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Sample records for risk gene variants

  1. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine ... variant of the gene for the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) with a decreased risk for addiction to ...

  2. Gene variants as risk factors for gastroschisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Schultz, Kathleen; Tom, Lauren; Lin, Bin; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Lammer, Edward J.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    In a population‐based case‐control study in California of 228 infants, we investigated 75 genetic variants in 20 genes and risk of gastroschisis with regard to maternal age, race/ethnicity, vitamin use, and smoking exposure. We hypothesized that genes related to vascular compromise may interact with environmental factors to affect the risk of gastroschisis. Haplotypes were constructed for 75 gene variants using the HaploView program. Risk for gastroschisis associated with each gene variant was calculated for both the homozygotes and the heterozygotes, with the homozygous wildtypes as the referent. Risks were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by logistic regression. We found 11 gene variants with increased risk and four variants with decreased risk of gastroschisis for heterozygous (ORh) or homozygous variants (ORv) genotypes. These included NOS3 (rs1036145) ORh = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.7); NOS3 (rs10277237) ORv = 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3–6.0); ADD1 (rs12503220) ORh = 2.9 (95% CI: 1.6–5.4), GNB3 (rs5443) ORh = 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1–0.5), ORv = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.9); ICAM1 (rs281428) ORv = 6.9 (95% CI: 2.1–22.9), ICAM1 (rs3093030) ORv = 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2–5.6); ICAM4 (rs281438) ORv = 4.9 (95% CI: 1.4–16.6), ICAM5 (rs281417) ORh = 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1–4.1), ORv = 4.8 (95% CI: 1.7–13.6); ICAM5 (rs281440) ORh = 23.7 (95% CI: 5.5–102.5), ORv = 20.6 (95% CI: 3.4–124.3); ICAM5 (rs2075741) ORv = 2.2 (95% CI: 1.1–4.4); NAT1 ORv = 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1–0.9). There were additional associations between several gene variants and gastroschisis among women aged 20–24 and among mothers with and without vitamin use. NOS3, ADD1, ICAM1, ICAM4, and ICAM5 warrant further investigation in additional populations and with the interaction of additional environmental exposures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27616475

  3. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... July 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, ... factors. Population-Based Autism Genetics and Environment Study Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from ...

  4. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  5. Multi-variant study of obesity risk genes in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijian; Wilson, James G; Jiang, Fan; Griswold, Michael; Correa, Adolfo; Mei, Hao

    2016-11-30

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been successful in identifying obesity risk genes by single-variant association analysis. For this study, we designed steps of analysis strategy and aimed to identify multi-variant effects on obesity risk among candidate genes. Our analyses were focused on 2137 African American participants with body mass index measured in the Jackson Heart Study and 657 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped at 8 GWAS-identified obesity risk genes. Single-variant association test showed that no SNPs reached significance after multiple testing adjustment. The following gene-gene interaction analysis, which was focused on SNPs with unadjusted p-valueobesity risk. Our study evidenced that obesity risk genes generated multi-variant effects, which can be additive or non-linear interactions, and multi-variant study is an important supplement to existing GWAS for understanding genetic effects of obesity risk genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic variants in epigenetic genes and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrian, Arancha; Pharoah, Paul D; Ahmed, Shahana; Ropero, Santiago; Fraga, Mario F; Smith, Paula L; Conroy, Don; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Esteller, Manel; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2006-08-01

    Epigenetic events, resulting changes in gene expression capacity, are important in tumour progression, and variation in genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms might therefore be important in cancer susceptibility. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined common variants in 12 genes coding for DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetyltransferases, histone methyltrasferases and methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, for association with breast cancer in a large case-control study (N cases = 4474 and N controls = 4580). We identified 63 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that efficiently tag all the known common variants in these genes, and are also expected to tag any unknown SNP in each gene. We found some evidence for association for six SNPs: DNMT3b-c31721t [P (2 df) = 0.007], PRDM2-c99243 t [P (2 df) = 0.03] and t105413c [P-recessive = 0.05], EHMT1-g-9441a [P (2df) = 0.05] and g41451t (P-trend = 0.04), and EHMT2-S237S [P (2df) = 0.04]. The most significant result was for DNMT3b-c31721t (P-trend = 0.124 after adjusting for multiple testing). However, there were three other results with P variants in histone methyltransferases, and warrant the design of larger epidemiological and biochemical studies to establish the true meaning of these findings.

  7. Genetic variants in telomere-maintenance genes and bladder cancer risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyuan Gu; Yao Zhu; Dingwei Ye

    2013-01-01

    Telomere maintenance genes play an important role in maintaining the integrity of the telomere structure that protects chromosome ends, and telomere dysfunction may lead to tumorigenesis. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes has been confirmed. Cumulative evidence shows that the dif erence of telomere length and stability among the indi-vidual depends on the genetic variants of telomere maintenance genes. Genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes may af ect telomere length and stability, thus the increased cancer risk. This review intends to summarize the association of genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes with bladder cancer risk.

  8. A global evolutionary and metabolic analysis of human obesity gene risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Joseph J; Hazlett, Zachary S; Orlando, Robert A; Garver, William S

    2017-09-05

    It is generally accepted that the selection of gene variants during human evolution optimized energy metabolism that now interacts with our obesogenic environment to increase the prevalence of obesity. The purpose of this study was to perform a global evolutionary and metabolic analysis of human obesity gene risk variants (110 human obesity genes with 127 nearest gene risk variants) identified using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to enhance our knowledge of early and late genotypes. As a result of determining the mean frequency of these obesity gene risk variants in 13 available populations from around the world our results provide evidence for the early selection of ancestral risk variants (defined as selection before migration from Africa) and late selection of derived risk variants (defined as selection after migration from Africa). Our results also provide novel information for association of these obesity genes or encoded proteins with diverse metabolic pathways and other human diseases. The overall results indicate a significant differential evolutionary pattern for the selection of obesity gene ancestral and derived risk variants proposed to optimize energy metabolism in varying global environments and complex association with metabolic pathways and other human diseases. These results are consistent with obesity genes that encode proteins possessing a fundamental role in maintaining energy metabolism and survival during the course of human evolution. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Clendenen

    Full Text Available Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  10. Common variants within oxidative phosphorylation genes influence risk of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher D; Biffi, Alessandro; Nalls, Michael A; Devan, William J; Schwab, Kristin; Ayres, Alison M; Valant, Valerie; Ross, Owen A; Rost, Natalia S; Saxena, Richa; Viswanathan, Anand; Worrall, Bradford B; Brott, Thomas G; Goldstein, Joshua N; Brown, Devin; Broderick, Joseph P; Norrving, Bo; Greenberg, Steven M; Silliman, Scott L; Hansen, Björn M; Tirschwell, David L; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Selim, Magdy; Roquer, Jaume; Montaner, Joan; Singleton, Andrew B; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Woo, Daniel; Furie, Karen L; Meschia, James F; Rosand, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies demonstrated association between mitochondrial DNA variants and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated whether variants within a larger set of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes encoded by both autosomal and mitochondrial DNA were associated with risk of IS and, based on our results, extended our investigation to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This association study used a discovery cohort of 1643 individuals, a validation cohort of 2432 individuals for IS, and an extension cohort of 1476 individuals for ICH. Gene-set enrichment analysis was performed on all structural OXPHOS genes, as well as genes contributing to individual respiratory complexes. Gene-sets passing gene-set enrichment analysis were tested by constructing genetic scores using common variants residing within each gene. Associations between each variant and IS that emerged in the discovery cohort were examined in validation and extension cohorts. IS was associated with genetic risk scores in OXPHOS as a whole (odds ratio [OR], 1.17; P=0.008) and complex I (OR, 1.06; P=0.050). Among IS subtypes, small vessel stroke showed association with OXPHOS (OR, 1.16; P=0.007), complex I (OR, 1.13; P=0.027), and complex IV (OR, 1.14; P=0.018). To further explore this small vessel association, we extended our analysis to ICH, revealing association between deep hemispheric ICH and complex IV (OR, 1.08; P=0.008). This pathway analysis demonstrates association between common genetic variants within OXPHOS genes and stroke. The associations for small vessel stroke and deep ICH suggest that genetic variation in OXPHOS influences small vessel pathobiology. Further studies are needed to identify culprit genetic variants and assess their functional consequences.

  11. Orofacial cleft risk is increased with maternal smoking and specific detoxification-gene variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Min; Christensen, Kaare; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2007-01-01

    Maternal smoking is a recognized risk factor for orofacial clefts. Maternal or fetal pharmacogenetic variants are plausible modulators of this risk. In this work, we studied 5,427 DNA samples, including 1,244 from subjects in Denmark and Iowa with facial clefting and 4,183 from parents, siblings......, or unrelated population controls. We examined 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 16 genes in pathways for detoxification of components of cigarette smoke, to look for evidence of gene-environment interactions. For genes identified as related to oral clefting, we studied gene-expression profiles in fetal...

  12. Rare coding variants in the phospholipase D3 gene confer risk for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimer's disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimer's disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid-β peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex

  13. Reelin gene variants and risk of autism spectrum disorders: an integrated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenling; Hong, Yuan; Zou, Li; Zhong, Rong; Zhu, Beibei; Shen, Na; Chen, Wei; Lou, Jiao; Ke, Juntao; Zhang, Ti; Wang, Weipeng; Miao, Xiaoping

    2014-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a severe neurological disorder with a high degree of heritability. Reelin gene (RELN), which plays a crucial role in the migration and positioning of neurons during brain development, has been strongly posed as a candidate gene for ASD. Genetic variants in RELN have been investigated as risk factors of ASD in numerous epidemiologic studies but with inconclusive results. To clearly discern the effects of RELN variants on ASD, the authors conducted a meta-analysis integrating case-control and transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) studies published through 2001 to 2013. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals were used to estimate the associations between three RELN variants (rs736707, rs362691, and GGC repeat variant) and ASD. In overall meta-analysis, the summary ORs for rs736707, rs362691, and GGC repeat variant were 1.11 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.80-1.54], 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56-0.86), and 1.09 (95% CI: 0.97-1.23), respectively. Besides, positive result was also obtained in subgroup of broadly-defined ASD for rs362691 (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.52-0.86). Our meta-analysis revealed that the RELN rs362691, rather than rs736707 or GGC repeat variant, might contribute significantly to ASD risk. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Association between Variants in Atopy-Related Immunologic Candidate Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Cotterchio

    Full Text Available Many epidemiology studies report that atopic conditions such as allergies are associated with reduced pancreas cancer risk. The reason for this relationship is not yet understood. This is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the association between variants in atopy-related candidate genes and pancreatic cancer risk.A population-based case-control study of pancreas cancer cases diagnosed during 2011-2012 (via Ontario Cancer Registry, and controls recruited using random digit dialing utilized DNA from 179 cases and 566 controls. Following an exhaustive literature review, SNPs in 180 candidate genes were pre-screened using dbGaP pancreas cancer GWAS data; 147 SNPs in 56 allergy-related immunologic genes were retained and genotyped. Logistic regression was used to estimate age-adjusted odd ratio (AOR for each variant and false discovery rate was used to adjust Wald p-values for multiple testing. Subsequently, a risk allele score was derived based on statistically significant variants.18 SNPs in 14 candidate genes (CSF2, DENND1B, DPP10, FLG, IL13, IL13RA2, LRP1B, NOD1, NPSR1, ORMDL3, RORA, STAT4, TLR6, TRA were significantly associated with pancreas cancer risk. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, two LRP1B SNPs remained statistically significant; for example, LRP1B rs1449477 (AA vs. CC: AOR=0.37, 95% CI: 0.22-0.62; p (adjusted=0.04. Furthermore, the risk allele score was associated with a significant reduction in pancreas cancer risk (p=0.0007.Preliminary findings suggest certain atopy-related variants may be associated with pancreas cancer risk. Further studies are needed to replicate this, and to elucidate the biology behind the growing body of epidemiologic evidence suggesting allergies may reduce pancreatic cancer risk.

  15. Association of Germline CHEK2 Gene Variants with Risk and Prognosis of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

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    Ondrej Havranek

    Full Text Available The checkpoint kinase 2 gene (CHEK2 codes for the CHK2 protein, an important mediator of the DNA damage response pathway. The CHEK2 gene has been recognized as a multi-cancer susceptibility gene; however, its role in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL remains unclear. We performed mutation analysis of the entire CHEK2 coding sequence in 340 NHL patients using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Identified hereditary variants were genotyped in 445 non-cancer controls. The influence of CHEK2 variants on disease risk was statistically evaluated. Identified CHEK2 germline variants included four truncating mutations (found in five patients and no control; P = 0.02 and nine missense variants (found in 21 patients and 12 controls; P = 0.02. Carriers of non-synonymous variants had an increased risk of NHL development [odds ratio (OR 2.86; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.42-5.79] and an unfavorable prognosis [hazard ratio (HR of progression-free survival (PFS 2.1; 95% CI 1.12-4.05]. In contrast, the most frequent intronic variant c.319+43dupA (identified in 22% of patients and 31% of controls was associated with a decreased NHL risk (OR = 0.62; 95% CI 0.45-0.86, but its positive prognostic effect was limited to NHL patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL treated by conventional chemotherapy without rituximab (HR-PFS 0.4; 94% CI 0.17-0.74. Our results show that germ-line CHEK2 mutations affecting protein coding sequence confer a moderately-increased risk of NHL, they are associated with an unfavorable NHL prognosis, and they may represent a valuable predictive biomarker for patients with DLBCL.

  16. A genetic signature of spina bifida risk from pathway-informed comprehensive gene-variant analysis.

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    Nicholas J Marini

    Full Text Available Despite compelling epidemiological evidence that folic acid supplements reduce the frequency of neural tube defects (NTDs in newborns, common variant association studies with folate metabolism genes have failed to explain the majority of NTD risk. The contribution of rare alleles as well as genetic interactions within the folate pathway have not been extensively studied in the context of NTDs. Thus, we sequenced the exons in 31 folate-related genes in a 480-member NTD case-control population to identify the full spectrum of allelic variation and determine whether rare alleles or obvious genetic interactions within this pathway affect NTD risk. We constructed a pathway model, predetermined independent of the data, which grouped genes into coherent sets reflecting the distinct metabolic compartments in the folate/one-carbon pathway (purine synthesis, pyrimidine synthesis, and homocysteine recycling to methionine. By integrating multiple variants based on these groupings, we uncovered two provocative, complex genetic risk signatures. Interestingly, these signatures differed by race/ethnicity: a Hispanic risk profile pointed to alterations in purine biosynthesis, whereas that in non-Hispanic whites implicated homocysteine metabolism. In contrast, parallel analyses that focused on individual alleles, or individual genes, as the units by which to assign risk revealed no compelling associations. These results suggest that the ability to layer pathway relationships onto clinical variant data can be uniquely informative for identifying genetic risk as well as for generating mechanistic hypotheses. Furthermore, the identification of ethnic-specific risk signatures for spina bifida resonated with epidemiological data suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis may differ between Hispanic and non-Hispanic groups.

  17. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amankwah, Ernest K.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value ...Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants...... contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among...

  18. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 and 6 gene variants and ischaemic stroke risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriott, A M; Heckman, M G; Rayaprolu, S; Soto-Ortolaza, A I; Diehl, N N; Kanekiyo, T; Liu, C-C; Bu, G; Malik, R; Cole, J W; Meschia, J F; Ross, O A

    2015-08-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor related proteins (LRPs) 1 and 6 have been implicated in cerebral ischaemia. In addition, genetic variation in LRP1 and LRP6 has been linked with various factors that are related to risk of ischaemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the association of LRP1 and LRP6 gene variants with risk of ischaemic stroke as part of the Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS). A Caucasian series (434 stroke patients, 319 controls) and an African American series (161 stroke patients, 116 controls) were included. Fourteen LRP6 variants and three LRP1 variants were genotyped and assessed for association with ischaemic stroke. In the Caucasian series, significant associations with ischaemic stroke were observed for LRP6 rs2075241 [odds ratio (OR) 0.42, P = 0.023], rs2302685 (OR 0.44, P = 0.049), rs7975614 (OR 0.07, P = 0.017), rs10492120 (OR 0.62, P = 0.036) and rs10743980 (OR 0.66, P = 0.037). Risk of ischaemic stroke was significantly lower for carriers of any of these five protective LRP6 variants (24.0% of subjects) compared to non-carriers (OR 0.57, P = 0.003). The protective association for LRP6 rs2075241 was observed at a similar magnitude across ischaemic stroke subtypes, whilst the effects of rs23022685, rs10492120 and rs10743980 were most apparent for cardioembolic and large vessel stroke. In the African American series, LRP1 rs11172113 was associated with an increased risk of stroke (OR 1.89, P = 0.006). The results of our preliminary study provide evidence that LRP6 and LRP1 variants may be associated with risk of ischaemic stroke. Validation in larger studies is warranted. © 2015 EAN.

  19. Prothrombotic gene variants as risk factors of acute myocardial infarction in young women

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    Tomaiuolo Rossella

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI in young women represent an extreme phenotype associated with a higher mortality compared with similarly aged men. Prothrombotic gene variants could play a role as risk factors for AMI at young age. Methods We studied Factor V Leiden, FII G20210A, MTHFR C677T and beta-fibrinogen -455G>A variants by real-time PCR in 955 young AMI (362 females and in 698 AMI (245 females patients. The data were compared to those obtained in 909 unrelated subjects (458 females from the general population of the same geographical area (southern Italy. Results In young AMI females, the allelic frequency of either FV Leiden and of FII G20210A was significantly higher versus the general population (O.R.: 3.67 for FV Leiden and O.R.: 3.84 for FII G20210A; p Discussion and conclusion Our data confirm that young AMI in females is a peculiar phenotype with specific risk factors as the increased plasma procoagulant activity of FV and FII. On the contrary, the homozygous state for the 677T MTHFR variant may cause increased levels of homocysteine and/or an altered folate status and thus an increased risk for AMI, particularly in males. The knowledge of such risk factors (that may be easily identified by molecular analysis may help to improve prevention strategies for acute coronary diseases in specific risk-group subjects.

  20. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  1. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  2. Prenatal vitamins, one-carbon metabolism gene variants, and risk for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rebecca J; Hansen, Robin L; Hartiala, Jaana; Allayee, Hooman; Schmidt, Linda C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Tassone, Flora; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2011-07-01

    Causes of autism are unknown. Associations with maternal nutritional factors and their interactions with gene variants have not been reported. Northern California families were enrolled from 2003 to 2009 in the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) population-based case-control study. Children aged 24-60 months were evaluated and confirmed to have autism (n = 288), autism spectrum disorder (n = 141), or typical development (n = 278) at the University of California-Davis Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute using standardized clinical assessments. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for associations between autism and retrospectively collected data on maternal vitamin intake before and during pregnancy. We explored interaction effects with functional genetic variants involved in one-carbon metabolism (MTHFR, COMT, MTRR, BHMT, FOLR2, CBS, and TCN2) as carried by the mother or child. Mothers of children with autism were less likely than those of typically developing children to report having taken prenatal vitamins during the 3 months before pregnancy or the first month of pregnancy (OR = 0.62 [95% confidence interval = 0.42-0.93]). Significant interaction effects were observed for maternal MTHFR 677 TT, CBS rs234715 GT + TT, and child COMT 472 AA genotypes, with greater risk for autism when mothers did not report taking prenatal vitamins periconceptionally (4.5 [1.4-14.6]; 2.6 [1.2-5.4]; and 7.2 [2.3-22.4], respectively). Greater risk was also observed for children whose mothers had other one-carbon metabolism pathway gene variants and reported no prenatal vitamin intake. Periconceptional use of prenatal vitamins may reduce the risk of having children with autism, especially for genetically susceptible mothers and children. Replication and mechanistic investigations are warranted.

  3. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawrenson, K.; Iversen, E.S.; Tyrer, J.; Weber, R.P.; Concannon, P.; Hazelett, D.J.; Li, Q.; Marks, J.R.; Berchuck, A.; Lee, J.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Antonenkova, N.; Bandera, E.V.; Bean, Y.; Beckmann, M.W.; Bisogna, M.; Bjorge, L.; Bogdanova, N.; Brinton, L.A.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Bruinsma, F.; Butzow, R.; Campbell, I.G.; Carty, K.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Chen, A; Chen, Z.; Cook, L.S.; Cramer, D.W; Cunningham, J.M.; Cybulski, C.; Plisiecka-Halasa, J.; Dennis, J.; Dicks, E.; Doherty, J.A.; Dork, T.; Bois, A. du; Eccles, D.; Easton, D.T.; Edwards, R.P.; Eilber, U.; Ekici, A.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Fridley, B.L.; Gao, Y.T.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Giles, G.G.; Glasspool, R.; Goode, E.L.; Goodman, M.T.; Gronwald, J.; Harter, P.; Hasmad, H.N.; Hein, A.; Heitz, F.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Hillemanns, P.; Hogdall, E.; Hogdall, C.; Hosono, S.; Jakubowska, A.; Paul, J.; Jensen, A.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kjaer, S.K.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kellar, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Krakstad, C.; Lambrechts, D.; Lambrechts, S.; Le, N.D.; Lee, A.W.; Cannioto, R.; Leminen, A.; Lester, J.; Levine, D.A.; Liang, D.; Lissowska, J.; Lu, K.; Lubinski, J.; Lundvall, L.; Massuger, L.F.; Matsuo, K.; McGuire, V.; McLaughlin, J.R.; Nevanlinna, H.; McNeish, I.; Menon, U.; Modugno, F.; Moysich, K.B.; Narod, S.A.; Nedergaard, L.; Ness, R.B.; Azmi, M.A. Noor; Odunsi, K.; Olson, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair g

  4. Selenoprotein gene variants, toenail selenium levels, and risk for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geybels, Milan S; van den Brandt, Piet A; Schouten, Leo J; van Schooten, Frederik J; van Breda, Simone G; Rayman, Margaret P; Green, Fiona R; Verhage, Bas A J

    2014-03-01

    Lower selenium levels have been associated with increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), and genetic variation in the selenoprotein genes selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) is thought to modify this relationship. We investigated whether the association between toenail selenium levels and advanced PCa risk in the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study is modified by common genetic variation in SEPP1 and GPX1. Toenail clippings were used to determine selenium levels and to isolate DNA for genotyping. This case-cohort study, which included 817 case subjects with advanced PCa and 1048 subcohort members, was analyzed with Cox regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Three genetic variants were associated with advanced (stage III/IV or IV) PCa risk: SEPP1 rs7579 (lower risk; P trend = .01), GPX1 rs17650792 (higher risk; P trend = .03), and GPX1 rs1800668 (lower risk; P trend = .005). Toenail selenium levels were inversely associated with advanced PCa risk, independently of common genetic variation in SEPP1 and GPX1.

  5. Role of interaction between variants in the PPARG and interleukin-6 genes on obesity related metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, M; Rizzo, M R; Papa, M; Acampora, R; De Angelis, L; Olivieri, F; Marchegiani, F; Franceschi, C; Paolisso, G

    2005-07-01

    The combined effect of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) Pro/Ala and interleukin-6 G174C gene variants, was evaluated in 429 Caucasian subjects in order to determine whether subjects carrying both variants were at different risk for obesity. In particular, the combined contribution of these two variants (both independent and interaction effects) to the total variation of obesity-related factors was estimated. All subjects were genotyped for codon 12 Pro/Ala locus variability and for the interleukin-6-174 C/G promoter polymorphism. Subjects with the Ala variant had significantly lower BMI, insulin resistance, triglyceride levels than those without. Furthermore, subjects with Ala variant had significantly lower IL-6 levels (0.88 +/- 0.9 vs 1.61 +/- 2.25 pg/ml; p = 0.041). In contrast, the IL6-C variant was significantly associated with lower plasma IL-6 and with lower total cholesterol levels but was not significantly associated with any other obesity risk factors. Indeed, subjects carrying both PPARG and IL-6 gene variants, had a clearly more favourable profile of obesity related risk factors than subjects with one variant, having Ala+/C+ carriers lower BMI (22.8 +/- 2.3 vs 24.14 +/- 1.9; f = 5.31; p obesity related' factors is additive.

  6. Association of IL8 and IL10 gene allelic variants with ischemic stroke risk and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherenko A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluating a role of IL8 gene –781 C/T, and IL10 gene –592C/A polymorphisms as genetic markers of ischemic stroke risk. Methods. A case group consisted of 183 patients with ischemic stroke, which were treated in the Brain Vascular Pathology unit of SI «Institute of Gerontology of NAMS of Ukraine». A control group included 88 healthy individuals older than 65 years without any history of ischemic stroke. Genotyping was performed using PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL8 –781T allele carriers in the case group (81,6 % comparing to the control (70,1% was revealed. –781T allele carriers have nearly 2-fold increased ischemic stroke development risk (OR = 1.886; 95 % CI: 1.041–3.417. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL10 gene –592C allele carriers was observed in the patients with ischemic stroke (98,2% comparing to the control (90,7 %. The ischemic stroke development risk in such individuals is 5-fold increased (OR = 5.71; 95 % CI: 1.48–22.11. It was revealed that –592C allele homozygotes with ischemic stroke have more than 2-fold higher improvement (according to the Rankin scale chances during the first fortnight of treatment (OR = 2,76; 95 % CI: 1,26–6,07. Conclusions. On the basis of the obtained significant differences, IL8 gene –781T and IL10 gene –592C variants may be considered the factors of ischemic stroke hereditary susceptibility. Besides, IL10 gene –592CC genotype is a genetic marker of the patients state positive dynamics during first two weeks of treatment.

  7. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tianbo; Ren, Yongchao; Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-11-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype "AG" was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype "AA" increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals.

  8. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the CASC15, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1, and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated eight additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNPs at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2,101 cases and 4,202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing, and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNPs associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014: Pcombined = 0.0050; OR, 0.88; rs2979704: Pcombined = 0.0072; OR, 0.87; rs1059111: Pcombined = 0.0049; OR, 0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biologic investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens were associated with better overall survival (P = 0.03; HR, 0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and

  9. A common variant in the PTPN11 gene contributes to the risk of tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodship, Judith A; Hall, Darroch; Topf, Ana; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Griffin, Helen; Rahman, Thahira J; Glen, Elise; Tan, Huay; Palomino Doza, Julian; Relton, Caroline L; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Cosgrove, Catherine; Brook, David; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Bu'Lock, Frances A; O'Sullivan, John; Stuart, A Graham; Parsons, Jonathan; Cordell, Heather J; Keavney, Bernard

    2012-06-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the commonest cyanotic form of congenital heart disease. In 80% of cases, TOF behaves as a complex genetic condition exhibiting significant heritability. As yet, no common genetic variants influencing TOF risk have been robustly identified. Two hundred and seven haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms in 22 candidate genes were genotyped in a test cohort comprising 362 nonsyndromic British white patients with TOF together with 717 unaffected parents of patients and 183 unrelated healthy controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with suggestive evidence of association in the test cohort (P<0.01) were taken forward for genotyping in an independent replication cohort comprising 392 cases of TOF, 218 unaffected parents of patients, and 1319 controls. Significant association was observed for 1 single nucleotide polymorphism, rs11066320 in the PTPN11 gene, in both the test and the replication cohort. Genotype at rs11066320 was associated with a per-allele odds ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 1.52; P=2.9 × 10(-6)) in the total cohort of TOF cases and controls; this remained highly significant after Bonferroni correction for 207 analyses (corrected P=0.00061). Genotype at rs11066320 was responsible for a population-attributable risk of TOF of approximately 10%. Common variation in the linkage disequilibrium block including the PTPN11 gene contributes to the risk of nonsyndromic TOF. Rare mutations in PTPN11 are known to cause the autosomal dominant condition Noonan syndrome, which includes congenital heart disease, by upregulating Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Our results suggest a role for milder perturbations in PTPN11 function in sporadic, nonsyndromic congenital heart disease.

  10. Genetic variants in FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and skin cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Abrar A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human fibroblast growth factor (FGF and its receptor (FGFR play an important role in tumorigenesis. Deregulation of the FGFR2 gene has been identified in a number of cancer sites. Overexpression of the FGFR4 protein has been linked to cutaneous melanoma progression. Previous studies reported associations between genetic variants in the FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and development of various cancers. Methods We evaluated the associations of four genetic variants in the FGFR2 gene highly related to breast cancer risk and the three common tag-SNPs in the FGFR4 gene with skin cancer risk in a nested case-control study of Caucasians within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS among 218 melanoma cases, 285 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cases, 300 basal cell carcinoma (BCC cases, and 870 controls. Results We found no evidence for associations between these seven genetic variants and the risks of melanoma and nonmelanocytic skin cancer. Conclusion Given the power of this study, we did not detect any contribution of genetic variants in the FGFR2 or FGFR4 genes to inherited predisposition to skin cancer among Caucasian women.

  11. Dopamine transporter DAT and receptor DRD2 variants affect risk of lethal cocaine abuse: a gene-gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D; Pinsonneault, J K; Papp, A C; Zhu, H; Lemeshow, S; Mash, D C; Sadee, W

    2013-01-22

    Epistatic gene-gene interactions could contribute to the heritability of complex multigenic disorders, but few examples have been reported. Here, we focus on the role of aberrant dopaminergic signaling, involving the dopamine transporter DAT, a cocaine target, and the dopamine D2 receptor, which physically interacts with DAT. Splicing polymorphism rs2283265 of DRD2, encoding D2 receptors, were shown to confer risk of cocaine overdose/death (odds ratio ∼3) in subjects and controls from the Miami Dade County Brain Bank.(1) Risk of cocaine-related death attributable to the minor allele of rs2283265 was significantly enhanced to OR=7.5 (P=0.0008) in homozygous carriers of the main 6-repeat allele of DAT rs3836790, a regulatory VNTR in intron8 lacking significant effect itself. In contrast, carriers of the minor 5-repeat DAT allele showed no significant risk (OR=1.1, P=0.84). DAT rs3836790 and DRD2 rs2283265 also interacted by modulating DAT protein activity in the ventral putamen of cocaine abusers. In high-linkage disequilibrium with the VNTR, DAT rs6347 in exon9 yielded similar results. Assessing the impact of DAT alone, a rare DAT haplotype formed by the minor alleles of rs3836790 and rs27072, a regulatory DAT variant in the 3'-UTR, occurred in nearly one-third of the cocaine abusers but was absent in African American controls, apparently conferring strong risk. These results demonstrate gene-gene-drug interaction affecting risk of fatal cocaine intoxication.

  12. Gene polymorphism of aldosterone synthetase (CYP11B2 variants and main cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ye. Lobach

    2016-12-01

    significant differences between all groups. The level of total cholesterol in patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with homozygous recessive variant CC (5.8±1.08 mmol/L, compared with heterozygotes TC (4.87±1.3 mmol/L, p=0.024 and had no statistical significance when compared with the dominant TT homozygotes (5.06±1.45 mmol. Higher levels of total cholesterol (5.76±1.5 mmol/L in TT homozygotes compared with TC (4.92±1.27 mmol/L, p=0.027 and CC (4.74±1.23 mmol/L, p=0.022 were found. In the group of patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis, LDL cholesterol in the subgroup homozygous recessive variant CC was higher (3.43±0.87 mmol/L (not significant compared with a TT variant (3.02±1.3 mmol/L and compared with heterozygotes TC (2.78±1.2 mmol/L, p=0.08. The level of TG in patients with stable coronary heart disease was the lowest in dominant homozygotes TT (1.13±0.56 mmol/L compared with CT heterozygotes (1.54±0.97 mmol/L, p=0.08 and CC homozygotes (1.36±0.58 mmol/L, p=0.2. Conclusions. 1. Group of high cardiovascular risk patients requires special attention in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, because this group showed the worst control of cardiovascular risk factors (level of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, glucose, SBP in the absence of appropriate treatment. 2. Ingroup of patients with stable coronary artery disease and postinfarction cardiosclerosis the link CC variant gene polymorphism of aldosterone synthase CYP11B2-344C/T with higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol was established, which increases the cardio-vascular risk in this group. 3. CC polymorphism of aldosterone synthase gene CYP11B2-344C/T was associated with higher levels of SBP in patients with stable coronary artery disease and postinfarction cardiosclerosis, which increases the cardiovascular risk such as the development of hypertension.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of DNA repair gene variants and risk of meningioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bethke, L.; Murray, A.; Webb, E.

    2008-01-01

    of meningioma and exposure to ionizing radiation is also well known and led us to examine whether variants in DNA repair genes contribute to disease susceptibility. METHODS: We analyzed 1127 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected to capture most of the common variation in 136 DNA...

  14. Common type 2 diabetes risk gene variants associate with gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Grarup, Niels; Damm, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 11 recently identified type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Type 2 diabetes risk variants in TCF7L2, CDKAL1, SLC30A8, HHEX/IDE, CDKN2A/2B, IGF2BP2, FTO, TCF2, PPARG, KCNJ11......, and WFS1 loci were genotyped in a cohort of women with a history of GDM (n = 283) and glucose-tolerant women of the population-based Inter99 cohort (n = 2446). RESULTS: All the risk alleles in the 11 examined type 2 diabetes risk variants showed an odds ratio (OR) greater than 1 for the GDM group compared....... CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence in a prior GDM group of several previously proven type 2 diabetes risk alleles equals the findings from association studies on type 2 diabetes. This supports the hypothesis that GDM and type 2 diabetes are two of the same entity....

  15. Variants in the human potassium channel gene (KCNN3) are associated with migraine in a high risk genetic isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Hannah C; Lea, Rod A; Bellis, Claire; Carless, Melanie; Dyer, Tom; Blangero, John; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2011-12-01

    The calcium-activated potassium ion channel gene (KCNN3) is located in the vicinity of the familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 locus on chromosome 1q21.3. This gene is expressed in the central nervous system and plays a role in neural excitability. Previous association studies have provided some, although not conclusive, evidence for involvement of this gene in migraine susceptibility. To elucidate KCNN3 involvement in migraine, we performed gene-wide SNP genotyping in a high-risk genetic isolate from Norfolk Island, a population descended from a small number of eighteenth century Isle of Man 'Bounty Mutineer' and Tahitian founders. Phenotype information was available for 377 individuals who are related through the single, well-defined Norfolk pedigree (96 were affected: 64 MA, 32 MO). A total of 85 SNPs spanning the KCNN3 gene were genotyped in a sub-sample of 285 related individuals (76 affected), all core members of the extensive Norfolk Island 'Bounty Mutineer' genealogy. All genotyping was performed using the Illumina BeadArray platform. The analysis was performed using the statistical program SOLAR v4.0.6 assuming an additive model of allelic effect adjusted for the effects of age and sex. Haplotype analysis was undertaken using the program HAPLOVIEW v4.0. A total of four intronic SNPs in the KCNN3 gene displayed significant association (P migraine. Two SNPs, rs73532286 and rs6426929, separated by approximately 0.1 kb, displayed complete LD (r (2) = 1.00, D' = 1.00, D' 95% CI = 0.96-1.00). In all cases, the minor allele led to a decrease in migraine risk (beta coefficient = 0.286-0.315), suggesting that common gene variants confer an increased risk of migraine in the Norfolk pedigree. This effect may be explained by founder effect in this genetic isolate. This study provides evidence for association of variants in the KCNN3 ion channel gene with migraine susceptibility in the Norfolk genetic isolate with the rarer allelic variants conferring a

  16. Clinical importance of risk variants in the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene for the prediction of early-onset fluoropyrimidine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Tanja K; Amstutz, Ursula; Aebi, Stefan; Joerger, Markus; Largiadèr, Carlo R

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical relevance of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) variants to predict severe early-onset fluoropyrimidine (FP) toxicity, in particular of a recently discovered haplotype hapB3 and a linked deep intronic splice site mutation c.1129-5923C>G. Selected regions of DPYD were sequenced in prospectively collected germline DNA of 500 patients receiving FP-based chemotherapy. Associations of DPYD variants and haplotypes with hematologic, gastrointestinal, infectious, and dermatologic toxicity in therapy cycles 1-2 and resulting FP-dose interventions (dose reduction, therapy delay or cessation) were analyzed accounting for clinical and demographic covariates. Fifteen additional cases with toxicity-related therapy delay or cessation were retrospectively examined for risk variants. The association of c.1129-5923C>G/hapB3 (4.6% carrier frequency) with severe toxicity was replicated in an independent prospective cohort. Overall, c.1129-5923G/hapB3 carriers showed a relative risk of 3.74 (RR, 95% CI = 2.30-6.09, p = 2 × 10(-5)) for severe toxicity (grades 3-5). Of 31 risk variant carriers (c.1129-5923C>G/hapB3, c.1679T>G, c.1905+1G>A or c.2846A>T), 11 (all with c.1129-5923C>G/hapB3) experienced severe toxicity (15% of 72 cases, RR = 2.73, 95% CI = 1.61-4.63, p = 5 × 10(-6)), and 16 carriers (55%) required FP-dose interventions. Seven of the 15 (47%) retrospective cases carried a risk variant. The c.1129-5923C>G/hapB3 variant is a major contributor to severe early-onset FP toxicity in Caucasian patients. This variant may substantially improve the identification of patients at risk of FP toxicity compared to established DPYD risk variants (c.1905+1G>A, c.1679T>G and c.2846A>T). Pre-therapeutic DPYD testing may prevent 20-30% of life-threatening or lethal episodes of FP toxicity in Caucasian patients. © 2014 UICC.

  17. Cholelithiasis in Patients with Gaucher Disease type 1: Risk Factors and the Role of ABCG5/ABCG8 Gene Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Anca; Popp, Radu A; Al-Khzouz, Camelia; Bucerzan, Simona; Naşcu, Ioana; Leucuta, Daniel; Galle, Peter R; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula

    2016-12-01

    Patients with Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) show an altered lipid profile and a certain degree of insulin resistance, which might contribute to cholelithiasis (CL) and could possibly be associated with ABCG5/ABCG8 gene variants. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of CL in Caucasian adult patients with GD1 and the possible risk factors, including gene variants of the ABCG5/ABCG8 genes. 61 Caucasian patients with GD1 (38 female/23male), aged 18-62 years and 61 healthy subjects matched for age, gender and BMI, without CL, for comparison of lipid profiles. Data before start of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were recorded: clinical, haematological, severity parameters, splenectomy, genotype. Fasting lipid profiles before ERT, glycemia, insulinaemia, HOMA-IR at the last visit were documented. Genotyping for the gene variants D19H, Y54C, T400K, A632V (ABCG8); Q604E (ABCG5) was performed. CL occurred in 45.9% of patients. Risk factors were: age, family history of CL, higher BMI values, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), disease severity, splenectomy. A specific dyslipidemia was found in patients vs. controls. Total serum cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C were higher in patients with CL than in those without; no obvious influence of insulin-resistance to lithogenesis was found. Patients with the GG genotype of D19H and the CC genotype of T400K (ABCG8 gene) had significantly higher levels of TC and LDL-C. Patients with GD1 showed an increased prevalence of CL, which was associated with common and disease-specific risk factors. Starting ERT soon after clinical onset and avoiding splenectomy might reduce the risk of CL in GD1.

  18. Genetic variants within telomere-associated genes, leukocyte telomere length and the risk of acute coronary syndrome in Czech women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouha, Dana; Pitha, Jan; Mesanyova, Jana; Mrazkova, Jolana; Fellnerova, Adela; Stanek, Vladimir; Lanska, Vera; Hubacek, Jaroslav A

    2016-02-15

    The association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been published in many reports, although almost exclusively in men. In our study we analysed the association between LTL and five selected variants within three candidate genes (TERC rs12696304; TERF2IP rs3784929 and rs8053257; UCP2 rs659366 and rs622064), which are not only involved in telomere-length maintenance but also potentially associated with higher risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Czech women (505 cases and 642 controls). We detected significantly shorter LTL in women with ACS (Ptelomere length or ACS risk in Czech females.

  19. The roles of Ca2+/NFAT signaling genes in Kawasaki disease: single- and multiple-risk genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Lou, Jiao; Zhong, Rong; Qi, Yan-qi; Shen, Na; Lu, Xu-zai; Wang, Yu-jia; Zhang, Qing; Zou, Li; Duan, Jia-yu; Ke, Jun-tao; Miao, Xiao-ping; Gong, Fang-qi

    2014-06-06

    Ca(2+)/nuclear factor of activated T-cells (Ca(2+)/NFAT) signaling pathway may play a crucial role in Kawasaki disease (KD). We investigated 16 genetic variants, selected by bioinformatics analyses or previous studies, in 7 key genes involved in this pathway in a Chinese population. We observed a significantly or marginally increased KD risk associated with rs2720378 GC + CC genotypes (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.07-1.80, P = 0.014) or rs2069762 AC + CC genotypes (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.98-1.67, P = 0.066), compared with their wild type counterparts. In classification and regression tree analysis, individuals carrying the combined genotypes of rs2720378 GC or CC genotype, rs2069762 CA or CC genotype and rs1561876 AA genotype exhibited the highest KD risk (OR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.46-3.07, P < 0.001), compared with the lowest risk carriers of rs2720378 GG genotype. Moreover, a significant dose effect was observed among these three variants (Ptrend < 0.001). In conclusion, this study implicates that single- and multiple-risk genetic variants in this pathway might contribute to KD susceptibility. Further studies on more comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphisms, different ethnicities and larger sample sizes are warranted, and the exact biological mechanisms need to be further clarified.

  20. Identification of rare high-risk copy number variants affecting the dopamine transporter gene in mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Duong, Linh T T; Ingason, Andrés;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dopamine transporter, also known as solute carrier 6A3 (SLC6A3), plays an important role in synaptic transmission by regulating the reuptake of dopamine in the synapses. In line with this, variations in the gene encoding this transporter have been linked to both schizophrenia...... rare high-risk variants of psychiatric disorders. METHODS: We performed a systematic screening for CNVs affecting SLC6A3 in 761 healthy controls, 672 schizophrenia patients, and 194 patients with bipolar disorder in addition to 253 family members from six large pedigrees affected by mental disorders...... sizes and two affected several genes in addition to SLC6A3. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that rare high-risk CNVs affecting the gene encoding the dopamine transporter contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and affective disorders....

  1. MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C variants are associated with FMF risk in a Turkish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursal, Ayse Feyda; Kaya, Süheyla; Sezer, Ozlem; Karakus, Nevin; Yigit, Serbulent

    2017-05-22

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a crucial enzyme in homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism. We aimed to evaluate a possible relationship between MTHFR gene C677T (rs 1801133), A1298C (rs 1801131) variants and susceptibility to FMF in a Turkish cohort. This case-control study included 198 Turkish FMF patients and 100 healthy subjects as controls. MTHFR C677T and A1298C were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods. The genotype distribution and allele frequency of the MTHFR C677T were statistically different between the patients and the control group (P=.006, P=.001, respectively). The frequency of the TT genotype and T allele of MTHFR C677T was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls. The genotype distribution of MTHFR A1298C variant did not show any statistically significant difference between the patients and the controls (P›.05). The patients had statistically different frequencies in allele C of MTHFR A1298C variant compared with the control (P=.032). We also examined the risk associated with inheriting the combined genotypes for the two MTHFR variants. According to these results, individuals who were CC homozygous at C677T locus and AA homozygous at A1298C locus have a lower risk of developing FMF (P=.002). Individuals who were TT homozygous at C677T locus and AC heterozygous at A1298C locus have higher risk of developing FMF (P=.033). Our findings clearly showed there was an association the MTHFR C677T/A1298C variants and susceptibility to FMF in the Turkish sample. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Variants in the interleukin-1 alpha and beta genes, and the risk for periodontal disease in dogs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. Albuquerque; F. Morinha; J. Magalhães; J. Requicha; I. Dias; H. Guedes-Pinto; E. Bastos; C. Viegas

    2015-12-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) have been shown to amplify the inflammatory response against periodontopathogenic bacteria. In humans, polymorphisms in the 1 and 1 genes are the most well-studied genetic polymorphisms associated with periodontal disease (PD). In contrast to human, there is a lack of knowledge on the genetic basis of canine PD. A case–control study was conducted in which a molecular analysis of dog 1 and 1 genes was performed. Of the eight genetic variants identified, seven in 1 gene and one in 1 gene, 1/1_g.388A>C and 1/1_g.521T>A showed statistically significant differences between groups (adjusted OR (95% CI): 0.15 (0.03–0.76), = 0.022; 5.76 (1.03–32.1), P = 0.046, respectively). It suggests that in the studied population the 1/1_g.388C allele is associated with a decreased PD risk, whereas the 1/1_g.521A allele can confer an increased risk. Additionally, the 1/2_g.515G>T variation resulted in a change of amino acid, i.e. glycine to valine. In silico analysis suggests that this change can alter protein structure and function, predicting it to be deleterious or damaging. This work suggests that 1 genetic variants may be important in PD susceptibility in canines.

  3. Comprehensive evaluation of one-carbon metabolism pathway gene variants and renal cell cancer risk.

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    Todd M Gibson

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Folate and one-carbon metabolism are linked to cancer risk through their integral role in DNA synthesis and methylation. Variation in one-carbon metabolism genes, particularly MTHFR, has been associated with risk of a number of cancers in epidemiologic studies, but little is known regarding renal cancer. METHODS: Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected to produce high genomic coverage of 13 gene regions of one-carbon metabolism (ALDH1L1, BHMT, CBS, FOLR1, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, SLC19A1, TYMS and the closely associated glutathione synthesis pathway (CTH, GGH, GSS were genotyped for 777 renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases and 1,035 controls in the Central and Eastern European Renal Cancer case-control study. Associations of individual SNPs (n = 163 with RCC risk were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and study center. Minimum p-value permutation (Min-P tests were used to identify gene regions associated with risk, and haplotypes were evaluated within these genes. RESULTS: The strongest associations with RCC risk were observed for SLC19A1 (P(min-P = 0.03 and MTHFR (P(min-P = 0.13. A haplotype consisting of four SNPs in SLC19A1 (rs12483553, rs2838950, rs2838951, and rs17004785 was associated with a 37% increased risk (p = 0.02, and exploratory stratified analysis suggested the association was only significant among those in the lowest tertile of vegetable intake. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively examine variation in one-carbon metabolism genes in relation to RCC risk. We identified a novel association with SLC19A1, which is important for transport of folate into cells. Replication in other populations is required to confirm these findings.

  4. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diogo, Dorothee; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome

  5. Common variant rs9939609 in gene FTO confers risk to polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    Tao Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO has been associated with obesity, especially the common variant rs9939609. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrine-metabolic disorder and over 50% of patients are overweight/obese. Thus FTO is a potential candidate gene for PCOS but their relationship is confusing and remains to be clarified in different population with a large sample size. METHOD: This study was performed adopting a two-stage design by genotyping SNP rs9939609. The first set comprise of 741 PCOS and 704 control subjects, with data from our previous GWAS. The second phase of replication study was performed among another independent group of 2858 PCOS and 2358 control subjects using TaqMan-MGB probe assay. All subjects are from Han Chinese. RESULTS: The less meaningful association of FTO rs9939609 and PCOS discovered in GWAS (P = 2.47E-03, was further confirmed in the replication study (P = 1.86E-09. Using meta-analysis, the P-meta value has reached 6.89E-12, over-exceeding the genome-wide association level of 5.00E-8. By combination, the P value was 1.26E-11 and after BMI adjustment it remained significant(P = 1.82E-06. To further elucidate whether this association is resulted from obesity or PCOS per se, the samples were divided into two groups-obese and non-obese PCOS, and the results were still positive in obese group (P obese = 5.81E-05, OR = 1.55, as well as in non-obese PCOS group (P non-obese = 7.06E-04, OR = 1.28. CONCLUSION: Variant rs9939609 in FTO is associated with PCOS in Chinese women, not only in obese PCOS subjects, but also in non-obese cases.

  6. Genetic Variants Of Cytochrome b-245, Alpha Polypeptide Gene And Premature Acute Myocardial Infarction Risk In An Iranian Population

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    Amin Fatemeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress induced by superoxide anion plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD and hence acute myocardial infarction (AMI. The major source of superoxide production in vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells is the NADPH oxidase complex. An essential component of this complex is p22phox, that is encoded by the cytochrome b-245, alpha polypeptide (CYBA gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of CYBA variants (rs1049255 and rs4673 and premature acute myocardial infarction risk in an Iranian population.

  7. Role of nicotine dependence on the relationship between variants in the nicotinic receptor genes and risk of lung adenocarcinoma.

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    Tung-Sung Tseng

    Full Text Available Several variations in the nicotinic receptor genes have been identified to be associated with both lung cancer risk and smoking in the genome-wide association (GWA studies. However, the relationships among these three factors (genetic variants, nicotine dependence, and lung cancer remain unclear. In an attempt to elucidate these relationships, we applied mediation analysis to quantify the impact of nicotine dependence on the association between the nicotinic receptor genetic variants and lung adenocarcinoma risk. We evaluated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the five nicotinic receptor related genes (CHRNB3, CHRNA6, and CHRNA5/A3/B4 previously reported to be associated with lung cancer risk and smoking behavior and 14 SNPs in the four 'control' genes (TERT, CLPTM1L, CYP1A1, and TP53, which were not reported in the smoking GWA studies. A total of 661 lung adenocarcinoma cases and 1,347 controls with a smoking history, obtained from the Environment and Genetics in Lung Cancer Etiology case-control study, were included in the study. Results show that nicotine dependence is a mediator of the association between lung adenocarcinoma and gene variations in the regions of CHRNA5/A3/B4 and accounts for approximately 15% of this relationship. The top two CHRNA3 SNPs associated with the risk for lung adenocarcinoma were rs1051730 and rs12914385 (p-value = 1.9×10(-10 and 1.1×10(-10, respectively. Also, these two SNPs had significant indirect effects on lung adenocarcinoma risk through nicotine dependence (p = 0.003 and 0.007. Gene variations rs2736100 and rs2853676 in TERT and rs401681 and rs31489 in CLPTM1L had significant direct associations on lung adenocarcinoma without indirect effects through nicotine dependence. Our findings suggest that nicotine dependence plays an important role between genetic variants in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 region, especially CHRNA3, and lung adenocarcinoma. This may provide valuable information for

  8. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair...

  9. Common variants in the PARL and PINK1 genes increase the risk to leprosy in Han Chinese from South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Feng, Jia-Qi; Li, Guo-Dong; Li, Xiao-An; Yu, Xiu-Feng; Long, Heng; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious and neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with massive genomic decay and dependence on host metabolism. We hypothesized that mitochondrial genes PARL and PINK1 would confer risk to leprosy. Thirteen tag SNPs of PARL and PINK1 were analyzed in 3620 individuals with or without leprosy from China. We also sequenced the entire exons of PARL, PINK1 and PARK2 in 80 patients with a family history of leprosy by using the next generation sequencing technology (NGS). We found that PARL SNP rs12631031 conferred a risk to leprosy (Padjusted = 0.019) and multibacillary leprosy (MB, Padjusted = 0.020) at the allelic level. rs12631031 and rs7653061 in PARL were associated with leprosy and MB (dominant model, Padjusted leprosy at the genotypic level (Padjusted = 0.004). We confirmed that common variants in PARL and PINK1 were associated with leprosy in patients underwent NGS. Furthermore, PARL and PINK1 could physically interact with each other and were involved in the highly connected network formed by reported leprosy susceptibility genes. Together, our results showed that PARL and PINK1 genetic variants are associated with leprosy. PMID:27876828

  10. MAPT1 gene rs1052553 variant is unrelated with the risk for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roco, Angela; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A G

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) can cause frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to the chromosome 17, and are associated with the risk for progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease, corticobasal degeneration, and multiple system atrophy. We tried to establish, whether MAPT H1 discriminating haplotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) (rs1052553) is associated with the risk for restless legs syndrome (RLS). We studied the allelic and genotype frequencies of the SNP rs1052553 in 205 patients with RLS and 324 healthy controls using TaqMan genotyping. rs1052553 genotype and allelic frequencies did not differ significantly between patients with RLS and controls, and were unrelated with the age at onset of RLS, gender, family history of RLS, and severity of RLS. The results of the present study suggest that the SNP rs1052553 is not related with the risk for RLS.

  11. MBL2 gene variants coding for mannose-binding lectin deficiency are associated with increased risk of nephritis in Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanha, N; Troelsen, L; From Hermansen, M-L;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Autoimmunity may in part result from deficiencies in the processing of apoptotic debris. As mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is involved in such processes, we hypothesized that the variants in the MBL2 gene resulting in MBL deficiency confer an increased risk of nephritis in systemic lupus...... erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: A total of 171 SLE patients attending a Danish tertiary rheumatology referral center were included. Common variant alleles in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene (R52C, rs5030737; G54D, rs1800450; G57E, rs1800451) were genotyped. The normal allele and variant alleles are termed A and O...

  12. FTO gene variant and risk of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Chibo Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO polymorphisms have been implicated in the susceptibility of overweight/obesity in children and adolescents. However, the results have been inconsistent. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to clarify the association of FTO gene polymorphisms with overweight/obesity risk among children and adolescents. METHODS: PubMed and Embase were used to search for eligible published literatures. Pooled odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using random- or fixed-effect models. RESULTS: A total of 21 articles containing 23 studies (11208cases and 35015controls were included in our analysis. The results indicated that variant in FTO gene was significantly associated with increased risk of overweight/obesity in children and adolescents (OR=1.35; 95%CI: 1.27-1.44; P<0.001. The overall pooled ORs for risk obesity and overweight were 1.34 (95%CI: 1.21-1.48 and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.25-1.47, respectively. Subgroup analyses also showed similar trends in most subgroups of adjustment for covariates and unadjustment, different ethnicities (Caucasians, Asians, and Amerindians, and each of three investigated polymorphisms (rs9939609, rs1421085, and rs1558902. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis suggested a positive association between FTO gene polymorphism and overweight/obesity risk among children and adolescents. Further prospective studies should be recommended to confirm the observed association, and underlying mechanism should be investigated to clarify the association of FTO gene polymorphism with overweight/obesity.

  13. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Dorothée; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). First, we assessed the contribution of rare coding variants in the 25 genes to the risk of RA in a pooled sequencing study of 500 RA cases and 650 controls of European ancestry. We observed an accumulation of rare nonsynonymous variants exclusive to RA cases in IL2RA and IL2RB (burden test: p = 0.007 and p = 0.018, respectively). Next, we assessed the aggregate contribution of low-frequency and common coding variants to the risk of RA by dense genotyping of the 25 gene loci in 10,609 RA cases and 35,605 controls. We observed a strong enrichment of coding variants with a nominal signal of association with RA (p A [p.His266Gln]), and a noncoding variant, rs624988, reside on distinct haplotypes and independently contribute to the risk of RA (p = 4.6 × 10−6). Overall, our results indicate that variants (distributed across the allele-frequency spectrum) within the protein-coding portion of a subset of biological candidate genes identified by GWASs contribute to the risk of RA. Further, we have demonstrated that very large sample sizes will be required for comprehensively identifying the independent alleles contributing to the missing heritability of RA. PMID:23261300

  14. S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene, lipids, and risk of coronary heart disease in 3 prospective cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.K.; Rimm, E.B.; Rader, D.

    2009-01-01

    in this gene, we investigated the association between the LPL S447X variant with lipids and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in 3 independent, prospective studies. Methods The S447X variant was genotyped in case-control studies of incident CHD nested within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), the Health......; the association was weaker in the HPFS and not statistically significant in the DCH women and men. The pooled relative risk per minor allele was 0.74 (0.56-1.00). There was a suggestion that the associations of the S447X variant with plasma lipids and CHD risk were more pronounced in obese individuals in the NHS...... whether greater benefit from this variant may be conferred in some subgroups. (Am Heart J 2009;157:384-90.)...

  15. Common variants in the obesity-associated genes FTO and MC4R are not associated with risk of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Thrift, Aaron P; Figueiredo, Jane C; Jenkins, Mark A; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Conti, David V; Lin, Yi; Win, Aung Ko; Limburg, Paul J; Berndt, Sonja I; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hudson, Thomas J; Marchand, Loïc Le; Newcomb, Polly A; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Peters, Ulrike; Casey, Graham; Campbell, Peter T

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is a convincing risk factor for colorectal cancer. Genetic variants in or near FTO and MC4R are consistently associated with body mass index and other body size measures, but whether they are also associated with colorectal cancer risk is unclear. In the discovery stage, we tested associations of 677 FTO and 323 MC4R single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) 100kb upstream and 300kb downstream from each respective locus with risk of colorectal cancer in data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR: 1960 cases; 1777 controls). Next, all SNPs that were nominally statistically significant (pCancer Consortium (GECCO: 9716 cases; 9844 controls). In the discovery stage, 43 FTO variants and 18 MC4R variants were associated with colorectal cancer risk (pobesity-related genes FTO and MC4R are associated with risk of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of common variants in JAK2 gene with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome and related disorders

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    Penas-Steinhardt Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbances in leptin and insulin signaling pathways are related to obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS with increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 is a tyrosine kinase involved in the activation of mechanisms that mediate leptin and insulin actions. We conducted a population cross-sectional study to explore the association between two common variants in JAK2 gene and MS related traits in 724 Argentinean healthy male subjects. Methods A total of 724 unrelated men aged 37.11 ± 10.91 yr were included in a cross-sectional study. Physical examination, anthropometric measurements and biochemical analysis were determined by a standardized protocol. rs7849191 and rs3780378 were genotyped. Analyses were done separately for each SNP and followed up by haplotype analysis. Results rs7849191 and rs3780378 were both associated with reduced risk of MS [p = 0.005; OR (95%CI = 0.52 (0.33-0.80 and p = 0.006; OR (95% CI = 0.59 (0.40-0.86 respectively, assuming a dominant model]. rs3780378 T allele was associated with triglyceridemia values under 150 mg/dl [p = 0.007; OR (95%CI = 0.610 (0.429-0.868] and TT carriers showed lower triglycerides (p = 0.017, triglycerides/HDL-C ratio (p = 0.022 and lipid accumulation product (p = 0.007 compared to allele C carriers. The two-SNPs-haplotype analysis was consistent with single locus analysis. Conclusions It was found for the first time, significant associations of JAK2 common variants and related haplotypes with reduced risk of MS. These findings could be explained by the role of JAK2 in insulin and/or leptin signaling.

  17. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  18. Multidrug resistance 1 gene variants, pesticide exposure, and increased risk of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Huang; Wu, Man-Tzu Marcie; Chou, Chia-Hsuan; Huang, Chia-Chen; Tseng, Tzu-Yen; Chang, Fang-Yu; Li, Ying-Ti; Tsai, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Tsung-Shing; Wong, Ruey-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR)1 gene, extrudes fat-soluble compounds to the extracellular environment. However, the DNA damage of pesticides in subjects with genetic variation in MDR1 has not been investigated. In this study, the comet assay was applied to examine the extent of DNA damage in the peripheral blood of 195 fruit growers who had been exposed to pesticides and 141 unexposed controls. The MDR1 polymorphisms were identified. Questionnaires were administered to obtain demographic data and occupational history. Results showed subjects experiencing high (2.14 μm/cell, P pesticide exposure (2.18 μm/cell, P pesticide-exposed groups. Combined analysis revealed that pesticide-exposed fruit growers with MDR1 -129 TT genotype had the greatest DNA damage in the subjects with the combinations of pesticide exposure and MDR1 -129 genotypes. In conclusion, pesticide exposed individuals with susceptible MDR1 -129 genotypes may experience increased risk of DNA damage.

  19. Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene Variants, Pesticide Exposure, and Increased Risk of DNA Damage

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    Chun-Chieh Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR1 gene, extrudes fat-soluble compounds to the extracellular environment. However, the DNA damage of pesticides in subjects with genetic variation in MDR1 has not been investigated. In this study, the comet assay was applied to examine the extent of DNA damage in the peripheral blood of 195 fruit growers who had been exposed to pesticides and 141 unexposed controls. The MDR1 polymorphisms were identified. Questionnaires were administered to obtain demographic data and occupational history. Results showed subjects experiencing high (2.14 μm/cell, P<0.01 or low pesticide exposure (2.18 μm/cell, P<0.01 had a significantly greater DNA tail moment than controls (1.28 μm/cell. Compared to the MDR1 T-129C (rs3213619 TC/CC carriers, the TT carriers had increased DNA tail moment in controls (1.30 versus 1.12 μm/cell, P<0.01. Similar results were observed in the high and low pesticide-exposed groups. Combined analysis revealed that pesticide-exposed fruit growers with MDR1 -129 TT genotype had the greatest DNA damage in the subjects with the combinations of pesticide exposure and MDR1 -129 genotypes. In conclusion, pesticide exposed individuals with susceptible MDR1 -129 genotypes may experience increased risk of DNA damage.

  20. A variant of human paraoxonase/arylesterase (HUMPONA) gene is a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, M; Marian, A J

    1995-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex trait caused by a number of genetic and environmental factors. Recently, paraoxonase/arylesterase (PONA) enzyme has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. There is a 10-40-fold variability in the activity of this enzyme among individuals. This variability is due to the presence of an A/G polymorphism in the coding region of the gene (HUMPONA). The A and G alleles code for glutamine (A genotype) and arginine (B genotype), respectively. Individuals with A genotype have a lower enzymatic activity than those with B genotype. We determined the HUMPONA genotypes and alleles in 223 patients with angiographically documented CAD and in 247 individuals in the general population. The distribution of genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients and in controls. Genotypes A and B were present in 120 (49%) and 28 (11%) individuals in controls and in 68 (30%) and 40 (18%) patients with CAD, respectively (chi squared= 16.5, P= 0.0003). The frequency of the A allele was 0.69 in controls and 0.56 in patients (OR= 1.7, P= 0.0001). There were no differences in the distribution of HUMPONA genotypes in the subgroups of patients with restenosis, myocardial infarction, or any of the conventional risk factors for CAD as compared with corresponding subgroups. In summary, variants of the HUMPONA gene are involved in predisposition to coronary atherosclerosis.

  1. Effects of season of birth and a common MTHFR gene variant on the risk of schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntjewerff, J.W.; Ophoff, R.A.; Buizer-Voskamp, J.E.; Strengman, E.; Heijer, M. den

    2011-01-01

    Season of birth - in particular winter birth - has been persistently related to increased schizophrenia risk. Variation in folate intake is among the explanations for this seasonal effect. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is an essential enzyme in the folate mediated methylation transfer

  2. Novel variants in the PRDX6 Gene and the risk of Acute Lung Injury following major trauma

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    Localio A Russell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 is involved in redox regulation of the cell and is thought to be protective against oxidant injury. Little is known about genetic variation within the PRDX6 gene and its association with acute lung injury (ALI. In this study we sequenced the PRDX6 gene to uncover common variants, and tested association with ALI following major trauma. Methods To examine the extent of variation in the PRDX6 gene, we performed direct sequencing of the 5' UTR, exons, introns and the 3' UTR in 25 African American cases and controls and 23 European American cases and controls (selected from a cohort study of major trauma, which uncovered 80 SNPs. In silico modeling was performed using Patrocles and Transcriptional Element Search System (TESS. Thirty seven novel and tagging SNPs were tested for association with ALI compared with ICU at-risk controls who did not develop ALI in a cohort study of 259 African American and 254 European American subjects that had been admitted to the ICU with major trauma. Results Resequencing of critically ill subjects demonstrated 43 novel SNPs not previously reported. Coding regions demonstrated no detectable variation, indicating conservation of the protein. Block haplotype analyses reveal that recombination rates within the gene seem low in both Caucasians and African Americans. Several novel SNPs appeared to have the potential for functional consequence using in silico modeling. Chi2 analysis of ALI incidence and genotype showed no significant association between the SNPs in this study and ALI. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any association beyond single SNP analyses. Conclusions This study revealed novel SNPs within the PRDX6 gene and its 5' and 3' flanking regions via direct sequencing. There was no association found between these SNPs and ALI, possibly due to a low sample size, which was limited to detection of relative risks of 1.93 and above. Future studies may focus on the role of

  3. Apolipoprotein E gene variants as a risk factor for coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetic Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Emad F Abd El; Reda, Ahmed A; Hendi, Amera A K; Zaki, Seham A; Essa, Enas S; Khalifa, Amani S

    2012-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular diseases compared with non-diabetic patients. The role of apolipoprotain E in lipid metabolism and cholesterol transport is well established. Apolipoprotein E gene (APO E) polymprphism that confers susceptibility to or protection from CAD in patients with type 2 DM may be quite different in different ethnic populations. We aimed to determine the frequencies of allelic variants of APO E in Egyptian population and to examine the relationship between APO E polymorphism and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in Egyptian type 2 diabetic patients. The study included 35 diabetic patients with CAD (group 1), 35 diabetic patients without CAD (group II) and 30 control subjects. All were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory investigations for lipid profile and APO E genotyping by PCR-RFLP. Results revealed that epsilon3 allele was the commonest among the studied subjects (84%). The frequencies of epsilon2 and epsilon4 alleles were higher in group I (24.3% and 8.6% respectively) than group II and controls. The frequency of E2/E2, E2/E3, and E4/E3 genotypes was significantly higher in group I than group II and controls. Comparing group I vs. controls and group I vs. group II, multivariate analysis demonstrated significantly increased risk for CAD with epsilon4 and epsilon2 alleles vs. E3 (OR=7.02 and 4.97 respectively). In Conclusion, epsilon4 and E2 alleles are associated with higher risk of CAD in type2 DM than epsilon3 allele. Larger scale studies are still needed to either confirm or modify these results.

  4. Common variants in MAGI2 gene are associated with increased risk for cognitive impairment in schizophrenic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Koide

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder characterized by positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and cognitive impairment. MAGI2, a relatively large gene (∼1.5 Mbps that maps to chromosome 7q21, is involved in recruitment of neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. A genetic association study designed to evaluate the association between MAGI2 and cognitive performance or schizophrenia has not been conducted. In this case-control study, we examined the relationship of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP variations in MAGI2 and risk for schizophrenia in a large Japanese sample and explored the potential relationships between variations in MAGI2 and aspects of human cognitive function related to glutamate activity. Based on the result of first schizophrenia genome-wide association study in a Japanese population (JGWAS, we selected four independent SNPs and performed an association study using a large independent Japanese sample set (cases 1624, controls 1621. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST was used to evaluate executive function in 114 cases and 91 controls. We found suggestive evidence for genetic association of common SNPs within MAGI2 locus and schizophrenia in Japanese population. Furthermore in terms of association between MAGI2 and cognitive performance, we observed that genotype effect of rs2190665 on WCST score was significant (p = 0.034 and rs4729938 trended toward significance (p = 0.08. In conclusion, although we could not detect strong genetic evidence for association of common variants in MAGI2 and increased schizophrenia risk in a Japanese population, these SNPs may increase risk of cognitive impairment in schizophrenic patients.

  5. Fatty acid desaturase gene variants, cardiovascular risk factors, and myocardial infarction in the Costa Rica Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella eAslibekyan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in fatty acid desaturases (FADS has previously been linked to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in adipose tissue and cardiovascular risk. The goal of our study was to test associations between six common FADS polymorphisms (rs174556, rs3834458, rs174570, rs2524299, rs174589, rs174627, adipose tissue fatty acids, intermediate cardiovascular risk factors, and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI in a matched population based case-control study of Costa Rican adults (n=1756. Generalized linear models and multiple conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the associations of interest. Analyses involving intermediate cardiovascular risk factors and MI were also conducted in two replication cohorts, The Nurses’ Health Study (n=1200 and The Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n=1295. In the Costa Rica Study, genetic variation in the FADS cluster was associated with a robust linear decrease in adipose gamma-linolenic, arachidonic, and eicosapentaenoic fatty acids, and significant or borderline significant increases in the eicosadienoic, eicosatrienoic, and dihomo-gamma-linolenic fatty acids. However, the associations with adipose tissue fatty acids did not translate into changes in inflammatory biomarkers, blood lipids, or the risk of MI in the discovery or the replication cohorts. In conclusion, fatty acid desaturase polymorphisms impact long-chain PUFA biosynthesis, but their overall effect on cardiovascular health likely involves multiple pathways and merits further investigation.

  6. Fatty acid desaturase gene variants, cardiovascular risk factors, and myocardial infarction in the costa rica study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variation in fatty acid desaturases (FADS) has previously been linked to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in adipose tissue and cardiovascular risk. The goal of our study was to test associations between six common FADS polymorphisms (rs174556, rs3834458, rs174570, rs2524299, r...

  7. Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene Variants, Pesticide Exposure, and Increased Risk of DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Chieh Chen; Chun-Huang Huang; Man-Tzu Marcie Wu; Chia-Hsuan Chou; Chia-Chen Huang; Tzu-Yen Tseng; Fang-Yu Chang; Ying-Ti Li; Chun-Cheng Tsai; Tsung-Shing Wang; Ruey-Hong Wong

    2014-01-01

    The P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR)1 gene, extrudes fat-soluble compounds to the extracellular environment. However, the DNA damage of pesticides in subjects with genetic variation in MDR1 has not been investigated. In this study, the comet assay was applied to examine the extent of DNA damage in the peripheral blood of 195 fruit growers who had been exposed to pesticides and 141 unexposed controls. The MDR1 polymorphisms were identified. Questionnaires were administ...

  8. Factor VIII gene variants and inhibitor risk in African American hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Devi; Ettinger, Ruth A; Nakaya Fletcher, Shelley; James, Eddie A; Liu, Maochang; Barrett, John C; Withycombe, Janice; Matthews, Dana C; Epstein, Melinda S; Hughes, Richard J; Pratt, Kathleen P

    2015-08-13

    African American hemophilia A (HA) patients experience a higher incidence of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies ("inhibitors") vis-à-vis white patients. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs) in the F8 gene encoding FVIII-H484, FVIII-E1241, and FVIII-V2238 are more prevalent in African Americans. This study tested the hypothesis that immune responses to these sites provoke inhibitors. Blood samples were obtained from 174 African American and 198 white HA subjects and their F8 gene sequences determined. Major histocompatibility complex class II binding and T-cell recognition of polymorphic sequences were evaluated using quantitative binding assays and HLA-DRB1 tetramers. Peptides corresponding to 4 common ns-SNPs showed limited binding to 11 HLA-DRB1 proteins. CD4 T cells from 22 subjects treated with FVIII products having sequences at residues FVIII-484, 1241, and 2238 differing from those of putative proteins encoded by their F8 genes did not show high-avidity tetramer binding, whereas positive-control staining of tetanus-specific CD4 T cells was routinely successful. African Americans with an intron-22 inversion mutation showed a 2-3 times-higher inhibitor incidence than whites with the same mutation (odds ratio = 2.3 [1.1-5.0, P = .04]), but this did not correlate with any of the ns-SNPs. We conclude that immune responses to "sequence-mismatched" FVIII products are unlikely to contribute appreciably to the inhibitor incidence in African Americans.

  9. Genetic variants and haplotype analyses of the ZBRK1/ZNF350 gene in high-risk non BRCA1/2 French Canadian breast and ovarian cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Sylvie; Belleau, Pascal; Labrie, Yvan; Ouellette, Geneviève; Bessette, Paul; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Laframboise, Rachel; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Pichette, Roxane; Plante, Marie; Durocher, Francine

    2008-01-01

    Our current understanding of breast cancer susceptibility involves mutations in the 2 major genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, found in about 25% of high-risk families, as well as few other low penetrance genes such as ATM and CHEK2. Approximately two-thirds of the multiple cases families remain to be explained by mutations in still unknown genes. In a candidate gene approach to identify new genes potentially involved in breast cancer susceptibility, we analyzed genomic variants in the ZBRK1 gene, a co-repressor implicated in BRCA1-mediated repression of GADD45. Direct sequencing of ZBRK1 entire coding region in affected breast cancer individuals from 97 high-risk French Canadian breast/ovarian cancer families and 94 healthy controls led to the identification of 18 genomic variants. Haplotype analyses, using PHASE, COCAPHASE and HaploStats programs, put in evidence 3 specific haplotypes which could potentially modulate breast cancer risk, and among which 2 that are associated with a potential protective effect (p = 0.01135 and p = 0.00268), while another haplotype is over-represented in the case group (p = 0.00143). Further analyses of these haplotypes indicated that a strong component of the observed difference between both groups emerge from the first 5 variants (out of 12 used for haplotype determination). The present study also permitted to determine a set of tagging SNPs that could be useful for subsequent analyses in large scale association studies. Additional studies in large cohorts and other populations will however be needed to further evaluate if common and/or rare ZBRK1 sequence variants and haplotypes could be associated with a modest/intermediate breast cancer risk.

  10. Metalloproteinase-9 gene variants and risk for hypertension among ethnic Javanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitranto Arjadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Hypertension is associated with endothelial-dependent vasodilation disorders, due to reduced nitric oxide (NO availability and excessive angiotensin II (ANG-II activation. The objective of this study was to determine the association between matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9 gene polymorphism and hypertension in ethnic Javanese in the 40-80 year age group. Methods This was a case-control study on 50 PROLANIS patients of family doctors meeting the inclusion criteria and 50 controls without hypertension. Subjects were hypertensive patients with constant systolic arterial pressure of >140 mmHg and diastolic arterial pressure of >90 mmHg, confirmed in three successive measurements The observed parameters were degree of MMP-9 polymorphism, and NO and ANG-II levels. Matrix metallopeptidase 9 polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP using the SmaI restriction enzyme. MMP-9 polymorphisms were indicated by variation in band patterns. Degree of polymorphism in cases and controls were compared with NO and ANG-II levels in both groups. Data analysis was done using independent t-test. Results The heterozygous (3 band to normal (2 band MMP-9 genotype ratio was 3:1 in hypertensives, but balanced in controls. In hypertensives, heterozygous GA and homozygous AA genotype frequencies were respectively 3.198 and 1.548 times higher than that of the GG genotype (p=0.008 and p=0.726. There was a statistically significant differences of NO and Ang-II levels between cases and controls (p=0.000 and p=0.000; respectively. Conclusion Matrix metallopeptidase 9 gene polymorphisms in hypertensive ethnic Javanese are associated with NO and angiotensin II levels.

  11. Circulating YKL-40 Level, but not CHI3L1 Gene Variants, Is Associated with Atherosclerosis-Related Quantitative Traits and the Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease

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    Semon Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available YKL-40, a pleotropic cytokine, is emerging as a risk factor and a prognostic predictor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We attempted to elucidate the genetic, clinical and biochemical correlates of circulating YKL-40 level and, by combining it with CHI3L1 gene variants, with the risk and long-term mortality of peripheral artery disease (PAD. Plasma YKL-40 concentrations were measured in 612 Taiwanese individuals who had no clinically overt systemic disease. Clinical parameters, CHI3L1 gene promoter variants and 18 biomarker levels were analyzed. Eighty-six PAD patients were further enrolled for analysis. Significant associations were found between CHI3L1 genotypes/haplotypes and YKL-40 levels for the health examination subjects (smallest p = 8.36 × 10−7 for rs4950928 and smallest p = 1.72 × 10−10 for haplotype TGG and also for PAD patients. For the health examination subjects, circulating YKL-40 level, but not CHI3L1 gene variants, were positively associated with age, smoking, and circulating levels of triglyceride, lipocalin 2 and multiple inflammatory biomarkers and negatively associated with low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Circulating YKL-40 level is also significantly associated with the risk of PAD (p = 3.3 × 10−23. Circulating YKL40 level, but not CHI3L1 gene promoter variants, is associated with the risk of PAD in Taiwanese. The association of YKL-40 levels with multiple quantitative traits relating to the risk of PAD may provide a molecular basis linking YKL-40 to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  12. No evidence that protein truncating variants in BRIP1 are associated with breast cancer risk: implications for gene panel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Douglas F; Lesueur, Fabienne; Decker, Brennan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Li, Jun; Allen, Jamie; Luccarini, Craig; Pooley, Karen A; Shah, Mitul; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Ahmad, Jamil; Thompson, Ella R; Damiola, Francesca; Pertesi, Maroulio; Voegele, Catherine; Mebirouk, Noura; Robinot, Nivonirina; Durand, Geoffroy; Forey, Nathalie; Luben, Robert N; Ahmed, Shahana; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Beckman, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Van Den Berg, David; Blot, William J; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chia, Kee Seng; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Conroy, Don M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hart, Steven N; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul A; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Li, Na; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Matsuo, Keitaro; Meindl, Alfons; Mitchell, Gillian; Muir, Kenneth; Nevelsteen, Ines; van den Ouweland, Ans; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phuah, Sze Yee; Pylkäs, Katri; Rowley, Simone M; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Schmutzler, Rita K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo H; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Verhoef, Senno; Wong-Brown, Michelle; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Nevanlinna, Heli; Scott, Rodney J; Andrulis, Irene L; Wu, Anna H; Hopper, John L; Couch, Fergus J; Winqvist, Robert; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Neuhausen, Susan L; Milne, Roger L; Fletcher, Olivia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Campbell, Ian G; Dunning, Alison M; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Goldgar, David E; Tavtigian, Sean V; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Background BRCA1 interacting protein C-terminal helicase 1 (BRIP1) is one of the Fanconi Anaemia Complementation (FANC) group family of DNA repair proteins. Biallelic mutations in BRIP1 are responsible for FANC group J, and previous studies have also suggested that rare protein truncating variants in BRIP1 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. These studies have led to inclusion of BRIP1 on targeted sequencing panels for breast cancer risk prediction. Methods We evaluated a truncating variant, p.Arg798Ter (rs137852986), and 10 missense variants of BRIP1, in 48 144 cases and 43 607 controls of European origin, drawn from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Additionally, we sequenced the coding regions of BRIP1 in 13 213 cases and 5242 controls from the UK, 1313 cases and 1123 controls from three population-based studies as part of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, and 1853 familial cases and 2001 controls from Australia. Results The rare truncating allele of rs137852986 was observed in 23 cases and 18 controls in Europeans in BCAC (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.58 to 2.03, p=0.79). Truncating variants were found in the sequencing studies in 34 cases (0.21%) and 19 controls (0.23%) (combined OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.70, p=0.75). Conclusions These results suggest that truncating variants in BRIP1, and in particular p.Arg798Ter, are not associated with a substantial increase in breast cancer risk. Such observations have important implications for the reporting of results from breast cancer screening panels. PMID:26921362

  13. The T111I variant in the endothelial lipase gene and risk of coronary heart disease in three independent populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M. K.; Rimm, E. B.; Mukamal, K. J.;

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (LIPG) is implicated in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Small studies in selected populations have reported higher HDL-C levels among carriers of the common T111I variant in LIPG, but whether this variant is associated with plasma lipids and risk......-control studies of CHD nested within the Diet, Cancer, and Health study with 998 cases, Nurses' Health Study with 241 cases, and Health Professionals Follow-up Study with 262 cases. The minor allele frequency in the combined pool of controls was 0.29. The T111I variant was not associated with HDL-C or any other...... lipid and lipoprotein measures. Compared with wildtype homozygotes, the pooled estimate for risk of CHD was 0.95 (0.85-1.06) per T111I allele. Our analysis among healthy Caucasian men and women from three independent studies does not support an association between the T111I variant and HDL-C, other...

  14. Genetic variants in DNA double-strand break repair genes and risk of salivary gland carcinoma: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB repair is the primary defense mechanism against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. Ionizing radiation is the only established risk factor for salivary gland carcinoma (SGC. We hypothesized that genetic variants in DSB repair genes contribute to individual variation in susceptibility to SGC. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study in which we analyzed 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 45 DSB repair genes in 352 SGC cases and 598 controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Rs3748522 in RAD52 and rs13180356 in XRCC4 were significantly associated with SGC after Bonferroni adjustment; ORs (95% CIs for the variant alleles of these SNPs were 1.71 (1.40-2.09, P = 1.70 × 10(-7 and 0.58 (0.45-0.74, P = 2.00 × 10(-5 respectively. The genetic effects were modulated by histological subtype. The association of RAD52-rs3748522 with SGC was strongest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.55-3.15, P = 1.25 × 10(-5, n = 74, and the association of XRCC4-rs13180356 with SGC was strongest for adenoid cystic carcinoma (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.87, P = 6.91 × 10(-3, n = 123. Gene-level association analysis revealed one gene, PRKDC, with a marginally significant association with SGC risk in non-Hispanic whites. To our knowledge, this study is the first to comprehensively evaluate the genetic effect of DSB repair genes on SGC risk. Our results indicate that genetic variants in the DSB repair pathways contribute to inter-individual differences in susceptibility to SGC and show that the impact of genetic variants differs by histological subtype. Independent studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  15. Common variants of inflammatory cytokine genes are associated with risk of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes among Asian Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Khullar, Madhu; Ahuja, Monica;

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokine genes have been proposed as good candidate genes for conferring susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we examined the combined effect of multiple alleles of pro inflammatory cytokine genes for determining the risk of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic...

  16. Common variants of inflammatory cytokine genes are associated with risk of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes among Asian Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Khullar, Madhu; Ahuja, Monica

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokine genes have been proposed as good candidate genes for conferring susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we examined the combined effect of multiple alleles of pro inflammatory cytokine genes for determining the risk of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic pat...

  17. DENND1B gene variants associate with elevated exhaled nitric oxide in healthy high-risk neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Bischoff, Anne Louise; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2015-01-01

    ; anthropometrics; demographics; socioeconomics; paternal atopy; maternal smoking, and mother's consumption of paracetamol and antibiotics during 3rd trimester; and neonatal bacterial airway colonization. RESULTS: FeNO values measured by the single-breath versus tidal-breathing technique yielded slightly higher......-risk neonates. METHODS: FeNO was measured during sedation by single-breath and tidal-breathing techniques in 253 one-month-old neonates from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2000 ) birth cohort. The risk factor analyses included genetic variants in DENND1B, Filaggrin, and ORMDL3...

  18. TNF-alpha gene (TNFA) variants increase risk for multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Sharma, Arun; Stello, Kimberly; Toth, Chad; O'Connell, Michael Richard; Evans, Anna C; LaRusch, Jessica; Muddana, Venkata; Papachristou, Georgios I; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complex inflammatory syndrome with unpredictable progression to systemic inflammation and multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine that may link inflammation to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which usually precedes MODS. Small genetic cohort studies of the TNFA promoter in AP produced ambiguous results. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of TNFA promoter variants to assess both susceptibility to AP and risk of progression to MODS. We prospectively ascertained 401 controls and 211 patients with AP that were assessed for persistent SIRS (>48 h) and MODS. MODS was defined as failure of ≥2 organ systems (cardiovascular, pulmonary, and/or renal) persisting more than 48 h. Subjects were genotyped by DNA sequencing and analyzed for SNPs at -1031 C/T (rs1799964), -863 A/C (rs1800630), -857 C/T (rs1799724), -308 A/G (rs1800629), and -238 A/G (rs361525). Twenty-three of 211 AP patients (11%) developed MODS. TNFA promoter variants were not associated with susceptibility to AP, but progression to MODS was associated with the minor allele at -1031C (56.5% vs. 32.4% P = 0.022, OR: 2.7; 95%CI: 1.12-6.51) and -863A (43.5% vs. 21.8% P = 0.022, OR: 2.76; 95%CI: 1.12-6.74). TNFA promoter variants do not alter susceptibility to AP, but rather the TNF-α expression-enhancing -1031C and -863A alleles significantly increased the risk of AP progression to MODS. These data, within the context of previous studies, clarify the risk of specific genetic variants in TNFA and therefore the role of TNF-α in the overall AP syndrome. Copyright © 2012 IAP and EPC. All rights reserved.

  19. A genetic variant in vitamin B12 metabolic genes that reduces the risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies on components of the one-carbon metabolic pathway revealed that human vitamin B12 levels could be significantly influenced by variations in the fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2, cubilin (CUBN, and transcobalamin-I (TCN1 genes. An altered vitamin B12 level is an important factor that disturbs the homeostasis of the folate metabolism pathway, which in turn can potentially lead to the development of congenital heart disease (CHD. Therefore, we investigated the association between the variants of vitamin B12-related genes and CHD in Han Chinese populations. METHODS AND RESULTS: Six variants of the vitamin B12-related genes were selected for analysis in two independent case-control studies, with a total of 868 CHD patients and 931 controls. The variant rs11254363 of the CUBN gene was associated with a decreased risk of developing CHD in both the separate and combined case-control studies. Combined samples from the two cohorts had a significant decrease in CHD risk for the G allele (OR = 0.48, P = 1.7×10⁻⁵ and AG+GG genotypes (OR = 0.49, P = 4×10⁻⁵, compared with the wild-type A allele and AA genotype, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the G allele of variant rs11254363 of the CUBN gene was associated with an increased level of circulating vitamin B12. This result suggested that the carriers of the G allele would benefit from the protection offered by the high vitamin B12 concentration during critical heart development stages. This finding shed light on the unexpected role of CUBN in CHD development and highlighted the interplay of diet, genetics, and human birth defects.

  20. CAG repeat variants in the POLG1 gene encoding mtDNA polymerase-gamma and risk of breast cancer in African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrak, Sami; Ayyasamy, Vanniarajan; Zirpoli, Gary; Ambrosone, Christine; Bandera, Elisa V; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Jandorf, Lina; Ciupak, Gregory; Davis, Warren; Pawlish, Karen S; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav

    2012-01-01

    The DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG) gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of enzyme responsible for directing mitochondrial DNA replication in humans, contains a polyglutamine tract encoded by CAG repeats of varying length. The length of the CAG repeat has been associated with the risk of testicular cancer, and other genomic variants that impact mitochondrial function have been linked to breast cancer risk in African-American (AA) women. We evaluated the potential role of germline POLG-CAG repeat variants in breast cancer risk in a sample of AA women (100 cases and 100 age-matched controls) who participated in the Women's Circle of Health Study, an ongoing multi-institutional, case-control study of breast cancer. Genotyping was done by fragment analysis in a blinded manner. Results from this small study suggest the possibility of an increased risk of breast cancer in women with minor CAG repeat variants of POLG, but no statistically significant differences in CAG repeat length were observed between cases and controls (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio 1.74; 95% CI, 0.49-6.21). Our study suggests that POLG-CAG repeat length is a potential risk factor for breast cancer that needs to be explored in larger population-based studies.

  1. CAG repeat variants in the POLG1 gene encoding mtDNA polymerase-gamma and risk of breast cancer in African-American women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Azrak

    Full Text Available The DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of enzyme responsible for directing mitochondrial DNA replication in humans, contains a polyglutamine tract encoded by CAG repeats of varying length. The length of the CAG repeat has been associated with the risk of testicular cancer, and other genomic variants that impact mitochondrial function have been linked to breast cancer risk in African-American (AA women. We evaluated the potential role of germline POLG-CAG repeat variants in breast cancer risk in a sample of AA women (100 cases and 100 age-matched controls who participated in the Women's Circle of Health Study, an ongoing multi-institutional, case-control study of breast cancer. Genotyping was done by fragment analysis in a blinded manner. Results from this small study suggest the possibility of an increased risk of breast cancer in women with minor CAG repeat variants of POLG, but no statistically significant differences in CAG repeat length were observed between cases and controls (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio 1.74; 95% CI, 0.49-6.21. Our study suggests that POLG-CAG repeat length is a potential risk factor for breast cancer that needs to be explored in larger population-based studies.

  2. A candidate gene approach identifies an IL33 genetic variant as a novel genetic risk factor for GCA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Márquez

    Full Text Available Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition.A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays.A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (P(MH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78-0.99 and recessive (P(MH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35-0.80 models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis.Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA.

  3. The 894G>T variant in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and spina bifida risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, I.J. van der; Heil, S.G.; Heijer, M. den; Blom, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The 894G>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the endothelial NOS (NOS3) gene, has recently been associated with embryonic spina bifida risk. In this study, a possible association between the NOS3 894G>T SNP and spina bifida risk in both mothers and children in a Dutch population was examined

  4. Positive selection on the osteoarthritis-risk and decreased-height associated variants at the GDF5 gene in East Asians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Dong Wu

    Full Text Available GDF5 is a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP gene family, and plays an important role in the development of the skeletal system. Variants of the gene are associated with osteoarthritis and height in some human populations. Here, we resequenced the gene in individuals from four geographically separated human populations, and found that the evolution of the promoter region deviated from neutral expectations, with the sequence evolution driven by positive selection in the East Asian population, especially the haplotypes carrying the derived alleles of 5' UTR SNPs rs143384 and rs143383. The derived alleles of rs143384 and rs143383, which are associated with a risk of osteoarthritis and decreased height, have high frequencies in non-Africans and show strong extended haplotype homozygosity and high population differentiation in East Asian. It is concluded that positive selection has driven the rapid evolution of the two osteoarthritis osteoarthritis-risk and decreased height associated variants of the human GDF5 gene, and supports the suggestion that the reduction in body size during the terminal Pleistocene and Holocene period might have been an adaptive process influenced by genetic factors.

  5. Report of a novel OCA2 gene mutation and an investigation of OCA2 variants on melanoma risk in a familial melanoma pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Jason E; Cassidy, Pamela B; Manga, Prashiela; Boissy, Raymond E; Goldgar, David; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Florell, Scott R; Leachman, Sancy A

    2013-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is caused by mutations of the OCA2 gene. Individuals affected by OCA2 as well as other types of albinism are at a significantly increased risk for sun-induced skin-cancers, including malignant melanoma (MM). To identify the molecular etiology of oculocutaneous albinism in a previously uncharacterized melanoma pedigree and to investigate the relationship between two OCA2 variants and melanoma predisposition in this pedigree. DNA and RNA were isolated from the peripheral blood of seven patients in a familial melanoma pedigree. Electron microscopy was performed on the individual with clinical oculocutaneous albinism. OCA2, TYRP1, MC1R, CDKN2A/p16, CDKN2A/p19ARF, and CDK4 genes were sequenced in affected individuals. The relationship between OCA2 variants and melanoma was assessed using a pedigree likelihood-based method. The proband was determined to be an OCA2 compound heterozygous mutation carrier with a previously reported conservative missense mutation (V443I) and a novel non-conservative missense mutation (L734R). The pedigree contained individuals diagnosed with both cutaneous and iris melanoma. Based on co-segregation analysis, the odds of these OCA2 variants being high penetrance loci for melanoma was: 1.3-to-1 if we include the iris melanoma as affected and 6.5-to-1 if we only consider cutaneous melanoma as affected. The discovery of this novel OCA2 variant adds to the body of evidence on the detrimental effects of OCA2 gene mutations on pigmentation, supports existing GWAS data on the relevance of the OCA2 gene in melanoma predisposition, and may ultimately assist in the development of targeted molecular therapies in the treatment of OCA and melanoma. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies an IL33 Genetic Variant as a Novel Genetic Risk Factor for GCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Ana; Solans, Roser; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.; Castañeda, Santos; Ramentol, Marc; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Narváez, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Palm, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Braun, Niko; Moosig, Frank; Witte, Torsten; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Vaglio, Augusto; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition. Methods A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway) were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays. Results A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (PMH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78–0.99) and recessive (PMH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35–0.80) models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis. Conclusions Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA. PMID:25409453

  7. Two-stage Case-control Study of DNMT-1 and DNMT-3B Gene Variants and Breast Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Chuanzhong; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Lu, Wei; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation of CpG islands is a common epigenetic alteration found in cancers. DNA methylation is typically mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Only two studies have evaluated DNMT-3B and/or DNMT-1 gene polymorphisms in relation to breast cancer risk, and results have been inconsistent. We comprehensively evaluated genetic variations in the DNMT-1 and DNMT-3B genes with breast cancer risk among the participants of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS), a large-scale, tw...

  8. Relationship between common lipoprotein lipase gene sequence variants, hyperinsulinemia, and risk of ischemic heart disease: A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen; Hansen, Tine Willum; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) are important determinants of fasting and postprandial plasma triglyceride levels. High insulin and high triglyceride levels are associated with an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD). This study aimed to find out whether common LPL gene...

  9. The association study of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate identified risk variants of the GLI3 gene in a Chinese population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YIRUI WANG; YIMIN SUN; YONGQING HUANG; YONGCHU PAN; BING SHI; JIAN MA; LAN MA; FEIFEI LAN; YUXI ZHOU; JIAYU SHI; JINFANG ZHU; HONGBING JIANG; LEI ZHANG; XUE XIAO; MIN JIANG; AIHUA YIN; LILI YU; LIN WANG; JING CHENG; YINXUE YANG

    2017-09-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a common birth defect due to abnormal orofacial development. Previous studies report abnormal sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling activity during NSCL/P pathogenesis and propose several genes in the SHH pathway as candidate risk genes. As such, we focussed on GLI3, a downstream modulator of the SHH pathway. In the present study,we genotyped 34 tag SNPs covering GLI3 and performed association analysis with NSCL/P in 504 cases and 455 healthy controls. Our preliminary results identified risk variants of GLI3 that are associated with NSCL/P susceptibility in a Chinese population. In particular, rs3801161 and its haplotypes rs3801161–rs7785287 displayed significant association with NSCL/Pand survived Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The robustness of the association between GLI3 and NSCL/P is worth further examination in the future across different populations.

  10. The association of ADH and ALDH gene variants with alcohol drinking habits and cardiovascular disease risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Fenger, Mogens; Friedrich, Nele

    2008-01-01

    . In a Caucasian population, we examined the association of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genetic variants with alcohol drinking habits, biomarkers of alcohol exposure, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. METHODS: The study population consisted of 1,216 Danish men and women......BACKGROUND: Genetic variation in ethanol metabolism may have an influence on both alcohol drinking habits and the susceptibility to health effects of alcohol drinking. Such influences are likely to bias exposure-disease associations in epidemiologic studies of health effects of alcohol drinking...... aged 15-77 years participating in a health examination in 1998. The health examination included a self-administered questionnaire (alcohol drinking habits), a physical examination (blood pressure), and various blood tests [alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume (E...

  11. Risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome associated with FTO gene variants discloses clinically relevant gender difference among Turks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu-Geyik, Filiz; Onat, Altan; Yuzbasıogulları, Ayse Berna; Coban, Neslihan; Can, Gunay; Lehtimäki, Terho; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2016-06-01

    Gene variations in the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO) have shown controversial associations with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in several populations. We explored the association of FTO gene with obesity, MetS, and insulin-related parameters separately in men and women. Two SNPs in the FTO, gene rs9939609 and rs1421085, were genotyped by the Taqman System in 1967 adults (mean age of the whole group 50.1 ± 12.0; 48.4 % male). A random sample of the Turkish Adult Risk Factor cohort was cross-sectionally analyzed. Both SNPs exhibited strong linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 0.85) and minor alleles were associated with risk of obesity in women and of MetS in men. Carriers of the rs1421085 C-allele exhibited higher body mass index (BMI) in each gender. Adjusted fasting insulin and HOMA index were significantly higher in C-allele carriers in men alone. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated significantly increased likelihood for obesity in female C-risk allele carriers (OR 1.61; 95 % CI 1.19-2.18), after adjustment for age, smoking status, alcohol usage, physical activity grade and presence of diabetes mellitus. Male C-allele carriers were at increased risk for MetS (OR 1.44; 95 % CI 1.07-1.95), adjusted for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Further adjustment for BMI attenuated the MetS risk, indicating interaction between C-allele, gender and BMI. The FTO gene in Turkish adults contributes independently to obesity in women and-by interacting with BMI-to MetS and insulin resistance in men.

  12. Contribution of a common variant in the promoter of the 1-α-hydroxylase gene (CYP27B1) to fracture risk in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Nguyen, Tuan V; Au, Amy; Bullock, Martyn; Cameron, Ian; Cumming, Robert; Chen, Jian Sheng; March, Lyn M; Seibel, Markus J; Sambrook, Philip N

    2011-02-01

    CYP27B1 encodes mitochondrial 1α-hydroxylase, which converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to its active 1,25-dihydroxylated metabolite. We tested the hypothesis that common variants in the CYP27B1 promoter are associated with fracture risk. The study was designed as a population-based genetic association study, which involved 153 men and 596 women aged 65-101 years, who had been followed for 2.2 years (range 0.1-5.5) between 1999 and 2006. During the follow-up period, the incidence of fragility fractures was ascertained. Bone ultrasound attenuation (BUA) was measured in all individuals, as were serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH concentrations; 86% subjects had vitamin D insufficiency. Genotypes were determined for the -1260C>A (rs10877012) and +2838T>C (rs4646536) CYP27B1 polymorphisms. A reporter gene assay was used to assess functional expression of the -1260C>A CYP27B1 variants. The association between genotypes and fracture risk was analyzed by Cox's proportional hazards model. We found that genotypic distribution of CYP27B1 -1260 and CYP27B1 +2838 polymorphisms was consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law. The two polymorphisms were in high linkage disequilibrium, with D' = 0.96 and r² = 0.94. Each C allele of the CYP27B1 -1260 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of fracture (hazard ratio = 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.73), after adjustment for age, sex, number of falls, and BUA. In transient transfection studies, a reporter gene downstream of the -1260(A)-containing promoter was more highly expressed than that containing the C allele. These data suggest that a common but functional variation within the CYP27B1 promoter gene is associated with fracture risk in the elderly.

  13. Genome-wide association study in a high-risk isolate for multiple sclerosis reveals associated variants in STAT3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakkula, Eveliina; Leppä, Virpi; Sulonen, Anna-Maija

    2010-01-01

    Genetic risk for multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to involve both common and rare risk alleles. Recent GWAS and subsequent meta-analysis have established the critical role of the HLA locus and identified new common variants associated to MS. These variants have small odds ratios (ORs) and expla...

  14. Application of multi-SNP approaches Bayesian LASSO and AUC-RF to detect main effects of inflammatory-gene variants associated with bladder cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelina López de Maturana

    Full Text Available The relationship between inflammation and cancer is well established in several tumor types, including bladder cancer. We performed an association study between 886 inflammatory-gene variants and bladder cancer risk in 1,047 cases and 988 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer (SBC/EPICURO Study. A preliminary exploration with the widely used univariate logistic regression approach did not identify any significant SNP after correcting for multiple testing. We further applied two more comprehensive methods to capture the complexity of bladder cancer genetic susceptibility: Bayesian Threshold LASSO (BTL, a regularized regression method, and AUC-Random Forest, a machine-learning algorithm. Both approaches explore the joint effect of markers. BTL analysis identified a signature of 37 SNPs in 34 genes showing an association with bladder cancer. AUC-RF detected an optimal predictive subset of 56 SNPs. 13 SNPs were identified by both methods in the total population. Using resources from the Texas Bladder Cancer study we were able to replicate 30% of the SNPs assessed. The associations between inflammatory SNPs and bladder cancer were reexamined among non-smokers to eliminate the effect of tobacco, one of the strongest and most prevalent environmental risk factor for this tumor. A 9 SNP-signature was detected by BTL. Here we report, for the first time, a set of SNP in inflammatory genes jointly associated with bladder cancer risk. These results highlight the importance of the complex structure of genetic susceptibility associated with cancer risk.

  15. The common rs9939609 variant of the fat mass and obesity-associated gene is associated with obesity risk in children and adolescents of Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindpaintner Klaus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes have confirmed that a common variant, rs9939609, in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene region is associated with body mass index (BMI in European children and adults. A significant association of the same risk allele has been described in Asian adult populations, but the results are conflicting. In addition, no replication studies have been conducted in children and adolescents of Asian ancestry. Methods A population-based survey was carried out among 3503 children and adolescents (6-18 years of age in Beijing, China, including 1229 obese and 2274 non-obese subjects. We investigated the association of rs9939609 with BMI and the risk of obesity. In addition, we tested the association of rs9939609 with weight, height, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, fat mass percentage, birth weight, blood pressure and related metabolic traits. Results We found significant associations of rs9939609 variant with weight, BMI, BMI standard deviation score (BMI-SDS, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and fat mass percentage in children and adolescents (p for trend = 3.29 × 10-5, 1.39 × 10-6, 3.76 × 10-6, 2.26 × 10-5, 1.94 × 10-5, and 9.75 × 10-5, respectively. No significant associations were detected with height, birth weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and related metabolic traits such as total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and fasting plasma glucose (all p > 0.05. Each additional copy of the rs9939609 A allele was associated with a BMI increase of 0.79 [95% Confidence interval (CI 0.47 to 1.10] kg/m2, equivalent to 0.25 (95%CI 0.14 to 0.35 BMI-SDS units. This rs9939609 variant is significantly associated with the risk of obesity under an additive model [Odds ratio (OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.50] after adjusting for age and gender. Moreover, an interaction between the FTO rs9939609

  16. Altered regional brain volumes in elderly carriers of a risk variant for drug abuse in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussotte, Florence F; Jahanshad, Neda; Hibar, Derrek P; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Dopamine D2 receptors mediate the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse. In humans, several polymorphisms in DRD2, the gene encoding these receptors, increase our genetic risk for developing addictive disorders. Here, we examined one of the most frequently studied candidate variant for addiction in DRD2 for association with brain structure. We tested whether this variant showed associations with regional brain volumes across two independent elderly cohorts, totaling 1,032 subjects. We first examined a large sample of 738 elderly participants with neuroimaging and genetic data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI1). We hypothesized that this addiction-related polymorphism would be associated with structural brain differences in regions previously implicated in familial vulnerability for drug dependence. Then, we assessed the generalizability of our findings by testing this polymorphism in a non-overlapping replication sample of 294 elderly subjects from a continuation of the first ADNI project (ADNI2) to minimize the risk of reporting false positive results. In both cohorts, the minor allele-previously linked with increased risk for addiction-was associated with larger volumes in various brain regions implicated in reward processing. These findings suggest that neuroanatomical phenotypes associated with familial vulnerability for drug dependence may be partially mediated by DRD2 genotype.

  17. Relationship between Factor V Leiden Gene Variant and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Misra, Shubham; Sagar, Ram; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Arun K; Talwar, Pumanshi; Raj, Ritesh; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2017-01-01

    Factor V Leiden is the most common genetic variation among the blood coagulation pathway which leads to prothrombotic state, therefore, is considered an important gene for understating the stroke mechanism. The aim of the present study is to determine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism at G1691A position of Factor V gene and risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in North Indian population. In a retrospective case-control study, 250 patients with IS and 250 age- and gender-matched controls were enrolled in the period of October 2012 to September 2014 from in- and out-patient department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Deoxyribonucleic acid for each case and control was isolated from peripheral blood using phenol-chloroform extraction method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used to determine the polymorphism. Data were analyzed using STATA Software Version 13. The mean age of IS patient was 52.8 ± 12.5 years and in control group was 50.97 ± 12.7 years. Genotypic frequency distributions were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and controls. As expected hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, heavy alcohol intake, family history of stroke, and poor economic status were significantly associated with the risk of IS. Multivariate analysis revealed 5.17 times higher odds for developing the risk of large vessel subtype of IS in patients carrying Factor V Leiden G1691A gene variation as compared to control subjects (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 1.32-20.3, P = 0.01). The present study suggests that Factor V Leiden G1691A polymorphism may be significantly associated with the risk of large vessel subtype of IS. Large sample size studies using prospective cohort designs are required to corroborate the present findings.

  18. Relationship between Factor V Leiden Gene Variant and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: A Case–Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Misra, Shubham; Sagar, Ram; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Arun K; Talwar, Pumanshi; Raj, Ritesh; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Factor V Leiden is the most common genetic variation among the blood coagulation pathway which leads to prothrombotic state, therefore, is considered an important gene for understating the stroke mechanism. Aim: The aim of the present study is to determine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism at G1691A position of Factor V gene and risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective case–control study, 250 patients with IS and 250 age- and gender-matched controls were enrolled in the period of October 2012 to September 2014 from in- and out-patient department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Deoxyribonucleic acid for each case and control was isolated from peripheral blood using phenol-chloroform extraction method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used to determine the polymorphism. Data were analyzed using STATA Software Version 13. Results: The mean age of IS patient was 52.8 ± 12.5 years and in control group was 50.97 ± 12.7 years. Genotypic frequency distributions were in accordance with Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and controls. As expected hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, heavy alcohol intake, family history of stroke, and poor economic status were significantly associated with the risk of IS. Multivariate analysis revealed 5.17 times higher odds for developing the risk of large vessel subtype of IS in patients carrying Factor V Leiden G1691A gene variation as compared to control subjects (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 1.32–20.3, P = 0.01). Conclusion: The present study suggests that Factor V Leiden G1691A polymorphism may be significantly associated with the risk of large vessel subtype of IS. Large sample size studies using prospective cohort designs are required to corroborate the present findings. PMID:28904463

  19. Genetic variants in microRNA and microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer risk among women of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Frank; Feng, Ye; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Nathanson, Katherine L; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Haiman, Christopher A; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate breast biology by binding to specific RNA sequences, leading to RNA degradation and inhibition of translation of their target genes. While germline genetic variations may disrupt some of these interactions between miRNAs and their targets, studies assessing the relationship between genetic variations in the miRNA network and breast cancer risk are still limited, particularly among women of African ancestry. We systematically put together a list of 822 and 10,468 genetic variants among primary miRNA sequences and 38 genes in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, respectively; and examined their association with breast cancer risk in the ROOT consortium which includes women of African ancestry. Findings were replicated in an independent consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). For overall breast cancer risk, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA biogenesis genes DROSHA rs78393591 (OR = 0.69, 95 % CI: 0.55-0.88, P = 0.003), ESR1 rs523736 (OR = 0.88, 95 % CI: 0.82-0.95, P = 3.99 × 10(-4)), and ZCCHC11 rs114101502 (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.59, P = 0.002), and one SNP in primary miRNA sequence (rs116159732 in miR-6826, OR = 0.74, 95 % CI: 0.63-0.89, P = 0.001) were found to have significant associations in both discovery and validation phases. In a subgroup analysis, two SNPs were associated with risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, and three SNPs were associated with risk of ER-positive breast cancer. Several variants in miRNA and miRNA biogenesis pathway genes were associated with breast cancer risk. Risk associations varied by ER status, suggesting potential new mechanisms in etiology.

  20. Identification of common variants in the SHBG gene affecting sex hormone-binding globulin levels and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Deborah J; Healey, Catherine S; Baynes, Caroline; Kalmyrzaev, Bolot; Ahmed, Shahana; Dowsett, Mitch; Folkerd, Elizabeth; Luben, Robert N; Cox, David; Ballinger, Dennis; Pharoah, Paul D P; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F

    2008-12-01

    Circulating levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) are inversely associated with breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. Three polymorphisms within the SHBG gene have been reported to affect SHBG levels, but there has been no systematic attempt to identify other such variants. We looked for associations between SHBG levels in 1,134 healthy, postmenopausal women and 11 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in or around the SHBG gene. Associations between SHBG SNPs and breast cancer were tested in up to 6,622 postmenopausal breast cancer cases and 6,784 controls. Ten SNPs within or close to the SHBG gene were significantly associated with SHBG levels as was the (TAAAA)(n) polymorphism. The best-fitting combination of rs6259, rs858521, and rs727428 and body mass index, waist, hip, age, and smoking status accounted for 24% of the variance in SHBG levels (natural logarithm transformed). Haplotype analysis suggested that rs858518, rs727428, or a variant in linkage disequilibrium with them acts to decrease SHBG levels but that this effect is neutralized by rs6259 (D356N). rs1799941 increases SHBG levels, but the previously reported association with (TAAAA)(n) repeat length appears to be a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with these SNPs. One further SHBG SNP was significantly associated with breast cancer (rs6257, per-allele odds ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.95; P = 0.002). At least 3 SNPs showed associations with SHBG levels that were highly significant but relatively small in magnitude. rs6257 is a potential breast cancer susceptibility variant, but relationships between the genetic determinants of SHBG levels and breast cancer are complex.

  1. Identification of common variants in the SHBG gene affecting sex hormone binding globulin levels and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Deborah J; Healey, Catherine S; Baynes, Caroline; Kalmyrzaev, Bolot; Ahmed, Shahana; Dowsett, Mitch; Folkerd, Elizabeth; Luben, Robert N; Cox, David; Ballinger, Dennis; Pharoah, Paul DP; Ponder, Bruce AJ; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-01-01

    Background Circulating levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) are inversely associated with breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. Three polymorphisms within the SHBG gene have been reported to affect SHBG levels, but there has been no systematic attempt to identify other such variants. Methods We looked for associations between SHBG levels in 1134 healthy, postmenopausal women and 11 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or around the SHBG gene. Associations between SHBG SNPs and breast cancer were tested in up to 6622 post-menopausal breast cancer cases and 6784 controls. Results Ten SNPs within or close to the SHBG gene were significantly associated with SHBG levels, as was the (TAAAA)n polymorphism. The best-fitting combination of rs6259, rs858521, rs727428 and body mass index, waist, hip, age and smoking status accounted for 24% of the variance in SHBG levels (natural logarithm transformed). Haplotype analysis suggested that rs858518, rs727428 or a variant in linkage disequilibrium with them, acts to decrease SHBG levels, but that this effect is neutralised by rs6259 (D356N). rs1799941 increases SHBG levels, but the previously reported association with (TAAAA)n repeat length appears to be a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with these SNPs. One further SHBG SNP was significantly associated with breast cancer (rs6257, per-allele odds ratio 0.88, 95% CI=0.82-0.95, p=0.002). Conclusion At least three SNPs showed associations with SHBG levels that were highly significant but relatively small in magnitude. rs6257 is a potential breast cancer susceptibility variant, but relationships between the genetic determinants of SHBG levels and breast cancer are complex. PMID:19064566

  2. Multiple Sclerosis Risk Variant HLA-DRB1*1501 Associates with High Expression of DRB1 Gene in Different Human Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Grau, María del Mar; Fedetz, María; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lucas, Miguel; Fernández, Óscar; Ndagire, Dorothy; Catalá-Rabasa, Antonio; Ruiz, Agustín; Gayán, Javier; Delgado, Concepción; Arnal, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1*1501 has been consistently associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) in nearly all populations tested. This points to a specific antigen presentation as the pathogenic mechanism though this does not fully explain the disease association. The identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) for genes in the HLA locus poses the question of the role of gene expression in MS susceptibility. We analyzed the eQTLs in the HLA region with respect to MS-associated HLA-variants obtained from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We found that the Tag of DRB1*1501, rs3135388 A allele, correlated with high expression of DRB1, DRB5 and DQB1 genes in a Caucasian population. In quantitative terms, the MS-risk AA genotype carriers of rs3135388 were associated with 15.7-, 5.2- and 8.3-fold higher expression of DQB1, DRB5 and DRB1, respectively, than the non-risk GG carriers. The haplotype analysis of expression-associated variants in a Spanish MS cohort revealed that high expression of DRB1 and DQB1 alone did not contribute to the disease. However, in Caucasian, Asian and African American populations, the DRB1*1501 allele was always highly expressed. In other immune related diseases such as type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, asthma and IgA deficiency, the best GWAS-associated HLA SNPs were also eQTLs for different HLA Class II genes. Our data suggest that the DR/DQ expression levels, together with specific structural properties of alleles, seem to be the causal effect in MS and in other immunopathologies rather than specific antigen presentation alone. PMID:22253788

  3. Multiple sclerosis risk variant HLA-DRB1*1501 associates with high expression of DRB1 gene in different human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alcina

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA DRB1*1501 has been consistently associated with multiple sclerosis (MS in nearly all populations tested. This points to a specific antigen presentation as the pathogenic mechanism though this does not fully explain the disease association. The identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL for genes in the HLA locus poses the question of the role of gene expression in MS susceptibility. We analyzed the eQTLs in the HLA region with respect to MS-associated HLA-variants obtained from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. We found that the Tag of DRB1*1501, rs3135388 A allele, correlated with high expression of DRB1, DRB5 and DQB1 genes in a Caucasian population. In quantitative terms, the MS-risk AA genotype carriers of rs3135388 were associated with 15.7-, 5.2- and 8.3-fold higher expression of DQB1, DRB5 and DRB1, respectively, than the non-risk GG carriers. The haplotype analysis of expression-associated variants in a Spanish MS cohort revealed that high expression of DRB1 and DQB1 alone did not contribute to the disease. However, in Caucasian, Asian and African American populations, the DRB1*1501 allele was always highly expressed. In other immune related diseases such as type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, asthma and IgA deficiency, the best GWAS-associated HLA SNPs were also eQTLs for different HLA Class II genes. Our data suggest that the DR/DQ expression levels, together with specific structural properties of alleles, seem to be the causal effect in MS and in other immunopathologies rather than specific antigen presentation alone.

  4. Common Variants of the Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein Gene Influence the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin Resistance in Spanish Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansego, Maria Luisa; Martínez, Fernando; Martínez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Zabena, Carina; Rojo, Gemma; Morcillo, Sonsoles; Soriguer, Federico; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Redon, Josep; Chaves, Felipe Javier

    2012-01-01

    Summary The main objective was to evaluate the association between SNPs and haplotypes of the FABP1-4 genes and type 2 diabetes, as well as its interaction with fat intake, in one general Spanish population. The association was replicated in a second population in which HOMA index was also evaluated. Methods 1217 unrelated individuals were selected from a population-based study [Hortega study: 605 women; mean age 54 y; 7.8% with type 2 diabetes]. The replication population included 805 subjects from Segovia, a neighboring region of Spain (446 females; mean age 52 y; 10.3% with type 2 diabetes). DM2 mellitus was defined in a similar way in both studies. Fifteen SNPs previously associated with metabolic traits or with potential influence in the gene expression within the FABP1-4 genes were genotyped with SNPlex and tested. Age, sex and BMI were used as covariates in the logistic regression model. Results One polymorphism (rs2197076) and two haplotypes of the FABP-1 showed a strong association with the risk of DM2 in the original population. This association was further confirmed in the second population as well as in the pooled sample. None of the other analyzed variants in FABP2, FABP3 and FABP4 genes were associated. There was not a formal interaction between rs2197076 and fat intake. A significant association between the rs2197076 and the haplotypes of the FABP1 and HOMA-IR was also present in the replication population. Conclusions The study supports the role of common variants of the FABP-1 gene in the development of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians. PMID:22396741

  5. Common variants of the liver fatty acid binding protein gene influence the risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance in Spanish population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Mansego

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: The main objective was to evaluate the association between SNPs and haplotypes of the FABP1-4 genes and type 2 diabetes, as well as its interaction with fat intake, in one general Spanish population. The association was replicated in a second population in which HOMA index was also evaluated. METHODS: 1217 unrelated individuals were selected from a population-based study [Hortega study: 605 women; mean age 54 y; 7.8% with type 2 diabetes]. The replication population included 805 subjects from Segovia, a neighboring region of Spain (446 females; mean age 52 y; 10.3% with type 2 diabetes. DM2 mellitus was defined in a similar way in both studies. Fifteen SNPs previously associated with metabolic traits or with potential influence in the gene expression within the FABP1-4 genes were genotyped with SNPlex and tested. Age, sex and BMI were used as covariates in the logistic regression model. RESULTS: One polymorphism (rs2197076 and two haplotypes of the FABP-1 showed a strong association with the risk of DM2 in the original population. This association was further confirmed in the second population as well as in the pooled sample. None of the other analyzed variants in FABP2, FABP3 and FABP4 genes were associated. There was not a formal interaction between rs2197076 and fat intake. A significant association between the rs2197076 and the haplotypes of the FABP1 and HOMA-IR was also present in the replication population. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports the role of common variants of the FABP-1 gene in the development of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians.

  6. Identification of genetic risk variants for deep vein thrombosis by multiplexed next-generation sequencing of 186 hemostatic/pro-inflammatory genes

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    Lotta Luca A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation DNA sequencing is opening new avenues for genetic association studies in common diseases that, like deep vein thrombosis (DVT, have a strong genetic predisposition still largely unexplained by currently identified risk variants. In order to develop sequencing and analytical pipelines for the application of next-generation sequencing to complex diseases, we conducted a pilot study sequencing the coding area of 186 hemostatic/proinflammatory genes in 10 Italian cases of idiopathic DVT and 12 healthy controls. Results A molecular-barcoding strategy was used to multiplex DNA target capture and sequencing, while retaining individual sequence information. Genomic libraries with barcode sequence-tags were pooled (in pools of 8 or 16 samples and enriched for target DNA sequences. Sequencing was performed on ABI SOLiD-4 platforms. We produced > 12 gigabases of raw sequence data to sequence at high coverage (average: 42X the 700-kilobase target area in 22 individuals. A total of 1876 high-quality genetic variants were identified (1778 single nucleotide substitutions and 98 insertions/deletions. Annotation on databases of genetic variation and human disease mutations revealed several novel, potentially deleterious mutations. We tested 576 common variants in a case-control association analysis, carrying the top-5 associations over to replication in up to 719 DVT cases and 719 controls. We also conducted an analysis of the burden of nonsynonymous variants in coagulation factor and anticoagulant genes. We found an excess of rare missense mutations in anticoagulant genes in DVT cases compared to controls and an association for a missense polymorphism of FGA (rs6050; p = 1.9 × 10-5, OR 1.45; 95% CI, 1.22-1.72; after replication in > 1400 individuals. Conclusions We implemented a barcode-based strategy to efficiently multiplex sequencing of hundreds of candidate genes in several individuals. In the relatively small dataset of

  7. The role of single-nucleotide variants of the energy metabolism-linked genes SIRT3, PPARGC1A and APOE in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Diego; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Elisa; Chierchia, Armando; Martines, Rosalba; Forloni, Gianluigi; Beghi, Ettore

    2017-05-13

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a multifactorial disease, possibly with contributions from genetics and lifestyle. We examined variants in genes relevant to energy metabolism and physical activity in a case-control association study, with the aim of assessing genetics and physical activity as contributors to ALS risk. A well-characterized sample of Italian ALS patients (101) and controls (101) from the EURALS Consortium underwent a questionnaire interview on demographic, physical and other lifestyle habits, and venipuncture for DNA extraction. The genes selected were sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PPARGC1A) and apolipoprotein E (APOE). Genetic studies suggested, for the first time, a protective role of the SIRT3 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs4980329 in ALS risk, and a contribution of the APOE-ε2 allele, which was more frequent in ALS patients than in controls. A joint analysis coupling genetic data and sporting activity revealed opposite roles of APOE-ε2 and SIRT3 rs3825075, the former being more frequent in physically active ALS patients and the latter more frequent in physically inactive patients. These findings suggest a contribution to ALS risk of genetic and environmental factors involved in energy metabolism, and stress the importance of a multifactorial analysis for evaluating this risk.

  8. Apolipoprotein AIF gene variant S347 is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and lower apolipoprotein AIV plasma concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Wai-man R.; Hawe, Emma; Li, Lai K.; Miller, George J.; Nicaud, Viviane; Pennacchio, Len A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.

    2003-01-30

    The impact of common variants in the apolipoprotein gene cluster (APOC3-A4-A5) on prospective CHD risk was examined in healthy UK men. Of the 2808 men followed over nine years, 187 had a clinically defined CHD event. Examination of 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this group revealed that homozygotes for APOA4 S347 had significantly increased risk of CHD [Hazard ratio (HR) of 2.07 (95%CI 1.04-4.12)] while men homozygous for APOC3 1100T were protected (HR 0.28 (95%CI 0.09-0.87)). In stepwise multiple regression analysis, after entering all the variants and adjusting for established risk factors APOA4 T347S alone remained in the model. Using nine-SNP haplotype analysis, highest risk-estimate haplotypes carried APOA4 S347 and rare alleles of the two flanking intergenic markers. The protective effect of APOC31100T could be explained by negative linkage disequilibrium with these alleles. To determine the association of APOA4 T347S with apoAIVlevels, the relationship was examined in over 1600 healthy young European men and women. S347 homozygotes had significantly lower apoAIV plasma levels (13.48 + 0.6mg/dl) compared to carriers of the T347 allele (14.85 + 0.12 mg/dl) (p=0.025). These results demonstrate that genetic variation in and around APOA4, independent of effects of TG, is associated with risk of CHD and apoAIV levels, supporting an anti-atherogenic role for apoAIV.

  9. Risk alleles of genes with monoallelic expression are enriched in gain-of-function variants and depleted in loss-of-function variants for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savova, V; Vinogradova, S; Pruss, D; Gimelbrant, A A; Weiss, L A

    2017-03-07

    Over 3000 human genes can be expressed from a single allele in one cell, and from the other allele-or both-in neighboring cells. Little is known about the consequences of this epigenetic phenomenon, monoallelic expression (MAE). We hypothesized that MAE increases expression variability, with a potential impact on human disease. Here, we use a chromatin signature to infer MAE for genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines and human fetal brain tissue. We confirm that across clones MAE status correlates with expression level, and that in human tissue data sets, MAE genes show increased expression variability. We then compare mono- and biallelic genes at three distinct scales. In the human population, we observe that genes with polymorphisms influencing expression variance are more likely to be MAE (PMolecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 March 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.13.

  10. Kin-cohort estimates for familial breast cancer risk in relation to variants in DNA base excision repair, BRCA1 interacting and growth factor genes

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    Rutter Joni L

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtle functional deficiencies in highly conserved DNA repair or growth regulatory processes resulting from polymorphic variation may increase genetic susceptibility to breast cancer. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can impact protein function leading to genomic instability facilitated by growth stimulation and increased cancer risk. Thus, 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in eight genes involved in base excision repair (XRCC1, APEX, POLD1, BRCA1 protein interaction (BRIP1, ZNF350, BRCA2, and growth regulation (TGFß1, IGFBP3 were evaluated. Methods Genomic DNA samples were used in Taqman 5'-nuclease assays for most SNPs. Breast cancer risk to ages 50 and 70 were estimated using the kin-cohort method in which genotypes of relatives are inferred based on the known genotype of the index subject and Mendelian inheritance patterns. Family cancer history data was collected from a series of genotyped breast cancer cases (N = 748 identified within a cohort of female US radiologic technologists. Among 2,430 female first-degree relatives of cases, 190 breast cancers were reported. Results Genotypes associated with increased risk were: XRCC1 R194W (WW and RW vs. RR, cumulative risk up to age 70, risk ratio (RR = 2.3; 95% CI 1.3–3.8; XRCC1 R399Q (QQ vs. RR, cumulative risk up to age 70, RR = 1.9; 1.1–3.9; and BRIP1 (or BACH1 P919S (SS vs. PP, cumulative risk up to age 50, RR = 6.9; 1.6–29.3. The risk for those heterozygous for BRCA2 N372H and APEX D148E were significantly lower than risks for homozygotes of either allele, and these were the only two results that remained significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. No associations with breast cancer were observed for: APEX Q51H; XRCC1 R280H; IGFPB3 -202A>C; TGFß1 L10P, P25R, and T263I; BRCA2 N289H and T1915M; BRIP1 -64A>C; and ZNF350 (or ZBRK1 1845C>T, L66P, R501S, and S472P. Conclusion Some variants in genes within the base-excision repair pathway (XRCC1 and

  11. Association of glucocorticoid and type 1 corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors gene variants and risk for depression during pregnancy and post-partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Neelam; Darwin, Lucy; Nishigandh, Deole; Ngianga-Bakwin, Kandala; Smith, Steve C; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2013-09-01

    Women with postnatal depression (PND) appear to have abnormal hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis responses to stress, which might involve a genetic variability component. We investigated association of genetic variants in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, NR3C1) and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes with increased risk for PND. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited prospectively and PND risk was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) during pregnancy and again 2-8 weeks post-natally (CW-GAPND study). The BclI and ER22/23EK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GR and the haplotype-tagged rs1876828, rs242939 and rs242941 SNPs of the CRHR1 associated with genetic risk to depressive disorders were genotyped. A cut-off score of 10 was used to detect increased risk of PND. Association analysis was carried out in 140 patients that completed the study protocol. The BclI and rs242939 SNPs were over-represented in women with postnatal EPDS score ≥10 with significant allele association (p = 0.011 and genetics of high-risk for depression during pregnancy and postpartum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... and Alcoholism (NIAAA) have identified a previously unknown gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive- ...

  13. Maternal and fetal variants in the TGF-beta3 gene and risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension in a predominantly Latino population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Melissa L; Desmond, Daniel H; Goodwin, T Murphy; Miller, David A; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2009-09-01

    We sought to determine whether polymorphisms in the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta3 gene are associated with risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) in case-control mother-baby dyads. Patients (n = 136) and control subjects (n = 169) were recruited from our hospital. We genotyped 4 TGF-beta3 polymorphisms and examined association with PIH using logistic regression, adjusting for parity, maternal age, gestational age at delivery, fetal (or maternal) genotypes for the polymorphism in question, and the 3 other polymorphisms within the TGF-beta3 gene. Only 1 of the TGF-beta3 polymorphisms (rs11466414) was associated with PIH. Mothers who carried a baby with a minor allele were at decreased risk (odds ratio(multi-locus adj), 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.77). Maternal TGF-beta3 variants had no effect on risk of PIH. A fetal TGF-beta3 polymorphism (rs11466414) is associated with PIH in a predominantly Hispanic population.

  14. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Gaudio, Francesca Di [Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Antonio, E-mail: lab-oncobiologia@usa.net [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-09-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance.

  15. ICO amplicon NGS data analysis: a Web tool for variant detection in common high-risk hereditary cancer genes analyzed by amplicon GS Junior next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Menéndez, Mireia; Lopez-Doriga, Sergio; Morón-Duran, Francisco D; del Valle, Jesús; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Campos, Olga; Gómez, Carolina; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized genomic research and is set to have a major impact on genetic diagnostics thanks to the advent of benchtop sequencers and flexible kits for targeted libraries. Among the main hurdles in NGS are the difficulty of performing bioinformatic analysis of the huge volume of data generated and the high number of false positive calls that could be obtained, depending on the NGS technology and the analysis pipeline. Here, we present the development of a free and user-friendly Web data analysis tool that detects and filters sequence variants, provides coverage information, and allows the user to customize some basic parameters. The tool has been developed to provide accurate genetic analysis of targeted sequencing of common high-risk hereditary cancer genes using amplicon libraries run in a GS Junior System. The Web resource is linked to our own mutation database, to assist in the clinical classification of identified variants. We believe that this tool will greatly facilitate the use of the NGS approach in routine laboratories.

  16. Identification of gene variants in NOS3, ET-1 and RAS that confer risk and protection against microangiopathy in type 2 diabetic obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Simona-Adriana; Robciuc, Alexandra; Guja, Cristian; Heltianu, Constantina

    2011-04-15

    The study aim was to investigate NOS3 VNTR, NOS3 G894T, EDN1 C8002T, ACE I/D, AGT M235T and AGTR1 A1166C in nonobese and obese T2DM patients, and their interaction with the incidence of microangiopathy. T2DM subjects (n=250; 166 nonobese, and 84 obese) were genotyped for the gene variants by PCR/RFLP. The interaction of these polymorphisms with obesity and their contribution to microangiopathy were analyzed by multivariate regression analysis. A higher frequency of NOS3 4a allele was found in obese (P=0.027) vs. nonobese subjects. ACE D (P=0.009) and AGT 235T (P=0.026) alleles were associated with the reduced risk of diabetic nephropathy in nonobese and obese patients, respectively. In obese subjects, NOS3 4a (P=0.011) had a converse effect to NOS3 894T (P=0.043), and EDN1 8002T (P=0.035) on the prevalence of combined microangiopathy (neuropathy/retinopathy/nephropathy) vs. microangiopathy-negative subjects. The study indicates association of RAS variants with obesity and nephropathy, and an opposite effect of NOS3 VNTR and NOS3 G894T on the occurrence of combined microangiopathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Common gene variants in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF and TNF receptor superfamilies and NF-kB transcription factors and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia S Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A promoter polymorphism in the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF (TNF G-308A is associated with increased non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL risk. The protein product, TNF-alpha, activates the nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-kappaB transcription factor, and is critical for inflammatory and apoptotic responses in cancer progression. We hypothesized that the TNF and NF-kappaB pathways are important for NHL and that gene variations across the pathways may alter NHL risk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped 500 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 48 candidate gene regions (defined as 20 kb 5', 10 kb 3' in the TNF and TNF receptor superfamilies and the NF-kappaB and related transcription factors, in 1946 NHL cases and 1808 controls pooled from three independent population-based case-control studies. We obtained a gene region-level summary of association by computing the minimum p-value ("minP test". We used logistic regression to compute odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for NHL and four major NHL subtypes in relation to SNP genotypes and haplotypes. For NHL, the tail strength statistic supported an overall relationship between the TNF/NF-kappaB pathway and NHL (p = 0.02. We confirmed the association between TNF/LTA on chromosome 6p21.3 with NHL and found the LTA rs2844484 SNP most significantly and specifically associated with the major subtype, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL (p-trend = 0.001. We also implicated for the first time, variants in NFKBIL1 on chromosome 6p21.3, associated with NHL. Other gene regions identified as statistically significantly associated with NHL included FAS, IRF4, TNFSF13B, TANK, TNFSF7 and TNFRSF13C. Accordingly, the single most significant SNPs associated with NHL were FAS rs4934436 (p-trend = 0.0024, IRF4 rs12211228 (p-trend = 0.0026, TNFSF13B rs2582869 (p-trend = 0.0055, TANK rs1921310 (p-trend = 0.0025, TNFSF7 rs16994592 (p-trend = 0.0024, and TNFRSF13C rs6002551

  18. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Amand F; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Holmes, Michael V;

    2016-01-01

    a standardised analysis plan, meta-analyses, and weighted gene-centric scores. FINDINGS: Data were available for more than 550 000 individuals and 51 623 cases of type 2 diabetes. Combined analyses of four independent PCSK9 variants (rs11583680, rs11591147, rs2479409, and rs11206510) scaled to 1 mmol/L lower LDL......BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2...... diabetes, which in no way offsets their substantial benefits. We sought to investigate the associations of LDL cholesterol-lowering PCSK9 variants with type 2 diabetes and related biomarkers to gauge the likely effects of PCSK9 inhibitors on diabetes risk. METHODS: In this mendelian randomisation study, we...

  19. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B gene variants in relation to ovarian cancer risk in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostowska, Adrianna; Sajdak, Stefan; Pawlik, Piotr; Lianeri, Margarita; Jagodzinski, Paweł P

    2013-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated that changes in DNA methylation of cancer related genes can be an elementary process accounting for ovarian tumorigenesis. Therefore, we evaluated the possible association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) genes, including DNMT1, DNMT3B, and DNMT3A, with ovarian cancer development in the Polish population. Using PCR-RFLP and HRM analyses, we studied the prevalence of the DNMT1 rs8101626, rs2228611 and rs759920, DNMT3A rs2289195, 7590760, rs13401241, rs749131 and rs1550117, and DNMT3B rs1569686, rs2424913 and rs2424932 SNPs in patients with ovarian cancer (n=159) and controls (n=180). The lowest p values of the trend test were observed for the DNMT1 rs2228611 and rs759920 SNPs in patients with ovarian cancer (p trend=0.0118 and p trend=0.0173, respectively). Moreover, we observed, in the recessive inheritance model, that the DNMT1 rs2228611 and rs759920 SNPs are associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer development [OR 1.836 (1.143-2.949), p=0.0114, p corr=0.0342, and OR 1.932 (1.185-3.152), p=0.0078, p cor=0.0234, respectively]. However, none of other nine studied SNPs displayed significant contribution to the development of ovarian cancer. Furthermore, haplotype and multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis of the studied DNMT1, DNMT3B, and DNMT3A polymorphisms did not reveal either SNP combinations or gene interactions to be associated with the risk of ovarian cancer development. Our results may suggest that DNMT1 variants may be risk factors of ovarian cancer.

  20. Potential risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma due to nucleotide excision repair XPA and XPC gene variants and their interaction among themselves and with environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Rumaisa; Bhat, Gulzar Ahmad; Lone, Mohd Maqbool; Masood, Akbar; Dar, Nazir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    The association of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene polymorphisms with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is inconclusive. The aim of the current study was to assess the association of repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA) (rs-1800975) and xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) (rs-2228000) polymorphisms with ESCC risk as well as modifying effects of environmental factors. The genotyping was done in 450 confirmed ESCC cases and equal number of individually matched controls by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and direct sequencing methods. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the genotypic associations and interactions. A high ESCC risk was found in subjects who carried the homozygous minor allele of XPA (odds ratio (OR) = 3.57; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.76-7.23), and the risk was higher when analysis was limited to participants who were ever smokers (OR = 4.22; 95 % CI = 2.01-8.88), lived in adobe houses (OR = 8.42; 95 % CI = 3.74-18.95), consumed large volumes of salt tea (OR = 7.42; 95 % CI = 3.30-16.69), or had a positive family history of cancer (FHC) (OR = 9.47; 95 % CI = 4.67-19.20). In case of XPC, a homozygous minor allele also showed strong association with ESCC risk (OR = 4.43; 95 % CI = 2.41-8.16). We again observed a very strong effect of the above environmental factors in elevating the risk of ESCC. Further, the variant genotypes of both genes in combination showed an increased risk towards ESCC (OR = 7.01; 95 % CI = 3.14-15.64) and such association was synergistically significant. Salt tea consumption showed an interaction with genotypes of XPA and XPC. However, an interaction with FHC was significant in the case of XPA genotype only. XPA and XPC genotypes are associated with an increased risk of ESCC, and such association was reasonably modulated by different exposures.

  1. The presence of both serotonin 1A receptor (HTR1A and dopamine transporter (DAT1 gene variants increase the risk of borderline personality disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction in the dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitter systems has been demonstrated to be important in the aetiology of Borderline personality disorder (BPD. We investigated the relationship of two BPD risk factors, the HTR1A promoter polymorphism -1019C>G (rs6295 and the DAT1 repeat allele, with BPD in a major depressive disorder cohort of 367 patients. Out-patients with major depressive disorder were recruited for two treatment trials and assessed for personality disorders, including BPD. DNA samples were collected and the rs6295 polymorphism was detected with a TaqMan® assay. The DAT1 repeat allele was genotyped using a modified PCR method. The impact of polymorphisms on BPD was statistically analysed using uncontrolled logistic and multiple logistic regression models. BPD patients had higher frequencies of the DAT1 9,9 (OR=2.67 and 9,10 (OR=3.67 genotypes and also those homozygous HTR1A G allele (OR=2.03. No significant interactions between HTR1A and DAT1 genotypes, were observed; however, an increased risk of BPD was observed for those patients who were either 9,10; G,G (OR=6.64 and 9,9; C,G (OR=5.42. Furthermore, the odds of BPD in patients exhibiting high-risk variants of these two genes differed from those of patients in low-risk groups by up to a factor of 9. Our study provides evidence implicating the importance of the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems in BPD and that the interaction between genes from different neurotransmitters may play a role in the susceptibility to BPD.

  2. Common variants in PERK, JNK, BIP and XBP1 genes are associated with the risk of prediabetes or diabetes-related phenotypes in a Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Nan; Ma Xiaowei; Wei Xiaowei; Zhang Junqing; Dong Aimei; Jin Mengmeng; Zhang Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediabetes is an early stage of β-cell dysfunction presenting as insulin resistance.Evidences suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and prediabetes.In a Chinese population with prediabetes,we investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of PERK,JNK,XBP1,BIP and CHOP which encode molecular proteins involved in ER stress pathways.Methods Nine SNPs at the PERK,JNK,XBP1,BIP and CHOP loci were genotyped by mass spectrometry in 1 448 unrelated individuals.By using a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT),828 subjects were diagnosed as prediabetes and 620 subjects aged 55 years and over as normal controls based on WHO diagnostic criteria (1999) for diabetes mellitus.Results The allele C of SNP rs867529 at PERK locus was a risk factor for prediabetes,with the carriers of C allele genotype at a higher risk of prediabetes compared to non-carriers (OR=1.279,95% CI:1.013-1.614,P=0.039,after adjustment for age,sex and body mass index (BMI).The SNPs rs6750998 at PERK locus was associated with homeostasis model assessments of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P=0.019),and rs17037621 with BMI (P=0.044).The allele G of SNP rs10986663 in BIP gene was associated with a decreased risk of prediabetes (OR=0.699,95% CI:0.539-0.907,P=0.007).The SNP rs2076431 in JNK gene was associated with fasting plasma glucose levels (P=0.006) and waist-hip ratios (P=0.019).The SNP rs2239815 in XBP1 gene was associated with 2-hour plasma glucose levels after 75 g oral glucose load (P=0.048) in the observed population.Conclusion Common variants at PERK and BIP loci contributed to the risk of prediabetes,and the genetic variations in JNK and XBP1 genes are associated with diabetes-related clinical parameters in this Chinese population.

  3. Genetic variants in CETP increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Christopher D.; Falcone, Guido J.; Phuah, Chia Ling; Radmanesh, Farid; Brouwers, H. Bart; Battey, Thomas W K; Biffi, Alessandro; Peloso, Gina M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; Ayres, Alison M.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Selim, Magdy; Meschia, James F.; Brown, Devin L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Silliman, Scott L.; Tirschwell, David L.; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Kraft, Peter; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M.; Schmidt, Helena; Hansen, Björn M.; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Elosua, Roberto; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Soriano, Carolina; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M.; Klijn, Catharina J M; Rannikmae, Kristiina; Samarasekera, Neshika; Salman, Rustam Al Shahi; Sudlow, Catherine L.; Deary, Ian J.; Morotti, Andrea; Pezzini, Alessandro; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Norrving, Bo; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Delgado, Pilar; Roquer, Jaume; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kittner, Steven J.; Waddy, Salina P.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Willer, Cristen J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In observational epidemiologic studies, higher plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has been associated with increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). DNA sequence variants that decrease cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene activity increase plasma HDL-C;

  4. Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Sara J.; Asai, Yuka; Cordell, Heather J.; Campbell, Linda E.; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Northstone, Kate; Henderson, John; Alizadehfar, Reza; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; Morgan, Kenneth; Roberts, Graham; Masthoff, Laury J. N.; Pasmans, Suzanne G. M. A.; van den Akker, Peter C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Lack, Gideon; Clarke, Ann; Hull, Peter R.; Irvine, Alan D.; McLean, W. H. Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Background: IgE-mediated peanut allergy is a complex trait with strong heritability, but its genetic basis is currently unknown. Loss-of-function mutations within the filaggrin gene are associated with atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases; therefore, filaggrin is a candidate gene in the etiol

  5. IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 gene variants are associated with obesity-related risk phenotypes in Brazilian children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, E M; Cândido, A P C; Castro, I M; Bastos, A Q A; Machado-Coelho, G L L; Freitas, R N

    2015-07-01

    Association studies of genetic variants and obesity and/or obesity-related risk factors have yielded contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 genes with obesity or obesity-related risk phenotypes. This case-control study assessed overweight (n=192) and normal-weight (n=211) children and adolescents. The SNPs were analyzed using minisequencing assays, and variables and genotype distributions between the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for selected phenotype risks in each group. No difference in SNP distribution was observed between groups. In children, POMC rs28932472(C) was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001), higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P=0.014), and higher risk in overweight children of altered total cholesterol (OR=7.35, P=0.006). In adolescents, IGF2 rs680(A) was associated with higher glucose (P=0.012) and higher risk in overweight adolescents for altered insulin (OR=10.08, P=0.005) and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (OR=6.34, P=0.010). PPARG rs1801282(G) conferred a higher risk of altered insulin (OR=12.31, P=0.003), and HOMA-IR (OR=7.47, P=0.005) in overweight adolescents. PARGC1 rs8192678(A) was associated with higher triacylglycerols (P=0.005), and LEPR rs1137101(A) was marginally associated with higher LDL cholesterol (P=0.017). LEPR rs1137101(A) conferred higher risk for altered insulin, and HOMA-IR in overweight adolescents. The associations observed in this population suggested increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes later in life for individuals carrying these alleles.

  6. MTRR gene variants may predispose to the risk of Congenital Heart Disease in Down syndrome patients of Indian origin

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    Ambreen Asim

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Results from this study indicate that the MTRR C524T and A66G polymorphisms influence the risk of the occurrence of CHD in DS patients of Indian Origin. This is the first report from India highlighting the potential association of MTRR C524T and A66G polymorphisms with CHD in DS. We are also the first one to report two novel polymorphisms, T19775C and 19778_19778delG in DS with CHD group. Hence these four polymorphisms can be used to evaluate the risk of CHD in DS patients.

  7. Association between insulin receptor gene exon 17 rs1799817 variant and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Touraj Mahmoudi, MSc

    2017-02-01

    Conclusions: To our knowledge, our findings suggested for the first time that the INSR rs1799817 “TT” genotype compared with the “CC” genotype and “CC + CT” genotypes had 86% and 80% decreased risks for NAFLD, respectively. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. : Reelin gene variants in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, Marie-Odile; Betancur, Catalina; Leroy, Sophie; Bourdel, Marie-Chantal; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion

    2002-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with severe cognitive and communication disabilities, that has a strong genetic predisposition. Reelin, a protein involved in neuronal migration during development, is encoded by a gene located on 7q22, within the candidate region on 7q showing increased allele sharing in previous genome scans. A case/control and family-based association study recently reported a positive association between a trinucleotide repeat polymorphism (GGC) located in t...

  9. Combined effects of thrombosis pathway gene variants predict cardiovascular events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Auro

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic background of complex diseases is proposed to consist of several low-penetrance risk loci. Addressing this complexity likely requires both large sample size and simultaneous analysis of different predisposing variants. We investigated the role of four thrombosis genes: coagulation factor V (F5, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1, protein C (PROC, and thrombomodulin (THBD in cardiovascular diseases. Single allelic gene variants and their pair-wise combinations were analyzed in two independently sampled population cohorts from Finland. From among 14,140 FINRISK participants (FINRISK-92, n = 5,999 and FINRISK-97, n = 8,141, we selected for genotyping a sample of 2,222, including 528 incident cardiovascular disease (CVD cases and random subcohorts totaling 786. To cover all known common haplotypes (>10%, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped. Classification-tree analysis identified 11 SNPs that were further analyzed in Cox's proportional hazard model as single variants and pair-wise combinations. Multiple testing was controlled by use of two independent cohorts and with false-discovery rate. Several CVD risk variants were identified: In women, the combination of F5 rs7542281 x THBD rs1042580, together with three single F5 SNPs, was associated with CVD events. Among men, PROC rs1041296, when combined with either ICAM1 rs5030341 or F5 rs2269648, was associated with total mortality. As a single variant, PROC rs1401296, together with the F5 Leiden mutation, was associated with ischemic stroke events. Our strategy to combine the classification-tree analysis with more traditional genetic models was successful in identifying SNPs-acting either in combination or as single variants--predisposing to CVD, and produced consistent results in two independent cohorts. These results suggest that variants in these four thrombosis genes contribute to arterial cardiovascular events at population level.

  10. PRRC2A and BCL2L11 gene variants influence risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma : Results from the InterLymph consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieters, Alexandra; Conde, Lucia; Slager, Susan L.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Morton, Lindsay; Skibola, Danica R.; Novak, Anne J.; Riby, Jacques; Ansell, Stephen M.; Halperin, Eran; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Agana, Luz; Wang, Alice H.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Severson, Richard K.; Cozen, Wendy; Spinelli, John; Butterbach, Katja; Becker, Nikolaus; de Sanjose, Silvia; Benavente, Yolanda; Cocco, Pierluigi; Staines, Anthony; Maynadie, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Purdue, Mark; Armstrong, Bruce; Kricker, Anne; Vajdic, Claire M.; Grulich, Andrew; Smith, Martyn T.; Bracci, Paige M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hartge, Patricia; Cerhan, James R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Skibola, Christine F.

    2012-01-01

    Many common genetic variants have been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but individual study results are often conflicting. To confirm the role of putative risk alleles in B-cell NHL etiology, we performed a validation genotyping study of 67 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms withi

  11. BRCA Share: A Collection of Clinical BRCA Gene Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béroud, Christophe; Letovsky, Stanley I; Braastad, Corey D; Caputo, Sandrine M; Beaudoux, Olivia; Bignon, Yves Jean; Bressac-De Paillerets, Brigitte; Bronner, Myriam; Buell, Crystal M; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle; Coulet, Florence; Derive, Nicolas; Divincenzo, Christina; Elzinga, Christopher D; Garrec, Céline; Houdayer, Claude; Karbassi, Izabela; Lizard, Sarab; Love, Angela; Muller, Danièle; Nagan, Narasimhan; Nery, Camille R; Rai, Ghadi; Revillion, Françoise; Salgado, David; Sévenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga; Sobol, Hagay; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Toulas, Christine; Trautman, Edwin; Vaur, Dominique; Vilquin, Paul; Weymouth, Katelyn S; Willis, Alecia; Eisenberg, Marcia; Strom, Charles M

    2016-12-01

    As next-generation sequencing increases access to human genetic variation, the challenge of determining clinical significance of variants becomes ever more acute. Germline variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes can confer substantial lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Assessment of variant pathogenicity is a vital part of clinical genetic testing for these genes. A database of clinical observations of BRCA variants is a critical resource in that process. This article describes BRCA Share™, a database created by a unique international alliance of academic centers and commercial testing laboratories. By integrating the content of the Universal Mutation Database generated by the French Unicancer Genetic Group with the testing results of two large commercial laboratories, Quest Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp), BRCA Share™ has assembled one of the largest publicly accessible collections of BRCA variants currently available. Although access is available to academic researchers without charge, commercial participants in the project are required to pay a support fee and contribute their data. The fees fund the ongoing curation effort, as well as planned experiments to functionally characterize variants of uncertain significance. BRCA Share™ databases can therefore be considered as models of successful data sharing between private companies and the academic world.

  12. Breast cancer susceptibility variants alter risk in familial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A; McBurney, H J; Roberts, S A; Lalloo, F; Howell, A; Evans, D G; Newman, W G

    2010-12-01

    Recent candidate gene and genome wide association studies have revealed novel loci associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of these breast cancer associated variants on ovarian cancer risk in individuals with familial ovarian cancer both with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. A total of 158 unrelated white British women (54 BRCA1/2 mutation positive and 104 BRCA1/2 mutation negative) with familial ovarian cancer were genotyped for FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3 and CASP8 variants. The p.Asp302His CASP8 variant was associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in the familial BRCA1/2 mutation negative ovarian cancer cases (P = 0.016). The synonymous TNRC9/TOX3 (Ser51) variant was present at a significantly lower frequency than in patients with familial BRCA1/2 positive breast cancer (P = 0.0002). Our results indicate that variants in CASP8 and TNRC9/TOX3 alter the risk of disease in individuals affected with familial ovarian cancer.

  13. Sex Steroid Hormone Gene Variants, Pesticide Use and the Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study within the Agricultural Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol H Christensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and epidemiologic investigations suggest that certain pesticides may alter sex steroid hormone synthesis, metabolism or regulation and the risk of hormone-related cancers. Here we evaluated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs involved in hormone homeostasis alter the effect of pesticide exposure on prostate cancer risk. We evaluated pesticide–SNP interactions between 39 pesticides and SNPs with respect to prostate cancer among 776 cases and 1444 controls nested in the Agricultural Health Study cohort. In these interactions, we included candidate SNPs involved in hormone synthesis, metabolism and regulation (N=1100, as well as SNPs associated with circulating sex steroid concentrations as identified by genome-wide association studies (N=17. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Multiplicative SNP–pesticide interactions were calculated using a likelihood ratio test. We translated p-values for interaction into q-values, which reflected the false discovery rate, to account for multiple comparisons. We observed a significant interaction, which was robust to multiple comparison testing, between the herbicide dicamba and rs8192166 in the testosterone metabolizing gene SRD5A1 (p-interaction=4.0x10-5; q-value=0.03, such that men with two copies of the wild-type genotype CC had a reduced risk of prostate cancer associated with low use of dicamba (OR=0.62 95% CI: 0.41, 0.93, and high use of dicamba (OR=0.44, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.68, compared to those who reported no use of dicamba; in contrast, there was no significant association between dicamba and prostate cancer among those carrying one or two copies of the variant T allele at rs8192166. In addition, interactions between two organophosphate insecticides and SNPs related to estradiol metabolism were observed to result in an increased risk of prostate cancer. While replication is needed, these data suggest both

  14. PIN1 gene variants in Alzheimer's disease

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    Siedlecki Janusz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1 plays a significant role in the brain and is implicated in numerous cellular processes related to Alzheimer's disease (AD and other neurodegenerative conditions. There are confounding results concerning PIN1 activity in AD brains. Also PIN1 genetic variation was inconsistently associated with AD risk. Methods We performed analysis of coding and promoter regions of PIN1 in early- and late-onset AD and frontotemporal dementia (FTD patients in comparison with healthy controls. Results Analysis of eighteen PIN1 common polymorphisms and their haplotypes in EOAD, LOAD and FTD individuals in comparison with the control group did not reveal their contribution to disease risk. In six unrelated familial AD patients four novel PIN1 sequence variants were detected. c.58+64C>T substitution that was identified in three patients, was located in an alternative exon. In silico analysis suggested that this variant highly increases a potential affinity for a splicing factor and introduces two intronic splicing enhancers. In the peripheral leukocytes of one living patient carrying the variant, a 2.82 fold decrease in PIN1 expression was observed. Conclusion Our data does not support the role of PIN1 common polymorphisms as AD risk factor. However, we suggest that the identified rare sequence variants could be directly connected with AD pathology, influencing PIN1 splicing and/or expression.

  15. Gene Variant from Africa Linked to Black Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Gene Variant From Africa Linked to Black Obesity Study sees first biological pathway to weight gain ... identified an Africa-specific gene variant associated with obesity. The team found that about 1 percent of ...

  16. Low-frequency nonsynonymous variants in FKBPL and ARPC1B genes are associated with breast cancer risk in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Jiang, Yue; Zhu, Meng; Hang, Dong; Chen, Jiaping; Zhou, Jing; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin; Jin, Guangfu; Sha, Jiahao; Shen, Hongbing

    2017-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies have reported more than 100 independent common loci associated with breast cancer risk. The contribution of low-frequency or rare variants to breast cancer susceptibility has not been well explored. Thus, we applied exome chip to genotype >200 000 low-frequency and rare variants in 1064 breast cancer cases and 1125 cancer-free controls and subsequently validated promising associations in another 1040 breast cancer cases and 1240 controls. We identified two low-frequency nonsynonymous variants at FKBPL (rs200847762, OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.57, P = 4.31 × 10(-5) ) and ARPC1B (rs1045012, OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.43-0.74, P = 4.30 × 10(-5) ) associated with breast cancer risk. In stratification analyses, we found that the protective effect of rs200847762 was stronger in ER-positive breast cancer (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06-0.42) than that in ER-negative one (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.31-1.05). Our findings indicate that low-frequency variants may also contribute to breast cancer susceptibility and genetic variants in 6p21.33 and 7q22.1 are important in breast carcinogenesis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neurophysiologic effect of GWAS derived schizophrenia and bipolar risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mei-Hua; Levy, Deborah L; Salisbury, Dean F; Haddad, Steve; Gallagher, Patience; Lohan, Mary; Cohen, Bruce; Ongür, Dost; Smoller, Jordan W

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as disease associated variants for schizophrenia (SCZ), bipolar disorder (BPD), or both. Although these results are statistically robust, the functional effects of these variants and their role in the pathophysiology of SCZ or BPD remain unclear. Dissecting the effects of risk genes on distinct domains of brain function can provide important biological insights into the mechanisms by which these genes may confer illness risk. This study used quantitative event related potentials to characterize the neurophysiological effects of well-documented GWAS-derived SCZ/BPD susceptibility variants in order to map gene effects onto important domains of brain function. We genotyped 199 patients with DSM-IV diagnoses of SCZ or BPD and 74 healthy control subjects for 19 risk SNPs derived from previous GWAS findings and tested their association with five neurophysiologic traits (P3 amplitude, P3 latency, N1 amplitude, P2 amplitude, and P50 sensory gating responses) known to be abnormal in psychosis. The TCF4 SNP rs17512836 risk allele showed a significant association with reduced auditory P3 amplitude (P = 0.00016) after correction for multiple testing. The same allele was also associated with delayed P3 latency (P = 0.005). Our results suggest that a SCZ risk variant in TCF4 is associated with neurophysiologic traits thought to index attention and working memory abnormalities in psychotic disorders. These findings suggest a mechanism by which TCF4 may contribute to the neurobiological basis of psychotic illness.

  18. Gender-specific effects of genetic variants within Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes on the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Rafael Cáliz

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes differentially influence the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA in women and men. In phase one, 27 functional/tagging polymorphisms in C-type lectins and MCP-1/CCR2 axis were genotyped in 458 RA patients and 512 controls. Carriers of Dectin-2 rs4264222T allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.47, 95%CI 1.10-1.96 whereas patients harboring the DC-SIGN rs4804803G, MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.49-0.88; OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.50-0.89; OR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.55-0.97 and OR = 0.68, 95%CI 0.51-0.91. Interestingly, significant gender-specific differences were observed for Dectin-2 rs4264222 and Dectin-2 rs7134303: women carrying the Dectin-2 rs4264222T and Dectin-2 rs7134303G alleles had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.93, 95%CI 1.34-2.79 and OR = 1.90, 95%CI 1.29-2.80. Also five other SNPs showed significant associations only with one gender: women carrying the MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of RA (OR = 0.61, 95%CI 0.43-0.87; OR = 0.67, 95%CI 0.47-0.95 and OR = 0.60, 95%CI 0.42-0.86. In men, carriers of the DC-SIGN rs2287886A allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.70, 95%CI 1.03-2.78, whereas carriers of the DC-SIGN rs4804803G had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.53, 95%CI 0.32-0.89. In phase 2, we genotyped these SNPs in 754 RA patients and 519 controls, leading to consistent gender-specific associations for Dectin-2 rs4264222, MCP-1 rs1024611, MCP-1 rs13900 and DC-SIGN rs4804803 polymorphisms in the pooled sample (OR = 1.38, 95%CI 1.08-1.77; OR = 0.74, 95%CI 0.58-0.94; OR = 0.76, 95%CI 0.59-0.97 and OR = 0.56, 95%CI 0.34-0.93. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of significant SNPs also showed a

  19. Genetic variants in CETP increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Guido J.; Phuah, Chia‐Ling; Radmanesh, Farid; Brouwers, H. Bart; Battey, Thomas W. K.; Biffi, Alessandro; Peloso, Gina M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; Ayres, Alison M.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Selim, Magdy; Meschia, James F.; Brown, Devin L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Silliman, Scott L.; Tirschwell, David L.; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Kraft, Peter; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M.; Schmidt, Helena; Hansen, Björn M.; Jimenez‐Conde, Jordi; Giralt‐Steinhauer, Eva; Elosua, Roberto; Cuadrado‐Godia, Elisa; Soriano, Carolina; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M.; Klijn, Catharina J. M.; Rannikmae, Kristiina; Samarasekera, Neshika; Salman, Rustam Al‐Shahi; Sudlow, Catherine L.; Deary, Ian J.; Morotti, Andrea; Pezzini, Alessandro; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Norrving, Bo; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez‐Cadenas, Israel; Delgado, Pilar; Roquer, Jaume; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kittner, Steven J.; Waddy, Salina P.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Willer, Cristen J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective In observational epidemiologic studies, higher plasma high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL‐C) has been associated with increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). DNA sequence variants that decrease cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene activity increase plasma HDL‐C; as such, medicines that inhibit CETP and raise HDL‐C are in clinical development. Here, we test the hypothesis that CETP DNA sequence variants associated with higher HDL‐C also increase risk for ICH. Methods We performed 2 candidate‐gene analyses of CETP. First, we tested individual CETP variants in a discovery cohort of 1,149 ICH cases and 1,238 controls from 3 studies, followed by replication in 1,625 cases and 1,845 controls from 5 studies. Second, we constructed a genetic risk score comprised of 7 independent variants at the CETP locus and tested this score for association with HDL‐C as well as ICH risk. Results Twelve variants within CETP demonstrated nominal association with ICH, with the strongest association at the rs173539 locus (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, standard error [SE] = 0.06, p = 6.0 × 10−4) with no heterogeneity across studies (I 2 = 0%). This association was replicated in patients of European ancestry (p = 0.03). A genetic score of CETP variants found to increase HDL‐C by ∼2.85mg/dl in the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium was strongly associated with ICH risk (OR = 1.86, SE = 0.13, p = 1.39 × 10−6). Interpretation Genetic variants in CETP associated with increased HDL‐C raise the risk of ICH. Given ongoing therapeutic development in CETP inhibition and other HDL‐raising strategies, further exploration of potential adverse cerebrovascular outcomes may be warranted. Ann Neurol 2016;80:730–740 PMID:27717122

  20. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Presson, Angela P; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-08-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P(ARTP) = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.03) and ER-/PR- tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process.

  1. Genome-wide and follow-up studies identify CEP68 gene variants associated with risk of aspirin-intolerant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Byung-Lae; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Bae, Joon Seol; Park, Jong Sook; Jang, An Soo; Uh, Soo-Taek; Choi, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Inseon S; Cho, Sang Heon; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Choon-Sik; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2010-11-03

    Aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) is a rare condition that is characterized by the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients after ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin. However, the underlying mechanisms of AIA occurrence are still not fully understood. To identify the genetic variations associated with aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, the first stage of genome-wide association study with 109,365 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was undertaken in a Korean AIA (n = 80) cohort and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, n = 100) subjects as controls. For the second stage of follow-up study, 150 common SNPs from 11 candidate genes were genotyped in 163 AIA patients including intermediate AIA (AIA-I) subjects and 429 ATA controls. Among 11 candidate genes, multivariate logistic analyses showed that SNPs of CEP68 gene showed the most significant association with aspirin intolerance (P values of co-dominant for CEP68, 6.0×10(-5) to 4.0×10(-5)). All seven SNPs of the CEP68 gene showed linkage disequilibrium (LD), and the haplotype of CEP68_ht4 (T-G-A-A-A-C-G) showed a highly significant association with aspirin intolerance (OR= 2.63; 95% CI= 1.64-4.21; P = 6.0×10(-5)). Moreover, the nonsynonymous CEP68 rs7572857G>A variant that replaces glycine with serine showed a higher decline of forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) by aspirin provocation than other variants (P = 3.0×10(-5)). Our findings imply that CEP68 could be a susceptible gene for aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, suggesting that the nonsynonymous Gly74Ser could affect the polarity of the protein structure.

  2. Genome-wide and follow-up studies identify CEP68 gene variants associated with risk of aspirin-intolerant asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available Aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA is a rare condition that is characterized by the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients after ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin. However, the underlying mechanisms of AIA occurrence are still not fully understood. To identify the genetic variations associated with aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, the first stage of genome-wide association study with 109,365 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was undertaken in a Korean AIA (n = 80 cohort and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, n = 100 subjects as controls. For the second stage of follow-up study, 150 common SNPs from 11 candidate genes were genotyped in 163 AIA patients including intermediate AIA (AIA-I subjects and 429 ATA controls. Among 11 candidate genes, multivariate logistic analyses showed that SNPs of CEP68 gene showed the most significant association with aspirin intolerance (P values of co-dominant for CEP68, 6.0×10(-5 to 4.0×10(-5. All seven SNPs of the CEP68 gene showed linkage disequilibrium (LD, and the haplotype of CEP68_ht4 (T-G-A-A-A-C-G showed a highly significant association with aspirin intolerance (OR= 2.63; 95% CI= 1.64-4.21; P = 6.0×10(-5. Moreover, the nonsynonymous CEP68 rs7572857G>A variant that replaces glycine with serine showed a higher decline of forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1 by aspirin provocation than other variants (P = 3.0×10(-5. Our findings imply that CEP68 could be a susceptible gene for aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, suggesting that the nonsynonymous Gly74Ser could affect the polarity of the protein structure.

  3. The ABCA1 Gene R230C Variant Is Associated with Decreased Risk of Premature Coronary Artery Disease: The Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease (GEA) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Antúnez-Argüelles, Erika; Bautista-Grande, Araceli; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Kimura-Hayama, Eric; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Juárez-Rojas, Juan Gabriel; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo; Medina-Urrutia, Aída; González-Salazar, María del Carmen; Martínez-Alvarado, Rocío; Jorge-Galarza, Esteban; Carnevale, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Background ABCA1 genetic variation is known to play a role in HDL-C levels and various studies have also implicated ABCA1 variation in cardiovascular risk. The functional ABCA1/R230C variant is frequent in the Mexican population and has been consistently associated with low HDL-C concentrations. Although it has been associated with other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is not known whether it is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). Aim The purpose of the study was to analyze whether the ABCA1/R230C variant is associated with premature CAD in a case-control association study (GEA or Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease), and to explore whether BMI modulates the effect of the C230 allele on other metabolic traits using a population-based design. Results The C230 allele was significantly associated with both lower HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD as compared to controls (OR = 0.566; Padd = 1.499×10−5). In addition, BMI modulated the effect of R230C on body fat distribution, as the correlation between BMI and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue (a metric of the propensity to store fat viscerally as compared to subcutaneously) was negative in RR homozygous individuals, but positive in premenopausal women bearing the C230 allele, with a statistically significant interaction (P = 0.005). BMI-R230C interaction was also significant for triglyceride levels in women regardless of their menopausal status (P = 0.036). Conclusion This is the first study assessing the effect of the R230C/ABCA1 variant in remature CAD. C230 was associated with both decreased HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD, and gender-specific BMI-R230C interactions were observed for different metabolic traits. These interactions may help explain inconsistencies in associations, and underscore the need to further analyze interactions of this functional and frequent variant with diet, exercise and other

  4. The ABCA1 gene R230C variant is associated with decreased risk of premature coronary artery disease: the genetics of atherosclerotic disease (GEA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Villarreal-Molina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ABCA1 genetic variation is known to play a role in HDL-C levels and various studies have also implicated ABCA1 variation in cardiovascular risk. The functional ABCA1/R230C variant is frequent in the Mexican population and has been consistently associated with low HDL-C concentrations. Although it has been associated with other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is not known whether it is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD. AIM: The purpose of the study was to analyze whether the ABCA1/R230C variant is associated with premature CAD in a case-control association study (GEA or Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease, and to explore whether BMI modulates the effect of the C230 allele on other metabolic traits using a population-based design. RESULTS: The C230 allele was significantly associated with both lower HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD as compared to controls (OR = 0.566; P(add = 1.499×10(-5. In addition, BMI modulated the effect of R230C on body fat distribution, as the correlation between BMI and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue (a metric of the propensity to store fat viscerally as compared to subcutaneously was negative in RR homozygous individuals, but positive in premenopausal women bearing the C230 allele, with a statistically significant interaction (P = 0.005. BMI-R230C interaction was also significant for triglyceride levels in women regardless of their menopausal status (P = 0.036. CONCLUSION: This is the first study assessing the effect of the R230C/ABCA1 variant in remature CAD. C230 was associated with both decreased HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD, and gender-specific BMI-R230C interactions were observed for different metabolic traits. These interactions may help explain inconsistencies in associations, and underscore the need to further analyze interactions of this functional and frequent variant with diet, exercise

  5. Modeling disease risk through analysis of physical interactions between genetic variants within chromatin regulatory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradin, Olivia; Cohen, Andrea J; Luppino, Jennifer M; Bayles, Ian M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Scacheri, Peter C

    2016-11-01

    SNPs associated with disease susceptibility often reside in enhancer clusters, or super-enhancers. Constituents of these enhancer clusters cooperate to regulate target genes and often extend beyond the linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks containing risk SNPs identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified 'outside variants', defined as SNPs in weak LD with GWAS risk SNPs that physically interact with risk SNPs as part of a target gene's regulatory circuitry. These outside variants further explain variation in target gene expression beyond that explained by GWAS-associated SNPs. Additionally, the clinical risk associated with GWAS SNPs is considerably modified by the genotype of outside variants. Collectively, these findings suggest a potential model in which outside variants and GWAS SNPs that physically interact in 3D chromatin collude to influence target transcript levels as well as clinical risk. This model offers an additional hypothesis for the source of missing heritability for complex traits.

  6. Lifelong reduction of LDL-cholesterol related to a common variant in the LDL-receptor gene decreases the risk of coronary artery disease--a Mendelian Randomisation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Linsel-Nitschke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rare mutations of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR cause familial hypercholesterolemia, which increases the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD. Less is known about the implications of common genetic variation in the LDLR gene regarding the variability of cholesterol levels and risk of CAD. METHODS: Imputed genotype data at the LDLR locus on 1 644 individuals of a population-based sample were explored for association with LDL-C level. Replication of association with LDL-C level was sought for the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP within the LDLR gene in three European samples comprising 6 642 adults and 533 children. Association of this SNP with CAD was examined in six case-control studies involving more than 15 000 individuals. FINDINGS: Each copy of the minor T allele of SNP rs2228671 within LDLR (frequency 11% was related to a decrease of LDL-C levels by 0.19 mmol/L (95% confidence interval (CI [0.13-0.24] mmol/L, p = 1.5x10(-10. This association with LDL-C was uniformly found in children, men, and women of all samples studied. In parallel, the T allele of rs2228671 was associated with a significantly lower risk of CAD (Odds Ratio per copy of the T allele: 0.82, 95% CI [0.76-0.89], p = 2.1x10(-7. Adjustment for LDL-C levels by logistic regression or Mendelian Randomisation models abolished the significant association between rs2228671 with CAD completely, indicating a functional link between the genetic variant at the LDLR gene locus, change in LDL-C and risk of CAD. CONCLUSION: A common variant at the LDLR gene locus affects LDL-C levels and, thereby, the risk for CAD.

  7. Lifelong Reduction of LDL-Cholesterol Related to a Common Variant in the LDL-Receptor Gene Decreases the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease—A Mendelian Randomisation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Götz, Anika; Erdmann, Jeanette; Braenne, Ingrid; Braund, Peter; Hengstenberg, Christian; Stark, Klaus; Fischer, Marcus; Schreiber, Stefan; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Schaefer, Arne; Schrezenmeier, Jürgen; Rubin, Diana; Hinney, Anke; Reinehr, Thomas; Roth, Christian; Ortlepp, Jan; Hanrath, Peter; Hall, Alistair S.; Mangino, Massimo; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Heid, Iris M.; Doering, Angela; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H.-Erich; König, Inke R.; Ziegler, Andreas; Kronenberg, Florian; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert

    2008-01-01

    Background Rare mutations of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR) cause familial hypercholesterolemia, which increases the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Less is known about the implications of common genetic variation in the LDLR gene regarding the variability of cholesterol levels and risk of CAD. Methods Imputed genotype data at the LDLR locus on 1 644 individuals of a population-based sample were explored for association with LDL-C level. Replication of association with LDL-C level was sought for the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the LDLR gene in three European samples comprising 6 642 adults and 533 children. Association of this SNP with CAD was examined in six case-control studies involving more than 15 000 individuals. Findings Each copy of the minor T allele of SNP rs2228671 within LDLR (frequency 11%) was related to a decrease of LDL-C levels by 0.19 mmol/L (95% confidence interval (CI) [0.13–0.24] mmol/L, p = 1.5×10−10). This association with LDL-C was uniformly found in children, men, and women of all samples studied. In parallel, the T allele of rs2228671 was associated with a significantly lower risk of CAD (Odds Ratio per copy of the T allele: 0.82, 95% CI [0.76–0.89], p = 2.1×10−7). Adjustment for LDL-C levels by logistic regression or Mendelian Randomisation models abolished the significant association between rs2228671 with CAD completely, indicating a functional link between the genetic variant at the LDLR gene locus, change in LDL-C and risk of CAD. Conclusion A common variant at the LDLR gene locus affects LDL-C levels and, thereby, the risk for CAD. PMID:18714375

  8. The association of genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes with bladder cancer risk%端粒维持基因多态性与膀胱癌易感性的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾成元; 朱耀; 叶定伟

    2013-01-01

    Telomere maintenance genes play an important role in maintaining the integrity of the telomere structure that protects chromosome ends, and telomere dysfunction may lead to tumorigenesis. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes has been confirmed. Cumulative evidence shows that the difference of telomere length and stability among the individual depends on the genetic variants of telomere maintenance genes. Genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes may affect telomere length and stability, thus the increased cancer risk. This review intends to summarize the association of genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes with bladder cancer risk.%  端粒维持基因在保持端粒稳定、维护染色体完整方面起重要作用,端粒功能紊乱将会导致肿瘤发生。在维持端粒稳定的基因中,已经发现多种基因存在单核苷酸多态性。随着研究的深入,越来越多的证据表明,个体间端粒稳定性及长度的差异主要取决于端粒维持基因的多态性。端粒维持基因单核苷酸多态性可能是导致端粒长度及稳定性存在个体差异及增加肿瘤易感性的主要因素之一。本文就端粒维持基因多态性与膀胱癌易感性关系的研究进展作一综述。

  9. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed.

  10. Variants of the PPARG, IGF2BP2, CDKAL1, HHEX, and TCF7L2 genes confer risk of type 2 diabetes independently of BMI in the German KORA studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, C; Rathmann, W; Strassburger, K; Finner, H; Grallert, H; Huth, C; Meisinger, C; Gieger, C; Martin, S; Giani, G; Scherbaum, W A; Wichmann, H-E; Illig, T

    2008-10-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies identified novel gene variants that are associated with type 2 diabetes. However, results were not always consistent across different populations. Thus, the aims of this study were (i) to replicate findings from previous GWA studies in mainly Northern European populations using data from the German KORA 500 K diabetes project and (ii) to assess the impact of BMI on associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and type 2 diabetes. The KORA 500 K diabetes project includes 433 cases with validated type 2 diabetes and 1 438 nondiabetic controls from two population-based KORA surveys. Genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500 K Array Set. We investigated associations between SNPs and type 2 diabetes in 10 genes that have been reported to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes or were in complete or near-complete linkage disequilibrium with these variants. SNPs in the CDKAL1 gene showed the strongest association with type 2 diabetes [range of age and sex-adjusted odds ratios (OR): 1.30-1.39, p-values 0.0008-0.0004]. In addition, we found evidence for association of SNPs in the genes PPARG, IGF2BP2, HHEX, TCF7L2, and FTO with type 2 diabetes in the same directions as previously described (p<0.05), but not for WFS1, CDKN2A/B, KCNJ11, or EXT2. Adjustment for BMI slightly strengthened the link between CDKAL1 and type 2 diabetes, but had almost no impact on the other associations. We conclude that gene variants of CDKAL1, PPARG, IGF2BP2, HHEX, TCF7L2, and FTO predispose to type 2 diabetes in the German KORA 500 K study population. These associations appear to be independent of BMI.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene variants and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, L; Warrington, N; Allcock, R; van Bockxmeer, F; Palmer, L J; Iacopetta, B; Golledge, J; Norman, P E

    2009-08-01

    To investigate associations between two polymorphisms of the matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene (MMP2) and the incidence and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Cases and controls were recruited from a trial of screening for AAAs. The association between two variants of MMP2 (-1360C>T, and +649C>T) in men with AAA (n=678) and in controls (n=659) was examined using multivariate analyses. The association with AAA expansion (n=638) was also assessed. In multivariate analyses with adjustments for multiple testing, no association between either SNP and AAA presence or expansion was detected. MMP2 -1360C>T and +649C>T variants are not risk factors for AAA.

  12. A variant in CDKAL1 influences insulin response and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinthorsdottir, V.; Thorleifsson, G.; Reynisdottir, I.; Benediktsson, R.; Jonsdottir, T.; Walters, G.B.; Styrkarsdottir, U.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Emilsson, V.; Ghosh, S.; Baker, A.; Snorradottir, S.; Bjarnason, H.; Ng, M.C.; Hansen, T.; Bagger, Y.; Wilensky, R.L.; Reilly, M.P.; Adeyemo, A.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, J.; Gudnason, V.; Chen, G.; Huang, H.; Lashley, K.; Doumatey, A.; So, W.Y.; Ma, R.C.; Andersen, G.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Jorgensen, T.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Hofker, M.H.; Wijmenga, C.; Christiansen, C.; Rader, D.J.; Rotimi, C.; Gurney, M.; Chan, J.C.; Pedersen, O.; Sigurdsson, G.; Gulcher, J.R.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Stefansson, K.

    We conducted a genome-wide association study for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Icelandic cases and controls, and we found that a previously described variant in the transcription factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2) gene conferred the most significant risk. In addition to confirming two recently identified risk

  13. Loss aversion and 5HTT gene variants in adolescent anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Ernst

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss aversion, a well-documented behavioral phenomenon, characterizes decisions under risk in adult populations. As such, loss aversion may provide a reliable measure of risky behavior. Surprisingly, little is known about loss aversion in adolescents, a group who manifests risk-taking behavior, or in anxiety disorders, which are associated with risk-avoidance. Finally, loss aversion is expected to be modulated by genotype, particularly the serotonin transporter (SERT gene variant, based on its role in anxiety and impulsivity. This genetic modulation may also differ between anxious and healthy adolescents, given their distinct propensities for risk taking. The present work examines the modulation of loss aversion, an index of risk-taking, and reaction-time to decision, an index of impulsivity, by the serotonin-transporter-gene-linked polymorphisms (5HTTLPR in healthy and clinically anxious adolescents. Findings show that loss aversion (1 does manifest in adolescents, (2 does not differ between healthy and clinically anxious participants, and (3, when stratified by SERT genotype, identifies a subset of anxious adolescents who are high SERT-expressers, and show excessively low loss-aversion and high impulsivity. This last finding may serve as preliminary evidence for 5HTTLPR as a risk factor for the development of comorbid disorders associated with risk-taking and impulsivity in clinically anxious adolescents.

  14. An abundance of rare functional variants in 202 drug target genes sequenced in 14.002 people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G.

    2012-01-01

    Rare genetic variants contribute to complex disease risk; however, the abundance of rare variants in human populations remains unknown. We explored this spectrum of variation by sequencing 202 genes encoding drug targets in 14,002 individuals. We find rare variants are abundant (1 every 17 bases)...

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins and

  16. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie M O'Brien

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT. Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836 and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836. CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively. Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic

  17. Lipoprotein lipase gene variants: Association with acute myocardial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipoprotein lipase gene variants: Association with acute myocardial infarction and lipid profiles. ... Therefore, genes involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism pathways such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), are proper candidates ... Article Metrics.

  18. Variant of Rett syndrome and CDKL5 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt;

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. The Hanefeld variant, or early-onset seizure variant, has been associated with mutations in CDKL5 gene. AIMS: In recent years more than 60 patients with mutations in the CDKL5 gene have b...

  19. Deep sequencing of the TP53 gene reveals a potential risk allele for non-small cell lung cancer and supports the negative prognostic value of TP53 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deben, Christophe; Van den Bossche, Jolien; Van Der Steen, Nele; Lardon, Filip; Wouters, An; de Beeck, Ken Op; Hermans, Christophe; Jacobs, Julie; Peeters, Marc; Van Camp, Guy; Rolfo, Christian; Deschoolmeester, Vanessa; Pauwels, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    The TP53 gene remains the most frequently altered gene in human cancer, of which variants are associated with cancer risk, therapy resistance, and poor prognosis in several tumor types. To determine the true prognostic value of TP53 variants in non-small cell lung cancer, this study conducted further research, particularly focusing on subtype and tumor stage. Therefore, we determined the TP53 status of 97 non-small cell lung cancer adenocarcinoma patients using next generation deep sequencing technology and defined the prognostic value of frequently occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms and mutations in the TP53 gene. Inactivating TP53 mutations acted as a predictor for both worse overall and progression-free survival in stage II-IV patients and patients treated with DNA-damaging (neo)adjuvant therapy. In stage I tumors, the Pro-allele of the TP53 R72P polymorphism acted as a predictor for worse overall survival. In addition, we detected the rare R213R (rs1800372, minor allele frequency: 0.0054) polymorphism in 7.2% of the patients and are the first to show the significant association with TP53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer adenocarcinoma patients (p = 0.003). In conclusion, Our findings show an important role for TP53 variants as negative predictors for the outcome of non-small cell lung cancer adenocarcinoma patients, especially for TP53 inactivating mutations in advanced stage tumors treated with DNA-damaging agents, and provide the first evidence of the R213R G-allele as possible risk factor for non-small cell lung cancer.

  20. Autopsy and postmortem examination case study on genetic risk factors for cardiac death: Polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene Glu298asp variant and T-786c mutation, human paraoxonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameno Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Glu298Asp variant in exon 7 and T-786C mutation in the 5'-flanking region of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS gene, paraoxonase I gene (PON1, and α2β- adrenergic receptor gene (α2β-AR have been reported to be genetic risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these four genetic polymorphisms on the probability of death due to CHD, using data obtained from medico-legal autopsies. Methods. Blood samples from three groups: healthy controls, dead cases with CHD and without CHD (the latter as a control for dead cases were used. After DNA extraction, genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction − restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP test. Results. The frequency of the T allele in Glu298Asp variant in the dead cases with CHD was significantly higher than that in the healthy control (p < 0.001, OR = 4.47 and that in the dead cases without CHD (p < 0.001, OR = 7.62. The gene frequency of PON1 was significantly different (p = 0.007 between dead cases with and without CHD, and was also significantly different (p = 0.025 between the healthy control and dead cases without CHD. The gene frequency of PON1 was not significantly different (p = 0.401 between the healthy controls and dead cases with CHD. Hence this gene was not associated with death due to CHD. The other polymorphisms (T- 786C mutation, α2β-AR also showed no effect on death due to CHD. Conclusion. The polymorphism of Glu298Asp eNOS gene in dead cases may be useful for determining the cause of death in CHD cases in the Japanese population.

  1. Copy number variants in the kallikrein gene cluster.

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    Pernilla Lindahl

    Full Text Available The kallikrein gene family (KLK1-KLK15 is the largest contiguous group of protease genes within the human genome and is associated with both risk and outcome of cancer and other diseases. We searched for copy number variants in all KLK genes using quantitative PCR analysis and analysis of inheritance patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two deletions were identified: one 2235-bp deletion in KLK9 present in 1.2% of alleles, and one 3394-bp deletion in KLK15 present in 4.0% of alleles. Each deletion eliminated one complete exon and created out-of-frame coding that eliminated the catalytic triad of the resulting truncated gene product, which therefore likely is a non-functional protein. Deletion breakpoints identified by DNA sequencing located the KLK9 deletion breakpoint to a long interspersed element (LINE repeated sequence, while the deletion in KLK15 is located in a single copy sequence. To search for an association between each deletion and risk of prostate cancer (PC, we analyzed a cohort of 667 biopsied men (266 PC cases and 401 men with no evidence of PC at biopsy using short deletion-specific PCR assays. There was no association between evidence of PC in this cohort and the presence of either gene deletion. Haplotyping revealed a single origin of each deletion, with most recent common ancestor estimates of 3000-8000 and 6000-14 000 years for the deletions in KLK9 and KLK15, respectively. The presence of the deletions on the same haplotypes in 1000 Genomes data of both European and African populations indicate an early origin of both deletions. The old age in combination with homozygous presence of loss-of-function variants suggests that some kallikrein-related peptidases have non-essential functions.

  2. Innate immunity in ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection: contribution of IL8 and CSF2 gene variants to risk of trachomatous scarring in Gambians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joof Hassan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trachoma, a chronic keratoconjunctivitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, is the world's commonest infectious cause of blindness. Blindness is due to progressive scarring of the conjunctiva (trachomatous scarring leading to in-turning of eyelashes (trichiasis and corneal opacification. We evaluated the contribution of genetic variation across the chemokine and cytokine clusters in chromosomes 4q and 5q31 respectively to risk of scarring trachoma and trichiasis in a large case-control association study in a Gambian population. Methods Linkage disequilibrium (LD mapping was used to investigate risk effects across the 4q and 5q31 cytokine clusters in relation to the risk of scarring sequelae of ocular Ct infection. Disease association and epistatic effects were assessed in a population based study of 651 case-control pairs by conditional logistic regression (CLR analyses. Results LD mapping suggested that genetic effects on risk within these regions mapped to the pro-inflammatory innate immune genes interleukin 8 (IL8 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor (CSF2 loci. The IL8-251 rare allele (IL8-251 TT was associated with protection from scarring trachoma (OR = 0.29 p = 0.027. The intronic CSF2_27348 A allele in chromosome 5q31 was associated with dose dependent protection from trichiasis, with each copy of the allele reducing risk by 37% (p = 0.005. There was evidence of epistasis, with effects at IL8 and CSF2 loci interacting with those previously reported at the MMP9 locus, a gene acting downstream to IL8 and CSF2 in the inflammatory cascade. Conclusion innate immune response SNP-haplotypes are linked to ocular Ct sequelae. This work illustrates the first example of epistatic effects of two genes on trachoma.

  3. Association study of copy number variants in FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene with risk of ankylosing spondylitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Yang, Xiao; Cai, Guoqi; Xin, Lihong; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Li, Xiaona; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Kang; Xia, Guo; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2016-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common inherited autoimmune disease. Copy number variation (CNV) of DNA segments has been found to be an important part of genetic variation, and the FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs have been associated with various autoimmune disorders. The aim of the study was to determine whether CNVs of FCGR3A and FCGR3B were also associated with the susceptibility of AS. A total of 801 individuals including 402 AS patients and 399 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The copy numbers of FCGR3 gene (two fragments, included FCGR3A and FCGR3B) were measured by AccuCopy™ methods. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were used to evaluate association between FCGR3 gene CNVs and AS susceptibility. P values, odds ratio, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the effects of risk. Significantly, difference in the frequencies of FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs was founded between the patients with AS and controls. For the FCGR3A gene, a low (≤3) copy number was significantly associated with AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 2.17, 95% CI (1.41, 3.34), P < 0.001, adjusted OR 2.22, 95% CI (1.44, 3.43), P < 0.001)]. A low FCGR3B copy number was also significantly associated with increasing risk of AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 1.87, 95% CI (1.25, 2.79), P = 0.002, adjusted OR 1.94, 95% CI (1.29, 2.91), P = 0.001)]; however, both the high FCGR3A and FCGR3B copy numbers (≥5) were not significantly associated with the risk of AS (≥5 copies versus 4 copies). The lower copy numbers (≤3) of FCGR3A and FCGR3B genes confer a risk factor for AS susceptibility.

  4. Association of ADIPOR2 gene variants with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Johan G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Two receptors for adiponectin, ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2, have been characterized that mediate effects of adiponectin in various tissues. We examined whether genetic variation in ADIPOR2 predicts the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD and/or Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT participating the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS. Methods CVD morbidity and mortality data were collected during a median follow-up of 10.2 years (range 1-13 years and conversion from IGT to T2DM was assessed during a median follow-up of 7 years (range 1-11 years. Altogether eight SNPs in the ADIPOR2 locus were genotyped in 484 participants of the DPS. Moreover, the same SNPs were genotyped and the mRNA expression levels of ADIPOR2 were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples derived from 56 individuals participating in the Genobin study. Results In the DPS population, four SNPs (rs10848554, rs11061937, rs1058322, rs16928751 were associated with CVD risk, and two remained significant (p = 0.014 for rs11061937 and p = 0.020 for rs1058322 when all four were included in the same multi-SNP model. Furthermore, the individuals homozygous for the rare minor alleles of rs11061946 and rs11061973 had increased risk of converting from IGT to T2DM. Allele-specific differences in the mRNA expression levels for the rs1058322 variant were seen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from participants of the Genobin study. Conclusions Our results suggest that SNPs in the ADIPOR2 may modify the risk of CVD in individuals with IGT, possibly through alterations in the mRNA expression levels. In addition an independent genetic signal in ADIPOR2 locus may have an impact on the risk of developing T2DM in individuals with IGT. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00518167

  5. Myostatin: genetic variants, therapy and gene doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Katayama Yamada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, myostatin (MSTN has been at the forefront of muscle therapy research because intrinsic mutations or inhibition of this protein, by either pharmacological or genetic means, result in muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. In addition to muscle growth, MSTN inhibition potentially disturbs connective tissue, leads to strength modulation, facilitates myoblast transplantation, promotes tissue regeneration, induces adipose tissue thermogenesis and increases muscle oxidative phenotype. It is also known that current advances in gene therapy have an impact on sports because of the illicit use of such methods. However, the adverse effects of these methods, their impact on athletic performance in humans and the means of detecting gene doping are as yet unknown. The aim of the present review is to discuss biosynthesis, genetic variants, pharmacological/genetic manipulation, doping and athletic performance in relation to the MSTN pathway. As will be concluded from the manuscript, MSTN emerges as a promising molecule for combating muscle wasting diseases and for triggering wide-ranging discussion in view of its possible use in gene doping.Desde sua descoberta, a miostatina (MSTN entrou na linha de frente em pesquisas relacionadas às terapias musculares porque mutações intrínsecas ou inibição desta proteína tanto por abordagens farmacológicas como genéticas resultam em hipertrofia muscular e hiperplasia. Além do aumento da massa muscular, a inibição de MSTN potencialmente prejudica o tecido conectivo, modula a força muscular, facilita o transplante de mioblastos, promove regeneração tecidual, induz termogênese no tecido adiposo e aumenta a oxidação na musculatura esquelética. É também sabido que os atuais avanços em terapia gênica têm uma relação com o esporte devido ao uso ilícito de tal método. Os efeitos adversos de tal abordagem, seus efeitos no desempenho de atletas e métodos para detectar doping genético s

  6. Genetic risk variants for social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Murray B; Chen, Chia-Yen; Jain, Sonia; Jensen, Kevin P; He, Feng; Heeringa, Steven G; Kessler, Ronald C; Maihofer, Adam; Nock, Matthew K; Ripke, Stephan; Sun, Xiaoying; Thomas, Michael L; Ursano, Robert J; Smoller, Jordan W; Gelernter, Joel

    2017-03-01

    Social anxiety is a neurobehavioral trait characterized by fear and reticence in social situations. Twin studies have shown that social anxiety has a heritable basis, shared with neuroticism and extraversion, but genetic studies have yet to demonstrate robust risk variants. We conducted genomewide association analysis (GWAS) of subjects within the Army Study To Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) to (i) determine SNP-based heritability of social anxiety; (ii) discern genetic risk loci for social anxiety; and (iii) determine shared genetic risk with neuroticism and extraversion. GWAS were conducted within ancestral groups (EUR, AFR, LAT) using linear regression models for each of the three component studies in Army STARRS, and then meta-analyzed across studies. SNP-based heritability for social anxiety was significant (h(2)g  = 0.12, P = 2.17 × 10(-4) in EUR). One meta-analytically genomewide significant locus was seen in each of EUR (rs708012, Chr 6: BP 36965970, P = 1.55 × 10(-8) ; beta = 0.073) and AFR (rs78924501, Chr 1: BP 88406905, P = 3.58 × 10(-8) ; beta = 0.265) samples. Social anxiety in Army STARRS was significantly genetically correlated (negatively) with extraversion (rg  = -0.52, se = 0.22, P = 0.02) but not with neuroticism (rg  = 0.05, se = 0.22, P = 0.81) or with an anxiety disorder factor score (rg  = 0.02, se = 0.32, P = 0.94) from external GWAS meta-analyses. This first GWAS of social anxiety confirms a genetic basis for social anxiety, shared with extraversion but possibly less so with neuroticism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A variant in CDKAL1 influences insulin response and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Reynisdottir, Inga

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Icelandic cases and controls, and we found that a previously described variant in the transcription factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2) gene conferred the most significant risk. In addition to confirming two recently identified r...

  8. Common variants conferring risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansson, Hreinn; Ophoff, Roel A; Steinberg, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder, caused by both genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. Research on pathogenesis has traditionally focused on neurotransmitter systems in the brain, particularly those involving dopamine. Schizophrenia has been considered a separate disease...... conform to classical nosological disease boundaries. Certain CNVs confer not only high relative risk of schizophrenia but also of other psychiatric disorders. The structural variations associated with schizophrenia can involve several genes and the phenotypic syndromes, or the 'genomic disorders', have.......2. Our findings implicating the MHC region are consistent with an immune component to schizophrenia risk, whereas the association with NRGN and TCF4 points to perturbation of pathways involved in brain development, memory and cognition....

  9. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes: A mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.F. (Amand F.); D.I. Swerdlow (Daniel); M.V. Holmes (Michael); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); Fairhurst-Hunter, Z. (Zammy); Lyall, D.M. (Donald M.); Hartwig, F.P. (Fernando Pires); Horta, B.L. (Bernardo Lessa); E. Hypponen (Elina); C. Power (Christopher); Moldovan, M. (Max); E.P.A. van Iperen (Erik); G. Kees Hovingh; I. Demuth (Ilja); Norman, K. (Kristina); E. Steinhagen-Thiessen (Elisabeth); Demuth, J. (Juri); L. Bertram (Lars); Liu, T. (Tian); S. Coassin (Stefan); J. Willeit (Johann); S. Kiechl (Stefan); Willeit, K. (Karin); Mason, D. (Dan); J. Wright (Juliet); R. Morris (Richard); Wanamethee, G. (Goya); P.H. Whincup (Peter); Y. Ben-Shlomo; S. McLachlan (Stela); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); M. Kivimaki (Mika); Welch, C. (Catherine); Sanchez-Galvez, A. (Adelaida); P. Marques-Vidal (Pedro); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); Onland-Moret, N.C. (N Charlotte); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); G. Matullo; Fiorito, G. (Giovanni); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); C. Sacerdote (Carlotta); N.J. Wareham (Nick); C. Langenberg (Claudia); Scott, R. (Robert); Luan, J. (Jian'an); M. Bobak (Martin); S. Malyutina; Pajak, A. (Andrzej); R. Kubinova; A. Tamosiunas (Abdonas); H. Pikhart (Hynek); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); N. Grarup (Niels); O. Pedersen (Oluf); T. Hansen (T.); A. Linneberg (Allan); Simonsen, K.S. (Kenneth Starup); J. Cooper (Jim); S.E. Humphries (Steve); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); D.S. Carrell (David); McCarty, C.A. (Catherine A.); Kirchner, H.L. (H Lester); E.B. Larson (Eric B.); D.R. Crosslin (David); de Andrade, M. (Mariza); Roden, D.M. (Dan M.); J.C. Denny (Joshua C.); C. Carty (Cara); Hancock, S. (Stephen); J. Attia (John); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); Donnell, M.O.'. (Martin O'); Yusuf, S. (Salim); Chong, M. (Michael); G. Pare (Guillame); P. van der Harst (Pim); Said, M.A. (M Abdullah); Eppinga, R.N. (Ruben N.); N. Verweij (Niek); H. Snieder (Harold); Christen, T. (Tim); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); E. Ingelsson (Erik); Pazoki, R. (Raha); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Dehghan (Abbas); A. Teumer (Alexander); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); M. Dörr (Marcus); Lerch, M.M. (Markus M.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); Ward, J. (Joey); J.P. Pell (Jill P.); Smith, D.J. (Daniel J.); Meade, T. (Tom); A-H. Maitland-van der Zee (Anke-Hilse); Baranova, E.V. (Ekaterina V.); Young, R. (Robin); I. Ford (Ian); A. Campbell (Archie); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); M.L. Bots (Michiel); Grobbee, D.E. (Diederick E.); P. Froguel (Philippe); D. Thuillier (Dorothee); B. Balkau (Beverley); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); Cariou, B. (Bertrand); Smart, M. (Melissa); Bao, Y. (Yanchun); M. Kumari (Meena); A. Mahajan (Anubha); P.M. Ridker (Paul); D.I. Chasman (Daniel I.); A. Reiner (Alexander); L.A. Lange (Leslie); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); J.P. Casas (Juan); J. Keating (John); Preiss, D. (David); A. Hingorani (Aroon); N. Sattar (Naveed)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of

  10. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : a mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hypponen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Onland-Moret, Charlotte N.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert A.; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofi A.; Pajak, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E.; Brilliant, Murray; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kirchner, H Lester; Larson, Eric B; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen J; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Donnell, Martin O'; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M. Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Doerr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P.; Smith, Daniel J; Meade, Tom W.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Baranova, Ekaterina V; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothee; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amelie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Reiner, Alex P.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Casas, Juan Pablo; Keating, Brendan J.; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed

    Background Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2

  11. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : A mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M.; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofia; Pajak, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E.; Brilliant, Murray; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Larson, Eric B.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Donnell, Martin O.; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M. Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian; Dörr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P.; Smith, Daniel J.; Meade, Tom; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Baranova, Ekaterina V.; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothée; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Reiner, Alex P.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Casas, Juan Pablo; Keating, Brendan J.; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed

    BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2

  12. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : A mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M.; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofia; Pajak, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E.; Brilliant, Murray; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Larson, Eric B.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Donnell, Martin O.; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M. Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian; Dörr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P.; Smith, Daniel J.; Meade, Tom; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Baranova, Ekaterina V.; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothée; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Reiner, Alex P.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Casas, Juan Pablo; Keating, Brendan J.; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2 diabet

  13. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : A mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M.; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofia; Pajak, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E.; Brilliant, Murray; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Larson, Eric B.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Donnell, Martin O.; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M. Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian; Dörr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P.; Smith, Daniel J.; Meade, Tom; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Baranova, Ekaterina V.; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothée; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Reiner, Alex P.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Casas, Juan Pablo; Keating, Brendan J.; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2 diabet

  14. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes: A mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.F. (Amand F.); D.I. Swerdlow (Daniel); M.V. Holmes (Michael); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); Fairhurst-Hunter, Z. (Zammy); Lyall, D.M. (Donald M.); Hartwig, F.P. (Fernando Pires); Horta, B.L. (Bernardo Lessa); E. Hypponen (Elina); C. Power (Christopher); Moldovan, M. (Max); E.P.A. van Iperen (Erik); G. Kees Hovingh; I. Demuth (Ilja); Norman, K. (Kristina); E. Steinhagen-Thiessen (Elisabeth); Demuth, J. (Juri); L. Bertram (Lars); Liu, T. (Tian); S. Coassin (Stefan); J. Willeit (Johann); S. Kiechl (Stefan); Willeit, K. (Karin); Mason, D. (Dan); J. Wright (Juliet); R. Morris (Richard); Wanamethee, G. (Goya); P.H. Whincup (Peter); Y. Ben-Shlomo; S. McLachlan (Stela); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); M. Kivimaki (Mika); Welch, C. (Catherine); Sanchez-Galvez, A. (Adelaida); P. Marques-Vidal (Pedro); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); Onland-Moret, N.C. (N Charlotte); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); G. Matullo; Fiorito, G. (Giovanni); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); C. Sacerdote (Carlotta); N.J. Wareham (Nick); C. Langenberg (Claudia); Scott, R. (Robert); Luan, J. (Jian'an); M. Bobak (Martin); S. Malyutina; Pajak, A. (Andrzej); R. Kubinova; A. Tamosiunas (Abdonas); H. Pikhart (Hynek); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); N. Grarup (Niels); O. Pedersen (Oluf); T. Hansen (T.); A. Linneberg (Allan); Simonsen, K.S. (Kenneth Starup); J. Cooper (Jim); S.E. Humphries (Steve); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); D.S. Carrell (David); McCarty, C.A. (Catherine A.); Kirchner, H.L. (H Lester); E.B. Larson (Eric B.); D.R. Crosslin (David); de Andrade, M. (Mariza); Roden, D.M. (Dan M.); J.C. Denny (Joshua C.); C. Carty (Cara); Hancock, S. (Stephen); J. Attia (John); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); Donnell, M.O.'. (Martin O'); Yusuf, S. (Salim); Chong, M. (Michael); G. Pare (Guillame); P. van der Harst (Pim); Said, M.A. (M Abdullah); Eppinga, R.N. (Ruben N.); N. Verweij (Niek); H. Snieder (Harold); Christen, T. (Tim); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); E. Ingelsson (Erik); Pazoki, R. (Raha); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Dehghan (Abbas); A. Teumer (Alexander); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); M. Dörr (Marcus); Lerch, M.M. (Markus M.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); Ward, J. (Joey); J.P. Pell (Jill P.); Smith, D.J. (Daniel J.); Meade, T. (Tom); A-H. Maitland-van der Zee (Anke-Hilse); Baranova, E.V. (Ekaterina V.); Young, R. (Robin); I. Ford (Ian); A. Campbell (Archie); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); M.L. Bots (Michiel); Grobbee, D.E. (Diederick E.); P. Froguel (Philippe); D. Thuillier (Dorothee); B. Balkau (Beverley); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); Cariou, B. (Bertrand); Smart, M. (Melissa); Bao, Y. (Yanchun); M. Kumari (Meena); A. Mahajan (Anubha); P.M. Ridker (Paul); D.I. Chasman (Daniel I.); A. Reiner (Alexander); L.A. Lange (Leslie); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); J.P. Casas (Juan); J. Keating (John); Preiss, D. (David); A. Hingorani (Aroon); N. Sattar (Naveed)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of t

  15. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Amand F; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Holmes, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2 dia...

  16. Genetic variants in nitric oxide synthase genes and the risk of male infertility in a Chinese population: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Yan

    Full Text Available In recent years, oxidative stress has been studied extensively as a main contributing factor to male infertility. Nitric Oxide, a highly reactive free radical gas, is potentially detrimental to sperm function and sperm DNA integrity at high levels. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the associations between five polymorphisms in nitric oxide synthase genes (NOSs and the risk of male infertility and sperm DNA damage as well.Genotypes were determined by the OpenArray platform. Sperm DNA fragmentation was detected using the Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and the level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG in sperm DNA was measured using immunofluorescence. The adjusted odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were estimated using unconditional logistic regression.Our results revealed a statistically significant difference between the cases and controls in both genotypic distribution (P<0.001 and allelic frequency (P = 0.021 only for the NOS3 rs1799983 SNP. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that rs1799983 was associated with a borderline significantly increased risk of male infertility (GT vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.00-1.70; GT+TT vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.03-1.74; P trend = 0.020. Moreover, NOS3 rs1799983 was positively associated with higher levels of sperm DNA fragmentation (β = 0.223, P = 0.044. However, the other 4 polymorphisms (NOS1 rs2682826, NOS1 rs1047735, NOS2 rs2297518, and NOS2 rs10459953 were not found to have any apparent relationships with male infertility risk.Of five NOS gene polymorphisms investigated in the present study, we found NOS3 rs1799983 might cause oxidative sperm DNA damage, thereby contributing to male infertility.

  17. Arrhythmogenic KCNE gene variants: current knowledge and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn M Crump

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are twenty-five known inherited cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility genes, all of which encode either ion channel pore-forming subunits or proteins that regulate aspects of ion channel biology such as function, trafficking and localization. The human KCNE gene family comprises five potassium channel regulatory subunits, sequence variants in each of which are associated with cardiac arrhythmias. KCNE gene products exhibit promiscuous partnering and in some cases ubiquitous expression, hampering efforts to unequivocally correlate each gene to specific native potassium currents. Likewise, deducing the molecular etiology of cardiac arrhythmias in individuals harboring rare KCNE gene variants, or more common KCNE polymorphisms, can be challenging. In this review we provide an update on putative arrhythmia-causing KCNE gene variants, and discuss current thinking and future challenges in the study of molecular mechanisms of KCNE-associated cardiac rhythm disturbances.

  18. Relationship of APOA5, PPARγ and HL gene variants with serial changes in childhood body mass index and coronary artery disease risk factors in young adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Shikha

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triglycerides is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD and is especially important in Indians because of high prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in this population. Both genetic and environmental factors determine triglyceride levels. In a birth cohort from India, hypertriglyceridemia was found in 41% of men and 11% of women. Subjects who had high triglycerides had more rapid body mass index (BMI or weight gain than rest of the cohort throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence. We analysed polymorphisms in APOA5, hepatic lipase and PPARγ genes and investigated their association with birth weight and serial changes in BMI. Results Polymorphisms in APOA5 (-1131T > C, S19W, PPARγ (Pro12Ala and hepatic lipase (-514C > T were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by restriction digestion in 1492 subjects from the New Delhi Birth Cohort (NDBC. We assessed whether these polymorphisms influence lipid and other variables and serial changes in BMI, both individually and together. The risk allele of APOA5 (-1131C resulted in 23.6 mg/dl higher triglycerides as compared to normal allele (P PPARγ Pro12Ala variation with a lower conditional weight at 6 months, (P = 0.020 and APOA5 S19W with a higher conditional BMI at 11 yrs of age (P = 0.030, none of the other associations between the gene polymorphisms and serial changes in body mass index from birth to young adulthood were significant. Conclusion The promoter polymorphism in APOA5 was associated with raised serum triglycerides and that of HL with raised HDL2 levels. None of the polymorphisms had any significant relationship with birth weight or serial changes in anthropometry from birth to adulthood in this cohort.

  19. Renin-Angiotensin System Gene Variants and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence of Angiotensinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce-Tan, Siew Mei; Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Abdul Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully used to call for variants associated with diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, some variants are not included in the GWAS to avoid penalty in multiple hypothetic testing. Thus, candidate gene approach is still useful even at GWAS era. This study attempted to assess whether genetic variations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and their gene interactions are associated with T2DM risk. We genotyped 290 T2DM patients and 267 controls using three genes of the RAS, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). There were significant differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls for AGT variants (P = 0.05) but not for ACE and AGTR1. Haplotype TCG of the AGT was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15-3.20, permuted P = 0.012); however, no evidence of significant gene-gene interactions was seen. Nonetheless, our analysis revealed that the associations of the AGT variants with T2DM were independently associated. Thus, this study suggests that genetic variants of the RAS can modestly influence the T2DM risk.

  20. Renin-Angiotensin System Gene Variants and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence of Angiotensinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Mei Joyce-Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been successfully used to call for variants associated with diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, some variants are not included in the GWAS to avoid penalty in multiple hypothetic testing. Thus, candidate gene approach is still useful even at GWAS era. This study attempted to assess whether genetic variations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS and their gene interactions are associated with T2DM risk. We genotyped 290 T2DM patients and 267 controls using three genes of the RAS, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensinogen (AGT, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1. There were significant differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls for AGT variants (P=0.05 but not for ACE and AGTR1. Haplotype TCG of the AGT was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15–3.20, permuted P=0.012; however, no evidence of significant gene-gene interactions was seen. Nonetheless, our analysis revealed that the associations of the AGT variants with T2DM were independently associated. Thus, this study suggests that genetic variants of the RAS can modestly influence the T2DM risk.

  1. Association of ADIPOQ and ADIPOR variants with risk of colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuan; Wang, Guo-Bin; Tang, Yong; Bai, Jie; Ye, Lin

    2017-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have studied the association of adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene and adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR) gene polymorphisms with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the outcomes were incomplete and inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the associations systematically. All eligible case-control studies published up to Jan. 2015 were searched from PubMed, the Cochrane library, Elsevier, Wiley Online library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang data and Chongqing VIP. Effect sizes of odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were calculated by using a fixed- or random-effect model. Twelve case-control studies including 6141 cases and 7398 controls were selected. Significant differences in the distributions of allele frequency with CRC risk were directly present in ADIPOQ variants rs2241766, rs1501299 and ADIPOR variant rs1342387. In stratified analysis for different populations, significant differences were present in ADIPOQ variant rs822396 for Ashkenazi Jewish, in ADIPOQ variant rs1501299 and ADIPOR variant rs1342387 for Chinese and in ADIPOQ variant rs 2241766 for Ashkenazi Jewish and Chinese. In addition, the factors correlated with insulin resistance had synergistic effect with ADIPOQ variants rs2241766 T/G and rs1501299 G/T on risk of CRC. ADIPOQ variants rs2241766 T/G, rs1501299 G/T and ADIPOR variant ADIPOR rs1342387 G/A had a population specific correlation with CRC risk, which may be mediated by insulin resistance. And large well-designed studies are still needed for further evaluation of rs822396 and rs1063538, especially for their interaction and combined effect in the correlation with CRC risk.

  2. The solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter), member 2 gene, SLC1A2, rs3794087 variant and assessment risk for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A G

    2014-02-01

    A glutamatergic dysfunction has been postulated to play a role in restless legs syndrome (RLS) pathophysiology, as glutamate concentrations have been found to increase in the thalamus of RLS patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible association between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3794087 in the solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter), member 2 gene, SLC1A2, related with glutamate transport and the risk for RLS. We studied the allelic and genotype frequencies of the SNP rs3794087 in 205 patients with RLS and 328 healthy controls using TaqMan genotyping. The rs3794087 genotype and allelic frequencies did not significantly differ between patients with RLS and controls and were unrelated with the age at onset of RLS, gender, and family history of RLS. The results of our study suggest that the rs3794087 polymorphism is not related to the risk for RLS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic variant in DNA repair gene GTF2H4 is associated with lung cancer risk: a large-scale analysis of six published GWAS datasets in the TRICL consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meilin; Liu, Hongliang; Liu, Zhensheng; Yi, Xiaohua; Bickeboller, Heike; Hung, Rayjean J; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Christiani, David C; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Amos, Christopher I; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-09-01

    DNA repair pathways maintain genomic integrity and stability, and dysfunction of DNA repair leads to cancer. We hypothesize that functional genetic variants in DNA repair genes are associated with risk of lung cancer. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of 123,371 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 169 DNA repair genes obtained from six previously published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of 12160 lung cancer cases and 16838 controls. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using the logistic regression model and used the false discovery rate (FDR) method for correction of multiple testing. As a result, 14 SNPs had a significant odds ratio (OR) for lung cancer risk with P FDR < 0.05, of which rs3115672 in MSH5 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.14-1.27) and rs114596632 in GTF2H4 (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.12-1.25) at 6q21.33 were the most statistically significant (P combined = 3.99×10(-11) and P combined = 5.40×10(-10), respectively). The MSH5 rs3115672, but not GTF2H4 rs114596632, was strongly correlated with MSH5 rs3131379 in that region (r (2) = 1.000 and r (2) = 0.539, respectively) as reported in a previous GWAS. Importantly, however, the GTF2H4 rs114596632 T, but not MSH5 rs3115672 T, allele was significantly associated with both decreased DNA repair capacity phenotype and decreased mRNA expression levels. These provided evidence that functional genetic variants of GTF2H4 confer susceptibility to lung cancer.

  4. Variants in microRNA genes in familial papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Jerneja; Fultz, Rebecca; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Genutis, Luke K; Wang, Yanqiang; Li, Wei; Volinia, Stefano; Jazdzewski, Krystian; He, Huiling; Wakely, Paul E; Senter, Leigha; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2017-01-24

    Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC) displays one of the highest familiality scores of all cancers as measured by case-control studies, yet only a handful of genes have been implicated until now. Variants in microRNAs have been associated with the risk of several cancers including PTC but the magnitude of this involvement is unclear. This study was designed to test to what extent genomic variants in microRNAs contribute to PTC risk. We used SOLiD technology to sequence 321 genomic regions encoding 427 miRNAs in one affected individual from each of 80 PTC families. After excluding variants with frequency ≥ 1% in 1000 Genomes Phase 1 (n = 1092) we detected 1978 variants. After further functional filtering steps 25 variants in pre-miRs remained. Co-segregation was observed for six out of 16 tested miRNA variants with PTC in the families, namely let-7e, miR-181b, miR-135a, miR-15b, miR-320, and miR-484. Expression of miR-135a and miR-181b was tested in normal thyroid and tumor tissue from patients that carry the variants and a decrease in expression was observed. In vitro assays were applied to measure the effect of the variants on microRNAs' maturation. Four out of six variants were tested. Only the let-7e and miR-181b variants showed an effect on processing leading to lower levels of mature miRNA. These two variants were not detected in 1170 sporadic PTC cases nor in 1404 controls. Taken together, our data show that high penetrance germline sequence variants of miRNAs potentially predispose to a fraction of all PTC but are not common.

  5. Variants in the ASB10 Gene Are Associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Micheal

    Full Text Available Recently nonsynonymous coding variants in the ankyrin repeats and suppressor of cytokine signaling box-containing protein 10 (ASB10 gene were found to be associated with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG in cohorts from Oregon and Germany, but this finding was not confirmed in an independent cohort from Iowa. The aim of the current study was to assess the role of ASB10 gene variants in Pakistani glaucoma patients.Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and splice junctions of the ASB10 gene was performed in 30 probands of multiplex POAG families, 208 sporadic POAG patients and 151 healthy controls from Pakistan. Genotypic associations of individual variants with POAG were analyzed with the Fisher's exact or Chi-square test.In total 24 variants were identified in POAG probands and sporadic patients, including 11 novel variants and 13 known variants. 13 of the variants were nonsynonymous, 6 were synonymous, and 5 were intronic. Three nonsynonymous variants (p.Arg49Cys, p.Arg237Gly, p.Arg453Cys identified in the probands were not segregating in the respective families. This is not surprising since glaucoma is a multifactorial disease, and multiple factors are likely to be involved in the disease manifestation in these families. However a nonsynonymous variant, p.Arg453Cys (rs3800791, was found in 6 sporadic POAG patients but not in controls, suggesting that it infers increased risk for the disease. In addition, one synonymous variant was found to be associated with sporadic POAG: p.Ala290Ala and the association of the variant with POAG remained significant after correction for multiple testing (uncorrected p-value 0.002, corrected p-value 0.047. The cumulative burden of rare, nonsynonymous variants was significantly higher in sporadic POAG patients compared to control individuals (p-value 0.000006.Variants in ASB10 were found to be significantly associated with sporadic POAG in the Pakistani population. This supports previous findings that sequence

  6. From risk genes to psychiatric phenotypes - Studies of fibroblast growth factor-related and genome-wide genetic variants in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder with a high heritability. This thesis describes studies on the association between genetic variants and phenotypes related to schizophrenia, such as brain volume and IQ, in order to learn about which processes are affected by schizophrenia-associated genetic

  7. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  8. Association of Common Variants in MMPs with Periodontitis Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyang; Zhu, Ying; Singh, Pradeep; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered to play an important role during tissue remodeling and extracellular matrix degradation. And functional polymorphisms in MMPs genes have been reported to be associated with the increased risk of periodontitis. Recently, many studies have investigated the association between MMPs polymorphisms and periodontitis risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to quantify the influence of MMPs polymorphisms on the susceptibility to periodontitis, we performed a meta-analysis and systematic review. Results. Overall, this comprehensive meta-analysis included a total of 17 related studies, including 2399 cases and 2002 healthy control subjects. Our results revealed that although studies of the association between MMP-8 −799 C/T variant and the susceptibility to periodontitis have not yielded consistent results, MMP-1 (−1607 1G/2G, −519 A/G, and −422 A/T), MMP-2 (−1575 G/A, −1306 C/T, −790 T/G, and −735 C/T), MMP-3 (−1171 5A/6A), MMP-8 (−381 A/G and +17 C/G), MMP-9 (−1562 C/T and +279 R/Q), and MMP-12 (−357 Asn/Ser), as well as MMP-13 (−77 A/G, 11A/12A) SNPs are not related to periodontitis risk. Conclusions. No association of these common MMPs variants with the susceptibility to periodontitis was found; however, further larger-scale and multiethnic genetic studies on this topic are expected to be conducted to validate our results. PMID:27194818

  9. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

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    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  10. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  11. NOS3 gene variants and male infertility: Association of 4a/4b with oligoasthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučić, N L J; Nikolić, Z Z; Vukotić, V D; Tomović, S M; Vuković, I I; Kanazir, S D; Savić-Pavićević, D L J; Brajušković, G N

    2017-05-03

    Results of recent studies confirmed that oxidative stress negatively affects sperm motility and causes sperm DNA damage. Produced by nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), nitric oxide is considered to be one of the important mediators of oxidative stress in testis tissue. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association of three genetic variants (rs2070744, rs1799983 and intron variant 4a/4b) in NOS3 gene and infertility occurrence in two groups of infertile men (idiopathic azoospermia and oligoasthenozoospermia) and fertile controls. Genotypes for the single-nucleotide genetic variants rs1799983 and rs2070744 were determined by PCR-RFLP, while genotyping of intron 4 variant 4a/4b was performed by gel electrophoresis of PCR products. Statistical analysis was performed by SNPStats software. No significant association between the three genetic variants of the NOS3 gene and infertility risk was determined comparing allele and genotype frequencies among group of patients diagnosed with azoospermia and the control group. Nevertheless, there was a significant positive association between 4a/4b and infertility in the group of males diagnosed with oligoasthenozoospermia, under overdominant genetic model. Our findings suggest that tandem repeat variant within intron 4 of the NOS3 gene is associated with an increased risk of infertility in men diagnosed with idiopathic oligoasthenozoospermia. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Germline miRNA DNA variants and the risk of colorectal cancer by subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Melissa C.; DeRycke, Melissa S.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Baheti, Saurabh; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Win, Aung Ko; Potter, John D.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Newcomb, Polly A.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate up to one‐third of all protein‐coding genes including genes relevant to cancer. Variants within miRNAs have been reported to be associated with prognosis, survival, response to chemotherapy across cancer types, in vitro parameters of cell growth, and altered risks for development of cancer. Five miRNA variants have been reported to be associated with risk for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we evaluated germline genetic variation in 1,123 miRNAs in 899 individuals with CRCs categorized by clinical subtypes and in 204 controls. The role of common miRNA variation in CRC was investigated using single variant and miRNA‐level association tests. Twenty‐nine miRNAs and 30 variants exhibited some marginal association with CRC in at least one subtype of CRC. Previously reported associations were not confirmed (n = 4) or could not be evaluated (n = 1). The variants noted for the CRCs with deficient mismatch repair showed little overlap with the variants noted for CRCs with proficient mismatch repair, consistent with our evolving understanding of the distinct biology underlying these two groups. © 2016 The Authors Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27636879

  13. Germline miRNA DNA variants and the risk of colorectal cancer by subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindor, Noralane M; Larson, Melissa C; DeRycke, Melissa S; McDonnell, Shannon K; Baheti, Saurabh; Fogarty, Zachary C; Win, Aung Ko; Potter, John D; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Newcomb, Polly A; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Goode, Ellen L; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate up to one-third of all protein-coding genes including genes relevant to cancer. Variants within miRNAs have been reported to be associated with prognosis, survival, response to chemotherapy across cancer types, in vitro parameters of cell growth, and altered risks for development of cancer. Five miRNA variants have been reported to be associated with risk for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we evaluated germline genetic variation in 1,123 miRNAs in 899 individuals with CRCs categorized by clinical subtypes and in 204 controls. The role of common miRNA variation in CRC was investigated using single variant and miRNA-level association tests. Twenty-nine miRNAs and 30 variants exhibited some marginal association with CRC in at least one subtype of CRC. Previously reported associations were not confirmed (n = 4) or could not be evaluated (n = 1). The variants noted for the CRCs with deficient mismatch repair showed little overlap with the variants noted for CRCs with proficient mismatch repair, consistent with our evolving understanding of the distinct biology underlying these two groups. © 2016 The Authors Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense...

  15. Localization of association signal from risk and protective variants in sequencing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbin, Abra; Jenkins, Gregory D; Ellsworth, Katarzyna A; Wang, Liewei; Fridley, Brooke L

    2012-01-01

    Aggregating information across multiple variants in a gene or region can improve power for rare variant association testing. Power is maximized when the aggregation region contains many causal variants and few neutral variants. In this paper, we present a method for the localization of the association signal in a region using a sliding-window based approach to rare variant association testing in a region. We first introduce a novel method for analysis of rare variants, the Difference in Minor Allele Frequency test (DMAF), which allows combined analysis of common and rare variants, and makes no assumptions about the direction of effects. In whole-region analyses of simulated data with risk and protective variants, DMAF and other methods which pool data across individuals were found to outperform methods which pool data across variants. We then implement a sliding-window version of DMAF, using a step-down permutation approach to control type I error with the testing of multiple windows. In simulations, the sliding-window DMAF improved power to detect a causal sub-region, compared to applying DMAF to the whole region. Sliding-window DMAF was also effective in localizing the causal sub-region. We also applied the DMAF sliding-window approach to test for an association between response to the drug gemcitabine and variants in the gene FKBP5 sequenced in 91 lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from white non-Hispanic individuals. The application of the sliding-window test procedure detected an association in a sub-region spanning an exon and two introns, when rare and common variants were analyzed together.

  16. Multiple insulin degrading enzyme variants alter in vitro reporter gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Belbin

    Full Text Available The insulin degrading enzyme (IDE variant, v311 (rs6583817, is associated with increased post-mortem cerebellar IDE mRNA, decreased plasma β-amyloid (Aβ, decreased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD and increased reporter gene expression, suggesting that it is a functional variant driving increased IDE expression. To identify other functional IDE variants, we have tested v685, rs11187061 (associated with decreased cerebellar IDE mRNA and variants on H6, the haplotype tagged by v311 (v10; rs4646958, v315; rs7895832, v687; rs17107734 and v154; rs4646957, for altered in vitro reporter gene expression. The reporter gene expression levels associated with the second most common haplotype (H2 successfully replicated the post-mortem findings in hepatocytoma (0.89 fold-change, p = 0.04 but not neuroblastoma cells. Successful in vitro replication was achieved for H6 in neuroblastoma cells when the sequence was cloned 5' to the promoter (1.18 fold-change, p = 0.006 and 3' to the reporter gene (1.29 fold change, p = 0.003, an effect contributed to by four variants (v10, v315, v154 and v311. Since IDE mediates Aβ degradation, variants that regulate IDE expression could represent good therapeutic targets for AD.

  17. Low-Frequency Variants in HMGA1 Are Not Associated With Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquez, Marcel; Huyvaert, Marlene; Perry, John R. B.; Pearson, Richard D.; Falchi, Mario; Morris, Andrew P.; Vivequin, Sidonie; Lobbens, Stephane; Yengo, Loic; Gaget, Stefan; Pattou, Francois; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Charpentier, Guillaume; Carlsson, Lena M. S.; Jacobson, Peter; Sjostrom, Lars; Lantieri, Olivier; Heude, Barbara; Walley, Andrew; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Froguel, Philippe; Cauchi, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the low-frequency c.136-14_136-13insC variant in high-mobility group Al (HMGA1) may strongly contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risk. In our study, we attempted to confirm that HMGA1 is a novel type 2 diabetes locus in French Caucasians. The gene

  18. Low-Frequency Variants in HMGA1 Are Not Associated With Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquez, Marcel; Huyvaert, Marlene; Perry, John R. B.; Pearson, Richard D.; Falchi, Mario; Morris, Andrew P.; Vivequin, Sidonie; Lobbens, Stephane; Yengo, Loic; Gaget, Stefan; Pattou, Francois; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Charpentier, Guillaume; Carlsson, Lena M. S.; Jacobson, Peter; Sjostrom, Lars; Lantieri, Olivier; Heude, Barbara; Walley, Andrew; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Froguel, Philippe; Cauchi, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the low-frequency c.136-14_136-13insC variant in high-mobility group Al (HMGA1) may strongly contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risk. In our study, we attempted to confirm that HMGA1 is a novel type 2 diabetes locus in French Caucasians. The gene

  19. BARD1 variants are not associated with breast cancer risk in Australian familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Choong, David Y H; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-10-01

    Several studies in various populations have suggested that non-synonymous BARD1 variants are associated with increased breast cancer risk. Using DHPLC analysis we screened the coding region of BARD1 for variants in 210 probands of breast cancer families including 129 families with no mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. These families were ascertained in Australia through the Kathleen Cunningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab). Nine coding variants were detected among the kConFab families, including two novel variants (Thr598Ile and Ile692Thr). The frequency of five of these variants were evaluated in 258 non-cancer controls and 401 women with sporadic breast cancer. Three variants (1139del21, G1756C and A2285G) were detected in all three groups at a similar frequency suggesting that these do not represent BRCAX candidates. Two variants (Thr598Ile and Ile692Thr) were not detected in any of the 659 sporadic breast cancer cases and controls and were assessed for segregation with breast cancer in the families of the probands. However, neither variant was identified in any other breast cancer case in either family suggesting that these variants are non-pathogenic polymorphisms. We have found no evidence to support involvement of BARD1 in familial breast cancer risk in the Australian population. In addition, three variants previously reported to be pathogenic in other populations are likely to represent benign polymorphisms and therefore we conclude that BARD1 is unlikely to represent a high-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene.

  20. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B gene variants in relation to ovarian cancer risk in the Polish population

    OpenAIRE

    Mostowska, Adrianna; SAJDAK, STEFAN; Pawlik, Piotr; Lianeri, Margarita; Jagodzinski, Paweł P.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that changes in DNA methylation of cancer related genes can be an elementary process accounting for ovarian tumorigenesis. Therefore, we evaluated the possible association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) genes, including DNMT1, DNMT3B, and DNMT3A, with ovarian cancer development in the Polish population. Using PCR–RFLP and HRM analyses, we studied the prevalence of the DNMT1 rs8101626, rs2228611 and rs759920, DNMT3A rs22891...

  1. [Roles of rs 6923761 gene variant in glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor on weight, cardiovascular risk factor and serum adipokine levels in morbid obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Pacheco, David; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz; Bachiller, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    Antecedentes: Los estudios de receptor de GLP-1 se han dirigido a la identificación de polimorfismos en el gen receptor de GLP- 1 que pueden ser un factor que contribuye en la patogénesis de la diabetes mellitus y factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Sin embargo, el papel de las variantes del receptor de GLP-1 variantes en el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovasculares y adipocitoquinas sigue estando poco estudiado en pacientes con obesidad morbida. Objetivo: Nuestro objetivo fue analizar los efectos del polimorfismo del receptor de GLP-1 rs6923761 sobre el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovascular y los niveles de adipocitoquinas séricas en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Diseño: Se estudió una muestra de 175 obesos mórbidos. La glucosa en ayunas, proteína C reactiva (PCR), insulina, resistencia a la insulina ( HOMA), colesterol total, LDL- colesterol, HDL- colesterol, triglicéridos y la concentración de adipoquinas se midieron. También se determinaron el peso, índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de la cintura, masa grasa a través de bioimpedancia y la presión arterial. Resultados: Un total de 87 obesos (49,7%) tenían el genotipo GG y 88 (50,3%) de los sujetos del estudio tenían los siguientes genotipos; GA (71 obesos, el 40,6%) o AA (17 sujetos del estudio, el 9,7%) ( segundo grupo) . En el grupo con genotipo GG, los niveles de glucosa (4,4 ± 2,3 mg/dl, p < 0,05), triglicéridos (6,8 ± 4,3 mg/dl , p < 0,05), insulina (4,5 ± 2,3 UI/l , p < 0,05) y HOMA (1,5 ± 0,9 unidades, p < 0,05 ) fueron mayores que en el grupo mutante. No se detectaron diferencias en el resto de parámetros analizados Conclusión: Existe una asociación entre los parámetros metabólicos y el alelo mutante (A) del polimorfismo rs6923761 del receptor de GLP- 1 en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Los niveles de triglicéridos, insulina y resistencia a la insulina son más elevados en los sujetos portadores del alelo A.

  2. Variants of the inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase gene are associated with reduced relapse risk following treatment for HCV genotype 2/3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rembeck, Karolina; Waldenström, Jesper; Hellstrand, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the impact of variations in the inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPase) gene (ITPA) on treatment outcome in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2/3 infection receiving peginterferon-α2a and lower, conventional 800 mg daily dose of ribavirin. Previous s...

  3. Genome-wide association study in a high-risk isolate for multiple sclerosis reveals associated variants in STAT3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakkula, Eveliina; Leppä, Virpi; Sulonen, Anna-Maija;

    2010-01-01

    in 711 cases and 1029 controls from Finland, and the top two findings were validated in 3859 cases and 9110 controls from more heterogeneous populations. SNP (rs744166) within the STAT3 gene was associated to MS (p = 2.75 x 10(-10), OR 0.87, confidence interval 0.83-0.91). The protective haplotype for MS...

  4. Genetic variants of the DNA repair genes from Exome Aggregation Consortium (EXAC) database: significance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raima; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    DNA repair pathway is a primary defense system that eliminates wide varieties of DNA damage. Any deficiencies in them are likely to cause the chromosomal instability that leads to cell malfunctioning and tumorigenesis. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes have demonstrated a significant association with cancer risk. Our study attempts to give a glimpse of the overall scenario of the germline polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes by taking into account of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database as well as the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) for evaluating the disease link, particularly in cancer. It has been found that ExAC DNA repair dataset (which consists of 228 DNA repair genes) comprises 30.4% missense, 12.5% dbSNP reported and 3.2% ClinVar significant variants. 27% of all the missense variants has the deleterious SIFT score of 0.00 and 6% variants carrying the most damaging Polyphen-2 score of 1.00, thus affecting the protein structure and function. However, as per HGMD, only a fraction (1.2%) of ExAC DNA repair variants was found to be cancer-related, indicating remaining variants reported in both the databases to be further analyzed. This, in turn, may provide an increased spectrum of the reported cancer linked variants in the DNA repair genes present in ExAC database. Moreover, further in silico functional assay of the identified vital cancer-associated variants, which is essential to get their actual biological significance, may shed some lights in the field of targeted drug development in near future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Gene Variants Associated With Deep Vein Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, Irene D.; Bare, Lance A.; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Arellano, Andre R.; Tong, Carmen; Rowland, Charles M.; Catanese, Joseph; Young, Bradford A.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Devlin, James J.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2008-01-01

    Context The genetic causes of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are not fully understood. Objective To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with DVT. Design, Setting, and Patients We used 3 case-control studies of first DVT. A total of 19 682 gene-centric SNPs were genotyped in 44

  6. The association of alcohol and alcohol metabolizing gene variants with diabetes and coronary heart disease risk factors in a white population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Jørgensen, Torben; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a J- or U-shaped relation between alcohol and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim was to examine the association between alcohol intake and diabetes and intermediate CHD risk factors in relation...

  7. Combination of polymorphic variants in serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes may influence the risk for early-onset alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordukalo-Niksic, Tatjana; Stefulj, Jasminka; Matosic, Ana; Mokrovic, Gordana; Cicin-Sain, Lipa

    2012-12-30

    The combinatory effect of polymorphisms in serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes on the aetiopathogenesis of alcoholism was investigated in a sample of 714 individuals. Increased frequency of subjects having three 'suspected' genotypes (5-HTTLPR-LL, STin2-1010 and MAO-A 3-repeat allele) was found among type-2 alcoholic patients (P=0.0189). Results highlight serotonergic/genetic contribution to early-onset alcoholism.

  8. A Genetic Variant in Vitamin B12 Metabolic Genes That Reduces the Risk of Congenital Heart Disease in Han Chinese Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jue; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Feng; Peng, Qian-Qian; Hou, Jia; Sun, Shu-Na; Gui, Yong-Hao; Duan, Wen-Yuan; Qiao, Bin; Wang, Hong-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies on components of the one-carbon metabolic pathway revealed that human vitamin B12 levels could be significantly influenced by variationsinthefucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2), cubilin (CUBN), and transcobalamin-I (TCN1) genes. An altered vitamin B12 level is an important factor that disturbs the homeostasis of the folate metabolism pathway, which in turn can potentially lead to the development of congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, we investigated t...

  9. The Association Analysis of Immune System Genes Allelic Variants With Embryonic Infection of Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vladimirovna Mashkina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of marker genes and their polymorphisms with increased risk of embryonic infection (EI- of the fetus and of the nervous system lesions development of different severity. Methods: The TLR2, TLR6, IL1ß, TNFa, IL10 genotypes and alleles frequencies were studied in three groups of infants of Rostov region with EI followed by hypoxic lesions of the central nervous system. Results: In our study the allelic variants of IL1ß and TNFa genes are characterized by a high level of expression, while the allelic variant of the IL10 gene results in a decrease in the corresponding mRNA level. Conclusion: The importance of the Ser249Pro (TLR6, -308G/A (TNFa and -31C/T (IL1ß interactions in changing the risk of the EI development was established

  10. Gene Variants Associated With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, May M.; O’Meara, Ellen S.; Rowland, Charles M.; Shiffman, Dov; Bare, Lance A.; Arellano, Andre R.; Longstreth, W.T.; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Kenneth; Tracy, Russell P.; Devlin, James J.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which had been associated with coronary heart disease, are associated with incident ischemic stroke. Methods Based on antecedent studies of coronary heart disease, we prespecified the risk allele for each of the 74 SNPs. We used Cox proportional hazards models that adjusted for traditional risk factors to estimate the associations of these SNPs with incident ischemic stroke during 14 years of follow-up in a population-based study of older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). Results In white CHS participants, the prespecified risk alleles of 7 of the 74 SNPs (in HPS1, ITGAE, ABCG2, MYH15, FSTL4, CALM1, and BAT2) were nominally associated with increased risk of stroke (one-sided PDMXL2, and ABCG2) were nominally associated with stroke (one-sided P<0.05, false discovery rate=0.55). The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 was associated with stroke in both white (hazard ratio, 1.46; 90% CI, 1.05 to 2.03) and black (hazard ratio, 3.59; 90% CI, 1.11 to 11.6) participants of CHS. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the 10-year cumulative incidence of stroke were greater among Val allele homozygotes than among Met allele carriers in both white (10% versus 6%) and black (12% versus 3%) participants of CHS. Conclusions The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 (encoding a transporter of sterols and xenobiotics) was associated with incident ischemic stroke in white and black participants of CHS. PMID:19023099

  11. A functional variant in the UBE2B gene promoter is associated with idiopathic azoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Lisha; Zhang, Qiang; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-07-30

    A variety of genetic variants lead to abnormal human spermatogenesis. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2B (UBE2B) plays a significant role in spermatogenesis as Ube2b-knockout male mice are infertile. In this study, we sequenced the exon and promoter region of UBE2B in 776 patients diagnosed with idiopathic azoospermia (IA) and 709 proven fertile men to examine whether UBE2B is involved in the pathogenesis of IA. In the exon region, two novel synonymous variants were detected in the patient group. In the promoter region, four known variants and four novel variants were identified in the patient group. Of the novel variants in the promoter region, three were located at the binding site of specificity protein 1 (SP1) transcription factor analyzed by TRANSFAC software. Luciferase assays demonstrated that one heterozygous variant (Chr5.133706925 A > G) inhibited the transcriptional regulation activity of SP1. A novel variant (Chr5.133706925 A > G) residing in the UBE2B gene promoter region confers a high risk for IA in a Chinese population. These results support a role for UBE2B in the pathogenesis of IA.

  12. Prebiotic Competition between Information Variants, With Low Error Catastrophe Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Popa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During competition for resources in primitive networks increased fitness of an information variant does not necessarily equate with successful elimination of its competitors. If variability is added fast to a system, speedy replacement of pre-existing and less-efficient forms of order is required as novel information variants arrive. Otherwise, the information capacity of the system fills up with information variants (an effect referred as “error catastrophe”. As the cost for managing the system’s exceeding complexity increases, the correlation between performance capabilities of information variants and their competitive success decreases, and evolution of such systems toward increased efficiency slows down. This impasse impedes the understanding of evolution in prebiotic networks. We used the simulation platform Biotic Abstract Dual Automata (BiADA to analyze how information variants compete in a resource-limited space. We analyzed the effect of energy-related features (differences in autocatalytic efficiency, energy cost of order, energy availability, transformation rates and stability of order on this competition. We discuss circumstances and controllers allowing primitive networks acquire novel information with minimal “error catastrophe” risks. We present a primitive mechanism for maximization of energy flux in dynamic networks. This work helps evaluate controllers of evolution in prebiotic networks and other systems where information variants compete.

  13. DC-SIGN (CD209), pentraxin 3 and vitamin D receptor gene variants associate with pulmonary tuberculosis risk in West Africans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, R; Wejse, C; Velez, D R;

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of DC-SIGN (CD209), long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in 321 TB cases and 347 healthy controls from Guinea-Bissau. Five additional, functionally relevant SNPs...... within toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2, 4 and 9 were typed but found, when polymorphic, not to affect host vulnerability to pulmonary TB. We did not replicate an association between SNPs in the DC-SIGN promoter and TB. However, we found that two polymorphisms, one in DC-SIGN and one in VDR, were associated...

  14. Interaction between 5 genetic variants and allergy in glioma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoemaker, Minouk J; Robertson, Lindsay; Wigertz, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of glioma is barely known. Epidemiologic studies have provided evidence for an inverse relation between glioma risk and allergic disease. Genome-wide association data have identified common genetic variants at 5p15.33 (rs2736100, TERT), 8q24.21 (rs4295627, CCDC26), 9p21.3 (rs4977756...

  15. Common nonsynonymous variants in PCSK1 confer risk of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzinou, Michael; Creemers, John W M; Choquet, Helene

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in PCSK1 cause monogenic obesity. To assess the contribution of PCSK1 to polygenic obesity risk, we genotyped tag SNPs in a total of 13,659 individuals of European ancestry from eight independent case-control or family-based cohorts. The nonsynonymous variants rs6232, encoding N221D...

  16. Analysis of non-synonymous-coding variants of Parkinson's disease-related pathogenic and susceptibility genes in East Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jia Nee; Tan, Louis C; Liany, Herty; Koh, Tat Hung; Irwan, Ishak D; Ng, Yen Yek; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Au, Wing-Lok; Aung, Tin; Chan, Anne Y Y; Chong, Siow-Ann; Chung, Sun Ju; Jung, Yusun; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Kim, Juyeon; Lee, Jimmy; Lim, Shen-Yang; Mok, Vincent; Prakash, Kumar-M; Song, Kyuyoung; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tan, Eng-King; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the contribution of non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and genome-wide association studies (GWAS)-linked genes for Parkinson's disease (PD) to PD risk in the East Asian population, we sequenced all the coding exons of 39 PD-related disease genes and evaluated the accumulation of rare non-synonymous-coding variants in 375 early-onset PD cases and 399 controls. We also genotyped 782 non-synonymous-coding variants of these genes in 710 late-onset PD cases and 9046 population controls. Significant enrichment of LRRK2 variants was observed in both early- and late-onset PD (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval = 1.29-1.93; P = 8.05 × 10(-6)). Moderate enrichment was also observed in FGF20, MCCC1, GBA and ITGA8. Half of the rare variants anticipated to cause loss of function of these genes were present in healthy controls. Overall, non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and GWAS-linked genes appear to make a limited contribution to PD risk, suggesting that clinical sequencing of these genes will provide limited information for risk prediction and molecular diagnosis.

  17. Classification and Clinical Management of Variants of Uncertain Significance in High Penetrance Cancer Predisposition Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, Setareh; Eccles, Diana M; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; van Asperen, Christi J

    2016-04-01

    In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) proposed a system for classifying sequence variants in highly penetrant breast and colon cancer susceptibility genes, linked to clinical actions. This system uses a multifactorial likelihood model to calculate the posterior probability that an altered DNA sequence is pathogenic. Variants between 5%-94.9% (class 3) are categorized as variants of uncertain significance (VUS). This interval is wide and might include variants with a substantial difference in pathogenicity at either end of the spectrum. We think that carriers of class 3 variants would benefit from a fine-tuning of this classification. Classification of VUS to a category with a defined clinical significance is very important because for carriers of a pathogenic mutation full surveillance and risk-reducing surgery can reduce cancer incidence. Counselees who are not carriers of a pathogenic mutation can be discharged from intensive follow-up and avoid unnecessary risk-reducing surgery. By means of examples, we show how, in selected cases, additional data can lead to reclassification of some variants to a different class with different recommendations for surveillance and therapy. To improve the clinical utility of this classification system, we suggest a pragmatic adaptation to clinical practice.

  18. Association of genetic variantions of circadian clock genes and risk of breast cancer%生物节律调控关键基因遗传变异与乳腺癌患病风险的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雯邈; 袁芃; 王佳玉; 马飞; 樊英; 李青; 张频; 徐兵河

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究生物节律调控关键基因Clock和Per2的遗传变异与乳腺癌发病风险的关系.方法 采用病例-对照研究,使用TaqMan荧光定量PCR法检测406例乳腺癌患者和412例健康对照者位于Clock基因(rs2070062)和Per2基因(rs2304672、rs2304669、rs934945)的4个位点的基因多态性,采用非条件Logistic回归模型分析不同基因型或等位基因与乳腺癌发病风险的关系.结果 携带rs2304669-TT基因型者发生乳腺癌的风险是携带rs2304669-CC+CT基因型者的2.33倍(P=0.001).单体型分析的结果也显示,所有含有rs2304669-T等位基因的单体型均可增加乳腺癌的发病风险.而另外3个位点未发现与乳腺癌的发病相关.结论 位于Per2基因上的rs2304669位点可能与乳腺癌的发病风险相关;生物节律调控关键基因Per2的遗传变异会增加乳腺癌的发病风险,可能可以作为乳腺癌易感性的重要分子生物标志物.%Objective To investigate the relationship between genetic variantions of circadian clock genes and risk of breast cancer.Methods A case-control study including 406 breast cancer patients and 412 controls was conducted and genes Clock (rs2070062) and Per2 (rs2304672,rs2304669,rs934945) were genotyped by TaqMan real-time PCR.Unconditional logistic regression model was used to analyze the association between the genetic polymorphisms and breast cancer.Results Individuals with the rs2304669-TT genotype showed significantly increased breast cancer risk with the OR of 2.33 when compared with the individuals with rs2304669-CC and CT genotypes (P =0.001).In addition,the three haplotypes containing the risk T allele of rs2304669 were identified to be associated with increased breast cancer risk.However,it was found that rs2304672,rs2070062 and rs934945 polymorphisms were not related with breast cancer risk.Conclusions The locus rs2304669 on Per2 gene is associated with breast cancer risk.Genetic variation of circadian clock genes may

  19. Different outcome of six homozygotes for prothrombin A20210A gene variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angiolillo Antonella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prothrombin G20210A gene variant (FII G20210A is a risk factor for venous thrombotic disease while conflicting results have been reported for the risk of arterial thrombotic events. However, vascular episodes were absent in up to 40% of the 67 homozygotes for the G20210A described so far, which indicates that the clinical expression depends on additional risk/trigger factors. We describe six homozygotes for the G20210A variant, among which the first pair of siblings (cases n. 3 and 4 reported so far that displayed a strongly heterogeneous clinical outcome. Case 1, a female of 27 years, developed a full thrombosis of common femoral, superficial and popliteal veins. She assumed oral contraceptives in the last two years. Case n. 2, 34 years old, suffered of recurrent pregnancy loss in absence of any causative alteration. Cases n. 3 and n. 5 experienced arterial thrombotic disease, i.e., juvenile myocardial infarction (40 years old and stroke (48 years old, respectively, in absence of other risk factors. Finally, cases n. 4 and 6 identified as homozygotes for the FII G20210A variant being consanguineous of symptomatic subjects bearing the variant, did not experience any episode of venous nor arterial disease. Both of them have chronic liver disease with an impairement of the prothrombin time INR. Thus, homozygotes for the G20210A are at risk for arterial (in addition to venous thromobotic events; chronic liver disease might modulate this risk.

  20. Polymorphisms in the F8 gene and MHC-II variants as risk factors for the development of inhibitory anti-factor VIII antibodies during the treatment of hemophilia a: a computational assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    Full Text Available The development of neutralizing anti-drug-antibodies to the Factor VIII protein-therapeutic is currently the most significant impediment to the effective management of hemophilia A. Common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs in the F8 gene occur as six haplotypes in the human population (denoted H1 to H6 of which H3 and H4 have been associated with an increased risk of developing anti-drug antibodies. There is evidence that CD4+ T-cell response is essential for the development of anti-drug antibodies and such a response requires the presentation of the peptides by the MHC-class-II (MHC-II molecules of the patient. We measured the binding and half-life of peptide-MHC-II complexes using synthetic peptides from regions of the Factor VIII protein where ns-SNPs occur and showed that these wild type peptides form stable complexes with six common MHC-II alleles, representing 46.5% of the North American population. Next, we compared the affinities computed by NetMHCIIpan, a neural network-based algorithm for MHC-II peptide binding prediction, to the experimentally measured values and concluded that these are in good agreement (area under the ROC-curve of 0.778 to 0.972 for the six MHC-II variants. Using a computational binding predictor, we were able to expand our analysis to (a include all wild type peptides spanning each polymorphic position; and (b consider more MHC-II variants, thus allowing for a better estimation of the risk for clinical manifestation of anti-drug antibodies in the entire population (or a specific sub-population. Analysis of these computational data confirmed that peptides which have the wild type sequence at positions where the polymorphisms associated with haplotypes H3, H4 and H5 occur bind MHC-II proteins significantly more than a negative control. Taken together, the experimental and computational results suggest that wild type peptides from polymorphic regions of FVIII constitute potential T-cell epitopes

  1. A nondegenerate code of deleterious variants in Mendelian loci contributes to complex disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David R; Lyttle, Christopher S; Mortensen, Jonathan M; Bearden, Charles F; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Khiabanian, Hossein; Melamed, Rachel; Rabadan, Raul; Bernstam, Elmer V; Brunak, Søren; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nicolae, Dan; Shah, Nigam H; Grossman, Robert L; Cox, Nancy J; White, Kevin P; Rzhetsky, Andrey

    2013-09-26

    Although countless highly penetrant variants have been associated with Mendelian disorders, the genetic etiologies underlying complex diseases remain largely unresolved. By mining the medical records of over 110 million patients, we examine the extent to which Mendelian variation contributes to complex disease risk. We detect thousands of associations between Mendelian and complex diseases, revealing a nondegenerate, phenotypic code that links each complex disorder to a unique collection of Mendelian loci. Using genome-wide association results, we demonstrate that common variants associated with complex diseases are enriched in the genes indicated by this "Mendelian code." Finally, we detect hundreds of comorbidity associations among Mendelian disorders, and we use probabilistic genetic modeling to demonstrate that Mendelian variants likely contribute nonadditively to the risk for a subset of complex diseases. Overall, this study illustrates a complementary approach for mapping complex disease loci and provides unique predictions concerning the etiologies of specific diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Non-Degenerate Code of Deleterious Variants in Mendelian Loci Contributes to Complex Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David R.; Lyttle, Christopher S.; Mortensen, Jonathan M.; Bearden, Charles F.; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Khiabanian, Hossein; Melamed, Rachel; Rabadan, Raul; Bernstam, Elmer V.; Brunak, Søren; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nicolae, Dan; Shah, Nigam H.; Grossman, Robert L.; Cox, Nancy J.; White, Kevin P.; Rzhetsky, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Summary Whereas countless highly penetrant variants have been associated with Mendelian disorders, the genetic etiologies underlying complex diseases remain largely unresolved. Here, we examine the extent to which Mendelian variation contributes to complex disease risk by mining the medical records of over 110 million patients. We detect thousands of associations between Mendelian and complex diseases, revealing a non-degenerate, phenotypic code that links each complex disorder to a unique collection of Mendelian loci. Using genome-wide association results, we demonstrate that common variants associated with complex diseases are enriched in the genes indicated by this “Mendelian code.” Finally, we detect hundreds of comorbidity associations among Mendelian disorders, and we use probabilistic genetic modeling to demonstrate that Mendelian variants likely contribute non-additively to the risk for a subset of complex diseases. Overall, this study illustrates a complementary approach for mapping complex disease loci and provides unique predictions concerning the etiologies of specific diseases. PMID:24074861

  3. A Nondegenerate Code of Deleterious Variants in Mendelian Loci Contributes to Complex Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blair, David R.; Lyttle, Christopher S.; Mortensen, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    with complex diseases are enriched in the genes indicated by this ‘‘Mendelian code.’’ Finally, we detect hundreds of comorbidity associations among Mendelian disorders, and we use probabilistic genetic modeling to demonstrate that Mendelian variants likely contribute nonadditively to the risk for a subset......Although countless highly penetrant variants have been associated with Mendelian disorders, the genetic etiologies underlying complex diseases remain largely unresolved. By mining the medical records of over 110 million patients, we examine the extent to which Mendelian variation contributes...... to complex disease risk. We detect thousands of associations between Mendelian and complex diseases, revealing a nondegenerate, phenotypic code that links each complex disorder to a unique collection of Mendelian loci. Using genome-wide association results, we demonstrate that common variants associated...

  4. Allelic variants at codon 146 in the PRNP gene show significant differences in the risk for natural scrapie in Cypriot goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Georgiadou, S; Simmons, M M; Windl, O; Dawson, M; Arnold, M E; Neocleous, P; Papasavva-Stylianou, P

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the association between the polymorphisms serine (S) or aspartic acid (D) at codon 146 of the PRNP gene and resistance to scrapie. All goats aged >12 months (a total of 1075 animals) from four herds with the highest prevalence of scrapie in the country were culled and tested, of which 234 (21·7%) were positive by either the rapid test or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for any of the tissues tested. The odds of scrapie infection occurring in NN146 goats was 101 [95% credible interval (CrI) 19-2938] times higher than for non-NN146 or unknown genotypes. IHC applied to lymphoreticular tissue produced the highest sensitivity (94%, 95% CrI 90-97). The presence of putatively resistant non-NN146 alleles in the Cypriot goat population, severely affected by scrapie, provides a potential tool to reduce/eradicate scrapie provided that coordinated nationwide breeding programmes are implemented and maintained over time.

  5. A Novel Genetic Variant in Long Non-coding RNA Gene NEXN-AS1 is Associated with Risk of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Liu, Hongliang; Liu, Zhensheng; Owzar, Kouros; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; McLaughlin, John; Brhane, Yonathan; Brennan, Paul; Bickeboeller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Christiani, David C.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Klein, Robert J.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer etiology is multifactorial, and growing evidence has indicated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in lung carcinogenesis. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of 690,564 SNPs in 15,531 autosomal lncRNAs by using datasets from six previously published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) from the Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung (TRICL) consortium in populations of European ancestry. Previously unreported significant SNPs (P value < 1 × 10−7) were further validated in two additional independent lung cancer GWAS datasets from Harvard University and deCODE. In the final meta-analysis of all eight GWAS datasets with 17,153 cases and 239,337 controls, a novel risk SNP rs114020893 in the lncRNA NEXN-AS1 region at 1p31.1 remained statistically significant (odds ratio = 1.17; 95% confidence interval = 1.11–1.24; P = 8.31 × 10−9). In further in silico analysis, rs114020893 was predicted to change the secondary structure of the lncRNA. Our finding indicates that SNP rs114020893 of NEXN-AS1 at 1p31.1 may contribute to lung cancer susceptibility. PMID:27713484

  6. A common variant in the PNPLA3 gene is a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese Taiwanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Pi-Feng; Hu, Fu-Chang; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Chang, Mei-Hwei; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2011-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that the presence of the PNPLA3 rs738409 G allele would increase the susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in obese Taiwanese children. A total of 520 obese children aged 6-18 years were recruited. Their PNPLA3 rs738409 genotypes-CC, CG, or GG-were detected by the 5'-nuclease assay. The effects of the PNPLA3 rs738409 G allele on pediatric NAFLD were evaluated based on liver ultrasonography findings and mean serum alanine aminotransferase levels in these children. NAFLD was present in 19.6% of the obese children. In comparison to the subjects with CC alleles, the risk of NAFLD was increased by 2.96-fold (95% CI, 1.57 to 5.59, P = .0008) in the subjects with CG alleles and by 5.84-fold (95% CI, 2.59 to 13.16; P obese Taiwanese children. The effect of the G allele on pediatric NAFLD followed a dominant genetic model. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  8. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  9. Cytokines and tumor metastasis gene variants in oral cancer and precancer in Puerto Rico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Erdei

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A cross-sectional epidemiological study explored genetic susceptibility to oral precancer and cancer in Puerto Rico (PR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred three individuals with a benign oral condition, oral precancer (oral epithelial hyperplasia/hyperkeratosis, oral epithelial dysplasia, or oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA were identified via PR pathology laboratories. A standardized, structured questionnaire obtained information on epidemiological variables; buccal cells were collected for genetic analysis. Genotyping was performed using Taqman® assays. Allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were evaluated in cytokine genes and genes influencing tumor metastasis. Risk estimates for a diagnosis of oral precancer or SCCA while having a variant allele were generated using logistic regression. Adjusted models controlled for age, gender, ancestry, education, smoking and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Relative to persons with a benign oral lesion, individuals with homozygous recessive allelic variants of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α -238 A/G SNP had a reduced odds of having an oral precancer (ORadjusted = 0.15; 95% CI 0.03-0.70. The transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1 -509 C/T polymorphism was inversely associated with having an oral SCCA among persons homozygous for the recessive variant (ORcrude = 0.27; 95% CI 0.09-0.79. The matrix metalloproteinase gene (MMP-1 variant, rs5854, was associated with oral SCCA; participants with even one variant allele were more likely to have oral SCCA (ORadjusted = 2.62, 95% CI 1.05-6.53 compared to people with ancestral alleles. CONCLUSION: Our exploratory analyses suggest that genetic alterations in immune system genes and genes with metastatic potential are associated with oral precancer and SCCA risk in PR.

  10. A comparison of genetic variants between proficient low- and high-risk sport participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia J; Power, Rebecca J; Carlson, Scott R; Rupert, Jim L; Michel, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    Athletes participating in high-risk sports consistently report higher scores on sensation-seeking measures than do low-risk athletes or non-athletic controls. To determine whether genetic variants commonly associated with sensation seeking were over-represented in such athletes, proficient practitioners of high-risk (n = 141) and low-risk sports (n = 132) were compared for scores on sensation seeking and then genotyped at 33 polymorphic loci in 14 candidate genes. As expected, athletes participating in high-risk sports score higher on sensation seeking than did low-risk sport athletes (P sport participation for two genes (stathmin, (P = .004) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (P = .03)) as well as when demographically matched subsets of the sport cohorts were compared (P < .05); however, in all cases, associations did not survive correction for multiple testing.

  11. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  12. Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 gene variants affect idiopathic recurrent miscarriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Singh, Bharti; Mishra, Aditi; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2016-12-01

    Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 genes are considered as a crucial player in the determination of inflammatory responses; genetic variability in these may modulate the risk for idiopathic recurrent miscarriages (IRM). We investigated the association of functional variants of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) with IRM cases. We recruited 200 IRM women with a history of at least three consecutive pregnancy losses before 20th week of pregnancy and 300 fertile control women. Determination of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) gene variants were based on the polymerase chain reaction pursued by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and validated with Sanger sequencing. Single marker analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) model used to predict the IRM risk. We observed nearly three- to twofold increased risk in single marker analysis for minor homozygous genotypes of rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G tag-SNPs in IRM cases, suggesting the risk association. In MDR analysis, we observed 10.5-fold augmented risk among IRM women in three-SNP model (rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G). The eQTL mapping analyses was performed to strengthen the results of our study. The eQTL mapping analysis revealed that the variations in CD28 and NFKB1 gene content might affect the abundance of transcripts of CD28 and Family with sequence similarity 177 member A1 (FAM177A1) genes, respectively. These results suggest that CD28 and NFKB1 gene variants may be associated with increased risks to IRM.

  13. THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS OF GENETIC RISK VARIANTS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

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    Rajiv Kumar Srivastava

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This review covers therapeutic implication of genetic risk variant responsible for coronary artery disease by utilising the highdensity single-nucleotide microarrays to screen the entire human genome. The sequence of the human genome provides the blueprint for life. Approximately, 99.5% of the human genome Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA sequence is identical among humans with 0.5% of the genome sequence (15 million bps accounting for all individual differences. MATERIALS AND METHODS The new technology of the computerised chip array of millions of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs as Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA markers makes it possible to study and detect genetic predisposition to common polygenic disorders such as Coronary Artery Disease (CAD. The sample sizes required for these studies are massive and large; worldwide consortiums such as Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM study have been formed to accommodate this requirement. After the identification of 9p21 progress to detect genetic predisposition has been remarkable. RESULTS There are currently a total of 50 genetic risk variants predisposing to CAD of genome-wide significance with confirmation in independent populations. Rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency, MAF <5% will require direct sequencing to detect genetic predisposition. CONCLUSION We can develop new biomarkers for detecting early CAD as well as unique targets for novel therapy. The challenge for the future will be to identify the molecular mechanisms mediating the risk of those genetic risk variants that act through nonconventional risk factors. The ultimate objective for the future is the sequencing and functional analysis of the causative polymorphisms for its therapeutic implications.

  14. CEACAM6 gene variants in inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Jürgen Glas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC and its ileal expression is increased in patients with Crohn's disease (CD. Given its contribution to the pathogenesis of CD, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic variants in the CEACAM6 region in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. METHODOLOGY: In this study, a total of 2,683 genomic DNA samples (including DNA from 858 CD patients, 475 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, and 1,350 healthy, unrelated controls was analyzed for eight CEACAM6 SNPs (rs10415946, rs1805223 = p.Pro42Pro, rs4803507, rs4803508, rs11548735 = p.Gly239Val, rs7246116 = pHis260His, rs2701, rs10416839. In addition, a detailed haplotype analysis and genotype-phenotype analysis were performed. Overall, our genotype analysis did not reveal any significant association of the investigated CEACAM6 SNPs and haplotypes with CD or UC susceptibility, although certain CEACAM6 SNPs modulated CEACAM6 expression in intestinal epithelial cell lines. Despite its function as receptor of AIEC in ileal CD, we found no association of the CEACAM6 SNPs with ileal or ileocolonic CD. Moreover, there was no evidence of epistasis between the analyzed CEACAM6 variants and the main CD-associated NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 variants. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents the first detailed analysis of CEACAM6 variants in IBD patients. Despite its important role in bacterial attachment in ileal CD, we could not demonstrate a role for CEACAM6 variants in IBD susceptibility or regarding an ileal CD phenotype. Further functional studies are required to analyze if these gene variants modulate ileal bacterial attachment.

  15. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B;

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL......-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss......-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from...

  16. A Large French Case-Control Study Emphasizes the Role of Rare Mc1R Variants in Melanoma Risk

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    Hui-Han Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The MC1R gene implicated in melanogenesis and skin pigmentation is highly polymorphic. Several alleles are associated with red hair and fair skin phenotypes and contribute to melanoma risk. Objective. This work aims to assess the effect of different classes of MC1R variants, notably rare variants, on melanoma risk. Methods. MC1R coding region was sequenced in 1131 melanoma patients and 869 healthy controls. MC1R variants were classified as RHC (R and non-RHC (r. Rare variants (frequency < 1% were subdivided into two subgroups, predicted to be damaging (D or not (nD. Results. Both R and r alleles were associated with melanoma (OR = 2.66 [2.20–3.23] and 1.51 [1.32–1.73] and had similar population attributable risks (15.8% and 16.6%. We also identified 69 rare variants, of which 25 were novel. D variants were strongly associated with melanoma (OR = 2.38 [1.38–4.15] and clustered in the same MC1R domains as R alleles (intracellular 2, transmembrane 2 and 7. Conclusion. This work confirms the role of R and r alleles in melanoma risk in the French population and proposes a novel class of rare D variants as important melanoma risk factors. These findings may improve the definition of high-risk subjects that could be targeted for melanoma prevention and screening.

  17. Identification of yak lactate dehydrogenase B gene variants by gene cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG YuCai; ZHAO XingBo; ZHOU Jing; PIAO Ying; JIN SuYu; HE QingHua; HONG Jian; LINing; WU ChangXin

    2008-01-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that two types of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) existed in yaks. Based on the electrophoresis characteristics of LDH isoenzymes, yak LDH variants were speculated to be the gene mutation on H subunit encoded by B gene. According to the mobility in electrophoresis, the fast-band LDH type was named LDH-Hf and the slow-band LDH type LDH-Hs. In order to reveal the gene alteration In yak LDH variants, total RNA was extracted from heart tissues of yaks with different LDH variants, and cDNAs of the two variants were reverse transcripted. Two variants of B genes were cloned by RT-PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that four nucleotides differed between LDH-Bf and LDH-Bs, which resulted in two amino acids alteration. By Deepview software analysis of the conformation of yak LDH1 variants and H subunit, these four nucleotides altered two amino acids that generated new hydrogen bonds to change the hydrogen bonds network, and further caused subtle conformstionsl changes between the two LDH variants.

  18. Identification of yak lactate dehydrogenase B gene variants by gene cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that two types of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) existed in yaks. Based on the electrophoresis characteristics of LDH isoenzymes, yak LDH variants were speculated to be the gene mutation on H subunit encoded by B gene. According to the mobility in electrophoresis, the fast-band LDH type was named LDH-Hf and the slow-band LDH type LDH-Hs. In order to reveal the gene alteration in yak LDH variants, total RNA was extracted from heart tissues of yaks with different LDH variants, and cDNAs of the two variants were reverse transcripted. Two variants of B genes were cloned by RT-PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that four nucleotides differed between LDH-Bf and LDH-Bs, which resulted in two amino acids alteration. By Deepview software analysis of the conformation of yak LDH1 variants and H subunit, these four nucleotides altered two amino acids that generated new hydrogen bonds to change the hydrogen bonds network, and further caused subtle conformational changes between the two LDH variants.

  19. Study on association of the polymorphic variants of ACE (I/D, AT2R1 (A1166C, TNF-alpha (G308A, MTHFR (C677T genes and their combinations with the risk of development of perinatal pathology and gestation reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossokha Z. I.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the association of the polymorphic variants of ACE (I/D, AT2R1 (A1166C, TNF-alpha (G308A, MTHFR (C677T genes and their combinations with the risk of perinatal pathology and gestation reduction. Methods. The polymorphic variants of genes were analyzed by PCR and RFLP in 235 newborns with severe perinatal pathology and 110 clinically healthy term newborns. Results. An increased risk of severe perinatal pathology was associated with such genotypes: DD and ID (ACE, 1166AC, 1166CC (AT2R1, 677CT (MTHFR, 308AA and 308AG (TNF-alpha, this risk for homozygotes is almost 2-fold higher than for heterozygotes. Reduction of terms of gestation is associated with the genotype 677TT (MTHFR, and resistance to diseases in the perinatal period – with the genotype II (ACE and 1166AA (AT2R1, 677CC (MTHFR and the 308GG (TNF-alpha, particularly when combined. Conclusions. The identified associations evidence the role of polymorphic variants of ACE, AT2R1, TNF-alpha, MTHFR genes in the development of severe perinatal pathology and can be used for its early prediction with subsequent correction of treatment.

  20. HFE p.C282Y gene variant is associated with varicose veins in Russian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Ekaterina A; Shadrina, Alexandra S; Sevost'ianova, Kseniya S; Shevela, Andrey I; Soldatsky, Evgenii Yu; Seliverstov, Evgenii I; Demekhova, Marina Yu; Shonov, Oleg A; Ilyukhin, Evgenii A; Smetanina, Mariya A; Voronina, Elena N; Zolotukhin, Igor A; Filipenko, Maxim L

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the association of polymorphism rs1800562 (p.C282Y) in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene with the increased risk of venous ulceration was shown. We hypothesized that HFE gene polymorphism might be involved not only in ulceration process, but also in susceptibility to primary varicose veins. We genotyped HFE p.C282Y (rs1800562) and p.H63D (rs1799945) variants in patients with primary varicose veins (n = 463) and in the control group (n = 754). In our study, p.282Y variant (rs1800562 A allele) was significantly associated with the risk of varicose veins (OR 1.79, 95 % CI = 1.11-2.89, P = 0.02). A borderline significant reverse association of p.63D variant (rs1799945 G allele) with venous leg ulcer development was revealed in Russians (OR 0.25, 95 % CI = 0.06-1.00, P = 0.05), but not in the meta-analysis (P = 0.56). We conclude that the HFE gene polymorphism can affect the risk of developing primary varicose veins.

  1. Common Variant of FTO Gene, rs9939609, and Obesity in Pakistani Females

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    Adeela Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies confirmed the association of FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene common variant, rs9939609, with obesity in European populations. However, studies in Asian populations revealed conflicting results. We examined the association of rs9939609 variant of FTO gene with obesity and obesity-related anthropometric and metabolic parameters in Pakistani population. Body weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumference, and blood pressure (BP were measured. BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR were calculated. Levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG, insulin, leptin, and leptin receptors were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated. The results showed association of FTO gene, rs9939609, with obesity in females (>18 years of age. FTO minor allele increased the risk of obesity by 2.8 times (95% CI = 1.3–6.0 in females. This allele showed association with body weight, BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, WHR, BP, plasma FBG levels, HOMA-IR, plasma insulin levels, and plasma leptin levels. In conclusion, FTO gene, rs9939609, is associated with BMI and risk of obesity in adult Pakistani females. Association of rs9939609 variant with higher FBG, plasma insulin, and leptin levels indicates that this polymorphism may disturb the metabolism in adult females and predispose them to obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the above-mentioned findings were not seen in children or males.

  2. The MC1R melanoma risk variant p.R160W is associated with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell-Marti, Gemma; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Potrony, Miriam; Badenas, Celia; Milà, Montserrat; Malvehy, Josep; Martí, María José; Ezquerra, Mario; Fernández-Santiago, Rubén; Puig, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported the co-occurrence of Parkinson disease (PD) and melanoma. Common genetic variants in the MC1R (melanocortin 1 receptor) gene, which determines skin and hair color, are associated with melanoma. Here we investigated whether genetic variants in MC1R modulate the risk of PD by sequencing the entire gene in 870 PD patients and 736 controls ascertained from Spain. We found that the MC1R variant p.R160W (rs1805008) is marginally associated with PD (odds ratio = 2.10, gender- and age-adjusted p = 0.009, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.063). Our results suggest that MC1R genetic variants modulate the risk of PD disease in the Spanish population. © 2015 American Neurological Association.

  3. Rare missense neuronal cadherin gene (CDH2) variants in specific obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette disorder phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Pablo R; Dodman, Nicholas H; Timpano, Kiara R; Rubenstein, Liza M; Rana, Zaker; Fried, Ruby L; Reichardt, Louis F; Heiman, Gary A; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Galdzicka, Marzena; Ginns, Edward I; Wendland, Jens R

    2013-08-01

    The recent finding that the neuronal cadherin gene CDH2 confers a highly significant risk for canine compulsive disorder led us to investigate whether missense variants within the human ortholog CDH2 are associated with altered susceptibility to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette disorder (TD) and related disorders. Exon resequencing of CDH2 in 320 individuals identified four non-synonymous single-nucleotide variants, which were subsequently genotyped in OCD probands, Tourette disorder probands and relatives, and healthy controls (total N=1161). None of the four variants was significantly associated with either OCD or TD. One variant, N706S, was found only in the OCD/TD groups, but not in controls. By examining clinical data, we found there were significant TD-related phenotype differences between those OCD probands with and without the N845S variant with regard to the co-occurrence of TD (Fisher's exact test P=0.014, OR=6.03). Both N706S and N845S variants conferred reduced CDH2 protein expression in transfected cells. Although our data provide no overall support for association of CDH2 rare variants in these disorders considered as single entities, the clinical features and severity of probands carrying the uncommon non-synonymous variants suggest that CDH2, along with other cadherin and cell adhesion genes, is an interesting gene to pursue as a plausible contributor to OCD, TD and related disorders with repetitive behaviors, including autism spectrum disorders.

  4. When is it MODY? Challenges in the Interpretation of Sequence Variants in MODY Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althari, Sara; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    The genomics revolution has raised more questions than it has provided answers. Big data from large population-scale resequencing studies are increasingly deconstructing classic notions of Mendelian disease genetics, which support a simplistic correlation between mutational severity and phenotypic outcome. The boundaries are being blurred as the body of evidence showing monogenic disease-causing alleles in healthy genomes, and in the genomes of individu-als with increased common complex disease risk, continues to grow. In this review, we focus on the newly emerging challenges which pertain to the interpretation of sequence variants in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), a presumed mono-genic form of diabetes characterized by Mendelian inheritance. These challenges highlight the complexities surrounding the assignments of pathogenicity, in particular to rare protein-alerting variants, and bring to the forefront some profound clinical diagnostic implications. As MODY is both genetically and clinically heterogeneous, an accurate molecular diagnosis and cautious extrapolation of sequence data are critical to effective disease management and treatment. The biological and translational value of sequence information can only be attained by adopting a multitude of confirmatory analyses, which interrogate variant implication in disease from every possible angle. Indeed, studies which have effectively detected rare damaging variants in known MODY genes in normoglycemic individuals question the existence of a sin-gle gene mutation scenario: does monogenic diabetes exist when the genetic culprits of MODY have been systematical-ly identified in individuals without MODY?

  5. Melanocortin-1 receptor gene variants in four Chinese ethnic populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There is strong relationship between melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants and human hair color and skin type.Based on a sequencing study of MC1R gene in 50 individuals from the Uygur,Tibetan,Wa and Dai ethnic populations,we discuss the occurrence of 7 mc1r variants consisting of 5 nonsynonymous sites (Val60Leu,Arg67Gln,Val92Met,Arg163Gln and Ala299Val) and 2 synonymous sites (C414T and A942G),among which C414T and Ala299Val were reported for the first time.Confirmation and analysis were also made of 122 individuals at three common point mutations (Val92Met,Arg163Gln,A942G) using PCR-SSCP.The frequency of Arg163Gln variant varies in the four ethnic populations,with percentage of 40%,85.0%,66.2% and 72.7%,respectively,while those of Val92Met and A942G are roughly similar in these four populations.The different environments,migration and admixture of various ethnic groups in China might have impact on the observed frequency of Arg163Gln.

  6. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variant C677T influences susceptibility to migraine with aura

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    Sundholm James

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C677T variant in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene is associated with increased levels of circulating homocysteine and is a mild risk factor for vascular disease. Migraine, with and without aura (MA and MO, is a prevalent and complex neurovascular disorder that may also be affected by genetically influenced hyperhomocysteinaemia. To determine whether the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene is associated with migraine susceptibility we utilised unrelated and family-based case-control study designs. Methods A total of 652 Caucasian migraine cases were investigated in this study. The MTHFR C677T variant was genotyped in 270 unrelated migraine cases and 270 controls as well as 382 affected subjects from 92 multiplex pedigrees. Results In the unrelated case-control sample we observed an over-representation of the 677T allele in migraine patients compared to controls, specifically for the MA subtype (40% vs. 33% (χ2 = 5.70, P = 0.017. The Armitage test for trend indicated a significant dosage effect of the risk allele (T for MA (χ2 = 5.72, P = 0.017. This linear trend was also present in the independent family-based sample (χ2 = 4.25, Padjusted = 0.039. Overall, our results indicate that the T/T genotype confers a modest, yet significant, increase in risk for the MA subtype (odds ratio: 2.0 – 2.5. No increased risk for the MO subtype was observed (P > 0.05. Conclusions In Caucasians, the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene influences susceptibility to MA, but not MO. Investigation into the enzyme activity of MTHFR and the role of homocysteine in the pathophysiology of migraine is warranted.

  7. Predicting the Pathogenic Potential of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Variants Identified in Clinical Genetic Testing

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    Clare Brookes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Missense variants are very commonly detected when screening for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes lead to an increased risk of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and/or pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess the predictive capability of in silico programmes and mutation databases in assisting diagnostic laboratories to determine the pathogenicity of sequence-detectable mutations. Methods: Between July 2011 and April 2013, an analysis was undertaken of 13 missense BRCA gene variants that had been detected in patients referred to the Genetic Health Services New Zealand (Northern Hub for BRCA gene analysis. The analysis involved the use of 13 in silico protein prediction programmes, two in silico transcript analysis programmes and the examination of three BRCA gene databases. Results: In most of the variants, the analysis showed different in silico interpretations. This illustrates the interpretation challenges faced by diagnostic laboratories. Conclusion: Unfortunately, when using online mutation databases and carrying out in silico analyses, there is significant discordance in the classification of some missense variants in the BRCA genes. This discordance leads to complexities in interpreting and reporting these variants in a clinical context. The authors have developed a simple procedure for analysing variants; however, those of unknown significance largely remain unknown. As a consequence, the clinical value of some reports may be negligible.

  8. Genetic variants in the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene are modestly associated with normal cognitive function in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, J; Christensen, K; Thinggaard, M;

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants in the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene have been suggested as risk factors for neurodegenerative Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we tested the importance of genetic variants in the ChAT gene in normal cognitive function of elderly in a study sample of Danish twins...... and singletons (N = 2070). The ChAT rs3810950 A allele, which has been associated with increased risk for AD, was found to be associated with a decrease cognitive status evaluated by a five-component cognitive composite score [P = 0.03, regression coefficient -0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.57 to -0...

  9. Good gene, bad gene: new APP variant may be both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Morbin, Michela; Giaccone, Giorgio; Moro, Maria Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Colombo, Laura; Messa, Massimo; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Romeo, Margherita; Stravalaci, Matteo; Diomede, Luisa; Gobbi, Marco; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-12-01

    APP mutations cause Alzheimer disease (AD) with virtually complete penetrance. We found a novel APP mutation (A673V) in the homozygous state in a patient with early-onset AD-type dementia and in his younger sister showing initial signs of cognitive decline. It is noteworthy that the heterozygous relatives were not affected, suggesting that this mutation is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Studies on molecular events for the recessive mutation in causing disease revealed a double synergistic effect: the A673V APP variant shifts APP processing towards the amyloidogenic pathway with increased production of Aβ peptides and it markedly enhances the aggregation and fibrillogenic properties of both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. However, co-incubation of mutated and wild-type (wt) Aβ species resulted in inhibition of amyloidogenesis, consistent with the observation that heterozygous carriers do not develop the disease. The opposite effects of the A673V mutation in the homozygous and heterozygous state on amyloidogenesis account for the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, revealing a new scenario in AD genetics and pathogenesis. The anti-amyloidogenic properties of this novel human Aβ variant may offer grounds for the development of therapeutic strategies for AD based on modified Aβ peptides. Indeed, the interaction between mutated Aβ1-6 and wt full-length Aβ prevents amyloid fibril formation. The anti-amyloidogenic effect is further amplified by the use of a mutated six-mer peptide, constructed entirely from D-amino acids to increase the its stability in vivo. Here we reviewed the studies on pathogenic mechanisms associated with the A673V mutation and the first experimental steps toward the development of a novel disease-modifying therapy for AD.

  10. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayols-Baixeras S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergi Sayols-Baixeras, Carla Lluís-Ganella, Gavin Lucas, Roberto ElosuaCardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics Research Group, Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Coronary artery disease (CAD is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility.Keywords: coronary artery disease, pathogenesis, genetic risk factors, genetic variants

  11. Chromosomal Aberrations and DNA Repair Gene Variants in a Radon-exposed Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, A.; Lindholm, C.; Koivistoinen, A.; Salomaa, S.

    2004-07-01

    Polymorphisms of XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1), XRCC3 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3), and hOGG1 (the human homologue of the yeast OGG1 gene) DNA repair genes have been associated with altered DNA repair capacity and risk of various cancers. In the present study our goal was to clarify the influence of various DNA repair gene variants on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in subjects exposed to residential radon. The study group of 84 non-smoking, healthy individuals exposed to domestic radon were analysed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique. No association between radon concentration and CA frequencies was observed. However, a significant increase with age was shown as well as a large variability in translocation frequencies between individuals within the same age group. In order to investigate the role of individual susceptibility to this variation genotypes of DNA repair genes XRCC1 (codons 194, 280 and 399), XRCC3 (codon 241) and hOGG1 (codon 326) were determined from leukocyte DNA using methods based on polymerase chain reaction. Multiple regression analysis was applied to evaluate the effect of the polymorphisms and the other confounding factors (age, exposure to randon etc) to the frequency of CA. The preliminary statistical analyses showed that the different gene appeared not to be related to a pronounced increase in chromosome aberration frequencies observed by FISH painting. However, the analysis indicated that the homozygous variant of XRCC3 codon 241 was associated (P<0.05) with two-ways translocations in conjunction with age. Larger studies, both with regard to the cohort and the number of gene variants are needed to elucidate the influence of other DNA repair variants to the yield of chromosomal aberrations. The results indicate that the chromosomal translocations accumulated by age (spontaneous background) may be partly explained by defects in homologous recombination repair. (Author

  12. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Larach, Daniel B.; Hancock-Cerutti, William F.; Millar, John S.; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J.; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J.; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  13. Meta-analysis of gene-level associations for rare variants based on single-variant statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Hirschhorn, Joel; North, Kari E; Ingelsson, Erik; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2013-08-08

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying "causal" rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available.

  14. Variants of the CNTNAP2 5' promoter as risk factors for autism spectrum disorders: a genetic and functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocchetti, A G; Kopp, M; Waltes, R; Haslinger, D; Duketis, E; Jarczok, T A; Poustka, F; Voran, A; Graab, U; Meyer, J; Klauck, S M; Fulda, S; Freitag, C M

    2015-07-01

    Contactin-associated protein-like 2 gene (CNTNAP2), a member of the Neurexin gene superfamily, is one of the best-replicated risk genes for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). ASD are predominately genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments of language development, social interaction and communication, as well as stereotyped behavior and interests. Although CNTNAP2 expression levels were proposed to alter ASD risk, no study to date has focused on its 5' promoter. Here, we directly sequenced the CNTNAP2 5' promoter region of 236 German families with one child with ASD and detected four novel variants. Furthermore, we genotyped the three most frequent variants (rs150447075, rs34712024, rs71781329) in an additional sample of 356 families and found nominal association of rs34712024G with ASD and rs71781329GCG[7] with language development. The four novel and the three known minor alleles of the identified variants were predicted to alter transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). At the functional level, the respective sequences spanning these seven variants were bound by nuclear factors. In a luciferase promoter assay, the respective minor alleles showed cell line-specific and differentiation stage-dependent effects at the level of promoter activation. The novel potential rare risk-variant M2, a G>A mutation -215 base pairs 5' of the transcriptional start site, significantly reduced promoter efficiency in HEK293T and in undifferentiated and differentiated neuroblastoid SH-SY5Y cells. This variant was transmitted to a patient with autistic disorder. The under-transmitted, protective minor G allele of the common variant rs34712024, in contrast, increased transcriptional activity. These results lead to the conclusion that the pathomechanism of CNTNAP2 promoter variants on ASD risk is mediated by their effect on TFBSs, and thus confirm the hypothesis that a reduced CNTNAP2 level during neuronal development increases liability for ASD.

  15. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity.

  16. Autozygosity reveals recessive mutations and novel mechanisms in dominant genes: implications in variant interpretation

    KAUST Repository

    Monies, Dorota

    2017-04-06

    The purpose of this study is to describe recessive alleles in strictly dominant genes. Identifying recessive mutations in genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported can expand our understanding of the medical relevance of these genes both phenotypically and mechanistically. The Saudi population is enriched for autozygosity, which enhances the homozygous occurrence of alleles, including pathogenic alleles in genes that have been associated only with a dominant inheritance pattern.Exome sequencing of patients from consanguineous families with likely recessive phenotypes was performed. In one family, the genotype of the deceased children was inferred from their parents due to lack of available samples.We describe the identification of 11 recessive variants (5 of which are reported here for the first time) in 11 genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported. The observed phenotypes for these recessive variants were novel (e.g., FBN2-related myopathy and CSF1R-related brain malformation and osteopetrosis), typical (e.g., ACTG2-related visceral myopathy), or an apparently healthy state (e.g., PDE11A), consistent with the corresponding mouse knockout phenotypes.Our results show that, in the era of genomic sequencing and

  17. Genetic variants in chromatin-remodeling pathway associated with lung cancer risk in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liguo; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Yuzhuo; Cheng, Yang; Liu, Jia; Shen, Wei; Li, Zhihua; Zhang, Jiahui; Wang, Cheng; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng

    2016-08-10

    Chromatin remodeling complexes utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have essential roles in transcriptional modulation. Increasing evidences indicate that these complexes directly interact with numerous proteins and regulate the formation of cancer. However, few studies reported the association of polymorphisms in chromatin remodeling genes and lung cancer. We hypothesized that variants in critical genes of chromatin remodeling pathway might contribute to the susceptibility of lung cancer. To validate this hypothesis, we systematically screened 40 polymorphisms in six key chromatin remodeling genes (SMARCA5, SMARCC2, SMARCD2, ARID1A, NR3C1 and SATB1) and evaluated them with a case-control study including 1341 cases and 1982 controls. Logistic regression revealed that four variants in NR3C1 and SATB1 were significantly associated with lung cancer risk after false discovery rate (FDR) correction [For NR3C1, rs9324921: odds ratio (OR)=1.23, P for FDR=0.029; rs12521436: OR=0.85, P for FDR=0.040; rs4912913: OR=1.17, P for FDR=0.040; For SATB1, rs6808523: OR=1.33, P for FDR=0.040]. Combing analysis presented a significant allele-dosage tendency for the number of risk alleles and lung cancer risk (Ptrendlung tumor and adjacent normal tissues in the database of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (P=0.009 for rs6808523). These findings suggested that genetic variants in key chromatin remodeling genes may contribute to lung cancer risk in Chinese population. Further large and well-designed studies are warranted to validate our results.

  18. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  19. Genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and the risk of CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuwei; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 and the downstream Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway have previously been reported to be important in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), and several studies have shown the relationship between the polymorphisms of related genes in this pathway with the risk of CRC. However, the findings of these related studies are inconsistent. Moreover, there has no systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the relationship between polymorphisms in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway genes and CRC risk. Eighteen eligible studies with a total of 13,795 CRC cases and 18,043 controls were identified by searching PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases for the period up to September 15, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the strength of the association. Our results indicated that IL-6 genetic variants in allele additive model (OR = 1.05, 95 % CI = 1.00, 1.09) and JAK2 genetic variants (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI = 1.15, 1.65) in genotype recessive model were significantly associated with CRC risk. Moreover, the pooled data revealed that IL-6 rs1800795 polymorphism significantly increased the risk of CRC in allele additive model in Europe (OR = 1.07, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.14). In conclusion, the present findings indicate that IL-6 and JAK2 genetic variants are associated with the increased risk of CRC while STAT3 genetic variants not. We need more well-designed clinical studies covering more countries and population to definitively establish the association between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility.

  20. Analysis of rare variants in the C3 gene in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

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    Maheswara R Duvvari

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a progressive retinal disorder affecting over 33 million people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs for AMD identified common variants at 19 loci accounting for 15-65% of the heritability and it has been hypothesized that the missing heritability may be attributed to rare variants with large effect sizes. Common variants in the complement component 3 (C3 gene have been associated with AMD and recently a rare C3 variant (Lys155Gln was identified which exerts a large effect on AMD susceptibility independent of the common variants. To explore whether additional rare variants in the C3 gene are associated with AMD, we sequenced all coding exons in 84 unrelated AMD cases. Subsequently, we genotyped all identified variants in 1474 AMD cases and 2258 controls. Additionally, because of the known genetic overlap between AMD and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, we genotyped two recurrent aHUS-associated C3 mutations in the entire cohort. Overall, we identified three rare variants (Lys65Gln (P=0.04, Arg735Trp (OR=17.4, 95% CI=2.2-136; P=0.0003, and Ser1619Arg (OR=5.2, 95% CI=1.0-25; P=0.05 at the C3 locus that are associated with AMD in our EUGENDA cohort. However, the Arg735Trp and Ser1619Arg variants were not found to be associated with AMD in the Rotterdam Study. The Lys65Gln variant was only identified in patients from Nijmegen, the Netherlands, and thus may represent a region-specific AMD risk variant.

  1. Pooled Resequencing of 122 Ulcerative Colitis Genes in a Large Dutch Cohort Suggests Population-Specific Associations of Rare Variants in MUC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visschedijk, Marijn C.; Alberts, Rudi; Mucha, Soren; Deelen, Patrick; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A.; Oldenburg, Bas; Löwenberg, Mark; Dijkstra, Gerard; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rivas, Manuel A.; Franke, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several common genetic risk variants for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, little is known about the contribution of rare, large effect genetic variants to UC susceptibility. In this study, we performed a deep targeted re-sequencing of 122 genes in Dutch UC patients in order to investigate the contribution of rare variants to the genetic susceptibility to UC. The selection of genes consists of 111 established human UC susceptibility genes and 11 genes that lead to spontaneous colitis when knocked-out in mice. In addition, we sequenced the promoter regions of 45 genes where known variants exert cis-eQTL-effects. Targeted pooled re-sequencing was performed on DNA of 790 Dutch UC cases. The Genome of the Netherlands project provided sequence data of 500 healthy controls. After quality control and prioritization based on allele frequency and pathogenicity probability, follow-up genotyping of 171 rare variants was performed on 1021 Dutch UC cases and 1166 Dutch controls. Single-variant association and gene-based analyses identified an association of rare variants in the MUC2 gene with UC. The associated variants in the Dutch population could not be replicated in a German replication cohort (1026 UC cases, 3532 controls). In conclusion, this study has identified a putative role for MUC2 on UC susceptibility in the Dutch population and suggests a population-specific contribution of rare variants to UC. PMID:27490946

  2. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmagid, Nada; Bereczky-Veress, Biborka; Atanur, Santosh; Musilová, Alena; Zídek, Václav; Saba, Laura; Warnecke, Andreas; Khademi, Mohsen; Studahl, Marie; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Hjalmarsson, Anders; Garcia-Diaz, Ana; Denis, Cécile V; Bergström, Tomas; Sköldenberg, Birgit; Kockum, Ingrid; Aitman, Timothy; Hübner, Norbert; Olsson, Tomas; Pravenec, Michal; Diez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway). Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains), displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus) named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb) containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor) gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008) after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  3. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

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    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway. Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains, displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism. Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008 after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  4. Studies of metabolic phenotypic correlates of 15 obesity associated gene variants.

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    Camilla Helene Sandholt

    Full Text Available AIMS: Genome-wide association studies have identified novel BMI/obesity associated susceptibility loci. The purpose of this study is to determine associations with overweight, obesity, morbid obesity and/or general adiposity in a Danish population. Moreover, we want to investigate if these loci associate with type 2 diabetes and to elucidate potential underlying metabolic mechanisms. METHODS: 15 gene variants in 14 loci including TMEM18 (rs7561317, SH2B1 (rs7498665, KCTD15 (rs29941, NEGR1 (rs2568958, ETV5 (rs7647305, BDNF (rs4923461, rs925946, SEC16B (rs10913469, FAIM2 (rs7138803, GNPDA2 (rs10938397, MTCH2 (rs10838738, BAT2 (rs2260000, NPC1 (rs1805081, MAF (rs1424233, and PTER (rs10508503 were genotyped in 18,014 middle-aged Danes. RESULTS: Five of the 15 gene variants associated with overweight, obesity and/or morbid obesity. Per allele ORs ranged from 1.15-1.20 for overweight, 1.10-1.25 for obesity, and 1.41-1.46 for morbid obesity. Five of the 15 variants moreover associated with increased measures of adiposity. BDNF rs4923461 displayed a borderline BMI-dependent protective effect on type 2 diabetes (0.87 (0.78-0.96, p = 0.008, whereas SH2B1 rs7498665 associated with nominally BMI-independent increased risk of type 2 diabetes (1.16 (1.07-1.27, p = 7.8×10(-4. CONCLUSIONS: Associations with overweight and/or obesity and measures of obesity were confirmed for seven out of the 15 gene variants. The obesity risk allele of BDNF rs4923461 protected against type 2 diabetes, which could suggest neuronal and peripheral distinctive ways of actions for the protein. SH2B1 rs7498665 associated with type 2 diabetes independently of BMI.

  5. Gene Variants Are Associated with PCOS Susceptibility and Hyperandrogenemia in Young Korean Women

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    Do Kyeong Song

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO gene is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obesity and insulin resistance are also common features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Therefore, the FTO gene might be a candidate gene for PCOS susceptibility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of FTO gene variants on PCOS susceptibility and metabolic and reproductive hormonal parameters.MethodsWe recruited 432 women with PCOS (24±5 years and 927 healthy women with regular menstrual cycles (27±5 years and performed a case-control association study. We genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8050136 in the FTO gene and collected metabolic and hormonal measurements.ResultsLogistic regression revealed that the G/G genotype (rs1421085, 1.6%, the C/C genotype (rs17817449, 1.6%, and the A/A genotype (rs8050136, 1.6% were strongly associated with an increased risk of PCOS (odds ratio, 2.551 to 2.559; all P<0.05. The strengths of these associations were attenuated after adjusting for age and BMI. The women with these genotypes were more obese and exhibited higher free androgen indices (P<0.05 and higher free testosterone levels (P=0.053 to 0.063 compared to the other genotypes. However the significant differences disappeared after adjusting for body mass index (BMI. When we analyzed the women with PCOS and the control groups separately, there were no significant differences in the metabolic and reproductive hormonal parameters according to the FTO gene variants.ConclusionThe rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8050136 variants of the FTO gene were associated with PCOS susceptibility and hyperandrogenemia in young Korean women. These associations may be mediated through an effect of BMI.

  6. Pooled Resequencing of 122 Ulcerative Colitis Genes in a Large Dutch Cohort Suggests Population-Specific Associations of Rare Variants in MUC2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschedijk, Marijn C; Alberts, Rudi; Mucha, Soren; Deelen, Patrick; de Jong, Dirk J; Pierik, Marieke; Spekhorst, Lieke M; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Oldenburg, Bas; Löwenberg, Mark; Dijkstra, Gerard; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rivas, Manuel A; Franke, Andre; van Diemen, Cleo C; Weersma, Rinse K

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several common genetic risk variants for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, little is known about the contribution of rare, large effect genetic variants to UC susceptibility. In this study, we performed a deep targeted re-sequencing of 122 genes in Dutch

  7. ANALYSIS OF POLYMORPHIC VARIANTS OF CYTOKINE GENES IN PATIENTS WITH HIV INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sukhalentseva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A distribution mode for allelic variants of cytokine genes was evaluated in 184 patients with slow viral infections, including 97 patients with chronic herpetic infection and 87 HIV-infected patients. Using modern methods of immunogenetics, we have found that relative risks of recurrent course and poor outcome of infection are positively associated with AA promoter region genotype and AA promoter genotype of +874 A/T polymorphism in the IFNG gene. Immunogenetic factors associated with protective effect in slow virus infections, include G allele of TNFA gene (G-308A SNP, and T allele/TT genotype of promoter region in  the IFNG gene (+874 A/T SNP. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 79-82

  8. Risk variants in BMP4 promoters for nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate in a Chilean population

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    Suazo José

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene (BMP4 plays a key role during maxillofacial development, since orofacial clefts are observed in animals when this gene is conditionally inactivated. We recently reported the existence of association between nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCLP and BMP4 polymorphisms by detecting transmission deviations for haplotypes that include a region containing a BMP4 promoter in case-parent trios. The aim of the present study was to search for possible causal mutations within BMP4 promoters (BMP4.1 and BMP4.2. Methods We analyzed the sequence of BMP4.1 and BMP4.2 in 167 Chilean NSCLP cases and 336 controls. Results We detected three novel variants in BMP4.1 (c.-5514G > A, c.-5365C > T and c.-5049C > T which could be considered as cleft risk factors due to their absence in controls. Additionally, rs2855530 G allele (BMP4.2 carriers showed an increased risk for NSCLP restricted to males (OR = 1.52; 95% C.I. = 1.07-2.15; p = 0.019. For this same SNP the dominant genotype model showed a higher frequency of G/G+G/C and a lower frequency of C/C in cases than controls in the total sample (p = 0.03 and in the male sample (p = 0.003. Bioinformatic prediction analysis showed that all the risk variants detected in this study could create new transcription factor binding motifs. Conclusions The sex-dependent association between rs2855530 and NSCLP could indirectly be related to the differential gene expression observed between sexes in animal models. We concluded that risk variants detected herein could potentially alter BMP4 promoter activity in NSCLP. Further functional and developmental studies are necessary to support this hypothesis.

  9. Multiple Gene Variants in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in the Era of Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Charlotte; Bagnall, Richard D; Lam, Lien; Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie

    2017-08-01

    Multiple likely pathogenic/pathogenic (LP/P; ≥2) variants in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were described 10 years ago with a prevalence of 5%. We sought to re-examine the significance of multiple rare variants in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the setting of comprehensive and targeted panels. Of 758 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy probands, we included 382 with ≥45 cardiomyopathy genes screened. There were 224 (59%) with ≥1 rare variant (allele frequency ≤0.02%). Variants were analyzed using varying sized gene panels to represent comprehensive or targeted testing. Based on a 45-gene panel, 127 (33%) had a LP/P variant, 139 (36%) had variants of uncertain significance, and 66 (17%) had multiple rare variants. A targeted 8-gene panel yielded 125 (32%) LP/P variants, 52 (14%) variants of uncertain significance, and 14 (4%) had multiple rare variants. No proband had 2 LP/P variants. Including affected family members (total n=412), cluster-adjusted analyses identified a phenotype effect, with younger age (odds ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.98; P=0.004) and family history of sudden cardiac death (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-9.9; P=0.02) significantly more likely in multiple versus single variant patients when considering an 8-gene panel but not larger panels. Those with multiple variants had worse event-free survival from all-cause death, cardiac transplantation, and cardiac arrest (log-rank P=0.008). No proband had multiple LP/P variants in contrast to previous reports. However, multiple rare variants regardless of classification were seen in 4% and contributed to earlier disease onset and cardiac events. Our findings support a cumulative variant hypothesis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  11. Empirical Bayes scan statistics for detecting clusters of disease risk variants in genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Kenneth J; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments of high-throughput genomic technologies offer an unprecedented detailed view of the genetic variation in various human populations, and promise to lead to significant progress in understanding the genetic basis of complex diseases. Despite this tremendous advance in data generation, it remains very challenging to analyze and interpret these data due to their sparse and high-dimensional nature. Here, we propose novel applications and new developments of empirical Bayes scan statistics to identify genomic regions significantly enriched with disease risk variants. We show that the proposed empirical Bayes methodology can be substantially more powerful than existing scan statistics methods especially so in the presence of many non-disease risk variants, and in situations when there is a mixture of risk and protective variants. Furthermore, the empirical Bayes approach has greater flexibility to accommodate covariates such as functional prediction scores and additional biomarkers. As proof-of-concept we apply the proposed methods to a whole-exome sequencing study for autism spectrum disorders and identify several promising candidate genes.

  12. Association of obesity susceptibility gene variants with metabolic syndrome and related traits in 1,443 Czech adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dušátková, L; Zamrazilová, H; Sedláčková, B; Včelák, J; Hlavatý, P; Aldhoon Hainerová, I; Korenková, V; Bradnová, O; Bendlová, B; Kunešová, M; Hainer, V

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several gene variants associated with obesity; however, only a few studies have further investigated their association with metabolic syndrome. We performed a study of eleven variants in/near genes TMEM18, SH2B1, KCTD15, PCSK1, BDNF, SEC16B, MC4R, and FTO in Czech adolescents and analysed their association with obesity, metabolic syndrome and related traits. Genotyping was performed in 1,443 adolescents aged 13.0-17.9 years. Anthropometric parameters, biochemical parameters and blood pressure were assessed. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation. The FTO rs9939609 variant was associated with overweight/obesity (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.21-1.63, P metabolic syndrome (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.14-2.04, P = 0.005; 1.51, 95% CI 1.12-2.04, P = 0.009). The PCSK1 rs6235 variant was negatively related to increased blood glucose (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.97, P = 0.040). In conclusion, the FTO variant was associated with overweight/obesity in Czech adolescents. Moreover, MC4R and BDNF variants increased the risk of metabolic syndrome, probably through their effect on abdominal obesity. The PCSK1 variant may have a protective role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

  13. FTO Obesity Risk Variants Are Linked to Adipocyte IRX3 Expression and BMI of Children - Relevance of FTO Variants to Defend Body Weight in Lean Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Kathrin; Scholz, Markus; Kovacs, Peter; Kiess, Wieland; Körner, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified variants within the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) locus as the strongest predictors of obesity amongst all obesity-associated gene loci. Recent evidence suggests that variants in FTO directly affect human adipocyte function through targeting IRX3 and IRX5 and thermogenesis regulation. Aim We addressed the relevance of this proposed FTO-IRX pathway in adipose tissue (AT) of children. Results Expression of IRX3 was higher in adipocytes compared to SVF. We found increased adipocyte-specific expression of IRX3 and IRX5 with the presence of the FTO risk haplotype in lean children, whereas it was unaffected by risk variants in obese peers. We further show that IRX3 expression was elevated in isolated adipocytes and AT of lean compared to obese children, particularly in UCP1-negative adipocytes, and inversely correlated with BMI SDS. Independent of BMI, IRX3 expression in adipocytes was significantly related to adipocyte hypertrophy, and subsequent associations with AT inflammation and HOMA-IR in the children. Conclusion One interpretation of our observation of FTO risk variants linked to IRX3 expression and adipocyte size restricted to lean children, along with the decreased IRX3 expression in obese compared to lean peers, may reflect a defense mechanism for protecting body-weight, which is pertinent for lean children. PMID:27560134

  14. Estrogen withdrawal, increased breast cancer risk and the KRAS-variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Jung, Song-Yi; Kerin, Michael J; Salzman, David W; Nallur, Sunitha; Nemec, Antonio A; Dookwah, Michelle; Sadofsky, Jackie; Paranjape, Trupti; Kelly, Olivia; Chan, Elcie; Miller, Nicola; Sweeney, Karl J; Zelterman, Daniel; Sweasy, Joann; Pilarski, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2015-01-01

    The KRAS-variant is a biologically functional, microRNA binding site variant, which predicts increased cancer risk especially for women. Because external exposures, such as chemotherapy, differentially impact the effect of this mutation, we evaluated the association of estrogen exposures, breast cancer (BC) risk and tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant. Women with BC (n = 1712), the subset with the KRAS-variant (n = 286) and KRAS-variant unaffected controls (n = 80) were evaluated, and hormonal exposures, KRAS-variant status, and pathology were compared. The impact of estrogen withdrawal on transformation of isogenic normal breast cell lines with or without the KRAS-variant was studied. Finally, the association and presentation characteristics of the KRAS-variant and multiple primary breast cancer (MPBC) were evaluated. KRAS-variant BC patients were more likely to have ovarian removal pre-BC diagnosis than non-variant BC patients (p = 0.033). In addition, KRAS-variant BC patients also appeared to have a lower estrogen state than KRAS-variant unaffected controls, with a lower BMI (P < 0.001). Finally, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) discontinuation in KRAS-variant patients was associated with a diagnosis of triple negative BC (P < 0.001). Biologically confirming our clinical findings, acute estrogen withdrawal led to oncogenic transformation in KRAS-variant positive isogenic cell lines. Finally, KRAS-variant BC patients had greater than an 11-fold increased risk of presenting with MPBC compared to non-variant patients (45.39% vs 6.78%, OR 11.44 [3.42–37.87], P < 0.001). Thus, estrogen withdrawal and a low estrogen state appear to increase BC risk and to predict aggressive tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant, who are also significantly more likely to present with multiple primary breast cancer. PMID:25961464

  15. Deceased-Donor Apolipoprotein L1 Renal-Risk Variants Have Minimal Effects on Liver Transplant Outcomes.

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    Casey R Dorr

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1 G1 and G2 renal-risk variants, common in populations with recent African ancestry, are strongly associated with non-diabetic nephropathy, end-stage kidney disease, and shorter allograft survival in deceased-donor kidneys (autosomal recessive inheritance. Circulating APOL1 protein is synthesized primarily in the liver and hydrodynamic gene delivery of APOL1 G1 and G2 risk variants has caused hepatic necrosis in a murine model.To evaluate the impact of these variants in liver transplantation, this multicenter study investigated the association of APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles in deceased African American liver donors with allograft survival. Transplant recipients were followed for liver allograft survival using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients.Of the 639 liver donors evaluated, 247 had no APOL1 risk allele, 300 had 1 risk allele, and 92 had 2 risk alleles. Graft failure assessed at 15 days, 6 months, 1 year and total was not significantly associated with donor APOL1 genotype (p-values = 0.25, 0.19, 0.67 and 0.89, respectively.In contrast to kidney transplantation, deceased-donor APOL1 G1 and G2 risk variants do not significantly impact outcomes in liver transplantation.

  16. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; Zhong, Chunlong; Krystal, John H; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-07-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7-ADH1C-ADH1B-ADH1A-ADH6-ADH4-ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between common ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.05] and 11 neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. A total of 50,063 subjects in 25 independent cohorts were analyzed. The entire ADH gene cluster was imputed across these 25 cohorts using the same reference panels. Association analyses were conducted, adjusting for multiple comparisons. We found 28 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, that were significantly associated with schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans after correction by false discovery rate (FDR) (q disorders after region-wide correction by SNPSpD (8.9 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003 and 2.4 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003, respectively). No variants were significantly associated with the other nine neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol dependence. We concluded that common ADH variants conferred risk for both schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans.

  17. Allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 repair genes and susceptibility of oral cancer in Brazilian patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Reis, Mariana Bisarro; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; de Souza Fonseca Ribeiro, Enilze Maria

    2013-01-01

    genes have been found to be associated with oral cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of allelic variants Arg194Trp (rs:1799782) and Arg399Gln (rs: 25487) of XRCC1 gene and Thr241Met (rs: 861539) of XRCC3 gene and susceptibility to oral cancer. We also...... variants of the XRCC1 gene within codon 194 (OR 0.82, 95% CI: 0.44-1.51) and codon 399 (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.59-1.50) and within the XRCC3 gene (OR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.45-1.16) were not associated with an increased risk of oral cancer. A combinational analysis of SNPs in both genes indicated no association....... The presence of the allelic variants of these two genes had no statistically significant effect on tumor differentiation, lymph node invasion or tumor size. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 are not suitable markers for susceptibility to carcinomas of the oral cavity...

  18. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang,Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; ZHONG, CHUNLONG; Krystal, John H.; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-01-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7–ADH1C–ADH1B–ADH1A–ADH6–ADH4–ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatr...

  19. A Missense LRRK2 Variant Is a Risk Factor for Excessive Inflammatory Responses in Leprosy.

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    Vinicius M Fava

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the epidemiological setting, a variable proportion of leprosy patients will suffer from excessive pro-inflammatory responses, termed type-1 reactions (T1R. The LRRK2 gene encodes a multi-functional protein that has been shown to modulate pro-inflammatory responses. Variants near the LRRK2 gene have been associated with leprosy in some but not in other studies. We hypothesized that LRRK2 was a T1R susceptibility gene and that inconsistent association results might reflect different proportions of patients with T1R in the different sample settings. Hence, we evaluated the association of LRRK2 variants with T1R susceptibility.An association scan of the LRRK2 locus was performed using 156 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Evidence of association was evaluated in two family-based samples: A set of T1R-affected and a second set of T1R-free families. Only SNPs significant for T1R-affected families with significant evidence of heterogeneity relative to T1R-free families were considered T1R-specific. An expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis was applied to evaluate the impact of T1R-specific SNPs on LRRK2 gene transcriptional levels.A total of 18 T1R-specific variants organized in four bins were detected. The core SNP capturing the T1R association was the LRRK2 missense variant M2397T (rs3761863 that affects LRRK2 protein turnover. Additionally, a bin of nine SNPs associated with T1R were eQTLs for LRRK2 in unstimulated whole blood cells but not after exposure to Mycobacterium leprae antigen.The results support a preferential association of LRRK2 variants with T1R. LRRK2 involvement in T1R is likely due to a pathological pro-inflammatory loop modulated by LRRK2 availability. Interestingly, the M2397T variant was reported in association with Crohn's disease with the same risk allele as in T1R suggesting common inflammatory mechanism in these two distinct diseases.

  20. Gene and pathway level analyses of germline DNA-repair gene variants and prostate cancer susceptibility using the iCOGS-genotyping array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations within DNA-repair genes are implicated in susceptibility to multiple forms of cancer. For prostate cancer (PrCa), rare mutations in BRCA2 and BRCA1 give rise to moderately elevated risk, whereas two of B100 common, low-penetrance PrCa susceptibility variants identif...

  1. ACE variants interact with the RAS pathway to confer risk and protection against type 2 diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Ahuja, Monica; Rai, Taranjit Singh

    2009-01-01

    , in the present study, we evaluated the association of ACE haplotypes and the interactions of ACE, angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II receptor type I (AGTR1) gene polymorphisms with DNP in Asian Indians. We genotyped seven variants of the RAS pathway genes (ACE, AGT, and AGTR1) in type 2 diabetic cohorts....../D) was significantly higher in DNP (p AGTR1: A1166C) was higher and associated with increased risk of DNP (235T, p

  2. Variants of FGFR2 and their associations with breast cancer risk: a HUGE systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fei; Wu, Duoguang; Wang, Wenjian; He, Xiaotian; Wang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Extensive epidemiological studies have demonstrated that there are associations between variants in intron 2 of FGFR2 and the breast cancer risk in various populations; however, the relationships are not yet conclusively established. To comprehensively review the epidemiological studies showing associations between the variants of FGFR2 and the breast cancer risk, and to establish correlations via a meta-analysis. The PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched for eligible studies. The associations between the variants and breast cancer risk were evaluated using a random-effects model. The heterogeneity among the studies and the potential publication bias were also evaluated. Fifty-three studies with a total of 121,740 cases and 198,549 controls have examined the associations between 23 variants in intron 2 of FGFR2 and the breast cancer risk. The relationships for the 10 most frequently evaluated variants-rs1078806, rs11200014, rs1219648, rs2420946, rs2981578, rs2981579, rs2981582, rs3135718, rs10736303, and rs3750817-were synthesized based on a meta-analysis. Interestingly, we found that all 10 variants were significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer. In studies stratified by ethnicity, we found that the associations were more notable in Caucasians and Asians compared to Africans. Similar pooled results were found in population-based and hospital-based case-control studies and in studies with small and large sample sizes. FGFR2 is a breast cancer susceptibility gene, and various variants of FGFR2 are significantly associated with the breast cancer risk. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the associations need to be elucidated in future studies.

  3. Human genes with a greater number of transcript variants tend to show biological features of housekeeping and essential genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Hyun Uk; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    64 vertebrate species as orthologs, subjected to regulations by transcription factors and microRNAs, and showed hub node-like properties in the human protein-protein interaction network. These findings were also confirmed by metabolic simulations of 60 cancer metabolic models. All these results......Alternative splicing is a process observed in gene expression that results in a multi-exon gene to produce multiple mRNA variants which might have different functions and activities. Although physiologically important, many aspects of genes with different number of transcript variants (or splice...... variants) still remain to be characterized. In this study, we provide bioinformatic evidence that genes with a greater number of transcript variants are more likely to play functionally important roles in cells, compared with those having fewer transcript variants. Among 21 983 human genes, 3728 genes were...

  4. A cytogenetic abnormality and rare coding variants identify ABCA13 as a candidate gene in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Helen M; Pickard, Benjamin S; Maclean, Alan; Malloy, Mary P; Soares, Dinesh C; McRae, Allan F; Condie, Alison; White, Angela; Hawkins, William; McGhee, Kevin; van Beck, Margaret; MacIntyre, Donald J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Visscher, Peter M; Porteous, David J; Cannon, Ronald E; St Clair, David; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are leading causes of morbidity across all populations, with heritability estimates of approximately 80% indicating a substantial genetic component. Population genetics and genome-wide association studies suggest an overlap of genetic risk factors between these illnesses but it is unclear how this genetic component is divided between common gene polymorphisms, rare genomic copy number variants, and rare gene sequence mutations. We report evidence that the lipid transporter gene ABCA13 is a susceptibility factor for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After the initial discovery of its disruption by a chromosome abnormality in a person with schizophrenia, we resequenced ABCA13 exons in 100 cases with schizophrenia and 100 controls. Multiple rare coding variants were identified including one nonsense and nine missense mutations and compound heterozygosity/homozygosity in six cases. Variants were genotyped in additional schizophrenia, bipolar, depression (n > 1600), and control (n > 950) cohorts and the frequency of all rare variants combined was greater than controls in schizophrenia (OR = 1.93, p = 0.0057) and bipolar disorder (OR = 2.71, p = 0.00007). The population attributable risk of these mutations was 2.2% for schizophrenia and 4.0% for bipolar disorder. In a study of 21 families of mutation carriers, we genotyped affected and unaffected relatives and found significant linkage (LOD = 4.3) of rare variants with a phenotype including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. These data identify a candidate gene, highlight the genetic overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, and suggest that rare coding variants may contribute significantly to risk of these disorders.

  5. An Excess of Deleterious Variants in VEGF-A Pathway Genes in Down-Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Christine; Locke, Adam E.; Feingold, Eleanor; Reshey, Benjamin; Espana, Karina; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Bean, Lora J.H.; Dooley, Kenneth J.; Cua, Clifford L.; Reeves, Roger H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    About half of people with trisomy 21 have a congenital heart defect (CHD), whereas the remainder have a structurally normal heart, demonstrating that trisomy 21 is a significant risk factor but is not causal for abnormal heart development. Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are the most commonly occurring heart defects in Down syndrome (DS), and ∼65% of all AVSD is associated with DS. We used a candidate-gene approach among individuals with DS and complete AVSD (cases = 141) and DS with no CHD (controls = 141) to determine whether rare genetic variants in genes involved in atrioventricular valvuloseptal morphogenesis contribute to AVSD in this sensitized population. We found a significant excess (p < 0.0001) of variants predicted to be deleterious in cases compared to controls. At the most stringent level of filtering, we found potentially damaging variants in nearly 20% of cases but fewer than 3% of controls. The variants with the highest probability of being damaging in cases only were found in six genes: COL6A1, COL6A2, CRELD1, FBLN2, FRZB, and GATA5. Several of the case-specific variants were recurrent in unrelated individuals, occurring in 10% of cases studied. No variants with an equal probability of being damaging were found in controls, demonstrating a highly specific association with AVSD. Of note, all of these genes are in the VEGF-A pathway, even though the candidate genes analyzed in this study represented numerous biochemical and developmental pathways, suggesting that rare variants in the VEGF-A pathway might contribute to the genetic underpinnings of AVSD in humans. PMID:23040494

  6. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  7. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD. PMID:27827986

  8. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-11-07

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4,CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  9. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  10. Human SLC26A1 Gene Variants: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dawson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney stones are a global health problem, incurring massive health costs annually. Why stones recur in many patients remains unknown but likely involves environmental, physiological, and genetic factors. The solute linked carrier (SLC 26A1 gene has previously been linked to kidney stones in mice. SLC26A1 encodes the sulfate anion transporter 1 (SAT1 protein, and its loss in mice leads to hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate renal stones. To investigate the possible involvement of SAT1 in human urolithiasis, we screened the SLC26A1 gene in a cohort of 13 individuals with recurrent calcium oxalate urolithiasis, which is the commonest type. DNA sequence analyses showed missense mutations in seven patients: one individual was heterozygous R372H; 4 individuals were heterozygous Q556R; one patient was homozygous Q556R; and one patient with severe nephrocalcinosis (requiring nephrectomy was homozygous Q556R and heterozygous M132T. The M132 amino acid in human SAT1 is conserved with 15 other species and is located within the third transmembrane domain of the predicted SAT1 protein structure, suggesting that this amino acid may be important for SAT1 function. These initial findings demonstrate genetic variants in SLC26A1 of recurrent stone formers and warrant wider independent studies of SLC26A1 in humans with recurrent calcium oxalate stones.

  11. Rare Variant Analysis of Human and Rodent Obesity Genes in Individuals with Severe Childhood Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Audrey E; Bochukova, Elena G; Marenne, Gaëlle

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Using targeted and whole-exome sequencing, we studied 32 human and 87 rodent obesity genes in 2,548 severely obese children and 1,117 controls. We identified 52 variants contributing to obesity in 2% of cases including multiple novel variants in GNAS......, which were sometimes found with accelerated growth rather than short stature as described previously. Nominally significant associations were found for rare functional variants in BBS1, BBS9, GNAS, MKKS, CLOCK and ANGPTL6. The p.S284X variant in ANGPTL6 drives the association signal (rs201622589, MAF∼0...... the challenges of testing rare variant associations and the need for very large sample sizes. Further validation in cohorts with severe obesity and engineering the variants in model organisms will be needed to explore whether human variants in ANGPTL6 and other genes that lead to obesity when deleted in mice, do...

  12. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data.

  13. Characterization of a novel splicing variant in the RAPTOR gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Chang [Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, 920 E. 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: csun1@bsd.uchicago.edu; Southard, Catherine; Di Rienzo, Anna [Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, 920 E. 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2009-03-09

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Raptor, the regulatory associated protein of mTOR, is an important member in this signaling pathway. In the present report, we identified and characterized a novel splicing variant of this gene, RAPTOR{sub v}2, in which exons 14-17, 474 bp in total, are omitted from the mRNA. This deletion does not change the open reading frame, but causes a nearly complete absence of HEAT repeats, which were shown to be involved in the binding of mTOR substrates. Real time PCR performed on 48 different human tissues demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of this splice variant. Quantification of mRNA levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) from 56 unrelated HapMap individuals revealed that the expression of this splicing form is quite variable. One synonymous SNP, rs2289759 in exon 14, was predicted by ESEfinder to cause a significant gain/loss of SRp55 and/or SF2/ASF binding sites, and thus potentially influence splicing. This prediction was confirmed by linear regression analysis between the ratio of RAPTOR{sub v}2 to total RAPTOR mRNA levels and the SNP genotype in the above 56 individuals (r = 0.281 and P = 0.036). Moreover, the functional evaluation indicated that this splicing isoform is expected to retain the ability to bind mTOR, but is unlikely to bind mTOR substrates, hence affecting signal transduction and further cell proliferation.

  14. Identification of a novel functional deletion variant in the 5'-UTR of the DJ-1 gene

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    Warnich Louise

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DJ-1 forms part of the neuronal cellular defence mechanism against oxidative insults, due to its ability to undergo self-oxidation. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of central nervous system damage in different neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD. Various mutations in the DJ-1 (PARK7 gene have been shown to cause the autosomal recessive form of PD. In the present study South African PD patients were screened for mutations in DJ-1 and we aimed to investigate the functional significance of a novel 16 bp deletion variant identified in one patient. Methods The possible effect of the deletion on promoter activity was investigated using a Dual-Luciferase Reporter assay. The DJ-1 5'-UTR region containing the sequence flanking the 16 bp deletion was cloned into a pGL4.10-Basic luciferase-reporter vector and transfected into HEK293 and BE(2-M17 neuroblastoma cells. Promoter activity under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress conditions was also investigated. Computational (in silico cis-regulatory analysis of DJ-1 promoter sequence was performed using the transcription factor-binding site database, TRANSFAC via the PATCH™ and rVISTA platforms. Results A novel 16 bp deletion variant (g.-6_+10del was identified in DJ-1 which spans the transcription start site and is situated 93 bp 3' from a Sp1 site. The deletion caused a reduction in luciferase activity of approximately 47% in HEK293 cells and 60% in BE(2-M17 cells compared to the wild-type (P Conclusion This is the first report of a functional DJ-1 promoter variant, which has the potential to influence transcript stability or translation efficiency. Further work is necessary to determine the extent to which the g.-6_+10del variant affects the normal function of the DJ-1 promoter and whether this variant confers a risk for PD.

  15. Genes that affect brain structure and function identified by rare variant analyses of Mendelian neurologic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ender; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Erdin, Serkan; Bayram, Yavuz; Campbell, Ian M.; Hunter, Jill V.; Atik, Mehmed M.; Van Esch, Hilde; Yuan, Bo; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Isikay, Sedat; Yesil, Gozde; Yuregir, Ozge O.; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Aslan, Huseyin; Aydin, Hatip; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Jain, Preti; Geckinli, B. Bilge; Sezer, Ozlem; Gul, Davut; Durmaz, Burak; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Topcu, Vehap; Candan, Sukru; Cebi, Alper Han; Ikbal, Mevlit; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Gezdirici, Alper; Koparir, Erkan; Ekici, Fatma; Coskun, Salih; Cicek, Salih; Karaer, Kadri; Koparir, Asuman; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Kirat, Emre; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ulucan, Hakan; Seven, Mehmet; Guran, Tulay; Elcioglu, Nursel; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Aktas, Dilek; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Ture, Mehmet; Yakut, Tahsin; Overton, John D.; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa; Muzny, Donna M.; Adams, David R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chung, Wendy K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human nervous system involves complex interactions between fundamental cellular processes and requires a multitude of genes, many of which remain to be associated with human disease. We applied whole exome sequencing to 128 mostly consanguineous families with neurogenetic disorders that often included brain malformations. Rare variant analyses for both single nucleotide variant (SNV) and copy number variant (CNV) alleles allowed for identification of 45 novel variants in 43 known disease genes, 41 candidate genes, and CNVs in 10 families, with an overall potential molecular cause identified in >85% of families studied. Among the candidate genes identified, we found PRUNE, VARS, and DHX37 in multiple families, and homozygous loss of function variants in AGBL2, SLC18A2, SMARCA1, UBQLN1, and CPLX1. Neuroimaging and in silico analysis of functional and expression proximity between candidate and known disease genes allowed for further understanding of genetic networks underlying specific types of brain malformations. PMID:26539891

  16. Association of Transforming Growth Factor Alpha and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate in the Indian population

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    Asavari L Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the relationship of the K-primer variant of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α gene and C677T variant of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (CL/P in the Indian population. Setting and Sample Population: The study group consisted of DNA samples of 25 subjects with nonsyndromic CL with or without cleft palate and 25 unrelated controls, already existing in the Department of Orthodontics, D.A.P.M.R.V. Dental College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: The DNA samples were divided into two categories: Group A which included the 25 subjects with nonsyndromic CL/P; and Group B, which consisted of the 25 unrelated controls. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR test was done for amplification of the region of interest from the DNA samples. Restriction digestion was then performed on the amplified product using the restriction enzyme HinfI, separately for each of the variants. The digested PCR products were separated into channels on a 1.5% agarose gel containing ethidium bromide in an electrophoretic chamber. A U.V. transilluminator was used to see the specific bands of base pairs of the digested PCR products. Results: In Group A, the TGF-α gene variant was present in 16 subjects (P = 0.001 and MTHFR gene variant was present in 8 subjects (P = 0.185. A combination of both gene variants were present in seven subjects, which was an interesting finding. In Group B, four subjects tested positive for the TGF-α and MTHFR gene variants. Conclusions: The TGF-α gene variant and a combination of TGF-α + MTHFR gene variants significantly contribute to the development of nonsyndromic CL/P and can be considered as genetic markers for Indian population. The MTHFR gene variant, though a minor risk factor, cannot be considered as a genetic marker.

  17. Association of Transforming Growth Factor Alpha and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate in the Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Asavari L; Dinesh, M R; Amarnath, B C; Dharma, R M; Akshai, K R; Prashanth, C S

    2014-07-01

    The aim was to evaluate the relationship of the K-primer variant of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) gene and C677T variant of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (CL/P) in the Indian population. The study group consisted of DNA samples of 25 subjects with nonsyndromic CL with or without cleft palate and 25 unrelated controls, already existing in the Department of Orthodontics, D.A.P.M.R.V. Dental College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. THE DNA SAMPLES WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO CATEGORIES: Group A which included the 25 subjects with nonsyndromic CL/P; and Group B, which consisted of the 25 unrelated controls. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was done for amplification of the region of interest from the DNA samples. Restriction digestion was then performed on the amplified product using the restriction enzyme HinfI, separately for each of the variants. The digested PCR products were separated into channels on a 1.5% agarose gel containing ethidium bromide in an electrophoretic chamber. A U.V. transilluminator was used to see the specific bands of base pairs of the digested PCR products. In Group A, the TGF-α gene variant was present in 16 subjects (P = 0.001) and MTHFR gene variant was present in 8 subjects (P = 0.185). A combination of both gene variants were present in seven subjects, which was an interesting finding. In Group B, four subjects tested positive for the TGF-α and MTHFR gene variants. The TGF-α gene variant and a combination of TGF-α + MTHFR gene variants significantly contribute to the development of nonsyndromic CL/P and can be considered as genetic markers for Indian population. The MTHFR gene variant, though a minor risk factor, cannot be considered as a genetic marker.

  18. Vitamin D3 receptor ( VDR gene rs2228570 (Fok1 and rs731236 (Taq1 variants are not associated with the risk for multiple sclerosis: results of a new study and a meta-analysis.

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    Elena García-Martín

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some epidemiological, genetic, and experimental data suggest a possible role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Data on the possible contribution of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene to the risk for MS are controversial. Several studies suggested an interaction between some SNPs in the VDR gene and HLADRB1*1501 in the risk for MS. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate a possible influence of the SNPs rs2228570 and rs731236 in the VDR gene in the risk for MS. A secondary objective was to address the possible interactions between VDR genes and HLADRB1*1501. METHODS: We analyzed the allelic and genotype frequency of VDR rs2228570, rs731236, and HLADRB1*1501 (rs3135388 in 303 patients with MS and 310 healthy controls, using TaqMan Assays. We also conducted a meta-analysis, that was carried out by using the software Meta-Disc 1.1.1 (http://www.hrc.es/investigacion/metadisc.html; Unit of Clinical Statistics, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. Heterogeneity between studies in terms of degree of association was tested using the Q-statistic. RESULTS: VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 allelic and genotype frequencies did not differ significantly between MS patients and controls, and were unrelated with the age of onset of MS, gender, and course of MS. HLADRB1*1501 showed a high association with the risk of developing MS 4.76(95% C.I.  = 3.14-7.27; p<0.0001. The meta-analysis, after excluding data of one study that was responsible of heterogeneity for rs731236 polymorphism, showed lack of relation of both SNPs with the risk for MS. HLADRB1*1501 showed lack of interaction with VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 in increasing MS risk. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 polymorphisms are not related with the risk for MS, and did not confirm interaction between these VDR SNPs and HLADRB1

  19. Whole-exome sequencing to identify genetic risk variants underlying inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Marcin M; Blighe, Kevin; Lotta, Luca A; Pappalardo, Emanuela; Garagiola, Isabella; Mancini, Ilaria; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Fasulo, Maria Rosaria; Santagostino, Elena; Peyvandi, Flora

    2016-06-09

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is the most problematic and costly complication of FVIII replacement therapy that affects up to 30% of previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A. The development of inhibitors is a multifactorial complication involving environmental and genetic factors. Among the latter, F8 gene mutations, ethnicity, family history of inhibitors, and polymorphisms affecting genes involved in the immune response have been previously investigated. To identify novel genetic elements underling the risk of inhibitor development in patients with severe hemophilia A, we applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) and data analysis in a selected group of 26 Italian patients with (n = 17) and without (n = 9) inhibitors. WES revealed several rare, damaging variants in immunoregulatory genes as novel candidate mutations. A case-control association analysis using Cochran-Armitage and Fisher's exact statistical tests identified 1364 statistically significant variants. Hierarchical clustering of these genetic variants showed 2 distinct patterns of homozygous variants with a protective or harmful role in inhibitor development. When looking solely at coding variants, a total of 28 nonsynonymous variants were identified and replicated in 53 inhibitor-positive and 174 inhibitor-negative Italian severe hemophilia A patients using a TaqMan genotyping assay. The genotyping results revealed 10 variants showing estimated odds ratios in the same direction as in the discovery phase and confirmed the association of the rs3754689 missense variant (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.36-0.94; P = .028) in a highly conserved haplotype region surrounding the LCT locus on chromosome 2q21 with inhibitor development. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. APOL1 risk variants and death among African American hemodialysis patients: survival of the fittest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teresa K; Estrella, Michelle M

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have focused on associations of the APOL1 risk variants with outcomes beyond kidney disease, including cardiovascular disease and mortality. Ma and colleagues now expand on this growing but contradicting body of work. Their analysis of a prevalent cohort of African American hemodialysis patients shows that the risk variants are associated with a survival benefit among nondiabetics. Whether this simply reflects a healthier status at hemodialysis initiation among those carrying 2 risk variants or whether these variants truly confer a survival advantage is unclear.

  1. Pooled sequencing of 531 genes in inflammatory bowel disease identifies an associated rare variant in BTNL2 and implicates other immune related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Natalie J; Lehne, Benjamin; Stone, Kristina; Lee, James C; Taylor, Kirstin; Knight, Jo; Papouli, Efterpi; Mirza, Muddassar M; Simpson, Michael A; Spain, Sarah L; Lu, Grace; Fraternali, Franca; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Gray, Emma; Amar, Ariella; Bye, Hannah; Green, Peter; Chung-Faye, Guy; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Pollok, Richard; Satsangi, Jack; Parkes, Miles; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Mansfield, John C; Sanderson, Jeremy; Lewis, Cathryn M; Weale, Michael E; Schlitt, Thomas; Mathew, Christopher G

    2015-02-01

    The contribution of rare coding sequence variants to genetic susceptibility in complex disorders is an important but unresolved question. Most studies thus far have investigated a limited number of genes from regions which contain common disease associated variants. Here we investigate this in inflammatory bowel disease by sequencing the exons and proximal promoters of 531 genes selected from both genome-wide association studies and pathway analysis in pooled DNA panels from 474 cases of Crohn's disease and 480 controls. 80 variants with evidence of association in the sequencing experiment or with potential functional significance were selected for follow up genotyping in 6,507 IBD cases and 3,064 population controls. The top 5 disease associated variants were genotyped in an extension panel of 3,662 IBD cases and 3,639 controls, and tested for association in a combined analysis of 10,147 IBD cases and 7,008 controls. A rare coding variant p.G454C in the BTNL2 gene within the major histocompatibility complex was significantly associated with increased risk for IBD (p = 9.65x10-10, OR = 2.3[95% CI = 1.75-3.04]), but was independent of the known common associated CD and UC variants at this locus. Rare (genes showed suggestive association (pT) or decreased risk (IL12B p.V298F, and NICN p.H191R) of IBD. These results provide additional insights into the involvement of the inhibition of T cell activation in the development of both sub-phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. We suggest that although rare coding variants may make a modest overall contribution to complex disease susceptibility, they can inform our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis.

  2. A common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayling, Timothy M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Weedon, Michael N; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Freathy, Rachel M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Perry, John R B; Elliott, Katherine S; Lango, Hana; Rayner, Nigel W; Shields, Beverley; Harries, Lorna W; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J; Knight, Bridget; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ness, Andrew R; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Ring, Susan M; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sovio, Ulla; Bennett, Amanda J; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Loos, Ruth J F; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J; Karpe, Fredrik; Owen, Katharine R; Cardon, Lon R; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Morris, Andrew D; Smith, George Davey; Hattersley, Andrew T; McCarthy, Mark I

    2007-05-11

    Obesity is a serious international health problem that increases the risk of several common diseases. The genetic factors predisposing to obesity are poorly understood. A genome-wide search for type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes identified a common variant in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) gene that predisposes to diabetes through an effect on body mass index (BMI). An additive association of the variant with BMI was replicated in 13 cohorts with 38,759 participants. The 16% of adults who are homozygous for the risk allele weighed about 3 kilograms more and had 1.67-fold increased odds of obesity when compared with those not inheriting a risk allele. This association was observed from age 7 years upward and reflects a specific increase in fat mass.

  3. WNT10A exonic variant increases the risk of keratoconus by decreasing corneal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Springelkamp, Henriët; Lucas, Sionne E M; Yazar, Seyhan; Hewitt, Alex W; Iglesias, Adriana I; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Pennell, Craig E; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Ramdas, Wishal D; Wolfs, Roger C W; Vingerling, Johannes R; Brown, Matthew A; Mills, Richard A; Craig, Jamie E; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Burdon, Kathryn P; MacGregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A

    2015-09-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative eye condition which results from thinning of the cornea and causes vision distortion. Treatments such as ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking have proved effective for management of keratoconus when performed in early stages of the disease. The central corneal thickness (CCT) is a highly heritable endophenotype of keratoconus, and it is estimated that up to 95% of its phenotypic variance is due to genetics. Genome-wide association efforts of CCT have identified common variants (i.e. minor allele frequency (MAF) >5%). However, these studies typically ignore the large set of exonic variants whose MAF is usually low. In this study, we performed a CCT exome-wide association analysis in a sample of 1029 individuals from a population-based study in Western Australia. We identified a genome-wide significant exonic variant rs121908120 (P = 6.63 × 10(-10)) in WNT10A. This gene is 437 kb from a gene previously associated with CCT (USP37). We showed in a conditional analysis that the WNT10A variant completely accounts for the signal previously seen at USP37. We replicated our finding in independent samples from the Brisbane Adolescent Twin Study, Twin Eye Study in Tasmania and the Rotterdam Study. Further, we genotyped rs121908120 in 621 keratoconus cases and compared the frequency to a sample of 1680 unscreened controls from the Queensland Twin Registry. We found that rs121908120 increases the risk of keratoconus two times (odds ratio 2.03, P = 5.41 × 10(-5)). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Studies of metabolic phenotypic correlates of 15 obesity associated gene variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Vestmar, Marie Aare; Bille, Dorthe Sadowa

    2011-01-01

    (rs10938397), MTCH2 (rs10838738), BAT2 (rs2260000), NPC1 (rs1805081), MAF (rs1424233), and PTER (rs10508503) were genotyped in 18,014 middle-aged Danes. Results: Five of the 15 gene variants associated with overweight, obesity and/or morbid obesity. Per allele ORs ranged from 1.15–1.20 for overweight...... with nominally BMI-independent increased risk of type 2 diabetes (1.16 (1.07–1.27, p = 7.861024)). Conclusions: Associations with overweight and/or obesity and measures of obesity were confirmed for seven out of the 15 gene variants. The obesity risk allele of BDNF rs4923461 protected against type 2 diabetes......Aims: Genome-wide association studies have identified novel BMI/obesity associated susceptibility loci. The purpose of this study is to determine associations with overweight, obesity, morbid obesity and/or general adiposity in a Danish population. Moreover, we want to investigate if these loci...

  5. cis-Expression QTL analysis of established colorectal cancer risk variants in colon tumors and adjacent normal tissue.

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    Lenora W M Loo

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified 19 risk variants associated with colorectal cancer. As most of these risk variants reside outside the coding regions of genes, we conducted cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL analyses to investigate possible regulatory functions on the expression of neighboring genes. Forty microsatellite stable and CpG island methylator phenotype-negative colorectal tumors and paired adjacent normal colon tissues were used for genome-wide SNP and gene expression profiling. We found that three risk variants (rs10795668, rs4444235 and rs9929218, using near perfect proxies rs706771, rs11623717 and rs2059252, respectively were significantly associated (FDR q-value ≤0.05 with expression levels of nearby genes (<2 Mb up- or down-stream. We observed an association between the low colorectal cancer risk allele (A for rs10795668 at 10p14 and increased expression of ATP5C1 (q = 0.024 and between the colorectal cancer high risk allele (C for rs4444235 at 14q22.2 and increased expression of DLGAP5 (q = 0.041, both in tumor samples. The colorectal cancer low risk allele (A for rs9929218 at 16q22.1 was associated with a significant decrease in expression of both NOL3 (q = 0.017 and DDX28 (q = 0.046 in the adjacent normal colon tissue samples. Of the four genes, DLGAP5 and NOL3 have been previously reported to play a role in colon carcinogenesis and ATP5C1 and DDX28 are mitochondrial proteins involved in cellular metabolism and division, respectively. The combination of GWAS findings, prior functional studies, and the cis-eQTL analyses described here suggest putative functional activities for three of the colorectal cancer GWAS identified risk loci as regulating the expression of neighboring genes.

  6. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Somatic Mutations and Candidate Genetic Risk Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Katie M O'Brien; Irene Orlow; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Karla Ballman; Linda McCall; Ronald DeMatteo; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated w...

  7. Influence of variants in the NPY gene on obesity and metabolic syndrome features in Spanish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olza, Josune; Gil-Campos, Mercedes; Leis, Rosaura; Rupérez, Azahara I; Tojo, Rafael; Cañete, Ramón; Gil, Angel; Aguilera, Concepción M

    2013-07-01

    Variants in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene have been associated with obesity and its traits. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NPY gene with obesity, metabolic syndrome features, and inflammatory and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk biomarkers in Spanish children. We recruited 292 obese children and 242 normal-body mass index (BMI) children. Height, weight, BMI, waist circumference, clinical and metabolic markers, adipokines, and inflammatory (PCR, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α) and CVD risk biomarkers (MPO, MMP-9, sE-selectin, sVCAM, sICAM, and PAI-1) were analyzed. Seven SNPs in the NPY gene were genotyped. The results of our study indicate that anthropometric measurements, clinical and metabolic markers, adipokines (leptin and resistin), and inflammatory and CVD risk biomarkers were generally elevated in the obese group. The exceptions to this finding included cholesterol, HDL-c, and adiponectin, which were lower in the obese group, and glucose, LDL-c, and MMP-9, which did not differ between the groups. Both rs16147 and rs16131 were associated with the risk of obesity, and the latter was also associated with insulin resistance, triacylglycerols, leptin, and HDL-c. Thus, we confirm the association of rs16147 with obesity, and we demonstrate for the first time the association of rs16131 with obesity and its possible impact on the early onset of metabolic syndrome features, mainly triacylglycerols, in children.

  8. No evidence that protein truncating variants in BRIP1 are associated with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Easton, Douglas F; Lesueur, Fabienne; Decker, Brennan

    2016-01-01

    in BRIP1 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. These studies have led to inclusion of BRIP1 on targeted sequencing panels for breast cancer risk prediction. METHODS: We evaluated a truncating variant, p.Arg798Ter (rs137852986), and 10 missense variants of BRIP1, in 48 144 cases and 43...

  9. Newly identified genetic risk variants for celiac disease related to the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, Karen A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Turner, Graham; Heap, Graham A. R.; Franke, Lude; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Romanos, Jihane; Dinesen, Lotte C.; Ryan, Anthony W.; Panesar, Davinder; Gwilliam, Rhian; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; McLaren, William M.; Holmes, Geoffrey K. T.; Howdle, Peter D.; Walters, Julian R. F.; Sanders, David S.; Playford, Raymond J.; Trynka, Gosia; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Trimble, Valerie; Stevens, Fiona M.; O'Morain, Colm; Kennedy, Nicholas P.; Kelleher, Dermot; Pennington, Daniel J.; Strachan, David P.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Mein, Charles A.; Wapenaar, Martin C.; Deloukas, Panos; McGinnis, Ralph; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Our genome-wide association study of celiac disease previously identified risk variants in the IL2-IL21 region. To identify additional risk variants, we genotyped 1,020 of the most strongly associated non-HLA markers in an additional 1,643 cases and 3,406 controls. Through joint analysis including t

  10. Circadian gene variants and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ann Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732 and without (N = 1780 type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+ using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66-0.86], p = 3.18 × 10(-5, while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07-1.39], p = 0.003. Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01-1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91-0.99], p = 0.015 respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: None of the selected circadian gene variants was associated with type

  11. Common Variants in CLDN2 and MORC4 Genes Confer Disease Susceptibility in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Giri

    Full Text Available A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS identified association with variants in X-linked CLDN2 and MORC4, and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci with chronic pancreatitis (CP in North American patients of European ancestry. We selected 9 variants from the reported GWAS and replicated the association with CP in Indian patients by genotyping 1807 unrelated Indians of Indo-European ethnicity, including 519 patients with CP and 1288 controls. The etiology of CP was idiopathic in 83.62% and alcoholic in 16.38% of 519 patients. Our study confirmed a significant association of 2 variants in CLDN2 gene (rs4409525-OR 1.71, P = 1.38 x 10-09; rs12008279-OR 1.56, P = 1.53 x 10-04 and 2 variants in MORC4 gene (rs12688220-OR 1.72, P = 9.20 x 10-09; rs6622126-OR 1.75, P = 4.04x10-05 in Indian patients with CP. We also found significant association at PRSS1-PRSS2 locus (OR 0.60; P = 9.92 x 10-06 and SAMD12-TNFRSF11B (OR 0.49, 95% CI [0.31-0.78], P = 0.0027. A variant in the gene MORC4 (rs12688220 showed significant interaction with alcohol (OR for homozygous and heterozygous risk allele -14.62 and 1.51 respectively, P = 0.0068 suggesting gene-environment interaction. A combined analysis of the genes CLDN2 and MORC4 based on an effective risk allele score revealed a higher percentage of individuals homozygous for the risk allele in CP cases with 5.09 fold enhanced risk in individuals with 7 or more effective risk alleles compared with individuals with 3 or less risk alleles (P = 1.88 x 10-14. Genetic variants in CLDN2 and MORC4 genes were associated with CP in Indian patients.

  12. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Polonikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase and PON2 (paraoxonase 2 as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma.

  13. Effect of genetic variants associated with plasma homocysteine levels on stroke risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Malik, Rainer; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Paré, Guillaume; Psaty, Bruce M; Fornage, Myriam; Hasan, Nazeeha; Rinne, Paul E; Ikram, M Arfan; Markus, Hugh S; Rosand, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Meschia, James F; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Worrall, Bradford B; Dichgans, Martin; Sharma, Pankaj

    2014-07-01

    Elevated total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) levels are known to be associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke (IS). Given that both tHcy and IS are heritable traits, we investigated a potential genetic relationship between homocysteine levels and stroke risk by assessing 18 polymorphisms previously associated with tHcy levels for their association with IS and its subtypes. Previous meta-analysis results from an international stroke collaborative network, METASTROKE, were used to assess association of the 18 tHcy-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 389 IS cases and 62 004 controls. We also investigated the associations in regions located within 50 kb from the 18 tHcy-related SNPs and the association of a genetic risk score, including the 18 SNPs. One SNP located in the RASIP1 gene and a cluster of 3 SNPs located at and near SLC17A3 were significantly associated with IS (Pstroke subtypes, the sentinel SNP located upstream of MUT was significantly associated with small-vessel disease (P=0.0022), whereas 1 SNP located in MTHFR was significantly associated with large-vessel disease (P=0.00019). A genetic risk score, including the 18 SNPs, did not show significant association with IS or its subtypes. This study found several potential associations with IS and its subtypes: an association of an MUT variant with small-vessel disease, an MTHFR variant with large-vessel disease, and associations of RASIP1 and SLC17A3 variants with overall IS. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia J; Rajala, Amelia K; Carlson, Scott R; Rupert, Jim L

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  15. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J Thomson

    Full Text Available Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4 influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599 that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  16. Schizophrenia risk variants affecting microRNA function and site-specific regulation of NT5C2 by miR-206.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauberg, Mads Engel; Holm-Nielsen, Marie Hebsgaard; Mattheisen, Manuel; Askou, Anne Louise; Grove, Jakob; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2016-09-01

    Despite the identification of numerous schizophrenia-associated genetic variants, few have been examined functionally to identify and characterize the causal variants. To mitigate this, we aimed at identifying functional variants affecting miRNA function. Using data from a large-scale genome-wide association study of schizophrenia, we looked for schizophrenia risk variants altering either miRNA binding sites, miRNA genes, promoters for miRNA genes, or variants that were expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for miRNA genes. We hereby identified several potentially functional variants relating to miRNA function with our top finding being a schizophrenia protective allele that disrupts miR-206׳s binding to NT5C2 thus leading to increased expression of this gene. A subsequent experimental follow-up of the variant using a luciferase-based reporter assay confirmed that the allele disrupts the binding. Our study therefore suggests that miR-206 may contribute to schizophrenia risk through allele-dependent regulation of the genome-wide significant gene NT5C2.

  17. Rs7903146 variant of TCF7L2 gene and rs18012824 variant of PPARG2 gene (Pro12Ala are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Novosibirsk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Arkad'evna Bondar'

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the association of polymorphisms in TCF7L2 and PPARG2 genes with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Novosibirsk population.Materials and Methods. We examined 391 patients with T2DM and 556 individuals with normal glucose metabolism. Allelic identification was performed with TaqMan technique, implementing allele-specific real-time PCR.Results. Analysis shows that allelic frequency distribution of rs1801282 variant of PPARG2 gene and rs7903146 variant of TCF7L2 differs significantly between the study and control groups (OR [CI 95%]=1.44 [1.12–1.85], p=0.005 and OR [CI 95%]=1.57 [1.17–2.10], p=0.003, respectively. T2DM patients with T/T genotype of rs7903146 variant of TCF7L2 gene had lower BMI (p=0.02. Observed combination of risk alleles reached 99%. Combined β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance genotypes were identified in 56% of tested subjects, isolated insulin resistance – in 42.2% of subjects, and isolated β-cell dysfunction – in 0.8% of subjects.Conclusion. Our data shows that carrier state of 12Pro rs1801284 variant of PPARG2 gene and T-allele rs7903146 variant of TCF7L2 gene are associated with T2DM in Novosibirsk population, increasing its risk 1.44 and 1.57 times, respectively. Combination of these polymorphisms was observed in 99% of patients with T2DM.

  18. Investigation of Dyslexia and SLI Risk Variants in Reading- and Language-Impaired Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, D. F.; Paracchini, S.; Scerri, T. S.; Winchester, L.; Addis, L.; Richardson, Alex J.; Walter, J.; Stein, J. F.; Talcott, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    Dyslexia (or reading disability) and specific language impairment (or SLI) are common childhood disorders that show considerable co-morbidity and diagnostic overlaps and have been suggested to share some genetic aetiology. Recently, genetic risk variants have been identified for SLI and dyslexia enabling the direct evaluation of possible shared genetic influences between these disorders. In this study we investigate the role of variants in these genes (namely MRPL19/C20RF3,ROBO1,DCDC2, KIAA0319, DYX1C1, CNTNAP2, ATP2C2 and CMIP) in the aetiology of SLI and dyslexia. We perform case–control and quantitative association analyses using measures of oral and written language skills in samples of SLI and dyslexic families and cases. We replicate association between KIAA0319 and DCDC2 and dyslexia and provide evidence to support a role for KIAA0319 in oral language ability. In addition, we find association between reading-related measures and variants in CNTNAP2 and CMIP in the SLI families. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10519-010-9424-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21165691

  19. Pooled sequencing of 531 genes in inflammatory bowel disease identifies an associated rare variant in BTNL2 and implicates other immune related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J Prescott

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of rare coding sequence variants to genetic susceptibility in complex disorders is an important but unresolved question. Most studies thus far have investigated a limited number of genes from regions which contain common disease associated variants. Here we investigate this in inflammatory bowel disease by sequencing the exons and proximal promoters of 531 genes selected from both genome-wide association studies and pathway analysis in pooled DNA panels from 474 cases of Crohn's disease and 480 controls. 80 variants with evidence of association in the sequencing experiment or with potential functional significance were selected for follow up genotyping in 6,507 IBD cases and 3,064 population controls. The top 5 disease associated variants were genotyped in an extension panel of 3,662 IBD cases and 3,639 controls, and tested for association in a combined analysis of 10,147 IBD cases and 7,008 controls. A rare coding variant p.G454C in the BTNL2 gene within the major histocompatibility complex was significantly associated with increased risk for IBD (p = 9.65x10-10, OR = 2.3[95% CI = 1.75-3.04], but was independent of the known common associated CD and UC variants at this locus. Rare (T or decreased risk (IL12B p.V298F, and NICN p.H191R of IBD. These results provide additional insights into the involvement of the inhibition of T cell activation in the development of both sub-phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. We suggest that although rare coding variants may make a modest overall contribution to complex disease susceptibility, they can inform our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis.

  20. Evaluation of Parkinson disease risk variants as expression-QTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne C Latourelle

    Full Text Available The recent Parkinson Disease GWAS Consortium meta-analysis and replication study reports association at several previously confirmed risk loci SNCA, MAPT, GAK/DGKQ, and HLA and identified a novel risk locus at RIT2. To further explore functional consequences of these associations, we investigated modification of gene expression in prefrontal cortex brain samples of pathologically confirmed PD cases (N = 26 and controls (N = 24 by 67 associated SNPs in these 5 loci. Association between the eSNPs and expression was evaluated using a 2-degrees of freedom test of both association and difference in association between cases and controls, adjusted for relevant covariates. SNPs at each of the 5 loci were tested for cis-acting effects on all probes within 250 kb of each locus. Trans-effects of the SNPs on the 39,122 probes passing all QC on the microarray were also examined. From the analysis of cis-acting SNP effects, several SNPs in the MAPT region show significant association to multiple nearby probes, including two strongly correlated probes targeting the gene LOC644246 and the duplicated genes LRRC37A and LRRC37A2, and a third uncorrelated probe targeting the gene DCAKD. Significant cis-associations were also observed between SNPs and two probes targeting genes in the HLA region on chromosome 6. Expanding the association study to examine trans effects revealed an additional 23 SNP-probe associations reaching statistical significance (p<2.8 × 10(-8 including SNPs from the SNCA, MAPT and RIT2 regions. These findings provide additional context for the interpretation of PD associated SNPs identified in recent GWAS as well as potential insight into the mechanisms underlying the observed SNP associations.

  1. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte;

    2012-01-01

    . Also, identifying family members that do not carry the variant is important so they can be released from the intensive surveillance. Determining which genetic variants are pathogenic and which are neutral is a major challenge in clinical genetics. The profound mechanistic knowledge on the genetics...

  2. Rare, protein-truncating variants in ATM, CHEK2 and PALB2, but not XRCC2, are associated with increased breast cancer risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brennan; Allen, Jamie; Luccarini, Craig; Pooley, Karen A; Shah, Mitul; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don M; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Ostrander, Elaine A; Pharoah, Paul Dp; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F

    2017-08-04

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy in women and has a major heritable component. The risks associated with most rare susceptibility variants are not well estimated. To better characterise the contribution of variants in ATM, CHEK2, PALB2 and XRCC2, we sequenced their coding regions in 13 087 BC cases and 5488 controls from East Anglia, UK. Gene coding regions were enriched via PCR, sequenced, variant called and filtered for quality. ORs for BC risk were estimated separately for carriers of truncating variants and of rare missense variants, which were further subdivided by functional domain and pathogenicity as predicted by four in silico algorithms. Truncating variants in PALB2 (OR=4.69, 95% CI 2.27 to 9.68), ATM (OR=3.26; 95% CI 1.82 to 6.46) and CHEK2 (OR=3.11; 95% CI 2.15 to 4.69), but not XRCC2 (OR=0.94; 95% CI 0.26 to 4.19) were associated with increased BC risk. Truncating variants in ATM and CHEK2 were more strongly associated with risk of oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative disease, while those in PALB2 were associated with similar risks for both subtypes. There was also some evidence that missense variants in ATM, CHEK2 and PALB2 may contribute to BC risk, but larger studies are necessary to quantify the magnitude of this effect. Truncating variants in PALB2 are associated with a higher risk of BC than those in ATM or CHEK2. A substantial risk of BC due to truncating XRCC2 variants can be excluded. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Rare variants in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 increase risk for AD in late-onset Alzheimer's disease families.

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    Carlos Cruchaga

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mutations in APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, MAPT and GRN have previously been linked to familial early onset forms of dementia. Mutation screening in these genes has been performed in either very small series or in single families with late onset AD (LOAD. Similarly, studies in single families have reported mutations in MAPT and GRN associated with clinical AD but no systematic screen of a large dataset has been performed to determine how frequently this occurs. We report sequence data for 439 probands from late-onset AD families with a history of four or more affected individuals. Sixty sequenced individuals (13.7% carried a novel or pathogenic mutation. Eight pathogenic variants, (one each in APP and MAPT, two in PSEN1 and four in GRN three of which are novel, were found in 14 samples. Thirteen additional variants, present in 23 families, did not segregate with disease, but the frequency of these variants is higher in AD cases than controls, indicating that these variants may also modify risk for disease. The frequency of rare variants in these genes in this series is significantly higher than in the 1,000 genome project (p = 5.09 × 10⁻⁵; OR = 2.21; 95%CI = 1.49-3.28 or an unselected population of 12,481 samples (p = 6.82 × 10⁻⁵; OR = 2.19; 95%CI = 1.347-3.26. Rare coding variants in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2, increase risk for or cause late onset AD. The presence of variants in these genes in LOAD and early-onset AD demonstrates that factors other than the mutation can impact the age at onset and penetrance of at least some variants associated with AD. MAPT and GRN mutations can be found in clinical series of AD most likely due to misdiagnosis. This study clearly demonstrates that rare variants in these genes could explain an important proportion of genetic heritability of AD, which is not detected by GWAS.

  4. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

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    Giuseppe Matullo

    Full Text Available Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM, a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes, causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14. Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28. These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos.

  5. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matullo, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Betti, Marta; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ferrante, Daniela; Voglino, Floriana; Cadby, Gemma; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosa, Fabio; Russo, Alessia; Hirvonen, Ari; Casalone, Elisabetta; Tunesi, Sara; Padoan, Marina; Giordano, Mara; Aspesi, Anna; Casadio, Caterina; Ardissone, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Libener, Roberta; Guaschino, Roberto; Piccolini, Ezio; Neri, Monica; Musk, Arthur W B; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; James, Alan L; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce W; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle J; Mirabelli, Dario; Ugolini, Donatella; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs) in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes), causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14). Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28). These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos.

  6. Association of FTO and IRX3 genetic variants to obesity risk in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Apurva; Mittal, Balraj; Prakash, Jai; Srivastava, Pranjal; Srivastava, Nimisha; Srivastava, Neena

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is an increasingly important health problem worldwide as well as in developing countries like India. Recent genetic studies suggest that obesity associated FTO and IRX3 are functionally linked and many effects due to genetic variants in FTO gene act through IRX3. To evaluate the association of FTO and IRX3 genetic variants towards obesity risk. North Indian individuals categorised as non-obese (BMI obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) were selected. FTO rs8050136, rs1421085, rs9939609, rs17817449 and IRX3 rs3751723 were genotyped by means of validated Taqman® allelic discrimination to evaluate their association with obesity by means of single locus logistic regression by SPSS ver. 19 and multi-locus linkage and haplotype analysis by SNPStats and gene-gene interaction with Generalised Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR) ver.6. In single locus analysis, FTO rs8050136 CA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.4 (1.7-3.4) and AA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 3.1 (1.9-5.2); FTO rs1421085 TA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.4-3.0) and AA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 3.0 (1.8-5.0); FTO rs9939609 TC (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.5-3.1) and CC (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 4.2 (2.5-7.3) along with TG (p = 0.001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.3-3.2) and GG (p = 0.021; OR (95% CI) = 3.8 (1.2-11.8) genotypes of FTO rs17817449 with GT (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.5-3.1) and TT (p = 0.012; OR (95% CI) = 3.3 (1.8-3.6) genotypes of IRX3 rs3751723 were significantly associated with obesity. In multi-locus analysis, SNPs of FTO and IRX3 were in strong linkage disequilibrium and in haplotype and GMDR analysis the SNPs were significantly associated with obesity risk (p genetic variants of both FTO and IRX3 genes are in high linkage disequilibrium (LD) and are associated with obesity risk in North Indians.

  7. Association between LDL-cholesterol lowering genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotta, Luca A.; Sharp, Stephen. J; Burgess, Stephen; Perry, John R. B.; Stewart, Isobel. D; Willems, Sara M.; Luan, Jian’an; Ardanaz, Eva; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Boeing, Heiner; Deloukas, Panos; Forouhi, Nita G; Franks, Paul W; Grioni, Sara; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, Jose-Ramón; Riboli, Elio; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salamanca, Elena C; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke MW; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Inês; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Savage, David. B; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Importance Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 or HMGCR, encoding the respective molecular targets of ezetimibe and statins, have previously been used as proxies to study the efficacy of these lipid-lowering drugs. Alleles near HMGCR are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, mimicking the increased incidence of new-onset diabetes associated with statin treatment in randomized clinical trials. It is unknown whether alleles near NPC1L1 are also associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective To investigate whether LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 and other genes encoding current or prospective molecular targets of lipid-lowering therapy (i.e. HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Design, Setting and Participants The associations with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease of LDL-lowering genetic variants were investigated in meta-analyses of genetic association studies. Meta-analyses included 50,775 individuals with type 2 diabetes and 270,269 controls including three studies and 60,801 individuals with coronary artery disease and 123,504 controls from a published meta-analysis. Data collection took place in Europe and the United States between 1991 and 2016. Exposure LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1, HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR. Main Outcomes and Measures Odds ratio of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Results LDL-lowering genetic variants at NPC1L1 were inversely associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio for a genetically-predicted reduction of 1 mmol/L in LDL cholesterol, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.88; p=0.008) and directly associated with type 2 diabetes (2.42, 1.70-3.43; p<0.001). The odds ratio of type 2 diabetes for PCSK9 genetic variants was 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.38, p=0.03). For a given reduction in LDL cholesterol, genetic variants were associated with a similar reduction in coronary artery

  8. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, M.L.; Norman, J E; Morgan, N. V.; Mundell, S J; Lordkipanidze, M.; Lowe, G. C.; Daly, M E; Simpson, M.A.; Drake, S.; Watson, S P; Mumford, A D; UKGAPPS,

    2016-01-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common\\ud population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)\\ud genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR\\ud gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants\\ud (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in\\ud 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing\\ud Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders\\ud (I...

  9. Genetic variants in the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway and risk of different types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Juan; Yu, Chen-Yang; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Hao-Yan; Guan, Jian; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-02-16

    Members of the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway regulate cell proliferation, migration and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, and are frequently dysregulated in cancer. Whether germline genetic variants in inositol phosphate metabolism pathway are associated with cancer risk remains to be clarified. We examined the association between inositol phosphate metabolism pathway genes and risk of eight types of cancer using data from genome-wide association studies. Logistic regression models were applied to evaluate SNP-level associations. Gene- and pathway-based associations were tested using the permutation-based adaptive rank-truncated product method. The overall inositol phosphate metabolism pathway was significantly associated with risk of lung cancer (P = 2.00 × 10(-4)), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (P = 5.70 × 10(-3)), gastric cancer (P = 3.03 × 10(-2)) and renal cell carcinoma (P = 1.26 × 10(-2)), but not with pancreatic cancer (P = 1.40 × 10(-1)), breast cancer (P = 3.03 × 10(-1)), prostate cancer (P = 4.51 × 10(-1)), and bladder cancer (P = 6.30 × 10(-1)). Our results provide a link between inherited variation in the overall inositol phosphate metabolism pathway and several individual genes and cancer. Further studies will be needed to validate these positive findings, and to explore its mechanisms.

  10. Genome-Wide Interaction Analyses between Genetic Variants and Alcohol Consumption and Smoking for Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Hutter, Carolyn M; Newcomb, Polly A; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Bien, Stephanie A; Campbell, Peter T; Baron, John A; Berndt, Sonja I; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C; Gallinger, Steven; Giovannucci, Edward L; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jeon, Jihyoun; Jenkins, Mark A; Kocarnik, Jonathan; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Lin, Yi; Lindor, Noralane M; Nishihara, Reiko; Ogino, Shuji; Potter, John D; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E; Schrotz-King, Petra; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Thornquist, Mark; Toth, Reka; Wallace, Robert; White, Emily; Jiao, Shuo; Lemire, Mathieu; Hsu, Li; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many genetic susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC). However, variants in these loci explain only a small proportion of familial aggregation, and there are likely additional variants that are associated with CRC susceptibility. Genome-wide studies of gene-environment interactions may identify variants that are not detected in GWAS of marginal gene effects. To study this, we conducted a genome-wide analysis for interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO). Interactions were tested using logistic regression. We identified interaction between CRC risk and alcohol consumption and variants in the 9q22.32/HIATL1 (Pinteraction = 1.76×10-8; permuted p-value 3.51x10-8) region. Compared to non-/occasional drinking light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs9409565 CT genotype (OR, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.74-0.91]; P = 2.1×10-4) and TT genotypes (OR,0.62 [95% CI, 0.51-0.75]; P = 1.3×10-6) but not associated among those with the CC genotype (p = 0.059). No genome-wide statistically significant interactions were observed for smoking. If replicated our suggestive finding of a genome-wide significant interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption might contribute to understanding colorectal cancer etiology and identifying subpopulations with differential susceptibility to the effect of alcohol on CRC risk.

  11. Genome-Wide Interaction Analyses between Genetic Variants and Alcohol Consumption and Smoking for Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many genetic susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC. However, variants in these loci explain only a small proportion of familial aggregation, and there are likely additional variants that are associated with CRC susceptibility. Genome-wide studies of gene-environment interactions may identify variants that are not detected in GWAS of marginal gene effects. To study this, we conducted a genome-wide analysis for interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO. Interactions were tested using logistic regression. We identified interaction between CRC risk and alcohol consumption and variants in the 9q22.32/HIATL1 (Pinteraction = 1.76×10-8; permuted p-value 3.51x10-8 region. Compared to non-/occasional drinking light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs9409565 CT genotype (OR, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.74-0.91]; P = 2.1×10-4 and TT genotypes (OR,0.62 [95% CI, 0.51-0.75]; P = 1.3×10-6 but not associated among those with the CC genotype (p = 0.059. No genome-wide statistically significant interactions were observed for smoking. If replicated our suggestive finding of a genome-wide significant interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption might contribute to understanding colorectal cancer etiology and identifying subpopulations with differential susceptibility to the effect of alcohol on CRC risk.

  12. An obesity-associated FTO gene variant and increased energy intake in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Joanne E; Tavendale, Roger; Watt, Peter; Hetherington, Marion M; Palmer, Colin N A

    2008-12-11

    Variation in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene has provided the most robust associations with common obesity to date. However, the role of FTO variants in modulating specific components of energy balance is unknown. We studied 2726 Scottish children, 4 to 10 years of age, who underwent genotyping for FTO variant rs9939609 and were measured for height and weight. A subsample of 97 children was examined for possible association of the FTO variant with adiposity, energy expenditure, and food intake. In the total study group and the subsample, the A allele of rs9939609 was associated with increased weight (P=0.003 and P=0.049, respectively) and body-mass index (P=0.003 and P=0.03, respectively). In the intensively phenotyped subsample, the A allele was also associated with increased fat mass (P=0.01) but not with lean mass. Although total and resting energy expenditures were increased in children with the A allele (P=0.009 and P=0.03, respectively), resting energy expenditure was identical to that predicted for the age and weight of the child, indicating that there is no defect in metabolic adaptation to obesity in persons bearing the risk-associated allele. The A allele was associated with increased energy intake (P=0.006) independently of body weight. In contrast, the weight of food ingested by children who had the allele was similar to that in children who did not have the allele (P=0.82). The FTO variant that confers a predisposition to obesity does not appear to be involved in the regulation of energy expenditure but may have a role in the control of food intake and food choice, suggesting a link to a hyperphagic phenotype or a preference for energy-dense foods. 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  13. Pleiotrophin gene therapy for peripheral ischemia: evaluation of full-length and truncated gene variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Fang

    Full Text Available Pleiotrophin (PTN is a growth factor with both pro-angiogenic and limited pro-tumorigenic activity. We evaluated the potential for PTN to be used for safe angiogenic gene therapy using the full length gene and a truncated gene variant lacking the domain implicated in tumorigenesis. Mouse myoblasts were transduced to express full length or truncated PTN (PTN or T-PTN, along with a LacZ reporter gene, and injected into mouse limb muscle and myocardium. In cultured myoblasts, PTN was expressed and secreted via the Golgi apparatus, but T-PTN was not properly secreted. Nonetheless, no evidence of uncontrolled growth was observed in cells expressing either form of PTN. PTN gene delivery to myocardium, and non-ischemic skeletal muscle, did not result in a detectable change in vascularity or function. In ischemic hindlimb at 14 days post-implantation, intramuscular injection with PTN-expressing myoblasts led to a significant increase in skin perfusion and muscle arteriole density. We conclude that (1 delivery of the full length PTN gene to muscle can be accomplished without tumorigenesis, (2 the truncated PTN gene may be difficult to use in a gene therapy context due to inefficient secretion, (3 PTN gene delivery leads to functional benefit in the mouse acute ischemic hindlimb model.

  14. Polymorphism of the Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Gene (TCF7L2) Interacts with Obesity on Type-2 Diabetes in the PREDIMED Study Emphasizing the Heterogeneity of Genetic Variants in Type-2 Diabetes Risk Prediction: Time for Obesity-Specific Genetic Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Coltell, Oscar; Sorlí, Jose V; Estruch, Ramón; Quiles, Laura; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Castañer, Olga; Arós, Fernando; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Portolés, Olga; Fiol, Miquel; Díez Espino, Javier; Basora, Josep; Fitó, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, José M

    2016-12-06

    Nutrigenetic studies analyzing gene-diet interactions of the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on type-2 diabetes (T2D) have shown controversial results. A reason contributing to this may be the additional modulation by obesity. Moreover, TCF7L2-rs7903146 is one of the most influential variants in T2D-genetic risk scores (GRS). Therefore, to increase the predictive value (PV) of GRS it is necessary to first see whether the included polymorphisms have heterogeneous effects. We comprehensively investigated gene-obesity interactions between the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on T2D (prevalence and incidence) and analyzed other T2D-polymorphisms in a sub-sample. We studied 7018 PREDIMED participants at baseline and longitudinally (8.7 years maximum follow-up). Obesity significantly interacted with the TCF7L2-rs7903146 on T2D prevalence, associations being greater in non-obese subjects. Accordingly, we prospectively observed in non-T2D subjects (n = 3607) that its association with T2D incidence was stronger in non-obese (HR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.13-2.92, p = 0.013 for TT versus CC) than in obese subjects (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.61-1.66; p = 0.979; p-interaction = 0.048). Accordingly, TCF7L2-PV was higher in non-obese subjects. Additionally, we created obesity-specific GRS with ten T2D-polymorphisms and demonstrated for the first time their higher strata-specific PV. In conclusion, we provide strong evidence supporting the need for considering obesity when analyzing the TCF7L2 effects and propose the use of obesity-specific GRS for T2D.

  15. Ischemic stroke in Ukrainian population: possible involvement of the F2 G20210A, F5 G1691A and MTHFR C677T gene variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova S. M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate a possible involvement of the F2, F5, MTHFR gene variants into ischemic stroke pathogenesis in population of Ukraine. Methods. Polymorphic variants were analyzed in unrelated 183 stroke patients, 100 individuals from the general population of Ukraine and 88 healthy individuals elder than 65 years using PCR followed by RFLP analysis. Results. Unfavourable polymorphic variants F2 20210A, F5 1691A and MTHFR 677T were observed more frequently in patients with ischemic stroke comparing to control groups. Conclusions. F5 1691A and MTHFR 677T polymorphic variants are associated with the occurrence of ischemic stroke in women. F2 20210A is associated with the occurrence of ischemic stroke in men. Cumulative risk factor for stroke development is revealed in a combination of unfavorable polymorphic variants 20210A, 1691A and 677T of F2, F5 and MTHFR genes.

  16. Rare Variant Analysis of Human and Rodent Obesity Genes in Individuals with Severe Childhood Obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricks, Audrey E.; Bochukova, Elena G.; Marenne, Gaëlle; Keogh, Julia M.; Atanassova, Neli; Bounds, Rebecca; Wheeler, Eleanor; Mistry, Vanisha; Henning, Elana; Körner, Antje; Muddyman, Dawn; McCarthy, Shane; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Scott, Robert A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J.; Surendran, Praveen; Howson, Joanna M M; Butterworth, Adam S.; Danesh, John; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Afzal, Shoaib; Papadia, Sofia; Ashford, Sofie; Garg, Sumedha; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Palomino, Rafael I.; Kwasniewska, Alexandra; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Barroso, Inês; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Benzeval, Michaela; Burton, Jonathan; Buck, Nicholas; Jäckle, Annette; Kumari, Meena; Laurie, Heather; Lynn, Peter; Pudney, Stephen; Rabe, Birgitta; Wolke, Dieter; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ferrari, Pietro; Palli, Domenico; Krogha, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; Tuminoa, Rosario; Matullo, Giuseppe; Boer, Jolanda Ma; Van Der Schouw, Yvonne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449253; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quiros, J. Ramon; Sánchez, María José; Navarro, Carmen; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Arriola, Larraitz; Melander, Olle; Wennberg, Patrik; Key, Timothy J.; Riboli, Elio; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl A; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Soler Artigas, María; Ayub, Muhammad; Bala, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Beales, Phil; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharyaa, Shoumo; Birney, Ewan; Blackwooda, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bolton, Patrick F.; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Calissanoa, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Charlton, Ruth; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Ciampia, Antonio; Cirak, Sebahattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Coccaa, Massimiliano; Collier, David A; Cosgrove, Catherine; Coxa, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Curtis, David; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Day, Ian N M; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Dominiczak, Anna; Down, Thomas; Du, Yuanping; Dunham, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ekong, Rosemary; Ellis, Peter; Evansa, David M.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, James S.; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Christopher S.; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom R.; Geihs, Matthias; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Greenwood, Celia M.T.; Griffin, Heather; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Guo, Xueqin; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah J.; Holmans, Peter A; Howie, Bryan; Huang, Jie; Huang, Liren; Hubbard, Tim; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Iotchkova, Valentina; Jackson, David K.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Joyce, Chris; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John P.; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Khawaja, Farrah; Van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lawson, Daniel; Lee, Irene; Lek, Monkol; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Liang, Jieqin; Lin, Hong; Liu, Ryan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Luis R.; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Mangino, Massimo; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; Mathieson, Iain; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McKechanie, Andrew G.; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Migone, Nicola; Min, Josine L.; Mitchison, Hannah M; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, Andrew D.; Morris, James; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael J; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Payne, Stewart J.; Perry, John R. B.; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollitt, Rebecca C.; Porteous, David J.; Povey, Sue; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, F. Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Richards, J Brent; Ridout, Cheryl K.; Ring, Susan M.; Ritchie, Graham R.S.; Roberts, Nicola; Robinson, Rachel L.; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter; Schiffels, Stephan; Schmidts, Miriam; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Scott, Richard H.; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Sharp, Sally I.; Shaw, Adam; Shihab, Hashem A.; Shin, So Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin S; Smee, Carol; Smith, Blair H.; Davey Smith, George; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spasic-Boskovic, Olivera; Spector, Timothy D; St Clair, David; St Pourcain, Beate; Stalker, Jim; Stevens, Elizabeth; Sun, Jianping; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Suvisaari, Jaana; Syrris, Petros; Taylor, Rohan; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tobin, Martin D; Valdes, Ana M.; Vandersteen, Anthony M.; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Visscher, Peter M.; Wain, Louise V.; Walter, Klaudia; Walters, James T.R.; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jun; Wang, Nai-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Using targeted and whole-exome sequencing, we studied 32 human and 87 rodent obesity genes in 2,548 severely obese children and 1,117 controls. We identified 52 variants contributing to obesity in 2% of cases including multiple novel variants in GNAS,

  17. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacArthur, D.G.; Balasubramanian, S.; Frankish, A.; Huang, N.; Morris, J.; Walter, K.; Jostins, L.; Habegger, L.; Pickrell, J.K.; Montgomery, S.B.; Albers, C.A.; Zhang, Z.D.; Conrad, D.F.; Lunter, G.; Zheng, H.; Ayub, Q.; DePristo, M.A.; Banks, E.; Hu, M.; Handsaker, R.E.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Fromer, M.; Jin, M.; Mu, X.J.; Khurana, E.; Ye, K.; Kay, M.; Saunders, G.I.; Suner, M.M.; Hunt, T.; Barnes, I.H.; Amid, C.; Carvalho-Silva, D.R.; Bignell, A.H.; Snow, C.; Yngvadottir, B.; Bumpstead, S.; Cooper, D.N.; Xue, Y.; Romero, I.G.; Genomes Project, C.; Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Gibbs, R.A.; McCarroll, S.A.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Pritchard, J.K.; Barrett, J.C.; Harrow, J.; Hurles, M.E.; Gerstein, M.B.; Tyler-Smith, C.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to det

  18. Response to succinylcholine in patients carrying the K-variant of the butyrylcholinesterase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretlau, Claus; Sørensen, Martin Kryspin; Vedersoe, Anne-Lise Zimling;

    2013-01-01

    Succinylcholine is usually metabolized quickly by the butyrylcholinesterase enzyme (BChE) but genetic variants of BChE may prolong the duration of action. The Kalow (K) variant is the most common mutation in the butyrylcholinesterase gene (BCHE), being present in 25% of Caucasians. The significan...

  19. Association between Common Genetic Variants and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Risk in a Chinese Han Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Yuan, Yi; Yang, Hua; Li, Jingjie; Feng, Tian; Ouyang, Yongri; Jin, Tianbo; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinopathies affecting 5-7% of reproductive age women worldwide. The aim of our study was to explore the PCOS-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations between common genetic variants and PCOS risk in a Han Chinese women population. Methods: In this case-control study, 285 Chinese Han women aged 28.50±6.858 years with PCOS and 299 controls of a mean age of 32.66±7.018 years were compared. We selected recently published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) which identified several genetic loci in PCOS. All the SNPs were genotyped by Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. Associations between the gene and the risk of PCOS were tested using various genetic models by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and Plink. Results: We found that rs705702 in the RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS (odds ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.87, p=0.011) and increased the PCOS risk. The genotypic model analysis also showed that rs705702 was associated with PCOS risk. Conclusion: Our results suggest that SNPs rs705702 in gene RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS in Han Chinese women. PMID:27217259

  20. Neural effects of the CSMD1 genome-wide associated schizophrenia risk variant rs10503253.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rose, Emma J

    2013-09-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs10503253 within the CUB and Sushi multiple domains-1 (CSMD1) gene on 8p23.2 has been identified as genome-wide significant for schizophrenia (SZ). This gene is of unknown function but has been implicated in multiple neurodevelopmental disorders that impact upon cognition, leading us to hypothesize that an effect on brain structure and function underlying cognitive processes may be part of the mechanism by which CMSD1 increases illness risk. To test this hypothesis, we investigated this CSMD1 variant in vivo in healthy participants in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study comprised of both fMRI of spatial working memory (N = 50) and a voxel-based morphometry investigation of grey and white matter (WM) volume (N = 150). Analyses of these data indicated that the risk "A" allele was associated with comparatively reduced cortical activations in BA18, that is, middle occipital gyrus and cuneus; posterior brain regions that support maintenance processes during performance of a spatial working memory task. Conversely, there was an absence of significant structural differences in brain volume (i.e., grey or WM). In accordance with previous evidence, these data suggest that CSMD1 may mediate brain function related to cognitive processes (i.e., executive function); with the relatively deleterious effects of the identified "A" risk allele on brain activity possibly constituting part of the mechanism by which CSMD1 increases schizophrenia risk.

  1. FTO gene variant modulates the neural correlates of visual food perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Anne B; Feis, Delia-Lisa; Schilbach, Leonhard; Kracht, Lutz; Hess, Martin E; Mauer, Jan; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene are currently the strongest known genetic factor predisposing humans to non-monogenic obesity. Recent experiments have linked these variants to a broad spectrum of behavioural alterations, including food choice and substance abuse. Yet, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variations influence body weight remain elusive. Here, we explore the brain structural substrate of the obesity-predisposing rs9939609 T/A variant of the FTO gene in non-obese subjects by means of multivariate classification and use fMRI to investigate genotype-specific differences in neural food-cue reactivity by analysing correlates of a visual food perception task. Our findings demonstrate that MRI-derived measures of morphology along middle and posterior fusiform gyrus (FFG) are highly predictive for FTO at-risk allele carriers, who also show enhanced neural responses elicited by food cues in the same posterior FFG area. In brief, these findings provide first-time evidence for FTO-specific differences in both brain structure and function already in non-obese individuals, thereby contributing to a mechanistic understanding of why FTO is a predisposing factor for obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Germline variants in Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndrome-associated genes from patients with one or few hamartomatous polyps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Brusgaard, Klaus; Hansen, Tine Plato;

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing, DNA samples from 77 patients with 84 hamartomatous polyps were sequenced. The detected germline variants were classified into pathogenicity classes. RESULTS: We detected several germline variants, among them three in ENG, two in BMPR1A, one in PTEN, and one in SMAD4. Although some of the detected......OBJECTIVE: A subgroup of patients with hamartomatous polyps in the GI tract has a hereditary Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndrome with an increased risk of cancer. The distinction between patients with one or few polyps and patients with a syndrome can be difficult. A pathogenic germline mutation can...... be detected in a majority of HPS patients. This study investigates whether patients with one or few hamartomatous polyps could have a syndrome based on genetic screening of relevant genes. METHODS: We designed a gene panel including 26 hamartomatous polyposis-associated genes. Using targeted Next Generation...

  3. Characterization of nodal/TGF-lefty signaling pathway gene variants for possible roles in congenital heart diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nodal/TGF-Lefty signaling pathway has important effects at early stages of differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in directing them to differentiate into different embryonic lineages. LEFTY, one of transforming growth factors in the Nodal/TGF-Lefty signaling pathway, plays an important role in the development of heart. The aim of this work was to find evidence on whether Lefty variations are associated with congenital heart diseases (CHD. METHODS: We sequenced the Lefty gene for 230 Chinese Han CHD patients and evaluated SNPs rs2295418, rs360057 and g.G169A, which are located within the translated regions of the genes. The statistical analyses were conducted using Chi-Square Tests as implemented in SPSS (version 13.0. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test of the population was carried out using online software OEGE, and multiple-sequence alignments of LEFTY proteins were carried out using the Vector NTI software. RESULTS: Two heterozygous variants in Lefty1 gene, g.G169A and g.A1035C, and one heterozygous variant in Lefty2 gene, g.C925A, were identified. Statistical analyses showed that the rs2295418 (g.C925A variant in Lefty2 gene was obviously associated with the risk of CHD (P value = 0.0160.05. CONCLUSIONS: The SNP rs2295418 in the Lefty2 gene is associated with CHD in Chinese Han populations.

  4. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlaeger, Tommy; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans O

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene are associated with SLE as well as with severe atherosclerosis. We determined whether mannose-binding lectin variant alleles were associated...

  5. High-throughput sequencing of mGluR signaling pathway genes reveals enrichment of rare variants in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond J Kelleher

    Full Text Available Identification of common molecular pathways affected by genetic variation in autism is important for understanding disease pathogenesis and devising effective therapies. Here, we test the hypothesis that rare genetic variation in the metabotropic glutamate-receptor (mGluR signaling pathway contributes to autism susceptibility. Single-nucleotide variants in genes encoding components of the mGluR signaling pathway were identified by high-throughput multiplex sequencing of pooled samples from 290 non-syndromic autism cases and 300 ethnically matched controls on two independent next-generation platforms. This analysis revealed significant enrichment of rare functional variants in the mGluR pathway in autism cases. Higher burdens of rare, potentially deleterious variants were identified in autism cases for three pathway genes previously implicated in syndromic autism spectrum disorder, TSC1, TSC2, and SHANK3, suggesting that genetic variation in these genes also contributes to risk for non-syndromic autism. In addition, our analysis identified HOMER1, which encodes a postsynaptic density-localized scaffolding protein that interacts with Shank3 to regulate mGluR activity, as a novel autism-risk gene. Rare, potentially deleterious HOMER1 variants identified uniquely in the autism population affected functionally important protein regions or regulatory sequences and co-segregated closely with autism among children of affected families. We also identified rare ASD-associated coding variants predicted to have damaging effects on components of the Ras/MAPK cascade. Collectively, these findings suggest that altered signaling downstream of mGluRs contributes to the pathogenesis of non-syndromic autism.

  6. Novel and functional DNA sequence variants within the GATA5 gene promoter in ventricular septal defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Ping Shan; Xiao-Li Wang; Yuan-Gang Qiao; Hong-Xin Wan Yan; Wen-Hui Huang; Shu-Chao Pang; Bo Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common human birth defect. Genetic causes for CHD remain largely unknown. GATA transcription factor 5 (GATA 5) is an essential regulator for the heart development. Mutations in the GATA5 gene have been reported in patients with a variety of CHD. Since misregulation of gene expression have been associated with human diseases, we speculated that changed levels of cardiac transcription factors, GATA5, may mediate the development of CHD. Methods: In this study, GATA5 gene promoter was genetically and functionally analyzed in large cohorts of patients with ventricular septal defect (VSD) (n=343) and ethnic-matched healthy controls (n=348). Results: Two novel and heterozygous DNA sequence variants (DSVs), g.61051165A>G and g.61051463delC, were identified in three VSD patients, but not in the controls. In cultured cardiomyocytes, GATA5 gene promoter activities were significantly decreased by DSV g.61051165A>G and increased by DSV g.61051463delC. Moreover, fathers of the VSD patients carrying the same DSVs had reduced diastolic function of left ventricles. Three SNPs, g.61051279C>T (rs77067995), g.61051327A>C (rs145936691) and g.61051373G>A (rs80197101), and one novel heterozygous DSV, g.61051227C>T, were found in both VSD patients and controls with similar frequencies. Conclusion: Our data suggested that the DSVs in the GATA5 gene promoter may increase the susceptibility to the development of VSD as a risk factor.

  7. Generalizability of Established Prostate Cancer Risk Variants in Men of African Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Signorello, Lisa B.; Strom, Sara S.; Kittles, Rick A.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chu, Lisa; Conti, David V.; Rand, Kristin A.; Diver, W. Ryan; Hennis, Anselm JM; John, Esther M.; Kibel, Adam S.; Klein, Eric A.; Kolb, Suzanne; Le Marchand, Loic; Leske, M. Cristina; Murphy, Adam B.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Park, Jong Y.; Pettaway, Curtis; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Zheng, S. Lilly; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Witte, John S.; Xu, Jianfeng; Isaacs, William; Ingles, Sue A.; Hsing, Ann; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Chanock, Stephen; Nemesure, Barbara; Blot, William J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than eighty risk variants for prostate cancer, mainly in European or Asian populations. The generalizability of these variants in other racial/ethnic populations needs to be understood before the loci can be utilized widely in risk modeling. In this study, we examined 82 previously reported risk variants in 4,853 prostate cancer cases and 4,678 controls of African ancestry. We performed association testing for each variant using logistic regression adjusted for age, study, and global ancestry. Of the 82 known risk variants, 68 (83%) had effects that were directionally consistent in their association with prostate cancer risk and 30 (37%) were significantly associated with risk at p<0.05, with the most statistically significant variants being rs116041037 (p=3.7×10-26) and rs6983561 (p=1.1×10-16) at 8q24, as well as rs7210100 (p=5.4×10-8) at 17q21. By exploring each locus in search of better markers, the number of variants that captured risk in men of African ancestry (p<0.05) increased from 30 (37%) to 44 (54%). An aggregate score comprised of these 44 markers was strongly associated with prostate cancer risk (per-allele odds ratio (OR)=1.12, p=7.3×10-98). In summary, the consistent directions of effects for the vast majority of variants in men of African ancestry indicate common functional alleles that are shared across populations. Further exploration of these susceptibility loci is needed to identify the underlying biologically relevant variants to improve prostate cancer risk modeling in populations of African ancestry. PMID:25044450

  8. PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM rare variants and cancer risk: data from COGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Couch, Fergus; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foulkes, William D; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Hopper, John L; Dörk, Thilo; Claes, Kathleen Bm; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Teo, Zhi Ling; Radice, Paolo; Catucci, Irene; Peterlongo, Paolo; Tsimiklis, Helen; Odefrey, Fabrice A; Dowty, James G; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B; Verhoef, Senno; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney J; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Bolla, Manjeet K; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federik; Burwinkel, Barbara; Yang, Rongxi; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan; Ziogas, Argyrios; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Investigators, kConFab; Wauters, Els; Smeets, Dominiek; Beuselinck, Benoit; Floris, Giuseppe; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Zheng, Wei; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Hankinson, Susan E; Kraft, Peter; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Kauppila, Saila; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Eccles, Diana M; Rafiq, Sajjad; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Sue M; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W R; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Dunning, Alison M; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind; Muir, Kenneth; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Weischer, Maren; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen; Schaid, Daniel J; Kelley, Joseph L; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Butterbach, Katja; Park, Jong; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara; Renner, Stefan P; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Alexander; Ruebner, Matthias; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Lambretchs, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Nickels, Stefan; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Friel, Grace; Lurie, Galina; Killeen, Jeffrey L; Wilkens, Lynne R; Goodman, Marc T; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter A; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; Moysich, Kirsten B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; Kommoss, Stefan; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Larson, Melissa C; Fogarty, Zachary C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A; Dao, Fanny; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S; Marks, Jeffrey R; Akushevich, Lucy

    2016-12-01

    The rarity of mutations in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM make it difficult to estimate precisely associated cancer risks. Population-based family studies have provided evidence that at least some of these mutations are associated with breast cancer risk as high as those associated with rare BRCA2 mutations. We aimed to estimate the relative risks associated with specific rare variants in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM via a multicentre case-control study. We genotyped 10 rare mutations using the custom iCOGS array: PALB2 c.1592delT, c.2816T>G and c.3113G>A, CHEK2 c.349A>G, c.538C>T, c.715G>A, c.1036C>T, c.1312G>T, and c.1343T>G and ATM c.7271T>G. We assessed associations with breast cancer risk (42 671 cases and 42 164 controls), as well as prostate (22 301 cases and 22 320 controls) and ovarian (14 542 cases and 23 491 controls) cancer risk, for each variant. For European women, strong evidence of association with breast cancer risk was observed for PALB2 c.1592delT OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.39 to 8.52, p=7.1×10(-5)), PALB2 c.3113G>A OR 4.21 (95% CI 1.84 to 9.60, p=6.9×10(-8)) and ATM c.7271T>G OR 11.0 (95% CI 1.42 to 85.7, p=0.0012). We also found evidence of association with breast cancer risk for three variants in CHEK2, c.349A>G OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.29 to 3.95), c.1036C>T OR 5.06 (95% CI 1.09 to 23.5) and c.538C>T OR 1.33 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.67) (p≤0.017). Evidence for prostate cancer risk was observed for CHEK2 c.1343T>G OR 3.03 (95% CI 1.53 to 6.03, p=0.0006) for African men and CHEK2 c.1312G>T OR 2.21 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.63, p=0.030) for European men. No evidence of association with ovarian cancer was found for any of these variants. This report adds to accumulating evidence that at least some variants in these genes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that is clinically important. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM rare variants and cancer risk: data from COGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Couch, Fergus; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foulkes, William D; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Hopper, John L; Dörk, Thilo; Claes, Kathleen BM; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Teo, Zhi Ling; Radice, Paolo; Catucci, Irene; Peterlongo, Paolo; Tsimiklis, Helen; Odefrey, Fabrice A; Dowty, James G; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B; Verhoef, Senno; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney J; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Bolla, Manjeet K; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federik; Burwinkel, Barbara; Yang, Rongxi; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan; Ziogas, Argyrios; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Investigators, kConFab; Wauters, Els; Smeets, Dominiek; Beuselinck, Benoit; Floris, Giuseppe; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Zheng, Wei; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Hankinson, Susan E; Kraft, Peter; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Kauppila, Saila; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Eccles, Diana M; Rafiq, Sajjad; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Sue M; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W R; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Dunning, Alison M; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind; Muir, Kenneth; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Weischer, Maren; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen; Schaid, Daniel J; Kelley, Joseph L; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Butterbach, Katja; Park, Jong; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara; Renner, Stefan P; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Alexander; Ruebner, Matthias; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Lambretchs, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Nickels, Stefan; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Friel, Grace; Lurie, Galina; Killeen, Jeffrey L; Wilkens, Lynne R; Goodman, Marc T; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter A; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; Moysich, Kirsten B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; Kommoss, Stefan; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Larson, Melissa C; Fogarty, Zachary C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A; Dao, Fanny; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S; Marks, Jeffrey R; Akushevich, Lucy; Cramer, Daniel W; Schildkraut, Joellen; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Stampfer, Meir; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Górski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Menkiszak, Janusz; Høgdall, Claus K; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan; Campbell, Ian; McNeish, Iain; Paul, James; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Whittemore, Alice S; Rothstein, Joseph H; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Cai, Hui; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Teten, Rachel T; Sutphen, Rebecca; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine M; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Fenstermacher, David; Lin, Hui-Yi; Permuth, Jennifer B; Sellers, Thomas A; Chen, Y Ann; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chen, Zhihua; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Menon, Usha; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Van Den Berg, David; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul DP; Song, Honglin; Winship, Ingrid; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Giles, Graham G; Tavtigian, Sean V; Easton, Doug F; Milne, Roger L

    2016-01-01

    Background The rarity of mutations in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM make it difficult to estimate precisely associated cancer risks. Population-based family studies have provided evidence that at least some of these mutations are associated with breast cancer risk as high as those associated with rare BRCA2 mutations. We aimed to estimate the relative risks associated with specific rare variants in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM via a multicentre case-control study. Methods We genotyped 10 rare mutations using the custom iCOGS array: PALB2 c.1592delT, c.2816T>G and c.3113G>A, CHEK2 c.349A>G, c.538C>T, c.715G>A, c.1036C>T, c.1312G>T, and c.1343T>G and ATM c.7271T>G. We assessed associations with breast cancer risk (42 671 cases and 42 164 controls), as well as prostate (22 301 cases and 22 320 controls) and ovarian (14 542 cases and 23 491 controls) cancer risk, for each variant. Results For European women, strong evidence of association with breast cancer risk was observed for PALB2 c.1592delT OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.39 to 8.52, p=7.1×10−5), PALB2 c.3113G>A OR 4.21 (95% CI 1.84 to 9.60, p=6.9×10−8) and ATM c.7271T>G OR 11.0 (95% CI 1.42 to 85.7, p=0.0012). We also found evidence of association with breast cancer risk for three variants in CHEK2, c.349A>G OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.29 to 3.95), c.1036C>T OR 5.06 (95% CI 1.09 to 23.5) and c.538C>T OR 1.33 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.67) (p≤0.017). Evidence for prostate cancer risk was observed for CHEK2 c.1343T>G OR 3.03 (95% CI 1.53 to 6.03, p=0.0006) for African men and CHEK2 c.1312G>T OR 2.21 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.63, p=0.030) for European men. No evidence of association with ovarian cancer was found for any of these variants. Conclusions This report adds to accumulating evidence that at least some variants in these genes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that is clinically important. PMID:27595995

  10. ADAMTS genes and the risk of cerebral aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arning, Astrid; Jeibmann, Astrid; Köhnemann, Stephan; Brokinkel, Benjamin; Ewelt, Christian; Berger, Klaus; Wellmann, Jürgen; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike; Stummer, Walter; Stoll, Monika; Holling, Markus

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral aneurysms (CAs) affect 2%-5% of the population, and familial predisposition plays a significant role in CA pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence suggest that genetic variations in matrix metalloproteinase genes (MMP) are involved in the etiopathology of CAs. The authors performed a case-control study to investigate the effect of 4 MMP variants from the ADAMTS family on the pathogenesis of CAs. METHODS To identify susceptible genetic variants, the authors investigated 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 genes from the ADAMTS family (ADAMTS2, -7, -12, and -13) known to be associated with vascular diseases. The study included 353 patients with CAs and 1055 healthy adults. RESULTS The authors found significant associations between CA susceptibility and genetic variations in 3 members of the ADAMTS family. The largest risk for CA (OR 1.32, p = 0.006) was observed in carriers of the ADAMTS2 variant rs11750568, which has been previously associated with pediatric stroke. Three SNPs under investigation are associated with a protective effect in CA pathogenesis (ADAMTS12 variant rs1364044: OR 0.65, p = 0.0001; and ADAMTS13 variants rs739469 and rs4962153: OR 0.77 and 0.63, p = 0.02 and 0.0006, respectively), while 2 other ADAMTS13 variants may confer a significant risk (rs2301612: OR 1.26, p = 0.011; rs2285489: OR 1.24, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that reduced integrity of the endothelial wall, as conferred by ADAMTS variants, together with inflammatory processes and defective vascular remodeling plays an important role in CA pathogenesis, although the mechanism of action remains unknown. The authors' findings may lead to specific screening of at-risk populations in the future.

  11. Evidence for significant overlap between common risk variants for Crohn's disease and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debby Laukens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A multicenter genome-wide association scan for Crohn's Disease (CD has recently reported 40 CD susceptibility loci, including 29 novel ones (19 significant and 10 putative. To gain insight into the genetic overlap between CD and ankylosing spondylitis (AS, these markers were tested for association in AS patients. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two previously established associations, namely with the MHC and IL23R loci, were confirmed. In addition, rs2872507, which maps to a locus associated with asthma and influences the expression of the ORMDL3 gene in lymphoblastoid cells, showed a significant association with AS (p = 0.03. In gut biopsies of AS and CD patients, ORMDL3 expression was not significantly different from controls and no correlation was found with the rs2872507 genotype (Spearman's rho: -0.067. The distribution of p-values for the remaining 36 SNPs was significantly skewed towards low p-values unless the top 5 ranked SNPs (ORMDL3, NKX2-3, PTPN2, ICOSLG and MST1 were excluded from the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Association analysis using risk variants for CD led to the identification of a new risk variant associated with AS (ORMDL3, underscoring a role for ER stress in AS. In addition, two known and five potentially relevant associations were detected, contributing to common susceptibility of CD and AS.

  12. Identifying genetic risk variants for coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolemia: an extreme genetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versmissen, Jorie; Oosterveer, Daniëlla M; Yazdanpanah, Mojgan; Dehghan, Abbas; Hólm, Hilma; Erdman, Jeanette; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Schunkert, Heribert; Huijgen, Roeland; Vongpromek, Ranitha; Uitterlinden, André G; Defesche, Joep C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Mulder, Monique; Dadd, Tony; Karlsson, Hróbjartur D; Ordovas, Jose; Kindt, Iris; Jarman, Amelia; Hofman, Albert; van Vark-van der Zee, Leonie; Blommesteijn-Touw, Adriana C; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Liem, Anho H; van der Ouderaa, Frans J; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano; Averna, Maurizio; Langslet, Gisle; Ose, Leiv; Ros, Emilio; Almagro, Fátima; de Leeuw, Peter W; Civeira, Fernando; Masana, Luis; Pintó, Xavier; Simoons, Maarten L; Schinkel, Arend FL; Green, Martin R; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Johnson, Keith J; Schaefer, Arne; Neil, Andrew; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Humphries, Steve E; Kastelein, John JP; Sijbrands, Eric JG

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a disorder characterized by coronary heart disease (CHD) at young age. We aimed to apply an extreme sampling method to enhance the statistical power to identify novel genetic risk variants for CHD in individuals with FH. We selected cases and controls with an extreme contrast in CHD risk from 17 000 FH patients from the Netherlands, whose functional LDLR mutation was unequivocally established. The genome-wide association (GWA) study was performed on 249 very young FH cases with CHD and 217 old FH controls without CHD (above 65 years for males and 70 years of age for females) using the Illumina HumanHap550K chip. In the next stage, two independent samples (one from the Netherlands and one from Italy, Norway, Spain, and the United Kingdom) of FH patients were used as replication samples. In the initial GWA analysis, we identified 29 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with suggestive associations with premature CHD (P<1 × 10−4). We examined the association of these SNPs with CHD risk in the replication samples. After Bonferroni correction, none of the SNPs either replicated or reached genome-wide significance after combining the discovery and replication samples. Therefore, we conclude that the genetics of CHD risk in FH is complex and even applying an ‘extreme genetics' approach we did not identify new genetic risk variants. Most likely, this method is not as effective in leveraging effect size as anticipated, and may, therefore, not lead to significant gains in statistical power. PMID:24916650

  13. PTSD and gene variants: new pathways and new thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Kelly; Ressler, Kerry J; Norrholm, Seth D; Jovanovic, Tanja; Bradley-Davino, Bekh

    2012-02-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder which can develop as a result of exposure to a traumatic event and is associated with significant functional impairment. Family and twin studies have found that risk for PTSD is associated with an underlying genetic vulnerability and that more than 30% of the variance associated with PTSD is related to a heritable component. Using a fear conditioning model to conceptualize the neurobiology of PTSD, three primary neuronal systems have been investigated - the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system, and neurocircuitry interconnecting the limbic system and frontal cortex. The majority of the initial investigations into main effects of candidate genes hypothesized to be associated with PTSD risk have been negative, but studies examining the interaction of genetic polymorphisms with specific environments in predicting PTSD have produced several positive results which have increased our understanding of the determinants of risk and resilience in the aftermath of trauma. Promising avenues of inquiry into the role of epigenetic modification have also been proposed to explain the enduring impact of environmental exposures which occur during key, often early, developmental periods on gene expression. Studies of PTSD endophenotypes, which are heritable biomarkers associated with a circumscribed trait within the more complex psychiatric disorder, may be more directly amenable to analysis of the underlying genetics and neural pathways and have provided promising targets for elucidating the neurobiology of PTSD. Knowledge of the genetic underpinnings and neuronal pathways involved in the etiology and maintenance of PTSD will allow for improved targeting of primary prevention amongst vulnerable individuals or populations, as well as timely, targeted treatment interventions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  14. The effects of psychosis risk variants on brain connectivity: A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar eMothersill

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In light of observed changes in connectivity in schizophrenia and the highly heritable nature of the disease, neural connectivity may serve as an important intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. However, how individual variants confer altered connectivity and which measure of brain connectivity is more proximal to the underlying genetic architecture (i.e. functional or structural has not been well delineated. In this review we consider these issues and the relative sensitivity of imaging methodologies to schizophrenia-related changes in connectivity.We searched PubMed for studies considering schizophrenia risk genes AND functional or structural connectivity. Where data was available, summary statistics were used to determine an estimate of effect size (i.e. Cohen’s d. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to consider (1 the largest effect and (2 all significant effects between functional and structural studies. Schizophrenia risk variants involved in neurotransmission, neurodevelopment and myelin function were found to be associated with altered neural connectivity. On average, schizophrenia risk genes had a large effect on functional (mean d=0.76 and structural connectivity (mean d=1.04. The examination of the largest effect size indicated that the outcomes of functional and structural studies were comparable (Q=2.17, p>0.05. Conversely, consideration of effect size estimates for all significant effects suggest that reported effect sizes in structural connectivity studies were more variable than in functional connectivity studies, and that there was a significant lack of homogeneity across the modalities (Q=6.928, p=0.008.Given the more variable profile of effect sizes associated with structural connectivity, these data may suggest that structural imaging methods are more sensitive to a wider range of effects, as opposed to functional studies which may only be able to determine large effects. These conclusions are limited by

  15. High-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jiwen; Mark, Adam; Afrasiabi, Cyrus; Tsueng, Ginger; Juchler, Moritz; Gopal, Nikhil; Stupp, Gregory S; Putman, Timothy E; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Griffith, Obi L; Torkamani, Ali; Whetzel, Patricia L; Mungall, Christopher J; Mooney, Sean D; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Chunlei

    2016-05-06

    Efficient tools for data management and integration are essential for many aspects of high-throughput biology. In particular, annotations of genes and human genetic variants are commonly used but highly fragmented across many resources. Here, we describe MyGene.info and MyVariant.info, high-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation information. These web services are currently accessed more than three million times permonth. They also demonstrate a generalizable cloud-based model for organizing and querying biological annotation information. MyGene.info and MyVariant.info are provided as high-performance web services, accessible at http://mygene.info and http://myvariant.info . Both are offered free of charge to the research community.

  16. Diversity and Impact of Rare Variants in Genes Encoding the Platelet G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  17. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes.

  18. Surface gene variants of hepatitis B Virus in Saudi Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Y Al-Qudari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV continues to be one of the most important viral pathogens in humans. Surface (S protein is the major HBV antigen that mediates virus attachment and entry and determines the virus subtype. Mutations in S gene, particularly in the “a” determinant, can influence virus detection by ELISA and may generate escape mutants. Since no records have documented the S gene mutations in HBV strains circulating in Saudi Arabia, the current study was designed to study sequence variation of S gene in strains circulating in Saudi Arabia and its correlation with clinical and risk factors. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Results: A total of 48 mutations (21 unique were recorded in viral strains in Saudi Arabia, among which 24 (11 unique changed their respective amino acids. Two amino acid changes were recorded in “a” determinant, including F130L and S135F with no evidence of the vaccine escape mutant G145R in any of the samples. No specific relationship was recognized between the mutation/amino acid change record of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia and clinical or laboratory data. Phylogenetic analysis categorized HBV viral strains in Saudi Arabia as members of subgenotypes D1 and D3. Conclusion: The present report is the first that describes mutation analysis of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia on both nucleotide and amino acid levels. Different substitutions, particularly in major hydrophilic region, may have a potential influence on disease diagnosis, vaccination strategy, and antiviral chemotherapy.

  19. -116A and K BCHE gene variants associated with obesity and hypertriglyceridemia in adolescents from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Thaís Jannuzzi; Leite, Neiva; Milano, Gerusa Eisfeld; Milano, Gisele Eisfeld; Souza, Ricardo Lehtonen Rodrigues; Chautard-Freire-Maia, Eleidi Alice; Furtado-Alle, Lupe

    2013-03-25

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) has been associated to body mass index (BMI), weight, cholesterol and triglyceride levels. -116A (rs1126680) and K (A539T, 1615A, rs1803274) BCHE gene variants had previously been associated to BChE activity, weight and BMI variance in adults. The present study examined -116A and K variants, BChE activity, anthropometric and biochemical variables associated with obesity in adolescents (120 obese and 150 non-obese from Curitiba, Brazil). Both -116A and K variants were found with significantly lower frequencies (pobese adolescents when compared with non-obese adolescents and with the general population. Mean BChE activity (KU/L) was significantly higher in obese adolescents when compared with non-obese adolescents and with the general population. Analyzing only the obese adolescents, it was found that carriers of the -116A variant showed lower BChE activity and higher triglyceride levels than homozygotes for the usual allele. Indeed, obese carriers of the -116A variant had triglyceride levels considered high according to reference values for serum triglycerides in Brazilian adolescents. These results show: (1) a protective effect of -116A and K variants on juvenile obesity risk, suggesting a role for the BCHE gene on juvenile onset obesity different from that observed on adult onset obesity and (2) an association of the -116A variant with hypertriglyceridemia in obese adolescents probably because of its effect on lowering BChE activity and consequently diminishing the enzyme capability of maintaining homeostasis on lipid metabolism during the metabolic stress caused by obesity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening for coding variants in FTO and SH2B1 genes in Chinese patients with obesity.

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    Zhaojing Zheng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential functional variants in FTO and SH2B1 genes among Chinese children with obesity. METHODS: Sanger sequencing of PCR products of all FTO and SH2B1 exons and their flanking regions were performed in 338 Chinese Han children with obesity and 221 age- and sex-matched lean controls. RESULTS: A total of seven and five rare non-synonymous variants were identified in FTO and SH2B1, respectively. The overall frequencies of FTO and SH2B1 rare non-synonymous variants were similar in obese and lean children (2.37% and 0.90% vs. 1.81% and 1.36%, P>0.05. However, four out of the seven variants in FTO were novel and all were unique to obese children (p>0.05. None of the novel variants was consistently being predicted to be deleterious. Four out of five variants in SH2B1 were novel and one was unique to obese children (p>0.05. One variant (L293R that was consistently being predicted as deleterious in SH2B1 gene was unique to lean control. While rare missense mutations were more frequently detected in girls from obesity as well as lean control than boys, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, it's shown that the prevalence of rare missense mutations of FTO as well as SH2B1 was similar across different ethnic groups. CONCLUSION: The rare missense mutations of FTO and SH2B1 did not confer risks of obesity in Chinese Han children in our cohort.

  1. Screening for Coding Variants in FTO and SH2B1 Genes in Chinese Patients with Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Yang, Peirong; Li, Juan; Ding, Yu; Yao, Ru-en; Geng, Juan; Shen, Yongnian; Shen, Yiping; Fu, Qihua; Yu, Yongguo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential functional variants in FTO and SH2B1 genes among Chinese children with obesity. Methods Sanger sequencing of PCR products of all FTO and SH2B1 exons and their flanking regions were performed in 338 Chinese Han children with obesity and 221 age- and sex-matched lean controls. Results A total of seven and five rare non-synonymous variants were identified in FTO and SH2B1, respectively. The overall frequencies of FTO and SH2B1 rare non-synonymous variants were similar in obese and lean children (2.37% and 0.90% vs. 1.81% and 1.36%, P>0.05). However, four out of the seven variants in FTO were novel and all were unique to obese children (p>0.05). None of the novel variants was consistently being predicted to be deleterious. Four out of five variants in SH2B1 were novel and one was unique to obese children (p>0.05). One variant (L293R) that was consistently being predicted as deleterious in SH2B1 gene was unique to lean control. While rare missense mutations were more frequently detected in girls from obesity as well as lean control than boys, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, it's shown that the prevalence of rare missense mutations of FTO as well as SH2B1 was similar across different ethnic groups. Conclusion The rare missense mutations of FTO and SH2B1 did not confer risks of obesity in Chinese Han children in our cohort. PMID:23825611

  2. Association of ARID5B gene variants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Yemeni children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Absi, Boshra; Noor, Suzita M; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Salem, Sameer D; Ahmed, Radwan H; Razif, Muhammad Fm; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2017-04-01

    Studies have shown an association between ARID5B gene polymorphisms and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the association between ARID5B variants and acute lymphoblastic leukemia among the Arab population still needs to be studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ARID5B variants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Yemeni children. A total of 14 ARID5B gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 289 Yemeni children, of whom 136 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 153 were controls, using the nanofluidic Dynamic Array (Fluidigm 192.24 Dynamic Array). Using logistic regression adjusted for age and gender, the risks of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were presented as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We found that nine SNPs were associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia under additive genetic models: rs7073837, rs10740055, rs7089424, rs10821936, rs4506592, rs10994982, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074. Furthermore, the recessive models revealed that six SNPs were risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: rs10740055, rs7089424, rs10994982, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074. The gender-specific impact of these SNPs under the recessive genetic model revealed that SNPs rs10740055, rs10994982, and rs6479779 in females, and rs10821938 and rs7923074 in males were significantly associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Under the dominant model, SNPs rs7073837, rs10821936, rs7896246, and rs6479778 in males only showed striking association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The additive model revealed that SNPs with significant association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were rs10821936 (both males and females); rs7073837, rs10740055, rs10994982, and rs4948487 (females only); and rs7089424, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074 (males only). In addition, the ARID5B haplotype block (CGAACACAA) showed a higher risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The haplotype (CCCGACTGC) was

  3. Testing the thrifty gene hypothesis: the Gly482Ser variant in PPARGC1A is associated with BMI in Tongans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macartney-Coxson Donia P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thrifty gene hypothesis posits that, in populations that experienced periods of feast and famine, natural selection favoured individuals carrying thrifty alleles that promote the storage of fat and energy. Polynesians likely experienced long periods of cold stress and starvation during their settlement of the Pacific and today have high rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM, possibly due to past positive selection for thrifty alleles. Alternatively, T2DM risk alleles may simply have drifted to high frequency in Polynesians. To identify thrifty alleles in Polynesians, we previously examined evidence of positive selection on T2DM-associated SNPs and identified a T2DM risk allele at unusually high frequency in Polynesians. We suggested that the risk allele of the Gly482Ser variant in the PPARGC1A gene was driven to high frequency in Polynesians by positive selection and therefore possibly represented a thrifty allele in the Pacific. Methods Here we examine whether PPARGC1A is a thrifty gene in Pacific populations by testing for an association between Gly482Ser genotypes and BMI in two Pacific populations (Maori and Tongans and by evaluating the frequency of the risk allele of the Gly482Ser variant in a sample of worldwide populations. Results We find that the Gly482Ser variant is associated with BMI in Tongans but not in Maori. In a sample of 58 populations worldwide, we also show that the 482Ser risk allele reaches its highest frequency in the Pacific. Conclusion The association between Gly482Ser genotypes and BMI in Tongans together with the worldwide frequency distribution of the Gly482Ser risk allele suggests that PPARGC1A remains a candidate thrifty gene in Pacific populations.

  4. Variant ASGR1 Associated with a Reduced Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nioi, P.; Sigurdsson, A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Helgason, H.; Agustsdottir, A.B.; Norddahl, G.L.; Helgadottir, A.; Magnusdottir, A.; Jonasdottir, A.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Jonsdottir, I.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Rafnar, T.; Swinkels, D.W.; Galesloot, T.E.; Grarup, N.; Jorgensen, T.; Vestergaard, H.; Hansen, T.; Lauritzen, T.; Linneberg, A.; Friedrich, N.; Krarup, N.T.; Fenger, M.; Abildgaard, U.; Hansen, P.R.; Galloe, A.M.; Braund, P.S.; Nelson, C.P.; Hall, A.S.; Williams, M.J.; Rij, A.M. van; Jones, G.T.; Patel, R.S.; Levey, A.I.; Hayek, S.; Shah, S.H.; Reilly, M.; Eyjolfsson, G.I.; Sigurdardottir, O.; Olafsson, I.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Quyyumi, A.A.; Rader, D.J.; Kraus, W.E.; Samani, N.J.; Pedersen, O.; Thorgeirsson, G.; Masson, G.; Holm, H.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Sulem, P.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several sequence variants are known to have effects on serum levels of non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol that alter the risk of coronary artery disease. METHODS: We sequenced the genomes of 2636 Icelanders and found variants that we then imputed into the genomes of

  5. Variant ASGR1 Associated with a Reduced Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nioi, P.; Sigurdsson, A. S.; Thorleifsson, G.

    2016-01-01

    of approximately 398,000 Icelanders. We tested for association between these imputed variants and non-HDL cholesterol levels in 119,146 samples. We then performed replication testing in two populations of European descent. We assessed the effects of an implicated loss-of-function variant on the risk of coronary...

  6. Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Webb, Penelope M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; McGuire, Valerie; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wang, Qinggang; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Song, Honglin; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Timorek, Agnieszka; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Narod, Steven A.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Cramer, Daniel W.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Leminen, Arto; Thompson, Pamela J.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Beesley, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Stram, Daniel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Kellar, Melissa; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.

    2014-01-01

    Scope We re-evaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. Methods and Results Odds ratios (OR) for 446 genetic variants were estimated among 13,410 OC cases and 22,635 controls and among 2,281 cases and 3,444 controls with folate information. Following multiple testing correction, the most significant main effect associations were for DPYD variants rs11587873 (OR=0.92, P=6x10−5) and rs828054 (OR=1.06, P=1x10−4). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multi-variant analysis (corrected P=9.9x10−6) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk. Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in one-carbon transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (Pinteraction=0.03-0.006). Conclusions Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which was previously reported to be associated with OC, may influence risk; however, stratification by folate intake is unlikely to modify disease risk appreciably in these women. SHMT1 SNP-byfolate interactions are plausible but require further validation. Polymorphisms in selected genes in purine metabolism were not associated with OC. PMID:25066213

  7. Contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor genetic variants to the risk of glioma and PAH-DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Aihua; Ji, Guixiang; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Ailin; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Luo, Chengzhang; Yan, Wei; Zhao, Peng

    2012-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene is involved in the response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure. To investigate the hypothesis that the genetic variants in the AHR gene might be a causal genetic susceptibility to PAH-DNA adduct formation and glioma risk, we conducted a case-control study of 384 glioma cases and 384 cancer-free controls to explore the association between six common single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the AHR gene and glioma risk. Using PAH-DNA adducts as biomarkers, we then evaluated the association between PAH-DNA adduct levels and glioma risk based on a tissue microarray including 11 controls and 77 glioma patients. We further explored the contributions of the glioma risk-associated AHR polymorphisms to the levels of PAH-DNA adducts in glioma tissues based on 77 glioma patients. We found that PAH-DNA adduct staining existed in normal brain tissues and grades I-IV gliomas, and the staining intensity was significantly associated with the glioma grade. Two AHR polymorphisms (rs2066853 and rs2158041) demonstrated significant association with glioma risk. Intriguingly, we also found statistically significant associations between these two variants and PAH-DNA adduct levels in glioma tissue. These data suggest the contributions of AHR rs2066853 and rs2158041 to glioma risk and the PAH-DNA adduct levels, which shed new light on gene-environment interactions in the etiology of glioma. Further studies with a larger sample size and ethnically diverse populations are required to elucidate the potential biological mechanism for, as well as the impact of, the susceptibility to glioma due to genetic variants of AHR.

  8. Copy number variants in candidate genes are genetic modifiers of Hirschsprung disease.

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    Qian Jiang

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a neurocristopathy characterized by absence of intramural ganglion cells along variable lengths of the gastrointestinal tract. The HSCR phenotype is highly variable with respect to gender, length of aganglionosis, familiality and the presence of additional anomalies. By molecular genetic analysis, a minimum of 11 neuro-developmental genes (RET, GDNF, NRTN, SOX10, EDNRB, EDN3, ECE1, ZFHX1B, PHOX2B, KIAA1279, TCF4 are known to harbor rare, high-penetrance mutations that confer a large risk to the bearer. In addition, two other genes (RET, NRG1 harbor common, low-penetrance polymorphisms that contribute only partially to risk and can act as genetic modifiers. To broaden this search, we examined whether a set of 67 proven and candidate HSCR genes harbored additional modifier alleles. In this pilot study, we utilized a custom-designed array CGH with ∼33,000 test probes at an average resolution of ∼185 bp to detect gene-sized or smaller copy number variants (CNVs within these 67 genes in 18 heterogeneous HSCR patients. Using stringent criteria, we identified CNVs at three loci (MAPK10, ZFHX1B, SOX2 that are novel, involve regulatory and coding sequences of neuro-developmental genes, and show association with HSCR in combination with other congenital anomalies. Additional CNVs are observed under relaxed criteria. Our research suggests a role for CNVs in HSCR and, importantly, emphasizes the role of variation in regulatory sequences. A much larger study will be necessary both for replication and for identifying the full spectrum of small CNV effects.

  9. HLA-G DNA sequence variants and risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsa Falah

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HLA-G gene is a non-classical MHC class 1 molecule that is highly expressed in the trophoblast at the maternal-fetal interface. In an attempt to elucidate possible immunological mechanisms facilitating protection of infants born to human immunodeficiency virus type (HIV-1 infected mothers, we have been studying genetic variations in the coding and untranslated regions of HLA-G antigen between HIV-1-infected mothers and their infected or uninfected infants. This study investigated whether HLA-G DNA sequence variants are associated with perinatal HIV-1 transmission. Results Genomic DNA samples were obtained from a nested case-control study of 34 mother-child pairs co-enrolled in a cohort of the Perinatal AIDS Collaborative Transmission Study in New York. The samples were from two groups predominantly of African-American and Hispanic origin: In the first group, both mother and child were HIV-1-infected; in the second group, only the mother was infected while the child remained uninfected. Genotyping of HLA-G gene were performed on the extracted DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using PCR based sequencing and restriction fragment-length polymorphism analyses. Among the studied HLA-G exons, dissimilarities in HLA-G DNA sequence variants between the HIV-1 non-transmitting mother child pairs were mostly observed in exon 8-3'-untranslated region at nucleotide positions T3742A, C3743T, G3777C (P = 0.001. Non-transmitting HIV-1 mother child pairs exhibited dissimilarities at nucleotide position C3743T allele with decreased risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission, compared with HIV-1 transmitting mother-child pairs carrying this allele (odds ratio 0.02 [95% confidence interval 0.00–0.15] P = 0.00001. In addition, heterozygous dissimilarities at nucleotide positions C634G and 714 insT/G in the 5'-upstream regulatory region were observed between the mother child pairs of the HIV-1-non-transmitting group while homozygous

  10. Neuropsychological effects of the CSMD1 genome-wide associated schizophrenia risk variant rs10503253.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, G

    2013-03-01

    The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10503253, located within the CUB and Sushi multiple domains-1 (CSMD1) gene on 8p23.2, was recently identified as genome-wide significant for schizophrenia (SZ), but is of unknown function. We investigated the neurocognitive effects of this CSMD1 variant in vivo in patients and healthy participants using behavioral and imaging measures of brain structure and function. We compared carriers and non-carriers of the risk \\'A\\' allele on measures of neuropsychological performance typically impaired in SZ (general cognitive ability, episodic and working memory and attentional control) in independent samples of Irish patients (n = 387) and controls (n = 171) and German patients (205) and controls (n = 533). Across these groups, the risk \\'A\\' allele at CSMD1 was associated with deleterious effects across a number of neurocognitive phenotypes. Specifically, the risk allele was associated with poorer performance on neuropsychological measures of general cognitive ability and memory function but not attentional control. These effects, while significant, were subtle, and varied between samples. Consistent with previous evidence suggesting that CSMD1 may be involved in brain mechanisms related to memory and learning, these data appear to reflect the deleterious effects of the identified \\'A\\' risk allele on neurocognitive function, possibly as part of the mechanism by which CSMD1 is associated with SZ risk.

  11. A pri-miR-218 variant and risk of cervical carcinoma in Chinese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Ting-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may compromise miRNA binding affinity and modify mRNA expression levels of the target genes, thus leading to cancer susceptibility. However, few studies have investigated roles of miRNA-related SNPs in the etiology of cervical carcinoma. Methods In this case–control study of 1,584 cervical cancer cases and 1,394 cancer-free female controls, we investigated associations between two miR-218-related SNPs involved in the LAMB3-miR-218 pathway and the risk of cervical carcinoma in Eastern Chinese women. Results We found that the pri-miR-218 rs11134527 variant GG genotype was significantly associated with a decreased risk of cervical carcinoma compared with AA/AG genotypes (adjusted OR=0.77, 95% CI=0.63-0.95, P=0.015. However, this association was not observed for the miR-218 binding site SNP (rs2566 on LAMB3. Using the multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis, we observed some evidence of interactions of these two SNPs with other risk factors, especially age at primiparity and menopausal status, in the risk of cervical carcinoma. Conclusions The pri-miR-218 rs11134527 SNP was significantly associated with the risk of cervical carcinoma in Eastern Chinese women. Larger, independent studies are warranted to validate our findings.

  12. A pri-miR-218 variant and risk of cervical carcinoma in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ting-Yan; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Zhu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Meng-Yun; He, Jing; Yu, Ke-Da; Shao, Zhi-Ming; Sun, Meng-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Cheng, Xi; Wu, Xiaohua; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-01-15

    MicroRNA (miRNA)-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may compromise miRNA binding affinity and modify mRNA expression levels of the target genes, thus leading to cancer susceptibility. However, few studies have investigated roles of miRNA-related SNPs in the etiology of cervical carcinoma. In this case-control study of 1,584 cervical cancer cases and 1,394 cancer-free female controls, we investigated associations between two miR-218-related SNPs involved in the LAMB3-miR-218 pathway and the risk of cervical carcinoma in Eastern Chinese women. We found that the pri-miR-218 rs11134527 variant GG genotype was significantly associated with a decreased risk of cervical carcinoma compared with AA/AG genotypes (adjusted OR=0.77, 95% CI=0.63-0.95, P=0.015). However, this association was not observed for the miR-218 binding site SNP (rs2566) on LAMB3. Using the multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis, we observed some evidence of interactions of these two SNPs with other risk factors, especially age at primiparity and menopausal status, in the risk of cervical carcinoma. The pri-miR-218 rs11134527 SNP was significantly associated with the risk of cervical carcinoma in Eastern Chinese women. Larger, independent studies are warranted to validate our findings.

  13. Associations of common copy number variants in glutathione S-transferase mu 1 and D-dopachrome tautomerase-like protein genes with risk of schizophrenia in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toru; Ohnuma, Tohru; Hanzawa, Ryo; Takebayashi, Yuto; Takeda, Mayu; Nishimon, Shohei; Sannohe, Takahiro; Katsuta, Narimasa; Higashiyama, Ryoko; Shibata, Nobuto; Arai, Heii

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative-stress, genetic regions of interest (1p13 and 22q11), and common copy number variations (CNVs) may play roles in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In the present study, we confirmed associations between schizophrenia and the common CNVs in the glutathione (GSH)-related genes GSTT1, DDTL, and GSTM1 using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of 620 patients with schizophrenia and in 622 controls. No significant differences in GSTT1 copy number distributions were found between patient groups. However, frequencies of characterized CNVs and assumed gain alleles of DDTL and GSTM1 were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia. In agreement with a previous report, the present data indicate that gains in the CNV alleles DDTL and GSTM1 are genetic risk factors in Japanese patients with schizophrenia, and suggest involvement of micro-inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  14. Genetic variants and increased risk of meningioma: an updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Lei-Lei; Wang, Xi-Rui; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Various genetic variants have been reported to be linked to an increased risk of meningioma. However, no confirmed conclusion has been obtained. The purpose of the study was to investigate potential meningioma-associated gene polymorphisms, based on published evidence. Materials and methods An updated meta-analysis was performed in September 2016. After electronic database searching and study screening, we selected eligible case-control studies and extracted data for meta-analysis, using Mantel–Haenszel statistics. P-values, pooled odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results We finally selected eight genes with ten polymorphisms: MLLT10 rs12770228, CASP8 rs1045485, XRCC1 rs1799782, rs25487, MTHFR rs1801133, rs1801131, MTRR rs1801394, MTR rs1805087, GSTM1 null/present, and GSTT1 null/present. Results of meta-analyses showed that there was increased meningioma risk in case groups under all models of MLLT10 rs12770228 (all OR >1, P1, P1, P<0.05). However, no significantly increased meningioma risks were observed for CASP8 rs1045485, XRCC1 rs25487, rs1799782, MTHFR rs1801133, MTR rs1805087, or GSTM1/GSTT1 null mutations. Conclusion Our updated meta-analysis provided statistical evidence for the role of MLLT10 rs12770228, MTRR rs1801394, and MTHFR rs1801131 in increased susceptibility to meningioma. PMID:28405167

  15. Application of the back-error propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) on genetic variants in the PPAR-γ and RXR-α gene and risk of metabolic syndrome in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Xu, Kang; Shi, Hui; Cheng, Jinluo; Ma, Jianhua; Gao, Yanqin; Li, Qian; Ye, Xinhua; Lu, Ying; Yu, Xiaofang; Du, Juan; Du, Wencong; Ye, Qing; Zhou, Ling

    2014-03-01

    This study was aimed to explore the associations between the combined effects of several polymorphisms in the PPAR-γ and RXR-α gene and environmental factors with the risk of metabolic syndrome by back-error propagation artificial neural network (BPANN). We established the model based on data gathered from metabolic syndrome patients (n = 1012) and normal controls (n = 1069) by BPANN. Mean impact value (MIV) for each input variable was calculated and the sequence of factors was sorted according to their absolute MIVs. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) confirmed a joint effect of PPAR-γ and RXR-α based on the results from BPANN. By BPANN analysis, the sequences according to the importance of metabolic syndrome risk factors were in the order of body mass index (BMI), serum adiponectin, rs4240711, gender, rs4842194, family history of type 2 diabetes, rs2920502, physical activity, alcohol drinking, rs3856806, family history of hypertension, rs1045570, rs6537944, age, rs17817276, family history of hyperlipidemia, smoking, rs1801282 and rs3132291. However, no polymorphism was statistically significant in multiple logistic regression analysis. After controlling for environmental factors, A1, A2, B1 and B2 (rs4240711, rs4842194, rs2920502 and rs3856806) models were the best models (cross-validation consistency 10/10, P = 0.0107) with the GMDR method. In conclusion, the interaction of the PPAR-γ and RXR-α gene could play a role in susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. A more realistic model is obtained by using BPANN to screen out determinants of diseases of multiple etiologies like metabolic syndrome.

  16. Surface Gene Variants of Hepatitis B Virus in Saudi Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudari, Ahmed Y.; Amer, Haitham M.; Abdo, Ayman A.; Hussain, Zahid; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alswat, Khalid; Almajhdi, Fahad N.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be one of the most important viral pathogens in humans. Surface (S) protein is the major HBV antigen that mediates virus attachment and entry and determines the virus subtype. Mutations in S gene, particularly in the “a” determinant, can influence virus detection by ELISA and may generate escape mutants. Since no records have documented the S gene mutations in HBV strains circulating in Saudi Arabia, the current study was designed to study sequence variation of S gene in strains circulating in Saudi Arabia and its correlation with clinical and risk factors. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Results: A total of 48 mutations (21 unique) were recorded in viral strains in Saudi Arabia, among which 24 (11 unique) changed their respective amino acids. Two amino acid changes were recorded in “a” determinant, including F130L and S135F with no evidence of the vaccine escape mutant G145R in any of the samples. No specific relationship was recognized between the mutation/amino acid change record of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia and clinical or laboratory data. Phylogenetic analysis categorized HBV viral strains in Saudi Arabia as members of subgenotypes D1 and D3. Conclusion: The present report is the first that describes mutation analysis of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia on both

  17. Identification of msp1 Gene Variants in Populations of Meloidogyne incognita Using PCR-DGGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Mohamed; Hallmann, Johannes; Heuer, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Effectors of root-knot nematodes are essential for parasitism and prone to recognition by adapted variants of the host plants. This selective pressure initiates hypervariability of effector genes. Diversity of the gene variants within nematode populations might correlate with host preferences. In this study we developed a method to compare the distribution of variants of the effector gene msp1 among populations of Meloidogyne incognita. Primers were designed to amplify a 234-bp fragment of msp1. Sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed five msp1 variants from seven populations that were distinguishable in their reproduction on five host plants. A protocol for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was developed to separate these msp1 variants. DGGE for replicated pools of juveniles from the seven populations revealed ten variants of msp1. A correlation between the presence of a particular gene variant and the reproductive potential on particular hosts was not evident. Especially race 3 showed substantial variation within the population. DGGE fingerprints of msp1 tended to cluster the populations according to their reproduction rate on pepper. The developed method could be useful for analyzing population heterogeneity and epidemiology of M. incognita. PMID:25276001

  18. Genetic risk variants associated with in situ breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Barrdahl, Myrto; Gaudet, Mia M; Black, Amanda; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Haiman, Christopher; Hankinson, Susan; Hazra, Aditi; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Willett, Walter; Travis, Ruth C; Amiano, Pilar; Siddiq, Afshan; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Sund, Malin; Tjønneland, Anne; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Peeters, Petra H; Panico, Salvatore; Dossus, Laure; Ziegler, Regina G; Canzian, Federico; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-06-13

    Breast cancer in situ (BCIS) diagnoses, a precursor lesion for invasive breast cancer, comprise about 20 % of all breast cancers (BC) in countries with screening programs. Family history of BC is considered one of the strongest risk factors for BCIS. To evaluate the association of BC susceptibility loci with BCIS risk, we genotyped 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), associated with risk of invasive BC, in 1317 BCIS cases, 10,645 invasive BC cases, and 14,006 healthy controls in the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Using unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for age and study, we estimated the association of SNPs with BCIS using two different comparison groups: healthy controls and invasive BC subjects to investigate whether BCIS and BC share a common genetic profile. We found that five SNPs (CDKN2BAS-rs1011970, FGFR2-rs3750817, FGFR2-rs2981582, TNRC9-rs3803662, 5p12-rs10941679) were significantly associated with BCIS risk (P value adjusted for multiple comparisons <0.0016). Comparing invasive BC and BCIS, the largest difference was for CDKN2BAS-rs1011970, which showed a positive association with BCIS (OR = 1.24, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.38, P = 1.27 x 10(-4)) and no association with invasive BC (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI: 0.99-1.07, P = 0.06), with a P value for case-case comparison of 0.006. Subgroup analyses investigating associations with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) found similar associations, albeit less significant (OR = 1.25, 95 % CI: 1.09-1.42, P = 1.07 x 10(-3)). Additional risk analyses showed significant associations with invasive disease at the 0.05 level for 28 of the alleles and the OR estimates were consistent with those reported by other studies. Our study adds to the knowledge that several of the known BC susceptibility loci are risk factors for both BCIS and invasive BC, with the possible exception of rs1011970, a putatively functional SNP situated in the CDKN2BAS gene that may be a specific

  19. Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Baird, Gillian; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Casey, Jillian; Conroy, Judith; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Jacob, Suma; Kenny, Graham P.; Kim, Cecilia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Law-Smith, Miriam; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lombard, Frances; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Mantoulan, Carine; McDougle, Christopher J.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Noakes, Carolyn; Nygren, Gudrun; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Posey, David J.; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Regan, Regina; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Schlitt, Sabine; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Sykes, Nuala; Tancredi, Raffaella; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, JAS; Wallace, Simon; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bailey, Anthony J.; Battaglia, Agatino; Cantor, Rita M.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Dawson, Geraldine; Ennis, Sean; Freitag, Christine M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Klauck, Sabine M.; McMahon, William M.; Maestrini, Elena; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar; Parr, Jeremy R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Piven, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vicente, Astrid M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; Hallmayer, Joachim; Paterson, Andrew D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm< 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest. PMID:22843504

  20. Orofacial clefts, parental cigarette smoking, and transforming growth factor-alpha gene variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; O`Malley, C.D. [California Birth Defects Monitoring Program, Emeryville, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Results of studies determine whether women who smoke during early pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering infants with orofacial clefts have been mixed, and recently a gene-environment interaction between maternal smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFa), and clefting has been reported. Using a large population-based case-control study, we investigated whether parental periconceptional cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk for having offspring with orofacial clefts. We also investigated the influence of genetic variation of the TGFa locus on the relation between smoking and clefting. Parental smoking information was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers of 731 (84.7% of eligible) orofacial cleft case infants and with mothers of 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed control infants. DNA was obtained from newborn screening blood spots and genotyped for the allelic variants of TGFa. We found that risks associated with maternal smoking were most elevated for isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, (odds ratio 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6]) and for isolated cleft palate (odds ratio 2.2 [1.1-4.5]) when mothers smoked {ge} 20 cigarrettes/d. These risks for white infants ranged from 3-fold to 11-fold across phenotypic groups. Paternal smoking was not associated with clefting among the offspring of nonsmoking mothers, and passive smoke exposures were associated with at most slightly increased risks. This study offers evidence that the risk for orofacial clefting in infants may be influenced by maternal smoke exposures alone as well as in combination (gene-environment interaction) with the presence of the uncommon TGFa allele. 56 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; Da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-10-28

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%-5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10(-6)]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations.

  2. The association of XRCC3 Thr241Met genetic variant with risk of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: We identified three eligible studies, 499 prostate cancer cases and 571 ... Conclusions: Results from this meta-analysis indicate that the XRCC3 Thr241Met genetic variant is associated with prostate cancer risk. ... Article Metrics.

  3. Polymorphism of the Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Gene (TCF7L2) Interacts with Obesity on Type-2 Diabetes in the PREDIMED Study Emphasizing the Heterogeneity of Genetic Variants in Type-2 Diabetes Risk Prediction: Time for Obesity-Specific Genetic Risk Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Coltell, Oscar; Sorlí, Jose V.; Estruch, Ramón; Quiles, Laura; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Castañer, Olga; Arós, Fernando; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Portolés, Olga; Fiol, Miquel; Díez Espino, Javier; Basora, Josep; Fitó, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrigenetic studies analyzing gene–diet interactions of the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on type-2 diabetes (T2D) have shown controversial results. A reason contributing to this may be the additional modulation by obesity. Moreover, TCF7L2-rs7903146 is one of the most influential variants in T2D-genetic risk scores (GRS). Therefore, to increase the predictive value (PV) of GRS it is necessary to first see whether the included polymorphisms have heterogeneous effects. We comprehensively investigated gene-obesity interactions between the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on T2D (prevalence and incidence) and analyzed other T2D-polymorphisms in a sub-sample. We studied 7018 PREDIMED participants at baseline and longitudinally (8.7 years maximum follow-up). Obesity significantly interacted with the TCF7L2-rs7903146 on T2D prevalence, associations being greater in non-obese subjects. Accordingly, we prospectively observed in non-T2D subjects (n = 3607) that its association with T2D incidence was stronger in non-obese (HR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.13–2.92, p = 0.013 for TT versus CC) than in obese subjects (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.61–1.66; p = 0.979; p-interaction = 0.048). Accordingly, TCF7L2-PV was higher in non-obese subjects. Additionally, we created obesity-specific GRS with ten T2D-polymorphisms and demonstrated for the first time their higher strata-specific PV. In conclusion, we provide strong evidence supporting the need for considering obesity when analyzing the TCF7L2 effects and propose the use of obesity-specific GRS for T2D. PMID:27929407

  4. Genetic variants of adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Gong, Jian; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Curtis, Keith R.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hsu, Li; Jiao, Shuo; Le Marchand, Loic; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Wu, Kana; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Hunter, David J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Hu, Frank B.; Rimm, Eric; Jensen, Majken; Peters, Ulrike; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating adiponectin has been associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genome-wide association studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with adiponectin levels. However, it is unclear whether these SNPs are associated with CRC risk. In addition, previous data on SNPs in the adiponectin pathway and their associations with CRC are inconsistent. Therefore, we examined 19 SNPs in genes related to adiponectin or its receptors and their associations with CRC using logistic regression among 7,020 cases and 7,631 controls drawn from 10 studies included in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Using data from a subset of two large cohort studies, we also assessed the contribution of individual SNPs and an adiponectin genetic score to plasma adiponectin after accounting for lifestyle factors among 2,217 women and 619 men. We did not find any statistically significant association between the 19 adiponectin-associated SNPs and CRC risk (multivariable-adjusted odds ratios ranged from 0.89 to 1.05, all P > 0.05). Each SNP explained less than 2.50% of the variance of plasma adiponectin, and the genetic score collectively accounted for 2.95% and 1.42% of the variability of adiponectin in women and men, respectively, after adjustment for age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, regular use of aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and postmenopausal hormone use. In conclusion, our findings do not support an association between known adiponectin-related common SNPs and CRC incidence. However, known common SNPs account for only a limited proportion of the interindividual variance in circulating adiponectin. Further work is warranted to investigate the relationship between adiponectin and CRC while accounting for other components in the pathway. PMID:25431318

  5. Association of Megsin Gene Variants With IgA Nephropathy in Northwest Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin-Ting; Fu, Rong-Guo; Gao, Jie; Yu, Qiao-Ling; Dong, Feng-Ming; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Meng; Liu, Xing-Han; Dai, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Megsin is a mesangial cell-predominant gene that encodes a serpin family protein which is expressed in the renal mesangium. Overexpression of megsin has been observed in the glomeruli of patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of megsin polymorphisms (rs1055901 and rs1055902) with IgAN in a Chinese population. We examined 351 patients with histologically proven IgAN and compared them with 310 age, sex, and ethnicity-matched healthy subjects. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in megsin were genotyped by Sequenom MassARRAY. SPSS 18.0 was used for statistical analyses, and SNP Stats to test for associations between these polymorphisms and IgAN risk. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the relationships. We found that rs1055901 and rs1055902 SNPs were not correlated with susceptibility to IgAN in Northwest Chinese population. Analyses of the relationship between genotypes and clinical variables indicated that in patients with IgAN, rs1055901 was associated with 24-hour proteinuria, an increase in blood pressure, and Lee's grade (P = 0.04, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively), and rs1055902 was associated with 24-hour proteinuria and Lee's grade (P = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). However, the results showed no association between these gene variants and sex of the patients. These results indicate that megsin gene variants may play a role in the severity, development, and/or progression of IgAN in Northwest Chinese population. PMID:26871801

  6. The Influence of Monoamine Oxidase Variants on the Risk of Betel Quid-Associated Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Ho Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Betel quid (BQ and areca nut (AN (major BQ ingredient are group I human carcinogens illustrated by International Agency for Research on Cancer and are closely associated with an elevated risk of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx. The primary alkaloid of AN, arecoline, can be metabolized via the monoamine oxidase (MAO gene by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the variants of the susceptible candidate MAO genes are associated with OPMDs and oral and pharyngeal cancer. A significant trend of MAO-A mRNA expression was found in in vitro studies. Using paired human tissues, we confirmed the significantly decreased expression of MAO-A and MAO-B in cancerous tissues when compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Moreover, we determined that MAO-A single nucleotide polymorphism variants are significantly linked with oral and pharyngeal cancer patients in comparison to OPMDs patients [rs5953210 risk G-allele, odds ratio = 1.76; 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.01]. In conclusion, we suggested that susceptible MAO family variants associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer may be implicated in the modulation of MAO gene activity associated with ROS.

  7. The Influence of Monoamine Oxidase Variants on the Risk of Betel Quid-Associated Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Wu, Ju-Hui; Huang, Jhen-Hao; Chen, Chun-Chia; Lee, Ka-Wo

    2014-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) and areca nut (AN) (major BQ ingredient) are group I human carcinogens illustrated by International Agency for Research on Cancer and are closely associated with an elevated risk of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx. The primary alkaloid of AN, arecoline, can be metabolized via the monoamine oxidase (MAO) gene by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the variants of the susceptible candidate MAO genes are associated with OPMDs and oral and pharyngeal cancer. A significant trend of MAO-A mRNA expression was found in in vitro studies. Using paired human tissues, we confirmed the significantly decreased expression of MAO-A and MAO-B in cancerous tissues when compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Moreover, we determined that MAO-A single nucleotide polymorphism variants are significantly linked with oral and pharyngeal cancer patients in comparison to OPMDs patients [rs5953210 risk G-allele, odds ratio = 1.76; 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.01]. In conclusion, we suggested that susceptible MAO family variants associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer may be implicated in the modulation of MAO gene activity associated with ROS. PMID:25389533

  8. Identification of a novel prostate cancer susceptibility variant in the KLK3 gene transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote-Jarai, Z; Amin Al Olama, A; Leongamornlert, D; Tymrakiewicz, M; Saunders, E; Guy, M; Giles, G G; Severi, G; Southey, M; Hopper, J L; Sit, K C; Harris, J M; Batra, J; Spurdle, A B; Clements, J A; Hamdy, F; Neal, D; Donovan, J; Muir, K; Pharoah, P D P; Chanock, S J; Brown, N; Benlloch, S; Castro, E; Mahmud, N; O'Brien, L; Hall, A; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Easton, D F; Eeles, R A

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. One of these (rs2735839) is located close to a plausible candidate susceptibility gene, KLK3, which encodes prostate-specific antigen (PSA). PSA is widely used as a biomarker for PrCa detection and disease monitoring. To refine the association between PrCa and variants in this region, we used genotyping data from a two-stage GWAS using samples from the UK and Australia, and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) study. Genotypes were imputed for 197 and 312 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from HapMap2 and the 1000 Genome Project, respectively. The most significant association with PrCa was with a previously unidentified SNP, rs17632542 (combined P = 3.9 × 10(-22)). This association was confirmed by direct genotyping in three stages of the UK/Australian GWAS, involving 10,405 cases and 10,681 controls (combined P = 1.9 × 10(-34)). rs17632542 is also shown to be associated with PSA levels and it is a non-synonymous coding SNP (Ile179Thr) in KLK3. Using molecular dynamic simulation, we showed evidence that this variant has the potential to introduce alterations in the protein or affect RNA splicing. We propose that rs17632542 may directly influence PrCa risk.

  9. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham A. R.; Adany, Roza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Barbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Maki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Mein, Charles A.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I.; Mulder, Chris J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Nunez, Concepcion; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A.; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J.; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wolters, Victorien M.; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) <10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions re

  10. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham A. R.; Adany, Roza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Barbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Maki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Mein, Charles A.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I.; Mulder, Chris J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Nunez, Concepcion; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A.; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J.; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wolters, Victorien M.; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) <10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions

  11. Two novel rare variants of APOA5 gene found in subjects with severe hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, Livia; Fresa, Raffaele; Bellocchio, Antonella; Guido, Virgilia; Priore Oliva, Claudio; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2011-11-20

    Common variants of APOA5 gene affect plasma triglyceride (TG) in the population and a number of rare variants APOA5 have been reported in individuals with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). APOA5 was analysed in 98 HTG individuals (plasma TG >9 mmol/L) in whom no mutations in LPL and APOC2 had been found. Two patients were found to be heterozygous for two novel APOA5 variants. The first variant (p.L253P) was identified in an obese male who consumed a diet rich in fat and simple sugars. He was also a carrier in trans of the common TG-raising p.S19W SNP (5*3 haplotype). The second variant (c.295-297 del GAG, p.E99 del) was found in a lean male with no life style or metabolic factors known to affect plasma TG. He was a carrier in trans of the TG-raising 5*2 haplotype and was homozygous for the rare c.1337T allele of a SNP of GCKR gene. No mutations in other genes affecting plasma TG (LMF1 and GPIHBP1) were found in these patients. These APOA5 variants, resulted to be deleterious in silico, were not found in 350 control subjects. These novel APOA5 variants predispose to HTG in combination with other genetic or nutritional factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  13. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trubicka Joanna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations.

  14. Exome Sequencing in an Admixed Isolated Population Indicates NFXL1 Variants Confer a Risk for Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Pía; Nudel, Ron; Hoischen, Alexander; Fernández, María Angélica; Simpson, Nuala H.; Gilissen, Christian; Reader, Rose H.; Jara, Lillian; Echeverry, Maria Magdalena; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; O’Hare, Anne; Bolton, Patrick F.; Hennessy, Elizabeth R.; Palomino, Hernán; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Veltman, Joris A.; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; De Barbieri, Zulema

    2015-01-01

    Children affected by Specific Language Impairment (SLI) fail to acquire age appropriate language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. SLI is highly heritable, but the understanding of underlying genetic mechanisms has proved challenging. In this study, we use molecular genetic techniques to investigate an admixed isolated founder population from the Robinson Crusoe Island (Chile), who are affected by a high incidence of SLI, increasing the power to discover contributory genetic factors. We utilize exome sequencing in selected individuals from this population to identify eight coding variants that are of putative significance. We then apply association analyses across the wider population to highlight a single rare coding variant (rs144169475, Minor Allele Frequency of 4.1% in admixed South American populations) in the NFXL1 gene that confers a nonsynonymous change (N150K) and is significantly associated with language impairment in the Robinson Crusoe population (p = 2.04 × 10–4, 8 variants tested). Subsequent sequencing of NFXL1 in 117 UK SLI cases identified four individuals with heterozygous variants predicted to be of functional consequence. We conclude that coding variants within NFXL1 confer an increased risk of SLI within a complex genetic model. PMID:25781923

  15. Exome sequencing in an admixed isolated population indicates NFXL1 variants confer a risk for specific language impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pía Villanueva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Children affected by Specific Language Impairment (SLI fail to acquire age appropriate language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. SLI is highly heritable, but the understanding of underlying genetic mechanisms has proved challenging. In this study, we use molecular genetic techniques to investigate an admixed isolated founder population from the Robinson Crusoe Island (Chile, who are affected by a high incidence of SLI, increasing the power to discover contributory genetic factors. We utilize exome sequencing in selected individuals from this population to identify eight coding variants that are of putative significance. We then apply association analyses across the wider population to highlight a single rare coding variant (rs144169475, Minor Allele Frequency of 4.1% in admixed South American populations in the NFXL1 gene that confers a nonsynonymous change (N150K and is significantly associated with language impairment in the Robinson Crusoe population (p = 2.04 × 10-4, 8 variants tested. Subsequent sequencing of NFXL1 in 117 UK SLI cases identified four individuals with heterozygous variants predicted to be of functional consequence. We conclude that coding variants within NFXL1 confer an increased risk of SLI within a complex genetic model.

  16. Exome sequencing in an admixed isolated population indicates NFXL1 variants confer a risk for specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Pía; Nudel, Ron; Hoischen, Alexander; Fernández, María Angélica; Simpson, Nuala H; Gilissen, Christian; Reader, Rose H; Jara, Lillian; Echeverry, María Magdalena; Echeverry, Maria Magdalena; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; O'Hare, Anne; Bolton, Patrick F; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Palomino, Hernán; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Veltman, Joris A; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; De Barbieri, Zulema; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2015-03-01

    Children affected by Specific Language Impairment (SLI) fail to acquire age appropriate language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. SLI is highly heritable, but the understanding of underlying genetic mechanisms has proved challenging. In this study, we use molecular genetic techniques to investigate an admixed isolated founder population from the Robinson Crusoe Island (Chile), who are affected by a high incidence of SLI, increasing the power to discover contributory genetic factors. We utilize exome sequencing in selected individuals from this population to identify eight coding variants that are of putative significance. We then apply association analyses across the wider population to highlight a single rare coding variant (rs144169475, Minor Allele Frequency of 4.1% in admixed South American populations) in the NFXL1 gene that confers a nonsynonymous change (N150K) and is significantly associated with language impairment in the Robinson Crusoe population (p = 2.04 × 10-4, 8 variants tested). Subsequent sequencing of NFXL1 in 117 UK SLI cases identified four individuals with heterozygous variants predicted to be of functional consequence. We conclude that coding variants within NFXL1 confer an increased risk of SLI within a complex genetic model.

  17. Protective Low-Frequency Variants for Preeclampsia in the Fms Related Tyrosine Kinase 1 Gene in the Finnish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, A Inkeri; Daly, Emma; Triebwasser, Michael; Kurki, Mitja I; Roberson, Elisha D O; Häppölä, Paavo; Auro, Kirsi; Perola, Markus; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Salmon, Jane E; Meri, Seppo; Daly, Mark; Atkinson, John P; Laivuori, Hannele

    2017-08-01

    Preeclampsia is a common pregnancy-specific vascular disorder characterized by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria during the second half of pregnancy. Predisposition to preeclampsia is in part heritable. It is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. We have sequenced 124 candidate genes implicated in preeclampsia to pinpoint genetic variants contributing to predisposition to or protection from preeclampsia. First, targeted exomic sequencing was performed in 500 preeclamptic women and 190 controls from the FINNPEC cohort (Finnish Genetics of Preeclampsia Consortium). Then 122 women with a history of preeclampsia and 1905 parous women with no such history from the National FINRISK Study (a large Finnish population survey on risk factors of chronic, noncommunicable diseases) were included in the analyses. We tested 146 rare and low-frequency variants and found an excess (observed 13 versus expected 7.3) nominally associated with preeclampsia (Ppreeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Rapid analysis of colipase gene variants by multicapillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaczó, Zsuzsanna; Pál, Eszter; Dénes, Réka; Somogyi, Anikó; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Guttman, András; Rónai, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    Despite of the fact that the Human Genome Project was completed more than a decade ago, identification of the genetic background of polygenic diseases is still challenging. Several somewhat different approaches are available to investigate inheritable factors of complex phenotypes, all require, however efficient, high-throughput techniques for SNP genotyping. In this paper, we report a robust and reliable multiplex PCR-RFLP for genotype and haplotype analysis of six SNPs (rs41270082, rs3748051, rs142027015, rs3748048, rs73404011, and rs72925892) of the colipase (CLPS) gene. A multicapillary (12 capillaries) electrophoresis unit was used for high throughput and sensitive analysis of the digestion fragments. A Microsoft Excel-based spreadsheet was designed for the flexible visualization and evaluation of the electrophoretic separations, which is readily adaptable for any kind of electrophoresis application. Haplotype analysis of the two loci localized in close proximity of each other was carried out by molecular method, extended haplotypes including all five SNPs in the 5' upstream region were calculated. The techniques were applied in a case-control association study of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although, single marker analysis did not reveal any significant association, it was observed that the rare GGCCG haplotype of the five 5' upstream region SNPs was about three times more frequent among patients compared to healthy control population. Our results demonstrated the applicability of multicapillary CGE in large-scale, high-throughput SNP analysis, and suggested that the CLPS gene polymorphisms might be considered as genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. rs5888 variant of SCARB1 gene is a possible susceptibility factor for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Jennyfer; Seddon, Johanna M; Richard, Florence; Reynolds, Robyn; Leveziel, Nicolas; Benlian, Pascale; Borel, Patrick; Feingold, Josué; Munnich, Arnold; Soubrane, Gisèle; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Souied, Eric H

    2009-10-05

    Major genetic factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have recently been identified as susceptibility risk factors, including variants in the CFH gene and the ARMS2 LOC387715/HTRA1locus. Our purpose was to perform a case-control study in two populations among individuals who did not carry risk variants for CFHY402H and LOC387715 A69S (ARMS2), called "study" individuals, in order to identify new genetic risk factors. Based on a candidate gene approach, we analyzed SNP rs5888 of the SCARB1 gene, coding for SRBI, which is involved in the lipid and lutein pathways. This study was conducted in a French series of 1241 AMD patients and 297 controls, and in a North American series of 1257 patients with advanced AMD and 1732 controls. Among these individuals, we identified 61 French patients, 77 French controls, 85 North American patients and 338 North American controls who did not carry the CFH nor ARMS2 polymorphisms. An association between AMD and the SCARB1 gene was seen among the study subjects. The genotypic distribution of the rs5888 polymorphism was significantly different between cases and controls in the French population (plutein and vitamin E) metabolism in AMD.

  20. Mannose-Binding Lectin Promoter Polymorphisms and Gene Variants in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Cantabria (Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-Gonzalo Ocejo-Vinyals

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin is a central molecule of the innate immune system. Mannose-binding lectin 2 promoter polymorphisms and structural variants have been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis. However, contradictory results among different populations have been reported, resulting in no convincing evidence of association between mannose-binding lectin 2 and susceptibility to tuberculosis. For this reason, we conducted a study in a well genetically conserved Spanish population in order to shed light on this controversial association. We analysed the six promoter and structural mannose-binding lectin 2 gene variants in 107 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 441 healthy controls. Only D variant and HYPD haplotype were significantly more frequents in controls which would indicate that this allele could confer protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, but this difference disappeared after statistical correction. Neither the rest of alleles nor the haplotypes were significantly associated with the disease. These results would indicate that mannose-binding lectin promoter polymorphisms and gene variants would not be associated with an increased risk to pulmonary tuberculosis. Despite the slight trend of the D allele and HYPD haplotype in conferring protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, susceptibility to this disease would probably be due to other genetic factors, at least in our population.

  1. The protective effect of LRRK2 p.R1398H on risk of Parkinson’s disease is independent of MAPT and SNCA variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Michael G.; Elbaz, Alexis; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Serie, Daniel J.; Aasly, Jan O.; Annesi, Grazia; Auburger, Georg; Bacon, Justin A.; Boczarska-Jedynak, Magdalena; Bozi, Maria; Brighina, Laura; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Destée, Alain; Ferrarese, Carlo; Ferraris, Alessandro; Fiske, Brian; Gispert, Suzana; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Jeon, Beom S.; Kim, Yun Joong; Klein, Christine; Kruger, Rejko; Kyratzi, Elli; Lin, Chin-Hsien; Lohmann, Katja; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Lynch, Timothy; Mellick, George D.; Mutez, Eugénie; Opala, Grzegorz; Park, Sung Sup; Petrucci, Simona; Quattrone, Aldo; Sharma, Manu; Silburn, Peter A.; Sohn, Young Ho; Stefanis, Leonidas; Tadic, Vera; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Uitti, Ryan J.; Valente, Enza Maria; Vassilatis, Demetrios K.; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; White, Linda R.; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Ross, Owen A.

    2013-01-01

    The best validated susceptibility variants for Parkinson’s disease (PD) are located in the alpha-synuclein (SNCA) and microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) genes. Recently, a protective p.N551K-R1398H-K1423K haplotype in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was identified, with p.R1398H appearing to be the most likely functional variant. To date, the consistency of the protective effect of LRRK2 p.R1398H across MAPT and SNCA variant genotypes has not been assessed. To address this, we examined four SNCA variants (rs181489, rs356219, rs11931074, rs2583988), the MAPT H1-haplotype defining variant rs1052553, and LRRK2 p.R1398H (rs7133914) in Caucasian (N=10,322) and Asian (N=2,289) series. There was no evidence of an interaction of LRRK2 p.R1398H with MAPT or SNCA variants (all P≥0.10); the protective effect of p.R1398H was observed at similar magnitude across MAPT and SNCA genotypes, and the risk effects of MAPT and SNCA variants were observed consistently for LRRK2 p.R1398H genotypes. Our results indicate that the association of LRRK2 p.R1398H with PD is independent of SNCA and MAPT variants, and vice versa, in Caucasian and Asian populations. PMID:23962496

  2. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods.

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-08-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS.We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls.The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs.The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population.

  4. FSH receptor gene variants are rarely associated with premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woad, Kathryn J; Prendergast, Deborah; Winship, Ingrid M; Shelling, Andrew N

    2013-04-01

    FSH receptor (FSHR) gene variants have been associated with premature ovarian failure (POF). Genomic DNA from New Zealand women with POF (n=80) and control women (n=80) was screened for variants in FSHR exons 7 and 10. FSHR exon 7 variants, including the c.566C>T Finnish founder mutation (p.Ala189Val), were not detected. Previously reported FSHR exon 10 polymorphisms were identified in both groups with similar allelic distributions. A novel heterozygous FSHR exon 10 variant c.1411A>T, p.Ile471Phe was observed in one woman with a family history of POF, but not her affected siblings. It is concluded that variants in exons 7 and 10 of FSHR are not frequently associated with the development of POF in the New Zealand population.

  5. Analysis of human papillomavirus 16 variants and risk for cervical cancer in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Dong; Yin, Yin; Han, Jing; Jiang, Jie; Ma, Hongxqia; Xie, Shuanghua; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Clifford, Gary M; Dai, Min; Li, Ni

    2016-01-15

    HPV16 is the most carcinogenic HPV type, but only a minority of HPV16 infections progress to cancer. Intratype genetic variants of HPV16 have been suggested to confer differential carcinogenicity. To investigate risk implications of HPV16 variants among Chinese women, a case-control study was conducted with 298 cervical cancer patients and 85 controls (all HPV16-positive). HPV16 isolates were predominantly of the A variant lineage, and variants of A4 (previously named "Asian") sublineage were common. A4/Asian variants were significantly associated with increased risk of cervical cancer compared to A1-3 (OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.04-2.85). Furthermore, a meta-analysis including 703 cases and 323 controls from East Asia confirmed the association (OR=2.82, 95% CI=1.44-5.52). In conclusion, A4 variants appear to predict higher risk of cervical cancer among HPV16-positive women, which may provide clues to the genetic basis of differences in the carcinogenicity of HPV16 variants.

  6. Expression of Tetrahymena snRNA gene variants including a U1 gene with mutations in the 5' splice site recognition sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Hagemeister, J J; Hellung-Larsen, P

    1997-01-01

    The expression of U1, U2 and U5 snRNA gene variants has been studied under different physiological states of Tetrahymena. Variants of all three snRNA genes are expressed. Among the snRNAs detected is U1-3, a variant with 66 mutations compared to the normal U1 snRNA. Three of these mutations affect...

  7. The Interaction between Pesticide Use and Genetic Variants Involved in Lipid Metabolism on Prostate Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Andreotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lipid metabolism processes have been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis. Since several pesticides are lipophilic or are metabolized via lipid-related mechanisms, they may interact with variants of genes in the lipid metabolism pathway. Methods. In a nested case-control study of 776 cases and 1444 controls from the Agricultural Health Study (AHS, a prospective cohort study of pesticide applicators, we examined the interactions between 39 pesticides (none, low, and high exposure and 220 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 59 genes. The false discovery rate (FDR was used to account for multiple comparisons. Results. We found 17 interactions that displayed a significant monotonic increase in prostate cancer risk with pesticide exposure in one genotype and no significant association in the other genotype. The most noteworthy association was for ALOXE3 rs3027208 and terbufos, such that men carrying the T allele who were low users had an OR of 1.86 (95% CI = 1.16–2.99 and high users an OR of 2.00 (95% CI = 1.28–3.15 compared to those with no use of terbufos, while men carrying the CC genotype did not exhibit a significant association. Conclusion. Genetic variation in lipid metabolism genes may modify pesticide associations with prostate cancer; however our results require replication.

  8. Evaluation of type 2 diabetes genetic risk variants in Chinese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Wei; Walters, Robin G; Holmes, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have discovered many risk variants for type 2 diabetes. However, estimates of the contributions of risk variants to type 2 diabetes predisposition are often based on highly selected case-control samples, and reliable estimates of population-level...... effect sizes are missing, especially in non-European populations. METHODS: The individual and cumulative effects of 59 established type 2 diabetes risk loci were measured in a population-based China Kadoorie Biobank (CKB) study of 93,000 Chinese adults, including >7,100 diabetes cases. RESULTS......-control samples of GWAS meta-analyses (mean 19-22% decrease in log odds, p ≤ 0.0048), likely to reflect correction of both 'winner's curse' and spectrum bias effects. The association with risk of diabetes of a genetic risk score, based on lead variants at 25 loci considered to act through beta cell function...

  9. Determination of variants in the 3'-region of the Tyrosinase gene requires locus specific amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaki, M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Ray, K.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (TYR, 11q14-q21) cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1). The 3'-region of the TYR shows 98.55% sequence identity with a pseudogene, known as Tyrosinase-Like Gene (TYRL, 11p11.2-cen). A large number of publicly available nucleotide variants of TYR in this region

  10. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  11. Passive cigarette smoke exposure during various periods of life, genetic variants, and breast cancer risk among never smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura N; Cotterchio, Michelle; Mirea, Lucia; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Kreiger, Nancy

    2012-02-15

    The association between passive cigarette smoke exposure and breast cancer risk is inconclusive and may be modified by genotype. The authors investigated lifetime passive cigarette smoke exposures, 36 variants in 12 carcinogen-metabolizing genes, and breast cancer risk among Ontario, Canada, women who had never smoked (2003-2004). DNA (saliva) was available for 920 breast cancer cases and 960 controls. Detailed information about passive smoke exposure was collected for multiple age periods (childhood, teenage years, and adulthood) and environments (home, work, and social). Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by multivariable logistic regression, and statistical interactions were assessed using the likelihood ratio test. Among postmenopausal women, most associations between passive smoke and breast cancer risk were null, whereas among premenopausal women, nonsignificant positive associations were observed. Significant interactions were observed between certain types of passive smoke exposure and genetic variants in CYP2E1, NAT2, and UGT1A7. While these interactions were statistically significant, the magnitudes of the effect estimates were not consistent or easily interpretable, suggesting that they were perhaps due to chance. Although the results of this study were largely null, it is possible that premenopausal women exposed to passive smoke or carrying certain genetic variants may be at higher risk of breast cancer.

  12. Stratifying type 2 diabetes cases by BMI identifies genetic risk variants in LAMA1 and enrichment for risk variants in lean compared to obese cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R B Perry

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Common diseases such as type 2 diabetes are phenotypically heterogeneous. Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but patients vary appreciably in body mass index. We hypothesized that the genetic predisposition to the disease may be different in lean (BMI<25 Kg/m² compared to obese cases (BMI≥30 Kg/m². We performed two case-control genome-wide studies using two accepted cut-offs for defining individuals as overweight or obese. We used 2,112 lean type 2 diabetes cases (BMI<25 kg/m² or 4,123 obese cases (BMI≥30 kg/m², and 54,412 un-stratified controls. Replication was performed in 2,881 lean cases or 8,702 obese cases, and 18,957 un-stratified controls. To assess the effects of known signals, we tested the individual and combined effects of SNPs representing 36 type 2 diabetes loci. After combining data from discovery and replication datasets, we identified two signals not previously reported in Europeans. A variant (rs8090011 in the LAMA1 gene was associated with type 2 diabetes in lean cases (P = 8.4×10⁻⁹, OR = 1.13 [95% CI 1.09-1.18], and this association was stronger than that in obese cases (P = 0.04, OR = 1.03 [95% CI 1.00-1.06]. A variant in HMG20A--previously identified in South Asians but not Europeans--was associated with type 2 diabetes in obese cases (P = 1.3×10⁻⁸, OR = 1.11 [95% CI 1.07-1.15], although this association was not significantly stronger than that in lean cases (P = 0.02, OR = 1.09 [95% CI 1.02-1.17]. For 36 known type 2 diabetes loci, 29 had a larger odds ratio in the lean compared to obese (binomial P = 0.0002. In the lean analysis, we observed a weighted per-risk allele OR = 1.13 [95% CI 1.10-1.17], P = 3.2×10⁻¹⁴. This was larger than the same model fitted in the obese analysis where the OR = 1.06 [95% CI 1.05-1.08], P = 2.2×10⁻¹⁶. This study provides evidence that stratification of type 2 diabetes cases by BMI may help

  13. Association of Fat Mass and Obesity-associated Gene Variant with Lifestyle Factors and Body Fat in Indian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarthy, Lavanya S; Phadke, Nikhil; Chiplonkar, Shashi; Khadilkar, Anuradha; Khatod, Kavita; Ekbote, Veena; Shah, Surabhi; Khadilkar, Vaman

    2017-01-01

    Common intronic variants of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity-related traits in humans. (1) The aim of this study is to study the distribution of FTO gene variants across different body mass index (BMI) categories and (2) to explore the association between FTO gene variants and lifestyle factors in obese and normal weight Indian children. Fifty-six children (26 boys, mean age 10.3 ± 2.2 years) were studied. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumference were measured. Physical activity (questionnaire) and food intake (food frequency questionnaire) were assessed. Body fat percentage (%BF) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. FTO allelic variants at rs9939609 site were detected by SYBR Green Amplification Refractory Mutation System real-time polymerase chain reaction using allele-specific primers. Generalized linear model was used to investigate the simultaneous influence of genetic and lifestyle factors on %BF. Mean height, weight, and BMI of normal and obese children were 130.6 ± 7.1 versus 143.2 ± 15.6, 24.0 ± 5.2 versus 53.1 ± 15.8, and 13.9 ± 2.1 versus 25.3 ± 3.2, respectively. The frequency of AA allele was 57% among obese children and 35% in normal weight children. Children with the AA allele who were obese had least physical activity, whereas children with AT allele and obesity had the highest intake of calories when compared to children who had AT allele and were normal. %BF was positively associated with AA alleles and junk food intake and negatively with healthy food intake and moderate physical activity. Healthy lifestyle with high physical activity and diet low in calories and fat may help in modifying the risk imposed by FTO variants in children.

  14. Association of fat mass and obesity-associated gene variant with lifestyle factors and body fat in Indian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya S Parthasarthy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Common intronic variants of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO gene have been associated with obesity-related traits in humans. Aims: (1 The aim of this study is to study the distribution of FTO gene variants across different body mass index (BMI categories and (2 to explore the association between FTO gene variants and lifestyle factors in obese and normal weight Indian children. Subjects and Methods: Fifty-six children (26 boys, mean age 10.3 ± 2.2 years were studied. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumference were measured. Physical activity (questionnaire and food intake (food frequency questionnaire were assessed. Body fat percentage (%BF was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. FTO allelic variants at rs9939609 site were detected by SYBR Green Amplification Refractory Mutation System real-time polymerase chain reaction using allele-specific primers. Generalized linear model was used to investigate the simultaneous influence of genetic and lifestyle factors on %BF. Results: Mean height, weight, and BMI of normal and obese children were 130.6 ± 7.1 versus 143.2 ± 15.6, 24.0 ± 5.2 versus 53.1 ± 15.8, and 13.9 ± 2.1 versus 25.3 ± 3.2, respectively. The frequency of AA allele was 57% among obese children and 35% in normal weight children. Children with the AA allele who were obese had least physical activity, whereas children with AT allele and obesity had the highest intake of calories when compared to children who had AT allele and were normal. %BF was positively associated with AA alleles and junk food intake and negatively with healthy food intake and moderate physical activity. Conclusions: Healthy lifestyle with high physical activity and diet low in calories and fat may help in modifying the risk imposed by FTO variants in children.

  15. Variants in the interleukin 8 gene and the response to inhaled bronchodilators in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Larissa Lazzarini; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia; Salomão Junior, João Batista; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima

    2017-07-15

    Interleukin 8 protein promotes inflammatory responses, even in airways. The presence of interleukin 8 gene variants causes altered inflammatory responses and possibly varied responses to inhaled bronchodilators. Thus, this study analyzed the interleukin 8 variants (rs4073, rs2227306, and rs2227307) and their association with the response to inhaled bronchodilators in cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of interleukin 8 gene variants was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction. The association between spirometry markers and the response to inhaled bronchodilators was evaluated by Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The analysis included all cystic fibrosis patients, and subsequently patients with two mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene belonging to classes I to III. This study included 186 cystic fibrosis patients. There was no association of the rs2227307 variant with the response to inhaled bronchodilators. The rs2227306 variant was associated with FEF50% in the dominant group and in the group with two identified mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. The rs4073 variant was associated with spirometry markers in four genetic models: co-dominant (FEF25-75% and FEF75%), dominant (FEV1, FEF50%, FEF75%, and FEF25-75%), recessive (FEF75% and FEF25-75%), and over-dominant (FEV1/FVC). This study highlighted the importance of the rs4073 variant of the interleukin 8 gene, regarding response to inhaled bronchodilators, and of the assessment of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional c...

  17. A rare variant in MYH6 is associated with high risk of sick sinus syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Hilma; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sulem, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Through complementary application of SNP genotyping, whole-genome sequencing and imputation in 38,384 Icelanders, we have discovered a previously unidentified sick sinus syndrome susceptibility gene, MYH6, encoding the alpha heavy chain subunit of cardiac myosin. A missense variant in this gene, ...

  18. Identification of Three Novel Splicing Variants and Expression Analysis of Chicken GPR1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyou Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available GPR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in eukaryotic cells: typically, response to glucose stimulation, l