assessment of carcinogenic risks associated with low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Aurengo, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report raises doubts on the validity of using LNT (linear no-threshold) relationship for evaluating the carcinogenic risk of low doses (< 100 mSv) and even more for very low doses (< 10 mSv). The LNT concept can be a useful pragmatic tool for assessing rules in radioprotection for doses above 10 mSv; however since it is not based on biological concepts of our current knowledge, it should not be used without precaution for assessing by extrapolation the risks associated with low and even more so, with very low doses (< 10 mSv), especially for benefit-risk assessments imposed on radiologists by the European directive 97-43. The biological mechanisms are different for doses lower than a few dozen mSv and for higher doses. The eventual risks in the dose range of radiological examinations (0.1 to 5 mSv, up to 20 mSv for some examinations) must be estimated taking into account radiobiological and experimental data. An empirical relationship which has been just validated for doses higher than 200 mSv may lead to an overestimation of risks (associated with doses one hundred fold lower), and this overestimation could discourage patients from undergoing useful examinations and introduce a bias in radioprotection measures against very low doses (< 10 mSv). Decision makers confronted with problems of radioactive waste or risk of contamination, should re-examine the methodology used for the evaluation of risks associated with very low doses and with doses delivered at a very low dose rate. This report confirms the inappropriateness of the collective dose concept to evaluate population irradiation risks

  12. Low doses of ionizing radiation and risk of cardiovascular disease: A review of epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Bonaventure, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M.O.; Milliat, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background While cardiovascular risks associated with high level of ionizing radiation are well-established, long-term effects of low and medium levels of exposure, between 0 and 5 gray (Gy), on the cardiovascular system are debated. Methods Available literature was reviewed considering various populations, such as survivors of atomic bombs, nuclear workers, Chernobyl liquidators, radiologists and radiological technologists and patients exposed for medical reasons. Results A significant increased risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with low doses of ionizing radiation was observed in 13 studies among the 27 analyzed. The ischemic heart diseases risk was detailed in 16 studies and seven of them showed a significant increase. The cerebrovascular risk was significantly increased in five studies among the 12 considered. Conclusion Some epidemiological and experimental data are clearly in favour of an increased cardiovascular risk associated with exposure to low doses. However, given the multi-factorial origin of cardiovascular diseases and the lack of a clear pathophysiologic mechanism, epidemiological results have to be carefully interpreted. Further research should be conducted in this area. (authors)

  13. Beneficial effect of low dose Amlodipine vs Nifedipine on serum cholesterol profile of rabbits receiving standard diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavane DS, Rajesh CS, Gurudatta Moharir, Bharatha Ambadasu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of low dose amlodipine v/s nifedipine on serum cholesterol profile of rabbits receiving standard diet. Methods: Fourty Newzealand rabbits were selected for the study. Their cholesterol profile was estimated at the beginning of the study. Rabbits were grouped into 4 groups receiving standard diet (control group, standard diet + vehicle propylene glycol, standard diet + nifedipine dissolved in propylene glycol and standard diet + amlodipine dissolved in propylene glycol. Along with standard diet they were treated with respective drugs for ten weeks. At the end of ten weeks serum cholesterol profile was estimated. Results: The cholesterol profile was estimated at the beginning and at the end of ten weeks. Total cholesterol in the amlodipine group decreased from 97±4.06 mg/dl to 90±4.2 mg/dl and HDL-Cholesterol increased from 32.01±4.40 mg/dl to 37±4.60 mg/dl after 10 week treatment but these changes were not significant. LDL cholesterol decreased significantly in rabbits with low dose of amlodipine from 55.42±3.32 mg/dl to 32.40±3.22 mg/dl and. In the nifedipine group there was a slight increase in total cholesterol from 102.49±5.16 mg/dl to 106±5.39 mg/dl, HDL cholesterol from 34.10±2.80 to 35.16±2.82 mg/dl and LDL cholesterol also increased from 56.20±2.20 mg/dl to 59.00±2.20 mg/dl after 10 week treatment. Conclusion: The study shows amlodipine produces favorable alterations in serum cholesterol profile

  14. The European initiative on low-dose risk research: from the HLEG to MELODI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, Mauro; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Repussard, Jacques; Salomaa, Sisko

    2015-01-01

    The importance of low-dose risk research for radiation protection is now widely recognised. The European Commission (EC) and five European Union (EU) Member States involved in the Euratom Programme set up in 2008 a 'High Level and Expert Group on European Low Dose Risk Research' (HLEG) aimed at identifying research needs and proposing a better integration of European efforts in the field. The HLEG revised the research challenges and proposed a European research strategy based on a 'Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative' (MELODI). In April 2009, five national organisations, with the support of the EC, created the initial core of MELODI (http://www.melodi-online.eu) with a view to integrate the EU institutions with significant programmes in the field, while being open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders, and to develop an agreed strategic research agenda (SRA) and roadmap. Since then, open workshops have been organised yearly, exploring ideas for SRA implementation. As of October 2014, 31 institutions have been included as members of MELODI. HLEG recommendations and MELODI SRA have become important reference points in the radiation protection part of the Euratom Research Programme. MELODI has established close interactions through Memorandum of Understanding with other European platforms involved in radiation protection (Alliance, NERIS and EURADOS) and, together with EURADOS, with the relevant medical European Associations. The role of Joint Programming in priority setting, foreseen in the forthcoming EU Horizon 2020, calls for keeping MELODI an open, inclusive and transparent initiative, able to avoid redundancies and possible conflicts of interest, while promoting common initiatives in radiation protection research. An important issue is the establishment of a proper methodology for managing these initiatives, and this includes the set-up of an independent MELODI Scientific Committee recently extended to Alliance, NERIS

  15. The European initiative on low-dose risk research: from the HLEG to MELODI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Mauro; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Jourdain, Jean-René; Salomaa, Sisko; Repussard, Jacques

    2015-09-01

    The importance of low-dose risk research for radiation protection is now widely recognised. The European Commission (EC) and five European Union (EU) Member States involved in the Euratom Programme set up in 2008 a 'High Level and Expert Group on European Low Dose Risk Research' (HLEG) aimed at identifying research needs and proposing a better integration of European efforts in the field. The HLEG revised the research challenges and proposed a European research strategy based on a 'Multidisciplinary European LOw Dose Initiative' (MELODI). In April 2009, five national organisations, with the support of the EC, created the initial core of MELODI (http://www.melodi-online.eu) with a view to integrate the EU institutions with significant programmes in the field, while being open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders, and to develop an agreed strategic research agenda (SRA) and roadmap. Since then, open workshops have been organised yearly, exploring ideas for SRA implementation. As of October 2014, 31 institutions have been included as members of MELODI. HLEG recommendations and MELODI SRA have become important reference points in the radiation protection part of the Euratom Research Programme. MELODI has established close interactions through Memorandum of Understanding with other European platforms involved in radiation protection (Alliance, NERIS and EURADOS) and, together with EURADOS, with the relevant medical European Associations. The role of Joint Programming in priority setting, foreseen in the forthcoming EU Horizon 2020, calls for keeping MELODI an open, inclusive and transparent initiative, able to avoid redundancies and possible conflicts of interest, while promoting common initiatives in radiation protection research. An important issue is the establishment of a proper methodology for managing these initiatives, and this includes the set-up of an independent MELODI Scientific Committee recently extended to Alliance, NERIS and EURADOS, with

  16. Risk of low-doses in radiodiagnosis; Risque des faibles doses en radiodiagnostic. Mythes, reglementation et rationalite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Le Frian, G.; Soulie, D.; Leveque, C. [Hopital d`Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of low doses of X-rays is inferred from the indubitable effects of high doses in human carcinogenesis, Genetic and teratogenic effects are mainly inferred from animal experimentation because clinical surveys of irradiated pregnant women have failed to demonstrate such consequences in the children, except for mental retardation after Japanese atomic bombing. Since no evidence of carcinogenic effect has been produced by epidemiological studies for doses lower than 500 mSv. the estimation of the risk due to low doses has been extrapolated from the linear relation between dose and cancers at high doses. Such an extrapolation gives a maximal risk which is falsely used as a probability of cancer. The actual risk lies between zero and this maximal number, and many epidemiologic surveys in people receiving doses much higher than the mean level of background irradiation failed to demonstrate higher rate of cancer. The explanation of this fact, which is supported by the most recent biological data, is the efficacy of the DNA repair system at low level of exposure to ionizing radiations. We expose the principles of regulation of radioprotection for workers, and give estimations of the doses delivered to the patients and the personnel by diagnostic investigations, by comparing these doses with those of natural irradiation. Practical aspect for conventional and computed radiology are exposed for patients and workers. (authors)

  17. Modified Exponential (MOE) Models: statistical Models for Risk Estimation of Low dose Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose-rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose-rates, since biological responses to radiation are complex processes that depend both on irradiation time and total dose. Consequently, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose,dose-rate and irradiation time to estimate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and (3H) thymidine uptake in U2OS, human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological response to gamma radiation. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a florescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and (3h) thymidine was pulsed for 4h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/dose-rate. (Author)

  18. Mechanisms of Enhanced Cell Killing at Low Doses: Implications for Radiation Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Peter J.; Wilson, George D.

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that cell lethality actually measured after exposure to low-doses of low-LET radiation, is markedly enhanced relative to the cell lethality previously expected by extrapolation of the high-dose cell-killing response. Net cancer risk is a balance between cell transformation and cell kill and such enhanced lethality may more than compensate for transformation at low radiation doses over a least the first 10 cGy of low-LET exposure. This would lead to a non-linear, threshold, dose-risk relationship. Therefore our data imply the possibility that the adverse effects of small radiation doses (<10 cGy) could be overestimated in specific cases. It is now important to research the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of low-dose hypersensitivity to cell killing, in order to determine whether this can be generalized to safely allow an increase in radiation exposure limits. This would have major cost-reduction implications for the whole EM program

  19. Effect of Low-Dose (Single-Dose Magnesium Sulfate on Postoperative Analgesia in Hysterectomy Patients Receiving Balanced General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Taheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Aparallel, randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled trial study was designed to assess the efficacy of single low dose of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH pain relief under balanced general anesthesia. Subject and Methods. Forty women undergoing TAH surgery were assigned to two magnesium sulfate (N=20 and normal saline (N=20 groups randomly. The magnesium group received magnesium sulfate 50 mg·kg−1 in 100 mL of normal saline solution i.v as single-dose, just 15 minutes before induction of anesthesia whereas patients in control group received 100 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride solution at the same time. The same balanced general anesthesia was induced for two groups. Pethidine consumption was recorded over 24 hours precisely as postoperative analgesic. Pain score was evaluated with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS at 0, 6, 12, and 24 hours after the surgeries. Results. Postoperative pain score was lower in magnesium group at 6, 12, and 24 hours after the operations significantly (P<0.05. Pethidine requirement was significantly lower in magnesium group throughout 24 hours after the surgeries (P=0.0001. Conclusion. Single dose of magnesium sulfate during balanced general anesthesia could be considered as effective and safe method to reduce postoperative pain and opioid consumption after TAH.

  20. Low dose irradiation and risk of leukaemia: A case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.; Bayrakova, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of low dose irradiation (medical X-ray diagnostic) on the developing of leukaemias in adults is investigated. The influence of non-radiation agents (occupational exposure to chemical carcinogens, past viral infections, family aggregations) to leukaemias are considered also. During this retrospective study 228 patients have been examined with the following diagnosis: acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myelogenous leukaemias, myelodisplastic syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (diagnosed between 1991-1993). Each case has been matched with two controls. Statistically significant increase has been found in the risk of developing leukaemias after X-ray diagnostic irradiation (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.14 ./. 3.46). Exposure to chemical agents is also associated with significant increase in the risk (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.25 ./. 2.86). (author)

  1. The Radiobiological Basis for Improvements in Radiotherapy and Low Dose Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hei, Tom K. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2009-12-09

    This conference grant was proposed to organize and host an international conference at Columbia University in New York to critically assess the cellular and molecular signaling events and tissue response following radiation damage. The conference would also serve as a venue to play tribute to the more than forty years contributions made by Professor Eric J. Hall to the radiation biology field. The goals of the meeting were to examine tumor hypoxia and sensitizer development; recent advances made in clinical radiotherapy; addressed several low dose phenomena, including genomic instability and bystander effects that are important in radiation risk assessment. Study and Results: The symposium was held on October 13th and 14th, 2008 at the Alfred Lerner Hall in the Morningside campus of Columbia University. The symposium, entitled “From Beans to Genes: A Forty Year Odyssey in Radiation Biology” was attended by more than 120 faculty, scientists, clinicians, fellows and students. The symposium, spanned over a day and a half, covered four scientific themes. These included tumor hypoxia and radiosensitizers; low dose radiation response; radiation biology in the practice of radiotherapy, and radiation hazard in space and genetic predisposition to cancer. The program of the symposium is as follow:

  2. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation—Implications for low dose risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadhim, Munira; Salomaa, Sisko; Wright, Eric

    2013-01-01

    and adaptive responses are powered by fundamental, but not clearly understood systems that maintain tissue homeostasis. Despite excellent research in this field by various groups, there are still gaps in our understanding of the likely mechanisms associated with non-DNA targeted effects, particularly......Non-DNA targeted effects of ionising radiation, which include genomic instability, and a variety of bystander effects including abscopal effects and bystander mediated adaptive response, have raised concerns about the magnitude of low-dose radiation risk. Genomic instability, bystander effects....... Furthermore, it is still not known what the initial target and early interactions in cells are that give rise to non-targeted responses in neighbouring or descendant cells. This paper provides a commentary on the current state of the field as a result of the non-targeted effects of ionising radiation (NOTE...

  3. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy -1 ) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was LDR data provide direct evidence regarding risk from exposures at low dose rates as an important complement to the LSS risk estimates used

  4. Contamination and cancers: low-dose risks and standards of radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignes, S.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of the population due to the running of nuclear power stations represents less than 1% of the natural radioactivity today, and should amount to 3% at most by the year 2 000. The main effects of ionizing radiations are reviewed and their undetectability below 100 rems is underlined. Thus the evaluation of low-dose risks can only be speculative and the cautions hypothesis adopted is that of a linear relationship between dose and effect, together with the absence of threshold. According to calculations the worker, supposedly exposed to 500 mrem a year between ages 18 and 65, would run a 22.2% instead of the normal 22% risk of dying of cancer. As for the population, the risk would increase by only 1 per 10 000 in the year 2 000. This means that no other mutagenic and carcinogenic agent is as well regulated as radioactive pollution and efforts directed at a better control of harmful chemicals, for instance, are only taking an example from the ruling on radioprotection [fr

  5. Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of radiation: biological basis of radiation-environment interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined due to ambiguity at low doses caused by limitations in statistical power and information available on interplay with environment. To deal with these problems, a novel non-parametric statistics was developed based on artificial neural networks theorem and applied to cancer and non-cancer risk in A-bomb survivors. The analysis revealed several unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal radiation dose alone. They include (1) threshold that varies with organ, gender and age, including cardiovascular diseases, (2) prevalence of infectious diseases, and (3) suppression of pathogenesis of HTLV1. The threshold is unique as it is manifested as negative excess relative risk, a reduction of spontaneous rate at low doses. The response is consistent with currently emerging laboratory data on DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice and its sustainability as epigenetic memory in accordance with histone code theory. In response to DSB, of radiation or DNA replication arrest origin, distinct and competitively operating repair pathways are instigated. Activation by low doses of restitution-directed canonical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) suppresses both error-prone alternative end-joining (Alt-NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). The latter two present major pathways to mutagenesis at stalled replication folk associated with endogenous and exogenous genotoxin such as tobacco smoke metabolites and AID-associated somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in Ig gene. Suppression of these error-prone pathways by low doses of low LET radiation is consistent with the reduction of cancer occurrence by environmental genotoxin, immunodiversity and stable integration of retrovirus DNA, providing a significant modulator of dose linearity at low doses. Whole picture may bring about a new landscape of cancer and non-cancer molecular epidemiology which

  6. Molecular alterations in childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident and low-dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of radiation carcinogenesis has been used for evaluating the risk from radiation exposure. While the epidemiological studies have supported the LNT model at doses above 100 mGy, more uncertainties are still existed in the LNT model at low doses below 100 mGy. Thus, it is urged to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis. After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, significant amount of childhood thyroid cancer has emerged in the children living in the contaminated area. As the incidence of sporadic childhood thyroid cancer is very low, it is quite evident that those cancer cases have been induced by radiation exposure caused mainly by the intake of contaminated foods, such as milk. Because genetic alterations in childhood thyroid cancers have extensively been studied, it should provide a unique chance to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. In a current review, molecular signatures obtained from the molecular studies of childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident have been overviewed, and new roles of radiation exposure in thyroid carcinogenesis will be discussed. (author)

  7. Lifetime radiation risks from low-dose rate radionuclides in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    One of the largest, long-term (25-yr) animal studies on the effects of low-dose internal irradiation is almost completed. Some 335 beagles were given continuous exposure to graded 90 Sr [low linear energy transfer (LET)] in their diets (D-dogs) through adulthood. A second group (R-dogs) was given fractionated doses of 225 Ra (high LET) as young adults. A third group of 44 was given a single injection of 90 Sr as adults (S-dogs) to compare single to continuous dosages. All dogs were followed through their lifetimes. Only one of the 848 dogs is still alive. The animals were whole-body counted over their entire life span and were examined frequently for assessment of medical status. There were no acute radiation lethalities. Analyses of the large data base from these dogs have begun and preliminary indications are that 90 Sr, which was tested over a 1500-fold skeletal dose rate range, does not cause significant life shortening at average accumulation skeletal doses of ∼2500 rads (25 Gy) and that a curvilinear dose response curve for life shortening was seen at higher accumulation doses. The data will be discussed in terms of modern epidemiological concepts and quantifications will be related to certain parameters of human risk from acute or chronic radiation exposures

  8. Radiation induced bystander effects: mechanisms and implication for low dose radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, T.L.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Zhou, H.

    2003-01-01

    Using a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction of cells in a population and irradiated their nuclei with exactly one alpha particle each, we found that the frequencies of induced mutations and chromosomal changes in populations where some known fractions of nuclei were hit are consistent with non-hit cells contributing significantly to the response. In fact, irradiation of 10% of a mammalian cell population with a single alpha particle per cell results in a mutant yield similar to that observed when all of the cells in the population are irradiated. Although the bystander observations have been well established, the underlying mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. There are indications that multiple pathways are involved in the bystander phenomenon and different cell types respond differently to the bystander signaling. In confluent monolayers, there is evident that gap junctional communication is crucial in mediating the bystander effect whereas reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species have been implicated as the mediating molecules in sub-confluent cultures. Although p53 is not necessary for the expression of bystander effect, there is evident that repair deficient cells may express a higher bystander response. Using cDNA microarrays, a number of cellular signaling genes have been shown to be differentially expressed among bystander cells. The functional roles of these genes in the bystander effect will be discussed. The bystander observations imply that the relevant target for various radiobiological endpoints is larger than an individual cell and suggest a need to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimate for low dose radiation exposure. (Work supported by NIH grants CA 49062 and CA-RR11623)

  9. U.S.Department of energy low dose radiation research program: potential impact on Human health risk from Chornobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation risks from low levels of radiation exposure, cannot be predicted with epidemiological studies alone. Combining advances in technology with those in cell and molecular biology make it possible to detect biological changes after low doses and dose-rates of radiation exposure, such as Chornobyl. Understanding the role of these biological changes in cancer risk may or may not impact radiation protection standards. However, they will help ensure that the standards are both adequate and appropriate

  10. Low-dose B vitamins supplementation ameliorates cardiovascular risk: a double-blind randomized controlled trial in healthy Chinese elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linlin; Li, Hongtian; Zhou, Yuan; Jin, Lei; Liu, Jianmeng

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether daily supplementation with low-dose B vitamins in the healthy elderly population improves the Framingham risk score (FRS), a predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. Between 2007 and 2012, a double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in a rural area of North China. In all, 390 healthy participants aged 60-74 were randomly allocated to receive daily vitamin C (50 mg; control group) or vitamin C plus B vitamins (400 µg folic acid, 2 mg B6, and 10 µg B12; treatment group) for 12 months. FRSs were calculated for all 390 subjects. Folate and vitamin B12 plasma concentrations in the treatment group increased by 253 and 80%, respectively, after 6 months, stopped increasing with continued supplementation after 12 months and returned to baseline levels 6 months after supplementation cessation. Compared with the control group, there was no significant effect of B vitamin supplementation on FRSs after 6 months (mean difference -0.38; 95% CI -1.06, 0.31; p = 0.279), whereas a significant effect of supplementation was evident after 12 months (reduced magnitude 7.6%; -0.77; 95% CI -1.47, -0.06; p = 0.033). However, this reduction disappeared 6 months after supplementation stopped (-0.07; 95% CI -0.80, 0.66; p = 0.855). The reduction in FRS 12 months after supplementation was more pronounced in individuals with a folate deficiency (10.4%; -1.30; 95% CI -2.54, -0.07; p = 0.039) than in those without (4.1%; -0.38; 95% CI -1.12, 0.36; p = 0.313). B vitamins increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 3.4% after 6 months (0.04; 95% CI -0.02, 0.10; p = 0.155) and by 9.2% after 12 months (0.11; 95 % CI 0.04, 0.18; p = 0.003). Compared with the control group, this change in magnitude decreased to 3.3% (0.04; 95 % CI -0.02, 0.10; p = 0.194) 6 months after supplementation cessation. Daily supplementation with a low-dose of B vitamins for 12 months reduced FRS, particularly in healthy elderly subjects with a folate deficiency. These reduced

  11. Low-Dose Aspirin Discontinuation and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Swedish Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Johan; Hedberg, Jakob; Thuresson, Marcus; Aarskog, Pernilla; Johannesen, Kasper Munk; Oldgren, Jonas

    2017-09-26

    There are increasing concerns about risks associated with aspirin discontinuation in the absence of major surgery or bleeding. We investigated whether long-term low-dose aspirin discontinuation and treatment gaps increase the risk of cardiovascular events. We performed a cohort study of 601 527 users of low-dose aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in the Swedish prescription register between 2005 and 2009 who were >40 years of age, were free from previous cancer, and had ≥80% adherence during the first observed year of treatment. Cardiovascular events were identified with the Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers. The first 3 months after a major bleeding or surgical procedure were excluded from the time at risk. During a median of 3.0 years of follow-up, 62 690 cardiovascular events occurred. Patients who discontinued aspirin had a higher rate of cardiovascular events than those who continued (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-1.41), corresponding to an additional cardiovascular event observed per year in 1 of every 74 patients who discontinue aspirin. The risk increased shortly after discontinuation and did not appear to diminish over time. In long-term users, discontinuation of low-dose aspirin in the absence of major surgery or bleeding was associated with a >30% increased risk of cardiovascular events. Adherence to low-dose aspirin treatment in the absence of major surgery or bleeding is likely an important treatment goal. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Low-Dose Aspirin Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in Women with Diabetes: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Sun; Kornelius, Edy; Chiou, Jeng-Yuan; Lai, Yung-Rung; Lo, Shih-Chang; Peng, Chiung-Huei; Huang, Chien-Ning

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose aspirin is commonly used for preventing cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes, but its association with cancer remains controversial. This study used a nationwide population-based reimbursement database to investigate the relationship between low-dose aspirin use and breast cancer incidence in women with diabetes. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using data retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2011. Women diagnosed as having diabetes with low-dose aspirin use (75-165 mg daily) were identified as the study population, whereas those without low-dose aspirin use were selected as the comparison group. We analyzed 148,739 patients with diabetes. Their mean age (standard deviation) was 63.3 (12.8) years. A total of 27,378 patients were taking aspirin. Overall, the use of aspirin in patients with diabetes reduced the risk of breast cancer by 18% (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.94) after adjustment for potential confounders, namely age and comorbidities. Specifically, a cumulative dose of aspirin exceeding 88,900 mg was observed to reduce the risk of breast cancer by 47% (HR, 0.53, 95% CI, 0.43-0.67); however, low (aspirin did not reduce the risk of breast cancer. Our findings suggest that a cumulative aspirin dosage of more than 88,900 mg daily was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in women with diabetes. However, additional studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  13. Use of low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; García-Rodríguez, L A; Sørensen, H T

    2013-01-01

    Background:Few studies have examined the association between use of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of glioma and the results have been equivocal. We therefore investigated the influence of NSAID use on glioma risk in a nationwide setting.Methods:We used...... exposure to low-dose aspirin or non-aspirin (NA) NSAIDs into ever use or long-term use, defined as continuous use for 5 years. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for glioma associated with NSAID use, adjusted for potential...... confounders.Results:A total of 2688 glioma cases and 18 848 population controls were included in the study. Ever use of low-dose aspirin (OR=0.90; 95% CI: 0.77-1.04) or NA-NSAIDs (OR=1.05; 95% CI: 0.96-1.14) was not associated with glioma risk. Compared with never use, long-term use of low-dose aspirin...

  14. What physicians think about the need for informed consent for communicating the risk of cancer from low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsli, Tijen; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Self, Julie L.; Rosenfeld, Jason Anders; Butler, Susan; Simoneaux, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, a subsidiary of the Food and Drug Administration, has declared that X-ray radiation at low doses is a human carcinogen. The purpose of our study was to determine if informed consent should be obtained for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiation-based imaging. Institutional review board approval was obtained for the prospective survey of 456 physicians affiliated with three tertiary hospitals by means of a written questionnaire. Physicians were asked to state their subspecialty, number of years in practice, frequency of referral for CT scanning, level of awareness about the risk of radiation-induced cancer associated with CT, knowledge of whether such information is provided to patients undergoing CT, and opinions about the need for obtaining informed consent as well as who should provide information about the radiation-induced cancer risk to patients. Physicians were also asked to specify their preference among different formats of informed consent for communicating the potential risk of radiation-induced cancer. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-squared test. Most physicians stated that informed consent should be obtained from patients undergoing radiation-based imaging (71.3%, 325/456) and the radiology department should provide information about the risk of radiation-induced cancer to these patients (54.6%, 249/456). The informed consent format that most physicians agreed with included modifications to the National Institute of Environmental Health Services report on cancer risk from low-dose radiation (20.2%, 92/456) or included information on the risk of cancer from background radiation compared to that from low-dose radiation (39.5%, 180/456). Most physicians do not know if patients are informed about cancer risk from radiation-based imaging in their institutions. However, they believe that informed consent for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer

  15. Physics must join with biology in better assessing risk from low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L. E.; Neumann, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    This review summarises the complex response of mammalian cells and tissues to low doses of ionising radiation. This thesis encompasses induction of DNA damage, and adaptive protection against both renewed damage and against propagation of damage from the basic level of biological organisation to the clinical expression of detriment. The induction of DNA damage at low radiation doses apparently is proportional to absorbed dose at the physical/chemical level. However, any propagation of such damage to higher levels of biological organisation inherently follows a sigmoid function. Moreover, low-dose-induced inhibition of damage propagation is not linear, but instead follows a dose-effect function typical for adaptive protection, after an initial rapid rise it disappears at doses higher than ∼0.1-0.2 Gy to cells. The particular biological response duality at low radiation doses precludes the validity of the linear-no-threshold hypothesis in the attempt to relate absorbed dose to cancer. In fact, theory and observation support not only a lower cancer incidence than expected from the linear-no-threshold hypothesis, but also a reduction of spontaneously occurring cancer, a hormetic response, in the healthy individual. (authors)

  16. Radiation Risk Associated with Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Irrational Fear or Real Danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetin, V.

    2007-01-01

    The established worldwide practice of protecting people from radiation based on the assessments of radiation risk received in the researches carried out earlier costs hundreds of billions of dollars a year to implement. In the opinion of the well-known experts, the maintenance of the existing radiation protection regulations or moreover acceptance of more tough regulations can influence the development of nuclear power engineering. The accepted practice of assessment of human health risk from radiation may also significantly affect our perception of threats of radiation terrorism. In this work, the critical analysis of publications on the assessment of the effects of small doses of radiation on human health is carried out. In our analysis, we especially emphasize the data on cancer mortality among survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who received instantaneous radiation doses of less than 200 mSv including the data on leukemia and solid cancer, as well as epidemiological studies in the regions of India and China with high level of natural radiation. Since the investigations of radiation risk is a base for formulating modern radiation protection regulations, their reliability and validity are of great importance. As follows from the analysis, the subsequent, during three decades, toughening of radiation protection regulations has already led to exceedingly prohibitive standards and impractical recommendations the science-based validity of which can cause serious doubts. Now, a number of world-wide known scientists and authoritative international organizations call for revision of these standards and of the radiation safety concept itself. (author)

  17. Use of BEIR V and UNSCEAR 1988 in radiation risk assessment: Lifetime total cancer mortality risk estimates at low doses and low dose rates for low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    In November 1986, the Department of Defense (DoD) asked the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) to develop a coordinated Federal position on risk assessment for low levels of ionizing radiation. Since Federal risk assessment activities are based primarily on the scientific data and analyses in authoritative review documents prepared by groups like the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR), the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the United Nations' Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), DoD proposed that the CIRRPC Science Panel undertake the task of providing coordinated interagency positions on the use of information in the reports of such groups. The practice has been for individual Federal agencies to interpret and decide independently how to use the information provided in such reports. As a result of its deliberations, the Subpanel recommends two nominal risk estimates for lifetime total cancer mortality following whole-body exposure to low levels of low-LET ionizing radiation, one for the general population and one for the working-age population (see Section II). The recommended risk estimates reflect the general agreement of information in BEIR V and UNSCEAR 1988 for total cancer mortality. The Subpanel's risk estimates and associated statements are intended to meet the needs of the Federal agencies for: (a) values that are current; (b) values that are relevant to the low-dose and low dose-rate ionizing radiation exposures principally encountered in carrying out Federal responsibilities; (c) a statement of the change in the estimates of lifetime total cancer mortality relative to estimates in previous authoritative review documents; and (d) a practical statement on the scientific uncertainty associated with applying the lifetime total cancer mortality values at very low doses

  18. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushberg, J; Boreham, D; Ulsh, B

    2014-01-01

    At dose levels of (approximately) 500 mSv or more, increased cancer incidence and mortality have been clearly demonstrated. However, at the low doses of radiation used in medical imaging, the relationship between dose and cancer risk is not well established. As such, assumptions about the shape of the dose-response curve are made. These assumptions, or risk models, are used to estimate potential long term effects. Common models include 1) the linear non-threshold (LNT) model, 2) threshold models with either a linear or curvilinear dose response above the threshold, and 3) a hormetic model, where the risk is initially decreased below background levels before increasing. The choice of model used when making radiation risk or protection calculations and decisions can have significant implications on public policy and health care decisions. However, the ongoing debate about which risk model best describes the dose-response relationship at low doses of radiation makes informed decision making difficult. This symposium will review the two fundamental approaches to determining the risk associated with low doses of ionizing radiation, namely radiation epidemiology and radiation biology. The strengths and limitations of each approach will be reviewed, the results of recent studies presented, and the appropriateness of different risk models for various real world scenarios discussed. Examples of well-designed and poorly-designed studies will be provided to assist medical physicists in 1) critically evaluating publications in the field and 2) communicating accurate information to medical professionals, patients, and members of the general public. Equipped with the best information that radiation epidemiology and radiation biology can currently provide, and an understanding of the limitations of such information, individuals and organizations will be able to make more informed decisions regarding questions such as 1) how much shielding to install at medical facilities, 2) at

  19. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushberg, J [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boreham, D [McMaster University, Ontario, CA (Canada); Ulsh, B

    2014-06-15

    At dose levels of (approximately) 500 mSv or more, increased cancer incidence and mortality have been clearly demonstrated. However, at the low doses of radiation used in medical imaging, the relationship between dose and cancer risk is not well established. As such, assumptions about the shape of the dose-response curve are made. These assumptions, or risk models, are used to estimate potential long term effects. Common models include 1) the linear non-threshold (LNT) model, 2) threshold models with either a linear or curvilinear dose response above the threshold, and 3) a hormetic model, where the risk is initially decreased below background levels before increasing. The choice of model used when making radiation risk or protection calculations and decisions can have significant implications on public policy and health care decisions. However, the ongoing debate about which risk model best describes the dose-response relationship at low doses of radiation makes informed decision making difficult. This symposium will review the two fundamental approaches to determining the risk associated with low doses of ionizing radiation, namely radiation epidemiology and radiation biology. The strengths and limitations of each approach will be reviewed, the results of recent studies presented, and the appropriateness of different risk models for various real world scenarios discussed. Examples of well-designed and poorly-designed studies will be provided to assist medical physicists in 1) critically evaluating publications in the field and 2) communicating accurate information to medical professionals, patients, and members of the general public. Equipped with the best information that radiation epidemiology and radiation biology can currently provide, and an understanding of the limitations of such information, individuals and organizations will be able to make more informed decisions regarding questions such as 1) how much shielding to install at medical facilities, 2) at

  20. Low-dose ketamine improves pain relief in patients receiving intravenous opioids for acute pain in the emergency department: results of a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Francesca L; Lin, Charlie; Guan, Wentao; Merchant, Roland C

    2014-11-01

    Low-dose ketamine has been used perioperatively for pain control and may be a useful adjunct to intravenous (IV) opioids in the control of acute pain in the emergency department (ED). The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of low-dose ketamine as an adjunct to morphine versus standard care with morphine alone for the treatment of acute moderate to severe pain among ED patients. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial with three study groups was conducted at a large, urban academic ED over a 10-month period. Eligible patients were 18 to 65 years old with acute moderate to severe pain (score of at least 5 out of 10 on the numerical pain rating scale [NRS] and pain duration ketamine (group 1), or 3) morphine and 0.3 mg/kg ketamine (group 2). Participants were assessed at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after study medication administration and received rescue analgesia as needed to target a 50% reduction in pain. The primary outcome measure of pain relief, or pain intensity reduction, was derived using the NRS and calculated as the summed pain-intensity (SPID) difference over 2 hours. The amount and timing of rescue opioid analgesia was evaluated as a secondary outcome. The occurrence of adverse events was also measured. Sixty patients were enrolled (n = 20 in each group). There were no differences between study groups with respect to age, sex, race/ethnicity, preenrollment analgesia, or baseline NRS. Over the 2-hour poststudy medication administration period, the SPIDs were higher (greater pain relief) for the ketamine study groups than the control group (standard care 4.0, interquartile range [IQR] = 1.8 to 6.5; group 1 7.0, IQR = 4.3 to 10.8; and group 2 7.8, IQR = 4.8 to 12.8; p ketamine groups were similar (p pain intensity up to 2 hours, whereas group 1 was similar to standard care by 2 hours. Similar numbers of patients received rescue analgesia: standard care group, seven of 20, 35%; group 1, four of 20, 20%; and group 2, four of 20, 20

  1. DoReMi workshop on multidisciplinary approaches to evaluating cancer risks associated with low-dose internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurier, D.; Guseva Canu, I.; Bertho, J.M.; Blanchardon, E.; Rage, E.; Baatout, S.; Bouffler, S.; Cardis, E.; Gomolka, M.; Kreuzer, M.; Hall, J.; Kesminiene, A.

    2012-01-01

    A workshop dedicated to cancer risks associated with low-dose internal contamination was organised in March 2011, in Paris, in the framework of the DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) European Network of Excellence. The aim was to identify the best epidemiological studies that provide an opportunity to develop a multidisciplinary approach to improve the evaluation of the cancer risk associated with internal contamination. This workshop provided an opportunity for in-depth discussions between researchers working in different fields including (but not limited to) epidemiology, dosimetry, biology and toxicology. Discussions confirmed the importance of research on the health effects of internal contamination. Several existing epidemiological studies provide a real possibility to improve the quantification of cancer risk associated with internal emitters. Areas for future multidisciplinary collaborations were identified, that should allow feasibility studies to be carried out in the near future. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place during this workshop. (authors)

  2. Gastric and renal effects of COX-2 selective and non-selective NSAIDs in rats receiving low-dose aspirin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Goetz MORO

    Full Text Available Abstract The consumption of low-dose aspirin (LDA to prevent cardiovascular disease continues to increase worldwide. Consequently, the number of chronic LDA users seeking dental procedures that require complementary acute anti-inflammatory medication has also grown. Considering the lack of literature evaluating this interaction, we analyzed the gastric and renal effects caused by a selective COX-2 inhibitor (etoricoxib and a non-selective COX-2 inhibitor (ibuprofen nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID in rats receiving chronic LDA therapy. Male Wistar rats were divided into six experimental groups (carboxymethylcellulose (CMC - vehicle; LDA; LDA + ibuprofen; ibuprofen; LDA + etoricoxib; and etoricoxib and submitted to long-term LDA therapy with a subsequent NSAID administration for three days by gavage. After the experimental period, we analyzed gastric and renal tissues and quantified serum creatinine levels. The concomitant use of LDA with either NSAID induced the highest levels of gastric damage when compared to the CMC group (F = 20.26, p 0.05. These results suggest that even the acute use of an NSAID (regardless of COX-2 selectivity can induce gastric damage when combined with the long-term use of low-dose aspirin in an animal model. Additional studies, including clinical assessments, are thus needed to clarify this interaction, and clinicians should be careful of prescribing NSAIDs to patients using LDA.

  3. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  4. Perception of low dose radiation risks among radiation researchers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Kwon, TaeWoo; Seo, Songwon; Lee, Dalnim; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Expert's risk evaluation of radiation exposure strongly influences the public's risk perception. Experts can inform laypersons of significant radiation information including health knowledge based on experimental data. However, some experts' radiation risk perception is often based on non-conclusive scientific evidence (i.e., radiation levels below 100 millisievert), which is currently under debate. Examining perception levels among experts is important for communication with the public since these individual's opinions have often exacerbated the public's confusion. We conducted a survey of Korean radiation researchers to investigate their perceptions of the risks associated with radiation exposure below 100 millisievert. A linear regression analysis revealed that having ≥ 11 years' research experience was a critical factor associated with radiation risk perception, which was inversely correlated with each other. Increased opportunities to understand radiation effects at perception of radiation exposure. In addition, radiation researchers conceived that more scientific evidence reducing the uncertainty for radiation effects perception of radiation exposure.

  5. Low-dose CT screening in an Asian population with diverse risk for lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Chin A.; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shin, Myung-Hee; Cho, Yun Yung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Kwon, O. Jung; Shin, Kyung Eun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer (LCA) detection in an Asian population with diverse risks for LCA. LCA screening was performed in 12,427 symptomless Asian subjects using either LDCT (5,771) or chest radiography (CXR) (6,656) in a non-trial setting. Subjects were divided into high-risk and non-high-risk groups. Data were collected on the number of patients with screening-detected LCAs and their survival in order to compare outcomes between LDCT and CXR screening with the stratification of risks considering age, sex and smoking status. In the non-high-risk group, a significant difference was observed for the detection of lung cancer (adjusted OR, 5.07; 95 % CI, 2.72-9.45) and survival (adjusted HR of LCA survival between LDCT vs. CXR group, 0.08; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.62). No difference in detection or survival of LCA was noticed in the high-risk group. LCAs in the non-high-risk group were predominantly adenocarcinomas (96 %), and more likely to be part-solid or non-solid compared with those in the high-risk group (p = 0.023). In the non-high-risk group, LDCT helps detect more LCAs and offers better survival than CXR screening, due to better detection of part solid or non-solid lung adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  6. Low-dose CT screening in an Asian population with diverse risk for lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Chin A. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Myung-Hee; Cho, Yun Yung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Center for Health Promotion, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, O. Jung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Eun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer (LCA) detection in an Asian population with diverse risks for LCA. LCA screening was performed in 12,427 symptomless Asian subjects using either LDCT (5,771) or chest radiography (CXR) (6,656) in a non-trial setting. Subjects were divided into high-risk and non-high-risk groups. Data were collected on the number of patients with screening-detected LCAs and their survival in order to compare outcomes between LDCT and CXR screening with the stratification of risks considering age, sex and smoking status. In the non-high-risk group, a significant difference was observed for the detection of lung cancer (adjusted OR, 5.07; 95 % CI, 2.72-9.45) and survival (adjusted HR of LCA survival between LDCT vs. CXR group, 0.08; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.62). No difference in detection or survival of LCA was noticed in the high-risk group. LCAs in the non-high-risk group were predominantly adenocarcinomas (96 %), and more likely to be part-solid or non-solid compared with those in the high-risk group (p = 0.023). In the non-high-risk group, LDCT helps detect more LCAs and offers better survival than CXR screening, due to better detection of part solid or non-solid lung adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  7. Perception of low dose radiation risks among radiation researchers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Songwon; Lee, Dalnim; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Expert’s risk evaluation of radiation exposure strongly influences the public’s risk perception. Experts can inform laypersons of significant radiation information including health knowledge based on experimental data. However, some experts’ radiation risk perception is often based on non-conclusive scientific evidence (i.e., radiation levels below 100 millisievert), which is currently under debate. Examining perception levels among experts is important for communication with the public since these individual’s opinions have often exacerbated the public’s confusion. We conducted a survey of Korean radiation researchers to investigate their perceptions of the risks associated with radiation exposure below 100 millisievert. A linear regression analysis revealed that having ≥ 11 years’ research experience was a critical factor associated with radiation risk perception, which was inversely correlated with each other. Increased opportunities to understand radiation effects at risk perception of radiation exposure. In addition, radiation researchers conceived that more scientific evidence reducing the uncertainty for radiation effects risk perception of radiation exposure. PMID:28166286

  8. Low-dose dexamethasone during arthroplasty: What do we know about the risks?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegener, Jessica T.; Kraal, Tim; Stevens, Markus F.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Haverkamp, Daniël

    2016-01-01

    Dexamethasone is commonly applied during arthroplasty to control post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). However, conflicting views of orthopaedic surgeons and anaesthesiologists regarding the use of dexamethasone raise questions about risks of impaired wound healing and surgical site infections

  9. We can do better than effective dose for estimating or comparing low-dose radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The effective dose concept was designed to compare the generic risks of exposure to different radiation fields. More commonly these days, it is used to estimate or compare radiation-induced cancer risks. For various reasons, effective dose represents flawed science: for instance, the tissue-specific weighting factors used to calculate effective dose are a subjective mix of different endpoints; and the marked and differing age and gender dependencies for different health detriment endpoints are not taken into account. This paper suggests that effective dose could be replaced with a new quantity, ‘effective risk’, which, like effective dose, is a weighted sum of equivalent doses to different tissues. Unlike effective dose, where the tissue-dependent weighting factors are a set of generic, subjective committee-defined numbers, the weighting factors for effective risk are simply evaluated tissue-specific lifetime cancer risks per unit equivalent dose. Effective risk, which has the potential to be age and gender specific if desired, would perform the same comparative role as effective dose, be just as easy to estimate, be less prone to misuse, be more directly understandable, and would be based on solid science. An added major advantage is that it gives the users some feel for the actual numerical values of the radiation risks they are trying to control.

  10. Worry and risk perception of breast cancer in a prevention trial of low dose tamoxifen in midlife postmenopausal hormone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanina, Gabriella; Puntoni, Matteo; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Marra, Domenico; Bonanni, Bernardo; DeCensi, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    There is increasing interest in combining postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) and SERMs in midlife women. We previously showed that refusal to participate in a prevention trial of low dose tamoxifen in HT users was associated with higher worry about breast cancer. Given this counterintuitive finding, we studied which factors influenced worry and risk perception of breast cancer. We assessed the relationships of breast cancer worry and risk perception with age, age at menopause, Gail risk, education, adherence to mammographic screening, BMI, smoking, physical activity, alcohol use, anxiety and depression in 457 midlife HT users who were eligible to participate in the trial. Women with menopause 52 years (OR = 5.0, 95% CI, 1.2-21.1). Worry was also associated with high absolute risk perception and former smoking. Factors associated with higher risk perception were age>60 years, at-risk life style, worry about breast cancer and depression. The inverse association between early menopause and worry about breast cancer is in contrast with the known protective effect of early menopause on breast cancer risk and seems to reflect a feeling of aging and disease vulnerability. Our findings indicate that worry about cancer has an affective construct which is independent of breast cancer biology but is engaged in health decision making. Increasing breast cancer risk awareness in subjects high in worry without a plan of emotional coping may therefore be counterproductive because of avoidant attitudes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Bock, Geertruida H. de

    2010-01-01

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the question of how low-dose radiation exposure affects breast cancer risk among high-risk women. A systematic search was conducted for articles addressing breast cancer, mammography screening, radiation and high-risk women. Effects of low-dose radiation on breast cancer risk were presented in terms of pooled odds ratios (OR). Of 127 articles found, 7 were selected for the meta-analysis. Pooled OR revealed an increased risk of breast cancer among high-risk women due to low-dose radiation exposure (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9- 1.8). Exposure before age 20 (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1) or a mean of ≥5 exposures (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.0) was significantly associated with a higher radiation-induced breast cancer risk. Low-dose radiation increases breast cancer risk among high-risk women. When using low-dose radiation among high-risk women, a careful approach is needed, by means of reducing repeated exposure, avoidance of exposure at a younger age and using non-ionising screening techniques. (orig.)

  12. Genetic radiation risks: a neglected topic in the low dose debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Schmitz-Feuerhake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To investigate the accuracy and scientific validity of the current very low risk factor for hereditary diseases in humans following exposures to ionizing radiation adopted by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The value is based on experiments on mice due to reportedly absent effects in the Japanese atomic bomb (Abomb survivors. Methods To review the published evidence for heritable effects after ionising radiation exposures particularly, but not restricted to, populations exposed to contamination from the Chernobyl accident and from atmospheric nuclear test fallout. To make a compilation of findings about early deaths, congenital malformations, Down’s syndrome, cancer and other genetic effects observed in humans after the exposure of the parents. To also examine more closely the evidence from the Japanese A-bomb epidemiology and discuss its scientific validity. Results Nearly all types of hereditary defects were found at doses as low as one to 10 mSv. We discuss the clash between the current risk model and these observations on the basis of biological mechanism and assumptions about linear relationships between dose and effect in neonatal and foetal epidemiology. The evidence supports a dose response relationship which is non-linear and is either biphasic or supralinear (hogs-back and largely either saturates or falls above 10 mSv. Conclusions We conclude that the current risk model for heritable effects of radiation is unsafe. The dose response relationship is non-linear with the greatest effects at the lowest doses. Using Chernobyl data we derive an excess relative risk for all malformations of 1.0 per 10 mSv cumulative dose. The safety of the Japanese A-bomb epidemiology is argued to be both scientifically and philosophically questionable owing to errors in the choice of control groups, omission of internal exposure effects and

  13. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  14. New use of low-dose aspirin and risk of colorectal cancer by stage at diagnosis: a nested case-control study in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rodríguez, Luis A; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; Bromley, Susan; Lanas, Angel; Cea Soriano, Lucía

    2017-09-07

    Evidence from clinical trial populations suggests low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Part of this reduction in risk might be due to protection against metastatic disease. We investigated the risk of CRC among new-users of low-dose aspirin (75-300 mg), including risk by stage at diagnosis. Using The Health Improvement Network, we conducted a cohort study with nested case-control analysis. Two cohorts (N = 170,336 each) aged 40-89 years from 2000 to 2009 and free of cancer were identified: i) new-users of low-dose aspirin, ii) non-users of low-dose aspirin, at start of follow-up, matched by age, sex and previous primary care practitioner visits. Patients were followed for up to 12 years to identify incident CRC. 10,000 frequency-matched controls were selected by incidence density sampling where the odds ratio is an unbiased estimator of the incidence rate ratio (RR). RRs with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Low-dose aspirin use was classified 'as-treated' independent from baseline exposure status to account for changes in exposure during follow-up. Current users of low-dose aspirin (use on the index date or in the previous 90 days) had a significantly reduced risk of CRC, RR 0.66 (95% CI 0.60-0.74). The reduction in risk was apparent across all age groups, and was unrelated to dose, indication, gender, CRC location or case-fatality status. Reduced risks occurred throughout treatment duration and with all low-dose aspirin doses. RRs by aspirin indication were 0.71 (0·63-0·79) and 0.60 (0.53-0.68) for primary and secondary cardiovascular protection, respectively. Among cases with staging information (n = 1421), RRs for current use of low-dose aspirin were 0.94 (0.66-1.33) for Dukes Stage A CRC, 0.54 (0.42-0.68) for Dukes B, 0.71 (0.56-0.91) for Dukes C, and 0.60 (0.48-0.74) for Dukes D. After 5 years' therapy, the RR for Dukes Stage A CRC was 0.53 (0.24-1.19). Patients starting low-dose aspirin therapy have a reduced

  15. Should patients prescribed long-term low-dose aspirin receive proton pump inhibitors? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran-Duy, A.; Vanmolkot, F. H.; Joore, M. A.; Hoes, A. W.; Stehouwer, C. D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several clinical guidelines recommend the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in patients taking low-dose aspirin but report no or limited supporting data. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effects of co-administration of PPIs in patients taking low-dose

  16. Risk management or mind control? Possible messages in the report by the working group on the risk management of low-dose exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Takayuki; Shirabe, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima accident discharged a large amount of radioactive materials to the air and brought about a long-term low-dose radiation exposure risk in contaminated area. In December 2011 the government working group (WG) on the risk management of low-dose radiation exposure issued the report on subjects: (1) health effects from annual radiation exposure of 20 mSv, (2) special consideration necessary for children and pregnant women and (3) proper way communicating citizens on radioactive materials and radiation doses in relation to health risks from low-dose radiation exposure. This article recommended making radiation protection strategies based on discussions among experts, government and citizens in consideration of “uncertainty” of scientific knowledge, and it criticized the WG's report mainly in the following respects. 1) The report mixed evacuation order level and ICRP's reference level in its discussion on “20 mSv”. 2) It was over-optimistic and frequently misleading on health risks of low-dose radiation. For example, it sometimes discussed the risks employing data and knowledge against recommendations of international authorities like UNSCEAR and ICRP. 3) It regarded Fukushima residents’ anxieties and stresses to be controlled as the only source of health risks. This attitude offered a counterpoint to UNSCEAR's deliberate attitude to “radiophobia”. 4) Against the spirit of ICRP Publ.111, only experts of WG made decisions about radiation protection in the absence of stakeholders. As its result, 5) risk communication recommended in the report was not interactive, in fact, based on “deficit model” of science communication. (author)

  17. On the risk to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging procedures - IOMP policy statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    The science committee of International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) developed a policy statement on the predictions of radiation-induced cancers and cancer deaths in patients exposed to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging; this statement has been approved by the IOMP council. In order to attract the attention of medical physicists, an editorial (1) titled 'Risk of Medical Imaging' that includes the said statement has recently been published in Medical Physics journal of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). As stated, IOMP represents 80 national and 6 regional medical physics organizations and 18,000 medical physicists worldwide. The IOMP affiliated bodies/organizations in different countries (such as Association of Medical Physicists of India, AMPI) have been encouraged to reproduce the IOMP statement in their journals/newsletters for the benefit of larger community of medical physicists. The IOMP statement is reproduced below (readers may also go through the supportive literature listed in references). It is hoped that this policy statement will have some deterrent influence on the continued propagation of unproven risk related to medical imaging procedures conducted with small doses.

  18. Permanent interstitial low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer. An interim analysis of 312 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter [University Hospital Berlin, Department for Radiation Oncology of Charite School of Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate after treatment with permanent iodine-125 seed implantation (PSI) or combined seeds and external beam radiotherapy (COMB) for clinical stage T1-T2 localized prostate cancer is a clinically relevant endpoint. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of relevant patient- and treatment-related factors. The study population comprised 312 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implantation. All patients were evaluable for analysis of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), 230 for bRFS, of which 192 were in the PSI group and 38 in the COMB group. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose was 145 Gy for PSI, for COMB 110 Gy implant and external beam radiotherapy of 45 Gy. The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 8-66 months). bRFS was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≤ 0.2 ng/ml at last follow-up. Overall, the actuarial bRFS at 50 months was 88.4 %. The 50-month bRFS rate for PSI and COMB was 90.9 %, and 77.2 %, respectively. In the univariate analysis, age in the categories ≤ 63 and > 63 years (p < 0.00), PSA nadir (≤ 0.5 ng/ml and > 0.5 ng/ml) and PSA bounce (yes/no) were the significant predicting factors for bRFS. None of the other patient and treatment variables (treatment modality, stage, PSA, Gleason score, risk group, number of risk factors, D90 and various other dose parameters) were found to be a statistically significant predictor of 50-month bRFS. The biochemical failure rates were low in this study. As a proof of principle, our large monocenteric analysis shows that low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective and safe procedure for patients with early stage prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das biochemisch rezidivfreie Ueberleben (bRFS) nach der Brachytherapie mit permanenter Iod-125-Seed-Implantation (PSI) oder in Kombination mit externer Radiotherapie (COMB) ist beim Patienten mit fruehem Prostatakarzinom (T1/T2) ein relevanter

  19. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  20. Charophyte electrogenesis as a biomarker for assessing the risk from low-dose ionizing radiation to a single plant cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevriukova, Olga; Kanapeckaite, Auste; Lapeikaite, Indre; Kisnieriene, Vilma; Ladygiene, Rima; Sakalauskas, Vidmantas

    2014-01-01

    The impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on the electrical signalling pattern and membrane properties of the characea Nitellopsis obtusa was examined using conventional glass-microelectrode and voltage-clamp techniques. The giant cell was exposed to a ubiquitous radionuclide of high biological importance – tritium – for low-dose irradiation. Tritium was applied as tritiated water with an activity concentration of 15 kBq L −1 (an external dose rate that is approximately 0.05 μGy h −1 above the background radiation level); experiments indicated that this was the lowest effective concentration. Investigating the dynamics of electrical excitation of the plasma membrane (action potential) showed that exposing Characeae to tritium for half an hour prolonged the repolarization phase of the action potential by approximately 35%: the repolarization rate decreased from 39.2 ± 3.1 mV s −1 to 25.5 ± 1,8 mV s −1 due to tritium. Voltage-clamp measurements showed that the tritium exposure decreased the Cl – efflux and Ca 2+ influx involved in generating an action potential by approximately 27% (Δ = 12.4 ± 1.1 μA cm −2 ) and 64% (Δ = −5.3 ± 0.4 μA cm −2 ), respectively. The measured alterations in the action potential dynamics and in the chloride and calcium ion transport due to the exogenous low-dose tritium exposure provide the basis for predicting possible further impairments of plasma membrane regulatory functions, which subsequently disturb essential physiological processes of the plant cell. - Highlights: • We show some cellular details of the impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on biota. • Giant green algae cells provides a useful tool for studying HTO toxicity to a single plant cell. • Rapid real-time electrophysiological methods allowed to determine low dose tritium effect on transmembrane ion fluxes. • Pattern of charophyte cell membrane electrical excitation encodes tritium-caused alteration in cell homeostasis

  1. Rat skin carcinogenesis as a basis for estimating risks at low doses and dose rates of various types of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.; Vanderlaan, M.; Strickland, P.; Albert, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    The recovery rate, age dependence and latent period for tumor induction in rat skin were measured for single and split doses of radiation, and the data were analyzed in terms of a general model in an attempt to estimate the expected tumor response for various types of radiation given at low dose rates for long periods of time. The dorsal skin of male rats was exposed to electrons, x rays, or protons in either single or split doses for several doses and the tumor responses were compared during 80 weeks of observation. A two stage model incorporating a reversible or recoverable mode was developed and various parameters in the model, including recovery rate, dose-response coefficients, and indices of age sensitivity, were evaluated experimentally. The measured parameters were then utilized to calculate expected tumor responses for exposure periods extending for duration of life. The calculations indicated that low dose rates could be markedly ( 1 / 100 to 1 / 1000 ) less effective in producing tumors than the same dose given in a short or acute exposure, although the magnitude of the reduction in effectiveness declines as the dose declines

  2. Low dose irradiation reduces cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation stimulate development, growth, memory, sensual acuity, fecundity, and immunity (Luckey, T.D., ''Radiation Hormesis'', CRC Press, 1991). Increased immune competence reduces cancer mortality rates and provides increased average lifespan in animals. Decreased cancer mortality rates in atom bomb victims who received low dose irradiation makes it desirable to examine populations exposed to low dose irradiation. Studies with over 300,000 workers and 7 million person-years provide a valid comparison of radiation exposed and control unclear workers (Luckey, T.D., Nurture with Ionizing Radiation, Nutrition and Cancer, 34:1-11, 1999). Careful selection of controls eliminated any ''healthy worker effect''. The person-year corrected average indicated the cancer mortality rate of exposed workers was only 51% that of control workers. Lung cancer mortality rates showed a highly significant negative correlation with radon concentrations in 272,000 U.S. homes (Cohen, B.L., Health Physics 68:157-174, 1995). In contrast, radon concentrations showed no effect on lung cancer rates in miners from different countries (Lubin, J.H. Am. J. Epidemiology 140:323-332, 1994). This provides evidence that excessive lung cancer in miners is caused by particulates (the major factor) or toxic gases. The relative risk for cancer mortality was 3.7% in 10,000 Taiwanese exposed to low level of radiation from 60 Co in their steel supported homes (Luan, Y.C. et al., Am. Nuclear Soc. Trans. Boston, 1999). This remarkable finding needs further study. A major mechanism for reduced cancer mortality rates is increased immune competence; this includes both cell and humoral components. Low dose irradiation increases circulating lymphocytes. Macrophage and ''natural killer'' cells can destroy altered (cancer) cells before the mass becomes too large. Low dose irradiation also kills suppressor T-cells; this allows helper T-cells to activate killer cells and antibody producing cells

  3. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  4. Similar Efficacy of Proton-Pump Inhibitors vs H2-Receptor Antagonists in Reducing Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding or Ulcers in High-Risk Users of Low-Dose Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Francis K L; Kyaw, Moe; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Cheong, Pui Kuan; Lee, Vivian; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Naito, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Ching, Jessica Y L; Lam, Kelvin; Lo, Angeline; Chan, Heyson; Lui, Rashid; Tang, Raymond S Y; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Tse, Yee Kit; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Handa, Osamu; Nebiki, Hiroko; Wu, Justin C Y; Abe, Takashi; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Ng, Siew C; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    It is not clear whether H 2 -receptor antagonists (H2RAs) reduce the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in aspirin users at high risk. We performed a double-blind randomized trial to compare the effects of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) vs a H2RA antagonist in preventing recurrent upper GI bleeding and ulcers in high-risk aspirin users. We studied 270 users of low-dose aspirin (≤325 mg/day) with a history of endoscopically confirmed ulcer bleeding at 8 sites in Hong Kong and Japan. After healing of ulcers, subjects with negative results from tests for Helicobacter pylori resumed aspirin (80 mg) daily and were assigned randomly to groups given a once-daily PPI (rabeprazole, 20 mg; n = 138) or H2RA (famotidine, 40 mg; n = 132) for up to 12 months. Subjects were evaluated every 2 months; endoscopy was repeated if they developed symptoms of upper GI bleeding or had a reduction in hemoglobin level greater than 2 g/dL and after 12 months of follow-up evaluation. The adequacy of upper GI protection was assessed by end points of recurrent upper GI bleeding and a composite of recurrent upper GI bleeding or recurrent endoscopic ulcers at month 12. During the 12-month study period, upper GI bleeding recurred in 1 patient receiving rabeprazole (0.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-5.1%) and in 4 patients receiving famotidine (3.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-8.1%) (P = .16). The composite end point of recurrent bleeding or endoscopic ulcers at month 12 was reached by 9 patients receiving rabeprazole (7.9%; 95% CI, 4.2%-14.7%) and 13 patients receiving famotidine (12.4%; 95% CI, 7.4%-20.4%) (P = .26). In a randomized controlled trial of users of low-dose aspirin at risk for recurrent GI bleeding, a slightly lower proportion of patients receiving a PPI along with aspirin developed recurrent bleeding or ulcer than of patients receiving an H2RA with the aspirin, although this difference was not statistically significant. ClincialTrials.gov no: NCT01408186. Copyright © 2017 AGA

  5. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  6. Regular and low-dose aspirin, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and prospective risk of HER2-defined breast cancer: the California Teachers Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christina A; Canchola, Alison J; Moy, Lisa M; Neuhausen, Susan L; Chung, Nadia T; Lacey, James V; Bernstein, Leslie

    2017-05-01

    Regular users of aspirin may have reduced risk of breast cancer. Few studies have addressed whether risk reduction pertains to specific breast cancer subtypes defined jointly by hormone receptor (estrogen and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression. This study assessed the prospective risk of breast cancer (overall and by subtype) according to use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) in a cohort of female public school professionals in California. In 1995 - 1996, participants in the California Teachers Study completed a baseline questionnaire on family history of cancer and other conditions, use of NSAIDs, menstrual and reproductive history, self-reported weight and height, living environment, diet, alcohol use, and physical activity. In 2005-2006, 57,164 participants provided some updated information, including use of NSAIDs and 1457 of these participants developed invasive breast cancer before January 2013. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models provided hazard rate ratios (HRR) for the association between NSAID use and risk of invasive breast cancer as well as hormone receptor- and HER2-defined subtypes. Developing breast cancer was associated inversely with taking three or more tablets of low-dose aspirin per week (23% of participants). Among women reporting this exposure, the HRR was 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-0.98) compared to those not taking NSAIDs and this was particularly evident in women with the hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative subtype (HRR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.96). Use of three or more tablets of "other" NSAIDs was marginally associated with lower risk of breast cancer (HRR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.62-1.00). Other associations with NSAIDs were generally null. Our observation of reduced risk of breast cancer, among participants who took three or more tablets of low-dose aspirin weekly, is consistent with other reports looking at

  7. Dose-response relationships and risk estimates for the induction of cancer due to low doses of low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaguppillai, V.

    1981-01-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer at low doses can be obtained only by extrapolation from the known effects at high doses and high dose rates, using a suitable dose-response model. The applicability of three different models, linear, sublinear and supralinear, are discussed in this paper. Several experimental studies tend to favour a sublinear dose-response model (linear-quadratic model) for low-LET radiation. However, human epidemiological studies do not exclude any of the dose-response relationships. The risk estimates based on linear and linear quadratic dose-response models are compared and it is concluded that, for low-LET radiation, the linear dose-response model would probably over-estimate the actual risk of cancer by a factor of two or more. (author)

  8. Reflections on the Implementation of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening in Individuals at High Risk of Lung Cancer in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Pilar; Sánchez, Marcelo; Belda Sanchis, José; Moreno Mata, Nicolás; Artal, Ángel; Gayete, Ángel; Matilla González, José María; Galbis Caravajal, José Marcelo; Isla, Dolores; Paz-Ares, Luis; Seijo, Luis M

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is a major public health issue. Despite recent advances in treatment, primary prevention and early diagnosis are key to reducing the incidence and mortality of this disease. A recent clinical trial demonstrated the efficacy of selective screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in reducing the risk of both lung cancer mortality and all-cause mortality in high-risk individuals. This article contains the reflections of an expert group on the use of LDCT for early diagnosis of LC in high-risk individuals, and how to evaluate its implementation in Spain. The expert group was set up by the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR), the Spanish Society of Thoracic Surgery (SECT), the Spanish Society of Radiology (SERAM) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM). Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. induction of cytogenetic damage by low doses of acute and chronic gamma-radiation in mammalian and plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Akhmadieva, A.Ch.; Rozanova, O.M.; Smirnova, E.N.; Rogova, N.J.; Ganassi, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of the biological action of low doses of mutagenic agents has received much attention recently. It is shown that the risk factors for low-dose exposure are greater that it was calculated by extrapolation from higher to lower doses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low doses on various biological objects including animal and plant cells. (authors)

  10. Induction of cytogenetic damage by low doses of acute and chronic gamma-radiation in mammalian and plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Akhmadieva, A.Ch.; Rozanova, O.M.; Smirnova, E.N.; Rogova, N.J.; Ganassi, E.E. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The problem of the biological action of low doses of mutagenic agents has received much attention recently. It is shown that the risk factors for low-dose exposure are greater that it was calculated by extrapolation from higher to lower doses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low doses on various biological objects including animal and plant cells. (authors)

  11. A randomized controlled clinical trial investigating the effect of calcium supplement plus low-dose aspirin on hs-CRP, oxidative stress and insulin resistance in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Z; Samimi, M; Heidarzadeh, Z; Khorrammian, H; Tabassi, Z

    2012-05-15

    Increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors, markers of oxidative stress and insulin resistance during pregnancy have been associated with the development of pre-eclampsia. There is some evidence to suggest that calcium supplement and aspirin can reduce the risk of the disorder. To our knowledge, no reports are available indicating the effects of consumed calcium supplement plus aspirin on high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), oxidative stress parameters and insulin resistance in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia. This study was designed to investigate the effects of consumed calcium supplement plus low-dose aspirin on hs-CRP, oxidative stress parameters and insulin resistance among Iranian pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia. This randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial was carried out among 42 pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia, primigravida, aged 18-40 year old who were carrying singleton pregnancy at their third trimester. Subjects were randomly assigned to received either the placebo (n = 22) or calcium supplement plus low-dose aspirin (n = 20) for 9 weeks. Calcium supplement plus low-dose aspirin were containing 500 mg carbonate calcium plus 80 mg aspirin. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9 weeks intervention to measure serum hs-CRP, oxidative stress parameters including plasma Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) and Total Glutathione (GSH), Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG), serum insulin and HOMA-IR score. Consumption of calcium supplement plus low-dose aspirin resulted in a significant difference serum hs-CRP levels as compared to the placebo (102.87 vs. 3227.75 ng mL(-1), p = 0.01). Also, mean changes for plasma TAC (68.96 vs. -74.46 mmol L(-1), p = 0.04) and total GSH levels (304.33 vs. -39.33 micromol L(-1), p = 0.03) were significantly different between the two groups. No significant differences were found comparing calcium supplement plus low-dose aspirin and placebo in terms of their effects on FPG

  12. Low dose irradiation and biological defense mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Tsutomu; Sagan, L.A.; Aoyama, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    It has been generally accepted in the context of radiation protection that ionizing radiation has some adverse effect even at low doses. However, epidemiological studies of human populations cannot definitively show its existence or absence. Furthermore, recent studies of populations living in areas of different background radiation levels reported some decrease in adverse health effects at high background levels. Genetic studies of atomic bomb survivors failed to produce statistically significant findings on the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. A British study however, suggests that a father's exposure to low dose radiation on the job may increase his children's risk of leukemia. On the other hand, many experimental studies have raised the possibility that low doses of ionizing radiation may not be harmful or may even produce stimulating or adaptive responses. The term 'hormesis' has come to be used to describe these phenomena produced by low doses of ionizing radiation when they were beneficial for the organisms studied. At the end of the International Conference on Low Dose Irradiation one conclusion appeared to be justified: radiation produces an adaptive response, though it is not universally detected yet. The conference failed to obtain any consensus on risk assessment at low doses, but raised many problems to be dealt with by future studies. The editors therefore believe that the Proceedings will be useful for all scientists and people concerned with radiation protection and the biological effects of low-dose irradiation

  13. Pretransplant HbA1c Is a Useful Predictor for the Development of New-Onset Diabetes in Renal Transplant Recipients Receiving No or Low-Dose Erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Tokodai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the predictive power of pretransplant HbA1c for new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT in kidney transplant candidates, who had several predispositions for fluctuated HbA1c levels. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of 119 patients without diabetes who received kidney transplantation between March 2000 and January 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association of several parameters with NODAT. Predictive discrimination of HbA1c was assessed using a receiver-operating characteristic curve. Results. Seventeen patients (14.3% developed NODAT within 1 year of transplantation. Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that recipient age, gender, and HbA1c were predictors of NODAT. In the multivariate analysis, the association between pretransplant HbA1c and NODAT development did not reach statistical significance (P=0.07. To avoid the strong influence of high-dose erythropoietin on HbA1c levels, we performed subgroup analyses on 85 patients receiving no or low-dose (≤6000 IU/week erythropoietin. HbA1c was again an independent predictor for NODAT. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis revealed a cut-off value of 5.2% with an optimal sensitivity of 64% and specificity of 78% for predicting NODAT. Conclusions. Our results reveal that the pretransplant HbA1c level is a useful predictor for NODAT in patients receiving no or low-dose erythropoietin.

  14. Frontline low-dose alemtuzumab with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide prolongs progression-free survival in high-risk CLL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, Christian H; van T' Veer, Mars B; Jurlander, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    .3%). FCA improves progression-free survival in high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As anticipated, FCA is more immunosuppressive than FC, but with due vigilance, does not lead to a higher treatment-related mortality. This study was registered at www.trialregister.nl as trial no. NTR529....

  15. Mycophenolic acid AUC in Thai kidney transplant recipients receiving low dose mycophenolate and its association with UGT2B7 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithukpakorn, Manop; Tiwawanwong, Tiwat; Lalerd, Yupaporn; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Premasathian, Nalinee; Tasanarong, Adis; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Vongwiwatana, Attapong

    2014-01-01

    Despite use of a lower mycophenolate dose in Thai kidney transplant patients, acceptable graft and patient outcomes can be achieved. We therefore examined the pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) by area under the curve (AUC) and investigated genetic contribution in mycophenolate metabolism in this population. Kidney transplant recipients with stable graft function who were receiving mycophenolate mofetil 1,000 mg/d in combination with either cyclosporine or tacrolimus, and prednisolone were studied. The MPA concentration was measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA), at predose and 1, 1.5, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours after dosing. Genetic polymorphisms in UGT1A8, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 were examined by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC)-based single-base extension (SBE) analysis. A total 138 patients were included in study. The mean AUC was 39.49 mg-h/L (28.39-89.58 mg-h/L), which was in the therapeutic range. The correlation between the predose MPA concentration and AUC was poor. The mean AUC in the tacrolimus group was higher than that in the cyclosporine group. Polymorphisms in UGT2B7 showed significant association with AUC. Most of our patients with reduced mycophenolate dose had the AUC within the therapeutic range. Genetic polymorphisms in UGT2B7 may play a role in MPA metabolism in Thai kidney transplant patients.

  16. Do non-targeted effects increase or decrease low dose risk in relation to the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review the evidence for departure from linearity for malignant and non-malignant disease and in the light of this assess likely mechanisms, and in particular the potential role for non-targeted effects. Excess cancer risks observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in many medically and occupationally exposed groups exposed at low or moderate doses are generally statistically compatible. For most cancer sites the dose-response in these groups is compatible with linearity over the range observed. The available data on biological mechanisms do not provide general support for the idea of a low dose threshold or hormesis. This large body of evidence does not suggest, indeed is not statistically compatible with, any very large threshold in dose for cancer, or with possible hormetic effects, and there is little evidence of the sorts of non-linearity in response implied by non-DNA-targeted effects. There are also excess risks of various types of non-malignant disease in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in other groups. In particular, elevated risks of cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and digestive disease are observed in the A-bomb data. In contrast with cancer, there is much less consistency in the patterns of risk between the various exposed groups; for example, radiation-associated respiratory and digestive diseases have not been seen in these other (non-A-bomb) groups. Cardiovascular risks have been seen in many exposed populations, particularly in medically exposed groups, but in contrast with cancer there is much less consistency in risk between studies: risks per unit dose in epidemiological studies vary over at least two orders of magnitude, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well known (but unobserved) risk factors. In the absence of a convincing mechanistic explanation of epidemiological evidence that is, at present, less than persuasive, a cause-and-effect interpretation of the reported

  17. [Low-dose aspirin in patients with diabete melitus: risks and benefits regarding macro and microvascular complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Eduardo G; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Weinert, Letícia S; Lavinsky, Joel; Silveiro, Sandra P

    2007-04-01

    Aspirin is recommended as cardiovascular disease prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus. Due to the increased risk of bleeding and because of the hypothesis that there could be a worsening of microvascular complications related to aspirin, there has been observed an important underutilization of the drug. However, it is now known that aspirin is not associated with a deleterious effect on diabetic retinopathy and there is evidence indicating that it also does not affect renal function with usual doses (150 mg/d). On the other hand, higher doses may prove necessary, since recent data suggest that diabetic patients present the so called "aspirin resistance". The mechanisms of this resistance are not yet fully understood, being probably related to an abnormal intrinsic platelet activity. The employment of alternative antiplatelet strategies or the administration of higher aspirin doses (150-300 mg/d) should be better evaluated regarding effective cardiovascular disease prevention in diabetes as well as the possible effects on microvascular complications.

  18. Lung nodule detection performance in five observers on computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three-dimensional processing (AIDR 3D) in a Japanese multicenter study: Comparison between ultra-low-dose CT and low-dose CT by receiver-operating characteristic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yukihisa; Moriya, Hiroshi; Noma, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-07-01

    To compare lung nodule detection performance (LNDP) in computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three dimensional processing (AIDR3D) between ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) and low dose CT (LDCT). This was part of the Area-detector Computed Tomography for the Investigation of Thoracic Diseases (ACTIve) Study, a multicenter research project being conducted in Japan. Institutional Review Board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-three subjects (body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.2) underwent chest CT at 6 institutions using identical scanners and protocols. In a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120 and 20 mA (3.52, 1.74 and 0.29 mSv, respectively). Axial CT images with 2-mm thickness/increment were reconstructed using AIDR3D. Standard of reference (SOR) was determined based on CT images at 240 mA by consensus reading of 2 board-certificated radiologists as to the presence of lung nodules with the longest diameter (LD) of more than 3mm. Another 5 radiologists independently assessed and recorded presence/absence of lung nodules and their locations by continuously-distributed rating in CT images at 20 mA (ULDCT) and 120 mA (LDCT). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate LNDP of both methods in total and also in subgroups classified by LD (>4, 6 and 8 mm) and nodular characteristics (solid and ground glass nodules). For SOR, 161 solid and 60 ground glass nodules were identified. No significant difference in LNDP for entire solid nodules was demonstrated between both methods, as area under ROC curve (AUC) was 0.844 ± 0.017 in ULDCT and 0.876 ± 0.026 in LDCT (p=0.057). For ground glass nodules with LD 8mm or more, LNDP was similar between both methods, as AUC 0.899 ± 0.038 in ULDCT and 0.941 ± 0.030 in LDCT. (p=0.144). ULDCT using AIDR3D with an equivalent radiation dose to chest x-ray could have comparable LNDP to LDCT with AIDR3D except for smaller ground

  19. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bellomi, Massimo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Palli, Domenico; Veronesi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.31–0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high “vitamins and fiber” pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95 % CI = 0.36–0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the “vitamin and fiber” nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  20. Biological influence from low dose and low-dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Although living organisms have defense mechanisms for radioadaptive response, the influence is considered to vary qualitatively and quantitatively for low dose and high dose, as well as for low-dose rate and high-dose rate. This article describes the bioresponse to low dose and low-dose rate. Among various biomolecules, DNA is the most sensitive to radiation, and accurate replication of DNA is an essential requirement for the survival of living organisms. Also, the influence of active enzymes resulted from the effect of radiation on enzymes in the body is larger than the direct influence of radiation on the body. After this, the article describes the carcinogenic risk by low-dose radiation, and then so-called Hormesis effect to create cancer inhibition effect by stimulating active physiology. (S.K.)

  1. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  2. Comparison of Thromboemboli Prophylactic Effect of Aspirin and Low Dose Warfarin in Standard Risk Multiple Myeloma Patients that Treated with Regimens Containing Thalidomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Amir Dadkhahi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Most of the current regimens in the treatment of multiple myeloma include thalidomide. Thalidomide is a modulator of the immune system and according to several studies, its main complication is thromboembolism. The aim of this study is to compare the thromboemboli prophylactic effect of aspirin and low dose warfarin in standard risk multiple myeloma patients that treated with regimens containing thalidomide. Materials and Methods: In this double- blind clinical trial study, sixty-six patients with multiple myeloma under treatment with thalidomide-containing regimens with standard risk for thromboembolism who were admitted to Khansari hospital, entered the study according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The incidence of thromboembolism in these patients was evaluated. Results: Five patients in the warfarin group and 2 patients in the aspirin group had thromboemboli. Chi square analyses showed no significant difference between groups (p=0.635. Conclusion: The results showed that both drugs are effective in preventing thromboembolism and can be used as a prophylactic treatment.

  3. The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score predicts biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose escalation or low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vimal; Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Larrivée, Sandra; Taussky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    To study the prognostic value of the University of California, San Francisco Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score to predict biochemical failure (bF) after various doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or permanent seed low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (PB). We retrospectively analysed 345 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, with PSA levels of 10-20 ng/mL and/or Gleason 7 including 244 EBRT patients (70.2-79.2 Gy) and 101 patients treated with LDR PB. The minimum follow-up was 3 years. No patient received primary androgen-deprivation therapy. bF was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the differences between CAPRA groups. The overall bF rate was 13% (45/345). The CAPRA score, as a continuous variable, was statistically significant in multivariate analysis for predicting bF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72, P = 0.006). There was a trend for a lower bF rate in patients treated with LDR PB when compared with those treated by EBRT ≤ 74 Gy (HR 0.234, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P = 0.055) in multivariate analysis. In the subgroup of patients with a CAPRA score of 3-5, CAPRA remained predictive of bF as a continuous variable (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.27, P = 0.047) in multivariate analysis. The CAPRA score is useful for predicting biochemical recurrence in patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer with EBRT or LDR PB. It could help in treatment decisions. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  4. Minimal percentage of dose received by 90% of the urethra (%UD90) is the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Anai, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihide; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2012-09-14

    To clarify the significant clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters to predict PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer. We studied 200 consecutive patients who received LDR-brachytherapy between July 2004 and November 2008. Of them, 137 patients did not receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. One hundred and forty-two patients were treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and 58 were treated with LDR-brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy. The cut-off value of PSA bounce was 0.1 ng/mL. The incidence, time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were investigated. Clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters were evaluated to elucidate independent factors to predict PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients who underwent LDR-brachytherapy alone. Fifty patients (25%) showed PSA bounce and 10 patients (5%) showed PSA failure. The median time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were 17 months, 0.29 ng/mL, and 7.0 months, respectively. In 103 hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and univariate Cox proportional regression hazard model indicated that age and minimal percentage of the dose received by 30% and 90% of the urethra were independent predictors of PSA bounce. With a multivariate Cox proportional regression hazard model, minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant parameter of PSA bounce. Minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone.

  5. Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Pulmonary Emphysema with T2-Weighted PROPELLER MRI in a High-Risk Population Compared to Low-Dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Schroers, Michael; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Becker, Manuel; Homsi, Rami; Thomas, Daniel

    2018-03-07

     To determine the suitability of T2-weighted PROPELLER MRI for the assessment of pulmonary emphysema.  60 participants in a lung cancer screening program (30 subjects with pulmonary emphysema, and 30 control subjects without emphysema) were included for this retrospective study. All subjects were examined with low-dose CT (LDCT) and MRI within the screening program. The use of a T2-weighted PROPELLER sequence for the assessment of emphysema was analyzed and correlated with the results of LDCT. The presence and the extent of pulmonary emphysema were first assessed qualitatively using a three-point score, and then quantitatively with a semi-automated software program to obtain emphysema indices.  All 30 cases with pulmonary emphysema were accurately detected by MRI. There were 3 cases with emphysema according to MRI without emphysematous changes on LDCT (false-positive results). The qualitative scores as well as the emphysema indices were significantly higher in the emphysema group compared to the control group for MRI and LDCT (p emphysema group and r = 0.668/p emphysema index: r = 0.960/p emphysema group and r = 0.746/p pulmonary emphysema may be assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by T2-weighted PROPELLER MRI with very good correlation to LDCT.   · T2-weighted PROPELLER MRI may be suitable for the assessment of pulmonary emphysema.. · There was significant correlation between MRI and LDCT regarding qualitative scores and quantitative emphysema indices in our study with correlation coefficients for different subgroups ranging from r = 0.668 to r = 0.960.. · T2-weighted PROPELLER MRI may have the potential to be used for follow-up examinations in patients with severe emphysema to avoid radiation exposure of repeated CTs.. · Meier-Schroers M, Sprinkart AM, Becker M et al. Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Pulmonary Emphysema with T2-Weighted PROPELLER MRI in a High-Risk Population Compared to Low-Dose CT

  6. A short-term risk-benefit analysis of occasional and regular use of low-dose aspirin in primary prevention of vascular diseases: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, I-Chen; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-09

    To calculate the short-term risk-benefit effect of occasional and regular use of low-dose aspirin (≤100 mg/day) in primary prevention. Two retrospective cohort studies. Taiwan. 63 788 and 24 910 patients of two nationwide population-based studies were examined. Two databases of 1 000 000 patients were randomly sampled from data of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) for years 1997-2000 (NHI 2000) and 2005 (NHI 2005). In NHI 2000, 63 788 patients 30-95 years of age were found not to have previously been prescribed aspirin before 1 January 2000, but to have first been prescribed low-dose aspirin after that date. They were also found to be at risk of first hospitalisation for any major vascular diseases including haemorrhage (major gastrointestinal haemorrhage or cerebral haemorrhage) and ischaemia (acute myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke) after their first prescription. We also applied it to NHI 2005, and the number of eligible patients was 24 910. Patients prescribed low-dose aspirin for risk. Vascular diseases. In NHI 2000, the overall unadjusted rates of haemorrhage and ischaemia were 0.09% and 0.21%, respectively, for occasional users and 0.32% and 2.30%, respectively, for regular users. Adjusted net clinical risk of low-dose aspirin use between the two groups was 2.24% (95% CI 2.03% to 2.48%; ppreventing major vascular diseases in primary prevention. Prescribing regular low-dose aspirin for primary prevention should be done with caution. Future studies should explore the risk-benefit effect of long-term low-dose aspirin use in primary prevention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Lung nodule detection performance in five observers on computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three-dimensional processing (AIDR 3D) in a Japanese multicenter study: Comparison between ultra-low-dose CT and low-dose CT by receiver-operating characteristic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro, E-mail: yatsushi@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673, Aichi (Japan); Yamashiro, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Miyara, Tetsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Department of Radiology, Okinawa Prefectural Yaeyama Hospital, Ishigaki 907-0022, Okinawa (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki 569-8686, Osaka (Japan); Sato, Yukihisa [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center of Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Moriya, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Noma, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Tenri Hospital, Tenri 632-8552, Nara (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Using AIDR 3D, ULDCT showed comparable LND of solid nodules to LDCT. • Using AIDR 3D, LND of smaller GGN in ULDCT was inferior to that in LDCT. • Effective dose in ULDCT was about only twice of that in chest X-ray. • BMI values in study population were mostly in the normal range body habitus. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare lung nodule detection performance (LNDP) in computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three dimensional processing (AIDR3D) between ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) and low dose CT (LDCT). Materials and methods: This was part of the Area-detector Computed Tomography for the Investigation of Thoracic Diseases (ACTIve) Study, a multicenter research project being conducted in Japan. Institutional Review Board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-three subjects (body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.2) underwent chest CT at 6 institutions using identical scanners and protocols. In a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120 and 20 mA (3.52, 1.74 and 0.29 mSv, respectively). Axial CT images with 2-mm thickness/increment were reconstructed using AIDR3D. Standard of reference (SOR) was determined based on CT images at 240 mA by consensus reading of 2 board-certificated radiologists as to the presence of lung nodules with the longest diameter (LD) of more than 3 mm. Another 5 radiologists independently assessed and recorded presence/absence of lung nodules and their locations by continuously-distributed rating in CT images at 20 mA (ULDCT) and 120 mA (LDCT). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate LNDP of both methods in total and also in subgroups classified by LD (>4, 6 and 8 mm) and nodular characteristics (solid and ground glass nodules). Results: For SOR, 161 solid and 60 ground glass nodules were identified. No significant difference in LNDP for entire solid nodules was demonstrated between both methods, as area under ROC

  8. Low dose epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Hubert, P.

    1992-01-01

    Actually, epidemiological studies have to establish if the assessment of cancer risk can be verified at low chronic radiation doses. The population surveillance must be very long, the side effects and cancers of such radiation appearing much later. In France, this epidemiological study on nuclear workers have been decided recently. Before describing the experiment and french projects in epidemiology of nuclear workers, the authors present the main english and american studies

  9. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Elliott, Sean [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  10. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tward, Jonathan D.; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Elliott, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  11. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tward, Jonathan D; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C; Elliott, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus EBRT) increases the risk of severe UAEs compared with HDR

  12. From Chernobyl to Fukushima: the effect of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.

    2011-01-01

    This Power Point presentation describes the Fukushima's reactors, recalls some data about the earthquake and tsunami, and indicates their consequences for the operation of the power station (notably the loss of cooling means). It identifies some design errors for the Chernobyl's and Fukushima's power stations, outlines differences between these two cases. It gives assessment of doses receives by external irradiation around Fukushima, of the dose rate evolution, of the sea contamination. It gives some data about the Chernobyl accident (radioactivity evolution). After some data about health consequences of Chernobyl, health risks and more particularly biological risks associated to low doses are described. Protection measures are evoked, as well as psycho-social impacts

  13. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  14. Low dose irradiation facilitates hepatocellular carcinoma genesis involving HULC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Ge, Chang; Feng, Guoxing; Xiao, Huiwen; Dong, Jiali; Zhu, Changchun; Jiang, Mian; Cui, Ming; Fan, Saijun

    2018-03-24

    Irradiation exposure positive correlates with tumor formation, such as breast cancer and lung cancer. However, whether low dose irradiation induces hepatocarcinogenesis and the underlying mechanism remain poorly defined. In the present study, we reported that low dose irradiation facilitated the proliferation of hepatocyte through up-regulating HULC in vitro and in vivo. Low dose irradiation exposure elevated HULC expression level in hepatocyte. Deletion of heightened HULC erased the cells growth accelerated following low dose irradiation exposure. CDKN1, the neighbor gene of HULC, was down-regulated by overexpression of HULC following low dose irradiation exposure via complementary base pairing, resulting in promoting cell cycle process. Thus, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of low dose irradiation-induced hepatocarcinogenesis through HULC/CDKN1 signaling, and shed light on the potential risk of low dose irradiation for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in pre-clinical settings. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localised prostate cancer in men with a high risk of disease relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Robert; Uribe, Jennifer; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Money-Kyrle, Julian; Perna, Carla; Chintzoglou, Stylianos; Khaksar, Sara; Langley, Stephen E M

    2018-04-01

    To report clinical outcomes of 125 I low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) as monotherapy or combined with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in high-risk localised prostate cancer. Analysis of clinical outcomes from a prospective cohort of patients treated with LDR-PB alone or combined treatment in a single institution. Men with a high risk of disease relapse were identified by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) criteria or by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria. Relapse-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and metastases-free survival (MFS), were analysed together with patient-reported symptom scores and physician-reported adverse events. The NICE and NCCN criteria identified 267 and 202 high-risk patients, respectively. NICE-defined patients had significantly lower pre-treatment PSA levels, Gleason scores LDR-PB monotherapy. At 9 years after implantation RFS was 89% and 87% in the NICE and NCCN groups, respectively (log-rank P = 0.637), and OS 93% and 94%, respectively (log-rank P = 0.481). All of the survival estimates were similar between LDR-PB monotherapy and combined therapies. Cox proportional hazards regression confirmed RFS was similar between the treatment types. Treatment-related toxicity was also similar between the treatment methods. LDR-PB is effective at controlling localised prostate cancer in patients with a high risk of disease relapse. As the present study was not randomised, it is not possible to define those patients who need the addition of ADT and/or EBRT. However, the NICE criteria appear suitable to define treatment options where patients could benefit from LDR-PB as monotherapy or combined treatment. This choice should be discussed with the patient taking into account comorbidities and presence of multiple high-risk factors. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International

  16. Very Low Dose Fetal Exposure to Chernobyl Contamination Resulted in Increases in Infant Leukemia in Europe and Raises Questions about Current Radiation Risk Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Busby

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Following contamination from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 excess infant leukemia (0–1 y was reported from five different countries, Scotland, Greece, Germany, Belarus and Wales and Scotland combined. The cumulative absorbed doses to the fetus, as conventionally assessed, varied from 0.02 mSv in the UK through 0.06 mSv in Germany, 0.2 mSv in Greece and 2 mSv in Belarus, where it was highest. Nevertheless, the effect was real and given the specificity of the cohort raised questions about the safety of applying the current radiation risk model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP to these internal exposures, a matter which was discussed in 2000 by Busby and Cato [7,8] and also in the reports of the UK Committee examining Radiation Risk from Internal Emitters. Data on infant leukemia in the United Kingdom, chosen on the basis of the cohorts defined by the study of Greece were supplied by the UK Childhood Cancer Research Group. This has enabled a study of leukemia in the combined infant population of 15,466,845 born in the UK, Greece, and Germany between 1980 and 1990. Results show a statistically significant excess risk RR = 1.43 (95% CI 1.13 < RR < 1.80 (2-tailed; p = 0.0025 in those born during the defined peak exposure period of 01/07/86 to 31/12/87 compared with those born between 01/01/80 and 31/12/85 and 01/01/88 and 31/12/90. The excess risks in individual countries do not increase monotonically with the conventionally calculated doses, the relation being biphasic, increasing sharply at low doses and falling at high doses. This result is discussed in relation to fetal/cell death at higher doses and also to induction of DNA repair. Since the cohort is chosen specifically on the basis of exposure to internal radionuclides, the result can be expressed as evidence for a significant error in the conventional modeling for such internal fetal exposures.

  17. Mammography-oncogenecity at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyes, G J; Mill, A J; Charles, M W

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the biological effectiveness of low energy x-rays used for mammography breast screening. Recent radiobiology studies have provided compelling evidence that these low energy x-rays may be 4.42 ± 2.02 times more effective in causing mutational damage than higher energy x-rays. These data include a study involving in vitro irradiation of a human cell line using a mammography x-ray source and a high energy source which matches the spectrum of radiation observed in survivors from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Current radiation risk estimates rely heavily on data from the atomic bomb survivors, and a direct comparison between the diagnostic energies used in the UK breast screening programme and those used for risk estimates can now be made. Evidence highlighting the increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mammography x-rays to a range of x-ray energies implies that the risks of radiation-induced breast cancers for mammography x-rays are potentially underestimated by a factor of four. A pooled analysis of three measurements gives a maximal RBE (for malignant transformation of human cells in vitro) of 4.02 ± 0.72 for 29 kVp (peak accelerating voltage) x-rays compared to high energy electrons and higher energy x-rays. For the majority of women in the UK NHS breast screening programme, it is shown that the benefit safely exceeds the risk of possible cancer induction even when this higher biological effectiveness factor is applied. The risk/benefit analysis, however, implies the need for caution for women screened under the age of 50, and particularly for those with a family history (and therefore a likely genetic susceptibility) of breast cancer. In vitro radiobiological data are generally acquired at high doses, and there are different extrapolation mechanisms to the low doses seen clinically. Recent low dose in vitro data have indicated a potential suppressive effect at very low dose rates and doses. Whilst mammography is a low

  18. A Paradigm Shift in Low Dose Radiation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Alatas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available When ionizing radiation traverses biological material, some energy depositions occur and ionize directly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA molecules, the critical target. A classical paradigm in radiobiology is that the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA are responsible for the detrimental biological effects of radiation. It is presumed that no radiation effect would be expected in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure through nucleus. The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation. However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose radiation than they do to high dose radiation. Moreover, recent experimental evidences from many laboratories reveal the fact that radiation effects also occur in cells that were not exposed to radiation and in the progeny of irradiated cells at delayed times after radiation exposure where cells do not encounter direct DNA damage. Recently, the classical paradigm in radiobiology has been shifted from the nucleus, specifically the DNA, as the principal target for the biological effects of radiation to cells. The universality of target theory has been challenged by phenomena of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response. The new radiation biology paradigm would cover both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. The mechanisms underlying these responses involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. These results brought in understanding that the biological response to low dose radiation at tissue or organism level is a complex process of integrated response of cellular targets as well as extra-cellular factors. Biological understanding of

  19. Efficacy of Low-Dose Protocol in Follow-Up of Lymphoproliferative Disorders - Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popic-Ramac, J.; Brnic, Z.; Klasic, B.; Hebrang, A.; Knezevic, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Most medically-related radiation is caused by diagnostic examinations, in particular by computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this research is to reduce radiation doses faced by the population frequently exposed to such procedures-those with lymphoproliferative disorders. The research was conducted comparing radiation-exposition doses received by the radiosensitive organs (thyroid, lens, breast and gonad) using the standard thoracic CT protocol with the radiation received using the low-dose protocol, while maintaining display quality. The standard-dose thoracic protocol implies 120 kV and 150 mAs. The low-dose protocol was conducted on the same device using 120 kV and 30 mAs. We confirmed the hypothesis that the use of the low-dose thoracic CT protocol leads to a reduction in radiation dose without compromising display quality. It is further expected that a reduction in doses will reduce the risk of radiation-related mutations. (author)

  20. Asbestos Surveillance Program Aachen (ASPA): initial results from baseline screening for lung cancer in asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals using low-dose multidetector-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Marco; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Hering, K.G.; Sirbu, H.; Zschiesche, W.; Knoll, Lars; Felten, Michael K.; Kraus, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of lung cancer in a high-risk asbestos-exposed cohort using low-dose MDCT. Of a population of 5,389 former power-plant workers, 316 were characterized as individuals at highest risk for lung cancer according to a lung-cancer risk model including age, asbestos exposure and smoking habits. Of these 316, 187 (mean age: 66.6 years) individuals were included in a prospective trial. Mean asbestos exposure time was 29.65 years and 89% were smokers. Screening was performed on a 16-slice MDCT (Siemens) with low-dose technique (10/20 mAs eff. ; 1 mm/0.5 mm increment). In addition to soft copy PACS reading analysis on a workstation with a dedicated lung analysis software (LungCARE; Siemens) was performed. One strongly suspicious mass and eight cases of histologically proven lung cancer were found plus 491 additional pulmonary nodules (average volume: 40.72 ml, average diameter 4.62 mm). Asbestos-related changes (pleural plaques, fibrosis) were visible in 80 individuals. Lung cancer screening in this high-risk cohort showed a prevalence of lung cancer of 4.28% (8/187) at baseline screening with an additional large number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Low-dose MDCT proved to be feasible in this highly selected population. (orig.)

  1. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses.

  2. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  3. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciezki, Jay P.; Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A.; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. Results: The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). Conclusion: HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR.

  4. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciezki, Jay P; Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (PLDR, and 1.0% for RP (PLDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciezki, Jay P., E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A.; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L. [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. Results: The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). Conclusion: HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR.

  6. Deep learning for low-dose CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Given the potential risk of X-ray radiation to the patient, low-dose CT has attracted a considerable interest in the medical imaging field. Currently, the main stream low-dose CT methods include vendor-specific sinogram domain filtration and iterative reconstruction algorithms, but they need to access raw data whose formats are not transparent to most users. Due to the difficulty of modeling the statistical characteristics in the image domain, the existing methods for directly processing reconstructed images cannot eliminate image noise very well while keeping structural details. Inspired by the idea of deep learning, here we combine the autoencoder, deconvolution network, and shortcut connections into the residual encoder-decoder convolutional neural network (RED-CNN) for low-dose CT imaging. After patch-based training, the proposed RED-CNN achieves a competitive performance relative to the-state-of-art methods. Especially, our method has been favorably evaluated in terms of noise suppression and structural preservation.

  7. Statistical and low dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The low dose response and the lower limit of detection of the Hanford dosimeter depend upon may factors, including the energy of the radiation, whether the exposure is to be a single radiation or mixed fields, annealing cycles, environmental factors, and how well various batches of TLD materials are matched in the system. A careful statistical study and sensitivity analysis were performed to determine how these factors influence the response of the dosimeter system. Estimates have been included in this study of the standard deviation of calculated dose for various mixed field exposures from 0 to 1000 mrem

  8. ASCENDE-RT: An Analysis of Treatment-Related Morbidity for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost with a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodda, Sree; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Keyes, Mira; Halperin, Ross; Pai, Howard; McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme; Morton, Gerard; Hamm, Jeremy; Murray, Nevin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and erectile dysfunction in a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for high- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: ASCENDE-RT (Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy) enrolled 398 men, median age 68 years, who were then randomized to either a standard arm that included 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. At clinic visits, investigators recorded GU and GI morbidity and information on urinary continence, catheter use, and erectile function. Exclusion of 15 who received nonprotocol treatment and correction of 14 crossover events left 195 men who actually received a DE-EBRT boost and 188, an LDR-PB boost. Median follow-up was 6.5 years. Results: The LDR-PB boost increased the risk of needing temporary catheterization and/or requiring incontinence pads. At 5 years the cumulative incidence of grade 3 GU events was 18.4% for LDR-PB, versus 5.2% for DE-EBRT (P<.001). Compared with the cumulative incidence, the 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GU morbidity was substantially lower for both arms (8.6% vs 2.2%, P=.058). The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade 3 GI events was 8.1% for LDR-PB, versus 3.2% for DE-EBRT (P=.124). The 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GI toxicity was lower than the cumulative incidence for both arms (1.0% vs 2.2%, respectively). Among men reporting adequate baseline erections, 45% of LDR-PB patients reported similar erectile function at 5 years, versus 37% after DE-EBRT (P=.30). Conclusions: The incidence of acute and late GU morbidity was higher after LDR-PB boost, and there was a nonsignificant trend for worse GI morbidity. No differences in the frequency of

  9. ASCENDE-RT: An Analysis of Treatment-Related Morbidity for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost with a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodda, Sree [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keyes, Mira [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Halperin, Ross [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Pai, Howard [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morton, Gerard [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Murray, Nevin [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To report the genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and erectile dysfunction in a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for high- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: ASCENDE-RT (Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy) enrolled 398 men, median age 68 years, who were then randomized to either a standard arm that included 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. At clinic visits, investigators recorded GU and GI morbidity and information on urinary continence, catheter use, and erectile function. Exclusion of 15 who received nonprotocol treatment and correction of 14 crossover events left 195 men who actually received a DE-EBRT boost and 188, an LDR-PB boost. Median follow-up was 6.5 years. Results: The LDR-PB boost increased the risk of needing temporary catheterization and/or requiring incontinence pads. At 5 years the cumulative incidence of grade 3 GU events was 18.4% for LDR-PB, versus 5.2% for DE-EBRT (P<.001). Compared with the cumulative incidence, the 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GU morbidity was substantially lower for both arms (8.6% vs 2.2%, P=.058). The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade 3 GI events was 8.1% for LDR-PB, versus 3.2% for DE-EBRT (P=.124). The 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GI toxicity was lower than the cumulative incidence for both arms (1.0% vs 2.2%, respectively). Among men reporting adequate baseline erections, 45% of LDR-PB patients reported similar erectile function at 5 years, versus 37% after DE-EBRT (P=.30). Conclusions: The incidence of acute and late GU morbidity was higher after LDR-PB boost, and there was a nonsignificant trend for worse GI morbidity. No differences in the frequency of

  10. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  11. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  12. Risks of low dose ionising radiation exposures Riesgos derivados de la exposición a dosis bajas de radiación ionizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Real Gallego

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although ionising radiation has been shown to have several beneficial applications for humans, it can also produce detrimental effects in humans and the environment. To adequately protect man and environment from the potential harmful effects of ionising radiation, is essential to know in detail the biological effects produced by it, its characteristics and the various factors that influence these effects. That is the objective of this article, describe the current status of knowledge about biological effects induced by ionising radiation, with special emphasis on those effects occurring after low dose exposures.La radiación ionizante ha mostrado tener diversas aplicaciones beneficiosas para el hombre, pero también puede dañar la salud de las personas y el medio ambiente. Para proteger adecuadamente al hombre de los posibles efectos nocivos de la radiación ionizante es imprescindible conocer en detalle los efectos biológicos producidos por esta, sus características y los distintos factores que influyen en dichos efectos. Ese es el objetivo de este artículo: describir el estado actual del conocimiento sobre los efectos biológicos que puede producir la radiación ionizante, con especial énfasis en aquellos efectos que se producen tras la exposición a dosis bajas.

  13. Uncommon toxicity of low-dose methotrexate: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yousefi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard treatment of Gestational Trophoblastic Disease (GTD is chemotherapy. Single-agent chemotherapy regime including Methotrexate (MTX or Actinomycin. Single-agent is widely used in treatment of persistent trophoblastic disease. We reported an uncommon toxicity of low-dose single-agent methotrexate in a patient. Case Presentation: A 20-year-old woman, primary gravid after two months missed period and spotting with diagnosis of incomplete abortion with uterine size equivalent of ten weeks pregnancy (8-10 cm underwent evacuation curettage. In serial follow-up, based on rise of beta-hCG titer and absence of metastatic disease, it was categorized as low-risk persistent trophoblastic disease. She was referred to gynecology oncology center of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in May 2014. Because of rise of beta-hCG titer, after complete metastatic work-up and lack of disease in other sites, persistent disease was diagnosed and candidate for chemotherapy (single agent low-dose. The patient received first course of therapy with MTX (50 mg/m², intra muscular. Unfortunately, after two days of treatment she developed uncommon severe toxicity, fever, severe nausea and vomiting, tachycardia, and generalized weakness. Also, we found hematologic abnormality (WBC: -14000-15000 µI, platelet- 540 µI and sever neutropenia, and abnormal rising in liver function test (SGOT, SGPT (three to four times and renal function test (BUN and Creatinine (two times. In addition, she had disseminated erosive lesion in all of body especially in face. Due to the fatal side effects of chemotherapy, she was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. Fortunately, after two to three weeks, she was improved by conservative management. After few weeks beta-hCG titer was in normal limit. However she had normal serial beta-hCG in one year of follow-up. Conclusion: It is important to emphasis unpredictable side effects of chemotherapy with low-dose

  14. Bioavailability of diclofenac potassium at low doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Burkhard; Chevts, Julia; Renner, Bertold; Wuttke, Henrike; Rau, Thomas; Schmidt, Andreas; Szelenyi, Istvan; Brune, Kay; Werner, Ulrike

    2005-01-01

    Aim Diclofenac-K has been recently launched at low oral doses in different countries for over-the-counter use. However, given the considerable first-pass metabolism of diclofenac, the degree of absorption of diclofenac-K at low doses remained to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability of low-dose diclofenac-K. Methods A randomized, three-way, cross-over study was performed in 10 subjects. Each received diclofenac-K, 22.5 mg via short-term i.v. infusion and orally at single doses of 12.5 mg and 25 mg. Results Mean (± SD) times to maximal plasma concentration (tmax) of diclofenac were 0.48 ± 0.28 h (12.5 mg) and 0.93 ± 0.96 h (25 mg). The absolute bioavailability of diclofenac-K after oral administration did not differ significantly in the 12.5-mg and 25-mg dose group (63.1 ± 12.6% vs. 65.1 ± 19.4%, respectively). The 90% confidence intervals for the AUC∞ and AUCt ratios for the two oral regimes were 82.6, 103.4% (point estimate 92.4%) and 86.2, 112.9% (point estimate 98.6%), respectively. These values were within the acceptance criteria for bioequivalence (80–125%). Conclusions Our data indicate that diclofenac-K is rapidly and well absorbed at low dose, and are consistent with a rapid onset of action of the drug. Abbreviations AUC, area under plasma concentraton-time curve; Cmax, peak plasma concentration; CI, confidence interval; COX, cyclooxygenase; D, dose; F, absolute bioavailability; tmax, time to reach Cmax. PMID:15606444

  15. Time-driven activity-based costing of low-dose-rate and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Annette M; Laviana, Aaron A; Kamrava, Mitchell; Veruttipong, Darlene; Steinberg, Michael; Park, Sang-June; Burke, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick A; Saigal, Christopher

    Cost estimates through traditional hospital accounting systems are often arbitrary and ambiguous. We used time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) to determine the true cost of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer and demonstrate opportunities for cost containment at an academic referral center. We implemented TDABC for patients treated with I-125, preplanned LDR and computed tomography based HDR brachytherapy with two implants from initial consultation through 12-month followup. We constructed detailed process maps for provision of both HDR and LDR. Personnel, space, equipment, and material costs of each step were identified and used to derive capacity cost rates, defined as price per minute. Each capacity cost rate was then multiplied by the relevant process time and products were summed to determine total cost of care. The calculated cost to deliver HDR was greater than LDR by $2,668.86 ($9,538 vs. $6,869). The first and second HDR treatment day cost $3,999.67 and $3,955.67, whereas LDR was delivered on one treatment day and cost $3,887.55. The greatest overall cost driver for both LDR and HDR was personnel at 65.6% ($4,506.82) and 67.0% ($6,387.27) of the total cost. After personnel costs, disposable materials contributed the second most for LDR ($1,920.66, 28.0%) and for HDR ($2,295.94, 24.0%). With TDABC, the true costs to deliver LDR and HDR from the health system perspective were derived. Analysis by physicians and hospital administrators regarding the cost of care afforded redesign opportunities including delivering HDR as one implant. Our work underscores the need to assess clinical outcomes to understand the true difference in value between these modalities. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biological responses to low dose rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    Linear non-threshold (LNT) theory is a basic theory for radioprotection. While LNT dose not consider irradiation time or dose-rate, biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose. Moreover, experimental and epidemiological studies that can evaluate LNT at low dose/low dose-rate are not sufficiently accumulated. Here we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, dose-rate and irradiation time using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells as indicators of biological responses. We also acquired quantitative data at low doses that can evaluate adaptability of LNT with statistically sufficient accuracy. Our results demonstrate that biological responses at low dose-rate are remarkably affected by exposure time, and they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in long-term irradiation. We also found that change of biological responses at low dose was not linearly correlated to dose. These results suggest that it is necessary for us to create a new model which sufficiently includes dose-rate effect and correctly fits of actual experimental and epidemiological results to evaluate risk of radiation at low dose/low dose-rate. (author)

  17. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin 10 mg and atorvastatin 20 mg in high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia – Prospective study to evaluate the Use of Low doses of the Statins Atorvastatin and Rosuvastatin (PULSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Hugo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease do not achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C goals. This study compared the efficacy and safety of low doses of rosuvastatin (10 mg and atorvastatin (20 mg in high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods A total of 996 patients with hypercholesterolemia (LDL-C ≥ 3.4 and Results Rosuvastatin 10 mg reduced LDL-C levels significantly more than atorvastatin 20 mg at week 6 (44.6% vs. 42.7%, p Conclusion In high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia, rosuvastatin 10 mg was more efficacious than atorvastatin 20 mg at reducing LDL-C, enabling LDL-C goal achievement and improving other lipid parameters. Both treatments were well tolerated.

  18. European Collaboration on Low-dose Aspirin in Polycythemia Vera (ECLAP): a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, R; Marchioli, R

    1997-01-01

    Thrombotic complications characterize the clinical course of polycythemia vera (PV) and represent the main cause of morbidity and mortality. However, uncertainty still exists as to the benefit/risk ratio of aspirin prophylaxis in this setting. In vivo platelet biosynthesis of thromboxane A2 is enhanced and can be suppressed by low-dose aspirin in PV, thus providing a rationale for assessing the efficacy and safety of a low-dose aspirin regimen in these patients. The Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera has recently performed a pilot study on 112 patients randomized to receive aspirin, 40 mg daily, or placebo and followed for 16 +/- 6 months (mean +/- SD). This study showed that low-dose aspirin is well tolerated in PV patients, and that a large-scale efficacy trial is feasible in this setting. In this article we report the protocol of the European Collaboration on Low-dose Aspirin in Polycythemia Vera (ECLAP) study, which is a randomized trial designed to assess the risk/benefit ratio of low-dose aspirin in PV. To estimate the size and the follow-up duration required for the ECLAP trial, a retrospective analysis of the clinical epidemiology of a large PV population has recently been completed by the Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera. On this basis, approximately 3500 patients will be enrolled in the ECLAP study with a follow-up of 3 to 4 years. The uncertainty principle will be used as the main eligibility criterion: Polycythemic patients of any age, having no clear indication for or contraindication to aspirin treatment, will be randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive oral aspirin (100 mg daily) or placebo. According to current therapeutic recommendations, the basic treatment of randomized patients should be aimed at maintaining the hematocrit value 50. Randomization will be stratified by participating center. The study is funded by the European Union BIOMED 2 program.

  19. Prophylactic low-dose aspirin is effective antithrombotic therapy for combination treatments of thalidomide or lenalidomide in myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesvizky, Ruben; Martínez-Baños, Déborah; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Christos, Paul; Furst, Jessica; De Sancho, Maria; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Mazumdar, Madhu; Zafar, Faiza; Pekle, Karen; Leonard, John; Jayabalan, David; Coleman, Morton

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) patients have a propensity for thromboembolic events (TE), and treatment with thalidomide/dexamethasone or lenalidomide/dexamethasone increases this risk. This report describes the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) as primary thromboprophylaxis in three series of MM patients receiving thalidomide or lenalidomide with other drugs. In the first regimen (clarithromycin, thalidomide, dexamethasone), initiation of low-dose aspirin negated the occurrence of any further TE. In a second study, prophylactic aspirin given with thalidomide/dexamethasone resulted in a rate of TE similar to that seen with dexamethasone alone (without aspirin). A third study (n = 72) evaluated thrombosis rates with aspirin and a lenalidomide-containing regimen (clarithromycin, lenalidomide, dexamethasone). Of nine occurrences of thromboembolism, five were associated with aspirin interruption or poor compliance. Low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the incidence of thrombosis with these regimens. Routine use of aspirin as antithrombotic prophylaxis in MM patients receiving immunomodulatory drugs with corticosteroids is warranted.

  20. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the

  1. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    2010-01-01

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the

  2. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  3. Safety of low-dose aspirin in endovascular treatment for intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety of low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel versus high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel in prevention of vascular risk within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2013, this prospective and observational study enrolled 370 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis of ≥70% with poor collateral undergoing intracranial endovascular treatment. Antiplatelet therapy consists of aspirin, at a low-dose of 100 mg or high-dose of 300 mg daily; clopidogrel, at a dose of 75 mg daily for 5 days before endovascular treatment. The dual antiplatelet therapy continued for 90 days after intervention. The study endpoints include acute thrombosis, subacute thrombosis, stroke or death within 90 days after intervention. RESULTS: Two hundred and seventy three patients received low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel and 97 patients received high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel before intracranial endovascular treatment. Within 90 days after intervention, there were 4 patients (1.5% with acute thrombosis, 5 patients (1.8% with subacute thrombosis, 17 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (0.7% in low-dose aspirin group, compared with no patient (0% with acute thrombosis, 2 patient (2.1% with subacute thrombosis, 6 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (2.1% in high-dose aspirin group, and there were no significant difference in all study endpoints between two groups. CONCLUSION: Low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel is comparative in safety with high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment.

  4. Comparison of Low-Dose Rosuvastatin with Atorvastatin in Lipid-Lowering Efficacy and Safety in a High-Risk Pakistani Cohort: An Open-Label Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rehman Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Treatment of hyperlipidemia is helpful in both primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke. Aim. To compare lipid-lowering efficacy of rosuvastatin with atorvastatin. Methodology. This open-label randomized controlled trial was carried out at 1 Mountain Medical Battalion from September 2012 to August 2013 on patients with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction, or stroke, meriting treatment with a statin. Those with secondary causes of dyslipidemia were excluded. Blood samples for estimation of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-C, and LDL-C were collected after a 12-hour fast. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either atorvastatin 10 mg HS or rosuvastatin 5 mg HS daily. Lipid levels were rechecked after six weeks. Results. Atorvastatin was used in 63 patients and rosuvastatin in 66. There was a greater absolute and percent reduction in serum LDL-C levels with rosuvastatin as compared to atorvastatin (0.96 versus 0.54 mg/dL; P=0.011 and 24.34 versus 13.66%; P=0.045, whereas reduction in all other fractions was equal. Myalgias were seen in 5 (7.94% patients treated with atorvastatin and 8 (12.12% patients treated with rosuvastatin (P: 0.432. Conclusion. Rosuvastatin produces a greater reduction in serum LDL-C levels and should therefore be preferred over atorvastatin.

  5. The assessment of the carcinogenic effects of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R.; Latarjet, R.

    1991-01-01

    It is concluded that the exclusion of patients for the purposes of risk estimation, the choice of a particular relative risk projection model and of a dose reduction factor equal to 2 are all decisions which result in an overestimation of the actual risk. These choices can be understood when the aim is radiation protection and when it is safer to overestimate the risk; however, they are open to criticism if the aim is a realistic assessment of the risk. For low doses, below 50 mSv/year, and when all causes of uncertainty are added, the actual risk might be markedly lower than the risk estimated with the ICRP (1991) carcinogenic risk coefficient and the DRF estimated by ICRP. Future studies should aim at providing direct and more precise assessments of risk coefficients in the low dose region. (Author)

  6. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    β-cells against superoxide generated by glycation reaction evoked by high glucose environment. Continuous irradiation at 0.63 mGy/hr from 28 days of age elongates life span, and recovers splenic inflammatory response in Klotho-mice bearing ageing syndrome. The radiation increases anti-oxidants in liver, implicating the prevention of ageing through the suppression of cellular oxidative damages. Our results suggest that low dose/low dose-rate radiation effectively ameliorates diseases related to reactive oxygen species, and elongates life span of animals, at least in part through the stimulation of protective responses against oxidative stress. These findings are important not only for clinical use of low dose/low dose-rate radiation for human diseases, but also for non-cancerous risk estimation at dose and dose rate range argued in legal restrictions. (author)

  7. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  8. Are the Polyomaviruses BK and JC Associated with Opportunistic Infections, Graft-versus-Host Disease, or Worse Outcomes in Adult Patients Receiving Their First Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation with Low-Dose Alemtuzumab?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidewind, Laila; Neumann, Thomas; Knoll, Florian; Zimmermann, Kathrin; Smola, Sigrun; Schmidt, Christian Andreas; Krüger, William

    2017-01-01

    The association of polyomaviruses BK and JC with other opportunistic infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in allogeneic stem cell transplantation is controversially discussed. We conducted a retrospective study of 64 adult patients who received their first allogeneic stem cell transplantation between March 2010 and December 2014; the follow-up time was 2 years. Acute leukemia was the most frequent underlying disease (45.3%), and conditioning included myeloablative (67.2%) and nonmyeloablative protocols (32.8%). All patients received 10 mg of alemtuzumab on day -2 (20 mg in case of mismatch) as GvHD prophylaxis. Twenty-seven patients (41.5%) developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation. BKPyV-associated hemorrhagic cystitis was diagnosed in 10 patients (15.6%). Other opportunistic infections caused by viruses or protozoa occurred rarely (reactivation, Epstein-Barr virus reactivation, human herpes virus 6, or parvovirus B19 infection requiring treatment. There was a significant correlation of BKPyV-associated hemorrhagic cystitis with toxoplasmosis (p = 0.013). Additionally, there was a significant link of simultaneous BKPyV and JCPyV viruria with toxoplasmosis (p = 0.047). BKPyV and JCPyV were not associated with GvHD, relapse, or death. We found no association of BKPyV or JCPyV with viral infections or GvHD. Only the correlation of both polyomaviruses with toxoplasmosis was significant. This is a novel and interesting finding. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  10. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  11. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  12. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alatas, Zubaidah

    2003-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  13. The influence of follow-up on DS02 low-dose ranges with a significant excess relative risk of all solid cancer in the Japanese A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Linda; Schneider, Uwe [University of Zuerich, Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-11-15

    Determinations of the lowest colon dose, D{sub min}, below which there is a statistically significant excess relative risk of all solid cancer, when analyses are restricted to the range [0, D{sub min}], are of current interest in research related to radiation protection and risk assessment. In reviewing recent cancer mortality reports on the Life Span Study (LSS) of Japanese A-bomb survivors, reported D{sub min} values were found to vary between different reports. The report 12 (follow-up: 1950-1990) found a D{sub min} of 50 mGy, but the most recent report 14 (follow-up: 1950-2003) found a D{sub min} of 200 mGy. There were small dosimetry changes between report 12, which used DS86, and report 14, which used DS02, but these changes are unlikely to account for a difference in D{sub min} of a factor of 4. This short communication examines the reasons for this difference in D{sub min} by presenting further investigations into D{sub min} using different trial values for D{sub min} and various follow-up time spans, all with the same DS02 dosimetry. Magnitudes of the low-dose risks in different dose ranges are also presented. It is shown here that the main influence on D{sub min} comes from the length of follow-up and a D{sub min} of 50 mGy may also be obtained with the most recent LSS mortality data and DS02, if a restricted follow-up is analyzed. A systematic trend was evident of lower D{sub min} values for earlier mortality follow-up periods, consistent with information from earlier LSS reports. Although it may seem surprising that the D{sub min} increases with longer follow-up and better statistics, this systematic trend appears to be a consequence of decreasing mortality risks with longer follow-up, even though the error bars on the risks are getting smaller with increasing follow-up. These systematic trends also persisted after accounting for differences between baseline cancer rates for two groups of survivors who were either proximal or distal to the A

  14. Systemic effects of low-dose dopamine during administration of cytarabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, James; Benani, Dina J; Newman, Matthew; Burton, Bradley; Crow, Jessica; Levis, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Low-dose dopamine has been utilized to improve renal blood flow, urine output, and reduce drug-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in renal function, cardiovascular adverse events, and neurologic toxicity in patients receiving cytarabine with or without low-dose dopamine. Methods A retrospective, single-center, cohort study of patients receiving cytarabine at 667 mg/m 2 /dose or greater, with or without dopamine at ≤5 mcg/kg/min. Cohorts were based upon initiation or absence of low-dose dopamine; cytarabine only, cytarabine + pre- and day of low-dose dopamine, and cytarabine + post-low-dose dopamine. Renal outcomes (urine output, serum creatinine, and creatinine clearance) were compared with baseline and between cohorts. Safety endpoints (arrhythmias, tachycardia, and neurotoxicity) were compared between cohorts based on low-dose dopamine exposure. Results There was no difference in urine output from baseline in all cohorts. Comparing cytarabine only and pre- and day of low-dose dopamine cohorts, there was no difference in urine output. In those receiving low-dose dopamine, there was no difference in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance from baseline. No arrhythmias were documented during the study period, and there was no difference in the incidence of tachycardia between groups (P = 0.66). Neurotoxicity was reported in three patients who were on low-dose dopamine. Conclusion Though variation existed in individual patients administered low-dose dopamine, the use of low-dose dopamine did not significantly impact renal function in this small sample at a single institution. In addition, low-dose dopamine did not negatively impact cardiovascular function.

  15. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  16. Reduced oxygen enhancement ratio at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    The oxygen depletion rate in cell suspensions was measured using a Clark electrode. It was found that under experimental conditions used in this laboratory for hypoxic irradiations, the oxygen levels before the start of irradiation are always below 0.1μm, the levels which could give any significant enhancement to radiation inactivation by x-rays. The measured O/sub 2/ depletion rates were comparable to those reported in the literature. Chinese hamster cells (CHO) were made hypoxic by gas exchange, combined with metabolic consumption of oxygen by cells at 37 0 C. Full survival curves were determined in the dose range 0 to 3Gy using the low dose survival assay. The results confirmed the authors' earlier finding that the OER decreases at low doses. The authors therefore believe that the dose-dependent OER is a true radiobiological phenomenon and not an artifact of the experimental method used in the low dose survival assay

  17. Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the knowledge about the effects of ionizing radiations on mankind. Some of them have been well documented (skin cancer and leukaemia for the pioneer scientists who worked on radiations, some other types of cancer for workers who handled luminescent paints, rock miners, nuclear explosion survivors, patients submitted to radiological treatments). He also evokes the issue of hereditary cancers, and discusses the issue of low dose irradiation where some surveys can now be performed on workers. He discusses the biological effects of these low doses. He outlines that many questions remain about these effects, notably the influence of dose level and of dose rate level on the biological reaction

  18. Cytogenetic damage at low doses and the problem of bioindication of chronic low level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, E.B.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    radioactive wastes located at Sosnovy Bor in the Leningrad region was carried out in 1995-1999. Results of this research give evidence on pronounced genotoxic influence presence in investigated sites and as against the 30-km ChNPP zone in the Sosnovy Bor region chemical toxicants make the significant contribution to pollution of the environment. The seeds collected in control and experimental population were compared by acute γ-irradiation resistance. This comparison has revealed the selection toward the increase of repair system efficiency. The received results give evidence that although the cytogenetic damage frequency within low dose range cannot be used in biological dosimetry, but the indexes based on it are informative and important for the man-made effect bioindication and for identification of groups at risk of long term health consequences of radiation. (author)

  19. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubeck, Claere von [German Cancer Consortium DKTK partner site Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Geniza, Matthew J. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 (United States); Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, R. Joe; Chrisler, William B. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B., E-mail: marianne.sowa@pnnl.gov [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Low doses of high LET radiation influence skin homeostasis. • Effects on proliferation and differentiation profiles are LET dependent. • Skin barrier function is not compromised following low dose exposure. - Abstract: Outside the protection of Earth's atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin's barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  20. Up-regulation of calreticulin in mouse liver tissues after long-term irradiation with low-dose-rate gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lan; Hu, Nan; Yin, Jie; Sun, Jing; Mu, Hongxiang; Dai, Keren; Ding, Dexin

    2017-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation on normal tissues has attracted attention. Based on previous research, we observed the morphology of liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice that received irradiation dose rates increased. Additionally, differential protein expression in liver tissues was analyzed using a proteomics approach. Compared with the matched group in the 2D gel analysis of the irradiated groups, 69 proteins had ≥ 1.5-fold changes in expression. Twenty-three proteins were selected based on ≥2.5-fold change in expression, and 22 of them were meaningful for bioinformatics and protein fingerprinting analysis. These molecules were relevant to cytoskeleton processes, cell metabolism, biological defense, mitochondrial damage, detoxification and tumorigenesis. The results from real-time PCR and western blot (WB) analyses showed that calreticulin (CRT) was up-regulated in the irradiated groups, which indicates that CRT may be relevant to stress reactions when mouse livers are exposed to low-dose irradiation and that low-dose-rate ionizing radiation may pose a cancer risk. The CRT protein can be a potential candidate for low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation early-warning biomarkers. However, the underlying mechanism requires further investigation.

  1. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelward, Bevin P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  2. Stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Helen

    1976-05-01

    The first section of the bibliography lists materials on the stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation, with particular reference to stimulation of germination and yield. The second section contains a small number of selected references on seed irradiation facilities. (author)

  3. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  4. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    1999-01-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  5. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  6. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  7. adverse effects of low dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, S.T.; Khan, D.A.; Khan, F.A.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the frequency of adverse effects attributed to Methotrexate (MTX) toxicity and serum minimum toxic concentration with low dose MTX in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Chemical Pathology and Endocrinology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from March 2010 to March 2011. Methodology: One hundred and forty adult patients of RA receiving low dose MTX (10 mg/week) for at least 3 months, ere included by consecutive sampling. Blood samples were collected 2 hours after the oral dose of MTX. Serum alanine transaminase and creatinine were analyzed on Hitachi and blood counts on Sysmex analyzer. Serum MTX concentration was measured on TDX analyzer. Results: Out of one hundred and forty patients; 68 males (49%) and 72 females (51%), 38 developed MTX toxicity (27%), comprising of hepatotoxicity in 12 (8.6%), nephrotoxicity in 3 (2.1%), anaemia in 8 (5.7%), leucopenia in 2 (1.4%), thrombocytopenia in 3 (2.1%), pancytopenia in 2 (1.4%), gastrointestinal adverse effects in 5 (3.6%) and mucocutaneous problems in 3 (2.1%). Receiver operating characteristic curve revealed serum minimum toxic concentration of MTX at cutoff value of 0.71 mu mol/l with a sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 76%. Conclusion: Adverse effects of low dose MTX were found in 27% of RA patients, mainly comprising of hepatotoxicity and haematological problems. MTX toxicity can be detected by therapeutic drug monitoring of serum concentration of 0.71 mu mol/l with sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 76% in the patients on low dose MTX maintenance therapy. (author)

  8. Intracranial germinomas: a case for low dose radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrigan, Patricia M.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shrieve, Dennis; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal dose and treatment outcome of patients treated with radiation for intracranial germinoma. Materials and Methods: Between 1975 and 1995, 39 patients with a diagnosis of intracranial germinoma were treated with radiation (RT) to the central nervous system. All but one pt received whole brain (WB) RT, (median dose: 3240 cGy range: 1500-4437 cGy) and a boost to the tumor volume (median total tumor volume dose: 5200 cGy, range: 3960-5950 cGy). Thirty-one pts received RT to the spine (median dose: 2500, range: 1875-3750). Eleven pts were treated with low dose RT and a tumor volume boost, (WB dose ≤ 2550 cGy, and spine dose ≤ 2160 cGy). Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and low dose WB RT. Fifteen pts were biopsy-proven and 18 presented with multiple midline germinomas (MMG). Among all pts, 33% had serum or CSF positive for low levels of HCG and none of 19 (9 biopsy-proven) germinomas measured positive for AFP tumor marker. Six of 22 (27%) pts who had spine imaging or CSF cytology had evidence of tumor seeding. The male-to female-ratio was 1.4. Median age at diagnosis was 14 yrs for male pts and 9.5 yrs for females (p=.02, overall age range: 1-31 yrs). Median follow-up for survivors is 64 months (range: 1-226 months). Toxicity of treatment relative to dose was assessed. Results: The 5-yr. actuarial rate of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival for presumed germinomas was 97%. No pts died of germinoma. One pt died of a shunt infection who had received concurrent chemotherapy and low dose whole brain RT. Among the low dose RT alone group 6 pts received whole brain RT of ≤ 2550 cGy and 9 pts were treated with spinal RT of ≤ 2160 cGy without chemotherapy. Two of these pts had CSF cytology positive for tumor seeding. Additionally, 8 pts received a total dose to the tumor volume of ≤ 4800 cGy without chemotherapy. The 5-yr DFS was 100%. Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed

  9. Intracranial germinomas: a case for low dose radiation therapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, Patricia M; Loeffler, Jay S; Shrieve, Dennis; Tarbell, Nancy J

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal dose and treatment outcome of patients treated with radiation for intracranial germinoma. Materials and Methods: Between 1975 and 1995, 39 patients with a diagnosis of intracranial germinoma were treated with radiation (RT) to the central nervous system. All but one pt received whole brain (WB) RT, (median dose: 3240 cGy range: 1500-4437 cGy) and a boost to the tumor volume (median total tumor volume dose: 5200 cGy, range: 3960-5950 cGy). Thirty-one pts received RT to the spine (median dose: 2500, range: 1875-3750). Eleven pts were treated with low dose RT and a tumor volume boost, (WB dose {<=} 2550 cGy, and spine dose {<=} 2160 cGy). Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and low dose WB RT. Fifteen pts were biopsy-proven and 18 presented with multiple midline germinomas (MMG). Among all pts, 33% had serum or CSF positive for low levels of HCG and none of 19 (9 biopsy-proven) germinomas measured positive for AFP tumor marker. Six of 22 (27%) pts who had spine imaging or CSF cytology had evidence of tumor seeding. The male-to female-ratio was 1.4. Median age at diagnosis was 14 yrs for male pts and 9.5 yrs for females (p=.02, overall age range: 1-31 yrs). Median follow-up for survivors is 64 months (range: 1-226 months). Toxicity of treatment relative to dose was assessed. Results: The 5-yr. actuarial rate of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival for presumed germinomas was 97%. No pts died of germinoma. One pt died of a shunt infection who had received concurrent chemotherapy and low dose whole brain RT. Among the low dose RT alone group 6 pts received whole brain RT of {<=} 2550 cGy and 9 pts were treated with spinal RT of {<=} 2160 cGy without chemotherapy. Two of these pts had CSF cytology positive for tumor seeding. Additionally, 8 pts received a total dose to the tumor volume of {<=} 4800 cGy without chemotherapy. The 5-yr DFS was 100%. Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy

  10. [Risk of deterministic effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation: retrospective study among health workers in view of a new publication of International Commission on Radiological Protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrone, Mario; Di Lascio, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    The new recommended equivalent (publication n. 118 of International Commission on Radiological Protection) dose limit for occupational exposure of the lens of the eye is based on prevention of radiogenic cataracts, with the underlying assumption of a nominal threshold which has been adjusted from 2,5 Gy to 0.5 Gy for acute or protracted exposure. The study aim was to determine the prevalence of ocular lens opacity among healthcare workers (radiologic technologists, physicians, physician assistants) with respect to occupational exposures to ionizing radiations. Therefore, we conducted another retrospective study to explore the relationship between occupational exposure to radiation and opacity lens increase. Healthcare data (current occupational dosimetry, occupational history) are used to investigate risk of increase of opacity lens of eye. The sample of this study consisted of 148 health-workers (64 M and 84 W) aged from 28 to 66 years coming from different hospitals of the ASL of Potenza (clinic, hospital and institute with scientific feature). On the basis of the evaluation of the dosimetric history of the workers (global and effective dose) we agreed to ascribe the group of exposed subjects in cat A (equivalent dose > 2 mSV) and the group of non exposed subjects in cat B (workers with annual absorbed level of dose near 0 mSv). The analisys was conducted using SPSS 15.0 (Statistical Package for Social Science). A trend of increased ocular lens opacity was found with increasing number for workers in highest category of exposure (cat. A, Yates' chi-squared test = 13,7 p = 0,0002); variable significantly related to opacity lens results job: nurse (Χ(2)Y = 14,3 p = 0,0002) physician (Χ(2)Y = 2.2 p = 0,1360) and radiologic technologists (Χ(2)Y = 0,1 p = 0,6691). In conclusion our provides evidence that exposure to relatively low doses of ionizing radiation may be harmful to the lens of the eye and may increase a long-term risk of cataract formation; similary

  11. MELODI: The 'Multidisciplinary European Low-Dose Initiative'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, M.; Salomaa, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of research to reduce uncertainties in risk assessment of low and protracted exposures is now recognised globally. In Europe a new initiative, called 'Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative' (MELODI), has been proposed by a 'European High Level and Expert Group on low-dose risk research' (www.hleg.de), aimed at integrating national and EC (Euratom) efforts. Five national organisations: BfS (DE), CEA (FR), IRSN (FR), ISS (IT) and STUK (FI), with the support of the EC, have initiated the creation of MELODI by signing a letter of intent. In the forthcoming years, MELODI will integrate in a step-by-step approach EU institutions with significant programmes in the field and will be open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders. A key role of MELODI is to develop and maintain over time a strategic research agenda (SRA) and a road map of scientific priorities within a multidisciplinary approach, and to transfer the results for the radiation protection system. Under the coordination of STUK a network has been proposed in the 2009 Euratom Programme, called DoReMi (Low-Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration), which can help the integration process within the MELODI platform. DoReMi and the First MELODI Open Workshop, organised by BfS in September 2009, are now important inputs for the European SRA. (authors)

  12. Problems linked to effects of ionizing radiations low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    The question of exposure to ionizing radiations low doses and risks existing for professional and populations has been asked again, with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) to lower the previous standards and agreed as guides to organize radiation protection, by concerned countries and big international organisms. The sciences academy presents an analysis which concerned on epidemiological and dosimetric aspects in risk estimation, on cellular and molecular aspects of response mechanism to irradiation. The observation of absence of carcinogen effects for doses inferior to 200 milli-sieverts and a re-evaluation of data coming from Nagasaki and Hiroshima, lead to revise the methodology of studies to pursue, to appreciate more exactly the effects of low doses, in taking in part, particularly, the dose rate. The progress of molecular and cellular biology showed that the extrapolation from high doses to low doses is not in accordance with actual data. The acknowledge of DNA repair and carcinogenesis should make clearer the debate. (N.C.). 61 refs., 9 annexes

  13. Low-Dose Aspirin for the Prevention of Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2018-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder specific to pregnancy that remains a significant cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Identification of women who are most at risk for preeclampsia is imprecise. Because of the potential negative health consequences of preeclampsia for women and newborns and the lack of effective screening mechanisms preventing preeclampsia is an important component of prenatal care. Researchers have documented that low-dose aspirin, taken daily after the first trimester, can decrease the development of preeclampsia and reduce the incidence of preterm birth and birth of small-for-gestational-age infants. This column includes an overview of low-dose aspirin in pregnancy and a review of current recommendations from leading national organizations. © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  14. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  15. Low dose effects detected by micronucleus assay in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Bojtor, I.; Kubasova, T.; Horvath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low doses of X-rays between 0.01 and 1 Gy were studied on whole blood samples of various individuals using the cytokinesis-blocked lymphocyte micronucleus assay as an endpoint. The adaptive response could be induced in G 0 cells by 0.01 Gy followed by 1 Gy challenging dose within a time period of 8 hours, in vitro. The probability distribution of micronucleus increments in those samples which had received very low doses in the range 0.01-0.05 Gy proved to be of asymmetrical type (i.e. lognormal) -very likely to the same shape which has been verified for unirradiated (control) population - while the variable turned to be normally distributed at or above 1 Gy. Profound changes have been experienced in the main characteristics of the linear dose - response relationship and in regression parameters, as well, when successively lessened dose ranges were studied toward 0.01 Gy. In the range below ∼ 0.2 Gy the response were found to be unrelated to the absorbed dose. These findings suggest that in (very) low dose range a higher attention should be needed to biological parameters like repair, protective mechanisms and antioxidant capacities, rather than to the absorbed radiation energy only. (author)

  16. Low-dose prophylactic craniospinal radiotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J.; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Keole, Sameer R.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of patients with localized intracranial germinoma treated with low-dose craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by a boost to the ventricular system and primary site. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients had pathologically confirmed intracranial germinoma and no spine metastases. Low-dose CSI was administered in 29 patients: usually 21 Gy of CSI, 9.0 Gy of ventricular boost, and a 19.5-Gy tumor boost, all at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Our neuroradiologist recorded three-dimensional tumor size on magnetic resonance images before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 29 of 31 patients (94%) are disease free. One failure had nongerminomatous histology; the initial diagnosis was a sampling error. Of 3 patients who did not receive CSI, 1 died. No patient developed myelopathy, visual deficits, dementia, or skeletal growth problems. In locally controlled patients, tumor response according to magnetic resonance scan was nearly complete within 6 months after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy alone with low-dose prophylactic CSI cures almost all patients with localized intracranial germinoma. Complications are rare when the daily dose of radiotherapy is limited to 1.5 Gy and the total CSI dose to 21 Gy. Patients without a near-complete response to radiotherapy should undergo resection to rule out a nongerminomatous element

  17. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  18. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, Caio H.

    2017-01-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  19. Modification of damage following low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Nelson, J.M.; Metting, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    At very low doses the damage-interaction mechanism is responsible for very little lethal or potentially lethal damage, and repair of the latter should essentially disappear. An alternative model suggests that potentially lethal damage is either repaired with a constant half time or misrepaired at a rate which is proportional to the square of the damage concentration. In this case, as the dose decreases, the probability of misrepair decreases faster than the probability of repair, and repair becomes a more pronounced feature of the cell response. Since the consequence of unrepaired damage is an important question in determining the effects of low doses of radiation delivered at low dose rates, we have attempted to determine which of these two types of models is consistent with the response of plateau-phase CHO cells. In the earlier experiments, there was no indication of repair after a 50-rad exposure with a 24-hour split dose or plating delay; in fact, immediate plating resulted in survival slightly above control and delayed plating in survival slightly below the control value

  20. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C., E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: villavic@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia

    2017-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  1. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of low-dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.; Muehlensiepen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The question of health effects from small radiation doses remains open. Individual cells, when being hit by single elemental doses - in low-dose irradiation - react acutely and temporarily by altering control of enzyme activity, as is demonstrated for the case of thymidine kinase. This response is not constant in that it provides a temporary protection of enzyme activity against a second irradiation, by a mechanism likely to be via improved detoxification of intracellular radicals. It must be considered that in the low-dose region radiation may also exert protection against other challenges involving radicals, causing a net beneficial effect by temporarily shielding the hit cell against radicals produced by metabolism. Since molecular alterations leading to late effects are considered a consequence of the initial cellular response, late effects from small radiation doses do not necessarily adhere to a linear dose-effect relationship. The reality of the linear relationship between the risk of late effects from high doses to small doses is an assumption, for setting dose limits, but it must not be taken for predicting health detriment from low doses. (author)

  3. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  4. Indications for suboptimal low-dose direct oral anticoagulants for non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Umei, MD

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: With good adherence, the clinical course associated with DOACs is comparatively good. In the future, suboptimal low-dose DOAC therapy may serve as an appropriate choice for some patients with a high risk of stroke and bleeding.

  5. Low dose radiation and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongguang; Gong Shouliang; Cai Lu

    2006-01-01

    Induction of hormesis and adaptive response by low-dose radiatio (LDR) has been extensively indicated. It's mechanism may be related with the protective protein and antioxidants that LDR induced, which take effects on the diabetes mellitus (DM) and other diseases. This review will summarize available dat with emphasis on three points: the preventive effect of LDR on the development of diabetes, the therapeutic effect of LDR on diabetic complications and possible mechanisms by which LDR prevents the development of diabetes and diabetic complications. Finally, the perspectives of LDR clinical, diabetes-related implication are discussed. (authors)

  6. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  7. Low and very low doses, new recommendations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, N.

    1999-01-01

    The topic of the seminar organized by the world council of nuclear workers (WONUC) was the effects of low or very low doses on human health. Discussions centred round the linearity of the relation between dose and effect in the evaluation and management of the health hazard. The recommendations proposed by ICPR (international commission for radiological protection) are based on this linearity as a precaution. On the one hand it is remembered that low dose irradiation might be beneficial. It has been proved that the irradiation of the whole body is efficient in case of Hodgkin lymphoma. On the other hand it is remembered that doses as low as 10 mSv in utero have led to an excess of cancer in children. Studies based on experimentally radio-induced cancers have been carried out in Japan, China, Canada and France.Their results seem to be not consistent with the hypothesis of linearity. During the last decade a lot of work has been made but a conclusion is far to be reached, it is said that the American department of energy (DOE) has invited bids in 1999 to launch research programs in order to clarify the situation. (A.C.)

  8. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  9. A consideration of low dose radiation effects on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2011-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake categorized as 9 Mw occurred off the northeast coast of Japan. The subsequent destructive tsunami disabled emergency units of Fukushima Dai'ichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused partial meltdown of reactors and explosions. Resulting radiation releases forced large evacuations, bore concerns about food and water and fears against human health. In this manuscript, we described the effect of radiation, especially low dose radiation below 100 mSv, on cancer risk, focusing on fetuses and children. (author)

  10. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Polly Y. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cucinotta, Francis A. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Bjornstad, Kathleen A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Bakke, James [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Rosen, Chris J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Du, Nicholas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Fairchild, David G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cacao, Eliedonna [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Blakely, Eleanor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2016-04-19

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ~70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ~100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  11. Better management of wheat allergy using a very low-dose food challenge: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yu; Yanagida, Noriyuki; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose reactive wheat-allergic children are at a high risk of a positive oral food challenge (OFC). The present study aimed to evaluate whether the results of a very low-dose (VL) OFC would contribute to better wheat allergy management in this population. We retrospectively reviewed wheat-allergic subjects who underwent a VL OFC with 2 g of udon noodles (equivalent to 53 mg of wheat protein) and had a previous allergic reaction to management of some low-dose reactive wheat-allergic children from complete avoidance to partial wheat intake. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a 'Th2 polarized' immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in

  13. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  14. Low dose preoperative radiotherapy for carcinoma of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, S.J.; Duncan, W.; Kerr, G.R.; Jack, W.J.L.; Mackillop, W.J.; Walbaum, P.R.; Cameron, E.

    1992-01-01

    Patients (176) with potentially operable squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of middle or lower thirds of oesophagus were randomly assigned to preoperative radiotherapy or surgery alone. Patients assigned to the radiotherapy arm received 20 Gy in 10 treatments over 2 weeks, using parallel opposed 4 MV beams. The preoperative radiotherapy was not associated with any significant acute morbidity or any increase in operative complications. The median survival of the overall group of 176 patients was 8 moths, and the 5-year survival was 13%. There was no significant difference in the survival of the 90 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and the 86 who were managed by surgery alone. Proportional hazards analysis identified lymph node involvement, high tumor grade and male sex as significant adverse prognostic features, but the treatment option assigned had no prognostic significance. It was concluded that low dose preoperative radiotherapy offered no advantage over surgery alone. (author). 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 6 tabs

  15. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  16. Low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) in the perioperative workup of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Overgaard, Angelica; Maly, Pavel [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden); Ohlin, Acke [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden); Gunnarsson, Mikael [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden); Sundgren, Pia C. [University of Michigan Health Systems, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2009-03-15

    The study aims were to estimate the radiation dose in patients examined with low dose spine CT and to compare it with that received by patients undergoing standard CT for trauma of the same region, as well as to evaluate the impact of dose reduction on image quality. Radiation doses in 113 consecutive low dose spine CTs were compared with those in 127 CTs for trauma. The inter- and intraobserver agreement in measurements of pedicular width, and vertebral rotation, measurements of signal-to-noise ratio and assessment of hardware status were the indicators in the evaluation of image quality. The effective dose of the low dose spine CT (0.37 mSv) was 20 times lower than that of a standard CT for trauma (13.09 mSv). This dose reduction conveyed no impact on image quality. This low dose spine CT protocol allows detailed evaluation that is necessary for preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation. (orig.)

  17. Low-dose CT: new tool for screening lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W.

    2001-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from malignant tumours as it is very common and has a poor prognosis at advanced tumour stages. Prognosis could be improved by treatment at early stages. As these stages are usually asymptomatic, a diagnostic test that would allow detection of early tumour stages in a population at risk could potentially reduce mortality from lung cancer. Previous approaches using chest radiography and sputum cytology in smokers have been disappointing. Fluorescent bronchoscopy and molecular markers are not yet applicable in clinical routine. Because of its high sensitivity for small pulmonary nodules, which are the most common manifestation of early lung cancer, CT appears suitable as a screening test. Low-dose examination parameters can and should be used for this purpose. From clinical practice it is well known that chest CT often demonstrates small pulmonary nodules, which do not represent lung cancer. Therefore, non-invasive diagnostic algorithms are required to avoid unnecessary biopsies in benign lesions. In preliminary studies of low-dose CT using algorithms based on size and density of detected nodules a large proportion of asymptomatic lung cancers and a large proportion of early, resectable tumour stages were found with a small proportion of invasive procedures for benign nodules. Before this technology can be recommended for broad application, however, further information is required regarding appropriate inclusion criteria (smoking habits, age groups) and screening intervals. Most importantly, further data are required to clarify whether lung cancer screening using low-dose CT can actually reduce mortality from lung cancer. (orig.)

  18. Cancer and low dose responses in vivo: implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection practices assume that cancer risk is linearly proportional to total dose, without a threshold, both for people with normal cancer risk and for people who may be genetically cancer prone. Mice heterozygous for the Tp 53 gene are cancer prone, and their increased risk from high doses was not different from Tp 53 normal mice. However, in either Tp 53 normal or heterozygous mice, a single low dose of low LET radiation given at low dose rate protected against both spontaneous and radiation-induced cancer by increasing tumor latency. Increased tumor latency without a cancer frequency change implies that low doses in vivo primarily slow the process of genomic instability, consistent with the elevated capacity for correct DSB rejoining seen in low dose exposed cells. The in vivo animal data indicates that, for low doses and low dose rates in both normal and cancer prone adult mice, risk does not increase linearly with dose, and dose thresholds for increased risk exist. Below those dose thresholds (which are influenced by Tp 53 function) overall risk is reduced below that of unexposed control mice, indicating that Dose Rate Effectiveness Factors (DREF) may approach infinity, rather than the current assumption of 2. However, as dose decreases, different tissues appear to have different thresholds at which detriment turns to protection, indicating that individual tissue weighting factors (Wt) are also not constant, but vary from positive values to zero with decreasing dose. Measurements of Relative Biological Effect between high and low LET radiations are used to establish radiation weighting factors (Wr) used in radiation protection, and these are also assumed to be constant with dose. However, since the risk from an exposure to low LET radiation is not constant with dose, it would seem unlikely that radiation-weighting factors for high LET radiation are actually constant at low dose and dose rate

  19. Oxidative stress and low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerit, I.; Alaoui-Youssefi, A.; Cernjavski, L.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of this working group indicate a shift of the prooxidant - antioxidant balance to the prooxidant side for a large proportion of workers engaged in the clean-up of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986-87. Similar findings were obtained in children exposed to radiation after the explosion or still living within contaminated regions. Increased superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by phagocytes were correlated with an increase in lipid peroxiation products and a decrease in the enzymatic and non enzymatic antioxidant defenses of the organism. The calstogenic factor test, which detects the presence of lipid peroxidation products and cytokines due to their chromosome damaging effects, yielded positive results for 41% of 89 workers from Armenia and 52% of 200 workers from St. Petersburg. Clastogenic plasma activity was increased even in those workers, who had received radiation doses between 5 and 10 cGy only. The number of CF-positive workers increased in the subgroups with increasing radiation dose. In children, the data varied according to sites and suggested correlations with the radioactive contamination of the soil. Treatments with antioxidant vitamins, flavonoids and terpenes improved the health status of this high risk population. However, the type of antioxidant, the treatment schedule and the dosage have to be standardized in order to obtain comparable results. (author)

  20. Pregnancy course in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy treated with very low doses of ursodeoxycholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grymowicz, Monika; Czajkowski, Krzysztof; Smolarczyk, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been proposed as the optimal pharmacological treatment for intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). The lowest effective dosage of UDCA in women with ICP has not been established. The objective is to determine the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes resulting from ICP and to measure changes in liver function parameters and pruritus severity in ICP patients treated with low doses of UDCA. ICP was diagnosed in 203 patients on the basis of pruritus and elevated liver biochemical parameters. Patients with total bile acids (TBA) ≥ 10 μmol/l (n = 157) received UDCA (300-450 mg/day; 4-6 mg/kg/day) until delivery. Maternal and fetal outcomes of women with ICP were compared with 100 patients without cholestasis. Patients with ICP were hospitalized for treatment and fetal surveillance. There was no correlation between fetal and neonatal complication rates in ICP patients and biochemical markers of cholestasis. Significant declines in serum TBA (p = 0.003), bilirubin concentration (p = 0.026) and aminotransferase activity (p < 0.001) were observed during treatment with low doses of UDCA. Moreover, severity of pruritus was ameliorated during the 2 weeks of therapy (p = 0.037). A total of 17 patients (10.9%) did not respond to treatment. UDCA at low doses improved biochemical markers and clinical symptoms in almost 90% of ICP patients.

  1. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at % 235 U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.) [es

  2. Responses of epithelial cells to low and very low doses of low let radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in our knowledge of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation have shown unexpected phenomena. These vary in the endpoint used to detect them and in the dose range examined but all occur as high-frequency events in cell populations. They include: 1. a 'bystander effect' which can be demonstrated at low doses as a transferable.factor(s) causing radiobiological effects in unexposed cells, 2. an assortment of delayed effects' occurring in progeny of cells exposed to low doses, 3. Low-dose Hypersensitivity (HRS) and Increased radioresistance (IRR) which can collectively be demonstrated as a change in the dose-effect relationship, occurring around 0.5-1 Gy of low LET radiation and 4. adaptive responses where cells exposed to very low doses followed by higher doses, exhibit an induced relatively resistant response to the second dose. In all cases, the effect of very low doses is greater than would be predicted by extrapolation of high dose data and is inconsistent with conventional DNA break/repair-based radiobiology. In practical risk assessment terms, the relative importance of the effects are high at low doses where they dominate the response, and small at high doses. This paper reviews these assorted phenomena and in particular seeks to explore whether related or distinct mechanisms underlie these various effects Understanding the mechanistic basis of these phenomena may suggest new approaches to controlling death or survival sectoring at low radiation doses. The key question is whether these low dose phenomena necessitate a new approach to risk assessment. (author)

  3. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Isheeta [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  4. Characteristics of repair following very low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Metting, N.F.; Nelson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on living systems being with the physical processes of energy deposition and develop through many stages of chemical reaction and biological response. The modeling effort attempts to organize the available data and theories of all of these stages into self-consistent models that can be compared and tested. In some cases, important differences among models result in only small differences in cell survival within the ranges of dose and dose rate that are normally investigated. To overcome this limitation, new ways of irradiating cells at extremes of dose rate, or ways of evaluating the effects of very small doses, are developed. Mathematical modeling and cellular studies complement each other. It has recently been found that some mechanisms are not adequate to account for the interaction of dose and repair time as they affect the reproductive survival of plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Repair of radiation-induced cellular damage plays a central role in the survival of cells exposed to doses of 1 Gy or more. This repair is responsible for the dose rate, split-dose and delayed plating effect and can be evaluated. Because split-dose and dose-rate experiments involve repair during irradiation and delayed plating experiments involve repair after irradiation is completed, it was originally thought that different repair processes were involved. It is now clear that this is not necessarily the case. Appropriately designed models can account for observed effects at conventional doses (1 Gy or more) whether they assume all damage is lethal unless repaired or some damage is innocuous unless it interacts with additional damage. The fact that the survival following a plating delay is always less than the survival following immediate plating at low doses indicates that the damage produced is probably not potentially lethal

  5. An investigation of the interactions of low doses of ionising radiation and chemical pollutants on Artemia Salina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Benova, K.; Hromada, R.; Falis, M.; Dvorak, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear reactor failures present a risk of global contamination which can be affected by other environmental factors, such as chemicals. The present study has investigated the effect of low doses of gamma radiation in relation to the presence of low doses of Cr and Cd. (authors)

  6. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates

  7. Effects of low dose mitomycin C on experimental tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianzheng; Liang Shuo; Qu Yaqin; Pu Chunji; Zhang Haiying; Wu Zhenfeng; Wang Xianli

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of low dose mitomycin C(MMC) as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. Methods: Change in tumor size tumor-bearing mice was measured. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine immune function of mice. Results: Low dose Mac's pretreatment reduced tumor size more markedly than did radiotherapy only. The immune function in mice given with low dose MMC 12h before radiotherapy was obviously higher than that in mice subjected to radiotherapy only (P<0.05), and was close to that in the tumor-bearing mice before radiotherapy. Conclusion: Low dose MMC could improve the radiotherapy effect. Pretreatment with low dose MMC could obviously improve the immune suppression state in mice caused by radiotherapy. The mechanism of its improvement of radiotherapeutic effect by low dose of MMC might be due to its enhancement of immune function and induction of adaptive response in tumor-bearing mice

  8. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 'Reasonable' regulation of low doses in the Netherlands?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuur, Ciska

    2002-01-01

    As long as it is not clear exactly what the risks of low doses are, exposures should be regulated to be 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). In radiation protection, for normal situations, this means that a projected dose reduction can only be obligatory when the efforts needed to achieve the reduction are 'reasonable' in comparison with it, economical and social aspects being taken into account. In the recent Dutch regulations, 'reasonable' values have been established for the relevant parameters used in the ALARA concept and the paper discusses the values required to calculate the doses for the critical group due to a source. In some cases, the effort expended in making the ALARA dose assessments might not be reasonable in comparison with the dose reduction to be expected. The system which has been developed in the Netherlands to avoid these 'unreasonable' dose calculations, measurements and assessments is explained. (author)

  10. State of human genome at low-doses ecological influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'nov, S.B.; Rytik, P.G.; Kruchinskij, N.G.; Kovalev, V.A.; Palamar, L.A.; Senyuk, O.F.

    2005-01-01

    The results of analysis of the state of genome (amounts of single strand breaks in DNA) of the persons exposed to influence of complex 'Chernobyl factor' in remote terms after a failure on ChNPP are resulted. Findings allowed to expose the increase of level of single strand breaks in DNA at the chronically irradiated persons mainly carry adaptive character and probably can be related to instability of genome. Thus at organism level growth of mutational pressure and strengthening of instability of cellular genome is related to the change of spectrum of biological characteristics, in particular individual reaction of somatic cells of victims on additional mutagens influences. The indicated changes can testify to existence of potential risk of remote genetic consequences of long-term irradiation influence in low doses

  11. High and low dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    For the brachytherapy component of the r[iation treatment of cervical carcinoma, high dose rate (HDR) is slowly replacing conventional low dose rate (LDR) due primarily to r[iation safety and other physical benefits attributed to the HDR modality. Many r[iation oncologists are reluctant to make this change because of perceived r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR. However, in clinical practice HDR appears to be as effective as LDR but with a lower risk of late complications, as demonstrated by one randomized clinical trial and two comprehensive literature and practice surveys. The reason for this appears to be that the r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR are outweighed by the physical [vantages. (orig.)

  12. Super-low dose endotoxin pre-conditioning exacerbates sepsis mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keqiang; Geng, Shuo; Yuan, Ruoxi; Diao, Na; Upchurch, Zachary; Li, Liwu

    2015-04-01

    Sepsis mortality varies dramatically in individuals of variable immune conditions, with poorly defined mechanisms. This phenomenon complements the hypothesis that innate immunity may adopt rudimentary memory, as demonstrated in vitro with endotoxin priming and tolerance in cultured monocytes. However, previous in vivo studies only examined the protective effect of endotoxin tolerance in the context of sepsis. In sharp contrast, we report herein that pre-conditionings with super-low or low dose endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause strikingly opposite survival outcomes. Mice pre-conditioned with super-low dose LPS experienced severe tissue damage, inflammation, increased bacterial load in circulation, and elevated mortality when they were subjected to cecal-ligation and puncture (CLP). This is in opposite to the well-reported protective phenomenon with CLP mice pre-conditioned with low dose LPS. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that super-low and low dose LPS differentially modulate the formation of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) in neutrophils. Instead of increased ERK activation and NET formation in neutrophils pre-conditioned with low dose LPS, we observed significantly reduced ERK activation and compromised NET generation in neutrophils pre-conditioned with super-low dose LPS. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel mechanism potentially responsible for the dynamic programming of innate immunity in vivo as it relates to sepsis risks.

  13. Super-low Dose Endotoxin Pre-conditioning Exacerbates Sepsis Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqiang Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis mortality varies dramatically in individuals of variable immune conditions, with poorly defined mechanisms. This phenomenon complements the hypothesis that innate immunity may adopt rudimentary memory, as demonstrated in vitro with endotoxin priming and tolerance in cultured monocytes. However, previous in vivo studies only examined the protective effect of endotoxin tolerance in the context of sepsis. In sharp contrast, we report herein that pre-conditioning with super-low or low dose endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS cause strikingly opposite survival outcomes. Mice pre-conditioned with super-low dose LPS experienced severe tissue damage, inflammation, increased bacterial load in circulation, and elevated mortality when they were subjected to cecal-ligation and puncture (CLP. This is in contrast to the well-reported protective phenomenon with CLP mice pre-conditioned with low dose LPS. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that super-low and low dose LPS differentially modulate the formation of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET in neutrophils. Instead of increased ERK activation and NET formation in neutrophils pre-conditioned with low dose LPS, we observed significantly reduced ERK activation and compromised NET generation in neutrophils pre-conditioned with super-low dose LPS. Collectively, our findings reveal a mechanism potentially responsible for the dynamic programming of innate immunity in vivo as it relates to sepsis risks.

  14. Low dose radiation exposure and atherosclerosis in ApoE{sup -/-} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Hasu, M. [Univ. of Ottawa, Department of Pathology and Lab. Medicine, and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Univ. of Ottawa Heart Inst., Vascular Biology Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Little, M. [Imperial Coll., Faculty of Medicine, St. Marys Campus, London (United Kingdom); Hildebrandt, G. [Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Priest, N.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Whitman, S.C. [Univ. of Ottawa, Department of Pathology and Lab. Medicine, and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Univ. of Ottawa Heart Inst., Vascular Biology Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The hypothesis that single low dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low LET radiation, given at either high (240 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate, would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BI/6 mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE-/-). Mice were exposed either at early stage disease (2 months of age) and examined 3 or 6 months later, or at late stage disease (8 months of age) and examined 2 or 4 months later. Compared to unexposed controls, all doses given at low or high dose rate at early stage disease had significant inhibitory effects on lesion growth and, at 25 or 50 mGy, on lesion frequency. No dose given at low dose rate had any effect on total serum cholesterol, but this was elevated by every dose given at high dose rate. Exposures at low dose rate had no effect on the percentage of lesion lipids contained within macrophages, and, at either high or low dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion severity. Exposure at late stage disease, to any dose at high dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion frequency, but at low dose rate some doses produced a small transient increase in this frequency. Exposure to low doses at low, but not high dose rate, significantly, but transiently reduced average lesion size, and at either dose rate transiently reduced lesion severity. Exposure to any dose at low dose rate (but not high dose rate) resulted in large and persistent decreases in serum cholesterol. These data indicate that a single low dose exposure, depending on dose and dose rate, generally protects against various measures of atherosclerosis in genetically susceptible mice. This result contrasts with the known, generally detrimental effects of high doses on this disease in the same mice, suggesting that a linear extrapolation of risk from high doses is not appropriate. (author)

  15. Low dose radiation exposure and atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Hasu, M.; Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H.; Little, M.; Hildebrandt, G.; Priest, N.D.; Whitman, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis that single low dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low LET radiation, given at either high (240 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate, would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BI/6 mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE-/-). Mice were exposed either at early stage disease (2 months of age) and examined 3 or 6 months later, or at late stage disease (8 months of age) and examined 2 or 4 months later. Compared to unexposed controls, all doses given at low or high dose rate at early stage disease had significant inhibitory effects on lesion growth and, at 25 or 50 mGy, on lesion frequency. No dose given at low dose rate had any effect on total serum cholesterol, but this was elevated by every dose given at high dose rate. Exposures at low dose rate had no effect on the percentage of lesion lipids contained within macrophages, and, at either high or low dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion severity. Exposure at late stage disease, to any dose at high dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion frequency, but at low dose rate some doses produced a small transient increase in this frequency. Exposure to low doses at low, but not high dose rate, significantly, but transiently reduced average lesion size, and at either dose rate transiently reduced lesion severity. Exposure to any dose at low dose rate (but not high dose rate) resulted in large and persistent decreases in serum cholesterol. These data indicate that a single low dose exposure, depending on dose and dose rate, generally protects against various measures of atherosclerosis in genetically susceptible mice. This result contrasts with the known, generally detrimental effects of high doses on this disease in the same mice, suggesting that a linear extrapolation of risk from high doses is not appropriate. (author)

  16. Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W.

    2003-01-01

    Screening for lung cancer is hoped to reduce mortality from this common tumour, which is characterised by a dismal overall survival, relatively well defined risk groups (mainly heavy cigarette smokers and workers exposed to asbestos) and a lack of early symptoms. In the past studies using sputum cytology and chest radiography have failed to demonstrate any reduction in lung cancer mortality through screening. One of the reasons is probably the relatively poor sensitivity of both these tests in early tumours. Low radiation dose computed tomography (CT) has been shown to have a much higher sensitivity for small pulmonary nodules, which are believed to be the most common presentation of early lung cancer. As, however, small pulmonary nodules are common and most are not malignant, non-invasive diagnostic algorithms are required to correctly classify the detected lesions and avoid invasive procedures in benign nodules. Nodule density, size and the demonstration of growth at follow-up have been shown to be useful in this respect and may in the future be supplemented by contrast-enhanced CT and positron emission tomography. Based on these diagnostic algorithms preliminary studies of low-dose CT in heavy smokers have demonstrated a high proportion of asymptomatic, early, resectable cancers with good survival. As, however, several biases could explain these findings in the absence of the ultimate goal of cancer screening, i.e. mortality reduction, most researchers believe that randomised controlled trials including several 10000 subjects are required to demonstrate a possible mortality reduction. Only then general recommendations to screen individuals at risk of lung cancer with low-dose CT should be made. It can be hoped that international cooperation will succeed in providing results as early as possible

  17. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  18. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose estradiol vaginal tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, James; Nachtigall, Lila; Ulrich, Lian G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17ß-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy.......To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17ß-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy....

  19. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose estradiol vaginal tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, James; Nachtigall, Lila; Ulrich, Lian G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17β-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy.......To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17β-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy....

  20. Study of genomic instability induced by low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoane, A.; Crudeli, C.; Dulout, F.

    2006-01-01

    The crews of commercial flights and services staff of radiology and radiotherapy from hospitals are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Genomic instability includes those adverse effects observed in cells, several generations after the exposure occurred. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of genomic instability by very low doses of ionizing radiation [es

  1. Low dose radiation prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Hong, Yaqiong; Zhao, Di; Meng, Xinxin; Zhao, Lijing; Du, Yanwei; Wang, Zan; Zheng, Yan; Cai, Lu; Jiang, Hongyu

    2018-01-02

    This study aimed to develop a novel and non-invasive approach, low-dose radiation (LDR, 75 mGy X-rays), to prevent doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups, Control, LDR (a single exposure), Sham (treated same as LDR group except for irradiation), DOX (a single intraperitoneal injection of DOX at 7.5 mg/kg), and LDR/DOX (received LDR and 72 h later received DOX). Electrocardiogram analysis displayed several kinds of abnormal ECG profiles in DOX-treated mice, but less in LDR/DOX group. Cardiotoxicity indices included histopathological changes, oxidative stress markers, and measurements of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Pretreatment of DOX group with LDR reduced oxidative damages (reactive oxygen species formation, protein nitration, and lipid peroxidation) and increased the activities of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) in the heart of LDR/DOX mice compared to DOX mice. Pretreatment of DOX-treated mice with LDR also decreased DOX-induced cardiac cell apoptosis (TUNEL staining and cleaved caspase-3) and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway (increased p53, Bax, and caspase-9 expression and decreased Bcl2 expression and ΔΨm dissipation). These results suggest that LDR could induce adaptation of the heart to DOX-induced toxicity. Cardiac protection by LDR may attribute to attenuate DOX-induced cell death via suppressing mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress and apoptosis signaling.

  2. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    low dose radiation exposure. Cells viability/cytotoxicity analysis data are currently being analyzed to determine how these endpoints are affected under our experimental conditions. The results from this study will be translatable to risk assessment for assigning limits to radiation workers, pre-dosing for more effective radiotherapy and the consequences of long duration space flight. The data from this study has been presented a various scientific meetings/workshops and a manuscript, containing the findings, is currently being prepared for publication. Due to unforeseen challenges in collecting the data and standardizing experimental procedures, the second and third aims have not been completed. However, attempts will be made, based on the availability of funds, to continue this project so that these aims can be satisfied.

  3. Dose response relationship at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The data that have accrued in Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing human brain are reviewed. Effects considered are severe mental retardation, lowered IQ scores, decline in school performance, seizures, other neuropsychological effects, and small head size. All these factors may be related to radiation doses received by the mother during pregnancy. (L.L.) 3 figs., tab., 7 refs

  4. Why low doses at Finnish NPPs?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.; Vaehaemaa, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Finnish nuclear power units - two BWRs (ABB Atom) and two PWRs (VVER) -are known for their high load factors. Finland's reactors have topped the world ranking list for more than ten years. This explains why their collective radiation doses are among the lowest in the world. During normal operation a collective dose of less than ten millisieverts per month is received at one site

  5. Medical effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggle, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ionising radiation is genotoxic and causes biological effects via a chain of events involving DNA strand breaks and 'multiply damaged sites' as critical lesions that lead to cell death. The acute health effects of radiation after doses of a few gray, are due to such cell death and consequent disturbance of cell population kinetics. Because of cellular repair and repopulation there is generally a threshold dose of about 1-2 Gy below which such severe effects are not inducible. However, more subtle, sub-lethal mutational DNA damage in somatic cells of the body and the germ cells of the ovary and testis cause the two major low dose health risks -cancer induction and genetic (heritable) effects. This paper discusses some of the epidemiological and experimental evidence regarding radiation genetic effects, carcinogenesis and CNS teratogenesis. It concludes that current risk estimates imply that about 3% of all cancers; 1% of genetic disorders and between 0% and 0.3% of severe mental subnormality in the UK is attributable to the ubiquitous background radiation. The health risks associated with the medical uses of radiation are smaller, whilst the nuclear industry causes perhaps 1% of the health detriment attributable to background doses. (author)

  6. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yang; Shi Luyao; Shu Huazhong; Luo Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Yin Xindao; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors. (paper)

  7. Usefulness of low-dose CT in the detection of pulmonary metastasis of gestational trophoblastic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.J.; Lou, F.L.; Zhang, M.M.; Pan, Z.M.; Zhang, L.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether a low-dose spiral chest computed tomography (CT) examination could replace standard-dose chest CT in detecting pulmonary metastases in patients with gestational trophoblastic tumour (GTT). Materials and methods: In a prospective investigation, 67 chest CT examinations of 39 GTT patients were undertaken. All the patients underwent CT examinations using standard-dose (150 mAs, pitch 1, standard reconstruction algorithm) and low-dose (40 mAs, pitch 2, bone reconstruction algorithm) protocols. Two radiologists interpreted images independently. A metastasis was defined as a nodule within lung parenchyma that could not be attributed to a pulmonary vessel. The number of metastases detected with each protocol was recorded. The size of each lesion was measured and categorized as <5, 5-9.9, and ≥10 mm. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to assess the difference between the numbers of lesion detected by the two protocols. Results: The CT dose index (CTDI) for the standard-dose and low-dose CT protocols was 10.4 mGy and 1.4 mGy, respectively. One thousand, six hundred, and eighty-two metastases were detected by standard-dose CT, and 1460 lesions by the low-dose protocol. The numbers detected by low-dose CT were significantly less than those detected by standard-dose CT (Z = -3.776, p < 0.001), especially for nodules smaller than 5 mm (Z = -4.167, p < 0.001). However, the disease staging and risk score of the patients were not affected by use of the low-dose protocol. Conclusion: Low-dose chest CT can be used as a staging and follow-up procedure for patients with GTT

  8. Intraoperative use of low-dose recombinant activated factor VII during thoracic aortic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas D; Bhattacharya, Syamal D; Williams, Judson B; Fosbol, Emil L; Lockhart, Evelyn L; Patel, Mayur B; Gaca, Jeffrey G; Welsby, Ian J; Hughes, G Chad

    2012-06-01

    Numerous studies have supported the effectiveness of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) for the control of bleeding after cardiac procedures; however safety concerns persist. Here we report the novel use of intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa in thoracic aortic operations, a strategy intended to improve safety by minimizing rFVIIa exposure. Between July 2005 and December 2010, 425 consecutive patients at a single referral center underwent thoracic aortic operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB); 77 of these patients received intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa (≤60 μg/kg) for severe coagulopathy after CPB. Propensity matching produced a cohort of 88 patients (44 received intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa and 44 controls) for comparison. Matched patients receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa got an initial median dose of 32 μg/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 16-43 μg/kg) rFVIIa given 51 minutes (42-67 minutes) after separation from CPB. Patients receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa demonstrated improved postoperative coagulation measurements (partial thromboplastin time 28.6 versus 31.5 seconds; p=0.05; international normalized ratio, 0.8 versus 1.2; pproduct transfusions (2.5 versus 5.0 units; p=0.05) compared with control patients. No patient receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa required postoperative rFVIIa administration or reexploration for bleeding. Rates of stroke, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and other adverse events were equivalent between groups. Intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa led to improved postoperative hemostasis with no apparent increase in adverse events. Intraoperative rFVIIa administration in appropriately selected patients may correct coagulopathy early in the course of refractory blood loss and lead to improved safety through the use of smaller rFVIIa doses. Appropriately powered randomized studies are necessary to confirm the safety and efficacy of this approach. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

  9. High versus low-dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Sonali S; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Ananth, Cande V; Huang, Yongmei; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cervical cancer. While small trials have shown comparable survival outcomes between high (HDR) and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, little data is available in the US. We examined the utilization of HDR brachytherapy and analyzed the impact of type of brachytherapy on survival for cervical cancer. Women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with primary (external beam and brachytherapy) radiotherapy between 2003-2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were analyzed. Generalized linear mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine predictors of HDR brachytherapy use and the association between HDR use and survival. A total of 10,564 women including 2681 (25.4%) who received LDR and 7883 (74.6%) that received HDR were identified. Use of HDR increased from 50.2% in 2003 to 83.9% in 2011 (Puse of HDR. While patients in the Northeast were more likely to receive HDR therapy, there were no other clinical or socioeconomic characteristics associated with receipt of HDR. In a multivariable Cox model, survival was similar between the HDR and LDR groups (HR=0.93; 95% CI 0.83-1.03). Similar findings were noted in analyses stratified by stage and histology. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated no difference in survival based on type of brachytherapy for stage IIB (P=0.68), IIIB (P=0.17), or IVA (P=0.16) tumors. The use of HDR therapy has increased rapidly. Overall survival is similar for LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Low-dose CT image reconstruction using gain intervention-based dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Yadunath; Arya, K. V.; Tiwari, Shailendra

    2018-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) approach is extensively utilized in clinical diagnoses. However, X-ray residue in human body may introduce somatic damage such as cancer. Owing to radiation risk, research has focused on the radiation exposure distributed to patients through CT investigations. Therefore, low-dose CT has become a significant research area. Many researchers have proposed different low-dose CT reconstruction techniques. But, these techniques suffer from various issues such as over smoothing, artifacts, noise, etc. Therefore, in this paper, we have proposed a novel integrated low-dose CT reconstruction technique. The proposed technique utilizes global dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (GDSIR) and adaptive dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (ADSIR)-based reconstruction techniques. In case the dictionary (D) is predetermined, then GDSIR can be used and if D is adaptively defined then ADSIR is appropriate choice. The gain intervention-based filter is also used as a post-processing technique for removing the artifacts from low-dose CT reconstructed images. Experiments have been done by considering the proposed and other low-dose CT reconstruction techniques on well-known benchmark CT images. Extensive experiments have shown that the proposed technique outperforms the available approaches.

  11. Research on low radiation doses - A better understanding of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Radiation doses below 100 mSv are called low doses. Epidemiological research on the health hazards of low doses are difficult to do because numerous pathologies, particularly cancer, appear lifelong for genetical or environmental causes without any link with irradiation and it is very difficult to identify the real cause of a cancer. Another concern is that the impact on human health is weak and are observed only after a long period after irradiation. These features make epidemiological studies cumbersome to implement since they require vast cohorts and a very long-term follow-up. The extrapolation of the effects of higher doses to the domain of low doses does not meet reality and it is why the European Union takes part into the financing of such research. In order to gain efficiency, scientists work together through various European networks among them: HLEG (High Level Expert Group On European Low Dose Risk Research) or MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative). Several programs are underway or have been recently launched: -) the impact of Cesium contamination on children's health (Epice program), -) the study of the impact of medical imaging on children, -) the study of the health of children living near nuclear facilities, -) the relationship between radon and lung cancer, -) the effect of occupational low radiation doses, -) the effect of uranium dissolved in water on living organisms (Envirhom program). (A.C.)

  12. Management of temporary urinary retention after arthroscopic knee surgery in low-dose spinal anesthesia: development of a simple algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Thomas J; Garoscio, Ivo; Rehder, Peter; Oberladstätter, Jürgen; Voelckel, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    In practice, trauma and orthopedic surgery during spinal anesthesia are often performed with routine urethral catheterization of the bladder to prevent an overdistention of the bladder. However, use of a catheter has inherent risks. Ultrasound examination of the bladder (Bladderscan) can precisely determine the bladder volume. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify parameters indicative of urinary retention after low-dose spinal anesthesia and to develop a simple algorithm for patient care. This prospective pilot study approved by the Ethics Committee enrolled 45 patients after obtaining their written informed consent. Patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery received low-dose spinal anesthesia with 1.4 ml 0.5% bupivacaine at level L3/L4. Bladder volume was measured by urinary bladder scanning at baseline, at the end of surgery and up to 4 h later. The incidence of spontaneous urination versus catheterization was assessed and the relative risk for catheterization was calculated. Mann-Whitney test, chi(2) test with Fischer Exact test and the relative odds ratio were performed as appropriate. *P 300 ml postoperatively had a 6.5-fold greater likelihood for urinary retention. In the management of patients with short-lasting spinal anesthesia for arthroscopic knee surgery we recommend monitoring bladder volume by Bladderscan instead of routine catheterization. Anesthesiologists or nurses under protocol should assess bladder volume preoperatively and at the end of surgery. If bladder volume is >300 ml, catheterization should be performed in the OR. Patients with a bladder volume of 500 ml.

  13. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p.) 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.). IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v.) prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical) given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. PMID:22114930

  14. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayado Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p. 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.. IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v. prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA.

  15. Determination of line edge roughness in low-dose top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduin, T.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the off-line metrology for line edge roughness (LER) determination by using the discrete power spectral density (PSD). The study specifically addresses low-dose scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images in order to reduce the acquisition time and the risk of resist shrinkage. The

  16. Low-dose ionizing radiation – is it harmful to health?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A. H. [CERN Radiation Protection Group (European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN))

    1987-09-15

    A conference on the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation organized in London earlier this year by the British Nuclear Energy Society brought together epidemiologists who have been investigating the mortality of workers from the nuclear industry in an attempt to put low-level radiation risk estimates on a scientific basis.

  17. Low-dose aspirin and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Holger; Jørgensen, Trine M M; Høgh, Annette

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The use of low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) has been suggested to attenuate growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), yet solid clinical evidence of this hypothesis is still missing. This study aimed to investigate whether preadmission ASA use influenced the risk...

  18. Low dose spironolactone reduces blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenburg Oxlund, Christina; Henriksen, J. E.; Tarnow, L.

    2013-01-01

    frequent adverse event leading to dose reduction in three cases and discontinuation in one, whereas gynaecomastia was not reported.Conclusion:Low dose spironolactone exerts significant BP and urinary albumin creatinine ratio lowering effects in high-risk patients with resistant hypertension and type 2...

  19. Radiation protection and environment day the low doses in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of low doses exposures are difficult to explore and the studies give often place to controversies. According to the are, differences exist in the methodological approaches. It results from it a confusion on the acceptable levels of exposure, even on the definition of low dose. This day organised by the sections 'non ionizing and research and health of the French society of radiation protection (S.F.R.P.), will be a meeting between professionals of different disciplines, to compare the approaches used for the ionizing and non ionizing radiations as well as the chemical and microbiological agents. It will allow to share the knowledge and the abilities and to progress on methodologies adapted to the evaluation and the management of risks in relation with low doses. (N.C.)

  20. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  1. Long term effects of low doses of ionising radiation: facts and fallacies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    Health effects of low doses of ionising radiation have been a public concern. The public perception of these low effects is that it causes cancer and genetic effects. Enormous amount of work regarding this cancer has been done all over the world, on occupational workers exposed to low doses of ionising radiation. These studies do not show any adverse effect on them. Epidemiological studies done on members of public staying near nuclear facilities also have shown that there is no health risk involved in staying near these facilities. Genetic effects have also shown negative results. These two aspects of health effects of low dose of radiation are discussed in detail. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  2. Bleeding risk of apixaban, dabigatran, and low-dose rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in Japanese patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a propensity matched analysis of administrative claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsaka, Shun; Murata, Tatsunori; Izumi, Naoko; Katada, Jun; Wang, Feng; Terayama, Yasuo

    2017-11-01

    There is scarce evidence comparing novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) with warfarin in real-world settings in Japan. This study compared the risk of bleeding events among patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) initiating treatment with NOACs versus warfarin. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a de-identified electronic health record based database of health claims and Diagnosis Procedure Combination data from 275 consenting hospitals in Japan. NVAF patients newly initiated on oral anticoagulants were eligible. Based on the first prescription, patients were assigned to 5/2.5 mg BID apixaban, 150/110 mg BID dabigatran, 15/10 mg QD rivaroxaban (approved dose lower in Japan compared to Western countries [20/15 mg QD]) or warfarin groups. One-to-one propensity score matching (PSM) was used to balance patient characteristics between warfarin and each NOAC. Patients were followed up to 1 year post-first prescription. Among 38,662 eligible patients, a total of 5977, 5090, and 6726 matched pairs were identified for warfarin versus apixaban, warfarin versus dabigatran, and warfarin versus rivaroxaban, respectively after PSM. Compared to warfarin, apixaban (hazard ratio [HR] 0.586; 95% CI 0.421-0.815), dabigatran (HR 0.617; 0.425-0.895) and rivaroxaban (HR 0.693; 0.514-0.933) were associated with a significantly lower risk of major bleeding. The risk of any bleeding was significantly lower for apixaban (HR 0.782; 0.682-0.896), but not for dabigatran (HR 0.988; 0.860-1.135) or rivaroxaban (HR 0.938; 0.832-1.057) when comparing to warfarin. Among Japanese patients with NVAF, treatment with apixaban 5/2.5 mg BID was associated with a significantly lower risk of major bleeding and any bleeding when compared to warfarin. Treatment with dabigatran 150/110 mg BID or rivaroxaban 15/10 mg QD was associated with a significantly lower risk of major bleeding, but not any bleeding, than warfarin. The potential benefit of individual NOACs in real

  3. X-raying with low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malevich, E.E.; Kisel, E.M.; Shpita, I.D.; Lazovsky, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    With the purpose of the improvement of diagnostics quality and reduction of beam load on a patient in modern x-ray devices pulse x-raying is applied. It is based on the using of radiation pulses with various frequencies of intervals between them instead of continuous radiation. At pulse x-raying with the net control the principle of filling of an interval is used, when the information about the image, received with the last pulse, get into memory and is displayed before occurrence of other pulse. It creates impression of the continuous image even at low frequency of pulses. Due to the unique concept of the simultaneous (double) control, all of 3 parameters, which define the quality of the image (pressure(voltage), force of a current and length of a pulse), are adjusted automatically at each pulse, thus optimum adaptation to varied thickness of object during dynamic researches occurs. At x-raying pulse the presence of a free interval from x-ray radiation between two pulses results in the decrease of a radiation dose. Pulsing occurs some times per one second with equal intervals between pulses. Thus, the degree of decrease irradiation dose depends on duration of a pause between pulses. On the screen the image of last pulse before occurrence of the following is kept and repeats. The principle of x-raying pulse was realized in system Grid Controlled Fluoroscopy by the firm 'Philips Medi zin Systeme'. In the x-ray tube of this system inclusion and de energizing of radiation occurs directly on a source. Electron cloud is broken off by the special grid, which is located between the cathode and the anode and operates as a barrier. Thus the tube continues to be energized. In usual devices for pulses formation is used generator pulsation system, which at increase and attenuation of a x-ray pulse results in occurrence of the increasing and fading radiation which are not participating in the formation of the image, but creating beam load on the patient and the personnel. Thus

  4. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  5. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  6. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  7. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  8. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek

    2007-07-01

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources

  9. Better management of cow's milk allergy using a very low dose food challenge test: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yu; Yanagida, Noriyuki; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2015-07-01

    Low dose reactive cow's milk (CM) allergic children are at high risk of persistent CM allergy and a positive oral food challenge (OFC). The present study aimed to evaluate if the results of a very low dose (VL) OFC with these children contributes to better management of CM allergy. We retrospectively reviewed subjects with CM allergy who underwent a VL OFC with 3 mL heated CM and had a previous allergic reaction to management of some low dose reactive CM allergic children to change from complete avoidance to partial intake of CM. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relative implications of protective responses versus damage induction at low dose and low-dose-rate exposures, using the microdose approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E

    2003-07-01

    In reviewing tissue effects of low-dose radiation (1) absorbed dose to tissue is replaced by the sum of energy deposited with track events in cell-equivalent tissue micromasses, i.e. with microdose hits, in the number of exposed micromasses and (2) induced cell damage and adaptive protection are related to microdose hits in exposed micromasses for a given radiation quality. DNA damage increases with the number of microdose hits. They also can induce adaptive protection, mainly against endogenous DNA damage. This protection involves cellular defenses, DNA repair and damage removal. With increasing numbers of low linear energy transfer (LET) microdose hits in exposed micromasses, adaptive protection first tends to outweigh damage and then (above 200 mGy) fails and largely disappears. These experimental data predict that cancer risk coefficients derived by epidemiology at high-dose irradiation decline at low doses and dose rates when adaptive protection outdoes DNA damage. The dose-risk function should include both linear and non-linear terms at low doses. (author)

  11. Relative implications of protective responses versus damage induction at low dose and low-dose-rate exposures, using the microdose approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    In reviewing tissue effects of low-dose radiation (1) absorbed dose to tissue is replaced by the sum of energy deposited with track events in cell-equivalent tissue micromasses, i.e. with microdose hits, in the number of exposed micromasses and (2) induced cell damage and adaptive protection are related to microdose hits in exposed micromasses for a given radiation quality. DNA damage increases with the number of microdose hits. They also can induce adaptive protection, mainly against endogenous DNA damage. This protection involves cellular defenses, DNA repair and damage removal. With increasing numbers of low linear energy transfer (LET) microdose hits in exposed micromasses, adaptive protection first tends to outweigh damage and then (above 200 mGy) fails and largely disappears. These experimental data predict that cancer risk coefficients derived by epidemiology at high-dose irradiation decline at low doses and dose rates when adaptive protection outdoes DNA damage. The dose-risk function should include both linear and non-linear terms at low doses. (author)

  12. Hormesis of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Immune System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, M.H.; Abbas, M.O.; El-Asady, R.S.; Amer, H.A.; El-Khouly, W.A.; Shabon, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the immune system has been a controversial subject. To evaluate the effect of low-doses γ-irradiation exposure on immune system. An animal model, using Rattus Rattus rats was used. The rats were divided into groups exposed to either continuous or fractionated 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mSv of radiation and compared to control rats that did not receive radiation. All groups were exposed to a total white blood count (Wcs), lymphocyte count and serum IgG level measurement, as indicators of the function of the cell-mediated (T lymphocytes) and the humoral (B lymphocytes) immune system. The results of the current study revealed that the counts of total leukocytes (WBCs) and lymphocytes, as well as the serum level of IgG were increased significantly in rats receiving low dose radiation, indicating enhancement of immune system. The data suggests that low-dose gamma-radiation improved hematological parameters and significantly enhances immune response indices of the exposed rats. These findings are similar to the radiation adaptive responses in which a small dose of pre irradiation would induce certain radiation resistance and enhances the cell response after exposure to further irradiation doses The applied low doses used in the present study may appear effective inducing the radio adaptive response. Farooqi and Kesavan (1993) and Bravard et al. (1999) reported that the adaptive response to ionizing radiation refers to the phenomenon by which cells irradiated with low (cGy) or sublethal doses (conditioning doses) become less susceptible to genotoxic effects of a subsequent high dose (challenge dose, several Gy).

  13. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.-M.; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD 5 dose of sarin (42 μg/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD 5 of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD 5 of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD 5 sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD 5 sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0.4 and 0.5 x LD 5 doses of sarin failed to

  14. Low-dose-rate total lymphoid irradiation: a new method of rapid immunosuppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.E.; de Silva, S.M.; Rachman, D.B.; Order, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI) has been successful in inducing immunosuppression in experimental and clinical applications. However, both the experimental and clinical utility of TLI are hampered by the prolonged treatment courses required (23 days in rats and 30-60 days in humans). Low-dose-rate TLI has the potential of reducing overall treatment time while achieving comparable immunosuppression. This study examines the immunosuppressive activity and treatment toxicity of conventional-dose-rate (23 days) vs low-dose-rate (2-7 days) TLI. Seven groups of Lewis rats were given TLI with 60Co. One group was treated at conventional-dose-rates (80-110 cGy/min) and received 3400 cGy in 17 fractions over 23 days. Six groups were treated at low-dose-rate (7 cGy/min) and received total doses of 800, 1200, 1800, 2400, 3000, and 3400 cGy over 2-7 days. Rats treated at conventional-dose-rates over 23 days and at low-dose-rate over 2-7 days tolerated radiation with minimal toxicity. The level of immunosuppression was tested using allogeneic (Brown-Norway) skin graft survival. Control animals retained allogeneic skin grafts for a mean of 14 days (range 8-21 days). Conventional-dose-rate treated animals (3400 cGy in 23 days) kept their grafts 60 days (range 50-66 days) (p less than .001). Low-dose-rate treated rats (800 to 3400 cGy total dose over 2-7 days) also had prolongation of allogeneic graft survival times following TLI with a dose-response curve established. The graft survival time for the 3400 cGy low-dose-rate group (66 days, range 52-78 days) was not significantly different from the 3400 cGy conventional-dose-rate group (p less than 0.10). When the total dose given was equivalent, low-dose-rate TLI demonstrated an advantage of reduced overall treatment time compared to conventional-dose-rate TLI (7 days vs. 23 days) with no increase in toxicity

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Dose Tranexamic Acid versus Placebo to Reduce Red Blood Cell Transfusion During Complex Multilevel Spine Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabini, Louanne M; Moreland, Natalie C; Vealey, Ryan J; Bebawy, John F; Koski, Tyler R; Koht, Antoun; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Avram, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Multilevel spine fusion surgery for adult deformity correction is associated with significant blood loss and coagulopathy. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in high-risk surgery, but the efficacy of a low-dose regimen is unknown. Sixty-one patients undergoing multilevel complex spinal fusion with and without osteotomies were randomly assigned to receive low-dose tranexamic acid (10 mg/kg loading dose, then 1 mg·kg -1 ·hr -1 throughout surgery) or placebo. The primary outcome was the total volume of red blood cells transfused intraoperatively. Thirty-one patients received tranexamic acid, and 30 patients received placebo. Patient demographics, risk of major transfusion, preoperative hemoglobin, and surgical risk of the 2 groups were similar. There was a significant decrease in total volume of red blood cells transfused (placebo group median 1460 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 1140 mL; median difference 463 mL, 95% confidence interval 15 to 914 mL, P = 0.034), with a decrease in cell saver transfusion (placebo group median 490 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 256 mL; median difference 166 mL, 95% confidence interval 0 to 368 mL, P = 0.042). The decrease in packed red blood cell transfusion did not reach statistical significance (placebo group median 1050 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 600 mL; median difference 300 mL, 95% confidence interval 0 to 600 mL, P = 0.097). Our results support the use of low-dose tranexamic acid during complex multilevel spine fusion surgery to decrease total red blood cell transfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental study of low dose radiation stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan; Yang Shun; Zhang Ye; Zhang Mingzhi; Jiang Jiagui; Jiang Jianping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if low dose radiation can stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation in mice. Methods: Bone marrow cells were irradiated in vitro by different low dose radiation and then cultured in vitro. 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to measure the reproductive activity of cells, and then the radiation dose with the best stimulating effect was determined. The donator myeloid cells were exposed to low dose radiation before the recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation; then the irradiated myeloid cells were infused to the recipient; and lastly, the counts of peripheral blood cells (PBC) and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were monitored in order to observe the effect of low dose radiation on haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient animal after bone marrow transplantation. Results: The reproductive activity of the bone marrow cells irradiated by 6 and 8 cGy could be improved significantly in vitro. When the recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation of the myeloid cells after low dose radiation, the counts of BMMNC and PBC were higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Low dose radiation can stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation. (authors)

  17. Relationship to carcinogenesis of repetitive low-dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuyama, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We studied the carcinogenic effects caused by repetitive irradiation at a low dose, which has received attention in recent years, and examined the experimental methods used to evaluate radiation-induced carcinogenesis. For this experiment, we selected a mouse with as few autochthonous cancers as possible. Skin cancer was selected as the target for analysis, because it is a rare cancer in mice. Beta-rays were selected as the radiation source. The advantage of using beta-rays is weaker penetration power into tissues, thus protecting organs, such as the digestive and hematogenous organs. The benefit of our experimental method is that only skin cancer requires monitoring, and it is possible to perform long-term experiments. The back skin of mice was exposed repetitively to beta-rays three times a week until the occurrence of cancer or death, and the dose per exposure ranged from 0.5 to 11.8 Gy. With the high-dose range (2.5-11.8 Gy), the latency period and carcinogenic rate were almost the same in each experimental group. When the dose was reduced to 1-1.5 Gy, the latency period increased, but the carcinogenic rate remained. When the dose was further reduced to 0.5 Gy, skin cancer never happened, even though we continued irradiation until death of the last mouse in this group. The lifespan of 0.5 Gy group mice was the same as that of the controls. We showed that the 0.5 Gy dose did not cause cancer, even in mice exposed repetitively throughout their life span, and thus refer to 0.5 Gy as the threshold-like dose. (author)

  18. The effect of single low-dose dexamethasone on vomiting during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Morioka, Nobutada; Maruyama, Takashi; Komayama, Noriaki; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Kawamata, Takakazu; Ozaki, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative vomiting leads to serious respiratory complications that could influence the surgical decision-making process for awake craniotomy. However, the use of antiemetics is still limited in Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactically administered single low-dose dexamethasone on the incidence of vomiting during awake craniotomy. The frequency of hyperglycemia was also examined. We conducted a retrospective case review of awake craniotomy for glioma resection between 2012 and 2015. Of the 124 patients, 91 were included in the analysis. Dexamethasone was not used in 43 patients and the 48 remaining patients received an intravenous bolus of 4.95 mg dexamethasone at anesthetic induction. Because of stable operating conditions, no one required conscious sedation throughout functional mapping and tumor resection. Although dexamethasone pretreatment reduced the incidence of intraoperative vomiting (P = 0.027), the number of patients who complained of nausea was comparable (P = 0.969). No adverse events related to vomiting occurred intraoperatively. Baseline blood glucose concentration did not differ between each group (P = 0.143), but the samples withdrawn before emergence (P = 0.018), during the awake period (P awake craniotomy cases. However, as even a small dose of dexamethasone increases the risk for hyperglycemia, antiemetic prophylaxis with dexamethasone should be administered after careful consideration. Monitoring of perioperative blood glucose concentration is also necessary.

  19. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. Low Dose Vaporized Cannabis Significantly Improves Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling either medium dose (3.53%), low dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being VAS pain intensity. Psychoactive side-effects, and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the two active dose groups’ results (p>0.7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo vs. low dose, 2.9 for placebo vs. medium dose, and 25 for medium vs. low dose. As these NNT are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being, for all intents and purposes, as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1–2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. PMID:23237736

  1. Improvement of quantification of somatic radiation risks at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.; Paretzke, H.G.; Henrichs, K.; Hettig, H.; Jacob, P.; Merkle, W.; Messerer, P.; Schindel, F.

    1985-10-01

    In this research contract several selected topics of basic relevancy for assessment models of radiological consequences of hypothetical reactor accidents have been considered. The investigations focussed on the following areas: 1) Age dependent dose conversion factors for members of the public and their variability for radioisotopes of iodine, strontium, and caesium, - improvement of the accuracy of dose calculations for external gamma irradiation from cloud- and ground-shine; 2) analysis of data and models relevant for the assessment of exposure-time-effect relationships for lethal somatic late effects of lung and breast cancer and of leukemia; 3) analysis of various health status indices (e.g. ''loss of healthy life span'') with respect to their usefulness in addition to incidence, mortality, etc. for the evaluation of the magnitude of a health detriment due to a previous radiation exposure. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Application of low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT scans in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Song, Lei; Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qifeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yong; Peng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of using low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT examinations in children with congenital heart disease. Ninety patients with congenital heart disease were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each who underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac scans on a Discovery CT750 HD scanner. Group A received 270 mg I/mL iodixanol, and group B received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol contrast media and was scanned with prospective ECG triggering mode. Group C received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol and was scanned with conventional retrospective ECG gating mode. The same weight-based contrast injection protocol was used for all three groups. Images were reconstructed using a 30% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm and a 50% ASIR in groups A and B and a 30% ASIR in group C. The subjective and objective image quality evaluations, diagnostic accuracies, radiation doses and amounts of contrast media in the three groups were measured and compared. All images in the three groups met the diagnostic requirements, with the same diagnostic accuracy and image quality scores greater than 3 in a 4-point scoring system. However, ventricular enhancement and the objective noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality scores in group C were better than those in groups A and B (all Pcontrast dose (14% lower than that of groups B and C). Enhanced CT scan images with low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media can meet the diagnostic requirements for examining children with congenital heart disease while reducing the potential risk of radiation damage and contrast-induced nephropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. MELODI - Multidisciplinary European Low dose Initiative - First Draft of Strategic Research Agenda (SRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.; Lloyd, D.; O'Neill, P.

    2010-01-01

    The SRA Working Group of MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) was tasked to develop a long-term strategic research agenda (SRA) to guide the coherent integration of national low dose research programmes. Priorities that need to be addressed concern fundamental mechanistic research ranging from radiation track structure and the deposition of energy in biologically important molecules; the resultant homeostatic perturbations and the steps in the cellular and tissue metabolic pathways that eventually lead to disease pathologies. In fact, the main priorities are here the step-wise elucidation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced (oxidative) stress responses and their impact on radiation-induced cancers and non cancer diseases. To achieve this a holistic approach is proposed staring with radiation-specific effects, radiation-induced molecular, biological and pathological effects involving a systems biology approach as well as molecular epidemiology and mathematical modelling in order to come up with more solid low dose health risk assessments. The pathologies considered are outlined in the report where the need is stressed for the MELODI platform to involve a constellation of classical and emerging technologies in a highly multidisciplinary approach. Elucidating the shapes of low-dose response relationships and resolving the question of thresholds is paramount to resolving questions of risk for both populations and individuals. Much is known about radiation-induced cancer in humans and animal models but this needs to be pursued particularly at low doses. More recently, the scientific community has realised that low radiation-induced health effects range well beyond cancer. The priority non-cancer areas that need to be brought into focus are cardiovascular, neurological and ophthalmic. (A.C.)

  4. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar, E-mail: s.ganapathy@neu.edu [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Li, Ping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Fagman, Johan [The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Zhang, Guojun [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Chen, Changyan [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  5. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-01-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  6. Regulatory aspects of low doses control in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollani, K.; Kushe, R.

    1997-01-01

    In the present paper are described the status of regulatory aspects of low doses control as well as the existing procedures for their implementation in Albania. According to new Radiological Protection Act, approved by Parliament in 1995, the establishment of the infrastructures in radiation protection area is in course, accompanied by the installation and functioning of new equipment for low dose control. Based in many years experience it is concluded that personal doses of the workers added by practices in Albania are 1/10 of dose Emits. Some particular cases of overexposured workers were investigated. Last times the elements of the optimisation procedures (QA and QC) are outlined in the frame of improving regulatory aspects of low doses control. (author)

  7. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  8. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Benzheng; Ma Shumei; Yi Heqing; Kong Dejuan; Zhao Guangtong; Gao Lin; Liu Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  9. Low-dose vaporized cannabis significantly improves neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling medium-dose (3.53%), low-dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being visual analog scale pain intensity. Psychoactive side effects and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed-effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the 2 active dose groups' results (P > .7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo versus low-dose, 2.9 for placebo versus medium-dose, and 25 for medium- versus low-dose. As these NNTs are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1 to 2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. The analgesia obtained from a low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (1.29%) in patients, most of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite conventional treatments, is a clinically significant outcome. In general, the effect sizes on cognitive testing were consistent with this minimal dose. As a result, one might not anticipate a significant impact on daily functioning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Some remarks on the significance of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.A.

    1989-12-01

    The criteria of the present system of individual dose limitation are considered as well as the evolution of the limiting values. The assumption of the linearity of the dose-effect relationship without any threshold is probably the best approach to adopt for recommendations in radiation protection and for accounting the doses acquired by exposure to ionizing radiation. On the other hand the present evaluation of the natural background could imply a different dose-effect relationship in the low doses region and perhaps the existence of a threshold. Therefore the extrapolations which are usually made after exposures of different groups of people to low doses cannot be considered as scientifically sound. (author)

  11. Evaluating low dose ionizing radiation effects on gene expression in human skin biopsy cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Z.; Schwietert, C.; Stern, R.L.; Lehnert, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    Significant biological effects can occur in animals, animal cells, immortalized human cell lines, and primary human cells after exposure to doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in the <1-10 cGy region. However it is unclear how these observations mimic or even pertain to the actual in vivo condition in humans, though such knowledge is required for reducing the uncertainty of assessing human risks due to low dose IR (LDIR) exposures. Further, low dose effects have increasing clinical relevance in the radiotherapeutic management of cancer as the volume of tissue receiving only LDIR increases as more targeted radiotherapy (i.e. IMRT) becomes more widely used. Thus, human translational data must be obtained with which to correlate in vitro experimental findings and evaluate their 'real-life' applicability. To evaluate LDIR effects in human tissue we have obtained freshly explanted full thickness human skin samples obtained from aesthetic surgery, and subjected them to ex vivo irradiation as a translational research model system of a complex human tissue. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposures were delivered at 1, 10, or 100 cGy. The temporal response to IR was assessed by harvesting RNA at multiple time points out to 24 hours post IR. Gene expression changes were assessed by real time PCR. We have shown that RNA can be reliably extracted with fidelity from 3 mm diameter punch biopsies of human tissue and provide good quality sample for the real time PCR evaluation. Genes of interest include those reported to have altered expression following LDIR from in vitro cell culture models. These include genes associated with cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and various cytokines. These feasibility studies in human skin irradiated ex vivo, have demonstrated that gene expression can be measured accurately from very small human tissue samples, thus setting the stage for biopsy acquisition of tissue irradiated in vivo from patients-volunteers. The clinical study has begun and the data from

  12. Health effects of low-dose radiation: Molecular, cellular, and biosystem response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollycove, M.; Paperiello, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Since the fifties, the prime concern of radiation protection has been protecting DNA from damage. UNSCEAR initiated a focus on biosystem response to damage with its 1994 report, ''Adaptive Responses to Radiation of Cells and Organisms''. The DNA damage-control biosystem is physiologically operative on both metabolic and radiation induced damage, both effected predominantly by free radicals. These adaptive responses are suppressed by high-dose and stimulated by low dose radiation. Increased biosystem efficiently reduces the number of mutations that accumulate during a lifetime and decrease DNA damage-control with resultant aging and malignancy. Several statistically significant epidemiologic studies have shown risk decrements of cancer mortality and mortality from all causes in populations exposed to low-dose radiation. Further biologic and epidemiologic research is needed to establish a valid threshold below which risk decrements occur. (author)

  13. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked – the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that “stress” can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called “non-targeted” mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the “health” of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed

  14. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  15. Use of combined paracetamol and low dose ketamine in pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of Paracetamol and low dose Ketamine in controlling burn pain during dressings. Setting: The burns ward of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, a 750 bed capacity tertiary centre in Western Kenya. Subjects: Consenting patients were recruited to the study on admission. Babies and ...

  16. Biological effects of very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with a qualitative microdosimetric analysis of a new radiobiological phenomenon (physiological reaction of the cell as a whole to very low doses of ionizing radiations). The analysis is aimed at identifying the type of the primary interaction of radiation with the cell and finding its place in the cell

  17. Advance of study on hormesis of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    There have been growing interests in recent years over the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on human. The paper gives a brief review on the LDR studies, which include LDR-induced hormesis and adaptive response, LDR experiments in vivo or in vitro and epidemiologic investigation, and clinical applications of LDR as well

  18. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  19. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  20. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-03-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented.

  1. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented

  2. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  3. Health hazards of low doses of ionizing radiations. Vo. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation results in clinical manifestations of several disease entities that may be fatal. The onset and severity of these acute radiation syndromes are deterministic in relation to dose magnitude. Exposure to ionizing radiations at low doses and low dose rates could initiate certain damage in critical molecules of the cell, that may develop in time into serious health effects. The incidence of such delayed effects in low, and is only detectable through sophisticated epidemiological models carried out on large populations. The radiation damage induced in critical molecules of cells may develop by stochastic biochemical mechanisms of repair, residual damage, adaptive response, cellular transformation, promotion and progression into delayed health effects, the most important of which is carcinogenesis. The dose response relationship of probabilistic stochastic delayed effects of radiation at low doses and low dose rates, is very complex indeed. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms, the factors involved, and the uncertainties encountered. Contrary to acute deterministic effects, the occurrence of probabilistic delayed effects of radiation remains to be enigmatic. 7 figs

  4. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Nomura, T.; Kojima, S.

    2000-01-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted α-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O 2 - to H 2 O 2 , the question as to whether the resultant H 2 O 2 is further detoxicated into H 2 O and O 2 or not must still be evaluated. Hence, we studied

  5. Low-dose radiation epidemiological studies: an assessment of methodological problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modan, B.

    1991-01-01

    The present report attempts to assess the problems inherent in the analysis of low dose radiation studies, with emphasis on possible sources of methodological errors in the published data, and the consequent relevance to risk estimates. The published data examined concerned populations exposed to nuclear sources such as fallout, weapons' test or in the vicinity of nuclear reactors, occupational exposure, intra-uterine diagnostic X-rays, scattered radiation following X-ray therapy and background irradiation. (UK)

  6. Chronic low dose radiation exposure and oxidative stress in radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.S.; Bhatt, M.B.; Kulkarni, MM.; Rajan, R.; Singh, B.B.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. In this study free radical stress due to low dose chronic radiation exposures of radiation workers was examined as a possible atherogenic risk factor. Data on lipid profiles, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione content in blood indicated an absence of correlation with radiation doses up to 125 mSv. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  7. The biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on adaptive possibilities of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulbuc, G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of adaptive possibilities and cancer risk in animals exposed at low doses of ionizing radiation was the object of the present work. The action of immunostimulating treatment on these processes was studied as well. In previously irradiated animals the diminution of adaptive possibilities and of the antitumoral resistance of the organism was observed. The stimulating action of Bufostimulin on these processes in irradiated animals was less pronounced than in unirradiated ones. (author)

  8. Low dose coronary CT angiography with 256-slice helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaodong; Tang Binghang; Li Fangyun

    2011-01-01

    of 573) in B, 96.1% (548 of 570) in C, and 85.7% (505/589) in D, with no significant difference for A vs C (Z= -1.351, P>0.05) and with significant differences for B vs D (Z=-2.236, P<0.05). Linear correlation analysis indicated a significant degradation of image quality with the increase of heart rate using SAS mode (Spearman correlation, r=0.577, P<0.01). ROC analysis established an upper HR threshold of 78 bpm for obtaining diagnostic image quality using SAS mode (AUC = 0.827, P<0.05). The average radiation dose in group A [(2.6±0.5) mSv] reduced 75% comparing with that in group C [(10.6±2.3) mSv], and the average radiation dose in group B [(4.0±0.7) mSv] reduced 69% comparing with that in group D [(13.0±1.4) mSv]. Conclusion: Using SAS mode to perform low-dose CCTA with 256-slice helical CT could keep the image quality and reduce radiation dose significantly. Our preliminary experience suggests a good promise of this technique which could be applied to a wider group of patients such as with higher heart rates. (authors)

  9. Smoking habits in the randomised Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial with low-dose CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Saghir, Zaigham; Dirksen, Asger

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present the final results of the effect of lung cancer screening with low-dose CT on the smoking habits of participants in a 5-year screening trial. METHODS: The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST) was a 5-year screening trial that enrolled 4104 subjects; 2052 were randomised...... to annual low-dose CT (CT group) and 2052 received no intervention (control group). Participants were current and ex-smokers (≥4 weeks abstinence from smoking) with a tobacco consumption of ≥20 pack years. Smoking habits were determined annually. Missing values for smoking status at the final screening...... round were handled using two different models. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in annual smoking status between the CT group and control group. Overall the ex-smoker rates (CT + control group) significantly increased from 24% (baseline) to 37% at year 5 of screening (p

  10. Inhibition of alloxan diabetes by low dose {gamma}-irradiation before alloxan administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Takehara, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Tamotsu; Utsumi, Kozo

    1994-10-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of whole body {sup 60}Co-{gamma} irradiation at a single low dose on alloxan-induced hyperglycemia in rats. (1) In rats that received alloxan, SOD activity in pancreas significantly decreased, but the decrease was inhibited by irradiation at a dose of 0.5 Gy. (2) Similarly, plasma peroxide, pancreatic peroxide, and blood glucose increased. However, the increase in pancreatic peroxide was inhibited by irradiation at a dose of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy and the increase in blood glucose by irradiation at 0.5 Gy. (3) After alloxan administration, degranulation was observed in cells, but this was inhibited by irradiation at 0.5 Gy. These results suggest that alloxan diabetes was inhibited by the increase of SOD activity in pancreas after low dose irradiation at 0.5 Gy. (author).

  11. Inhibition of alloxan diabetes by low dose γ-irradiation before alloxan administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Takehara, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Tamotsu; Utsumi, Kozo.

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of whole body 60 Co-γ irradiation at a single low dose on alloxan-induced hyperglycemia in rats. (1) In rats that received alloxan, SOD activity in pancreas significantly decreased, but the decrease was inhibited by irradiation at a dose of 0.5 Gy. (2) Similarly, plasma peroxide, pancreatic peroxide, and blood glucose increased. However, the increase in pancreatic peroxide was inhibited by irradiation at a dose of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy and the increase in blood glucose by irradiation at 0.5 Gy. (3) After alloxan administration, degranulation was observed in cells, but this was inhibited by irradiation at 0.5 Gy. These results suggest that alloxan diabetes was inhibited by the increase of SOD activity in pancreas after low dose irradiation at 0.5 Gy. (author)

  12. RISC-RAD. A European integrated approach to the problem of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, A.; Sabatier, L.; Atkinson, M.; Paretzke, H.; Bouffler, S.; Mullenders, L.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Funded by the European Commission in the framework of a dedicated programme supporting research in the Nuclear sector (FP6 Euratom), the project RISC-RAD undertakes experimental and modelling studies ultimately to improve low dose radiation cancer risk assessment by exploring and providing evidence for the most appropriate radiation cancer risk projection and interpolation models. It started on 1st January 2004 and is running until 31 st October 2008. It mobilizes a consortium of 31 partners and is coordinated by Dr. Laure Sabatier from the French atomic energy commission. Indeed the project represents an unprecedented attempt to integrate horizontally the research on the effects of low doses of IR at the European level. A multipartner project supporting objective-driven research, RISC-RAD aims at contributing to bridge the remaining gap of scientific knowledge about effects of lows doses of ionizing radiation. It spans a large part of the research spectrum, including many topics addressed during the LOWRAD2007 conference. This presentation intends to give an account of the integrative aspects of the project, insights on the innovative solutions found to approach a complex and controversial scientific topic like the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, and links with some areas of social studies on science.The concept of 'integration' implies the development of a new kind of activity in the research field, which crosses its traditional boundaries : controversies of several kinds must temporarily be overcome within the project management board in order to define and follow a common strategy. Among them, how to reconcile the creative part of fundamental research with the compliance to strict project planning rules has come up as a debate which questions the best way a significant collective and coordinated action can address the issue of the low dose cancer risk assessment on the long term. The knowledge and

  13. Personal dosimetry statistics and specifics of low dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, R.E.; Gómez Salinas, R.A.; Oyarzún Cortés, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    The dose statistics of a personal dosimetry service, considering 35,000+ readings, display a sharp peak at low dose (below 0.5 mSv) with skewness to higher values. A measure of the dispersion is that approximately 65% of the doses fall below the average plus 2 standard deviations, an observation which may prove helpful to radiation protection agencies. Categorizing the doses by the concomitant use of a finger ring dosimeter, that skewness is larger in the whole body, and ring dosimeters. The use of Harshaw 5500 readers at high gain leads to frequent values of the glow curve that are judged to be spurious, i.e. values not belonging to the roughly normal noise over the curve. A statistical criterion is shown for identifying those anomalous values, and replacing them with the local behavior, as fit by a cubic polynomial. As a result, the doses above 0.05 mSv which are affected by more than 2% comprise over 10% of the data base. The low dose peak of the statistics, above, has focused our attention on the evaluation of LiF(Mg,Ti) dosimeters exposed at low dose, and read with Harshaw 5500 readers. The standard linear procedure, via an overall reader calibration factor, is observed to fail at low dose, in detailed calibrations from 0.02 mSv to 1 Sv. A significant improvement is achieved by a piecewise polynomials calibration curve. A cubic, at low dose is matched, at ∼10 mSv, in value and first derivative, to a linear dependence at higher doses. This improvement is particularly noticeable below 2 mSv, where over 60% of the evaluated dosimeters are found. (author)

  14. Lyssavirus infection: 'low dose, multiple exposure' in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Ashley C; Healy, Derek M; Brookes, Sharon M; Voller, Katja; Hicks, Daniel J; Núñez, Alejandro; Fooks, Anthony R

    2014-03-06

    The European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV-1 and EBLV-2) are zoonotic pathogens present within bat populations across Europe. The maintenance and transmission of lyssaviruses within bat colonies is poorly understood. Cases of repeated isolation of lyssaviruses from bat roosts have raised questions regarding the maintenance and intraspecies transmissibility of these viruses within colonies. Furthermore, the significance of seropositive bats in colonies remains unclear. Due to the protected nature of European bat species, and hence restrictions to working with the natural host for lyssaviruses, this study analysed the outcome following repeat inoculation of low doses of lyssaviruses in a murine model. A standardized dose of virus, EBLV-1, EBLV-2 or a 'street strain' of rabies (RABV), was administered via a peripheral route to attempt to mimic what is hypothesized as natural infection. Each mouse (n=10/virus/group/dilution) received four inoculations, two doses in each footpad over a period of four months, alternating footpad with each inoculation. Mice were tail bled between inoculations to evaluate antibody responses to infection. Mice succumbed to infection after each inoculation with 26.6% of mice developing clinical disease following the initial exposure across all dilutions (RABV, 32.5% (n=13/40); EBLV-1, 35% (n=13/40); EBLV-2, 12.5% (n=5/40)). Interestingly, the lowest dose caused clinical disease in some mice upon first exposure ((RABV, 20% (n=2/10) after first inoculation; RABV, 12.5% (n=1/8) after second inoculation; EBLV-2, 10% (n=1/10) after primary inoculation). Furthermore, five mice developed clinical disease following the second exposure to live virus (RABV, n=1; EBLV-1, n=1; EBLV-2, n=3) although histopathological examination indicated that the primary inoculation was the most probably cause of death due to levels of inflammation and virus antigen distribution observed. All the remaining mice (RABV, n=26; EBLV-1, n=26; EBLV-2, n=29) survived the tertiary and

  15. Ultra-low dose of intravitreal bevacizumab in retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, A; Gürsel-Özkurt, Z; Şahin, M; Türkcü, F M; Yıldırım, A; Yüksel, H

    2018-05-01

    We aimed to investigate the effectivity of the 0.0625 mg dose of bevacizumab in patients with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and compare the results with 0.625 mg dose of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) injection. The medical records of the patients with type 1 ROP who received IVB monotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. The patients were classified into two groups with respect to received dose of bevacizumab as follows: group F (n = 46) (full dose of bevacizumab-0.625 mg/0.025 ml) and group L (n = 45) (low dose (one tenth) of bevacizumab-0.0625 mg/0.025 ml). Both treatment dose regimens have similar outcomes. Moreover, the mean retinal vascularization time seemed to be significantly higher in group F compared to group L, 168 ± 65 and 97 ± 29 days, respectively (p < 0.001). Disappearance of plus sign is observed earlier in group F (2.45 ± 1.7 vs 3.66 ± 2.46 days, respectively, p = 0.03). The low dose (0.0625 mg) of IVB treatment was effective as full (0.625 mg) dose in ROP treatment. Moreover, our results showed that low-dose treatment might provide faster retinal vascularization than the regular used dose. On the other hand, disappearance of the plus sign takes longer time in patients treated with low dose compared to eyes treated with full dose of IVB that should be taken into account.

  16. What happens at very low levels of radiation exposure ? Are the low dose exposures beneficial ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Dalji

    2006-01-01

    . This adaptive response seems to be the manifestation of a protective effect that may reduce risk at very low doses. Current knowledge in molecular biology shows no evidence of a threshold effect for Stochastic Effects. Therefore, any level of radiation may be considered to cause them. Conversely, some studies show that low levels of irradiation are in fact beneficial to the health (Radiation Hormesis). However, in the absence of clear scientific evidence, the regulators adopted a conservative approach and consider all levels of radiation as being potentially damaging to the human body (LNT theory). According to LNT theory; the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation can be estimated by linear extrapolation from effects observed by linear extrapolation from effects observed by high doses. There is not any safe dose because even very low doses of ionizing radiation produce some biological effect. The results of many investigations do not support the LNT theory. Furthermore relationship between environmental radon concentrations and lung cancer even contradict this theory and clearly suggest a hermetic effect -radiation hormesis-. Although data are still incomplete, extensive epidemiological studies have indicated that radiation hormesis is really exist. In this review, contradictory evidence Linear No-Threshold Theory and Radiation Hormesis Effect is discussed

  17. A role for very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII in refractory bleeding after cardiac surgery: Lessons from an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Till; Assmann, Alexander; Dierksen, Angelika; Roussel, Elisabeth; Ullrich, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Artur; Albert, Alexander; Sixt, Stephan

    2018-04-18

    Although off-label use of recombinant activated factor VII against refractory bleeding is incorporated in current guideline recommendations, safety concerns persist predominantly with respect to thromboembolic complications. We analyzed the safety and efficacy of recombinant activated factor VII at a very low dose in cardiosurgical patients with refractory bleeding. This prospective study includes 1180 cardiosurgical patients at risk of bleeding. Goal-directed substitution was based on real-time laboratory testing and clinical scoring of the bleeding intensity. All patients who fulfilled the criteria for enhanced risk of bleeding (n = 281) were consequently included in the present analysis. Patients in whom refractory bleeding developed despite substitution with specific hemostatic compounds (n = 167) received a single shot of very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII (≤20 μg/kg). Mortality and risk of thromboembolic complications, and freedom from stroke and acute myocardial infarction in particular, were analyzed (vs patients without recombinant activated factor VII) by multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses, as well as Kaplan-Meier estimates. There was no increase in rates of mortality (30-day mortality 4.2% vs 7.0% with P = .418; follow-up survival 85.6% at 13.0 [interquartile range, 8.4-15.7] months vs 80.7% at 10.2 [interquartile range, 7.2-16.1] months with P = .151), thromboembolic complications (6.6% vs 9.6% with P = .637), renal insufficiency, need for percutaneous coronary intervention, duration of ventilation, duration of hospital stay, or rehospitalization in patients receiving very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII compared with patients not receiving recombinant activated factor VII. Complete hemostasis without any need for further hemostatic treatment was achieved after very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII administration in the majority of patients (up to 88.6% vs 0% with P factor VII treatment of

  18. Gender-Specific Differences in Low-Dose Haloperidol Response for Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Register-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettner, Florian; Janitza, Silke; Prüll, Kathrin; Weninger, Ernst; Mansmann, Ulrich; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Jovanovic, Alexander; Pollwein, Bernhard; Chappell, Daniel; Zwissler, Bernhard; von Dossow, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of the most common and distressing complications after general anesthesia and surgery, with young non-smoking females receiving postoperative opioids being high-risk patients. This register-based study aims to evaluate the effect of low-dose haloperidol (0.5 mg intravenously) directly after induction of general anesthesia to reduce the incidence of PONV in the postoperative anesthesiological care unit (PACU). Multivariable regression models were used to investigate the association between low-dose haloperidol and the occurrence of PONV using a patient registry containing 2,617 surgical procedures carried out at an university hospital. Haloperidol 0.5 mg is associated with a reduced risk of PONV in the total collective (adjusted odds ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: [0.56, 0.99], p = 0.05). The results indicate that there is a reduced risk in male patients (adjusted odds ratio = 0.45, 95% confidence interval: [0.28, 0.73], p = 0.001) if a dose of 0.5 mg haloperidol was administered while there seems to be no effect in females (adjusted odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval: [0.71, 1.46], p = 0.93). Currently known risk factors for PONV such as female gender, duration of anesthesia and the use of opioids were confirmed in our analysis. This study suggests that low-dose haloperidol has an antiemetic effect in male patients but has no effect in female patients. A confirmation of the gender-specific effects we have observed in this register-based cohort study might have major implications on clinical daily routine.

  19. Comparison of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetics on low dose aspirin and not on low dose aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetes patients who are taking low dose aspirin with those patients who are not taking low dose aspirin. Study design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: This study was carried out at Military Hospital Rawalpindi for a period of two years (June 2006-May 2008). Patients and Methods: Sixty diabetic patients were selected who were taking low dose aspirin comparing group A and sixty diabetic patients who were not taking aspirin were placed in group B. These patients were selected from the OPD through non probability convenience sampling. All these patients were being followed up in medical outpatient quite regularly on fort-nightly basis. Data had been collected through a carefully designed questionnaire. Results: In group A, 90% of the patients had uric acid less than 445 micro mol/l and 10% of the patients had uric acid more than 445micro mol/l. Whereas in group B 100% of the patients had uric acid less than 445umol/l, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Aspirin in low doses cause hyperuricemia and regular monitoring of uric acid is mandatory to prevent its adverse effects. (author)

  20. Evaluation of a combination of low-dose ketamine and low-dose midazolam in terminal dyspnea-attenuation of "double-effect"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Kanti Dam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Of all symptoms in palliative medicine those concerning respiration are most excruciating and difficult to treat. Reticence about the use of morphine for palliation of dyspnea is common, especially in nonmalignant diseases, as there is a fear of causing respiratory depression, particularly where Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD exists. This factor is also compounded by the lack of availability of morphine in parts of developing countries. Ketamine has excellent anesthetic and analgesic effects in addition to being easily available. It produces bronchodilatation and does not produce respiratory or cardiovascular depression. The author seeks to evaluate the role of low-dose (0.2 mg/kg ketamine and midazolam (0.02 mg/kg in the attenuation of terminal dyspnea. Methods: Sixteen patients with terminal dyspnea, admitted to the Critical Care Unit (CCU with cancer and other noncancer diagnoses were recruited. The subjective component of dyspnea was assessed using the Graphic Rating Scale (GRS, which has values from 0 - 10, 10 being maximum dyspnea. Each patient received a low-dose of ketamine and midazolam for relief of dyspnea. All the patients received low-flow (2 L/min. oxygen therapy via nasal cannula. Immediately after admission, all the patients were reassured and nursed in a decubitus position of their choice. The GRS was recorded at the point of admission, 10 minutes after starting oxygen therapy, and ten minutes after administration of low-dose ketamine and midazolam. Hemodynamic parameters were also recorded at these three points. Result: All the patients who enrolled in our study had significant dyspnea at admission, as was evident from the GRS scores of 8.250 (SD 0.91, respiratory rate of 28.56 (SD 5.0, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP of 102.7 (SD 14.63, pulse rate of 115.62 (SD 23.3, and SpO2 of 92.43 (SD 2.38. All the patients benefited from the combination of ketamine and midazolam, as evidenced by the statistically

  1. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Akira; Kawai, Yuichi; Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  2. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Akira, E-mail: onodera@pharm.kobegakuin.ac.jp [Department of Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobegakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Kawai, Yuichi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobegakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio [Department of Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  3. Pharmacokinetic properties and tolerability of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Paul J; Olugemo, Kemi; Solorio, Daniel; Young, Clarence L

    2015-02-01

    This study compared the pharmacokinetic properties and safety profile of low-dose (18- and 35-mg) diclofenac capsules manufactured using SoluMatrix Fine Particle Technology (Trademark of iCeutica Inc. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), and the technology is licensed to Iroko Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) for exclusive use in NSAIDs), which produces submicron-sized drug particles with enhanced dissolution properties, to those of diclofenac potassium immediate-release (IR) 50-mg tablets. This Phase 1, single-center, randomized, open-label, single-dose crossover study was conducted in 40 healthy volunteers. Subjects received, in randomized order, SoluMatrix diclofenac 18- or 35-mg capsules in the fasting condition, SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules under fed conditions, and diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting and fed conditions. Pharmacokinetic parameters (T(max), C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞)) were calculated from the concentrations of diclofenac in the plasma. Absorption, food effect, and dose proportionality were determined using a mixed-model ANOVA for C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞). Tolerability was assessed by recording adverse events, physical examination findings, vital sign measurements: clinical laboratory test results. Overall, 35 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 52 years completed the study. The mean age of the subjects was 33.4 years, and approximately half were men (47.5%). Median T(max) values were similar between the low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules and the diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets (both, ~1.0 hour). The mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) after the administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was 26% lower than that with diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting conditions (868.72 vs 1194.21 ng/mL). The administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was associated with a 23% lower overall systemic exposure compared with that of diclofenac

  4. Addition of low-dose ketamine to midazolam and low-dose bupivacaine improves hemodynamics and postoperative analgesia during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Sobhy Basuni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Intrathecal low-dose ketamine combined with midazolam and low-dose bupivacaine stabilizes hemodynamics and prolongs postoperative analgesia without significant side-effects in parturients undergoing CS.

  5. Quantitative determination of circulating endothelial cells in persons with low dose radioactivity exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Massarani, Gh.; Najjar, F.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk of occupational exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on the endothelium detachment through the quantification of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) in the peripheral blood of 63 workers in the Atomic Energy Commission in Syria (AECS) using a Magnetic Immuno-separation technique (IMS) and compare the results with 28 healthy (controls) is not exposed during their careers for any type of ionizing radiation. Our study showed for the first time the significantly increasing in the circulating endothelial cells count (P <0.0001) when employees are exposed to low doses of radiation less than 50 mSv. This result with previous studies about the late effects of radiation, assuming the existence of impact late radiation exposure on the cohesion of the endothelium, despite the lack of correlation with radiation dose measured during the past four years of work in AECS (between 2006-2010). This is due to several reasons, including the small sample size and lack of commitment by some workers develop individual control films during some periods of their work. The prospective studies for such workers can allow us to know if the rise in the number of CEC will be considered an early indicator for the risk of a cardiovascular disease when workers exposed to low-doses of ionizing radiation( tens of millisievert) that up to date are considered harmless (author).

  6. Focal low-dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Y Tong, Gilad Cohen, Yoshiya Yamada Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Whole-gland low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy has been a well-established modality of treating low-risk prostate cancer. Treatment in a focal manner has the advantages of reduced toxicity to surrounding organs. Focal treatment using LDR brachytherapy has been relatively unexplored, but it may offer advantages over other modalities that have established experiences with a focal approach. This is particularly true as prostate cancer is being detected at an earlier and more localized stage with the advent of better detection methods and newer imaging modalities. Keywords: prostate cancer, focal, low dose rate, brachytherapy

  7. Effect of Hashimoto thyroiditis on low-dose radioactive-iodine remnant ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyungju; Choi, June Young; Moon, Jae Hoon; Park, Hyo Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Kyu Eun

    2016-04-01

    Radioactive-iodine remnant ablation is an integral part of the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) treatment. Although a minimum dose is usually recommended, there is controversy as to whether the low-dose (1100 MBq) radioactive-iodine remnant ablation is adequate for selected patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 691 patients. Patients with no remnant thyroid on the follow-up whole body scan and low stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) level (Hashimoto thyroiditis based on histopathology diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.23; p Hashimoto thyroiditis and elevated sTg are negative predictive factors for successful low-dose radioactive-iodine remnant ablation treatment. An appropriate risk-adjusted approach may improve the efficacy of radioactive-iodine remnant ablation treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E730-E735, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  9. Repair and dose-response at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totter, J.R.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-04-01

    The DNA of each individual is subject to formation of some 2-4 x 10 14 ion pairs during the first 30 years of life from background radiation. If a single hit is sufficient to cause cancer, as is implicit in the linear, no-threshold theories, it is unclear why all individuals do not succumb to cancer, unless repair mechanisms operate to remove the damage. We describe a simple model in which the exposed population displays a distribution of repair thresholds. The dose-response at low dose is shown to depend on the shape of the threshold distribution at low thresholds. If the probability of zero threshold is zero, the response at low dose is quadratic. The model is used to resolve a longstanding discrepancy between observed incidence of leukemia at Nagasaki and the predictions of the usual linear hypothesis

  10. Response of human fibroblasts to low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritschilo, A.; Brennan, T.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Cells from 11 human strains, including fibroblasts from patients with the genetic diseases of ataxia telangiectasia (AT), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Fanconi's anemia (FA), were exposed to γ radiation at high (1.6-2.2 Gy/min) and at low (0.03-0.07 Gy/min) dose rates. Survival curves reveal an increase inthe terminal slope (D 0 ) when cells are irradiated at low dose rates compared to high dose rates. This was true for all cell lines tested, although the AT, FA, and XP cells are reported or postulated to have radiation repair deficiencies. From the response of these cells, it is apparent that radiation sensitivities differ; however, at low dose rate, all tested human cells are able to repair injury

  11. Low dose CT in early lung cancer diagnosis: prevalence data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinale, Luciano; Cortese, Giancarlo; Ferraris, Fabrizio; Perotto, Fabio; Fava, Cesare; Borasio, Piero; Dogliotti, Luigi; Novello, Silvia; Scagliotti, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. Lung cancer has a high mortality rate and its prognosis largely depends on early detection. We report the prevalence data of the study on early detection of lung cancer with low-dose spiral CT underway at our hospital. Materials and methods. Since the beginning of 2001, 519 asymptomatic volunteers have undergone annual blood tests, sputum tests, urinalyses and low-dose spiral CT. The inclusion criteria were age (55 years old), a history of cigarette smoking and a negative history for previous neoplastic disease. The diagnostic workup varied depending on the size and CT features of the nodules detected. Results. At baseline, the CT scan detected nodules> 5 mm in 22% of subjects; the nodules were single in 42 and multiple in 71. In 53% of cases the findings were completely negative, while in 122 (23.4%) nodules with a diameter [it

  12. Gamma regularization based reconstruction for low dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Bicao; Liu, Jin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the radiation in computerized tomography is today a major concern in radiology. Low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) offers a sound way to deal with this problem. However, more severe noise in the reconstructed CT images is observed under low dose scan protocols (e.g. lowered tube current or voltage values). In this paper we propose a Gamma regularization based algorithm for LDCT image reconstruction. This solution is flexible and provides a good balance between the regularizations based on l 0 -norm and l 1 -norm. We evaluate the proposed approach using the projection data from simulated phantoms and scanned Catphan phantoms. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the Gamma regularization based reconstruction can perform better in both edge-preserving and noise suppression when compared with other norms. (paper)

  13. Low-dose effects hypothesis and observations on NPP personal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, R.; Acheva, A.; Boteva, R.; Chobanova, N.; Djounova, J.; Gyuleva, I.; Ivanova, K.; Kurchatova, G.; Milchev, A.; Negoicheva, K.; Nikolov, V.; Panova, D.; Pejankov, I.; Rupova, I.; Stankova, K.; Zacharieva, E. [Radiobiology Department, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    In the modern world the use of various sources of ionizing radiation is nearly ubiquitous. They have numerous applications in industry, medicine, science, agriculture, etc. Radiation doses to workers nevertheless are commensurable to the natural background exposure. Published data on the health effects of occupational radiation exposure are often contradictory. Addressing the issue of „negative” (bystander effects, genomic instability) and „positive” (adaptive response, radiation hormesis) effects of low doses is important and has a significant social and economic impact. In this paper we summarize the results of our extensive monitoring of nuclear power plant (NPP) staff. We believe it is a cohort suitable for analysis of health effects at low doses, because of their good medical and dosimetric control. Our results rather support the idea of absence of adverse health effects in NPP workers. (author)

  14. Cystoid Macular Edema Induced by Low Doses of Nicotinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Domanico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystoid macular edema (CME is a condition that involves the macula, causing painless vision loss. In this paper, we report a case of niacin-induced bilateral cystoid macular edema (CME in a middle-age woman taking low dose of niacin (18 mg of nicotinic acid. Optical coherence tomography (OCT showed retinal thickening and cystoid spaces in both eyes, whereas fluorescein angiography (FA; HRA 2, Heidelberg Engineering revealed the absence of fluorescein leakage also in later phases. Four weeks after discontinuation of therapy there were a complete disappearance of macular edema at funduscopic examination and an improvement of visual acuity in both eyes. Furthermore OCT showed a normal retinal profile in both eyes. In our opinion considering the wide availability of niacin, medical monitoring and periodical examination should be considered during niacin administration. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that described the very low-dose niacin-induced bilateral niacin maculopathy.

  15. Parkinson’s Disease: Low-Dose Haloperidol Increases Dopamine Receptor Sensitivity and Clinical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig J. Hudson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is known that ultra-low doses of haloperidol can cause dopamine supersensitivity of dopamine D2 receptors and related behaviour in animals. Objective. The objective was to determine whether a daily ultra-low dose of 40 micrograms of haloperidol could enhance the clinical action of levodopa in Parkinson’s disease patients. Method. While continuing their daily treatment with levodopa, 16 patients with Parkinson’s disease were followed weekly for six weeks. They received an add-on daily dose of 40 micrograms of haloperidol for the first two weeks only. The SPES/SCOPA scale (short scale for assessment of motor impairments and disabilities in Parkinson’s disease was administered before treatment and weekly throughout the trial. Results. The results showed a mean decrease in SPES/SCOPA scores after one week of the add-on treatment. Conclusion. SCOPA scores decreased after the addition of low-dose haloperidol to the standard daily levodopa dose. This finding is consistent with an increase in sensitivity of dopamine D2 receptors induced by haloperidol. Such treatment for Parkinson’s disease may possibly permit the levodopa dose to be reduced and, thus, delay the onset of levodopa side effects.

  16. Thyroid neoplasia following low-dose radiation in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.; Alfandary, E.; Stovall, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The thyroid gland is highly sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation. Previously, we reported a significant increase of thyroid cancer and adenomas among 10,834 persons in Israel who received radiotherapy to the scalp for ringworm. These findings have now been extended with further follow-up and revised dosimetry. Overall, 98 thyroid tumors were identified among the exposed and 57 among 10,834 nonexposed matched population and 5392 sibling comparison subjects. An estimated thyroid dose of 9 cGy was linked to a fourfold (95% Cl = 2.3-7.9) increase of malignant tumors and a twofold (95% Cl = 1.3-3.0) increase of benign tumors. The dose-response relationship was consistent with linearity. Age was an important modifier of risk with those exposed under 5 years being significantly more prone to develop thyroid tumors than older children. The pattern of radiation risk over time could be described on the basis of a constant multiplication of the background rate, and an absolute risk model was not compatible with the observed data. Overall, the excess relative risk per cGy for thyroid cancer development after childhood exposure is estimated as 0.3, and the absolute excess risk as 13 per 10(6) PY-cGy. For benign tumors the estimated excess relative risk was 0.1 per cGy and the absolute risk was 15 per 10(6) PY-cGy

  17. Low-dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantak, S.S.; Onoda, J.M.; Diglio, C.A.; Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI

    1993-01-01

    The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema. (author)

  18. Fruit-flies in low-dose exposure experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Sheptyakova, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    In vivo exposure of fruit-flies of Drosophila melanogaster line to low doses provided new data indicating that mechanisms of induced genetic instability are involved in radiation-induced alteration of genotype. It is true for increase of genetic variance due to change in transposition number, for change in adaptation capabilities due to modification of gene expression, and for mutability-associated reparation and apoptosis. (author)

  19. Transportable, Low-Dose Active Fast-Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, John T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wright, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McConchie, Seth M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Archer, Daniel E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Palles, Blake A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This document contains a description of the method of transportable, low-dose active fast-neutron imaging as developed by ORNL. The discussion begins with the technique and instrumentation and continues with the image reconstruction and analysis. The analysis discussion includes an example of how a gap smaller than the neutron production spot size and detector size can be detected and characterized depending upon the measurement time.

  20. Biological effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmak, M.

    1998-01-01

    A study was performed with the aim to examine whether the progeny of cells that had been repeatedly irradiated with low doses of gamma rays will change their sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Four mammalian cell lines were used in the experiment. It was found that the progeny of cells irradiated in this way do not change their sensitivity to gamma rays but would change their sensitivity to various cytostatics drugs. (A.K.)

  1. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  2. Low dose monitoring by double implant technique in IC fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.B.; Weidemann, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilisation of low dose implant monitoring (using Boron) in a manufacturing line has been discussed. The utilisation of phosphorus ions as the second implant dose were also studied as comparison. The technique relies on the fact that the sheet resistant of doped layer will increase significantly when damaged by relatively low implant dose. The technique is very sensitive and applicable for adjusting the channel dose so that an accurate threshold voltage in MOS device could be achieved

  3. Global DNA methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.R.; Ormsby, R.J.; Blyth, B.J.; Sykes, P.J.; Bezak, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: High radiation doses cause breaks in the DNA which are considered the critical lesions in initiation of radiation-induced cancer. However, at very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of such breaks will be rare, and other changes to the DNA such as DNA methylation which affects gene expression may playa role in radiation responses. We are studying global DNA methylation after low dose radiation exposure to determine if low dose radiation has short- and/or long-term effects on chromatin structure. We developed a sensitive high resolution melt assay to measure the levels of DNA methylation across the mouse genome by analysing a stretch of DNA sequence within Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements-I (LINE I) that comprise a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Our initial results suggest no significant short-term or longterm) changes in global NA methylation after low dose whole-body X-radiation of 10 J1Gyor 10 mGy, with a significant transient increase in NA methylation observed I day after a high dose of I Gy. If the low radiation doses tested are inducing changes in bal DNA methylation, these would appear to be smaller than the variation observed between the sexes and following the general stress of the sham-irradiation procedure itself. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Biological and Environmental Research, US DOE, Grant DE-FG02-05ER64104 and MN is the recipient of the FMCF/BHP Dose Radiation Research Scholarship.

  4. Exercise and Sport Performance with Low Doses of Caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Spriet, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5–13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (

  5. Donor-specific cell-based assays in studying sensitivity to low-dose radiation: a population-based perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora eIl'yasova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a linear no-threshold model is used to estimate health risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation, a prevalent exposure in the general population, because the direct estimation from epidemiological studies suffers from uncertainty. This model has been criticized based on unique biology of low-dose radiation. Whether the departure from linearity is toward increased or decreased risk is intensely debated. We present an approach based on individual radiosensitivity testing and discuss how individual radiosensitivity can be assessed with the goal to develop a quantifiable measure of cellular response that can be conducted via high-throughput population testing.

  6. Differential analgesic effects of low-dose epidural morphine and morphine-bupivacaine at rest and during mobilization after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Rosenberg, J; Hansen, B L

    1992-01-01

    In a double-blind, randomized study, epidural infusions of low-dose morphine (0.2 mg/h) combined with low-dose bupivacaine (10 mg/h) were compared with epidural infusions of low-dose morphine (0.2 mg/h) alone for postoperative analgesia at rest and during mobilization and cough in 24 patients after...... elective major abdominal surgery. All patients in addition received systemic piroxicam (20 mg daily). No significant differences were observed between the groups at any assessment of pain at rest (P greater than 0.05), whereas pain in the morphine/bupivacaine group was significantly reduced during...... mobilization from the supine into the sitting position 12 and 30 h after surgical incision and during cough 8, 12, and 30 h after surgical incision (P less than 0.05). We conclude, that low-dose epidural bupivacaine potentiates postoperative low-dose epidural morphine analgesia during mobilization and cough...

  7. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Sol Fernández, S.; García-Salcedo, R.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G.; Gaona, E.; León-Alfaro, M.A. de; Rivera-Montalvo, T.

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO_4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm"2 at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO_4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO_4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy - Highlights: • Low dose X-ray doses for personal dosimetry were measured. • Radiation dose (µGy ) for environmental dosimetry were determined. • Scattering radiation dose were measured by TLDs. • Linearity of pair TLD system was successful in the range of microgray. • Pair TLDs composed by CaSO_4:Dy and by LiF:Mg,Cu,P. is suggested for clinical dosimetry.

  8. Ageing effects of polymers at very low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenion, J.; Armand, X.; Berthet, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-10-01

    The equipment irradiation dose-rate into the containment is variable from 10 -6 to 10 -4 gray per second for the most exposed materials. During qualification, safety equipments are submitted in France to dose-rates around 0.28 gray per second. This study purpose is to now if a so large irradiation dose-rate increase is reasonable. Three elastomeric materials used in electrical cables, o'rings seals and connectors, are exposed to a very large dose-rates scale between 2.1.10 -4 and 1.4 gray per second, to 49 KGy dose. This work was carried out during 3.5 years. Oxygen consumption measurement of the air in contact with polymer materials, as mechanical properties measurement show that: - at very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption is maximum at the same time (1.4 year) for the three elastomeric samples. Also, mechanical properties simultaneously change with oxygen consumption. At very low dose-rate, for the low irradiation doses, oxygen consumption is at least 10 times more important that it is showed when irradiation is carried out with usual material qualification dose-rate. At very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption decreases when absorbed irradiation dose by samples increases. The polymer samples irradiation dose is not still sufficient (49 KGy) to certainly determine, for the three chosen polymer materials, the reasonable irradiation acceleration boundary during nuclear qualification tests [fr

  9. Exercise and sport performance with low doses of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5-13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis.

  10. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  11. A NEW ANIMAL-MODEL FOR HUMAN PREECLAMPSIA - ULTRA-LOW-DOSE ENDOTOXIN INFUSION IN PREGNANT RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FAAS, MM; SCHUILING, GA; BALLER, JFW; VISSCHER, CA; BAKKER, WW

    OBJECTIVE: An animal model for preeclampsia was developed by means of an ultra-low-dose endotoxin infusion protocol in conscious pregnant rats. STUDY DESIGN: Rats received a permanent jugular vein cannula on day 0 of pregnancy, through which endotoxin (1.0 mu/kg body weight) (n = 10) or saline

  12. Risk perception among women receiving genetic counseling: a population-based follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Sunde, Lone; Johansen, Christoffer

    2007-01-01

    -up study of 213 women who received genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, 319 women who underwent mammography (Reference Group I), and a random sample of 1070 women from the general population (Reference Group II). RESULTS: Women who received genetic counseling decreased...... counseling, compared to a reduction of 5% (p=0.03) and 2% (p=0.01) in Reference Groups I and II, respectively. Risk communicated only in words, inaccurate risk perception at baseline, and presence of a familial mutation appeared to be predictors of inaccurate risk perception 12 months after counseling......BACKGROUND: We aimed to explore the impact of genetic counseling on perceived personal lifetime risk of breast cancer, the accuracy of risk perception, and possible predictors of inaccurate risk perception 1 year following counseling. METHODS: We conducted a population-based prospective follow...

  13. Plants as warning signal for exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli Ibrahim; Norhafiz Talib

    2012-01-01

    The stamen-hair system of Tradescantia for flower colour has proven to be one of the most suitable materials to study the frequency of mutations induced by low doses of various ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens. The system has also been used successfully for detecting mutagenic synergisms among chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations as well as for studying the variations of spontaneous mutation frequency. In this study of radiobiology, the main objective is to observe somatic mutation (occurrence of pink cells from blue cells) induced on stamen hairs of five Tradescantia sp. available in Malaysia after exposure to low doses of chronic gamma irradiation using Gamma Green House. Pink cells appeared only on Tradescantia Pallida Purpurea stamen hairs after 13 days of exposure to irradiation with different doses of gamma rays. The highest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded from flowers irradiated with the highest dose of 6.37 Gy with 0.07 Gy/ h of dose rate. The lowest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded with an average of 0.57, irradiated with the lowest dose of 0.91 Gy with 0.01 Gy/ h of dose rate. There were no pink cells observed on Tradescantia Spathaceae Discolor after exposure to different doses of gamma rays. Similar negative results were observed for the control experiments. The principal cells in this assay are the mitotic stamen hair cells developing in the young flower buds. After exposure to radiation, the heterozygous dominant blue character of the stamen hair cell is prevented, resulting in the appearance of the recessive pink color. Furthermore, no pink cell appears on all species of Tradescantia spathaceae after irradiated with different doses of gamma rays. The sensitivity of the Tradescantia has been used widely and has demonstrated the relation between radiation dose and frequency of mutation observed at low doses which can contribute to the effects of low doses and their consequences for human health. This system

  14. Low dose versus high dose anti-snake venom therapy in the treatment of haematotoxic snake bite in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Imanto M; Kuriakose, Cijoy K; Dev, Anand Vimal; Philip, George A

    2017-10-01

    Most of the studies on the appropriate dose of anti-snake venom (ASV) are from tertiary hospitals and the guidelines are unclear. Our observational study compared the outcomes of two prevalent treatment regimes for haematotoxic snake bite in a secondary care hospital in South India. The time to normalisation of whole blood clotting time, mortality and complications were not different between the groups. The average dose of ASV required in the low and high dose groups were 106 mL and 246 mL, respectively. Consequently, patients who received low dose ASV incurred approximately 50% less expense. Urticarial rashes were also significantly fewer in the low dose group.

  15. Construction of data base for radiation safety assessment of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, Shin

    2001-01-01

    Data base with an electronic text on the safety assessment of low dose ionizing radiation have been constructed. The contents and the data base system were designed to provide useful information to Japanese citizens, radiation specialists, and decision makers for a scientific and reasonable understanding of radiation health effects, radiation risk assessment, and radiation protection. The data base consists of the following four essential parts, namely, ORIGINAL DESCRIPTION, DETAILED INFORMATION, TOPIC INFORMATION, and RELATED INFORMATION. The first two parts of the data base are further classified into following subbranches: Radiobiological effects, radiation risk assessment, and radiation exposure and protection. (author)

  16. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, Karen Mandrup; Boberg, Julie; Isling, Louise Krag

    2016-01-01

    was to perform a study robust enough to contribute to the risk assessment of BPA and to elucidate possible biphasic dose–response relationships. We investigated mammary gland effects in the offspring at 22, 100, and 400 days of age. Male offspring showed increased mammary outgrowth on pup day (PD) 22 at 0.025 mg...... intraductal hyperplasia in female rats could be associated with an increased risk for developing hyperplastic lesions, which are parallels to early signs of breast neoplasia in women. Collectively, current knowledge on effects of BPA on mammary gland at low doses indicates that highly exposed humans may...

  17. Low dose effects of ionizing radiations in in vitro and in vivo biological systems: a multi-scale approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoccia, A.; Berardinelli, F.; Argazzi, E.; Balata, M.; Bedogni, R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term biological effects of low-dose radiation are little known nowadays and its carcinogenic risk is estimated on the assumption that risk remains linearly proportional to the radiation dose down to low-dose levels. However in the last 20 years this hypothesis has gradually begun to seem in contrast with a huge collection of experimental evidences, which has shown the presence of plethora of non-linear phenomena (including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance, adaptive response, and non-targeted phenomena like bystander effect and genomic instability) occurring after low-dose irradiation. These phenomena might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model currently used for cancer risk assessment through extrapolation from existing high-dose data. Moreover only few information is available regarding the effects induced on cryo preserved cells by multi-year background radiation exposure, which might induce a radiation-damage accumulation, due to the inhibition of cellular repair mechanisms. In this framework, the multi-year Excalibur (Exposure effects at low doses of ionizing radiation in biological culture) experiment, funded by INFN-CNS5, has undertaken a multi-scale approach investigation on the biological effects induced in in vitro and in vivo biological systems, in culture and cryo preserved conditions, as a function of radiation quality (X/γ-rays, protons, He-4 ions of various energies) and dose, with particular emphasis on the low-dose region and non-linear phenomena, in terms of different biological endpoints.

  18. Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy (the ASCENDE-RT Trial): An Analysis of Survival Endpoints for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost to a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Rodda, Sree [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Halperin, Ross [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Centre for the Southern Interior, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Pai, Howard [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Island Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morton, Gerard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Murray, Nevin [BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To report the primary endpoint of biochemical progression-free survival (b-PFS) and secondary survival endpoints from ASCENDE-RT, a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: ASCENDE-RT enrolled 398 men, with a median age of 68 years; 69% (n=276) had high-risk disease. After stratification by risk group, the subjects were randomized to a standard arm with 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy, pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy, followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. Of the 398 trial subjects, 200 were assigned to DE-EBRT boost and 198 to LDR-PB boost. The median follow-up was 6.5 years. Results: In an intent-to-treat analysis, men randomized to DE-EBRT were twice as likely to experience biochemical failure (multivariable analysis [MVA] hazard ratio [HR] 2.04; P=.004). The 5-, 7-, and 9-year Kaplan-Meier b-PFS estimates were 89%, 86%, and 83% for the LDR-PB boost versus 84%, 75%, and 62% for the DE-EBRT boost (log-rank P<.001). The LDR-PB boost benefited both intermediate- and high-risk patients. Because the b-PFS curves for the treatment arms diverge sharply after 4 years, the relative advantage of the LDR-PB should increase with longer follow-up. On MVA, the only variables correlated with reduced overall survival were age (MVA HR 1.06/y; P=.004) and biochemical failure (MVA HR 6.30; P<.001). Although biochemical failure was associated with increased mortality and randomization to DE-EBRT doubled the rate of biochemical failure, no significant overall survival difference was observed between the treatment arms (MVA HR 1.13; P=.62). Conclusions: Compared with 78 Gy EBRT, men randomized to the LDR-PB boost were twice as likely to be free of biochemical failure at a median follow-up of 6.5 years.

  19. The Management of Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid: An International Survey of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleman, Jehuda; Kamenova, Maria; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this international survey was to investigate the current management of patients undergoing surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) treated with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). We administered a survey via e-mail to neurosurgeons with questions relating to the surgical treatment of cSDH, emphasizing their practices with patients treated with low-dose ASA. We received 157 responses, with a response rate of 22.4%. Almost 80% of the responders discontinue ASA treatment at least 5 days before surgery and 80.7% resume treatment after 5 days or more, and 27.6% discontinue treatment for at least 30 days. The main factor influencing ASA resumption time is the indication for ASA (54.5%), and postoperative imaging is concluded in 71.7%, Postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis is administered by 60% of the responders, and 50% apply it 24 hours after surgery. Almost 95% of the responders believe that better evidence is needed for the management of patients with cSDH treated with ASA. Guidelines for these patients exist in only 24.3% of the institutes. Most neurosurgeons discontinue ASA treatment for at least 7 days in the perioperative period of surgical evacuation of cSDH, even though recent studies show that early ASA resumption might be safe. Thrombosis prophylaxis is administered by only 60%, even though patients with cSDH are at high risk of developing thromboembolic complications. Better evidence and guidelines are warranted because the incidence of patients with cSDH under the treatment of ASA is increasing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Learning from agriculture: understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi eYou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health challenge worldwide, with agricultural use of antimicrobials being one major contributor to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. Globally, most antimicrobials are used in industrial food animal production, a major context for microbiomes encountering low-doses or subtherapeutic-levels of antimicrobial agents from all mechanistic classes. This modern practice exerts broad eco-evolutionary effects on the gut microbiome of food animals, which is subsequently transferred to animal waste. This waste contains complex constituents that are challenging to treat, including antimicrobial resistance determinants and low-dose antimicrobials. Unconfined storage or land deposition of a large volume of animal waste causes its wide contact with the environment and drives the expansion of the environmental resistome through mobilome facilitated horizontal genet transfer. The expanded environmental resistome, which encompasses both natural constituents and anthropogenic inputs, can persist under multiple stressors from agriculture and may re-enter humans, thus posing a public health risk to humans. For these reasons, this review focuses on agricultural antimicrobial use as a laboratory for understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion, briefly summarizes current knowledge on this topic, highlights the importance of research specifically on environmental microbial ecosystems considering antimicrobial resistance as environmental pollution, and calls attention to the needs for longitudinal studies at the systems level.

  1. Learning from agriculture: understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yaqi; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health challenge worldwide, with agricultural use of antimicrobials being one major contributor to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Globally, most antimicrobials are used in industrial food animal production, a major context for microbiomes encountering low-doses or subtherapeutic-levels of antimicrobial agents from all mechanistic classes. This modern practice exerts broad eco-evolutionary effects on the gut microbiome of food animals, which is subsequently transferred to animal waste. This waste contains complex constituents that are challenging to treat, including AMR determinants and low-dose antimicrobials. Unconfined storage or land deposition of a large volume of animal waste causes its wide contact with the environment and drives the expansion of the environmental resistome through mobilome facilitated horizontal genet transfer. The expanded environmental resistome, which encompasses both natural constituents and anthropogenic inputs, can persist under multiple stressors from agriculture and may re-enter humans, thus posing a public health risk to humans. For these reasons, this review focuses on agricultural antimicrobial use as a laboratory for understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion, briefly summarizes current knowledge on this topic, highlights the importance of research specifically on environmental microbial ecosystems considering AMR as environmental pollution, and calls attention to the needs for longitudinal studies at the systems level.

  2. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.eu

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  3. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm

  4. New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Okada, Yu; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have suggested that a large subset of children (approximately 70%) who react to unheated milk or egg can tolerate extensively heated forms of these foods. A diet that includes baked milk or egg is well tolerated and appears to accelerate the development of regular milk or egg tolerance when compared with strict avoidance. However, the indications for an oral food challenge (OFC) using baked products are limited for patients with high specific IgE values or large skin prick test diameters. Oral immunotherapies (OITs) are becoming increasingly popular for the management of food allergies. However, the reported efficacy of OIT is not satisfactory, given the high frequency of symptoms and requirement for long-term therapy. With food allergies, removing the need to eliminate a food that could be consumed in low doses could significantly improve quality of life. This review discusses the importance of an OFC and OIT that use low doses of causative foods as the target volumes. Utilizing an OFC or OIT with a low dose as the target volume could be a novel approach for accelerating the tolerance to causative foods. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Edge enhancement algorithm for low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Seok; Park, Chul Hee; Kang, Moon Gi

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy has continually evolved to reduce radiation risk to patients during clinical diagnosis and surgery. However, the reduction in dose exposure causes quality degradation of the acquired images. In general, an X-ray device has a time-average pre-processor to remove the generated quantum noise. However, this pre-processor causes blurring and artifacts within the moving edge regions, and noise remains in the image. During high-pass filtering (HPF) to enhance edge detail, this noise in the image is amplified. In this study, a 2D edge enhancement algorithm comprising region adaptive HPF with the transient improvement (TI) method, as well as artifacts and noise reduction (ANR), was developed for degraded X-ray fluoroscopic images. The proposed method was applied in a static scene pre-processed by a low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy device. First, the sharpness of the X-ray image was improved using region adaptive HPF with the TI method, which facilitates sharpening of edge details without overshoot problems. Then, an ANR filter that uses an edge directional kernel was developed to remove the artifacts and noise that can occur during sharpening, while preserving edge details. The quantitative and qualitative results obtained by applying the developed method to low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images and visually and numerically comparing the final images with images improved using conventional edge enhancement techniques indicate that the proposed method outperforms existing edge enhancement methods in terms of objective criteria and subjective visual perception of the actual X-ray fluoroscopic image. The developed edge enhancement algorithm performed well when applied to actual low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images, not only by improving the sharpness, but also by removing artifacts and noise, including overshoot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-dose multislice CT in febrile neutropenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, F.; Jenett, M.; Hahn, D.; Sandstede, J.; Geib, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to define the value of low-dose multislice CT in a clinical setting for early detection of pneumonia in neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin. Materials and methods: thirty-five neutropenic patients suffering from fever of unknown origin with normal chest X-ray underwent unenhanced low-dose CT of the chest (120 kV, 10 eff. mAs, collimation 4 x 1 mm) using a multislice CT scanner. Axial und frontal slices with a thickness of 5 mm were calculated. If no pneumonia was found, standard antibiotics were given and a repeated examination was performed if fever continued. In case of pneumonia, antimycotic therapy was added and a follow-up CT was performed within one week. Regression or progression of pneumonia at follow-up served as evidence of pneumonia; lowering of fever within 48 h or inconspicuous follow-up CT was regarded as absence of pneumonia. Results: ten of 35 patients had pneumonic infiltration, which decreased or increased on follow-up CT in 3 and 6 patients, respectively. One patient revealed leucemic infiltration by bronchoalveolar lavage. Twenty-five of 35 patients had no evidence of pneumonia. Twenty of these patients were free of fever within 48 h under antibiotics; one patient died due to his basic illness. Out of 4 patients with persisting fever, 3 patients had no pneumonia on repeated examination; one patient showed disseminated micronodular infiltration. Frontal reconstructions helped to differentiate infiltration from atelectasis in 4 patients. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of pneumonia at the first examination were 90% and 96%, negative predictive value was 96%. Conclusion: low-dose multislice CT should be performed in neutropenic patients having a fever of unknown origin and normal chest X-ray. (orig.)

  7. Development of new chemical dosimeter for low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.; Adhikari, S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of low dose radiation in complex systems is of utmost importance in radiation biology and related areas. Ferrous Benzoic acid Xylenol orange (FBX) system is being widely used for measurement of low dose gamma radiation because of its reproducibility and precision. However, an additional step, i.e., dissolution of benzoic acid in water at higher temperature followed by cooling at room temperature is involved for the preparation of this dosimeter. This makes it inconvenient as a ready to use dosimeter. In the present work, the organic molecule, sorbitol has been used for measurement of low doses of radiation. The advantages of using sorbitol are its ready availability and instantaneous water solubility. Owing to its dissolution at room temperature, possible errors those are involved in calculation of dose due to thermal oxidation of ferrous ions during preparation of the FBX dosimetric solution could be made insignificant in the proposed dosimeter. In the present system, sorbitol acts as radiolytic sensitizer for the oxidation of ferrous ion, and xylenol orange forms a 1:1 complex specifically with ferric ions. Thus, the analytical detection limit of ferric ions is enhanced compared to other systems. Final composition of the dosimetric solution is; 0.5 mol/m 3 xylenol orange, 10 mol/m 3 sorbitol and 0.2 mol/m 3 ferrous ion in 50 mol/m 3 sulfuric acid. Radiolytic sensitization in combination with analytical enhancement of the ferrous based system, allows us to measure radiation dose in the range of 0.05 Gy–12 Gy with ease and high reproducibility.

  8. Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2014-07-10

    This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications\\/relevance of the effect.

  9. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  10. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Genes Promoting Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shu-Zheng; Chen, Dong; Mu, Ying

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important process controlling homeostasis of the body. It is influenced by stimuli constantly arising from the external and internal environment of the organism. It is well known that radiation could induce apoptosis of cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the dose-effect relationship of apoptosis extending to the low-dose range has scarcely been studied. Here, the molecular basis of the phenomenon is explored by examining the changes in expression of some of the proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes

  11. Anti-tumor effect of low dose radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhengping; Lu Jiaben; Zhu Bingchai

    1997-01-01

    The author reports the effects of the total body irradiation of low dose radiation (LDR) and/or the local irradiation of large dose on average tumor weights and tumor inhibitory rates in 170 mice inoculated S 180 sarcoma cell, and the influence of LDR on average longevity in 40 tumor-bearing animals. Results show (1) LDR in the range of 75∼250 mGy can inhibit tumor growth to some extent; (2) fractionated irradiation of 75 mGy and local irradiation of 10 Gy may produce a synergism in tumor growth inhibition; and (3)LDR may enhance average longevity in ascitic tumor-bearing mice

  12. Uterine malignant degeneration after low-dose endometrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikkanen, V.; Salmi, T.; Groenroos, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of low-dose intrauterine irradiation for benign diseases and its possible carcinogenic effect on the uterus was studied in 190 patients who were treated during the years 1952-1974. The indications for irradiation were premenopausal functional bleeding, leukemia, hemophilia, fibroids, endometriosis or other benign reason. Radiation was also performed on patients with severe neurologic diseases that contraindicated surgery and on some mentally retarded patients whose restlessness and epileptic seizures were aggravated premenstrually and during menstruation. The mean follow-up period was 15 years. Uterine bleeding recurred in 21 percent of the patients. No cases of uterine malignant degeneration were found. (author)

  13. Application of low dose radiation for preservation of sea foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.; Nair, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of food with low doses of gamma radiation has been recognized to have two main advantages. These consist of: (1) improvement of food safety by elimination of pathogens and (2) reduction of microbial spoilage and extension of shelf life of perishable items by reducing the number of viable spoilage organisms. Studies during the last few decades have conclusively proved the beneficial effects of radiation with respect to fishery products. The three potential areas of application to fish products include: (i) radurization for shelf life extension (ii) radicidation to eliminate food borne pathogens in the products and (iii) radiation treatment to dried products to control insects

  14. Examining Fall Recurrence Risk of Homebound Hispanic Older Adults Receiving Home Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Guillermina R; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2017-03-01

    Unintentional falls and injuries is a major problem among older adults and the fourth cause of death in the United States. A previous fall event doubles the risk of recurrence and lessens the person's quality of life. Hispanic older adults have higher rates of disability and lower independent functioning due to poor medical health and risk for fall recurrence. Most fall studies focus on fall risk with few studies on fall recurrence in older adults receiving home health care services unrelated to fall incident. A descriptive pilot study of 30 homebound Hispanic older adults receiving home care services who reported a fall within 3 months was conducted by a multidisciplinary team to evaluate risk of fall recurrence. A heightened risk for fall recurrence was identified with high number of chronic illnesses, high intake of medications, vision problems, and prevalence of urinary incontinence. Findings highlight significant number of intrinsic factors for fall risk recurrence and injuries in a Hispanic older adults population that is homebound and receiving home care services. A multidisciplinary evaluation and culturally appropriate interventions to lessen the risk of fall recurrence are recommended.

  15. Low-dose prednisolone in first-line docetaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    incidence of peripheral edema (32% vs. 15%, Pneutropenia in this group (25% vs. 10%, P...% CI: 0.76-1.26, P = 0.89, Cox proportional hazard regression model). CONCLUSIONS: Coadministration of low-dose P reduced the incidence of peripheral edema, grade 3 nonhematological toxicity, and the risk of being admitted owing to febrile neutropenia during treatment with D. Adjusted survival analysis...

  16. Human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: the BEIR III controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Controversy in the BEIR III Subcommittee on Somatic Effects concerning human health effects of low doses of low-LET radiation has centered on (a) the appropriate dose-response relationship by which extrapolation to low doses of data obtained at relatively high doses should be governed, and (b) the appropriate human evidence which should be the basis of estimation of lifetime cancer risk from radiation exposure. It is shown that the use of the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship for extrapolation purposes is an excellent approximation that is in agreement with widely accepted fundamental radiobiological principles. The appropriate human data for derivation of cancer risks are the composite age-specific risks derived from all epidemiologic studies of human cancer resulting from partial-body and whole-body radiation exposure; this composite is in good agreement with the currently available cancer incidence dose-response data obtained from the Nagasaki Tumor Registry. The current version of BEIR III significantly underestimates the radiation-induced cancer risk because it ignores the effect of high-dose-rate, low-LET radiation on cell survival in relation to cancer induction probability, and because it emphasizes cancer mortality rather than cancer incidence. The controversy and the way in which it was resolved raises important questions about how the public and its representatives can in the future obtain objective scientific evaluations of issues that may have significant economic, social, and political implications

  17. Biologically based modelling and simulation of carcinogenesis at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Noriyuki B.

    2003-01-01

    The process of the carcinogenesis is studied by computer simulation. In general, we need a large number of experimental samples to detect mutations at low doses, but in practice it is difficult to get such a large number of data. To satisfy the requirements of the situation at low doses, it is good to study the process of carcinogenesis using biologically based mathematical model. We have mainly studied it by using as known as 'multi-stage model'; the model seems to get complicated, as we adopt the recent new findings of molecular biological experiments. Moreover, the basic idea of the multi-stage model is based on the epidemiologic data of log-log variation of cancer incidence with age, it seems to be difficult to compare with experimental data of irradiated cell culture system, which has been increasing in recent years. Taking above into consideration, we concluded that we had better make new model with following features: 1) a unit of the target system is a cell, 2) the new information of the molecular biology can be easily introduced, 3) having spatial coordinates for checking a colony formation or tumorigenesis. In this presentation, we will show the detail of the model and some simulation results about the carcinogenesis. (author)

  18. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umezaki Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yojiro Umezaki,1 Miho Takenoshita,2 Akira Toyofuku2 1Psychosomatic Dentistry Clinic, Dental Hospital, 2Psychosomatic Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. Keywords: burning mouth syndrome, low-dose aripiprazole, chronic pain

  19. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following γ-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of β-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following γ-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not γ-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to γ rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure

  20. Low dose iodine-131 therapy in solitary toxic thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Rajeev

    1999-01-01

    Forty patients with solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules were treated with relatively low dose radioiodine therapy, 131 I doses were calculated taking into account thyroid mass and radioiodine kinetics to deliver 100 μCi/g of estimated nodule weight corrected for uptake. Patients remaining persistently hyperthyroid at four months after the initial therapy were retreated with a similarly calculated dose. Cure of the hyperthyroid state was achieved in all patients, total administered dose in individual cases ranging from 3-17 mCi. 28 of the 40 patients required a single therapy dose. 36 patients were euthyroid after a 4.5 year mean follow-up period. Four cases developed post therapy hypothyroidism requiring replacement therapy. Nodules regressed completely in nine cases following 131 I treatment, with partial regression in size in 19 patients. Control of hyperthyroid state in cases of solitary toxic thyroid nodules can be satisfactorily achieved using relatively low dose radioiodine therapy with low incidence of post therapy hypothyroidism. (author)

  1. Development of microcontroller based instrumentation for low dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, K.; Saravanan, K.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    In experiments like ion implantation based ion track formations, the sample is implanted to low doses of the order of 10 10 ions/cm 2 , limiting the ion beam currents to be less than 1-5 x 10 -12 A. However the standard current integrators available are not sensitive to very low currents, causing an unacceptable high level of error in dose measurement. Hence a low dose implantation measurement system has been developed. It consists of a very sensitive low current preamplifier with full scale input 1nA/100pA, a standard current integrator, a microcontroller based interface circuit, which are connected to a personal computer(PC) through USB. Two types of the software are developed for the system: the microcontroller firmware using C and windows based virtual instrument programs using LabVIEW 7.0. Necessary precautions associated with pA level measurement like rigidly fastened good quality cables, low ripple DC power supply, shielding, close mounting of the preamplifier to the sample are adopted. After necessary calibrations with an ECIL make low current source, the system has been put into regular use. Design and development details, salient features are discussed in this paper. (author)

  2. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  3. The effects of chronic, low doses of Ra-226 on cultured fish and human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaopei; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel, E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the chronic low-dose radiation effects caused by α-particle radiation from {sup 226}Ra over multiple cell generations in CHSE/F fish cells and HaCaT human cells. Methods: CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells were cultured in medium containing {sup 226}Ra to deliver the chronic low-dose α-particle radiation. Clonogenic assay was used to test the clonogenic survival fractions of cells with or without being exposed to radiation from {sup 226}Ra. Results: The chronic low-dose radiation from {sup 226}Ra does have effects on the clonogenic survival of CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells. When CHSE/F cells were cultured in {sup 226}Ra-medium over 9 passages for about 134 days, the clonogenic surviving fractions for cells irradiated at dose rates ranging from 0.00066 to 0.66 mGy/d were significantly lower than that of cells sham irradiated. For HaCaT cells grown in medium containing the same range of {sup 226}Ra activity, the clonogenic surviving fraction decreased at first and reached the lowest value at about 42 days (8 passages). After that, the clonogenic survival began to increase, and was significantly higher than that of control cells by the end of the experimental period. Conclusion: The chronic, low-dose high LET radiation from {sup 226}Ra can influence the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. CHSE/F cells were sensitized by the radiation, and HaCaT cells were initially sensitized but later appeared to be adapted. The results could have implications for determining risk from chronic versus acute exposures to radium. - Highlights: • Cells were exposed to chronic low-dose α-radiation from {sup 226}Ra in medium with {sup 226}Ra. • The clonogenic survival of CHSE/F cells decreased when exposed to {sup 226}Ra for 134 days. • The clonogenic survival of HaCaT cells decreased at first and then increased. • The doubling time of both cells were not affected by this kind of radiation.

  4. Combination effect of low dose fentanyl and propofol on emergence agitation in children following sevoflurane anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhamees, Hassan S; Mercan, Arzu; ElHalafawy, Yasser M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the combination effect of low dose fentanyl and subhypnotic dose of propofol on emergence agitation in children receiving sevoflurane for adenotonsillectomy procedure.After ethical approval, a prospective, randomized, clinical study was performed in Saad Specialist Hospital, Al-Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 2007-2008. One hundred and twenty children in physical status of I according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, aged 2-6 years, scheduled for adentonsillectomy under general anesthesia were allocated into 3 groups randomly. Anesthesia was induced and maintained by sevoflurane in all groups. Children received 0.1 ml.kg-1 normal saline at the end of surgery in group C (n=40), 1.5 mcg.kg-1 fentanyl during induction, and 0.1 ml.kg-1 normal saline at the end of surgery in group F (n=40), and 1.5 mcg.kg-1 fentanyl during induction and 1 mg.kg-1 propofol at the end of surgery in group FP (n=40). Postoperative agitation was recorded, if any, for the first postoperative hour.Three groups were comparable with regard to demographic data. Twenty-one patients (53%) in the control group, 14 patients (35%) in group F and 7 (18%) patients in group FP experienced postoperative agitation.The combination of low dose fentanyl before surgery and propofol at the end of surgery decreases the incidence and level of emergence agitation in children after adenotonsillectomy procedure under sevoflurane anesthesia. (author)

  5. Low-dose intranasal versus oral midazolam for routine body MRI of claustrophobic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschirch, Frank T.C.; Goepfert, Kerstin; Brunner, Genevieve; Weishaupt, Dominik [University Hospital Zuerich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Klus-Apotheke, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess prospectively the potential of low-dose intranasal midazolam compared to oral midazolam in claustrophobic patients undergoing routine body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventy-two adult claustrophobic patients referred for body MRI were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (TG1 and TG2). The 36 patients of TG1 received 7.5 mg midazolam orally 15 min before MRI, whereas the 36 patients of TG2 received one (or, if necessary, two) pumps of a midazolam nasal spray into each nostril immediately prior to MRI (in total, 1 or 2 mg). Patients' tolerance, anxiety and sedation were assessed using a questionnaire and a visual analogue scale immediately before and after MRI. Image quality was evaluated using a five-point-scale. In TG1, 18/36 MRI examinations (50%) had to be cancelled, the reduction of anxiety was insufficient in 12/18 remaining patients (67%). In TG2, 35/36 MRI examinations (97%) were completed successfully, without relevant adverse effects. MRI image quality was rated higher among patients of TG2 compared to TG1 (p<0.001). Low-dose intranasal midazolam is an effective and patient-friendly solution to overcome anxiety in claustrophobic patients in a broad spectrum of body MRI. Its anxiolytic effect is superior to that of the orally administrated form. (orig.)

  6. Exercise and Low-Dose Ibuprofen for Cognitive Impairment in Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-13

    Cognitive Impairment; Stage 0 Colorectal Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  7. Low-dose ionizing radiation limitations to seed germination: Results from a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Hu, Dawei; Dong, Chen; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Guanghui; Qin, Youcai; Sun, Yi; Liu, Dianlei; Li, Lei; Liu, Hong

    2017-08-01

    There is much uncertainty about the risks of seed germination after repeated or protracted environmental low-dose ionizing radiation exposure. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination using a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation. A low-dose ionizing radiation environment simulator was built to investigate wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds germination process and then a kinetic model expressing the relationship between wheat seed germination dynamics and low-dose ionizing radiation intensity variations was developed by experimental data, plant physiology, relevant hypotheses and system dynamics, and sufficiently validated and accredited by computer simulation. Germination percentages were showing no differences in response to different dose rates. However, root and shoot lengths were reduced significantly. Plasma governing equations were set up and the finite element analysis demonstrated H 2 O, CO 2 , O 2 as well as the seed physiological responses to the low-dose ionizing radiation. The kinetic model was highly valid, and simultaneously the related influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination proposed in the modeling process was also adequately verified. Collectively these data demonstrate that low-dose ionizing radiation has an important effect on absorbing water, consuming O 2 and releasing CO 2 , which means the risk for embryo and endosperm development was higher. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppression of carcinogenesis in mice by adaptive responses to low dose rate irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Hoshi, Yuko; Nomura, Takaharu; Ina, Yasuhiro; Tanooka, Hiroshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Low Dose Radiation Research Center, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Effects of prolonged low-dose-rate irradiation on the process of carcinogenesis were examined in mice treated with chemical carcinogen or irradiated with high doses of X-rays. Female ICR mice, 5 week-old, 35 in each group, were exposed to gamma-rays from a {sup 137}Cs source in the long-term low dose rate irradiation facility at CRIEPI. The dose rate was 2.6 mGy/hr (A), 0.96 mGy/hr (B), or 0.30 mGy/hr (C). Thirty-five days later, the mice were injected into the groin with 0.5 mg of methylcholanthrene (MC) dissolved in olive oil and irradiation was continued. Cumulative tumor incidences after 216 days following MC injection were 89% in group A, 76% in group B, and 94% in group C. That in non-irradiated control group was 94%. The difference in the tumor incidence between the control and position B was statistically significant, indicating the suppressive effect of the low dose rate irradiation on the process of MC-induced carcinogenesis with an optimum dose rate around 1 mGy/hr. In B6C3F1 mice, although the suppression of tumor incidence was not observed, there was a significant delay in tumor appearance in the irradiated mice between 100-150 days after MC injection. A group of 20 female C57BL/6N mice, 5 weeks old, were exposed to gamma-rays at 0.95 mGy/hr for 5 weeks. Then, they were exposed weekly to 1.8 Gy whole body X-irradiation (300 kVp) for consecutive 4 weeks to induce thymic lymphoma. Another group received only the fractionated irradiation. The first mouse died from thymic lymphoma appeared 89 days after the last irradiation in the group received only the fractionated irradiation, while 110 days in the group combined with the low dose rate irradiation. (author)

  9. Estimation of radiation exposure from lung cancer screening program with low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jun, Jae Kwan [Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that screening with Low-dose Computed Tomography (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer mortality in a high-risk population. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) gave a B recommendation for annual LDCT screening for individuals at high-risk. With the promising results, Korea developed lung cancer screening guideline and is planning a pilot study for implementation of national lung cancer screening. With widespread adoption of lung cancer screening with LDCT, there are concerns about harms of screening, including high false-positive rates and radiation exposure. Over the 3 rounds of screening in the NLST, 96.4% of positive results were false-positives. Although the initial screening is performed at low dose, subsequent diagnostic examinations following positive results additively contribute to patient's lifetime exposure. As with implementing a large-scale screening program, there is a lack of established risk assessment about the effect of radiation exposure from long-term screening program. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate cumulative radiation exposure of annual LDCT lung cancer screening program over 20-year period.

  10. The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, A.N.; Dixit, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by various researches, that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health. There is substantial controversy regarding the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause radiation injury, and these injuries can be relatively severe with sufficiently high radiation doses. Prolonged exposure to low levels of radiation may lead to cancer, although the nature of our response to very low radiation levels is not well known at this time. Many of our radiation safety regulations and procedures are designed to protect the health of those exposed to radiation occupationally or as members of the public. According to the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, any amount, however small, of radiation is potentially harmful, even down to zero levels. The threshold hypothesis, on the other hand, emphasizes that below a certain threshold level of radiation exposure, any deleterious effects are absent. At the same time, there are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). These effects cannot be anticipated by extrapolating from harmful effects noted at high doses. Evidence indicates an inverse relationship between chronic low-dose radiation levels and cancer incidence and/or mortality rates. Examples are drawn from: 1) state surveys for more than 200 million people in the United States; 2) state cancer hospitals for 200 million people in India; 3) 10,000 residents of Taipei who lived in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; 4) high-radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 5) 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; 6) almost 300,000 radon measurements of homes in the United States; and 7) non-smokers in high-radon areas of early Saxony, Germany. This evidence conforms to the hypothesis that

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Dose Estradiol and the SNRI Venlafaxine for Vasomotor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Hadine; Guthrie, Katherine A.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Reed, Susan D.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Newton, Katherine M.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Anderson, Garnet L.; Larson, Joseph C.; Hunt, Julie; Shifren, Jan; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Caan, Bette; Sternfeld, Barbara; Carpenter, Janet S.; Cohen, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Importance Estrogen therapy is the gold standard treatment for hot flashes and night sweats, but some women are unable or unwilling to use it because of associated risks. The serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine is used widely as a non-hormonal treatment. While clinical impression is that serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are less effective than estrogen, these medications have not been simultaneously evaluated in one clinical trial. Objective To determine the efficacy and tolerability of low-dose oral 17-beta-estradiol and low-dose venlafaxine XR in alleviating vasomotor symptoms. Design and Participants 339 peri- and postmenopausal women with ≥2 bothersome vasomotor symptoms per day (mean 8.1, SD 5.3/day) were recruited from the community to MsFLASH (Menopause Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health) clinical network sites November 2011—October 2012. Interventions Participants were randomized to double-blinded treatment with low-dose oral 17-beta-estradiol 0.5-mg/day (n=97), low-dose venlafaxine XR 75-mg/day (n=96), or placebo (n=146) for 8 weeks. Main Outcomes Primary outcome was the mean daily frequency of vasomotor symptoms after 8 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes were vasomotor symptom severity, bother and interference. Intent-to-treat analyses compared change in vasomotor symptom frequency between each active intervention and placebo and between the two active treatments. Results Compared to baseline, mean vasomotor symptom frequency at week 8 decreased by 53% with estradiol, 48% with venlafaxine, and 29% with placebo. Estradiol reduced the frequency of symptoms by 2.3 (95% CI 1.3–3.4) more per day than placebo (p<0.001), and venlafaxine by 1.8 (95% CI 0.8–2.7) more per day than placebo (p=0.005). Results were consistent for VMS severity, bother and interference. Low-dose estradiol reduced symptom frequency by 0.6 more per day than venlafaxine (95% CI, 1.8 more per day to 0.6 fewer per day than

  12. A review of the bystander effect and its implications for low-dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Michael, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Current models for the interaction between ionising radiation and living cells or tissues are based on direct genetic damage produced by energy deposition in cellular DNA. An important observation which has questioned this basic assumption is radiation-induced bystander response, in which cells which have not been directly targeted respond if their neighbours have been exposed. This response predominates at low doses of relevance to radiation risk analysis (<0.2 Gy) and therefore needs to be fully characterised. The development of microbeams, which allow individual cells within populations to be targeted with precise doses of radiation, has provided a useful tool for quantifying this response. The authors' studies have targeted individual human and mouse cells with counted protons and helium ions and monitored neighbouring cells for the production of bystander responses. Bystander responses have been measured after exposures as low as a single proton or helium ion delivered to an individual cell. An important aspect is that these responses saturate with increasing dose to the single target cell, thus the relative roles of direct and indirect (non-targeted) responses change with dose. Studies with multicellular, tissue-based models are providing evidence that bystander responses may have a complex phenotype involving multiple pathways and the overall response may be a balance between multiple signalling processes and responses to radiation exposure. Current models for radiation risk assume a linear non-threshold response and have generally been extrapolated from high-dose exposures. The involvement of competing processes at low doses may have important consequences for understanding the effects of low-dose exposure. (author)

  13. Persistent Sexual Dysfunction and Suicidal Ideation in Young Men Treated with Low-Dose Finasteride: A Pharmacovigilance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayad K; Heran, Balraj S; Etminan, Mahyar

    2015-07-01

    reports were identified. Persistent SD might be a potential risk of low-dose finasteride for androgenic alopecia therapy in young men, and this risk might contribute to SI. Our findings provide a strong hypothesis for pharmacoepidemiologic studies to further examine this association. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  14. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, Alexander A.; Turner, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  15. Low dose response analysis through a cytogenetic end-point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojtor, I.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of low doses were studied on human lymphocytes of various individuals. The frequency of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked cultured lymphocytes was taken as end-point. The probability distribution of radiation-induced increment was statistically proved and identified as to be asymmetric when the blood samples had been irradiated with doses of 0.01-0.05 Gy of X-rays, similarly to that in unirradiated control population. On the contrary, at or above 1 Gy the corresponding normal curve could be accepted only reflecting an approximately symmetrical scatter of the increments about their mean value. It was found that the slope as well as the closeness of correlation of the variables considerably changed when lower and lower dose ranges had been selected. Below approximately 0.2 Gy even an unrelatedness was found betwen the absorbed dose and the increment

  16. Metabolomics: new prospects in low-dose radio-toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, Maamar; Grison, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    There is recurring public concern regarding the health impact of chronic exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation. This concern is further heightened when possible sources of exposure are identified, such as disused mines, the operation of nuclear facilities and radioactive waste disposal facilities, accidental release from fuel cycle facilities or the possible return of residents to areas contaminated following a reactor accident, such as the one that occurred at Fukushima. In keeping with the guidelines set out in the European strategic research agenda for MELODI, IRSN is conducting an extensive, largely experiment-based, research program to acquire scientific data to respond to this concern. The program has already revealed that chronic ingestion of cesium-137 or uranium induces many subtle, generally slight, metabolic changes, the overall biological effects of which remain to be studied. A recent 'broad-spectrum' analytical technique known as metabolomics was used to pinpoint these metabolic changes. (authors)

  17. Transcriptome profiling of mice testes following low dose irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belling, Kirstine C.; Tanaka, Masami; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is used routinely to treat testicular cancer. Testicular cells vary in radio-sensitivity and the aim of this study was to investigate cellular and molecular changes caused by low dose irradiation of mice testis and to identify transcripts from different cell types...... in the adult testis. METHODS: Transcriptome profiling was performed on total RNA from testes sampled at various time points (n = 17) after 1 Gy of irradiation. Transcripts displaying large overall expression changes during the time series, but small expression changes between neighbouring time points were...... selected for further analysis. These transcripts were separated into clusters and their cellular origin was determined. Immunohistochemistry and in silico quantification was further used to study cellular changes post-irradiation (pi). RESULTS: We identified a subset of transcripts (n = 988) where changes...

  18. The effect of low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbaek, Mette; Hjerrild, Mette; Hallas, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    with three classes of antihypertensive drugs. The effect on blood pressure was estimated by office measurements together with serum potassium and adverse effects. The data were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 544 patients were identified; 200 were excluded because of secondary hypertension, other......Our objective was to estimate the effect of addition of low-dose spironolactone to previous antihypertensive therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. Patients had 25 to 50 mg of spironolactone once daily added to the treatment of hypertension that was uncontrolled despite previous treatment...... indications for spironolactone than hypertension, previous antihypertensive therapy with less than three drugs unless demonstrated intolerance to a third drug, insufficient compliance, and lack of follow-up data. Thus, 344 cases were included in the analysis. The population was 62.1 ± 12.8 years old, 45...

  19. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS.

  20. Low-dose irradiation for controlling prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among North American men and the second leading cause of death in those aged 65 and over. The American Cancer Society recommends testing those over age 50 who are expected to live at least 10 years, even though the ability of early detection to decrease prostate cancer mortality has not been demonstrated. So controversy exists about the appropriateness of screening because of the considerable economic and social burden of diagnosing and treating prostate cancer, coupled with the projected large increase in the number of new cases as the population ages. This very important public health issue could be addressed at low cost by total-body low-dose irradiation therapy to stimulate the patient's own defences to prevent and control most cancers, including prostate cancer, with no symptomatic side effects. (author)

  1. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  2. Effect of low dose radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-ray on apoptosis in mouse spleen. Methods: Time course changes and dose-effect relationship of apoptosis in mouse spleen induced by WBI were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) qualitatively and TUNEL method semi-quantitatively. Results: Many typical apoptotic lymphocytes were found by TEM in mouse spleen after WBI with 2 Gy. No marked alterations of ultrastructure were found following WBI with 0.075 Gy. It was observed by TUNEL that the apoptosis of splenocytes increased after high dose radiation and decreased following low dose radiation (LDR). The dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis showed a J-shaped curve. Conclusion: The effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen was distinct. And the decrease of apoptosis after LDR is considered a manifestation of radiation hormesis

  3. The effects of chronic low dose irradiation on drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.; Taskaev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    It was investigated the influence of the chronic gamma-irradiation in the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability and on the life-span in the laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes in mobile genetic elements and defects in the DNA repair processes. It is shown that the radiation-induced alteration of the traits under study depends from genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains we have observed an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate and life-span. Also it was established that irradiation leads to the frequencies of the GD-sterility and mutability of the snw and h(w+) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. The obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation. (author)

  4. Genetic effects of low-dose irradiation in Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnulin, V.G.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.

    2000-01-01

    Influence of chronic γ-irradiation at the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability in the laboratory strains of Drosophila Melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes by families of mobile genetic elements and of systems of hybrid disgenesis and also violations in reparation processes control mechanisms. It was shown that the rates of induction of recessive lethal mutations depended on genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate were observed. Also in was established that irradiation leads to the increase in frequencies of the gonads sterility and mutability of the sn w and h(w + ) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. Obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation [ru

  5. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radiation-induced T helper Cell Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gridley, Daila S.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to radiation above levels normally encountered on Earth can occur during wartime, accidents such as those at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, and detonation of 'dirty bombs' by terrorists. Relatively high levels of radiation exposure can also occur in certain occupations (low-level waste sites, nuclear power plants, nuclear medicine facilities, airline industry, and space agencies). Depression or dysfunction of the highly radiosensitive cells of the immune system can lead to serious consequences, including increased risk for infections, cancer, hypersensitivity reactions, poor wound healing, and other pathologies. The focus of this research was on the T helper (Th) subset of lymphocytes that secrete cytokines (proteins), and thus control many actions and interactions of other cell types that make up what is collectively known as the immune system. The Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Program is concerned with mechanisms altered by exposure to high energy photons (x- and gamma-rays), protons and electrons. This study compared, for the first time, the low-dose effects of two of these radiation forms, photons and protons, on the response of Th cells, as well as other cell types with which they communicate. The research provided insights regarding gene expression patterns and capacity to secrete potent immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive cytokines, some of which are implicated in pathophysiological processes. Furthermore, the photon versus proton comparison was important not only to healthy individuals who may be exposed, but also to patients undergoing radiotherapy, since many medical centers in the United States, as well as worldwide, are now building proton accelerators. The overall hypothesis of this study was that whole-body exposure to low-dose photons (gamma-rays) will alter CD4+ Th cell function. We further proposed that exposure to low-dose proton radiation will induce a different pattern of gene and functional changes compared to

  6. Investigation of the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabian, M.; Faghihi, R.; Zahmatkesh, M.H.; Meigooni, A.S.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Sina, S.; Bagheri, S.

    2012-01-01

    Medical physicists need dosimeters such as gel dosimeters capable of determining three-dimensional dose distributions with high spatial resolution. To date, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polyacrylamide gel (PAG) polymers are the most promising gel dosimetry systems. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates. The gel dosimeter was used for measurement of the dose distribution around a Cs-137 source from a brachytherapy LDR source to have a range of dose rates from 0.97 Gy h −1 to 0.06 Gy h −1 . After irradiation of the PAGAT gel, it was observed that the dose measured by gel dosimetry was almost the same at different distances (different dose rates) from the source, although the points nearer the source had been expected to receive greater doses. Therefore, it was suspected that the PAGAT gel is dose rate dependent at low dose rates. To test this further, three other sets of measurements were performed by placing vials containing gel at different distances from a Cs-137 source. In the first two measurements, several plastic vials were exposed to equal doses at different dose rates. An ionization chamber was used to measure the dose rate at each distance. In addition, three TLD chips were simultaneously irradiated in order to verify the dose to each vial. In the third measurement, to test the oxygen diffusion through plastic vials, the experiment was repeated again using plastic vials in a nitrogen box and glass vials. The study indicates that oxygen diffusion through plastic vials for dose rates lower than 2 Gy h −1 would affect the gel dosimeter response and it is suggested that the plastic vials or (phantoms) in an oxygen free environment or glass vials should be used for the dosimetry of low dose rate sources using PAGAT gel to avoid oxygen diffusion through the vials.

  7. Clarithromycin (Biaxin)-lenalidomide-low-dose dexamethasone (BiRd) versus lenalidomide-low-dose dexamethasone (Rd) for newly diagnosed myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Francesca; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Coleman, Morton; Kumar, Shaji; Mark, Tomer; Dispenzieri, Angela; Pearse, Roger; Gertz, Morie A; Leonard, John; Lacy, Martha Q; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Roy, Vivek; Jayabalan, David S; Lust, John A; Witzig, Thomas E; Fonseca, Rafael; Kyle, Robert A; Greipp, Philip R; Stewart, A Keith; Niesvizky, Ruben

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this case-matched study was to compare the efficacy and toxicity of the addition of clarithromycin (Biaxin) to lenalidomide/low-dose dexamethasone (BiRd) vs. lenalidomide/low-dose dexamethasone (Rd) for newly diagnosed myeloma. Data from 72 patients treated at the New York Presbyterian Hospital-Cornell Medical Center were retrospectively compared with an equal number of matched pair mates selected among patients seen at the Mayo Clinic who received Rd. Case matching was blinded and was performed according to age, gender, and transplant status. On intention-to-treat analysis, complete response (45.8% vs. 13.9%, P < 0.001) and very-good-partial-response or better (73.6% vs. 33.3%, P < 0.001) were significantly higher with BiRd. Time-to-progression (median 48.3 vs. 27.5 months, P = 0.071), and progression-free survival (median 48.3 vs. 27.5 months, P = 0.044) were higher with BiRd. There was a trend toward better OS with BiRd (3-year OS: 89.7% vs. 73.0%, P = 0.170). Main grade 3-4 toxicities of BiRd were hematological, in particular thrombocytopenia (23.6% vs. 8.3%, P = 0.012). Infections (16.7% vs. 9.7%, P = 0.218) and dermatological toxicity (12.5% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.129) were higher with Rd. Results of this case-matched analysis suggest that there is significant additive value when clarithromycin is added to Rd. Randomized phase III trials are needed to confirm these results. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Intraoperative ventilation: incidence and risk factors for receiving large tidal volumes during general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Bustamante Ana

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing concern of the potential injurious role of ventilatory over-distention in patients without lung injury. No formal guidelines exist for intraoperative ventilation settings, but the use of tidal volumes (VT under 10 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW has been recommended in healthy patients. We explored the incidence and risk factors for receiving large tidal volumes (VT > 10 mL/kg PBW. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of our prospectively collected perioperative electronic database for current intraoperative ventilation practices and risk factors for receiving large tidal volumes (VT > 10 mL/kg PBW. We included all adults undergoing prolonged (≥ 4 h elective abdominal surgery and collected demographic, preoperative (comorbidities, intraoperative (i.e. ventilatory settings, fluid administration and postoperative (outcomes information. We compared patients receiving exhaled tidal volumes > 10 mL/kg PBW with those that received 8-10 or Results Ventilatory settings were non-uniform in the 429 adults included in the analysis. 17.5% of all patients received VT > 10 mL/kg PBW. 34.0% of all obese patients (body mass index, BMI, ≥ 30, 51% of all patients with a height T > 10 mL/kg PBW. Conclusions Ventilation with VT > 10 mL/kg PBW is still common, although poor correlation with PBW suggests it may be unintentional. BMI ≥ 30, female gender and height

  9. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  10. Varicose Vein Stripping Under Low-Dose Spinal Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Muhammedoğlu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Spinal anesthesia is frequently used for procedures involving the lower limbs. Compared with general anesthesia, low-dose spinal anesthesia is a cost-effective method and has advantages such as avoiding hypotension, longer duration of anesthesia and increased length of hospitalization. The aim of this trial was to compare two different low-dose bupivacaine drug regimens. Methods: Sixty unpremedicated patients were randomly allocated into two groups (n=30. There were no differences between the groups in age, weight, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, gender, and duration of surgery. We performed spinal anesthesia at the L3-4 interspace with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. We administered 6.5 mg (group 1 and 8 mg (group 2 0.5% heavy bupivacaine into the subarachnoid space. We positioned the patient laterally to the operation side for 15 minutes, then, turned to supine position. Motor and sensory block was assessed by the Bromage scale and pinprick test. Results: There were significant differences between the two groups in duration of motor block, but no significant differences in hemodynamic response to spinal anesthesia. None of the patients had intraoperative pain. Five patients in group 1 and 2 patients in group 2 had urinary retention. Conclusion: Our observations suggest that 6.5 mg heavy bupivacaine is efficient and suitable for unilateral varicose veins stripping operation. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 25-8

  11. Clinical application of low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Na; Gan Yungen; Shu Huang; Lin FeiFei; Li Zhiyong; Sun Jie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of reducing the value of mA or kV on the image quality and the radiation dose of the patients undergoing low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics. Methods: Thirty patients were divided into three groups, each group has 10 patients. They were group 1 (80 kV and 200 mA), group 2 (120 kV and 80 mA), group 3 (120 kV and 200 mA) The volume CT dose index (CTDI) was recorded and the average dose-length produce (DLP) was calculated in three groups,respectively. Image quality of three groups were compared and scored by two radiologists, and the results were statistically analysed. Results: The CTDI and DLP of 80 kV group (group 2) were 8.7 mGy and (36.80 ± 3.60) mGy · cm, respectively, those of 80 mA group (group 3) were 19.6 mGy and (82.14 ± 7.18) mGy · cm, respectively, and those of conventional-dose group (group 1) were 19.6 mGy and (82.14 ± 7.18) mGy · cm, respectively. There was no significant difference among three groups in diagnostic image quality. Conclusions: Low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics, especially the low-kV scan, may decrease the radiation exposure and guarantee the image quality. (authors)

  12. Low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia (GISP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In this pilot study, aimed at exploring the feasibility of a large-scale trial of low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera (PV), 112 PV patients (42 females, 70 males. aged 17-80 years) were selected for not having a clear indication for, or contraindication to, aspirin treatment and randomized to receive oral aspirin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up duration was 16 +/- 6 months. Measurements of thromboxane A2 production during whole blood clotting demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity in patients receiving aspirin. Aspirin administration was not associated with any bleeding complication. Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study indicates that a biochemically effective regimen of antiplatelet therapy is well tolerated in patients with polycythaemia vera and that a large-scale placebo-controlled trial is feasible.

  13. Beneficial effects of low dose Musa paradisiaca on the semen quality of male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, A S; Omotoso, Gabriel O; Enaibe, B U; Akinola, O B; Tagoe, C N B

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed at determining the effects of administration of mature green fruits of Musa paradisiaca on the semen quality of adult male Wistar rats. THE ANIMALS USED FOR THE STUDY WERE GROUPED INTO THREE: the control group, given 2 ml of double distilled water, a low dose group given 500 mg/kg/day and a high dose group given 1000 mg/kg/day of the plantain fruits, which was made into flour, and dissolved in 2 ml of double distilled water for easy oral administration. Significant increment in the semen parameters was noticed in animals that received a lower dose of the plantain flour, but those animals who received the high dose had marked and very significant reduction in sperm cell concentration and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa. Musa paradisiaca should be consumed in moderate quantities in order to derive its beneficial effects of enhancing male reproductive functions.

  14. Metabolic profile and cardiovascular risk factors among Latin American HIV-infected patients receiving HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Cahn

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Determine the prevalence of metabolic abnormalities (MA and estimate the 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD among Latin American HIV-infected patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. METHODS: A cohort study to evaluate MA and treatment practices to reduce CVD has been conducted in seven Latin American countries. Adult HIV-infected patients with at least one month of HAART were enrolled. Baseline data are presented in this analysis. RESULTS: A total of 4,010 patients were enrolled. Mean age (SD was 41.9 (10 years; median duration of HAART was 35 (IQR: 10-51 months, 44% received protease inhibitors. The prevalence of dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome was 80.2% and 20.2%, respectively. The overall 10-year risk of CVD, as measured by the Framingham risk score (FRF, was 10.4 (24.7. Longer exposure to HAART was documented in patients with dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The FRF score increased with duration of HAART. Male patients had more dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, smoking habit and higher 10-year CVD than females. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional risk factors for CVD are prevalent in this setting leading to intermediate 10-year risk of CVD. Modification of these risk factors through education and intervention programs are needed to reduce CVD.

  15. Risk factors for death in HIV-infected adult African patients receiving anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siika, A M; Wools-Kaloustian, K; Mwangi, A W; Kimaiyo, S N; Diero, L O; Ayuo, P O; Owino-Ong'or, W D; Sidle, J E; Einterz, R M; Yiannoutsos, C T; Musick, B; Tierney, W M

    2010-11-01

    To determine risk factors for death in HIV-infected African patients on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Retrospective Case-control study. The MOH-USAID-AMPATH Partnership ambulatory HIV-care clinics in western Kenya. Between November 2001 and December 2005 demographic, clinical and laboratory data from 527 deceased and 1054 living patients receiving ART were compared to determine independent risk factors for death. Median age at ART initiation was 38 versus 36 years for the deceased and living patients respectively (p100/mm3 (HR=1.553. 95% CI (1.156, 2.087), p<0.003). Patients attending rural clinics had threefold higher risk of dying compared to patients attending clinic at a tertiary referral hospital (p<0.0001). Two years after initiating treatment fifty percent of non-adherent patients were alive compared to 75% of adherent patients. Male gender, WHO Stage and haemoglobin level <10 grams% were associated with time to death while age, marital status, educational level, employment status and weight were not. Profoundly immunosuppressed patients were more likely to die early in the course of treatment. Also, patients receiving care in rural clinics were at greater risk of dying than those receiving care in the tertiary referral hospital.

  16. Incidence of intracranial bleeds in new users of low-dose aspirin: a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, L; Gaist, D; Soriano-Gabarró, M; García Rodríguez, L A

    2017-06-01

    Essentials Intracranial bleeds (ICB) are serious clinical events that have been associated with aspirin use. Incidence rates of ICB were calculated among new-users of low-dose aspirin in the UK (2000-2012). Over a median follow-up of 5.58 years, the incidence of ICB was 0.08 per 100 person-years. Our estimates are valuable for inclusion in risk-benefit assessments of low-dose aspirin use. Background Low-dose aspirin protects against both ischemic cardiovascular (CV) events and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, low-dose aspirin may be associated with a slightly increased risk of intracranial bleeds (ICBs). Objectives To obtain the incidence rates of ICBs overall and by patient subgroups among new users of low-dose aspirin. Patients/Methods Using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) UK primary-care database (2000-2012), we identified a cohort of new users of low-dose aspirin aged 40-84 years (N = 199 079; mean age at start of follow-up, 63.9 years) and followed them for up to 14 years (median 5.58 years). Incident ICB cases were identified and validated through linkage to hospitalization data and/or review of THIN records with free-text comments. Incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results Eight hundred and eighty-one incident ICBs cases were identified: 407 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), 283 cases of subdural hematoma (SDH), and 191 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Incidence rates per 100 person-years were 0.08 (95% CI 0.07-0.08) for all ICBs, 0.04 (95% CI 0.03-0.04) for ICH, 0.03 (95% CI 0.02-0.03) for SDH, and 0.02 (95% CI 0.01-0.02) for SAH. The ICB incidence rates per 100 person-years for individuals with an indication of primary CV disease prevention were 0.07 (95% CI 0.06-0.07) and 0.09 (95% CI 0.08-0.10) for secondary CV disease prevention. Incidence rates were higher in men for SDH, and higher in women for ICH and SAH. Conclusions Our results provide valuable estimates of the absolute ICB risk for

  17. Cancer and low dose responses In Vivo: implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    This paper discusses the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, risk prediction and radiation protection. The summary implications for the radiation protection system are that at low doses the conceptual basis of the present system appears to be incorrect. The belief that the current system embodies the precautionary principle and that the LNT assumption is cautious appears incorrect. The concept of dose additivity appears incorrect. Effective dose (Sievert) and the weighting factors on which it is based appear to be invalid. There may be no constant and appropriate value of DDREF for radiological protection dosimetry. The use of dose as a predictor of risk needs to be re-examined. The use of dose limits as a means of limiting risk need to be re-evaluated.

  18. Early brain response to low-dose radiation exposure involves molecular networks and pathways associated with cognitive functions, advanced aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy and environmental nuclear contamination as well as for Earth-orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of mouse brain tissue after whole-body irradiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high-dose radiation (2 Gy) and that low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues and pathways that were specific for brain tissue. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (P < 10(-53)) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified nine neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose irradiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down-regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p -53 ) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease

  20. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  2. Addition of low dose hCG to rFSh benefits older women during ovarian stimulation for IVF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomaa Hala

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the outcome of IVF cycles in women receiving controlled ovarian stimulation with recFSH or recFSH plus low dose hCG. Methods A retrospective case control study, performed at a private practice affiliated with an academic institute. Patients were infertile women who were treated with IVF/ICSI and controlled ovarian stimulation in a long GnRH agonist protocol using either low dose hCG in addition to recFSH [N = 88] or recFSH alone [N = 99]. Primary outcomes were mean FSH dose, number of mature eggs, number of fertilized eggs, and serum levels of estradiol. Secondary outcomes were endometrial thickness, cycle cancellations and pregnancy rates. Results A significant increase in number of mature and fertilized eggs was observed in women over 40 years of age using low dose hCG in addition to recFSH. The estradiol level was significantly higher on the day of hCG administration and the serum level of FSH on cycle day 7 and on the day of hCG administration were lower. Conclusion Addition of low dose hCG to recFSH compared with recFSH alone significantly modified cycle characteristics in patients >/= 40 years and could be of potential benefit for IVF cycles in older infertile women.

  3. Comparing the Efficacy of Low Dose and Conventional Dose of Oral Isotretinoin in Treatment of Moderate and Severe Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Fard, Nasrin Motamedi; Motamedi, Narges; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effect of low-dose isotretinoin with its conventional dose in patients with moderate and severe acne. This was a clinical trial conducted on 60 male and female patients with moderate and severe acne vulgaris. The patients were divided into two treatment groups: 0.5 mg/kg/day isotretinoin capsule and low-dose isotretinoin capsule (0.25 mg/kg/day). Patients in both groups received 6-month treatment. At the end of the 6 th month and 12 th month (6 months after the end of the treatment), they were examined again, and their improvement was determined and compared. The average severity of acne in the two treatment groups did not differ significantly within any of the study periods. The most common side effects were nose dryness in the low-dose group (17%) and hair thinning and loss in the conventional-dose group (33.2%), although all the patients had dry lips. According to the same severity of the acne in two groups in different study periods, as well as fewer side effects and more patients' satisfaction, the low-dose isotretinoin can be considered in the treatment of acne.

  4. A deep convolutional neural network using directional wavelets for low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunhee; Min, Junhong; Ye, Jong Chul

    2017-10-01

    Due to the potential risk of inducing cancer, radiation exposure by X-ray CT devices should be reduced for routine patient scanning. However, in low-dose X-ray CT, severe artifacts typically occur due to photon starvation, beam hardening, and other causes, all of which decrease the reliability of the diagnosis. Thus, a high-quality reconstruction method from low-dose X-ray CT data has become a major research topic in the CT community. Conventional model-based de-noising approaches are, however, computationally very expensive, and image-domain de-noising approaches cannot readily remove CT-specific noise patterns. To tackle these problems, we want to develop a new low-dose X-ray CT algorithm based on a deep-learning approach. We propose an algorithm which uses a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) which is applied to the wavelet transform coefficients of low-dose CT images. More specifically, using a directional wavelet transform to extract the directional component of artifacts and exploit the intra- and inter- band correlations, our deep network can effectively suppress CT-specific noise. In addition, our CNN is designed with a residual learning architecture for faster network training and better performance. Experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm effectively removes complex noise patterns from CT images derived from a reduced X-ray dose. In addition, we show that the wavelet-domain CNN is efficient when used to remove noise from low-dose CT compared to existing approaches. Our results were rigorously evaluated by several radiologists at the Mayo Clinic and won second place at the 2016 "Low-Dose CT Grand Challenge." To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first deep-learning architecture for low-dose CT reconstruction which has been rigorously evaluated and proven to be effective. In addition, the proposed algorithm, in contrast to existing model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods, has considerable potential to benefit from

  5. Cytogenetic characterization of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity in Cobalt-60 irradiated human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Gnanada S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Human cells were irradiated in G1 or G2 and evaluated for micronuclei and bridges. • Cells irradiated in G2 but not in G1 exhibit low dose hyper-radiosensitivity. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G2 do not fit a linear-no-threshold model. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G1 fit a linear-no-threshold model. - Abstract: The dose-effect relationships of cells exposed to ionizing radiation are frequently described by linear quadratic (LQ) models over an extended dose range. However, many mammalian cell lines, when acutely irradiated in G2 at doses ≤0.3 Gy, show hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) as measured by reduced clonogenic cell survival, thereby indicating greater cell lethality than is predicted by extrapolation from high-dose responses. We therefore hypothesized that the cytogenetic response in G2 cells to low doses would also be steeper than predicted by LQ extrapolation from high doses. We tested our hypothesis by exposing four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines to 0–400 cGy of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was used to determine the frequencies of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. To characterize the dependence of the cytogenetic damage on dose, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare the responses in the low- (HRS) and high-dose response regions. Our data indicate that the slope of the response for all four cell lines at ≤20 cGy during G2 is greater than predicted by an LQ extrapolation from the high-dose responses for both micronuclei and bridges. These results suggest that the biological consequences of low-dose exposures could be underestimated and may not provide accurate risk assessments following such exposures.

  6. Low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy preserves good quality of life in buccal mucosa cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayier, A.; Hayashi, Keiji; Yoshimura, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the results and long-term changes in radiation toxicity of stage I-II buccal mucosa cancer patients treated by low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy with 198 Au grains. A total of 133 stage I-II buccal mucosa carcinomas patients received 198 Au grain implantation brachytherapy between January 1982 and July 2005: 75 of them were treated by 198 Au grain implantation alone and 58 were treated by 198 Au implantation in combination with external irradiation. The average 198 Au-grain dose was 70 Gy in 7 days. Gross tumor areas ranged from 2.4 cm 2 to 9 cm 2 , and the clinical target areas ranged from 6 cm 2 to 15 cm 2 . The follow-up periods ranged from 3 months to 20 years (mean: 5 years 11 months and median: 5 years 1 months). Failure at the site of the primary lesion occurred in 17 patients. Post-treatment mucosal ulceration developed in 15 patients, and all were cured within 25 months by conservative treatment. Osteoradionecrosis was diagnosed in 8 patients, but only one patient required surgical treatment. No severe complications or aggravation of complications developed more than 10 years after treatment. The results of low-dose-rate (LDR)-brachytherapy (BT) alone and LDR-BT in combination with external irradiation at a total dose of 25 Gy were acceptable from the standpoint of cure rate and quality of life (QOL). (author)

  7. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Soo Hyung [School of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, Jun; Wang Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K; Zheng Bin, E-mail: zhengb@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 {+-} 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  8. Pancytopenia after low dose methotrexate therapy in a hemodialysis patient: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Ping; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Guh, Jinn-Yuh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2006-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a side effect of pancytopenia. However, only a few cases of severe pancytopenia caused by low-dose MTX therapy have been reported, and the condition is rarely reported in uremic patients on dialysis therapy. We thereby report a hemodialysis patient who developed severe pancytopenia after oral treatment with low-dose MTX for RA. A 55-year-old woman who had been on regular hemodialysis treatment for 7 yr suffered from RA for 10 yr. She was regularly treated with celecoxib, prednisolone, and sulfasalazine in the past year. Because of the increasing arthralgia, 7.5 mg per week MTX was prescribed 3 months before admission. Stomatitis, fever, general fatigue, multiple skin carbuncles, and easy bruising developed after a cumulative dose of 90 mg. Pancytopenia was found at admission and the nadir of white blood cell count was 250/microL with 28% neutrophils, hematocrit was 22%, and platelet count was 6000/microL. Eosinophil counts increased from 11.5% initially to 26.1% on the sixth admission day. Transfusion with red blood cells and platelets, and appropriate antibiotics and folic acid were prescribed. She continued receiving regular hemodialysis and eventually recovered within 3 weeks.

  9. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N [Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image.

  10. Low-dose radiation therapy for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Hideaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Mariya, Yasushi; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi; Noda, Yasuko.

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of low-dose radiation was evaluated in the treatment of eyes with subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. Ten eyes of ten patients received a total dose of 14 Gy of 10 MV X-rays in seven fractions and the mean follow-up time was 12 months (range 9-18 months). Thirteen control eyes of thirteen patients were followed for an average of 18 months (range 12-24 months). Visual acuity was improved in 2 eyes (20%), unchanged in 3 eyes (30%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and it was improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients at their last follow-up examinations. Funduscopic and angiographic findings were improved in 3 eyes (30%), unchanged in 2 eyes (20%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and they were improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients. These results suggested that low-dose radiation is beneficial for the management of subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  11. Low-dose radiation therapy for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Hideaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Mariya, Yasushi; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Noda, Yasuko

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of low-dose radiation was evaluated in the treatment of eyes with subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. Ten eyes of ten patients received a total dose of 14 Gy of 10 MV X-rays in seven fractions and the mean follow-up time was 12 months (range 9-18 months). Thirteen control eyes of thirteen patients were followed for an average of 18 months (range 12-24 months). Visual acuity was improved in 2 eyes (20%), unchanged in 3 eyes (30%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and it was improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients at their last follow-up examinations. Funduscopic and angiographic findings were improved in 3 eyes (30%), unchanged in 2 eyes (20%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and they were improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients. These results suggested that low-dose radiation is beneficial for the management of subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  12. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N

    2004-01-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image

  13. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  14. Pneumonia risk in COPD patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids alone or in combination: TORCH study results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crim, C; Calverley, P M A; Anderson, J A

    2009-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are important in reducing exacerbation frequency associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little is known about the risk of associated infections. In a post hoc analysis of the TOwards a Revolution in COPD Health (TORCH) study, we analys...... not be concluded for FP. Despite the benefits of ICS-containing regimens in COPD management, healthcare providers should remain vigilant regarding the possible development of pneumonia as a complication in COPD patients receiving such therapies....

  15. Increase in overall mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving different oral diabetes drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Pigarova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Pantalone KM, Kattan MW, Yu C, Wells BJ, Arrigain S, Jain A, Atreja A, Zimmerman RS. Increase in overall mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving glipizide, glyburide or glimepiride monotherapy versus metformin: a retrospective analysis. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2012 Sep;14(9:803-809.

  16. Parotid gland mean dose as a xerostomia predictor in low-dose domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabryś, Hubert Szymon; Buettner, Florian; Sterzing, Florian; Hauswald, Henrik; Bangert, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Xerostomia is a common side effect of radiotherapy resulting from excessive irradiation of salivary glands. Typically, xerostomia is modeled by the mean dose-response characteristic of parotid glands and prevented by mean dose constraints to either contralateral or both parotid glands. The aim of this study was to investigate whether normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models based on the mean radiation dose to parotid glands are suitable for the prediction of xerostomia in a highly conformal low-dose regime of modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques. We present a retrospective analysis of 153 head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. The Lyman Kutcher Burman (LKB) model was used to evaluate predictive power of the parotid gland mean dose with respect to xerostomia at 6 and 12 months after the treatment. The predictive performance of the model was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and precision-recall (PR) curves. Average mean doses to ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands were 25.4 Gy and 18.7 Gy, respectively. QUANTEC constraints were met in 74% of patients. Mild to severe (G1+) xerostomia prevalence at both 6 and 12 months was 67%. Moderate to severe (G2+) xerostomia prevalence at 6 and 12 months was 20% and 15%, respectively. G1 + xerostomia was predicted reasonably well with area under the ROC curve ranging from 0.69 to 0.76. The LKB model failed to provide reliable G2 + xerostomia predictions at both time points. Reduction of the mean dose to parotid glands below QUANTEC guidelines resulted in low G2 + xerostomia rates. In this dose domain, the mean dose models predicted G1 + xerostomia fairly well, however, failed to recognize patients at risk of G2 + xerostomia. There is a need for the development of more flexible models able to capture complexity of dose response in this dose regime.

  17. [Weekly low-dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. Review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganelli, P; Troise Rioda, W

    1993-10-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an antifolic drug that in recent years has been largely employed in the treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Both short and long term clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy and good tolerability. It induces a significant improvement of all clinical variables and a decrease in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and other acute phase reactants with a steroid sparing effect. The probability of continuing MTX therapy for up to 5 years is 46-55% whereas that of continuing gold, hydroxychloroquine, sulfasalazine or D-penicillamine therapy is less than 20%. MTX is a rapidly acting drug with a clinical response within 4 weeks and a plateau phase after 6 months of therapy. Discontinuation of long-term MTX therapy induces a flare-up of the disease so that patients receiving long-term MTX must continue the drug to maintain clinical benefits. In spite of its clinical efficacy, MTX does not seem to have a significant effect on disease progression as determined radiographically. In this respect, MTX appears to have some superiority when compared to azathioprine, but not when compared to gold salts. MTX has been employed in patients with RA unresponsive to other Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs), but according to some recent views on the therapeutic strategy of RA, it could be used in early RA as a first choice drug. Toxic effects are the main reason in limiting long-term MTX treatment. Hepatic toxicity is one of the more common side-effects of MTX, but the recognition of its "risk factors" such as alcohol abuse, may reduce it. Acute pneumonitis is one of the more severe complications of MTX therapy and may be life-threatening. In RA patients treated with MTX are also reported complications of immunosuppression, such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia whose clinical-radiological picture may be similar to that of acute pneumonitis. The mechanism of action of low-dose weekly MTX in RA is still unclear, but it might be more

  18. Hearing preservation after low dose linac radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma depends on initial hearing and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel E.; Potter, Andrew E.; Zacest, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess long term outcomes and factors determining hearing preservation after low dose linac stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuroma (AN) at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using prospectively collected data. Material and methods: Between 1994 and 2010, 102 patients had SRS for AN. Five patients had neurofibromatosis type 2, six sporadic cases had relapsed after surgery, and the remaining 91 sporadic cases had primary SRS. Dose was 12 or 14 Gy. Sustained changes ⩾ 2 mm in any diameter were deemed significant, and useful hearing was defined as inter-aural pure tone average (PTA) ⩽ 50 dB. Possible prognostic factors for hearing retention were tested by dividing the patients at pre-specified cutpoints: age (60 years), maximum tumour diameter (20 mm), initial PTA (20 dB) and dose (12 vs 14 Gy). Results: Eighty-four of the 91 sporadic primary SRS cases were evaluable for tumour control with at least one post-treatment MRI. Their median follow-up was 65 mo (range 10–184 mo). Eighty-two (97.6%) were controlled, the remaining two requiring salvage surgery for progression at 5.75 and 9.75 years. Also, one of the post-operative cases required surgery at 2.1 years after SRS. For the 50 sporadic primary SRS patients with initially useful hearing, median age was 56 (range 21–76), median initial PTA 16 dB (range −11 to +45 dB) and median tumour diameter 21 mm (range 10–33 mm). Four received 14 Gy, the rest 12 Gy. After SRS, 19 patients (38%) retained useful hearing. The Kaplan–Meier estimated preservation rate at 5 years was 50% (95% CI 36–64%) but by 10 years, this had fallen to 23% (95% CI 12–41%). On univariate analysis, the only significant factor was initial PTA (P < 0.0001). The estimated risk of hearing loss after SRS for patients with initial PTA ⩾ 20 dB was 5.0 (95% CI 2.2–11.2) times that with PTA < 20 dB. Conclusions: Tumour control was excellent (99/102 = 97% freedom from surgical salvage). Hearing preservation was strongly

  19. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria; Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  20. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica [Department of Radiation Physics, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  1. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  2. Low doses of prophylactic cranial irradiation effective in limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenstein, James H.; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J.; Blitzer, Peter H.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Floody, Patrick A.; Harwin, William N.; Teufel, Thomas E.; Raymond, Michael G.; Reeves, James A.; Hart, Lowell L.; McCleod, Michael J.; Pizarro, Alejandro; Gabarda, Antonio L.; Rana, Van G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for the prevention of brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer remains controversial, both in terms of efficacy and the optimal dose-fractionation scheme. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of PCI at low doses. Methods and Materials: One hundred and ninety-seven patients were referred to our institution for treatment of limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung between June 1986 and December 1992. Follow-up ranged from 1.1 to 89.8 months, with a mean of 19 months. Eighty-five patients received PCI. Results: Patients receiving PCI exhibited brain failure in 15%, while 38% of untreated patients developed metastases. This degree of prophylaxis was achieved with a median total dose of 25.20 Gy and a median fraction size of 1.80 Gy. At these doses, acute and late complications were minimal. Patients receiving PCI had significantly better 1-year and 2-year overall survivals (68% and 46% vs. 33% and 13%). However, patients with a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy and better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) were overrepresented in the PCI group. In an attempt to compare similar patients in both groups (PCI vs. no PCI), only patients with KPS ≥ 80, CR or near-CR to chemotherapy, and treatment with attempt to cure, were compared. In this good prognostic group, survival was still better in the PCI group (p = 0.0018). Conclusion: In this patient population, relatively low doses of PCI have accomplished a significant reduction in the incidence of brain metastasis with little toxicity. Whether such treatment truly improves survival awaits the results of additional prospective randomized trials

  3. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Broock, M. van; Gillette, V.H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  4. China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with Low-dose Computed 
Tomography (2018 version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in China. The results from a randomized controlled trial using annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT in specific high-risk groups demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality. The aim of tihs study is to establish the China National lung cancer screening guidelines for clinical practice. Methods The China lung cancer early detection and treatment expert group (CLCEDTEG established the China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with multidisciplinary representation including 4 thoracic surgeons, 4 thoracic radiologists, 2 medical oncologists, 2 pulmonologists, 2 pathologist, and 2 epidemiologist. Members have engaged in interdisciplinary collaborations regarding lung cancer screening and clinical care of patients with at risk for lung cancer. The expert group reviewed the literature, including screening trials in the United States and Europe and China, and discussed local best clinical practices in the China. A consensus-based guidelines, China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline (CNLCSG, was recommended by CLCEDTEG appointed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission, based on results of the National Lung Screening Trial, systematic review of evidence related to LDCT screening, and protocol of lung cancer screening program conducted in rural China. Results Annual lung cancer screening with LDCT is recommended for high risk individuals aged 50-74 years who have at least a 20 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past five years. Individualized decision making should be conducted before LDCT screening. LDCT screening also represents an opportunity to educate patients as to the health risks of smoking; thus, education should be integrated into the screening process in order to assist smoking cessation. Conclusion A lung cancer screening guideline is recommended for the high-risk population in China

  5. [China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with Low-dose Computed 
Tomography (2018 version)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Fan, Yaguang; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Youlin; Wang, Guiqi; Huang, Yunchao; Wang, Xinyun; Wu, Ning; Zhang, Guozheng; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Bu, Hong; Li, Yin; Wei, Sen; Chen, Liang'an; Hu, Chengping; Shi, Yuankai; Sun, Yan

    2018-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in China. The results from a randomized controlled trial using annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in specific high-risk groups demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality. The aim of tihs study is to establish the China National lung cancer screening guidelines for clinical practice. The China lung cancer early detection and treatment expert group (CLCEDTEG) established the China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with multidisciplinary representation including 4 thoracic surgeons, 4 thoracic radiologists, 2 medical oncologists, 2 pulmonologists, 2 pathologist, and 2 epidemiologist. Members have engaged in interdisciplinary collaborations regarding lung cancer screening and clinical care of patients with at risk for lung cancer. The expert group reviewed the literature, including screening trials in the United States and Europe and China, and discussed local best clinical practices in the China. A consensus-based guidelines, China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline (CNLCSG), was recommended by CLCEDTEG appointed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission, based on results of the National Lung Screening Trial, systematic review of evidence related to LDCT screening, and protocol of lung cancer screening program conducted in rural China. Annual lung cancer screening with LDCT is recommended for high risk individuals aged 50-74 years who have at least a 20 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past five years. Individualized decision making should be conducted before LDCT screening. LDCT screening also represents an opportunity to educate patients as to the health risks of smoking; thus, education should be integrated into the screening process in order to assist smoking cessation. A lung cancer screening guideline is recommended for the high-risk population in China. Additional research , including LDCT combined with biomarkers, is

  6. The special cell effects and somatic consequences of exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regina Fedortseva; Sergei Aleksanin; Eugene Zheleznyakov; Irina Bychkovskaya

    2007-01-01

    effects, are not connected to cell division. They appear according to the principle 'all or nothing' in low doses of radiation (in mammals less than 1 Gy). In slowly regenerating tissues these effects (we called them 'alternative effects' result in various subcellular disorders (mostly cytoplasmic). An irreversible change of intracellular homeostasis and dystrophic processes occur within a few hours after exposure. This can result in morphological and functional changes in tissues (depopulation), thus providing for the development of non-carcinogenic somatic consequences of low-dose irradiation. Presumably the changes of this kind are responsible for pathogenesis of the remote somatic disorders following a moderate radiation exposure. The alternative effects are based on special hidden non-mutational alterations. Unlike the traditionally studied alterations they involve all cells of the population and can be inherited by all off-springs (at least in F1). This substantially broadens our notion of biological and applied significance of this phenomenon. Conclusion: The most typical manifestation of alternative effects is a persistently increasing predisposition of cells to damage and death. It is likely that other manifestations are also possible, including a non-specific increase of likelihood (due to impairment of reparation capability) of genome damage. This could give a better insight into the problem of biological risks of cancer transformation and occurrence of hereditary disorders after exposure to low-dose irradiation. It is essential that different biological organisms may develop alternative effects not only due to radiation but other kinds of exposure. This represents a substantial ecological importance of alternative effects and requires development of new methods of assessment of external factors.

  7. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Relationship between biological benefit and damage induction. A synopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    damage at high doses but protection at low doses. This low-dose induced protection mainly functions against accumulation of DNA damage from endogenous sources, such as ROS. Bystander effects from high-dosed cells to non-irradiated neighboring cells appear to induce both damage and protection. With respect to oncogenesis, a model using microdosimetry and based on the above dual response pattern at low doses and dose rates is consistent with published non-linear epidemiological and experimental data and, thus, contradicts the linear-no-threshold dose-risk hypothesis for radiation induced cancer. The LNT hypothesis should be abandoned and be replaced by a hypothesis that is scientifically justified and causes less unreasonable fear and unnecessary expenditure. (author)

  8. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    time, and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose-rate and irradiation time. Many epidemiological and experimental studies have been demonstrated that biological responses to radiation at low dose/low dose rate does not follow LNT. Our study supports their observations with sufficient statistical power. Threshold of radiation risk will be discussed. (Author)

  9. Accounts Receivable Risk Management Practices and Growth of SMEs in Kakamega County, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Nelima LYANI (SINDANI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Accounts receivable risk management is a structured approach to managing uncertainties through risk assessment, developing strategies to manage it, and mitigation of risk using managerial resources (Gakure et al., 2012 Although there has been a considerable interest by government to promote SMEs by encouraging owners to take up government tenders, in Kenya the number of SMEs capable of sustaining themselves is still low. Studies show credit risk as an important variable affecting firms. Nonetheless, these risks’ influence on SMEs has not received as much attention as it should. This study’s main objective was to examine the influence of credit risk assessment practices on growth of SMEs. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of credit risk assessment practices on growth of SMEs in Kakamega County, in Kenya. Causal research design was applied to show the influence of credit risk assessment practice on growth. Using the sampling technique of purposive stratified random, a sample size of 359 out of 5401 SMEs was used from Kakamega Central Sub-County that had been in operation between 2013 and 2015. Secondary data was acquired from the Kakamega County Revenue Department, for the period under study. The hypotheses that form the premises for a regression model using analysis techniques like homoscedasticity and autocorrelation. Ordinary Least Square method was utilized to establish the relationship of cause-effect between variables while hypothesis was tested at 5% significance level. The overall model was discovered to be significant considering the F=14.918 and p-value (0.00 < 0.05. The findings revealed that good credit risk assessment practices when adopted by SMEs lead to growth. The study recommended that owners and managers should be trained and made to understand the various techniques risk management to well manage them so as to increase growth. The findings would form a basis for government and policy makers to formulate

  10. Is Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Safe to Take Following Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass for Obesity Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xian; Hong, Dennis; Anvari, Mehran; Tiboni, Maria; Amin, Nalin; Gmora, Scott

    2017-05-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery is a safe and effective procedure for patients with severe obesity. One potential complication of LRYGB is the development of marginal ulcers (MUs). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to significantly increase the likelihood of developing marginal ulcers after surgery. However, the risk associated with low-dose aspirin consumption is not well defined. We examined the impact of daily low-dose aspirin (81 mg) on the development of marginal ulcers following LRYGB. A retrospective cohort design studied patients undergoing LRYGB surgery, between January 2009 and January 2013, at a single, high-volume bariatric center in Ontario, Canada. The marginal ulcer rate of patients taking low-dose aspirin after surgery was compared to that of the control patients who did not take any NSAID. Diagnosis of MU was confirmed by upper endoscopy in patients presenting with symptoms and a history indicative of marginal ulceration. A chi-square test of independence was performed to examine the difference in marginal ulcer rates. A total of 1016 patients underwent LRYGB. Patients taking aspirin were more likely to be male, older, and have diabetes than patients not taking NSAIDs. Of the 1016 patients, 145 (14.3%) took low-dose aspirin following LRYGB and the rest did not (n = 871, 85.7%). The incidence of marginal ulceration was not significantly different between the two treatment groups (12/145, 8.3% versus 90/871, 10.3%; p = 0.45). Patients treated with LRYGB at our institution were not at increased risk of marginal ulcer formation when taking low-dose aspirin after surgery.

  11. A prospective randomized study of the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuwan, Pawana; Tuntawiroon, Malulee; Sritongkul, Nopamol; Chaudakshetrin, Pachee; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Komoltri, Chulalak; Thepamongkhol, Kullathorn; Khiewvan, Benjapa; Tuchinda, Pongpija; Sriussadaporn, Sutin

    2011-03-01

    To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. One hundred fifty patients with proven hyperthyroidism were randomly allocated into the high (74 patients) and low (76 patients) dose regimen of I-131 treatment. Four patients of the high dose group and one patient of the low dose group were excluded because of lost follow-up. A gland-specific dosage was calculated on the estimated weight of thyroid gland and 24-hour I-131 uptake. The high and low I-131 dose regimens were 150 microCi/gm and 100 microCi/gm, respectively. The first mean radioiodine activity administered to the high and low dose group was 10.2 and 8 mCi, respectively. Repeated treatment was given to 25 patients of the high dose group and 40 patients of the low dose group. Clinical outcome and calculated costs for outpatient attendances, and laboratory tests together with initial and subsequent treatments were evaluated for one year after I-131 treatment. Elimination of hyperthyroidism that resulted in either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism was classified as therapeutic success. The cost effectiveness was also compared. At 6 months after treatment, 45 (64.3%) patients receiving high dose and 59 (78.7%) patients receiving low dose were hyperthyroidism. Clinical outcome at one year showed persistence of hyperthyroidism in 21 (30%) patients of the high dose regimen and 36 (48%) patients of the low dose regimen. At one year post treatment, it was demonstrated that the high dose regimen could eliminate hyperthyroidism in a significantly shorter time than the low dose regimen, i.e., 259.6 days and 305.5 days, respectively, p = 0.008). For the persistent hyperthyroid patients, the average total cost of treatment in the low dose group was significantly higher than that of the high dose group, i.e., 13,422.78 baht and 10,942.79 baht, respectively; p = 0.050). A high dose regimen of radioactive iodine treatment is more effective than

  12. Experimental RBE values of high LET radiations at low doses and the implications for quality factor assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    RBE determinations of special relevance to the quality factor assigned for radiation protection purposes are those relating to the effects of special importance at low doses, namely carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. Measurements of RBE that enable the maximum value of RBE, namely RBEsub(M), to be determined at low doses require data points as low as 0.1 Gy or even 0.01 Gy or high LET radiation. Corresponding data points as low as 0.5 Gy to 0.25 Gy or less of low LET radiation are also needed. Relatively few such measurements have been made, but many more are available now than formerly. A review of recent RBEs for tumour induction, life shortening, transformation, cytogenetics and genetic endpoints, which updated an earlier review, indicates a broad range of results. The principle findings are that X rays are more effective than hard γ rays at low doses by a factor o