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Sample records for ribonucleases

  1. The amino acid sequence of snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) ribonuclease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, Jacob; Broos, Jaap; Meulenberg, Janneke; Schüller, Cornelis

    1985-01-01

    Snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue. Turtle ribonuclease binds much more weakly to the affinity chromatography matrix used than mammalian ribonucleases. The amino acid sequence was determined from overlapping peptides obtained from three different

  2. Preliminary studies on ribonucleases from Poa pratensis seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lorenc-Kubis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribonuclease was extracted from Poa pratensis seeds with 0.1 M acetate buffer, pH 5.1, and then precipitated with alcohol. The enzyme was separated into 5 fractions (I-V after chromatography on DEAE-cellulose at pH 5.1. The enzymes were stable at 50°C, at pH 7.1. The activity of ribonucleases I, II, III and V were optimal at pH 7.1-7.3, and that of ribonuclease IV at pH 8.1. Ali enzymes were inhibited by Ca2+ and EDTA. Mg2+ inhibited the activity of ribonucleases II, III, IV, and had no influence on that of ribonucleases I and V. Ribonucleases IV and V showed only one activity band in disc electrophoresis, whereas ribonucleases, I, II and III were found to be heterogenous.

  3. Bovine brain ribonuclease is the functional homolog of human ribonuclease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Chelcie H; Lomax, Jo E; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-09-19

    Mounting evidence suggests that human pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase 1) plays important roles in vivo, ranging from regulating blood clotting and inflammation to directly counteracting tumorigenic cells. Understanding these putative roles has been pursued with continual comparisons of human RNase 1 to bovine RNase A, an enzyme that appears to function primarily in the ruminant gut. Our results imply a different physiology for human RNase 1. We demonstrate distinct functional differences between human RNase 1 and bovine RNase A. Moreover, we characterize another RNase 1 homolog, bovine brain ribonuclease, and find pronounced similarities between that enzyme and human RNase 1. We report that human RNase 1 and bovine brain ribonuclease share high catalytic activity against double-stranded RNA substrates, a rare quality among ribonucleases. Both human RNase 1 and bovine brain RNase are readily endocytosed by mammalian cells, aided by tight interactions with cell surface glycans. Finally, we show that both human RNase 1 and bovine brain RNase are secreted from endothelial cells in a regulated manner, implying a potential role in vascular homeostasis. Our results suggest that brain ribonuclease, not RNase A, is the true bovine homolog of human RNase 1, and provide fundamental insight into the ancestral roles and functional adaptations of RNase 1 in mammals. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. cytotoxicity of polyspermine-ribonuclease A and polyspermine-dimeric ribonuclease A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poučková, P.; Morbio, M.; Vottariello, F.; Laurents, D. V.; Matoušek, Josef; Souček, J.; Gotte, G.; Donadelli, M.; Costanzo, C.; Libonati, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2007), s. 1946-1955 ISSN 1043-1802 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/04/0755; GA ČR GA521/06/1149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : ribonuclease A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.384, year: 2007

  5. Contribution of electrostatics to the binding of pancreatic-type ribonucleases to membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundlass, Nadia K; Eller, Chelcie H; Cui, Qiang; Raines, Ronald T

    2013-09-17

    Pancreatic-type ribonucleases show clinical promise as chemotherapeutic agents but are limited in efficacy by the inefficiency of their uptake by human cells. Cellular uptake can be increased by the addition of positive charges to the surface of ribonucleases, either by site-directed mutagenesis or by chemical modification. This observation has led to the hypothesis that ribonuclease uptake by cells depends on electrostatics. Here, we use a combination of experimental and computational methods to ascertain the contribution of electrostatics to the cellular uptake of ribonucleases. We focus on three homologous ribonucleases: Onconase (frog), ribonuclease A (cow), and ribonuclease 1 (human). Our results support the hypothesis that electrostatics are necessary for the cellular uptake of Onconase. In contrast, specific interactions with cell-surface components likely contribute more to the cellular uptake of ribonuclease A and ribonuclease 1 than do electrostatics. These findings provide insight for the design of new cytotoxic ribonucleases.

  6. Characterization of ribonuclease III from Brucella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Xian; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Fang; Yang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Chen, Huan-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a highly conserved endonuclease, which plays pivotal roles in RNA maturation and decay pathways by cleaving double-stranded structure of RNAs. Here we cloned rncS gene from the genomic DNA of Brucella melitensis, and analyzed the cleavage properties of RNase III from Brucella. We identified Brucella-encoding small RNA (sRNA) by high-throughput sequencing and northern blot, and found that sRNA of Brucella and Homo miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA) can be bound and cleaved by B.melitensis ribonuclease III (Bm-RNase III). Cleavage activity of Bm-RNase III is bivalent metal cations- and alkaline buffer-dependent. We constructed several point mutations in Bm-RNase III, whose cleavage activity indicated that the 133th Glutamic acid residue was required for catalytic activity. Western blot revealed that Bm-RNase III was differently expressed in Brucella virulence strain 027 and vaccine strain M5-90. Collectively, our data suggest that Brucella RNase III can efficiently bind and cleave stem-loop structure of small RNA, and might participate in regulation of virulence in Brucella. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  8. Is zucchini a phosphodiesterase or a ribonuclease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Nureki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zucchini (Zuc, a member of the phospholipase D (PLD superfamily, is essential for the primary PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA biogenesis and the suppression of transposon expression, which are crucial for the genome integrity of germline cells. However, it has been ambiguous whether Zuc acts as a phosphodiesterase to produce phosphatidic acid (PA, the lipid signaling molecule, or as a nuclease. The recent three papers describing the crystal structures and functional analyses of fly and mouse Zuc proteins have elucidated that Zuc is a PLD family single-strand ribonuclease, not a phosphodiesterase, and functions in the maturation of primary piRNAs. This review will discuss in detail how the crystal structures clearly predict the function of Zuc, which is subsequently demonstrated by biochemical analysis to conclude the previous controversial discussion on the real function of Zuc.

  9. An endogenous ribonuclease inhibitor regulates the antimicrobial activity of ribonuclease 7 in the human urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Eichler, Tad; Wang, Huanyu; Kline, Jennifer; Justice, Sheryl S.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Hains, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies stress the importance of antimicrobial peptides in protecting the urinary tract from infection. Previously, we have shown that ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is a potent antimicrobial peptide that has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against uropathogenic bacteria. The urothelium of the lower urinary tract and intercalated cells of the kidney produce RNase 7 but regulation of its antimicrobial activity has not been well defined. Here we characterize the expression of an endogenous inhibitor, ribonuclease inhibitor (RI), in the urinary tract and evaluate its effect on RNase 7’s antimicrobial activity. Using RNA isolated from non-infected human bladder and kidney tissue, quantitative real-time PCR showed that RNH1, the gene encoding RI, is constitutively expressed throughout the urinary tract. With pyelonephritis, RNH1 expression and RI peptide production significantly decrease. Immunostaining localized RI production to the umbrella cells of the bladder and intercalated cells of the renal collecting tubule. In vitro assays showed that RI bound to RNase 7 and suppressed its antimicrobial activity by blocking its ability to bind the cell wall of uropathogenic bacteria. Thus, these results demonstrate a new immunomodulatory role for RI and identified a unique regulatory pathway that may affect how RNase 7 maintains urinary tract sterility. PMID:24107847

  10. Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H with an acylhydrazone inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qingguo; Menon, Lakshmi; Ilina, Tatiana; Miller, Lena G; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A; Ishima, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is a bifunctional enzyme, having both DNA polymerase (RNA- and DNA-dependent) and ribonuclease H activities. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been an exceptionally important target for antiretroviral therapeutic development, and nearly half of the current clinically used antiretrovirals target reverse transcriptase DNA polymerase. However, no inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H are on the market or in preclinical development. Several drug-like small molecule inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H have been described, but little structural information is available about the interactions between reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H and inhibitors that exhibit antiviral activity. In this report, we describe NMR studies of the interaction of a new ribonuclease H inhibitor, BHMP07, with a catalytically active HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain fragment. We carried out solution NMR experiments to identify the interaction interface of BHMP07 with the ribonuclease H domain fragment. Chemical shift changes of backbone amide signals at different BHMP07 concentrations clearly demonstrate that BHMP07 mainly recognizes the substrate handle region in the ribonuclease H fragment. Using ribonuclease H inhibition assays and reverse transcriptase mutants, the binding specificity of BHMP07 was compared with another inhibitor, dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone. Our results provide a structural characterization of the ribonuclease H inhibitor interaction and are likely to be useful for further improvements of the inhibitors. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. A Phosphate Starvation-Inducible Ribonuclease of Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Trung; Nguyen, Minh Hung; Nguyen, Huy Thuan; Nguyen, Hoang Anh; Le, Thi Hoi; Schweder, Thomas; Jürgen, Britta

    2016-08-28

    The BLi03719 protein of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 belongs to the most abundant extracellular proteins under phosphate starvation conditions. In this study, the function of this phosphate starvation inducible protein was determined. An amino-acid sequence analysis of the BLi03719-encoding gene showed a high similarity with genes encoding the barnase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and binase-like RNase of Bacillus pumilus SARF-032. The comparison of the control strain and a BLi03719-deficient strain revealed a strongly reduced extracellular ribonuclease activity of the mutant. Furthermore, this knockout mutant exhibited delayed growth with yeast RNA as an alternative phosphate and carbon source. These results suggest that BLi03719 is an extracellular ribonuclease expressed in B. licheniformis under phosphate starvation conditions. Finally, a BLi03719 mutant showed an advantageous effect on the overexpression of the heterologous amyE gene under phosphate-limited growth conditions.

  12. Complete cDNA sequence and amino acid analysis of a bovine ribonuclease K6 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowski, D; Förster, M

    2000-01-01

    The complete cDNA sequence of a ribonuclease k6 gene of Bos Taurus has been determined. It codes for a protein with 154 amino acids and contains the invariant cysteine, histidine and lysine residues as well as the characteristic motifs specific to ribonuclease active sites. The deduced protein sequence is 27 residues longer than other known ribonucleases k6 and shows amino acids exchanges which could reflect a strain specificity or polymorphism within the bovine genome. Based on sequence similarity we have termed the identified gene bovine ribonuclease k6 b (brk6b).

  13. Novel Ribonuclease Activity Differs between Fibrillarins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Rodriguez-Corona

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillarin is one of the most important nucleolar proteins that have been shown as essential for life. Fibrillarin localizes primarily at the periphery between fibrillar center and dense fibrillar component as well as in Cajal bodies. In most plants there are at least two different genes for fibrillarin. In Arabidopsis thaliana both genes show high level of expression in transcriptionally active cells. Here, we focus on two important differences between A. thaliana fibrillarins. First and most relevant is the enzymatic activity by AtFib2. The AtFib2 shows a novel ribonuclease activity that is not seen with AtFib1. Second is a difference in the ability to interact with phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid between both proteins. We also show that the novel ribonuclease activity as well as the phospholipid binding region of fibrillarin is confine to the GAR domain. The ribonuclease activity of fibrillarin reveals in this study represents a new role for this protein in rRNA processing.

  14. Novel Ribonuclease Activity Differs between Fibrillarins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodriguez-Corona, U.; Pereira-Santana, A.; Sobol, Margaryta; Rodriguez-Zapata, L.C.; Hozák, Pavel; Castano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, podzim (2017), č. článku 1878. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA ČR GA16-03346S; GA ČR GA15-08738S; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nucleoli * fibrillarin * ribonuclease * phosphoinositides * phosphatidic acid * glycinearginine rich domain Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  15. A ribonuclease from the wild mushroom Boletus griseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hexiang; Ng, T B

    2006-10-01

    A ribonuclease (RNase) with a molecular mass of 29 kDa and cospecific for poly A and poly U was isolated from fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus griseus. Its N-terminal sequence exhibited some similarity to those of RNases from the mushrooms Irpex lacteus and Lentinus edodes. The RNase was adsorbed on diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and Affi-gel blue gel and was unadsorbed on CM-cellulose. The enzyme exhibited a temperature optimum between 60 and 70 degrees C and a pH optimum at 3.5.

  16. Ribonuclease inhibitor 1 regulates erythropoiesis by controlling GATA1 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Veiga, Diogo Ft; Maslowski, Kendle M; Andina, Nicola; Tardivel, Aubry; Yu, Eric Chi-Wang; Stilinovic, Martina; Simillion, Cedric; Duchosal, Michel A; Quadroni, Manfredo; Roberts, Irene; Sankaran, Vijay G; MacDonald, H Robson; Fasel, Nicolas; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Schneider, Pascal; Hoang, Trang; Allam, Ramanjaneyulu

    2018-04-02

    Ribosomal proteins (RP) regulate specific gene expression by selectively translating subsets of mRNAs. Indeed, in Diamond-Blackfan anemia and 5q- syndrome, mutations in RP genes lead to a specific defect in erythroid gene translation and cause anemia. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of selective mRNA translation and involvement of ribosomal-associated factors in this process. Ribonuclease inhibitor 1 (RNH1) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds to and inhibits pancreatic-type ribonucleases. Here, we report that RNH1 binds to ribosomes and regulates erythropoiesis by controlling translation of the erythroid transcription factor GATA1. Rnh1-deficient mice die between embryonic days E8.5 and E10 due to impaired production of mature erythroid cells from progenitor cells. In Rnh1-deficient embryos, mRNA levels of Gata1 are normal, but GATA1 protein levels are decreased. At the molecular level, we found that RNH1 binds to the 40S subunit of ribosomes and facilitates polysome formation on Gata1 mRNA to confer transcript-specific translation. Further, RNH1 knockdown in human CD34+ progenitor cells decreased erythroid differentiation without affecting myelopoiesis. Our results reveal an unsuspected role for RNH1 in the control of GATA1 mRNA translation and erythropoiesis.

  17. Nitrile bonds as infrared probes of electrostatics in ribonuclease S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Boxer, Steven G

    2010-10-28

    Three different nitrile-containing amino acids, p-cyanophenylalanine, m-cyanophenylalanine, and S-cyanohomocysteine, have been introduced near the active site of the semisynthetic enzyme ribonuclease S (RNase S) to serve as probes of electrostatic fields. Vibrational Stark spectra, measured directly on the probe-modified proteins, confirm the predominance of the linear Stark tuning rate in describing the sensitivity of the nitrile stretch to external electric fields, a necessary property for interpreting observed frequency shifts as a quantitative measure of local electric fields that can be compared with simulations. The X-ray structures of these nitrile-modified RNase variants and enzymatic assays demonstrate minimal perturbation to the structure and function, respectively, by the probes and provide a context for understanding the influence of the environment on the nitrile stretching frequency. We examine the ability of simulation techniques to recapitulate the spectroscopic properties of these nitriles as a means to directly test a computational electrostatic model for proteins, specifically that in the ubiquitous Amber-99 force field. Although qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the largest shifts, substantial discrepancies are observed in some cases, highlighting the ongoing need for experimental metrics to inform the development of theoretical models of electrostatic fields in proteins.

  18. Convergent evolution of ribonuclease h in LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustyantsev, Kirill; Novikova, Olga; Blinov, Alexander; Smyshlyaev, Georgy

    2015-05-01

    Ty3/Gypsy long terminals repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are structurally and phylogenetically close to retroviruses. Two notable structural differences between these groups of genetic elements are 1) the presence in retroviruses of an additional envelope gene, env, which mediates infection, and 2) a specific dual ribonuclease H (RNH) domain encoded by the retroviral pol gene. However, similar to retroviruses, many Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons harbor additional env-like genes, promoting concepts of the infective mode of these retrotransposons. Here, we provide a further line of evidence of similarity between retroviruses and some Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons. We identify that, together with their additional genes, plant Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons of the Tat group have a second RNH, as do retroviruses. Most importantly, we show that the resulting dual RNHs of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses emerged independently, providing strong evidence for their convergent evolution. The convergent resemblance of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses may indicate similar selection pressures acting on these diverse groups of elements and reveal potential evolutionary constraints on their structure. We speculate that dual RNH is required to accelerate retrotransposon evolution through increased rates of strand transfer events and subsequent recombination events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Ribonuclease S dynamics measured using a nitrile label with 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Sayan; Boxer, Steven G; Fayer, Michael D

    2012-04-05

    A nitrile-labeled amino acid, p-cyanophenylalanine, is introduced near the active site of the semisynthetic enzyme ribonuclease S to serve as a probe of protein dynamics and fluctuations. Ribonuclease S is the limited proteolysis product of subtilisin acting on ribonuclease A, and consists of a small fragment including amino acids 1-20, the S-peptide, and a larger fragment including residues 21-124, the S-protein. A series of two-dimensional vibrational echo experiments performed on the nitrile-labeled S-peptide and the RNase S are described. The time-dependent changes in the two-dimensional infrared vibrational echo line shapes are analyzed using the center line slope method to obtain the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF). The observations show that the nitrile probe in the S-peptide has dynamics that are similar to, but faster than, those of the single amino acid p-cyanophenylalanine in water. In contrast, the dynamics of the nitrile label when the peptide is bound to form ribonuclease S are dominated by homogeneous dephasing (motionally narrowed) contributions with only a small contribution from very fast inhomogeneous structural dynamics. The results provide insights into the nature of the structural dynamics of the ribonuclease S complex. The equilibrium dynamics of the nitrile labeled S-peptide and the ribonuclease S complex are also investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The experimentally determined FFCFs are compared to the FFCFs obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, thereby testing the capacity of simulations to determine the amplitudes and time scales of protein structural fluctuations on fast time scales under thermal equilibrium conditions.

  20. A study of ribonuclease activity in venom of vietnam cobra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiet Van Nguyen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribonuclease (RNase is one of the few toxic proteins that are present constantly in snake venoms of all types. However, to date this RNase is still poorly studied in comparison not only with other toxic proteins of snake venom, but also with the enzymes of RNase group. The objective of this paper was to investigate some properties of RNase from venom of Vietnam cobra Naja atra. Methods Kinetic methods and gel filtration chromatography were used to investigate RNase from venom of Vietnam cobra. Results RNase from venom of Vietnam cobra Naja atra has some characteristic properties. This RNase is a thermostable enzyme and has high conformational stability. This is the only acidic enzyme of the RNase A superfamily exhibiting a high catalytic activity in the pH range of 1–4, with pHopt = 2.58 ± 0.35. Its activity is considerably reduced with increasing ionic strength of reaction mixture. Venom proteins are separated by gel filtration into four peaks with ribonucleolytic activity, which is abnormally distributed among the isoforms: only a small part of the RNase activity is present in fractions of proteins with molecular weights of 12–15 kDa and more than 30 kDa, but most of the enzyme activity is detected in fractions of polypeptides, having molecular weights of less than 9 kDa, that is unexpected. Conclusions RNase from the venom of Vietnam cobra is a unique member of RNase A superfamily according to its acidic optimum pH (pHopt = 2.58 ± 0.35 and extremely low molecular weights of its major isoforms (approximately 8.95 kDa for RNase III and 5.93 kDa for RNase IV.

  1. Secondary structure of prokaryotic 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Garrett, R A

    1981-01-01

    The structures of 5S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus were examined by using ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom ribonuclease. By using both 5' and 3'-32P-end labeling methods and selecting for digested but intact 5S RNA molecules...... evidence for three of the helical regions of the Fox and Woese model of 5S RNA [Fox, G. E., & Woese, C. (1975) Nature (London) 256, 505] and support other important structural features which include a nucleotide looped out from a helical region which has been proposed as a recognition site for protein L18....

  2. Antitumour activity and other biological actions of oligomers of ribonuclease A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Josef; Gottes, G.; Poučková, P.; Souček, J.; Slavík, Tomáš; Vottariello, F.; Libonati, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 26 (2003), s. 23817-23822 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/01/0114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : ribonuclease A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.482, year: 2003

  3. THE AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCE OF IGUANA (IGUANA-IGUANA) PANCREATIC RIBONUCLEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZHAO, W; BEINTEMA, JJ; HOFSTEENGE, J

    1994-01-01

    The pyrimidine-specific ribonuclease superfamily constitutes a group of homologous proteins so far found only in higher vertebrates. Four separate families are found in mammals, which have resulted from gene duplications in mammalian ancestors. To learn more about the evolutionary history of this

  4. Mapping the ribonucleolytic active site of bovine seminal ribonuclease. The binding of pyrimidinyl phosphonucleotide inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dossi, K.; Tsirkone, V.G.; Hayes, J.M.; Matoušek, Josef; Poučková, P.; Souček, J.; Zadinová, M.; Zographos, S.E.; Leonidas, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 11 (2009), s. 4496-4508 ISSN 0223-5234 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : bovine seminal ribonuclease * antitumor agent Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 3.269, year: 2009

  5. Molecular cloning of the human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin: A member of the ribonuclease gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, H.F.; Tenen, D.G.; Ackerman, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated a 725-base-pair cDNA clone for human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). EDN is a distinct cationic protein of the eosinophil's large specific granule known primarily for its ability to induce ataxia, paralysis, and central nervous system cellular degeneration in experimental animals (Gordon phenomenon). The open reading frame encodes a 134-amino acid mature polypeptide with a molecular mass of 15.5 kDa and a 27-residue amino-terminal hydrophobic leader sequence. The sequence of the mature polypeptide is identical to that reported for human urinary ribonuclease, and to the amino-terminal sequence of human liver ribonuclease; the cDNA encodes a tryptophan in position 7. Both EDN and the related granule protein, eosinophil cationic protein, have ribonucleolytic activity; sequence similarities among EDN, eosinophil cationic protein, ribonucleases from liver, urine, and pancreas, and angiogenin define a ribonuclease multigene family. mRNA encoding EDN was detected in uninduced HL-60 cells and was up-regulated in cells induced toward eosinophilic differentiation with B-cell growth factor 2/interleukin 5 and toward neutrophilic differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide. EDN mRNA was detected in mature neutrophils even though EDN-like neurotoxic activity is not found neutrophil extracts. These results suggest that neutrophils contain a protein that is closely related or identical to EDN

  6. A nonradioactive assay for poly(a)-specific ribonuclease activity by methylene blue colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Wei-Feng; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2006-01-01

    A simple nonradioactive assay, which was based on the specific shift of the absorbance maximum of methylene blue induced by its intercalation into poly(A) molecules, was developed for poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN). A good linear relationship was found between the absorbance at 662 nm and the poly(A) concentration. The assay conditions, including the concentration of methylene blue, the incubation temperature and time, and the poly(A) concentration were evaluated and optimized.

  7. A Ribonuclease Isolated from Wild Ganoderma Lucidum Suppressed Autophagy and Triggered Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dan, Xiuli; Liu, Wenlong; Wong, Jack H.; Ng, Tzi B.

    2016-01-01

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been consumed in China as a medicine for promoting health and longevity for thousands of years. Due to its paramount and multiple pharmaceutical effects, G. lucidum has received considerable attention from researchers and its chemical constituents as well as their respective functions were gradually unveiled by using modern research methods. Herein, we reported the isolation of a protein (Ganoderma lucidum ribonuclease, GLR) with anti-colorectal...

  8. A Hydrogen Exchange Method Using Tritium and Sephadex: Its Application to Ribonuclease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, S. Walter

    2012-01-01

    A new method for measuring the hydrogen exchange of macromolecules in solution is described. The method uses tritium to trace the movement of hydrogen, and utilizes Sephadex columns to effect, in about 2 minutes, a separation between tritiated macromolecule and tritiated solvent great enough to allow the measurement of bound tritium. High sensitivity and freedom from artifact is demonstrated and the possible value of the technique for investigation of other kinds of colloid-small molecule interaction is indicated. Competition experiments involving tritium, hydrogen, and deuterium indicate the absence of any equilibrium isotope effect in the ribonuclease-hydrogen isotope system, though a secondary kinetic isotope effect is apparent when ribonuclease is largely deuterated. Ribonuclease shows four clearly distinguishable kinetic classes of exchangeable hydrogens. Evidence is marshaled to suggest the independently measurable classes II, III, and IV (in order of decreasing rate of exchange) to represent “random-chain” peptides, peptides involved in α-helix, and otherwise shielded side-chain and peptide hydrogens, respectively. PMID:14075117

  9. Studies on protein synthesis by protoplasts of saccharomyces carlsbergensis III. Studies on the specificity and the mechanism of the action of ribonuclease on protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, S.R. de; Dam, G.J.W. van; Koningsberger, V.V.

    1962-01-01

    In this paper, the experimental results are presented of a continued study on the specificity and the mechanism of the inhibition by ribonuclease of protein synthesis in protoplasts of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. By comparing the effects of native pancreatic ribonuclease with those of

  10. Influence of the solubilization of ribonuclease and of its hydrophobic derivatives on water-in-oil microemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Fabienne

    1993-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of the structural disruption of a water-in-oil microemulsion during the solubilization of an enzyme. More precisely, the microemulsion is the water/isooctane system, stabilised by the commonly named AOT anionic surfactant, and the disrupting agent is an enzymatic protein, ribonuclease A. The author addresses the following topics: interactions in microemulsion, percolation in microemulsion, use of microemulsions as micro-reactor, chemical modification of enzymes, and reactivity of enzymes. After a recall of the main results concerning AOT inverse micelles, the author addresses the influence of ribonuclease solubilisation on the micellar system. The micellar environment is then used as a micro-reactor in order to fix hydrophobic molecules in a covalent way onto the ribonuclease A, and then to promote the percolation process. The author then studies the structure of the microemulsion in presence of modified enzymes [fr

  11. A dual surface plasmon resonance assay for the determination of ribonuclease H activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Vaisocherová, Hana; Štepánek, J.; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2010), s. 1605-1611 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058; GA ČR GA202/09/0193 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) SVV-2010-261 304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Enzyme activity assay * Ribonuclease H * Biosensor Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 5.361, year: 2010

  12. Effect of amino acids and amino acid derivatives on crystallization of hemoglobin and ribonuclease A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Len; Kobayashi, Toyoaki; Shiraki, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the addition of amino acids and amino acid derivatives on the crystallization of hemoglobin and ribonuclease A has been evaluated. The results showed that certain types of additives expand the concentration conditions in which crystals are formed. Determination of the appropriate conditions for protein crystallization remains a highly empirical process. Preventing protein aggregation is necessary for the formation of single crystals under aggregation-prone solution conditions. Because many amino acids and amino acid derivatives offer a unique combination of solubility and stabilizing properties, they open new avenues into the field of protein aggregation research. The use of amino acids and amino acid derivatives can potentially influence processes such as heat treatment and refolding reactions. The effect of the addition of several amino acids, such as lysine, and several amino acid derivatives, such as glycine ethyl ester and glycine amide, on the crystallization of equine hemoglobin and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A has been examined. The addition of these amino acids and amino acid derivatives expanded the range of precipitant concentration in which crystals formed without aggregation. The addition of such additives appears to promote the crystallization of proteins

  13. Effect of amino acids and amino acid derivatives on crystallization of hemoglobin and ribonuclease A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Len, E-mail: len@ksc.kwansei.ac.jp; Kobayashi, Toyoaki [School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Shiraki, Kentaro [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hiroshi [School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2008-05-01

    The effect of the addition of amino acids and amino acid derivatives on the crystallization of hemoglobin and ribonuclease A has been evaluated. The results showed that certain types of additives expand the concentration conditions in which crystals are formed. Determination of the appropriate conditions for protein crystallization remains a highly empirical process. Preventing protein aggregation is necessary for the formation of single crystals under aggregation-prone solution conditions. Because many amino acids and amino acid derivatives offer a unique combination of solubility and stabilizing properties, they open new avenues into the field of protein aggregation research. The use of amino acids and amino acid derivatives can potentially influence processes such as heat treatment and refolding reactions. The effect of the addition of several amino acids, such as lysine, and several amino acid derivatives, such as glycine ethyl ester and glycine amide, on the crystallization of equine hemoglobin and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A has been examined. The addition of these amino acids and amino acid derivatives expanded the range of precipitant concentration in which crystals formed without aggregation. The addition of such additives appears to promote the crystallization of proteins.

  14. Structural investigation of ribonuclease A conformational preferences using high pressure protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpiewska, Katarzyna, E-mail: kurpiews@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland); Dziubek, Kamil; Katrusiak, Andrzej [Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Umultowska 89b, 61-61 Poznań (Poland); Font, Josep [School of Medical Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ribò, Marc; Vilanova, Maria [Universitat de Girona, Laboratorid’Enginyeria de Proteïnes, Departament de Biologia, Facultat de Ciències, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Lewiński, Krzysztof [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A unique crystallographic studies of wild-type and mutated form of the same protein under high pressure. • Compressibility of RNase A molecule is significantly affected by a single amino acid substitution. • High pressure protein crystallography helps understanding protein flexibility and identify conformational substrates. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure in range 0.1–1.5 GPa is used to modify biological system behaviour mostly in biophysical studies of proteins in solution. Due to specific influence on the system equilibrium high pressure can act as a filter that enables to identify and investigate higher energy protein conformers. The idea of the presented experiments is to examine the behaviour of RNase A molecule under high pressure before and after introduction of destabilizing mutation. For the first time crystal structures of wild-type bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and its markedly less stable variant modified at position Ile106 were determined at different pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure showed that the secondary structure of RNase A is well preserved even beyond 0.67 GPa at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis of ribonuclease A conformation observed under high pressure revealed that pressure influences hydrogen bonds pattern, cavity size and packing of molecule.

  15. Ribonucleases 6 and 7 have antimicrobial function in the human and murine urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Eichler, Tad; Beceiro, Susana; Li, Birong; Easterling, Robert; Carpenter, Ashley R.; James, Cindy; McHugh, Kirk M.; Hains, David S.; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Spencer, John David

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests antimicrobial peptides protect the urinary tract from infection. Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7), a member of the RNase A superfamily, is a potent epithelial-derived protein that maintains human urinary tract sterility. RNase 7 expression is restricted to primates, limiting evaluation of its antimicrobial activity in vivo. Here we identified Ribonuclease 6 (RNase 6) as the RNase A Superfamily member present in humans and mice that is most conserved at the amino acid level relative to RNase 7. Like RNase 7, recombinant human and murine RNase 6 has potent antimicrobial activity against uropathogens. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analysis indicate that RNase 6 mRNA and protein are up-regulated in the human and murine urinary tract during infection. Immunostaining located RNase 6 to resident and infiltrating monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils. Uropathogenic E. coli induces RNase 6 peptide expression in human CD14+ monocytes and murine bone marrow derived macrophages. Thus, RNase 6 is an inducible, myeloid-derived protein with markedly different expression from the epithelial-derived RNase 7 but with equally potent antimicrobial activity. Our studies suggest RNase 6 serves as an evolutionarily conserved antimicrobial peptide that participates in the maintenance of urinary tract sterility. PMID:25075772

  16. Structural investigation of ribonuclease A conformational preferences using high pressure protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpiewska, Katarzyna; Dziubek, Kamil; Katrusiak, Andrzej; Font, Josep; Ribò, Marc; Vilanova, Maria; Lewiński, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A unique crystallographic studies of wild-type and mutated form of the same protein under high pressure. • Compressibility of RNase A molecule is significantly affected by a single amino acid substitution. • High pressure protein crystallography helps understanding protein flexibility and identify conformational substrates. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure in range 0.1–1.5 GPa is used to modify biological system behaviour mostly in biophysical studies of proteins in solution. Due to specific influence on the system equilibrium high pressure can act as a filter that enables to identify and investigate higher energy protein conformers. The idea of the presented experiments is to examine the behaviour of RNase A molecule under high pressure before and after introduction of destabilizing mutation. For the first time crystal structures of wild-type bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and its markedly less stable variant modified at position Ile106 were determined at different pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure showed that the secondary structure of RNase A is well preserved even beyond 0.67 GPa at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis of ribonuclease A conformation observed under high pressure revealed that pressure influences hydrogen bonds pattern, cavity size and packing of molecule.

  17. Archaeal ribonuclease P proteins have potential for biotechnological applications where precise hybridization of nucleic acids is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanoshita, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Takashi; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Kimura, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay showed that archaeal ribonuclease P (RNase P) proteins significantly promoted DNA annealing and strand displacement. Moreover, we found that archaeal RNase P proteins could discriminate nucleotide exchanges in DNA chains via their activity accelerating DNA strand displacement, suggesting that they have potential for biotechnological application to genetic diagnosis.

  18. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  19. Studies on protein synthesis by protoplasts of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis I. The effect of ribonuclease on protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, S.R. de; Wermeskerken, R.K.A. van; Koningsberger, V.V.

    1961-01-01

    Ribonuclease was found to inhibit the protein synthesis in the naked yeast protoplast for nearly 100%. Even small concentrations (5 μg/ml) were found inhibitory. The cause of this inhibition can be attributed at least in part to a 90% inhibition of the respiration. Amino acid uptake was found to

  20. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  1. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S...... stearothermophilus 5S RNA. Several protein-induced changes in the RNA structures were identified; some are possibly allosteric in nature. The two prokaryotic 5S RNAs were also incubated with total 50S subunit proteins from E. coli and B. stearothermophilus ribosomes. Homologous and heterologous reconstitution....... stearothermophilus 5S RNA, which may have been due to a third ribosomal protein L5....

  2. Influenza virus inactivated by artificial ribonucleases as a prospective killed virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Antonina A; Goncharova, Elena P; Kovpak, Mikhail P; Vlassov, Valentin V; Zenkova, Marina A

    2012-04-19

    The inactivation of viral particles with agents causing minimal damage to the structure of surface epitopes is a well-established approach for the production of killed virus vaccines. Here, we describe new agents for the inactivation of influenza virus, artificial ribonucleases (aRNases), which are chemical compounds capable of cleaving RNA molecules. Several aRNases were identified, exhibiting significant virucidal activity against the influenza A virus and causing a minimal effect on the affinity of monoclonal antibodies for the inactivated virus. Using a murine model of the influenza virus infection, a high protective activity of the aRNase-inactivated virus as a vaccine was demonstrated. The results of the experiments demonstrate the efficacy of novel chemical agents in the preparation of vaccines against influenza and, perhaps, against other infections caused by RNA viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reducing conditions are the key for efficient production of active ribonuclease inhibitor in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eukaryotic RNase ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitors (RI are a protein group distinguished by a unique structure - they are composed of hydrophobic leucine-rich repeat motifs (LRR and contain a high amount of reduced cysteine residues. The members of this group are difficult to produce in E. coli and other recombinant hosts due to their high aggregation tendency. Results In this work dithiothreitol (DTT was successfully applied for improving the yield of correctly folded ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor in E. coli K12 periplasmic and cytoplasmic compartments. The feasibility of the in vivo folding concepts for cytoplasmic and periplasmic production were demonstrated at batch and fed-batch cultivation modes in shake flasks and at the bioreactor scale. Firstly, the best secretion conditions of RI in the periplasmic space were evaluated by using a high throughput multifactorial screening approach of a vector library, directly with the Enbase fed-batch production mode in 96-well plates. Secondly, the effect of the redox environment was evaluated in isogenic dsbA+ and dsbA- strains at the various cultivation conditions with reducing agents in the cultivation medium. Despite the fusion to the signal peptide, highest activities were found in the cytoplasmic fraction. Thus by removing the signal peptide the positive effect of the reducing agent DTT was clearly proven also for the cytoplasmic compartment. Finally, optimal periplasmic and cytoplasmic RI fed-batch production processes involving externally added DTT were developed in shake flasks and scaled up to the bioreactor scale. Conclusions DTT highly improved both, periplasmic and cytoplasmic accumulation and activity of RI at low synthesis rate, i.e. in constructs harbouring weak recombinant synthesis rate stipulating genetic elements together with cultivation at low temperature. In a stirred bioreactor environment RI folding was strongly improved by repeated pulse addition

  4. A Ribonuclease Isolated from Wild Ganoderma Lucidum Suppressed Autophagy and Triggered Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xiuli; Liu, Wenlong; Wong, Jack H; Ng, Tzi B

    2016-01-01

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been consumed in China as a medicine for promoting health and longevity for thousands of years. Due to its paramount and multiple pharmaceutical effects, G. lucidum has received considerable attention from researchers and its chemical constituents as well as their respective functions were gradually unveiled by using modern research methods. Herein, we reported the isolation of a protein (Ganoderma lucidum ribonuclease, GLR) with anti-colorectal cancer activities from G. lucidum. This protein is a 17.4-kDa RNA degrading enzyme (ribonuclease) and was purified by using liquid chromatography procedures. GLR manifested potent anti-proliferative and anti-colony formation activities on HT29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase through the regulation of cyclin D1 and P53 expression. GLR was demonstrated to induce cell apoptosis in HCT116 cells by activating unfolded protein response and caspase-9 regulated pathways. Besides, the ability to undergo autophagy which is a stress adaption mechanism to cope with metabolic crisis was significantly suppressed by GLR treatment in HCT116 cells. The activation of apoptosis in GLR-treated HT29 cells was, however, independent of caspase-9 and the suppression of autophagy was also relatively minor. Thus the apoptosis of HT29 cells triggered by GLR was much milder than that in HCT116 cells. Our findings show that the RNase from G. lucidum may be one of the bioactive components that contribute to the anti-colorectal cancer activity of G. lucidum.

  5. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-05

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. PMID:25903123

  7. Eukaryotic ribonucleases P/MRP: the crystal structure of the P3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Quan, Chao; Khanova, Elena; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2010-02-17

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is a site-specific endoribonuclease found in all kingdoms of life. Typical RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and a protein moiety. In the eukaryotes, the RNase P lineage has split into two, giving rise to a closely related enzyme, RNase MRP, which has similar components but has evolved to have different specificities. The eukaryotic RNases P/MRP have acquired an essential helix-loop-helix protein-binding RNA domain P3 that has an important function in eukaryotic enzymes and distinguishes them from bacterial and archaeal RNases P. Here, we present a crystal structure of the P3 RNA domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP proteins Pop6 and Pop7 solved to 2.7 A. The structure suggests similar structural organization of the P3 RNA domains in RNases P/MRP and possible functions of the P3 domains and proteins bound to them in the stabilization of the holoenzymes' structures as well as in interactions with substrates. It provides the first insight into the structural organization of the eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family.

  8. VapD in Xylella fastidiosa Is a Thermostable Protein with Ribonuclease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Juliano S; Santiago, André da S; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K; Favaro, Marianna T P; Santos, Clelton A; Horta, Maria Augusta C; Crucello, Aline; Beloti, Lilian L; Romero, Fabian; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Alessandra A; de Souza, Anete P

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c is a gram-negative phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), a disease that is responsible for economic losses in Brazilian agriculture. The most well-known mechanism of pathogenicity for this bacterial pathogen is xylem vessel occlusion, which results from bacterial movement and the formation of biofilms. The molecular mechanisms underlying the virulence caused by biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we provide evidence showing that virulence-associated protein D in X. fastidiosa (Xf-VapD) is a thermostable protein with ribonuclease activity. Moreover, protein expression analyses in two X. fastidiosa strains, including virulent (Xf9a5c) and nonpathogenic (XfJ1a12) strains, showed that Xf-VapD was expressed during all phases of development in both strains and that increased expression was observed in Xf9a5c during biofilm growth. This study is an important step toward characterizing and improving our understanding of the biological significance of Xf-VapD and its potential functions in the CVC pathosystem.

  9. Restricted fragmentation of poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3 RNAs by ribonuclease III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomoto, A. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook); Lee, Y.F.; Babich, A.; Jacobson, A.; Dunn, J.J.; Wimmer, E.

    1979-01-01

    Cleavage of the genome RNAs of poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3 with the ribonuclease III of Escherichia coli has been investigated with the following results: (1) at or above physiological salt concentration, the RNAs are completely resistant to the action of the enzyme, an observation suggesting that the RNAs lack primary cleavage sites; (2) lowering the salt concentration to 0.1 M or below allows RNase III to cleave the RNAs at secondary sites. Both large and small fragments can be obtained in a reproducible manner depending on salt conditions chosen for cleavage. Fingerprints of three large fragments of poliovirus type 2 RNA show that they originate from unique segments and represent most if not all sequences of the genome. Based upon binding to poly(U) filters of poly(A)-linked fragments, a physical map of the large fragments of poliovirus type 2 RNA was constructed. The data suggest that RNase III cleavage of single-stranded RNA provides a useful method to fragment the RNA for further studies.

  10. VapD in Xylella fastidiosa Is a Thermostable Protein with Ribonuclease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano S Mendes

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c is a gram-negative phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC, a disease that is responsible for economic losses in Brazilian agriculture. The most well-known mechanism of pathogenicity for this bacterial pathogen is xylem vessel occlusion, which results from bacterial movement and the formation of biofilms. The molecular mechanisms underlying the virulence caused by biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we provide evidence showing that virulence-associated protein D in X. fastidiosa (Xf-VapD is a thermostable protein with ribonuclease activity. Moreover, protein expression analyses in two X. fastidiosa strains, including virulent (Xf9a5c and nonpathogenic (XfJ1a12 strains, showed that Xf-VapD was expressed during all phases of development in both strains and that increased expression was observed in Xf9a5c during biofilm growth. This study is an important step toward characterizing and improving our understanding of the biological significance of Xf-VapD and its potential functions in the CVC pathosystem.

  11. Localization in the Nucleolus and Coiled Bodies of Protein Subunits of the Ribonucleoprotein Ribonuclease P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrous, Nayef; Wolenski, Joseph S.; Wesolowski, Donna; Lee, Christopher; Altman, Sidney

    1999-01-01

    The precise location of the tRNA processing ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease P (RNase P) and the mechanism of its intranuclear distribution have not been completely delineated. We show that three protein subunits of human RNase P (Rpp), Rpp14, Rpp29 and Rpp38, are found in the nucleolus and that each can localize a reporter protein to nucleoli of cells in tissue culture. In contrast to Rpp38, which is uniformly distributed in nucleoli, Rpp14 and Rpp29 are confined to the dense fibrillar component. Rpp29 and Rpp38 possess functional, yet distinct domains required for subnucleolar localization. The subunit Rpp14 lacks such a domain and appears to be dependent on a piggyback process to reach the nucleolus. Biochemical analysis suggests that catalytically active RNase P exists in the nucleolus. We also provide evidence that Rpp29 and Rpp38 reside in coiled bodies, organelles that are implicated in the biogenesis of several other small nuclear ribonucleoproteins required for processing of precursor mRNA. Because some protein subunits of RNase P are shared by the ribosomal RNA processing ribonucleoprotein RNase MRP, these two evolutionary related holoenzymes may share common intranuclear localization and assembly pathways to coordinate the processing of tRNA and rRNA precursors. PMID:10444065

  12. Radiolytic and enzymatic dimerization of tyrosyl residues in insulin, ribonuclease, papain and collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boguta, G; Dancewicz, A M [Institute of Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    1983-03-01

    Insulin ribonuclease, papain and collagen solutions saturated with nitrogen, N/sub 2/O or air were irradiated with doses of 10 to 640 Gy of gamma rays. Protein solutions were also oxidized enzymatically in a system of horse-radish peroxidase: hydrogen peroxide. Column chromatography (Sephadex G-75 or Sephacryl S-200) of treated protein solutions revealed that they contain protein molecular aggregates. Nitrogen saturation of solution before irradiation was most favourable for radiation-induced aggregation of proteins. Fluorescence analysis of protein solutions resulted in detection of dityrosyl structures in irradiated as well as in enzymatically oxidized proteins. Concentration of dityrosine in proteins studied was determined fluorimetrically in their hydrolysates separated on BioGel P-2 column. In irradiated proteins, dityrosine was present almost exclusively in their aggregated forms. In proteins oxidized enzymatically, dityrosine was also present in fractions containing apparently unchanged protein. Mechanisms which could account for differences in the yield of dityrosine formation in radiolysis and in enzymatic oxidation of proteins are suggested.

  13. An in vitro reprogrammable antiviral RISC with size-preferential ribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarov, Rustem T; Ciomperlik, Jessica; Scholthof, Herman B

    2016-03-01

    Infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) mutants compromised for silencing suppression induces formation of an antiviral RISC (vRISC) that can be isolated using chromatography procedures. The isolated vRISC sequence-specifically degrades TBSV RNA in vitro, its activity can be down-regulated by removing siRNAs, and re-stimulated by exogenous supply of siRNAs. vRISC is most effective at hydrolyzing the ~4.8kb genomic RNA, but less so for a ~2.2kb TBSV subgenomic mRNA (sgRNA1), while the 3' co-terminal sgRNA2 of ~0.9kb appears insensitive to vRISC cleavage. Moreover, experiments with in vitro generated 5' co-terminal viral transcripts show that RNAs of ~2.7kb are efficiently cleaved while those of ~1.1kb or shorter are unaffected. The isolated antiviral ribonuclease complex fails to degrade ~0.4kb defective interfering RNAs (DIs) in vitro, agreeing with findings that in plants DIs are not targeted by silencing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Ribonuclease activity of buckwheat plant (Fagopyrum esculentum cultivars with different sensitivities to buckwheat burn virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. R. Sindarovska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleases (RNases are present in base-level amounts in intact plants, but this level is able to increase greatly under stress conditions. The possible cause for such an increase is protection against plant RNA-virus attack. Buckwheat burn virus (BBV is a highly virulent pathogen that belongs to Rhabdoviridae family. In our study, we have analyzed the correlation between RNase activity and resistance of different buckwheat cultivars to BBV infection. Two cultivars, Kara-Dag and Roksolana, with different sensitivities to BBV have been used. Kara-Dag is a cultivar with medium sensitivity to virus and Roksolana is a tolerant cultivar. It has been shown that the base level of RNase activity in Roksolana cultivar was in most cases higher than the corresponding parameter in Kara-Dag cultivar. Both infected and uninfected plants of Roksolana cultivar demonstrated high RNase activity during two weeks. Whereas infected plants of Kara-Dag cultivar demonstrated unstable levels of RNase activity. Significant decline in RNase activity was detected on the 7th day post infection with subsequent gradual increase in RNase activity. Decline of the RNase activity during the first week could promote the virus replication and therefore more successful infection of upper leaves of plants. Unstable levels of RNase activity in infected buckwheat plants may be explained by insufficiency of virus-resistant mechanisms that determines the medium sensitivity of the cultivar to BBV. Thus, plants of buckwheat cultivar having less sensitivity to virus, displayed in general higher RNase activity.

  15. Radiolytic and enzymatic dimerization of tyrosyl residues in insulin, ribonuclease, papain and collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, G.; Dancewicz, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Insulin ribonuclease, papain and collagen solutions saturated with nitrogen, N 2 O or air were irradiated with doses of 10 to 640 Gy of gamma rays. Protein solutions were also oxidized enzymatically in a system of horse-radish peroxidase: hydrogen peroxide. Column chromatography (Sephadex G-75 or Sephacryl S-200) of treated protein solutions revealed that they contain protein molecular aggregates. Nitrogen saturation of solution before irradiation was most favourable for radiation-induced aggregation of proteins. Fluorescence analysis of protein solutions resulted in detection of dityrosyl structures in irradiated as well as in enzymatically oxidized proteins. Concentration of dityrosine in proteins studied was determined fluorimetrically in their hydrolysates separated on BioGel P-2 column. In irradiated proteins, dityrosine was present almost exclusively in their aggregated forms. In proteins oxidized enzymatically, dityrosine was also present in fractions containing apparently unchanged protein. Mechanisms which could account for differences in the yield of dityrosine formation in radiolysis and in enzymatic oxidation of proteins are suggested. (author)

  16. The leucine zipper domains of the transcription factors GCN4 and c-Jun have ribonuclease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP proteins are one of the largest transcription factor families that regulate a wide range of cellular functions. Owing to the stability of their coiled coil structure leucine zipper (LZ domains of bZIP factors are widely employed as dimerization motifs in protein engineering studies. In the course of one such study, the X-ray structure of the retro-version of the LZ moiety of yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 suggested that this retro-LZ may have ribonuclease activity. Here we show that not only the retro-LZ but also the authentic LZ of GCN4 has weak but distinct ribonuclease activity. The observed cleavage of RNA is unspecific, it is not suppressed by the ribonuclease A inhibitor RNasin and involves the breakage of 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds with formation of 2',3'-cyclic phosphates as the final products as demonstrated by HPLC/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Several mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper are catalytically inactive, providing important negative controls and unequivocally associating the enzymatic activity with the peptide under study. The leucine zipper moiety of the human factor c-Jun as well as the entire c-Jun protein are also shown to catalyze degradation of RNA. The presented data, which was obtained in the test-tube experiments, adds GCN4 and c-Jun to the pool of proteins with multiple functions (also known as moonlighting proteins. If expressed in vivo, the endoribonuclease activity of these bZIP-containing factors may represent a direct coupling between transcription activation and controlled RNA turnover. As an additional result of this work, the retro-leucine zipper of GCN4 can be added to the list of functional retro-peptides.

  17. Particle-bound phytochrome: differential pigment release by surfactants, ribonuclease and phospholipase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressel, J.; Quail, P.H.

    1976-01-01

    Surfactants and hydrolytic enzymes were used to probe the nature of the constituent(s) to which phytochrome binds in particulate fractions from red-irradiated Cucurbita, [ 14 C]-choline and [ 3 H]-uridine pre-labelled tissue was used to monitor the release of phospholipids and RNA by these agents. Ribonuclease (RNase) digestion of 20,000 x g pellets eliminates both the phytochrome and ribonucleprotein (RNP) which cosediment at 31S. Little [ 14 C]-choline occurs in the 31S fraction and the amount is not changed by RNase digestion. This is further evidence that phytochrome binds directly to the RNP in the 31S fraction rather than to any membranous material present. The distribution profile of the RNA in a second (='heavy') phytochrome fraction does not correlate with that of the pigment. This suggests that the phytochrome in this fraction is not bound to RNP. The RNA is of ribosomal origin but much less degraded than that of the 31S RNP and is resistant to RNase digestion. Phospholipase C releases 80% of the [ 14 C]-choline from the 'heavy' fraction without freeing phytochrome. This indicates that the pigment does not bind to the polar head groups of the membrane phospholipids present. Low concentrations of deoxycholate dissociate phytochrome from this fraction without releasing substantial quantities of integral membrane proteins or phospholipids. Some RNP is dislodged by the surfactant but the phytochrome and RNP are not released as a complex. The data suggest that the pigment in the 'heavy' fraction may be loosely bound to a protein constituent rather than to RNP or polar phospholipids. (auth.)

  18. An integrated in silico approach to design specific inhibitors targeting human poly(a-specific ribonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Vlachakis

    Full Text Available Poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN is an exoribonuclease/deadenylase that degrades 3'-end poly(A tails in almost all eukaryotic organisms. Much of the biochemical and structural information on PARN comes from the human enzyme. However, the existence of PARN all along the eukaryotic evolutionary ladder requires further and thorough investigation. Although the complete structure of the full-length human PARN, as well as several aspects of the catalytic mechanism still remain elusive, many previous studies indicate that PARN can be used as potent and promising anti-cancer target. In the present study, we attempt to complement the existing structural information on PARN with in-depth bioinformatics analyses, in order to get a hologram of the molecular evolution of PARNs active site. In an effort to draw an outline, which allows specific drug design targeting PARN, an unequivocally specific platform was designed for the development of selective modulators focusing on the unique structural and catalytic features of the enzyme. Extensive phylogenetic analysis based on all the publicly available genomes indicated a broad distribution for PARN across eukaryotic species and revealed structurally important amino acids which could be assigned as potentially strong contributors to the regulation of the catalytic mechanism of PARN. Based on the above, we propose a comprehensive in silico model for the PARN's catalytic mechanism and moreover, we developed a 3D pharmacophore model, which was subsequently used for the introduction of DNP-poly(A amphipathic substrate analog as a potential inhibitor of PARN. Indeed, biochemical analysis revealed that DNP-poly(A inhibits PARN competitively. Our approach provides an efficient integrated platform for the rational design of pharmacophore models as well as novel modulators of PARN with therapeutic potential.

  19. A Ribonuclease Isolated from Wild Ganoderma Lucidum Suppressed Autophagy and Triggered Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Dan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum has been consumed in China as a medicine for promoting health and longevity for thousands of years. Due to its paramount and multiple pharmaceutical effects, G. lucidum has received considerable attention from researchers and its chemical constituents as well as their respective functions were gradually unveiled by using modern research methods. Herein, we reported the isolation of a protein (GLR with anti-colorectal cancer activities from G. lucidum. This protein is a 17.4-kDa RNA degrading enzyme (ribonuclease and was purified by using liquid chromatography procedures. GLR manifested potent anti-proliferative and anti-colony formation activities on HT29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase through the regulation of cyclin D1 and P53 expression. GLR was demonstrated to induce cell apoptosis in HCT116 cells by activating unfolded protein response and caspase-9 regulated pathways. Besides, the ability to undergo autophagy which is a stress adaption mechanism to cope with metabolic crisis was significantly suppressed by GLR treatment in HCT116 cells. The activation of apoptosis in GLR-treated HT29 cells was, however, independent of caspase-9 and the suppression of autophagy was also relatively minor. Thus the apoptosis of HT29 cells triggered by GLR was much milder than that in HCT116 cells. Our findings show that the RNase from G. lucidum may be one of the bioactive components that contribute to the anti-colorectal cancer activity of G. lucidum.

  20. The ribonuclease Dis3 is an essential regulator of the developmental transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Dezhi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dis3 is ribonuclease that acts directly in the processing, turnover, and surveillance of a large number of distinct RNA species. Evolutionarily conserved from eubacteria to eukaryotes and a crucial component of the RNA processing exosome, Dis3 has been shown to be essential in yeast and fly S2 cells. However, it is not known whether Dis3 has essential functions in a metazoan. This study inquires whether Dis3 is required for Drosophila development and viability and how Dis3 regulates the transcriptome in the developing fly. Results Using transgenic flies, we show that Dis3 knock down (Dis3KD retards growth, induces melanotic tumor formation, and ultimately results in 2nd instar larval lethality. In order to determine whether Dis3KD fly phenotypes were a consequence of disrupting developmentally regulated RNA turnover, we performed RNA deep sequencing analysis on total RNA isolated from developmentally staged animals. Bioinformatic analysis of transcripts from Dis3KD flies reveals substantial transcriptomic changes, most notably down-regulation in early expressed RNAs. Finally, gene ontology analysis of this early stage shows that Dis3 regulates transcripts related to extracellular structure and remodelling, neurogenesis, and nucleotide metabolism. Conclusions We conclude that Dis3 is essential for early Drosophila melanogaster development and has specific and important stage-specific roles in regulating RNA metabolism. In showing for the first time that Dis3 is required for the development of a multicellular organism, our work provides mechanistic insight into how Dis3—either independent of or associated with the RNA processing exosome—participates in cell type-specific RNA turnover in metazoan development.

  1. Cloning, purification, and functional characterization of Carocin S2, a ribonuclease bacteriocin produced by Pectobacterium carotovorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Kuo-Ching

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most isolates of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc produce bacteriocins. In this study, we have determined that Pcc strain F-rif-18 has a chromosomal gene encoding the low-molecular-weight bacteriocin, Carocin S2, and that this bacteriocin inhibits the growth of a closely related strain. Carocin S2 is inducible by ultraviolet radiation but not by mutagenic agents such as mitomycin C. Results A carocin S2-defective mutant, TF1-2, was obtained by Tn5 insertional mutagenesis using F-rif-18. A 5706-bp DNA fragment was detected by Southern blotting, selected from a genomic DNA library, and cloned to the vector, pMS2KI. Two adjacent complete open reading frames within pMS2KI were sequenced, characterized, and identified as caroS2K and caroS2I, which respectively encode the killing protein and immunity protein. Notably, carocin S2 could be expressed not only in the mutant TF1-2 but also in Escherichia coli DH5α after entry of the plasmid pMS2KI. Furthermore, the C-terminal domain of CaroS2K was homologous to the nuclease domains of colicin D and klebicin D. Moreover, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the relative mass of CaroS2K was 85 kDa and that of CaroS2I was 10 kDa. Conclusion This study shown that another nuclease type of bacteriocin was found in Pectobacterium carotovorum. This new type of bacteriocin, Carocin S2, has the ribonuclease activity of CaroS2K and the immunity protein activity of CaroS2I.

  2. Typing of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms using ribonuclease cleavage of DNA/RNA chimeric single-base extension primers and detection by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Børsting, Claus

    2005-01-01

    A novel single-base extension (SBE) assay using cleavable and noncleavable SBE primers in the same reaction mix is described. The cleavable SBE primers consisted of deoxyribonucleotides and one ribonucleotide (hereafter denoted chimeric primers), whereas the noncleavable SBE primers consisted....... A ribonuclease mix was developed to specifically cleave the chimeric primers, irrespective of the base of the ribonucleotide, whereas standard primers without a ribonucleotide were unaffected by the ribonuclease treatment. The SBE products were analyzed in linear mode using a matrix-assisted laser desorption...... containing 9 chimeric primers and 8 standard primers....

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A-CpA and transition state-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formoso, Elena; Matxain, Jon M; Lopez, Xabier; York, Darrin M

    2010-06-03

    The mechanisms of enzymes are intimately connected with their overall structure and dynamics in solution. Experimentally, it is considerably challenging to provide detailed atomic level information about the conformational events that occur at different stages along the chemical reaction path. Here, theoretical tools may offer new potential insights that complement those obtained from experiments that may not yield an unambiguous mechanistic interpretation. In this study, we apply molecular dynamics simulations of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A, an archetype ribonuclease, to study the conformational dynamics, structural relaxation, and differential solvation that occur at discrete stages of the transesterification and cleavage reaction. Simulations were performed with explicit solvation with rigorous electrostatics and utilize recently developed molecular mechanical force field parameters for transphosphorylation and hydrolysis transition state analogues. Herein, we present results for the enzyme complexed with the dinucleotide substrate cytidilyl-3',5'-adenosine (CpA) in the reactant, and transphosphorylation and hydrolysis transition states. A detailed analysis of active site structures and hydrogen-bond patterns is presented and compared. The integrity of the overall backbone structure is preserved in the simulations and supports a mechanism whereby His12 stabilizes accumulating negative charge at the transition states through hydrogen-bond donation to the nonbridge oxygens. Lys41 is shown to be highly versatile along the reaction coordinate and can aid in the stabilization of the dianionic transition state, while being poised to act as a general acid catalyst in the hydrolysis step.

  4. Poly(A-Specific Ribonuclease Mediates 3′-End Trimming of Argonaute2-Cleaved Precursor MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Yoda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are typically generated as ∼22-nucleotide double-stranded RNAs via the processing of precursor hairpins by the ribonuclease III enzyme Dicer, after which they are loaded into Argonaute (Ago proteins to form an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. However, the biogenesis of miR-451, an erythropoietic miRNA conserved in vertebrates, occurs independently of Dicer and instead requires cleavage of the 3′ arm of the pre-miR-451 precursor hairpin by Ago2. The 3′ end of the Ago2-cleaved pre-miR-451 intermediate is then trimmed to the mature length by an unknown nuclease. Here, using a classical chromatographic approach, we identified poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN as the enzyme responsible for the 3′–5′ exonucleolytic trimming of Ago2-cleaved pre-miR-451. Surprisingly, our data show that trimming of Ago2-cleaved precursor miRNAs is not essential for target silencing, indicating that RISC is functional with miRNAs longer than the mature length. Our findings define the maturation step in the miRNA biogenesis pathway that depends on Ago2-mediated cleavage.

  5. Characterization of the archaeal ribonuclease P proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Atsushi; Honda, Takashi; Fukuhara, Hideo; Hada, Kazumasa; Kimura, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Our earlier study revealed that RNase P RNA (pRNA) and five proteins (PhoPop5, PhoRpp38, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, and PhoRpp30) in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 reconstituted RNase P activity that exhibits enzymatic properties like those of the authentic enzyme. In present study, we investigated involvement of the individual proteins in RNase P activity. Two particles (R-3Ps), in which pRNA was mixed with three proteins, PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38 or PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp21 showed a detectable RNase P activity, and five reconstituted particles (R-4Ps) composed of pRNA and four proteins exhibited RNase P activity, albeit at reduced level compared to that of the reconstituted particle (R-5P) composed of pRNA and five proteins. Time-course analysis of the RNase P activities of R-4Ps indicated that the R-4Ps lacking PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, or PhoRpp30 had virtually reduced activity, while omission of PhoRpp29 or PhoRpp38 had a slight effect on the activity. The results indicate that the proteins contribute to RNase P activity in order of PhoPop5 > PhoRpp30 > PhoRpp21 > PhoRpp29 > PhoRpp38. It was further found that R-4Ps showed a characteristic Mg2+ ion dependency approximately identical to that of R-5P. However, R-4Ps had optimum temperature of around at 55 degrees C which is lower than 70 degrees C for R-5P. Together, it is suggested that the P. horikoshii RNase P proteins are predominantly involved in optimization of the pRNA conformation, though they are individually dispensable for RNase P activity in vitro.

  6. A ribonuclease-resistant region of 5S RNA and its relation to the RNA binding sites of proteins L18 and L25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Garrett, R A; Wagner, R

    1979-01-01

    An RNA fragment, constituting three subfragments of nucleotide sequences 1-11, 69-87 and 89-120, is the most ribonuclease-resistant part of the native 5S RNA of Escherichia coli, at 0 degrees C. A smaller fragment of nucleotide sequence 69-87 and 90-110 is ribonuclease-resistant at 25 degrees....... Degradation of the L25-5S RNA complex with ribonuclease A or T2 yielded RNA fragments similar to those of the free 5S RNA at 0 degrees C and 25 degrees C; moreover L25 remained strongly bound to both RNA fragments and also produced some opening of the RNA structure in at least two positions. Protein L18...... initially protected most of the 5S RNA against ribonuclease digestion, at 0 degrees C, but was then gradually released prior to the formation of the larger RNA fragment. It cannot be concluded, therefore, as it was earlier (Gray et al., 1973), that this RNA fragment contains the primary binding site of L18....

  7. Primary structures of two ribonucleases from ginseng calluses - New members of the PR-10 family of intracellular pathogenesis-related plant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moiseyev, GP; Fedoreyeva, LI; Zhuravlev, YN; Yasnetskaya, E; Jekel, PA; Beintema, JJ

    1997-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of two ribonucleases from a callus cell culture of Panax ginseng were determined, The two sequences differ at 26% of the amino acid positions, Homology was found with a large family of intracellular pathogenesis-related proteins, food allergens and tree pollen allergens from

  8. Effect of urea and glycerol on the adsorption of ribonuclease A at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsecken, Anne K; Evers, Florian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2010-08-17

    This study reports on the influence of nonionic cosolvents on the interfacial structure of ribonuclease A (RNase) adsorbed at the air-water interface. We applied X-ray reflectometry to obtain detailed volume fraction profiles of the adsorbed layers and to follow the effect of glycerol and urea on the adsorbate structure as a function of cosolvent concentration. Under all conditions studied, the adsorbed RNase layer maintains its compact shape, and the adsorbed RNase molecules adopt a flat-on orientation at the interface. Both kosmotropic glycerol and chaotropic urea exert profound effects on the adsorbate: The surface excess decreases linearly with glycerol content and is also reduced at low urea concentration. However, at high urea concentration, parts of the adsorbed layer are dehydrated and become exposed to air. The electron density and volume fraction profiles of the adsorbed protein provide clear evidence that these effects are ruled by different mechanisms.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the P3 RNA domain of yeast ribonuclease MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP protein components Pop6 and Pop7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Quan, Chao; Khanova, Elena; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribonucleases P and MRP are closely related RNA-based enzymes which contain a catalytic RNA component and several protein subunits. The roles of the protein subunits in the structure and function of eukaryotic ribonucleases P and MRP are not clear. Crystals of a complex that included a circularly permuted 46-nucleotide-long P3 domain of the RNA component of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonuclease MRP and selenomethionine derivatives of the shared ribonuclease P/MRP protein components Pop6 (18.2 kDa) and Pop7 (15.8 kDa) were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P4(2)22 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.2, c = 76.8 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees ) and diffracted to 3.25 A resolution.

  10. Preparation, structural analysis and bioactivity of ribonuclease A-albumin conjugate: tetra-conjugation or PEG as the linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunju; Lin, Qixun; Wang, Jun; Shen, Lijuan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo; Hu, Tao

    2012-12-31

    Ribonuclease A (RNase A) is a therapeutic enzyme with cytotoxic action against tumor cells. Its clinical application is limited by the short half-life and insufficient stability. Conjugation of albumin can overcome the limitation, whereas dramatically decrease the enzymatic activity of RNase A. Here, three strategies were proposed to prepare the RNase A-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugates. R-SMCC-B (a conjugate of four RNase A attached with one BSA) and R-PEG-B (a mono-conjugate) were prepared using Sulfo-SMCC (a short bifunctional linker) and mal-PEG-NHS (a bifunctional PEG), respectively. Mal-PEG-NHS and hexadecylamine (HDA) were used to prepare the mono-conjugate, R-HDA-B, where HDA was adopted to bind BSA. The PEG linker can elongate the proximity between RNase A and BSA. In contrast, four RNase A were closely located on BSA in R-SMCC-B. R-SMCC-B showed the lowest K(m) and the highest relative enzymatic activity and k(cat)/K(m) in the three conjugates. Presumably, the tetravalent interaction of RNase A in R-SMCC-B can increase the binding affinity to its substrate. In addition, the slow release of BSA from R-HDA-B may increase the enzymatic activity of R-HDA-B. Our study is expected to provide strategies to develop protein-albumin conjugate with high therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assay of hybrid ribonuclease using a membrane filter-immobilized synthetic hybrid: application to the human leukemic cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaphilis, A.D.; Kamper, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    A method for assaying hybrid ribonuclease has been devised which utilizes as substrate the synthetic hybrid [ 3 H]polyriboadenylic acid [poly(rA)]:polydeoxythymidylic acid [poly(dT)] immobilized on the solid matrix of nitrocellulose filters. The hybridization on filter of [ 3 H]poly(rA) to poly(dT) has been explored in terms of efficacy of the process and the response of the product to RNase H. A pulse of uv irradiation of poly(dT) while in dry state on the filter increased its firm binding to the filter in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in a concomitant increase of the yield of hybrid formation. The filter-immobilized hybrid was 95% resistant to RNase A but sensitive to RNase H. When stored in toluene in the cold the hybrid maintained its stability for over 6 months, as judged by its resistance to RNase A. The method offers a number of advantages over assays that use solution hybrids as substrates and was readily applicable in the screening of leukemic patients, in the leukocytes of which it has demonstrated increased RNase H levels

  12. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L. (UW-MED); (UCB)

    2015-04-22

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  14. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of PNA-peptide-DETA conjugates as potential cell penetrating artificial ribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lene; de Koning, Martijn C; van Kuik-Romeijn, Petra; Weterings, Jimmy; Pol, Christine J; Platenburg, Gerard; Overhand, Mark; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; van Boom, Jacques H

    2004-01-01

    We report the synthesis of novel artificial ribonucleases with potentially improved cellular uptake. The design of trifunctional conjugates 1a and 1b is based on the specific RNA-recognizing properties of PNA, the RNA-cleaving abilities of diethylenetriamine (DETA), and the peptide (KFF)(3)K for potential uptake into E. coli. The conjugates were assembled in a convergent synthetic route involving native chemical ligation of a PNA, containing an N-terminal cysteine, with the C-terminal thioester of the cell-penetrating (KFF)(3)K peptide to give 12a and 12b. These hybrids contained a free cysteine side-chain, which was further functionalized with an RNA-hydrolyzing diethylenetriamine (DETA) moiety. The trifunctional conjugates (1a, 1b) were evaluated for RNA-cleaving properties in vitro and showed efficient degradation of the target RNA at two major cleavage sites. It was also established that the cleavage efficiency strongly depended on the type of spacer connecting the PNA and the peptide.

  15. Insulin and the PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway Regulate Ribonuclease 7 Expression in the Human Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Tad; Becknell, Brian; Easterling, Robert S.; Ingraham, Susan E.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Schwaderer, Andrew; Hains, David S.; Li, Birong; Cohen, Ariel; Metheny, Jackie; Trindandapani, Susheela; Spencer, John David

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease associated with a deficiency of insulin production or action. Diabetic patients have an increased susceptibility to infection with the urinary tract being the most common site of infection. Recent studies suggest that Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is a potent antimicrobial peptide that plays an important role in protecting the urinary tract from bacterial insult. The impact of diabetes on RNase 7 expression and function are unknown. Here, we investigate the effects of insulin on RNase 7. Using human urine specimens, we measured urinary RNase 7 concentrations in healthy control patients and insulin-deficient type 1 diabetics before and after starting insulin therapy. Compared to controls, diabetic patients had suppressed urinary RNase 7 concentrations, which increased with insulin. Using primary human urothelial cells, we explored the mechanisms by which insulin induces RNase 7. Insulin induces RNase 7 production via the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway (PI3K/AKT) to shield urothelial cells from uropathogenic E. coli. In contrast, we show that uropathogenic E. coli suppresses PI3K/AKT and RNase 7. Together, these results indicate that insulin and PI3K/AKT signaling are essential for RNase 7 expression. They also suggest that increased infection risks in diabetic patients may be secondary to suppressed RNase 7 production. These data may provide unique insight into novel UTI therapeutic strategies in at risk populations. PMID:27401534

  16. Ribonuclease 7, an antimicrobial peptide up-regulated during infection, contributes to microbial defense of the human urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Wang, Huanyu; Bartz, Julianne; Kline, Jennifer; Eichler, Tad; DeSouza, Kristin R.; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Baker, Peter; Hains, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that maintain sterility in the urinary tract are incompletely understood; however, recent studies stress the importance of antimicrobial peptides in protecting the urinary tract from infection. Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7), a potent antimicrobial peptide contributing to urinary tract sterility, is expressed by intercalated cells in the renal collecting tubules and is present in the urine at levels sufficient to kill bacteria at baseline. Here, we characterize the expression and function of RNase 7 in the human urinary tract during infection. Both quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA assays demonstrated increases in RNASE7 expression in the kidney along with kidney and urinary RNase 7 peptide concentrations with infection. While immunostaining localized RNase 7 production to the intercalated cells of the collecting tubule during sterility, its expression during pyelonephritis was found to increase throughout the nephron but not in glomeruli or the interstitium. Recombinant RNase 7 exhibited antimicrobial activity against uropathogens at low micromolar concentrations by disrupting the microbial membrane as determined by atomic force microscopy. Thus, RNase 7 expression is increased in the urinary tract with infection, and has antibacterial activity against uropathogens at micromolar concentrations. PMID:23302724

  17. Crystal structure of the pestivirus envelope glycoprotein E(rns) and mechanistic analysis of its ribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Thomas; Bontems, Francois; Vonrhein, Clemens; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Bricogne, Gerard; Rümenapf, Till; Rey, Félix A

    2012-05-09

    Pestiviruses, which belong to the Flaviviridae family of RNA viruses, are important agents of veterinary diseases causing substantial economical losses in animal farming worldwide. Pestivirus particles display three envelope glycoproteins at their surface: E(rns), E1, and E2. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E(rns), the ribonucleolytic activity of which is believed to counteract the innate immunity of the host. The structure reveals a three-dimensional fold corresponding to T2 ribonucleases from plants and fungi. Cocrystallization experiments with mono- and oligonucleotides revealed the structural basis for substrate recognition at two binding sites previously identified for T2 RNases. A detailed analysis of poly-U cleavage products using (31)P-NMR and size exclusion chromatography, together with molecular docking studies, provides a comprehensive mechanistic picture of E(rns) activity on its substrates and reveals the presence of at least one additional nucleotide binding site. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the P3 RNA domain of yeast ribonuclease MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP protein components Pop6 and Pop7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Quan, Chao; Khanova, Elena; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the first successful crystallization of components of eukaryotic ribonucleases P/MRP. Yeast RNase MRP RNA domain P3 was crystallized in a complex with the proteins Pop6 and Pop7; the crystals diffracted to 3.25 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribonucleases P and MRP are closely related RNA-based enzymes which contain a catalytic RNA component and several protein subunits. The roles of the protein subunits in the structure and function of eukaryotic ribonucleases P and MRP are not clear. Crystals of a complex that included a circularly permuted 46-nucleotide-long P3 domain of the RNA component of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonuclease MRP and selenomethionine derivatives of the shared ribonuclease P/MRP protein components Pop6 (18.2 kDa) and Pop7 (15.8 kDa) were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P4 2 22 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.2, c = 76.8 Å, α = β = γ = 90°) and diffracted to 3.25 Å resolution

  19. Plasma autoantibodies against heat shock protein 70, enolase 1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 as potential biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucksak Rucksaken

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is often challenging, leading to poor prognosis. CCA arises via chronic inflammation which may be associated with autoantibodies production. This study aims to identify IgG antibodies directed at self-proteins and tumor-associated antigens. Proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1 and CCA cell lines (M055, M214 and M139 were separated using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and incubated with pooled plasma of patients with CCA and non-neoplastic controls by immunoblotting. Twenty five immunoreactive spots against all cell lines-derived proteins were observed on stained gels and studied by LC-MS/MS. Among these, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, enolase 1 (ENO1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 (RNH1 obtained the highest matching scores and were thus selected for further validation. Western blot revealed immunoreactivity against HSP70 and RNH1 in the majority of CCA cases and weakly in healthy individuals. Further, ELISA showed that plasma HSP70 autoantibody level in CCA was significantly capable to discriminate CCA from healthy individuals with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9158 (cut-off 0.2630, 93.55% sensitivity and 73.91% specificity. Plasma levels of IgG autoantibodies against HSP70 were correlated with progression from healthy individuals to cholangitis to CCA (r = 0.679, P<0.001. In addition, circulating ENO1 and RNH1 autoantibodies levels were also significantly higher in cholangitis and CCA compared to healthy controls (P<0.05. Moreover, the combinations of HSP70, ENO1 or RNH1 autoantibodies positivity rates improved specificity to over 78%. In conclusion, plasma IgG autoantibodies against HSP70, ENO1 and RNH1 may represent new diagnostic markers for CCA.

  20. Lopinavir up-regulates expression of the antiviral protein ribonuclease L in human papillomavirus-positive cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Gavin; Oliver, Anthony W; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Richard, Christina; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir has selective toxicity against human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cervical carcinoma cells via an unknown mechanism. SiHa cervical carcinoma cells were stably transfected with the proteasome sensor vector pZsProSensor-1 to confirm lopinavir inhibits the proteasome in these cells. The Panorama Xpress profiler 725 antibody array was then used to analyse specific changes in protein expression in lopinavir-treated versus control untreated SiHa cells followed by PCR and western blotting. Colorimetric growth assays of lopinavir-treated E6/E7 immortalised versus control human keratinocytes were performed. Targeted small interfering RNA gene silencing followed by growth assay comparison of lopinavir-treated/untreated SiHa cells was also used. Lopinavir induced an increase in the fluorescence of pZsProSensor-1 transfected SiHa cells, indicative of proteasomal inhibition. Ribonuclease L (RNASEL) protein was shown to be up-regulated in lopinavir-treated SiHa cells, which was confirmed by PCR and western blot. Targeted silencing of RNASEL reduced the sensitivity of SiHa cells to lopinavir. Selective toxicity against E6/E7 immortalised keratinocytes versus control cells was also seen with lopinavir and was associated with up-regulated RNASEL expression. These data are consistent with the toxicity of lopinavir against HPV-positive cervical carcinoma cells being related to its ability to block viral proteasome activation and induce an up-regulation of the antiviral protein RNASEL. This is supported by the drug's selective toxicity and up-regulation of RNASEL in E6/E7 immortalised keratinocytes combined with the increased resistance to lopinavir observed in SiHa cells following silencing of RNASEL gene expression.

  1. Modeling formalin fixation and histological processing with ribonuclease A: effects of ethanol dehydration on reversal of formaldehyde cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Carol B; O'Leary, Timothy J; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the chemistry of protein modification by formaldehyde fixation and subsequent tissue processing is central to developing improved methods for antigen retrieval in immunohistochemistry and for recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for proteomic analysis. Our initial studies of single proteins, such as bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A), in 10% buffered formalin solution revealed that upon removal of excess formaldehyde, monomeric RNase A exhibiting normal immunoreactivity could be recovered by heating at 60 degrees C for 30 min at pH 4. We next studied tissue surrogates, which are gelatin-like plugs of fixed proteins that have sufficient physical integrity to be processed using normal tissue histology. Following histological processing, proteins could be extracted from the tissue surrogates by combining heat, detergent, and a protein denaturant. However, gel electrophoresis revealed that the surrogate extracts contained a mixture of monomeric and multimeric proteins. This suggested that during the subsequent steps of tissue processing protein-formaldehyde adducts undergo further modifications that are not observed in aqueous proteins. As a first step toward understanding these additional modifications we have performed a comparative evaluation of RNase A following fixation in buffered formaldehyde alone and after subsequent dehydration in 100% ethanol by combining gel electrophoresis, chemical modification, and circular dichroism spectroscopic studies. Our results reveal that ethanol-induced rearrangement of the conformation of fixed RNase A leads to protein aggregation through the formation of large geometrically compatible hydrophobic beta-sheets that are likely stabilized by formaldehyde cross-links, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. It requires substantial energy to reverse the formaldehyde cross-links within these sheets and regenerate protein monomers free of formaldehyde modifications

  2. Highly Fluorescent Ribonuclease-A-Encapsulated Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots for Ultrasensitive Fluorescence in Vivo Imaging in the Second Near-Infrared Window

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Yifei; Chen, Jun; Fang, Hongwei; Heath, George; Wo, Yan; Wang, Weili; Li, Yunxia; Guo, Yuan; Evans, Stephen D.; Chen, Shiyi; Zhou, Dejian

    2016-01-01

    Ribonuclease-A (RNase-A) encapsulated PbS quantum dots (RNase-A@PbS Qdots) which emit in the second near-infrared biological window (NIR-II, ca. 1000?1400 nm) are rapidly synthesized under microwave heating. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the Qdots can be tuned across the entire NIR-II range by simply controlling synthesis temperature. The size and morphology of the Qdots are examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and dynamic light scattering (DL...

  3. Interplay between intergrin-linked kinase and ribonuclease inhibitor affects growth and metastasis of bladder cancer through signaling ILK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiang; Lv, Mengxin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Zhang, Luyu; Jiang, Rong; Chen, Junxia

    2016-08-30

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional adaptor protein which is involved with protein signalling within cells to modulate malignant (cancer) cell movement, cell cycle, metastasis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our previous experiment demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis of bladder cancer cells as well as increased the expression of Ribonuclease inhibitor (RI), an important cytoplasmic protein with many functions. We also reported that RI overexpression inhibited ILK and phosphorylation of AKT and GSK3β. ILK and RI gene both locate on chromosome 11p15 and the two genes are always at the adjacent position of same chromosome during evolution, which suggest that ILK and RI could have some relationship. However, underlying interacting mechanisms remain unclear between them. Here, we postulate that RI might regulate ILK signaling pathway via interacting with ILK. Co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down and co-localization under laser confocal microscope assay were used to determine the interaction between ILK and RI exogenously and endogenously. Furthermore, we further verified that there is a direct binding between the two proteins by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in cells. Next, The effects of interplay between ILK and RI on the key target protein expressions of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway were determined by western blot, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence assay in vivo and in vitro. Finally, the interaction was assessed using nude mice xenograft model. We first found that ILK could combine with RI both in vivo and in vitro by GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and FRET. The protein levels of ILK and RI revealed a significant inverse correlation in vivo and in vitro. Subsequently, The results showed that up-regulating ILK could increase cell proliferation, change cell morphology and regulate cell cycle. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of ILK remarkably

  4. A rat pancreatic ribonuclease fused to a late cotton pollen promoter severely reduces pollen viability in tobacco plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Bernd-Souza

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of an animal RNase fused to the late cotton pollen-specific promoter G9 in a plant system were investigated. Expression of the chimeric genes G9-uidA and G9-RNase in tobacco plants showed that the 1.2-kb promoter fragment of the G9 gene was sufficient to maintain tissue and temporal specificity in a heterologous system. GUS (beta-glucuronidase expression was detected only in pollen from anther stage 6 through anthesis, with maximal GUS activity in pollen from stage 10 anthers. Investigating the effects of the rat RNase on pollen viability at stage 10, we found that pollen viability was reduced from 79 to 8% and from 89 to 40%, in pollen germination and fluoresceine diacetate assays, respectively, in one G9-RNase transgenic line, suggesting a lethal effect of the RNase gene. This indicates that the rat RNase produces deleterious effects in this plant system and may be useful for engineering male sterility.Foram investigados os efeitos da expressão de uma ribonuclease de origem animal em um sistema vegetal, ligando-se esta ao promotor do gene pólen-específico G9 de algodão. Examinou-se a expressão dos genes quiméricos G9-uidA e G9-RNase em plantas de tabaco e determinou-se que o fragmento de 1.2 kb do promotor do gene G9 foi suficiente para manter a especificidade temporal e espacial da expressão, em sistema heterólogo. A expressão do gene GUS foi detectada somente em pólen, do estágio 6 do desenvolvimento da antera até a antese, com atividade máxima em pólen de anteras no estágio 10. Estudos neste estágio com linhagens transgênicas contendo G9-RNase mostraram que um clone transgênico apresentava reduções na viabilidade do pólen de 79 para 8% e de 89 para 40% nos testes de germinação e coloração com diacetato de fluoresceína, respectivamente, sugerindo letalidade na expressão do gene de RNase. Estes resultados indicam que a RNase animal apresenta um efeito deletério em planta e oferece possibilidade de uso

  5. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione analogues as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase associated ribonuclease H and polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Vernekar, Sanjeev Kumar V; Chen, Yue-Lei; Miller, Lena; Huber, Andrew D; Myshakina, Nataliya; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Parniak, Michael A; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-06-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not clinically validated as an antiviral target. 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) is known to confer active site directed inhibition of divalent metal-dependent enzymatic functions, such as HIV RNase H, integrase (IN) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a few C-5, C-6 or C-7 substituted HID subtypes as HIV RNase H inhibitors. Our data indicate that while some of these subtypes inhibited both the RNase H and polymerase (pol) functions of RT, potent and selective RNase H inhibition was achieved with subtypes 8-9 as exemplified with compounds 8c and 9c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. VapC from the leptospiral VapBC toxin-antitoxin module displays ribonuclease activity on the initiator tRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre P Y Lopes

    Full Text Available The prokaryotic ubiquitous Toxin-Antitoxin (TA operons encode a stable toxin and an unstable antitoxin. The most accepted hypothesis of the physiological function of the TA system is the reversible cessation of cellular growth under stress conditions. The major TA family, VapBC is present in the spirochaete Leptospira interrogans. VapBC modules are classified based on the presence of a predicted ribonucleasic PIN domain in the VapC toxin. The expression of the leptospiral VapC in E. coli promotes a strong bacterial growth arrestment, making it difficult to express the recombinant protein. Nevertheless, we showed that long term induction of expression in E. coli enabled the recovery of VapC in inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein was successfully refolded by high hydrostatic pressure, providing a new method to obtain the toxin in a soluble and active form. The structural integrity of the recombinant VapB and VapC proteins was assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Physical interaction between the VapC toxin and the VapB antitoxin was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro by pull down and ligand affinity blotting assays, respectively, thereby indicating the ultimate mechanism by which the activity of the toxin is regulated in bacteria. The predicted model of the leptospiral VapC structure closely matches the Shigella's VapC X-ray structure. In agreement, the ribonuclease activity of the leptospiral VapC was similar to the activity described for Shigella's VapC, as demonstrated by the cleavage of tRNAfMet and by the absence of unspecific activity towards E. coli rRNA. This finding suggests that the cleavage of the initiator transfer RNA may represent a common mechanism to a larger group of bacteria and potentially configures a mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation leading to the inhibition of global translation.

  7. The Expansion and Functional Diversification of the Mammalian Ribonuclease A Superfamily Epitomizes the Efficiency of Multigene Families at Generating Biological Novelty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Stephen M.; Cho, Soochin

    2013-01-01

    The ribonuclease (RNase) A superfamily is a vertebrate-specific gene family. Because of a massive expansion that occurred during the early mammalian evolution, extant mammals in general have much more RNase genes than nonmammalian vertebrates. Mammalian RNases have been associated with diverse physiological functions including digestion, cytotoxicity, angiogenesis, male reproduction, and host defense. However, it is still uncertain when their expansion occurred and how a wide array of functions arose during their evolution. To answer these questions, we generate a compendium of all RNase genes identified in 20 complete mammalian genomes including the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. Using this, we delineate 13 ancient RNase gene lineages that arose before the divergence between the monotreme and the other mammals (∼220 Ma). These 13 ancient gene lineages are differentially retained in the 20 mammals, and the rate of protein sequence evolution is highly variable among them, which suggest that they have undergone extensive functional diversification. In addition, we identify 22 episodes of recent expansion of RNase genes, many of which have signatures of adaptive functional differentiation. Exemplifying this, bursts of gene duplication occurred for the RNase1, RNase4, and RNase5 genes of the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), which might have contributed to the species’ effective defense against heavier pathogen loads caused by its communal roosting behavior. Our study illustrates how host-defense systems can generate new functions efficiently by employing a multigene family, which is crucial for a host organism to adapt to its ever-changing pathogen environment. PMID:24162010

  8. RNase MC2: a new Momordica charantia ribonuclease that induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells associated with activation of MAPKs and induction of caspase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Zhang, Chris Zhi Yi; Fong, Wing Ping; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-04-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are ubiquitously distributed nucleases that cleave RNA into smaller pieces. They are promising drugs for different cancers based on their concrete antitumor activities in vitro and in vivo. Here we report for the first time purification and characterization of a 14-kDa RNase, designated as RNase MC2, in the seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia). RNase MC2 manifested potent RNA-cleavage activity toward baker's yeast tRNA, tumor cell rRNA, and an absolute specificity for uridine. RNase MC2 demonstrated both cytostatic and cytotoxic activities against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with RNase MC2 caused nuclear damage (karyorrhexis, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation), ultimately resulting in early/late apoptosis. Further molecular studies unveiled that RNase MC2 induced differential activation of MAPKs (p38, JNK and ERK) and Akt. On the other hand, RNase MC2 exposure activated caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-7, increased the production of Bak and cleaved PARP, which in turn contributed to the apoptotic response. In conclusion, RNase MC2 is a potential agent which can be exploited in the worldwide fight against breast cancer.

  9. Prediction of the binding mode and resistance profile for a dual-target pyrrolyl diketo acid scaffold against HIV-1 integrase and reverse-transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengyuan; Zheng, Guoxun; Fu, Tingting; Li, Xiaofeng; Tu, Gao; Li, Ying Hong; Yao, Xiaojun; Xue, Weiwei; Zhu, Feng

    2018-06-27

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants is one of the most common causes of highly active antiretroviral therapeutic (HAART) failure in patients infected with HIV-1. Compared with the existing HAART, the recently developed pyrrolyl diketo acid scaffold targeting both HIV-1 integrase (IN) and reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is an efficient approach to counteract the failure of anti-HIV treatment due to drug resistance. However, the binding mode and potential resistance profile of these inhibitors with important mechanistic principles remain poorly understood. To address this issue, an integrated computational method was employed to investigate the binding mode of inhibitor JMC6F with HIV-1 IN and RNase H. By using per-residue binding free energy decomposition analysis, the following residues: Asp64, Thr66, Leu68, Asp116, Tyr143, Gln148 and Glu152 in IN, Asp443, Glu478, Trp536, Lys541 and Asp549 in RNase H were identified as key residues for JMC6F binding. And then computational alanine scanning was carried to further verify the key residues. Moreover, the resistance profile of the currently known major mutations in HIV-1 IN and 2 mutations in RNase H against JMC6F was predicted by in silico mutagenesis studies. The results demonstrated that only three mutations in HIV-1 IN (Y143C, Q148R and N155H) and two mutations in HIV-1 RNase H (Y501R and Y501W) resulted in a reduction of JMC6F potency, thus indicating their potential role in providing resistance to JMC6F. These data provided important insights into the binding mode and resistance profile of the inhibitors with a pyrrolyl diketo acid scaffold in HIV-1 IN and RNase H, which would be helpful for the development of more effective dual HIV-1 IN and RNase H inhibitors.

  10. How short RNAs impact the human ribonuclease Dicer activity: putative regulatory feedback-loops and other RNA-mediated mechanisms controlling microRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralewska, Natalia; Hoffmann, Weronika; Pokornowska, Maria; Milewski, Marek; Lipinska, Andrea; Bienkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Kurzynska-Kokorniak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Ribonuclease Dicer plays a pivotal role in RNA interference pathways by processing long double-stranded RNAs and single-stranded hairpin RNA precursors into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), respectively. While details of Dicer regulation by a variety of proteins are being elucidated, less is known about non-protein factors, e.g. RNA molecules, that may influence this enzyme's activity. Therefore, we decided to investigate the question of whether the RNA molecules can function not only as Dicer substrates but also as its regulators. Our previous in vitro studies indicated that the activity of human Dicer can be influenced by short RNA molecules that either bind to Dicer or interact with its substrates, or both. Those studies were carried out with commercial Dicer preparations. Nevertheless, such preparations are usually not homogeneous enough to carry out more detailed RNA-binding studies. Therefore, we have established our own system for the production of human Dicer in insect cells. In this manuscript, we characterize the RNA-binding and RNA-cleavage properties of the obtained preparation. We demonstrate that Dicer can efficiently bind single-stranded RNAs that are longer than ~20-nucleotides. Consequently, we revisit possible scenarios of Dicer regulation by single-stranded RNA species ranging from ~10- to ~60-nucleotides, in the context of their binding to this enzyme. Finally, we show that siRNA/miRNA-sized RNAs may affect miRNA production either by binding to Dicer or by participating in regulatory feedback-loops. Altogether, our studies suggest a broad regulatory role of short RNAs in Dicer functioning.

  11. Translocation of {sup 3}H-DNA, {sup 131}I-ribonuclease and {sup 3}H-DNA {sup 131}I-ribonuclease complexes in germinated barley grains; Translocation des ADN{sup 3}H, RNase{sup 131}I et complexes ADN{sup 3}H - RNase {sup 131}I dans les orges en germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshitenge, G. [Centre nucléaire TRICO, Kinshasa (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Ledoux, L. [Centre d’étude de l' énergie nucléaire Mol (Belgium)

    1970-01-15

    Barley grains, after germinating for 11 hours in the presence of water, were cut into sections at the end opposite the embryo. They were incubated in solutions of {sup 3}H-DNA, {sup 13I}I-ribonuclease, and {sup 3}H-DNA {sup 131}I-ribonuclease complex for three hours. They were then placed in a water-saturated atmosphere for 24 hours. At this stage the different organs of the seedlings were separated and homogenized in a solution containing 0.15M sodium chloride and 0.1 M sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate at pH 7. By measuring the radioactivity found in the homogenates one can estimate the penetration of the macromolecules under study. The results show that the quantity found varies from one case to the other and depends both on the nature of the macromolecule and of the organ studied. (author) [French] Des orges qui ont germé pendant 11 h en présence d’eau sont sectionnées au bout opposé à l’embryon. Elles sont incubées avec des solutions d’ADN{sup 3}H, de RNase{sup 131}1 et de complexe ADN{sup 3}H - RNase {sup 131}I, pendant 3 h. Elles sont ensuite placées dans une atmosphère saturée d'eau pendant 24 h. A ce moment, les différents organes des plantules sont séparés et homogénéisés en présence d'une solution 0,15M en NaCl et 0,1M en éthylènediamine-tétracétate de Na à pH 7. La mesure de la radioactivité retrouvée dans les homogénats permet d'évaluer la pénétration des macromolécules considérées. Les résultats montrent que la quantité retrouvée varie d'un cas â l'autre et dépend à la fois de la nature de la macromolécule et de l'organe considéré. (author)

  12. VapC toxins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are ribonucleases that differentially inhibit growth and are neutralized by cognate VapB antitoxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bintou Ahmadou Ahidjo

    Full Text Available The chromosome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb encodes forty seven toxin-antitoxin modules belonging to the VapBC family. The role of these modules in the physiology of Mtb and the function(s served by their expansion are unknown. We investigated ten vapBC modules from Mtb and the single vapBC from M. smegmatis. Of the Mtb vapCs assessed, only Rv0549c, Rv0595c, Rv2549c and Rv2829c were toxic when expressed from a tetracycline-regulated promoter in M. smegmatis. The same genes displayed toxicity when conditionally expressed in Mtb. Toxicity of Rv2549c in M. smegmatis correlated with the level of protein expressed, suggesting that the VapC level must exceed a threshold for toxicity to be observed. In addition, the level of Rv2456 protein induced in M. smegmatis was markedly lower than Rv2549c, which may account for the lack of toxicity of this and other VapCs scored as 'non-toxic'. The growth inhibitory effects of toxic VapCs were neutralized by expression of the cognate VapB as part of a vapBC operon or from a different chromosomal locus, while that of non-cognate antitoxins did not. These results demonstrated a specificity of interaction between VapCs and their cognate VapBs, a finding corroborated by yeast two-hybrid analyses. Deletion of selected vapC or vapBC genes did not affect mycobacterial growth in vitro, but rendered the organisms more susceptible to growth inhibition following toxic VapC expression. However, toxicity of 'non-toxic' VapCs was not unveiled in deletion mutant strains, even when the mutation eliminated the corresponding cognate VapB, presumably due to insufficient levels of VapC protein. Together with the ribonuclease (RNase activity demonstrated for Rv0065 and Rv0617--VapC proteins with similarity to Rv0549c and Rv3320c, respectively--these results suggest that the VapBC family potentially provides an abundant source of RNase activity in Mtb, which may profoundly impact the physiology of the organism.

  13. Quantitation of TGF-beta1 mRNA in porcine mesangial cells by comparative kinetic RT/PCR: comparison with ribonuclease protection assay and in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceol, M; Forino, M; Gambaro, G; Sauer, U; Schleicher, E D; D'Angelo, A; Anglani, F

    2001-01-01

    Gene expression can be examined with different techniques including ribonuclease protection assay (RPA), in situ hybridisation (ISH), and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR). These methods differ considerably in their sensitivity and precision in detecting and quantifying low abundance mRNA. Although there is evidence that RT/PCR can be performed in a quantitative manner, the quantitative capacity of this method is generally underestimated. To demonstrate that the comparative kinetic RT/PCR strategy-which uses a housekeeping gene as internal standard-is a quantitative method to detect significant differences in mRNA levels between different samples, the inhibitory effect of heparin on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced-TGF-beta1 mRNA expression was evaluated by RT/PCR and RPA, the standard method of mRNA quantification, and the results were compared. The reproducibility of RT/PCR amplification was calculated by comparing the quantity of G3PDH and TGF-beta1 PCR products, generated during the exponential phases, estimated from two different RT/PCR (G3PDH, r = 0.968, P = 0.0000; TGF-beta1, r = 0.966, P = 0.0000). The quantitative capacity of comparative kinetic RT/PCR was demonstrated by comparing the results obtained from RPA and RT/PCR using linear regression analysis. Starting from the same RNA extraction, but using only 1% of the RNA for the RT/PCR compared to RPA, significant correlation was observed (r = 0.984, P = 0.0004). Moreover the morphometric analysis of ISH signal was applied for the semi-quantitative evaluation of the expression and localisation of TGF-beta1 mRNA in the entire cell population. Our results demonstrate the close similarity of the RT/PCR and RPA methods in giving quantitative information on mRNA expression and indicate the possibility to adopt the comparative kinetic RT/PCR as reliable quantitative method of mRNA analysis. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Preparation, description and properties of {sup 3}H- DNA - {sup 131}I-ribonuclease complexes; Preparation, caracterisation et proprietes des complexes ADN{sup 3}H - RNase {sup 131}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshitenge, G. [Centre nucléaire TRICO, Kinshasa (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Ledoux, L. [Centre d’étude de l' énergie nucléaire Mol (Belgium)

    1970-01-15

    Bacterial DNA, both radioactive and non-radioactive, and pancreatic ribonuclease labelled with iodine-131 are mixed together at a high ion strength and neutral pH. They are then dialysed against 0.009M sodium chloride. During dialysis a precipitate is formed, which is then separated with a centrifuge and redissolved at a neutral pH in a 0.1M phosphate buffer solution, or in 0.15M sodium chloride and 0.015M sodium citrate solution adjusted to pH 7. This solution is then analysed: (1) by DEAE-cellulose paper chromatography using a centrifuge; (2) by sedimentation of caesium chloride along a gradient; (3) by electrophoresis in agar gel. The results obtained show that a stable complex is formed between the DNA and ribonuclease. The properties of this complex are such that it can be compared with natural nucleoproteins. (author) [French] Des ADN bactériens radioactifs ou non et de la ribonucléase pancréatique marquée a l'iode-131 sont mélangés, à force ionique élevée et à pH neutre. Ils sont ensuite dialyses contre du NaCl 0.009M. Au cours de cette dialyse, un précipité se forme. Ce précipité est séparé par centrifugation et redissous à pH neutre dans du tampon phosphate 0,1M, ou dans une solution 0.015M en citrate de Na et 0,15M en NaCl ajustée à pH 7. Cette solution a été analysée: 1) par Chromatographie centrifugée sur pulpe de papier de DEAE- cellulose; 2) par sédimentation en gradient de CsCl; 3) par électrophorèse en gel d'agar. Les résultats obtenus montrent qu'un complexe stable sfest formé entre l'ADN et la RNase. Les propriétés de ce complexe permettent de le comparer aux nucléoprotéines naturelles. (author)

  15. 5-Hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one derivatives as novel dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H and integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Gao, Ping; Dong, Guanyu; Zhang, Xujie; Cheng, Xiqiang; Ding, Xiao; Wang, Xueshun; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2018-06-18

    We reported herein the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of 5-hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one derivatives as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) ribonuclease H (RNase H) inhibitors using a privileged structure-guided scaffold refining strategy. In view of the similarities between the pharmacophore model of RNase H and integrase (IN) inhibitors as well as their catalytic sites, we also performed IN inhibition assays. Notably, the majority of these derivatives inhibited RNase H and IN at micromolar concentrations. Among them, compound 7a exhibited similar inhibitory activity against RNase H and IN (IC 50 RNase H  = 1.77 μM, IC 50 IN  = 1.18 μM, ratio = 1.50). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported dual HIV-1 RNase H-IN inhibitor based on a 5-hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one structure. Molecular modeling has been used to predict the binding mode of 7a in complex with the catalytic cores of HIV-1 RNase H and IN. Taken together these results strongly support the feasibility of developing HIV-1 dual inhibitors from analog-based optimization of divalent metal ion chelators. Recently, the identification of dual inhibitors proved to be a highly effective strategy for novel antivirals discovery. Therefore, these compounds appear to be useful leads that can be further modified to develop more valuable anti-HIV-1 molecules with suitable drug profiles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting deletions, insertions, and single nucleotide substitutions in cloned β-globin genes and new polymorphic nucleotide substitutions in β-globin genes in a Japanese population using ribonuclease cleavage at mismatches in RNA: DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko.

    1990-08-01

    The applicability of ribonuclease (RNase) cleavage at mismatches in RNA:DNA duplexes (the RNase cleavage method) for determining nucleotide variant rates was examined in a Japanese population. DNA segments of various lengths obtained from four different regions of one normal and three thalassemic cloned human β-globin genes were inserted into transcription vectors. Sense and antisense RNA probes uniformly labeled with 32 P were prepared. When RNA probes of 771 nucleotides (nt) or less were hybridized with cloned DNAs and the resulting duplexes were treated with a mixture of RNases A and T1, the length of products agreed with theoretical values. Twelve possible mismatches were examined. Since both sense and antisense probes were used, uncleavable mismatches such as G:T and G:G which were made from one combination of RNA and DNA strands could be converted to the cleavable C:A and C:C mismatches, respectively, by using the opposite combination. Deletions and insertions of one (G), four(TTCT), five (ATTTT), and 10 (ATTTTATTTT) nt were easily detected. A polymorphic substitution of T to C at position 666 of the second intervening sequence (IVS2-666) of the β-globin gene was detected using genomic DNAs from cell lines established from the peripheral B lymphocytes of 59 unrelated Japanese from Hiroshima or those amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The frequency of the gene with C at the IVS2-666 (allele C) was 0.48 and that of the gene with T (allene T) was 0.52. Two new polymorphic substitutions of C to A and A to T were detected at nucleotide positions 1789 and 1945 from the capping site, respectively, using genomic DNAs amplified by PCR. We conclude that it would be feasible to use the RNase cleavage method combined with PCR for large-scale screening of variation in chromosomal DNA. (J.P.N.)

  17. Ribonuclease-mediated control of body fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habacher, Cornelia; Guo, Yanwu; Venz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    . Using exon-intron split analysis, we find that REGE-1 promotes fat by degrading the mRNA encoding ETS-4, a fat-loss-promoting transcription factor. Because ETS-4, in turn, induces rege-1 transcription, REGE-1 and ETS-4 appear to form an auto-regulatory module. We propose that this type of fat regulation...

  18. Ribonucleases, nucleases and antiangiogenins in antiproliferative activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2011), s. 363-382 ISSN 1574-3624 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/1149; GA ČR GA521/09/1214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Angiogenin * Anticancer * Antiproliferative Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2011

  19. Petunia nectar proteins have ribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillwig, Melissa S; Liu, Xiaoteng; Liu, Guangyu; Thornburg, Robert W; Macintosh, Gustavo C

    2010-06-01

    Plants requiring an insect pollinator often produce nectar as a reward for the pollinator's visitations. This rich secretion needs mechanisms to inhibit microbial growth. In Nicotiana spp. nectar, anti-microbial activity is due to the production of hydrogen peroxide. In a close relative, Petunia hybrida, limited production of hydrogen peroxide was found; yet petunia nectar still has anti-bacterial properties, suggesting that a different mechanism may exist for this inhibition. The nectar proteins of petunia plants were compared with those of ornamental tobacco and significant differences were found in protein profiles and function between these two closely related species. Among those proteins, RNase activities unique to petunia nectar were identified. The genes corresponding to four RNase T2 proteins from Petunia hybrida that show unique expression patterns in different plant tissues were cloned. Two of these enzymes, RNase Phy3 and RNase Phy4 are unique among the T2 family and contain characteristics similar to both S- and S-like RNases. Analysis of amino acid patterns suggest that these proteins are an intermediate between S- and S-like RNases, and support the hypothesis that S-RNases evolved from defence RNases expressed in floral parts. This is the first report of RNase activities in nectar.

  20. Actividad Ribonucleasa en el Látex de Calotropis procera (Aiton W.T. Aiton y Pedilanthus tithymaloides (L. Poit / Ribonuclease Activity in Latex from Calotropis procera (Aiton W.T. Aiton and Pedilanthus tithymaloides (L. Poit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rueda de Arvelo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Las enzimas ribonucleasas (RNasas han sido utilizadascon efectividad en el tratamiento de ciertos tipos de cáncer ypueden tener otras propiedades aplicables en biotecnología. Con el objetivo de identificar la presencia de actividad RNasa en el látex de las plantas tropicales Calotropis procera y Pedilanthus tithymaloides se colectaron muestras a partir de plantas adultas ubicadas al norte del estado Aragua, Venezuela. Las proteínas solubles fueron extraídas con acetato de sodio 50 mM pH 5 (16 μL/μgde látex y eliminada la porción poliisoprenoide por centrifugación a 16.000 x g durante 15 min. La actividad RNasa se estimó utilizando una técnica que incluye la aplicación de alícuotas de la mezcla de reacción sobre geles de poliacrilamida-urea y separadaspor electroforesis. La degradación del sustrato fue cuantificada pordensitometría. Se probaron diversos sustratos (ARNttotal, ARNtphe yARNm transcrito in vitro a partir de ADN plasmídico. El látexde ambas especies presentó actividad RNasa, con actividadesespecíficas iniciales de 1,42 ± 0,74 μg de ARN hidrolizado/min/ μg de proteína; 0,45 ± 0,18 ng de ARN hidrolizado/min/ng de proteína y 0,28 ± 0,07 ng de ARN hidrolizado/min/ng de proteínapara el ARNttotal, ARNm transcrito y ARNtphe, respectivamente, en C. procera, y de 0,02 ± 0,001 ng de ARN hidrolizado/min/ng de proteína para el ARNm transcrito y ARNtphe en P. tithymaloides. Este constituye el primer reporte acerca de la presencia de enzimas RNasas en el látex de estas especies. / Ribonuclease enzymes (RNase have been used effectively in the treatment of certain cancers and other properties that may be applicable in biotechnology. In order to identify the RNase activity in the latex of Calotropis procera and Pedilanthus tithymaloides, tropical plants samples were collected from adult plants located in the North State of Aragua, Venezuela. Soluble proteins were extracted with 50 mM sodium acetate pH 5 (16

  1. Binding of dioxouranium(VI) and platinum(II) to ribonuclease-S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzotto, A [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi

    1976-12-01

    The preferred binding sites of RNase-S to dioxouranium(VI) and platinum(II) has been determined by Wyckoff et al., (J.Biol.Chem., v242, 1967, p.3749; ibid p.3984; ibid v245, 1970, p.305) elaborating protein and of heavy-atom derivatives reported by Wyckoff and coworkers. The major sites are exposed at the surface of the protein molecule and are not directly involved in the biological properties; the coordination geometry of the groups bound to the metal ions have been examined in comparison with model compounds.

  2. Tri- and tetra-substituted cyclen based lanthanide(III) ion complexes as ribonuclease mimics: a study into the effect of log Ka, hydration and hydrophobicity on phosphodiester hydrolysis of the RNA-model 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Ann-Marie; Plush, Sally E; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-05-28

    A series of tetra-substituted 'pseudo' dipeptide ligands of cyclen (1,4,7,10,-tetraazacyclododecane) and a tri-substituted 3'-pyridine ligand of cyclen, and the corresponding lanthanide(III) complexes were synthesised and characterised as metallo-ribonuclease mimics. All complexes were shown to promote hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP, τ1/2 = 5.87 × 10(3) h), a well known RNA mimic. The La(III) and Eu(III) tri-substituted 3'-pyridine lanthanide(III) complexes being the most efficient in promoting such hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and at 37 °C; with τ1/2 = 1.67 h for La(III) and 1.74 h for Eu(III). The series was developed to provide the opportunity to investigate the consequences of altering the lanthanide(III) ion, coordination ability and hydrophobicity of a metallo-cavity on the rate of hydrolysis using the model phosphodiester, HPNP, at 37 °C. To further provide information on the role that the log Ka of the metal bound water plays in phosphodiester hydrolysis the protonation constants and the metal ion stability constants of both a tri and tetra-substituted 3'pyridine complex were determined. Our results highlighted several key features for the design of lanthanide(III) ribonucelase mimics; the presence of two metal bound water molecules are vital for pH dependent rate constants for Eu(III) complexes, optimal pH activity approximating physiological pH (∼7.4) may be achieved if the log Ka values for both MLOH and ML(OH)2 species occur in this region, small changes to hydrophobicity within the metallo cavity influence the rate of hydrolysis greatly and an amide adjacent to the metal ion capable of forming hydrogen bonds with the substrate is required for achieving fast hydrolysis.

  3. Ribonuclease E modulation of the bacterial SOS response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Manasherob

    Full Text Available Plants, animals, bacteria, and Archaea all have evolved mechanisms to cope with environmental or cellular stress. Bacterial cells respond to the stress of DNA damage by activation of the SOS response, the canonical RecA/LexA-dependent signal transduction pathway that transcriptionally derepresses a multiplicity of genes-leading to transient arrest of cell division and initiation of DNA repair. Here we report the previously unsuspected role of E. coli endoribonuclease RNase E in regulation of the SOS response. We show that RNase E deletion or inactivation of temperature-sensitive RNase E protein precludes normal initiation of SOS. The ability of RNase E to regulate SOS is dynamic, as down regulation of RNase E following DNA damage by mitomycin C resulted in SOS termination and restoration of RNase E function leads to resumption of a previously aborted response. Overexpression of the RraA protein, which binds to the C-terminal region of RNase E and modulates the actions of degradosomes, recapitulated the effects of RNase E deficiency. Possible mechanisms for RNase E effects on SOS are discussed.

  4. Ribonuclease E modulation of the bacterial SOS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasherob, Robert; Miller, Christine; Kim, Kwang-sun; Cohen, Stanley N

    2012-01-01

    Plants, animals, bacteria, and Archaea all have evolved mechanisms to cope with environmental or cellular stress. Bacterial cells respond to the stress of DNA damage by activation of the SOS response, the canonical RecA/LexA-dependent signal transduction pathway that transcriptionally derepresses a multiplicity of genes-leading to transient arrest of cell division and initiation of DNA repair. Here we report the previously unsuspected role of E. coli endoribonuclease RNase E in regulation of the SOS response. We show that RNase E deletion or inactivation of temperature-sensitive RNase E protein precludes normal initiation of SOS. The ability of RNase E to regulate SOS is dynamic, as down regulation of RNase E following DNA damage by mitomycin C resulted in SOS termination and restoration of RNase E function leads to resumption of a previously aborted response. Overexpression of the RraA protein, which binds to the C-terminal region of RNase E and modulates the actions of degradosomes, recapitulated the effects of RNase E deficiency. Possible mechanisms for RNase E effects on SOS are discussed.

  5. Novel ribonuclease activity differs between fibrillarins from arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Corona, Ulises; Pereira-Santana, Alejandro; Sobol, Margarita; Rodriguez-Zapata, Luis C.; Hozak, Pavel; Castano, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Fibrillarin is one of the most important nucleolar proteins that have been shown as essential for life. Fibrillarin localizes primarily at the periphery between fibrillar center and dense fibrillar component as well as in Cajal bodies. In most plants there are at least two different genes for

  6. Effect of wheat leaf ribonuclease on tumor cells and tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škvor, J.; Lipovová, P.; Poučková, P.; Souček, J.; Slavík, Tomáš; Matoušek, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 7 (2006), s. 815-823 ISSN 0959-4973 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/04/0755; GA ČR GA521/06/1149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : antibodies * aspermatogenesis * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2006

  7. The reaction rates of electrons with native and irradiated ribonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.; Ebert, M.; Davies, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of reaction of hydrated electrons with proteins depends, amongst other things, on the conformational structure of the protein, and irradiation itself causes conformational changes in proteins. A study has been made of variations in the reaction rates of hydrated electrons with RNase pre-irradiated by the Linac or by a 60 Co γ-source. The reaction rate constants varied with the pre-irradiation dose, the concentration of phosphate buffer, the enzyme concentration and also the presence of 10 -2 M ethanol. These variations serve to emphasize the importance of the tertiary structure of biological molecules in irradiation processes and have significant implications in the mathematical analysis of the inactivation of enzymes in steady-state irradiation processes. (U.K.)

  8. Molecularly imprinted nanoparticles for inhibiting ribonuclease in reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Xiaotong; Ashley, Jon; Zhou, Tongchang

    2018-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) are synthesized via a solid-phase approach using RNase as the template. The feasibility of employing the nanoMIPs as RNase inhibitor is successfully demonstrated in reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, suggesting the tailor...

  9. Potent inhibition of mammalian ribonucleases by 3', 5'-pyrophosphate-linked nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, N; Shapiro, R

    1999-05-21

    Molecular modeling based on the crystal structure of the complex of bovine pancreatic RNase A with the inhibitor 5'-diphosphoadenosine 3'-phosphate (ppAp) (Leonidas, D. D., Shapiro, R., Irons, L. I., Russo, N., and Acharya, K. R. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 5578-5588) was used to design new inhibitors that extend into unoccupied regions of the enzyme active site. These compounds are dinucleotides that contain an unusual 3',5'-pyrophosphate linkage and were synthesized in solution by a combined chemical and enzymatic procedure. The most potent of them, 5'-phospho-2'-deoxyuridine 3'-pyrophosphate, P' --> 5'-ester with adenosine 3'-phosphate (pdUppAp), binds to RNase A with Ki values of 27 and 220 nM at pH 5.9 and 7, respectively. These values are 6-9-fold lower than those for ppAp and 50-fold lower than that for the transition state analogue, uridine vanadate. pdUppAp has broad specificity; it is an effective inhibitor of at least two other members of the pancreatic RNase superfamily, human RNase-2 (eosinophil-derived neurotoxin) and RNase-4, which share only 36-44% sequence identity with the pancreatic enzyme. The potency of pdUppAp and the other inhibitors described here depends critically on the extended internucleotide linkage; the pyrophosphate group enhances dinucleotide binding to the three RNases by 2.1-2.9 orders of magnitude, as compared with a monophosphate. These data give further insight into the organization of the catalytic centers of the various RNases. Moreover, the new class of inhibitors provides a useful means by which to probe the biological actions of these and other related enzymes.

  10. Identification of special fragments containing the 5' end of polivirus RNA after ribonuclease III digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, T.J.R.; Dunn, J.J.; Wimmer, E.

    1978-11-01

    The small protein (VPg) covalently linked to the 5' end of the poliovirus Type 1 (PV-1) RNA has been labeled in vitro with /sup 125/I usingthe Bolton and Hunter reagent. The RNA is not degraded under the conditions used and nearly all the label enters VPg and not the polynucleotide chain. When this /sup 125/I-labeled RNA is cleaved with RNase III at low monovalent salt concentrations, one major /sup 125/I-labeled fragment, approximately 100 nucleotides long, is produced. The corresponding fragment from similar digests of /sup 32/P-labeled RNA has also been identified. The /sup 32/P-labeled fragment changes electrophoretic mobility after protease treatment indicating that it contains VPg. Furthermore, the RNase T1 oligonucleotide known to be at the 5' terminus of poliovirus RNA is found in T1 digests of the purified fragment. These results confirm that the fragment is derived from the 5' end of the RNA. This fragment will be useful in studies concerning the initiation of protein synthesis during poliovirus infection.

  11. Atomistic Details of the Associative Phosphodiester Cleavage in Human Ribonuclease H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Fels, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    During translation of the genetic information of DNA into proteins, mRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase and after the transcription process degraded by RNase H. The endoribonuclease RNase H is a member of the nucleotidyl-transferase (NT) superfamily and is known to hydrolyze the phosphodiester bonds of RNA which is hybridized to DNA. Retroviral RNase H is part of the viral reverse transcriptase enzyme that is indispensable for the proliferation of retroviruses, such as HIV. Inhibitors of this enzyme could therefore provide new drugs against diseases like AIDS. In our study we investigated the molecular mechanism of RNA cleavage by human RNase H using a comprehensive high level DFT/B3LYP QM/MM theoretical method for the calculation of the stationary points and nudged elastic band (NEB) and free energy calculations to identify the transition state structures, the rate limiting step and the reaction barrier. Our calculations reveal that the catalytic mechanism proceeds in two steps and that the nature of the nucleophile is a water molecule. In the first step, the water attack on the scissile phosphorous is followed by a proton transfer from the water to the O2P oxygen and a trigonal bipyramidal pentacoordinated phosphorane is formed. Subsequently, in the second step the proton is shuttled to the O30 oxygen to generate the product state. During the reaction mechanism two Mg2+ ions support the formation of a stable associated in-line SN2-type phosphorane intermediate. Our calculated energy barrier of 19.3 kcal mol*1 is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (20.5 kcal mol*1). These results may contribute to the clarification and understanding of the RNase H reaction mechanism and of further enzymes from the RNase family.

  12. The herpes simplex virus 2 virion-associated ribonuclease vhs interferes with stress granule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnen, Renée L; Hay, Thomas J M; Dauber, Bianca; Smiley, James R; Banfield, Bruce W

    2014-11-01

    In a previous study, it was observed that cells infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) failed to accumulate stress granules (SGs) in response to oxidative stress induced by arsenite treatment. As a follow-up to this observation, we demonstrate here that disruption of arsenite-induced SG formation by HSV-2 is mediated by a virion component. Through studies on SG formation in cells infected with HSV-2 strains carrying defective forms of UL41, the gene that encodes vhs, we identify vhs as a virion component required for this disruption. Cells infected with HSV-2 strains producing defective forms of vhs form SGs spontaneously late in infection. In addition to core SG components, these spontaneous SGs contain the viral immediate early protein ICP27 as well as the viral serine/threonine kinase Us3. As part of these studies, we reexamined the frameshift mutation known to reside within the UL41 gene of HSV-2 strain HG52. We demonstrate that this mutation is unstable and can rapidly revert to restore wild-type UL41 following low-multiplicity passaging. Identification of the involvement of virion-associated vhs in the disruption of SG formation will enable mechanistic studies on how HSV-2 is able to counteract antiviral stress responses early in infection. In addition, the ability of Us3 to localize to stress granules may indicate novel roles for this viral kinase in the regulation of translation. Eukaryotic cells respond to stress by rapidly shutting down protein synthesis and storing mRNAs in cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs). Stoppages in protein synthesis are problematic for all viruses as they rely on host cell machinery to synthesize viral proteins. Thus, many viruses target SGs for disruption or modification. Infection by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) was previously observed to disrupt SG formation induced by oxidative stress. In this follow-up study, we identify virion host shutoff protein (vhs) as a viral protein involved in this disruption. The identification of a specific viral protein involved in disrupting SG formation is a key step toward understanding how HSV-2 interacts with these antiviral structures. Additionally, this understanding may provide insights into the biology of SGs that may find application in studies on human motor neuron degenerative diseases, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which may arise as a result of dysregulation of SG formation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Yeast ribonuclease III uses a network of multiple hydrogen bonds for RNA binding and cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mathieu; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2008-08-19

    Members of the bacterial RNase III family recognize a variety of short structured RNAs with few common features. It is not clear how this group of enzymes supports high cleavage fidelity while maintaining a broad base of substrates. Here we show that the yeast orthologue of RNase III (Rnt1p) uses a network of 2'-OH-dependent interactions to recognize substrates with different structures. We designed a series of bipartite substrates permitting the distinction between binding and cleavage defects. Each substrate was engineered to carry a single or multiple 2'- O-methyl or 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions to prevent the formation of hydrogen bonds with a specific nucleotide or group of nucleotides. Interestingly, introduction of 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides near the cleavage site increased the rate of catalysis, indicating that 2'-OH are not required for cleavage. Substitution of nucleotides in known Rnt1p binding site with 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides inhibited cleavage while single 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions did not. This indicates that while no single 2'-OH is essential for Rnt1p cleavage, small changes in the substrate structure are not tolerated. Strikingly, several nucleotide substitutions greatly increased the substrate dissociation constant with little or no effect on the Michaelis-Menten constant or rate of catalysis. Together, the results indicate that Rnt1p uses a network of nucleotide interactions to identify its substrate and support two distinct modes of binding. One mode is primarily mediated by the dsRNA binding domain and leads to the formation of stable RNA/protein complex, while the other requires the presence of the nuclease and N-terminal domains and leads to RNA cleavage.

  14. A Dimeric Mutant of Human Pancreatic Ribonuclease with Selective Cytotoxicity toward Malignant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Renata; di Gaetano, Sonia; de Lorenzo, Claudia; Grauso, Michela; Monaco, Carmen; Spalletti-Cernia, Daniela; Laccetti, Paolo; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Matousek, Josef; D'Alessio, Giuseppe

    1999-07-01

    Monomeric human pancreatic RNase, devoid of any biological activity other than its RNA degrading ability, was engineered into a dimeric protein with a cytotoxic action on mouse and human tumor cells, but lacking any appreciable toxicity on mouse and human normal cells. This dimeric variant of human pancreas RNase selectively sensitizes to apoptotic death cells derived from a human thyroid tumor. Because of its selectivity for tumor cells, and because of its human origin, this protein represents a potentially very attractive, novel tool for anticancer therapy.

  15. Plant Ribonucleases and Nucleases as Antiproliferative Agens Targeting Human Tumors Growing in Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Jaroslav; Matoušek, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2010), s. 29-39 ISSN 1872-2156 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/1149; GA ČR GA521/09/1214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : antiproliferative cytotoxic * effect human * plant nuclease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  16. A ribonuclease coordinates siRNA amplification and mRNA cleavage during RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yue; Chen, Chun-Chieh G; Conte, Darryl; Moresco, James J; Chaves, Daniel A; Mitani, Shohei; Yates, John R; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Mello, Craig C

    2015-01-29

    Effective silencing by RNA-interference (RNAi) depends on mechanisms that amplify and propagate the silencing signal. In some organisms, small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are amplified from target mRNAs by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). Both RdRP recruitment and mRNA silencing require Argonaute proteins, which are generally thought to degrade RNAi targets by directly cleaving them. However, in C. elegans, the enzymatic activity of the primary Argonaute, RDE-1, is not required for silencing activity. We show that RDE-1 can instead recruit an endoribonuclease, RDE-8, to target RNA. RDE-8 can cleave RNA in vitro and is needed for the production of 3' uridylated fragments of target mRNA in vivo. We also find that RDE-8 promotes RdRP activity, thereby ensuring amplification of siRNAs. Together, our findings suggest a model in which RDE-8 cleaves target mRNAs to mediate silencing, while generating 3' uridylated mRNA fragments to serve as templates for the RdRP-directed amplification of the silencing signal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. On the mechanism of action of ribonucleases: dinucleotide cleavage catalyzed by imidazole and Zn2+.

    OpenAIRE

    Breslow, R; Huang, D L; Anslyn, E

    1989-01-01

    Cyclization/cleavage of the 2-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate ester of propylene glycol is catalyzed by imidazole and, much more effectively, by Zn2+ with imidazole. In the latter case, the mechanism involves simultaneous Lewis acid/base catalysis. Similar Zn2+ and imidazole catalysis of cyclization/cleavage is seen with the dinucleotide 3',5'-UpU (uridylyluridine). Again, the zinc system is much more effective than is catalysis by imidazole alone, and in this case simultaneous Lewis acid/base cata...

  18. Proteins at interfaces : the adsorption of human plasma albumin and bovine pancreas ribonuclease on polystyrene latices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, W.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption from (aqueous) solution of proteins is very complex. The interfacial behaviour of proteins is determined by the properties of, and the mutual interactions between, the adsorbing interface, the protein molecules, the solvent (water) molecules and other solutes (e.g. ions).

  19. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppelli, Elisabetta; Levy, Hazel C; Sun, Eileen; Strauss, Mike; Nicol, Clare; Gold, Sarah; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Tuthill, Tobias J; Hogle, James M; Rowlands, David J

    2017-02-01

    Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus) acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes.

  20. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Groppelli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes.

  1. Extracellular Ribonuclease from Bacillus licheniformis (Balifase, a New Member of the N1/T1 RNase Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sokurenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The N1/T1 RNase superfamily comprises enzymes with well-established antitumor effects, such as ribotoxins secreted by fungi, primarily by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, and bacterial RNase secreted by B. pumilus (binase and B. amyloliquefaciens (barnase. RNase is regarded as an alternative to classical chemotherapeutic agents due to its selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells. New RNase with a high degree of structural similarity with binase (73% and barnase (74% was isolated and purified from Bacillus licheniformis (balifase, calculated molecular weight 12421.9 Da, pI 8.91. The protein sample with enzymatic activity of 1.5 × 106 units/A280 was obtained. The physicochemical properties of balifase are similar to those of barnase. However, in terms of its gene organization and promoter activity, balifase is closer to binase. The unique feature of balifase gene organization consists in the fact that genes of RNase and its inhibitor are located in one operon. Similarly to biosynthesis of binase, balifase synthesis is induced under phosphate starvation; however, in contrast to binase, balifase does not form dimers under natural conditions. We propose that the highest stability of balifase among analyzed RNase types allows the protein to retain its structure without oligomerization.

  2. Contrasting oxygen-effects in the inactivation of ribonuclease A by N3, (SCN)-2 and OH radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruetz, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    N 3 exhibits higher efficiency than OH in the inactivation of RNase in de-acerated (neutral) aqueous solution. In O 2 -saturated solution the OH-induced inactivation is enhanced, but N 3 and (SCN) - 2 become remarkably inefficient. Our results suggest that semi-oxidized tyrosine, the predominant initial defect induced by N 3 and (SCN) - 2 but not by OH, can be re-reduced upon reaction with O - 2 or cysteine. (orig.) [de

  3. Cytotoxic effect of bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) on human malignant neuroblastoma in vitro and in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Josef; Činatl Jr., J.; Činatl, J.; Poučková, P.; Schwabe, D.

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (1998), s. 0 ISSN 0268-9146. [International Conference on Animal Genetics /26./. 09.08.1998-14.08.1998, Auckland ] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/96/1738 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Structure-Activity Analysis of Vinylogous Urea Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Encoded Ribonuclease H ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Suhman; Wendeler, Michaela; Rausch, Jason W.; Beilhartz, Greg; Gotte, Matthias; O'Keefe, Barry R.; Bermingham, Alun; Beutler, John A.; Liu, Shixin; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.

    2010-01-01

    Vinylogous ureas 2-amino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide and N-[3-(aminocarbonyl)-4,5-dimethyl-2-thienyl]-2-furancarboxamide (compounds 1 and 2, respectively) were recently identified to be modestly potent inhibitors of the RNase H activity of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptase (RT). Both compounds shared a 3-CONH2-substituted thiophene ring but were otherwise structurally unrelated, which prevented a precise definition of the pharmacophore. We have therefore exa...

  5. The effect of radiation on processing of nuclear RNA and chromatin ribonuclease activity in rat liver and thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarskaya, V.I.; Skotnikova, O.I.; Umansky, S.R.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of radiation on the kinetics of nuclear RNA degradation was studied during actinomycin chase. The intranuclear breakdown of RNA in thymus was inhibited for the first 30 to 120 min after 800 R irradiation of rats. In liver the degradation of nuclear RNA was unchanged for 60 min after irradiation. By the second hour, the breakdown of the rRNA precursor accelerated and the processing of D-RNA slowed down. Rat thymus and liver chromatin showed RNAase activity with two optimal pH values - in the acidic (pH 5.0 to 5.5) and weakly alkaline (pH 7.5) regions. The activity of the acidic RNAase of thymus (but not the liver) chromatin fell after 5 to 20 kR irradiation in vitro. The activity of the alkaline RNAase did not change under these conditions. The data indicate that a fall in activity of the acidic RNAase in irradiated thymus chromatin may be related to disturbance in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction. A possible contribution of the chromatin acidic RNAase to the processing of nuclear RNA in control and after irradiation is discussed. (author)

  6. [Induced expression of Serratia marcescens ribonuclease III gene in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. SR1 tobacco plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirnov, I V; Trifonova, E A; Romanova, A V; Filipenko, E A; Sapotsky, M V; Malinovsky, V I; Kochetov, A V; Shumny, V K

    2016-11-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. SR1 plants, characterized by an increase in the level of dsRNA-specific hydrolytic activity after induction by wounding, were obtained. The Solanum lycopersicum anionic peroxidase gene promoter (new for plant genetic engineering) was for the first time used for the induced expression of the target Serratia marcescens RNase III gene. Upon infection with the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the transgenic plants of the obtained lines did not differ significantly from the control group in the level of TMV capsid protein accumulation. In general, no delay in the development of the infection symptoms was observed in transgenic plants as compared with the control group. The obtained transgenic plants represent a new model for the study of the biological role of endoribonucleases from the RNase III family, including in molecular mechanisms of resistance to pathogens.

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Ribonuclease I precursor (EC 3.1.27.6) (enterobacter ... ribonuclease) (RNase I). [Escherichi...a coli K12] ... dbj|BAA35240.1| Ribonuclease I precursor (EC 3.1.27.6) ... (enterobacter ribon

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Ribonuclease I precursor (EC 3.1.27.6) (enterobacter ... ribonuclease) (RNase I). [Escherichi...a coli K12] ... dbj|BAA35240.1| Ribonuclease I precursor (EC 3.1.27.6) ... (enterobacter ribon

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Ribonuclease I precursor (EC 3.1.27.6) (enterobacter ... ribonuclease) (RNase I). [Escherichi...a coli K12] ... dbj|BAA35240.1| Ribonuclease I precursor (EC 3.1.27.6) ... (enterobacter ribon

  10. Next generation sequencing analysis reveals that the ribonucleases RNase II, RNase R and PNPase affect bacterial motility and biofilm formation in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobre, Vânia; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2015-02-14

    The RNA steady-state levels in the cell are a balance between synthesis and degradation rates. Although transcription is important, RNA processing and turnover are also key factors in the regulation of gene expression. In Escherichia coli there are three main exoribonucleases (RNase II, RNase R and PNPase) involved in RNA degradation. Although there are many studies about these exoribonucleases not much is known about their global effect in the transcriptome. In order to study the effects of the exoribonucleases on the transcriptome, we sequenced the total RNA (RNA-Seq) from wild-type cells and from mutants for each of the exoribonucleases (∆rnb, ∆rnr and ∆pnp). We compared each of the mutant transcriptome with the wild-type to determine the global effects of the deletion of each exoribonucleases in exponential phase. We determined that the deletion of RNase II significantly affected 187 transcripts, while deletion of RNase R affects 202 transcripts and deletion of PNPase affected 226 transcripts. Surprisingly, many of the transcripts are actually down-regulated in the exoribonuclease mutants when compared to the wild-type control. The results obtained from the transcriptomic analysis pointed to the fact that these enzymes were changing the expression of genes related with flagellum assembly, motility and biofilm formation. The three exoribonucleases affected some stable RNAs, but PNPase was the main exoribonuclease affecting this class of RNAs. We confirmed by qPCR some fold-change values obtained from the RNA-Seq data, we also observed that all the exoribonuclease mutants were significantly less motile than the wild-type cells. Additionally, RNase II and RNase R mutants were shown to produce more biofilm than the wild-type control while the PNPase mutant did not form biofilms. In this work we demonstrate how deep sequencing can be used to discover new and relevant functions of the exoribonucleases. We were able to obtain valuable information about the transcripts affected by each of the exoribonucleases and compare the roles of the three enzymes. Our results show that the three exoribonucleases affect cell motility and biofilm formation that are two very important factors for cell survival, especially for pathogenic cells.

  11. Structure-guided approach identifies a novel class of HIV-1 ribonuclease H inhibitors: binding mode insights through magnesium complexation and site-directed mutagenesis studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Corona, Angela; Steinmann, Casper

    2018-01-01

    is a long and expensive process that can be speeded up by in silico methods. In the present study, a structure-guided screening is coupled with a similarity-based search on the Specs database to identify a new class of HIV-1 RNase H inhibitors. Out of the 45 compounds selected for experimental testing, 15...... inhibited the RNase H function below 100 μM with three hits exhibiting IC50 values active compound, AA, inhibits HIV-1 RNase H with an IC50 of 5.1 μM and exhibits a Mg-independent mode of inhibition. Site-directed mutagenesis studies provide valuable insight into the binding mode of newly...

  12. 6-(1-Benzyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-2,4-dioxo-5-hexenoic acids as dual inhibitors of recombinant HIV-1 integrase and ribonuclease H, synthesized by a parallel synthesis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costi, Roberta; Métifiot, Mathieu; Esposito, Francesca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Pescatori, Luca; Messore, Antonella; Scipione, Luigi; Tortorella, Silvano; Zinzula, Luca; Novellino, Ettore; Pommier, Yves; Tramontano, Enzo; Marchand, Christophe; Di Santo, Roberto

    2013-11-14

    The increasing efficiency of HAART has helped to transform HIV/AIDS into a chronic disease. Still, resistance and drug-drug interactions warrant the development of new anti-HIV agents. We previously discovered hit 6, active against HIV-1 replication and targeting RNase H in vitro. Because of its diketo-acid moiety, we speculated that this chemotype could serve to develop dual inhibitors of both RNase H and integrase. Here, we describe a new series of 1-benzyl-pyrrolyl diketohexenoic derivatives, 7a-y and 8a-y, synthesized following a parallel solution-phase approach. Those 50 analogues have been tested on recombinant enzymes (RNase H and integrase) and in cell-based assays. Approximately half (22) exibited inhibition of HIV replication. Compounds 7b, 7u, and 8g were the most active against the RNase H activity of reverse-transcriptase, with IC50 values of 3, 3, and 2.5 μM, respectively. Compound 8g was also the most potent integrase inhibitor with an IC50 value of 26 nM.

  13. FATHEAD MINNOW VITELLOGENIN: CDNA SEQUENCE AND MRNA AND PROTEIN EXPRESSION AFTER 17 BETA-ESTRADIOL TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the present study, a sensitive ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) for VTG mRNA was developed for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a species proposed for routine endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) screening.

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2-5A; antiviral function; cellular RNA degradation; interferons; recombinant RNase L ... yield and degradation of the recombinant protein, which demands number of ... A semi-quantitative agarose-gel-based ribonuclease assay was developed ...

  15. Simplified riboprobe purification using translucent straws as gel tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, S; Ben-Shlomo, I; Adashi, E Y; Rohan, R M

    1996-01-01

    Gel purification of radioactive riboprobes enhances the quality of the ribonuclease protection assay. A simple and effective method for riboprobe purification is described. The method uses acrylamide gels in plastic tubes to achieve electrophoretic separation of the RNA polymerase products.

  16. A New Concept for Androgen Receptor-Independent Growth of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hu, Guo-fu; Kishikawa, Hiroko; Yoshioka, Norie

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenin is an angiogenic ribonuclease that is upregulated in prostate cancer. The objective of this project is to explore the role angiogenin plays in the development of androgen-independent disease...

  17. Translational and rotational motions of proteins in a protein crowded environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorilla, S.; Hink, M.A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Lillo, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to measure the translational diffusion of labeled apomyoglobin (tracer) in concentrated solutions of ribonuclease A and human serum albumin (crowders), as a quantitative model system of protein diffusive motions in crowded physiological

  18. African Journal of Science and Technology (AJST) EFFECT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opiyo

    1997-05-23

    May 23, 1997 ... Accel contains plant growth regulators namely benzyladenine (BA) ... deficit by inducing stomatal opening, hence increasing the rate of water loss, ... content and hormone effects on ribonuclease activity. Plant Physiology 52 ...

  19. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase; MD simulations; ribonuclease H activity; retroviral therapy; conformational transition; protein-nucleic acid interactions. ... Details of key interactions found at the interface of enzyme-nucleic acid complex that are ...

  20. Secretion of intact proteins and peptide fragments by lysosomal pathways of protein degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isenman, L.D.; Dice, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    We report that degradation of proteins microinjected into human fibroblasts is accompanied by release into the culture medium of peptide fragments and intact proteins as well as single amino acids. For the nine proteins and polypeptides microinjected, acid-precipitable radioactivity, i.e. peptide fragments and/or intact proteins, ranged from 10 to 67% of the total released radioactivity. Peptide fragments and/or intact protein accounted for 60% of the radioactivity released into the medium by cells microinjected with ribonuclease A. Two major radiolabeled peptide fragments were found, and one was of an appropriate size to function as an antigen in antigen-presenting cells. The peptides released from microinjected ribonuclease A were derived from lysosomal pathways of proteolysis based on several lines of evidence. Previous studies have shown that microinjected ribonuclease A is degraded to single amino acids entirely within lysosomes. We show that release of free amino acids and peptide fragments and/or intact protein was equivalently stimulated by serum deprivation and equivalently inhibited by NH4Cl. We also show that lysosomal degradation of endocytosed [3H]ribonuclease A was accompanied by the release of two peptide fragments similar in size and charge to those from microinjected [ 3 H]ribonuclease A. These findings demonstrate that degradation within lysosomes occurs in a manner that spares specific peptides; they also suggest a previously unsuspected pathway by which cells can secrete cytosol-derived polypeptides

  1. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ribonuclease/transcriptional repressor (R/TR). 59. MULTICOPY SUPRESSOR OF IRA1 (MSI). 60. AP2-domain DNA-binding protein (ORCA3). 61. LEAFY PETIOLE (LEP). 62. GLYCINE-RICH PROTEIN 2B (ATGRP2B). 63. LEAFY COTYLEDON 2 (LEC2). 64. YELLOW-LEAF-SPECIFIC GENE 9 (YLS9). 65. TRANSCRIPTION ...

  2. A376S in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers increased risk of virological failure to nevirapine therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paredes, Roger; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Bannister, Wendy; Kisic, Mónica; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Pou, Christian; Bellido, Rocío; Betancor, Gilberto; Bogner, Johannes; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Bánhegyi, Dénes; Clotet, Bonaventura; Lundgren, Jens; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Poll, B.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Oestergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Vella, S.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Iacomi, F.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Finazzi, R.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; d'Arminio, A.; Rozentale, B.; Aldins, P.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Reiss, P.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Brunn, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Prokopowicz, D.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Valadas, E.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Rakhmanova, A.; Vinogradova, E.; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokrás, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Martin-Carbonero, L.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Domingo, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Karlsson, A.; Persson, P. O.; Ledergerber, B.; Weber, R.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Gatell, J.; Gazzard, B.; Lundgren, J.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Kirk, O.; Mocroft, A.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Grint, D.; Ellefson, M.; Podlekareva, D.; Kjaer, J.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Kowalska, J.; Tverland, J.; Fischer, A. H.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical relevance of mutations in the connection subdomain and the ribonuclease (RNase) H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is uncertain. The risk of virological failure to nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was evaluated in NNRTI-naive patients who

  3. Contribution to the study of proteins and peptides structure by hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabedryk-Viala, Eliane.

    1978-01-01

    Development of hydrogen exchange measurement methods to study the structure and the molecular interaction of globular protein molecules in aqueous solution (ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, coupling factors of chloroplasts), in peptide hormones in trifluoroethanol solution (angiotensin II, corticotropin) and in proteins of membranes (rhodopsin) [fr

  4. Hierarchical organization in aggregates of protein molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer

    1997-01-01

    of the solution and the density of protein are varied shows the existence of specific growth processes resulting in different branch-like structures. The resulting structures are strongly influenced by the shape of each protein molecule. Lysozyme and ribonuclease are found to form spherical structures...

  5. Metabolic changes associated with ozone injury of bean leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craker, L.E.; Starbuck, J.S.

    1972-07-01

    Metabolic processes in primary leaves of bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) were altered by ozone stress. Decreases in levels of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein, and increases in ribonuclease (RNase) and free amine groups were associated with visible oxidant injury to the leaves. It appears that some air pollution injury to plants may result from changes in metabolic processes. 23 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. The exosome associates cotranscriptionally with the nascent pre-mRNP through interactions with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessle, Viktoria; Björk, Petra; Sokolowski, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved quality control mechanisms to degrade aberrant mRNA molecules and prevent the synthesis of defective proteins that could be deleterious for the cell. The exosome, a protein complex with ribonuclease activity, is a key player in quality control. An early quality check...

  7. Nickel affects Xlem Sap RNase A and converts RNase A to a Urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel (Ni) is an essential micronutrient; however, its metabolic or physiological functions in plants and animals are largely uncharacterized. The ribonucleases (RNase, e.g., RNase A) are a large family of hydrolases found in one form or many forms facilitating nitrogen (N) cycling. It is current...

  8. Problem-Solving Test: Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Pre-mRNA Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: transcription, pre-mRNA, RNA processing, RNA transport, RNA polymerase II, direct and indirect immunofluorescence staining, cell fractionation by centrifugation, oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography, washing and elution of the column, ribonuclease, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis,…

  9. Expression, purification and characterization of the interferon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... utilizing a single-step affinity purification with an appreciable yield of the highly purified protein. Recombinant RNase L was characterized by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting and MALDI-TOF analysis. A semi-quantitative agarose-gel-based ribonuclease assay was developed for measuring its 2-5A-dependent ...

  10. Detection of salt bridges to lysines in solution in barnase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Williamson, Michael P.; Hounslow, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that salt bridges involving lysines can be detected by deuterium isotope effects on NMR chemical shifts of the sidechain amine. Lys27 in the ribonuclease barnase is salt bridged, and mutation of Arg69 to Lys retains a partially buried salt bridge. The salt bridges are functionally important....

  11. pH dependence of the kinetics of interfacial tension changes during protein adsorption from sessile droplets on FEP-Teflon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderVegt, W; Norde, W; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    Interfacial tension changes during protein adsorption at both the solid-liquid and the liquid-vapor interface were measured simultaneously by ADSA-P from sessile droplets of protein solutions on fluoroethylenepropylene-Teflon. Four globular proteins of similar size, viz. lysozyme, ribonuclease,

  12. Studies of the aggregation of RNase Sa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khasa, Harshit; Kramer, Ryan; Maddux, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-eight mutants of RNase Sa (ribonuclease from Streptomyces aureofaciens) were examined for their structure, thermal sensitivity, and tendency to aggregate. Although a biphasic correlation was seen between the effect of temperature on structure and the free energy of transfer changes in many...

  13. Cloning of a novel gene, Cymg1, related to family 2 cystatins and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We have cloned a novel gene, Cymg1 (GenBank accession number ... Cymg1 expression level varied in the different developmental stages of .... Reaction mixture containing 10 µl ribonuclease-free water, ... reaction was terminated by heating at 70ºC for 10 min, .... stage-specific germ cells in the testis (Cornwall et al. 1992 ...

  14. Studies on protein synthesis by protoplasts of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis II. Reversal of the RNase effect of protein synthesis by polymethacrylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, S.R. de; Wermeskerken, R.K.A. van; Koningsberger, V.V.

    1961-01-01

    The ribonuclease inhibited protein synthesis and respiration of yeast protoplasts can be restored by the addition of several polyanionic compounds, among which polymethacrylic acid proved to be the most effective one. The results of preliminary experiments with the ultracentrifuge indicate a

  15. RNA Isolation from Plant Tissues: A Hands-On Laboratory Experimental Experience for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianhui; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    The practice of RNA isolation in undergraduate experimental courses is rare because of the existence of robust, ubiquitous and stable ribonucleases. We reported here modifications to our original protocol for RNA isolation from plant tissues, including the recovery of nucleic acids by ethanol precipitation at 0 degrees C for 10 min and the…

  16. Action of radiations on some biological model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czapski, G.

    1977-06-01

    Brief summaries are presented of studies on primary photochemical processes under conditions of high excitation intensity of pulsed lasers and pulse radiolysis studies of inactivation of ribonuclease by redox reactions and the redox mechanism of cytochrome C. Publications resulting from these studies are cited

  17. Structural analysis of the active site architecture of the VapC toxin from Shigella flexneri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Kehan; Dedic, Emil; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    2016-01-01

    The VapC toxin from the Shigella flexneri 2a virulence plasmid pMYSH6000 belongs to the PIN domain protein family, which is characterized by a conserved fold with low amino acid sequence conservation. The toxin is a bona fide Mg2+-dependent ribonuclease and has been shown to target initiator t...

  18. Polymorphism of growth hormone gene and its association with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2016-04-06

    Apr 6, 2016 ... recorded to be more frequent (83.3, 92.86 and 90%) than pattern II (16.7, 7.14 and 10%) in Barki,. Rahmani ... Key words: Sheep, wool, growth hormone (GH) gene, polymorphism, single strand conformation polymorphism. (SSCP). ... electrophoresis and chemical and ribonuclease cleavage,. SSCP has ...

  19. AcEST: BP916784 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B0_MARFA Pancreatic ribonuclease (Fragment) OS=Martes flavigula Align length 57 Score (bit) 34.3 E-value 3.8...ibonuclease (Fragment) OS=Martes flavigula GN=RNASE1 PE=3 SV=1 Length = 140 Score = 34.3 bits (77), Expect =

  20. Nucleic acid helices: I. Structure of M1 RNA from E. coli as determined bypsoralen crosslinking. II. Thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing 3.0 M tetramethylammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This work includes two different investigations examining nucleic acid helices. The first study discusses secondary and tertiary interactions in the RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli. The second study discusses the thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing tetramethylammonium chloride. The RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli (M1 RNA) has been photoreacted with 4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5'8-trimethylpsoralen and long wave UV light (320-380 nm) in a buffer in which the M1 RNA alone acts as a true catalyst of tRNA processing. Limited specific digestion followed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis yields fragments crosslinked by HMT. The positions of the crosslinks have been determined to within ±15 nucleotides by photoreversal of the isolated crosslinked fragments and enzymatic sequencing of the resulting RNA. Further assignments of the exact locations of the crosslinks have been made on the known photoreactivity of the psoralen with different bases

  1. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  2. Nuclear RNA quantification in protoplast cell-cycle phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergounioux, C; Perennes, C; Brown, S C; Gadal, P

    1988-01-01

    Using acridine orange staining and flow cytometry the DNA and RNA levels (arbitrary units) of individual cells may be established. Here, this method has been applied to nuclei isolated from plant protoplasts during culture. The specificity of the technique has been validated for such plant material; ribonuclease markedly reduced nuclear staining without modifying the DNA histogram; ribonuclease inhibitor prevented the action of released cell nucleases; and protoplasts cultivated with actinomycin D did not synthesize RNA. First RNA synthesis was evident 18 h after Petunia hybrida protoplasts had been put into culture. An increase of RNA above a critical level was required for cells to be able to initiate DNA replication from G1, termed G1B. G2 nuclei had an RNA:DNA ratio similar to that of G1 nuclei.

  3. Effects of sub-lethal dose of γ-irradiation on lysosomal enzymes in tissue of pigeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.C.; Gadhia, P.K.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of total body γ-irradiation with sub-lethal dose (300 rad) on three lysosomal enzymes namely acid phosphatase, ribonuclease-II and deoxyribonuclease-II have been studied in pigeons. Liver, kidney and spleen were the tissues studied at different intervals like 1-h, 24-h, 48-h, and 72-h of irradiation. The specific activities ('crude' fraction) of acid phosphatase and ribonuclease-II increased significantly in spleen and liver at 48-h of irradiation. The activity of deoxyribonuclease-II in liver and spleen was increased only at 72-h post-irradiation. On the other hand, the total activities of three lysosomal enzymes did not show remarkable change throughout 72-h of irradiation. (author)

  4. Effect of endocrine therapy on growth of T61 human breast cancer xenografts is directly correlated to a specific down-regulation of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Yee, D; Kern, F G

    1993-01-01

    xenograft. Growth of the T61 tumour is inhibited by treatment with E2 and TAM. Ribonuclease (RNAse) protection assays with human- and mouse-specific IGF-II antisense probes were used to study the regulation of IGF-II mRNA by E2 and TAM in the tumour. IGF-II protein expression was studied by radioimmunoassay......-IR3 resulted in inhibition of tumour growth during treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)...

  5. Infection and pathogenecity of Myroides odoratimimus (NIOCR-12) isolated from the gut of grey mullet (Mugil cephalus (Linnaeus, 1758))

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, C.; Varatharajan, G.R.; Rajasabapathy R.; Vasudevan, L.; Sreepada, R.A.

    were extracted from zebrafish using Tri Reagent according to the manufacturer’s protocols (Sigma-Aldrich, USA). The RNA preparations were treated with ribonuclease-free deoxyribonuclease (Dnase) I (Invitrogen) to remove residual genomic DNA. Total... anion radical (O2), a highly toxic reactive oxygen species (ROSs) are released during the phagocytosis process and act as a potent antibacterial system was analyzed in this study. Thus, we used the NBT assay method were the reduction of nitroblue...

  6. Molecular modelling of the GIR1 branching ribozyme gives new insight into evolution of structurally related ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckert, Bertrand Dominique; Nielsen, Henrik; Einvik, Christer

    2008-01-01

    a catalytic core showing a different topology from that of group I ribozymes. The differences include a core J8/7 region that has been reduced and is complemented by residues from the pre-lariat fold. These findings provide the basis for an evolutionary mechanism that accounts for the change from group I...... splicing ribozyme to the branching GIR1 architecture. Such an evolutionary mechanism can be applied to other large RNAs such as the ribonuclease P....

  7. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on regulation of gene expression included research projects on turnover of ribosomal RNA, ribonuclease-resistant oligonucleotides, and reutilization of oligonucleotides. Studies on radiation effects on RNA included research projects on radioinduced strand breaks in RNA and radioinduced alterations in RNA nucleotides. Effects of vasopression on radiosensitivity were studied. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions included research projects on synthesis and spectroscopic analysis of nucleotide-amino acid covalently bonded model compound and intermolecular interactions between tryptophan and dinucleoside phosphates

  8. Chilled in Translation: Adapting to Bacterial Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, Susan

    2018-04-19

    Cold-shocked bacteria transiently shut down protein translation, but the mechanisms whereby they adaptively restore translation were incompletely understood. Zhang et al. (2018) demonstrate a global increase in mRNA structure after cold shock and that, as structured RNA decreases, translation returns, dependent upon ribonuclease RNase R and cold shock protein CspA and its homologs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Crystallographic and Modeling Studies of RNase III Suggest a Mechanism for Double-Stranded RNA Cleavage | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Ribonuclease III belongs to the family of Mg2+-dependent endonucleases that show specificity for double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). RNase III is conserved in all known bacteria and eukaryotes and has 1–2 copies of a 9-residue consensus sequence, known as the RNase III signature motif. The bacterial RNase III proteins are the simplest, consisting of two domains: an

  10. 5´-O-Methylphosphonate nucleic acids—new modified DNAs that increase the Escherichia coli RNase H cleavage rate of hybrid duplexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Špringer, Tomáš; Rejman, Dominik; Šimák, Ondřej; Petrová, Magdalena; Novák, Pavel; Rosenbergová, Šárka; Páv, Ondřej; Liboska, Radek; Barvík, I.; Štěpánek, J.; Rosenberg, Ivan; Homola, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 8 (2014), s. 5378-5389 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0820; GA ČR GA13-26526S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : Antisense Oligonucleotides * Ribonuclease H * Surface Plasmon Resonance Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014

  11. Conserved Proteins of the RNA Interference System in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizoglomus irregulare Provide New Insight into the Evolutionary History of Glomeromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Jae; Kong, Mengxuan; Harrison, Paul; Hijri, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important mechanism in the evolution of many living organisms particularly in Prokaryotes where genes are frequently dispersed between taxa. Although, HGT has been reported in Eukaryotes, its accumulative effect and its frequency has been questioned. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are an early diverged fungal lineage belonging to phylum Glomeromycota, whose phylogenetic position is still under debate. The history of AMF and land plant symbiosis dates back to at least 460 Ma. However, Glomeromycota are estimated to have emerged much earlier than land plants. In this study, we surveyed genomic and transcriptomic data of the model arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizoglomus irregulare (synonym Rhizophagus irregularis) and its relatives to search for evidence of HGT that occurred during AMF evolution. Surprisingly, we found a signature of putative HGT of class I ribonuclease III protein-coding genes that occurred from autotrophic cyanobacteria genomes to R. irregulare. At least one of two HGTs was conserved among AMF species with high levels of sequence similarity. Previously, an example of intimate symbiosis between AM fungus and cyanobacteria was reported in the literature. Ribonuclease III family enzymes are important in small RNA regulation in Fungi together with two additional core proteins (Argonaute/piwi and RdRP). The eukaryotic RNA interference system found in AMF was conserved and showed homology with high sequence similarity in Mucoromycotina, a group of fungi closely related to Glomeromycota. Prior to this analysis, class I ribonuclease III has not been identified in any eukaryotes. Our results indicate that a unique acquisition of class I ribonuclease III in AMF is due to a HGT event that occurred from cyanobacteria to Glomeromycota, at the latest before the divergence of the two Glomeromycota orders Diversisporales and Glomerales. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society

  12. Tissue-specific splicing pattern of fibronectin messenger RNA precursor during development and aging in rat

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Fibronectin isoforms are generated by the alternative splicing of a primary transcript derived from a single gene. In rat at least three regions of the molecule are involved: EIIIA, EIIIB, and V. This study investigated the splicing patterns of these regions during development and aging, by means of ribonuclease protection analysis. Between fetal and adult rat, the extent of inclusion of the EIIIA and/or EIIIB region in fibronectin mRNA varied according to the type of tissue analyzed; but the...

  13. Studies on the effects of persistent RNA priming on DNA replication and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    [EN]: DNA replication and transcription take place on the same DNA template, and the correct interplay between these processes ensures faithful genome duplication. DNA replication must be highly coordinated with other cell cycle events, such as segregation of fully replicated DNA in order to maintain genomic integrity. Transcription generates RNA:DNA hybrids, transient intermediate structures that are degraded by the ribonuclease H (RNaseH) class of enzymes. RNA:DNA hybrids can form R-loops, ...

  14. Enhancing Protein Disulfide Bond Cleavage by UV Excitation and Electron Capture Dissociation for Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Li, Huilin; Zhang, Xing; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Julian, Ryan R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of ion pre-activation with 266 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation combined with electron capture dissociation (ECD) is demonstrated to enhance top-down mass spectrometry sequence coverage of disulfide bond containing proteins. UV-based activation can homolytically cleave a disulfide bond to yield two separated thiol radicals. Activated ECD experiments of insulin and ribonuclease A containing three and four disulfide bonds, respectively, were performed. UV-activation in comb...

  15. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on the X-ray induced aggregation of ribonnuclease, lactate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and serum albumin. A comparison with malate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, P.; Gatterer, H.G.; Schutz, J.; Durchschlag, H.

    1980-01-01

    The X-ray induced aggregation of ribonuclease, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and serum albumin in aqueous solution was monitored in situ by means of small-angle X-ray scattering. Measurements carried out with ribonuclease, LDH and serum albumin in the absence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and with GAPDH in the presence of 0.2mM DTT established the following series for the rates of aggregation of the proteins under these conditions: ribonuclease >LDH> >GAPDH> serum albumin. Within six hours from the beginning of irradiation (i.e. about the time required for the exposure of one complete scattering curve under the conditions of our experiments) the following increases of R tilde resulted: ribonuclease 9%, LDH 7%, GAPDH 4%, serum albumin <1%. Changes of R tilde exceeding 1% are, of course, too high to be tolerated in conventional scattering experiments. Measurements carried out with LDH and GAPDH in the presence of 2mM DTT established a strong protective effect of DTT against the X-ray induced aggregation of these enzymes. The initial increase of R tilde upon irradiation of LDH and GAPDH in the presence of 2mM DTT was found to be even lower than the increase of R tilde observed when serum albumin was irradiated in the absence of DTT. However, the observed decrease of anti x of LDH and GAPDH at the early stages of irradiation suggested the occurrence of fragmentation of the enzymes as another consequence of radiation damage. This finding is discussed in context with the results from previous scattering experiments and electrophoretic studies on malate synthase. (author)

  16. Insights into the energetics and mechanism underlying the interaction of tetraethylammonium bromide with proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Tuhina; Kishore, Nand

    2008-01-01

    Calorimetry has been employed to investigate the quantitative energetic aspects and mechanism underlying protein-tetraethylammonium bromide (TEAB) interactions. Differential scanning calorimetry and UV-Visible spectroscopy have been used to study the thermal unfolding of three proteins of different structure and function (bovine serum albumin, α-lactalbumin, and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A). The mode of interaction has been studied by using isothermal titration calorimetry, which demonstrates the absence of appreciable specific binding of TEAB to the protein. This suggests the involvement of solvent mediated effects and, possibly weak non-specific binding. The thermal unfolding transitions were found to be calorimetrically reversible for α-lactalbumin and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and partially reversible in the case of bovine serum albumin. The results indicate protein destabilization promoted by the TEAB interaction. The preferential interaction parameters of TEAB with α-lactalbumin and ribonuclease A confirm that an increased interaction of the hydrophobic groups of the TEAB with that of the protein upon denaturation is responsible for the reduced thermal stability of the protein. The decrease in the thermal stability of proteins in the presence of TEAB is well supported by a red shift in the intrinsic fluorescence of these proteins leading to conformational change thereby shifting the native ↔ denatured equilibrium towards right. The forces responsible for the thermal denaturation of the proteins of different structure and function in the presence of TEAB are discussed

  17. Overaccumulation of the chloroplast antisense RNA AS5 is correlated with decreased abundance of 5S rRNA in vivo and inefficient 5S rRNA maturation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Hotto, Amber M.; Bollenbach, Thomas J.; Stern, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation in the chloroplast is exerted by nucleus-encoded ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. One of these ribonucleases is RNR1, a 3′-to-5′ exoribonuclease of the RNase II family. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis rnr1-null mutants exhibit specific abnormalities in the expression of the rRNA operon, including the accumulation of precursor 23S, 16S, and 4.5S species and a concomitant decrease in the mature species. 5S rRNA transcripts, however, accumulate to a very low level in both precursor and mature forms, suggesting that they are unstable in the rnr1 background. Here we demonstrate that rnr1 plants overaccumulate an antisense RNA, AS5, that is complementary to the 5S rRNA, its intergenic spacer, and the downstream trnR gene, which encodes tRNAArg, raising the possibility that AS5 destabilizes 5S rRNA or its precursor and/or blocks rRNA maturation. To investigate this, we used an in vitro system that supports 5S rRNA and trnR processing. We show that AS5 inhibits 5S rRNA maturation from a 5S-trnR precursor, and shorter versions of AS5 demonstrate that inhibition requires intergenic sequences. To test whether the sense and antisense RNAs form double-stranded regions in vitro, treatment with the single-strand-specific mung bean nuclease was used. These results suggest that 5S–AS5 duplexes interfere with a sense-strand secondary structure near the endonucleolytic cleavage site downstream from the 5S rRNA coding region. We hypothesize that these duplexes are degraded by a dsRNA-specific ribonuclease in vivo, contributing to the 5S rRNA deficiency observed in rnr1. PMID:21148395

  18. Impaired Sperm Maturation in Rnase9 Knockout Mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmuckett, Andrew D.; Nguyen, Edward B.; Herlea-Pana, Oana M.; Alvau, Antonio; Salicioni, Ana M.; Moore, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ribonuclease, RNase A family, 9 (RNASE9) is a ribonuclease A superfamily member that is expressed only in the epididymis. It is a small, secreted polypeptide, it lacks ribonuclease activity, and its function(s) is unknown. However, epididymis-specific expression suggests a role in sperm maturation. We generated Rnase9−/− mice to study RNASE9 function in vivo. We confirm that RNASE9 expression is restricted to the epididymis. Within the epididymis, RNASE9 is first detected in midcaput, persists through the distal caput and corpus, and wanes in the cauda. Rnase9−/− mice are born at the expected Mendelian ratio, have normal postnatal growth and development, and have no outwardly apparent phenotype. Spermatogenesis is normal, and Rnase9-null sperm are morphologically normal. Rnase9−/− males have normal fertility in unrestricted mating trials, and fertilization rates in in vitro fertilization assays are indistinguishable from wild-type mice. Visual observations coupled with analyses of sperm velocities shortly after swim out from the corpus shows that motility of Rnase9-null sperm is significantly impaired. However, no differences between wild-type and Rnase9-null sperm are detected by computer-assisted sperm analysis 10–90 min after sperm isolation from the corpus or cauda. Assessment of capacitation-dependent signaling pathways in Rnase9-null sperm showed that, while levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins were normal, there was decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase A substrates upon capacitation compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, RNASE9 is dispensable for fertility, but the absence of RNASE9 during epididymal transit results in impaired sperm maturation. PMID:24719258

  19. Halophilic Nuclease from a Moderately Halophilic Micrococcus varians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamekura, Masahiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    1974-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Micrococcus varians, isolated from soy sauce mash, produced extracellular nuclease when cultivated aerobically in media containing 1 to 4 M NaCl or KCl. The enzyme, purified to an electrophoretically homogeneous state, had both ribonuclease and deoxyribonuclease activities. The nuclease had maximal activity in the presence of 2.9 M NaCl or 2.1 M KCl at 40 C. The enzymatic activity was lost by dialysis against low-salt buffer, whereas when the inactivated enzyme was dialyzed against 3.4 M NaCl buffer as much as 77% of the initial activity could be restored. Images PMID:4852218

  20. Changes in secondary structure of poliovirus ribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koza, J.

    1975-01-01

    Infectious single-stranded RNA isolated from mature purified poliovirus was separated into three fractions by means of chromatography on an ''evaporated'' calcium phosphate column. RNA molecules with a higher degree of secondary structure were detected in two of the fractions as a result of the chromatography. These RNA molecules (1) were resistant to hydrolysis by pancreatic ribonuclease A, (2) retained unchanged the original infectivity for actinomycin D-pretreated cells, (3) were resistant to ultraviolet-light inactivation and (4) were partially resistant to formaldehyde inactivation

  1. Stage-specific gene expression during sexual development in Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabritius, Anna-Liisa; Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2002-01-01

    Eight genes that are upregulated during sexual development in the heterothallic oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization. Two genes showed very low but detectable expression in vegetative hyphae and became induced about 40- to >100-fold early...... revealed that the predicted products of three of the genes had similarity to proteins that influence RNA stability, namely a ribonuclease activator, the pumilio family of RNA-binding proteins and RNase H. The products of two other mating-induced genes resembled two types of Phytophthora proteins previously...

  2. Regulation of 2-5A Dependent RNase at the Level of its Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-26

    extract as follows: 25 ul wheat germ extract 10 ul H2O 1 ul RNasin ribonuclease inhibitor (40 u/ml) 7 ul ImM amino acid mixture 1 ul IM...diacylglycerol (DAG) 2. TPA 3. Indolactam Figure 6. Chemical structure of: 1. H-7 (A kinase inhibitor) 2. okadaic acid (A phosphatase inhibitor) Figure 7...elevating agents: Forskolin and Cholera toxin Figure 17. Down-regulation of 2-5A-depRNase by Okadaic 77 acid : A phosphatase inhibitor Figure 18

  3. Curcumin, a Natural Antioxidant, Acts as a Noncompetitive Inhibitor of Human RNase L in Presence of Its Cofactor 2-5A In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribonuclease L (RNase L is an antiviral endoribonuclease of the innate immune system, which is induced and activated by viral infections, interferons, and double stranded RNA (dsRNA in mammalian cells. Although, RNase L is generally protective against viral infections, abnormal RNase L expression and activity have been associated with a number of diseases. Here, we show that curcumin, a natural plant-derived anti-inflammatory active principle, inhibits RNase L activity; hence, it may be exploited for therapeutic interventions in case of pathological situations associated with excess activation of RNase L.

  4. Curcumin, a natural antioxidant, acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of human RNase L in presence of its cofactor 2-5A in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankush; Rath, Pramod C

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is an antiviral endoribonuclease of the innate immune system, which is induced and activated by viral infections, interferons, and double stranded RNA (dsRNA) in mammalian cells. Although, RNase L is generally protective against viral infections, abnormal RNase L expression and activity have been associated with a number of diseases. Here, we show that curcumin, a natural plant-derived anti-inflammatory active principle, inhibits RNase L activity; hence, it may be exploited for therapeutic interventions in case of pathological situations associated with excess activation of RNase L.

  5. Stabilization of RNA through Absorption by Functionalized Mesoporous Silicate Nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    contaminating RNA ribonucleases (RNases). RNases are known to be present endogenously in cells, tissues, body oils, and bacteria and/or fungi in airborne dust...CTAB was dissolved at 80uC in 475 mL water and 7.0 mL 1.0 M NaOH with stirring. The reactor vessel was a polyethylene bottle suspended in a temperature...of the pores in these materials. Large polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules, for example, would be expected to occupy a large portion of the available

  6. An ancient divergence among the bacteria. [methanogenic phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, W. E.; Magrum, L. J.; Fox, G. E.; Wolfe, R. S.; Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNZs from two species of met methanogenic bacteria, the mesophile Methanobacterium ruminantium and the thermophile Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, have been characterized in terms of the oligonucleotides produced by digestion with T1 ribonuclease. These two organisms are found to be sufficiently related that they can be considered members of the same genus or family. However, they bear only slight resemblance to 'typical' Procaryotic genera; such as Escherichia, Bacillus and Anacystis. The divergence of the methanogenic bacteria from other bacteria may be the most ancient phylogenetic event yet detected - antedating considerably the divergence of the blue green algal line for example, from the main bacterial line.

  7. Unstable structure of ribosomal particles synthesized in. gamma. -irradiated Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, H; Morita, K [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-06-01

    Stability of Escherichia coli ribosomes newly synthesized after ..gamma..-irradiation was compared with that of normal ribosomes. The ribosomal particles around 70-S synthesized in irradiated cells were more sensitive to digestion by pancreatic ribonuclease A. A larger number of the salt-unstable '50-S' precursor particles existed in the extract from irradiated cells than in the extract from unirradiated cells. These facts suggest that ribosomal particles, synthesized during an earlier stage in irradiated cells, maintain an incomplete structure even though they are not distinguishable from normal ribosomes by means of sucrose density-gradient centrifugation.

  8. Overexpression and rapid purification of the orfE/rph gene product, RNase PH of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Andersen, J T; Poulsen, Peter

    1992-01-01

    acid residue protein which was recently identified as the phosphorolytic ribonuclease, RNase PH, that removes nucleotides from the 3' ends of tRNA precursors. In this paper we report the construction of a plasmid, which overexpresses the orfE and pyrE gene products substantially, as well....../min/mg, as characteristic for RNase PH. OrfE/RNase PH contains helix-turn-helix motifs resembling those in DNA-binding proteins, and it binds nonspecifically to DNA. On SDS gels, OrfE/RNase PH migrates as two distinct protein bands. This heterogeneity might be caused by post-translational modification other than...

  9. Nucleic acid helices: I. Structure of M1 RNA from E. coli as determined bypsoralen crosslinking. II. Thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing 3. 0 M tetramethylammonium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This work includes two different investigations examining nucleic acid helices. The first study discusses secondary and tertiary interactions in the RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli. The second study discusses the thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing tetramethylammonium chloride. The RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli (M1 RNA) has been photoreacted with 4{prime}-hydroxymethyl-4,5{prime}8-trimethylpsoralen and long wave UV light (320-380 nm) in a buffer in which the M1 RNA alone acts as a true catalyst of tRNA processing. Limited specific digestion followed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis yields fragments crosslinked by HMT. The positions of the crosslinks have been determined to within {plus minus}15 nucleotides by photoreversal of the isolated crosslinked fragments and enzymatic sequencing of the resulting RNA. Further assignments of the exact locations of the crosslinks have been made on the known photoreactivity of the psoralen with different bases.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a pathogenesis-related protein CsPR10 from Crocus sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gómez, L; Rubio-Moraga, A; Ahrazem, O

    2011-03-01

    Plants have developed many mechanisms to protect themselves against most potential microbial pathogens and diseases. Among these mechanisms, pathogenesis-related proteins are produced as part of the active defence to prevent attack. In this study, a full-length cDNA encoding the CsPR10 protein was identified in fresh saffron stigmas (Crocus sativus). The deduced amino acid sequence from the nucleotide sequence of the coding region showed homology with PR10 proteins. The clone expressed as a protein in fusion with a GST tag produced a 47-kDa protein in E. coli. CsPR10 had ribonuclease activity, with features common to class II-type ribonucleases; its specific activity was quantified as 68.8 U·mg(-1) protein, thus falling within the range of most PR10 proteins exhibiting RNase activity. Antifungal activity of CsPR10 was assayed against Verticillium dahliae, Penicillium sp. and Fusarium oxysporum. CsPR10 inhibited only F. oxysporum growth, and antifungal potency was reflected in a IC(50) of 8.3 μm. Expression analysis showed the presence of high transcript levels in anther and tepal tissues, low levels in stigmas and roots, and no signal detected in leaves. This protein seems to be involved in the active defence response through activation of the jasmonic acid pathway. © 2010 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. Hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric surface capable of effective suppression of protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamon, Yuri; Inoue, Naoko; Mihara, Erika; Kitayama, Yukiya; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: takeuchi@gold.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Three hydrophilic crosslinked polymers were examined for protein adsorption. • All polymers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins. • Poly(MMPC) showed the lowest adsorption for positively charged proteins. • Poly(MMPC) is able to reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins. - Abstract: We investigated the nonspecific adsorption of proteins towards three hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric thin layers prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization using N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-[N-(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]phosphorylcholine (MMPC), or 6,6′-diacryloyl-trehalose crosslinkers. Protein binding experiments were performed by surface plasmon resonance with six proteins of different pI values including α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme in buffer solution at pH 7.4. All of the obtained crosslinked-polymeric thin layers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins at pH 7.4 such as α-lactalbumin, BSA, and myoglobin. Nonspecific adsorption of positively charged proteins including ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was the lowest for poly(MMPC). These results suggest poly(MMPC) can effectively reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins that are negatively or positively charged at pH 7.4. MMPC is a promising crosslinker for a wide range of polymeric materials requiring low nonspecific protein binding.

  12. An autosampling differential scanning calorimeter instrument for studying molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Valerian; Rochalski, Andrew; Brandts, Michael; Brandts, John F; Williston, Samuel; Frasca, Verna; Lin, Lung-Nan

    2002-11-01

    A new ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) instrument is described, which utilizes autosampling for continuous operation. High scanning rates to 250 deg/h with rapid cooling and equilibration between scans facilitates higher sample throughput up to 50 samples during each 24 h of unattended operation. The instrument is suited for those pharmaceutical applications where higher throughput is important, such as screening drug candidates for binding constant or screening solution conditions for stability of liquid protein formulations. Results are presented on the binding of five different anionic inhibitors to ribonuclease A, which included cytidine 2'-monophosphate (2'CMP), 3'CMP, uridine 3'-monophosphate, pyrophosphate, and phosphate. Binding constants K(B) (or dissociation constants K(d)) are obtained from the shift in the transition temperature T(M) for ribonuclease thermal unfolding in the presence of ligand relative to the transition temperature in the absence of ligand. Measured binding constants ranged from 155 M(-1) (K(d) = 6.45 mM) for the weak-binding phosphate anion to 13100 M(-1) (K(d) = 76.3 microM) for the strongest binding ligand, 2'CMP. The DSC method for measuring binding constants can also be extended to ultratight interactions involving either ligand-protein or protein-protein binding.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Barnase: Contribution of Noncovalent Intramolecular Interaction to Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ribonuclease Barnase (RNase Ba is a 12 kD (kilodalton small extracellular ribonuclease. It has broad application prospects in agriculture, clinical medicine, pharmaceutical, and so forth. In this work, the thermal stability of Barnase has been studied using molecular dynamics simulation at different temperatures. The present study focuses on the contribution of noncovalent intramolecular interaction to protein stability and how they affect the thermal stability of the enzyme. Profiles of root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation identify thermostable and thermosensitive regions of Barnase. Analyses of trajectories in terms of secondary structure content, intramolecular hydrogen bonds and salt bridge interactions indicate distinct differences in different temperature simulations. In the simulations, Four three-member salt bridge networks (Asp8-Arg110-Asp12, Arg83-Asp75-Arg87, Lys66-Asp93-Arg69, and Asp54-Lys27-Glu73 have been identified as critical salt bridges for thermostability which are maintained stably at higher temperature enhancing stability of three hydrophobic cores. The study may help enlighten our knowledge of protein structural properties, noncovalent interactions which can stabilize secondary peptide structures or promote folding, and also help understand their actions better. Such an understanding is required for designing efficient enzymes with characteristics for particular applications at desired working temperatures.

  14. Homeopathic medicines do not alter growth and gene expression in prostate and breast cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Gaddipati, Jaya P; Rajeshkumar, N V; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Anoop K; Ives, John A; Maheshwari, Radha K; Jonas, Wayne B

    2006-12-01

    Homeopathy is an alternative medical system practiced in all parts of the world. Although several theories are proposed to explain the mechanisms of action, none are scientifically verified. In this study, the authors investigate the effect of selected homeopathic remedies often used to treat prostate and breast cancer. The authors investigated the effect of the homeopathic medicines Conium maculatum, Sabal serrulata, Thuja occidentalis, Asterias, Phytolacca, and Carcinosin on prostate and breast cancer cell (DU-145, LNCaP, MAT-LyLu, MDA-MB-231) growth and on gene expression that regulates apoptosis, using MTT and multiprobe ribonuclease protection assay. None of the homeopathic remedies tested in different potencies produced significant inhibitory or growth-promoting activity in either prostate or breast cancer cells. Also, gene expression studies by ribonuclease protection assay produced no significant changes in mRNA levels of bax, bcl-2, bcl-x, caspase-1, caspase-2, caspase-3, Fas, or FasL after treatment with homeopathic medicines. The results demonstrate that the highly diluted homeopathic remedies used by homeopathic practitioners for cancer show no measurable effects on cell growth or gene expression in vitro using currently available methodologies.

  15. One-electron reduction reactions with enzymes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisby, R.H.; Cundall, R.B.; Redpath, J.L.; Adams, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    At pH 8 and above, hydrated electrons react with ribonuclease lysozyme and α-chymotrypsin to form transient products whose spectra resemble, but are not identical to, those for the RSSR - radical anion already known for simple disulphides. Assuming a value for the extinction coefficient similar to that for RSSR - in simple disulphides, only a fraction of the hydrated electrons are shown to react with the disulphide bridges: the remainder react at other sites in the protein molecule, such as histidine, tyrosine and, in lysozyme, tryptophan residues, giving rise to comparatively weak optical absorptions between 300 and 400 nm. This has been substantiated by studying the reaction of e - sub(aq) with subtilisin Novo (an enzyme which does not contain disulphide bridges), with enzymes in which the sulphur bridges have been oxidised and with some amino acid derivatives. On lowering the pH of the solution the intensity of the RSSR - absorption diminishes as the protonated histidine residues become the favoured reaction sites. In acid solutions (pH 2 to 3) the transient optical absoptions observed are due to reactions of hydrogen atoms with the aromatic amino acids tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine. The CO - 2 radical anion is only observed to transfer an electron to disulphide groups in ribonuclease, although the effect of repeated pulsing shows that some reaction must occur elsewhere in the protein molecule. In acid solutions, protonation of the electron adduct appears to produce the RSSRH. radical, whose spectrum has a maximum at 340 nm. (author)

  16. Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus Noncoding RNA Production Depends on a 5′→3′ Xrn Exoribonuclease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Flobinus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The RNA3 species of the beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV, a multipartite positive-stranded RNA phytovirus, contains the ‘core’ nucleotide sequence required for its systemic movement in Beta macrocarpa. Within this ‘core’ sequence resides a conserved “coremin” motif of 20 nucleotides that is absolutely essential for long-distance movement. RNA3 undergoes processing steps to yield a noncoding RNA3 (ncRNA3 possessing “coremin” at its 5′ end, a mandatory element for ncRNA3 accumulation. Expression of wild-type (wt or mutated RNA3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae allows for the accumulation of ncRNA3 species. Screening of S. cerevisiae ribonuclease mutants identified the 5′-to-3′ exoribonuclease Xrn1 as a key enzyme in RNA3 processing that was recapitulated both in vitro and in insect cell extracts. Xrn1 stalled on ncRNA3-containing RNA substrates in these decay assays in a similar fashion as the flavivirus Xrn1-resistant structure (sfRNA. Substitution of the BNYVV-RNA3 ‘core’ sequence by the sfRNA sequence led to the accumulation of an ncRNA species in yeast in vitro but not in planta and no viral long distance occurred. Interestingly, XRN4 knockdown reduced BNYVV RNA accumulation suggesting a dual role for the ribonuclease in the viral cycle.

  17. Using enzyme folding to explore the mechanism of therapeutic touch: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Mallory L; Boylan, Helen M

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this research is to design a novel model using protein folding to study Therapeutic Touch, a noncontact form of energy manipulation healing. Presented is a feasibility study suggesting that the denaturation path of ribonuclease A may be a useful model to study the energy exchange underlying therapeutic touch. The folding of ribonuclease A serves as a controlled energy-requiring system in which energy manipulation can be measured by the degree of folding achieved. A kinetic assay and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to assess the enzyme-folding state. The data suggest that the kinetic assay is a useful means of assessing the degree of refolding, and specifically, the enzyme function. However, fluorescence spectroscopy was not shown to be an effective measurement of enzyme structure for the purposes of this work. More research is needed to assess the underlying mechanism of therapeutic touch to complement the existing studies. An enzyme-folding model may provide a useful means of studying the energy exchange in therapeutic touch.

  18. A multi-method approach toward de novo glycan characterization: a Man-5 case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prien, Justin M; Prater, Bradley D; Cockrill, Steven L

    2010-05-01

    Regulatory agencies' expectations for biotherapeutic approval are becoming more stringent with regard to product characterization, where minor species as low as 0.1% of a given profile are typically identified. The mission of this manuscript is to demonstrate a multi-method approach toward de novo glycan characterization and quantitation, including minor species at or approaching the 0.1% benchmark. Recently, unexpected isomers of the Man(5)GlcNAc(2) (M(5)) were reported (Prien JM, Ashline DJ, Lapadula AJ, Zhang H, Reinhold VN. 2009. The high mannose glycans from bovine ribonuclease B isomer characterization by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS). J Am Soc Mass Spectrom. 20:539-556). In the current study, quantitative analysis of these isomers found in commercial M(5) standard demonstrated that they are in low abundance (2-aminobenzoic acid to detect and chromatographically resolve multiple M(5) isomers in bovine ribonuclease B. With this multi-method approach, we have the capabilities to comprehensively characterize a biotherapeutic's glycan array in a de novo manner, including structural isomers at >/=0.1% of the total chromatographic peak area.

  19. Highly efficient destruction of squamous carcinoma cells of the head and neck by photochemical internalization of Ranpirnase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebers, Nora; Holland-Letz, Tim; Welschof, Mona; Høgset, Anders; Jäger, Dirk; Arndt, Michaela A E; Krauss, Jürgen

    2017-11-01

    Photochemical Internalization is a novel drug delivery technology for cancer treatment based on the principle of Photodynamic Treatment. Using a photosensitizer that locates in endocytic vesicles membranes of tumor cells, Photochemical internalization enables cytosolic release of endocytosed antitumor agents in a site-specific manner. The purpose of the present in-vitro study was to explore whether Photochemical Internalization is able to enhance the efficacy of Ranpirnase, a cytotoxic amphibian ribonuclease, for eradication of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Cell viability was measured in 8 primary human cell lines of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after treatment with Ranpirnase and Photochemical Internalization. For Photochemical Internalization the photosensitizer disulfonated tetraphenyl porphine was incubated with tumor cells followed by exposure to blue light (435 nm). Our study demonstrates significant enhancement of antitumor activity of Ranpirnase by Photochemical Internalization. Treatment responses were heterogeneous between the primary cancer cell lines. Combining Photochemical Internalization with Ranpirnase resulted in 4.6 to 1,940-fold increased cytotoxicity when compared with the ribonuclease alone (P Internalization in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

  20. Elevation of D4 dopamine receptor mRNA in postmortem schizophrenic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanis, N C; Bresnick, J N; Kerwin, R W; Schofield, W N; McAllister, G

    1998-01-01

    The D4 dopamine (DA) receptor has been proposed to be a target for the development of a novel antipsychotic drug based on its pharmacological and distribution profile. There is much interest in whether D4 DA receptor levels are altered in schizophrenia, but the lack of an available receptor subtype-specific radioligand made this difficult to quantitate. In this study, we examined whether D4 mRNA levels are altered in different brain regions of schizophrenics compared to controls. Ribonuclease protection assays were carried out on total RNA samples isolated postmortem from frontal cortex and caudate brain regions of schizophrenics and matched controls. 32P-labelled RNA probes to the D4 DA receptor and to the housekeeping gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), were hybridised with the RNA samples, digested with ribonucleases to remove unhybridised probe, and separated on 6% sequencing gels. Densitometer analysis on the subsequent autoradiogams was used to calculate the relative optical density of D4 mRNA compared to G3PDH mRNA. Statistical analysis of the data revealed a 3-fold higher level (P<0.011) of D4 mRNA in the frontal cortex of schizophrenics compared to controls. No increase was seen in caudate. D4 receptors could play a role in mediating dopaminergic activity in frontal cortex, an activity which may be malfunctioning in schizophrenia.

  1. Enhancing Protein Disulfide Bond Cleavage by UV Excitation and Electron Capture Dissociation for Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Li, Huilin; Zhang, Xing; Loo, Rachel R Ogorzalek; Julian, Ryan R; Loo, Joseph A

    2015-11-15

    The application of ion pre-activation with 266 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation combined with electron capture dissociation (ECD) is demonstrated to enhance top-down mass spectrometry sequence coverage of disulfide bond containing proteins. UV-based activation can homolytically cleave a disulfide bond to yield two separated thiol radicals. Activated ECD experiments of insulin and ribonuclease A containing three and four disulfide bonds, respectively, were performed. UV-activation in combination with ECD allowed the three disulfide bonds of insulin to be cleaved and the overall sequence coverage to be increased. For the larger sized ribonuclease A with four disulfide bonds, irradiation from an infrared laser (10.6 µm) to disrupt non-covalent interactions was combined with UV-activation to facilitate the cleavage of up to three disulfide bonds. Preferences for disulfide bond cleavage are dependent on protein structure and sequence. Disulfide bonds can reform if the generated radicals remain in close proximity. By varying the time delay between the UV-activation and the ECD events, it was determined that disulfide bonds reform within 10-100 msec after their UV-homolytic cleavage.

  2. An Interaction between RRP6 and SU(VAR)3-9 Targets RRP6 to Heterochromatin and Contributes to Heterochromatin Maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Andrea B.; Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gañez-Zapater, Antoni; Hessle, Viktoria; Silberberg, Gilad; von Euler, Anne; Silverstein, Rebecca A.; Visa, Neus

    2015-01-01

    RNA surveillance factors are involved in heterochromatin regulation in yeast and plants, but less is known about the possible roles of ribonucleases in the heterochromatin of animal cells. Here we show that RRP6, one of the catalytic subunits of the exosome, is necessary for silencing heterochromatic repeats in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that a fraction of RRP6 is associated with heterochromatin, and the analysis of the RRP6 interaction network revealed physical links between RRP6 and the heterochromatin factors HP1a, SU(VAR)3-9 and RPD3. Moreover, genome-wide studies of RRP6 occupancy in cells depleted of SU(VAR)3-9 demonstrated that SU(VAR)3-9 contributes to the tethering of RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci. Depletion of the exosome ribonucleases RRP6 and DIS3 stabilizes heterochromatic transcripts derived from transposons and repetitive sequences, and renders the heterochromatin less compact, as shown by micrococcal nuclease and proximity-ligation assays. Such depletion also increases the amount of HP1a bound to heterochromatic transcripts. Taken together, our results suggest that SU(VAR)3-9 targets RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci where RRP6 degrades chromatin-associated non-coding RNAs in a process that is necessary to maintain the packaging of the heterochromatin. PMID:26389589

  3. The inactivation of papain by high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisby, R.H.; Cundall, R.B.; Sims, H.E.; Burns, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of varying LET over a wide range (0.2-1570 eV/nm) on the radiation-induced inactivation of the enzyme papain in dilute aqueous solution has been investigated. Measurements of total, reparable and non-reparable inactivation G values in oxygen, nitrous oxide and argon saturated solutions have allowed the contributions to inactivation from radicals and hydrogen peroxide to be evaluated. At high LET the results demonstrate an increasing component due to reaction of the superoxide radical, formed from oxygen produced in the track as a primary radiolysis product. This effect was not observed in our previous study with ribonuclease due to the insensitivity of ribonuclease to inactivation by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. The results obtained with papain clearly demonstrate a maximum in G(H 2 O 2 ) at an LET of equivalent to 140 eV/nm. Generation of O 2 within the track as a primary radiolysis product at high LET now appears to be confirmed as an important mechanism leading to reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio for cellular systems exposed to high LET radiations (Baverstock and Burns 1981). (author)

  4. Structure and evolution of barley powdery mildew effector candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Carsten

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein effectors of pathogenicity are instrumental in modulating host immunity and disease resistance. The powdery mildew pathogen of grasses Blumeria graminis causes one of the most important diseases of cereal crops. B. graminis is an obligate biotrophic pathogen and as such has an absolute requirement to suppress or avoid host immunity if it is to survive and cause disease. Results Here we characterise a superfamily predicted to be the full complement of Candidates for Secreted Effector Proteins (CSEPs in the fungal barley powdery mildew parasite B. graminis f.sp. hordei. The 491 genes encoding these proteins constitute over 7% of this pathogen’s annotated genes and most were grouped into 72 families of up to 59 members. They were predominantly expressed in the intracellular feeding structures called haustoria, and proteins specifically associated with the haustoria were identified by large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomics. There are two major types of effector families: one comprises shorter proteins (100–150 amino acids, with a high relative expression level in the haustoria and evidence of extensive diversifying selection between paralogs; the second type consists of longer proteins (300–400 amino acids, with lower levels of differential expression and evidence of purifying selection between paralogs. An analysis of the predicted protein structures underscores their overall similarity to known fungal effectors, but also highlights unexpected structural affinities to ribonucleases throughout the entire effector super-family. Candidate effector genes belonging to the same family are loosely clustered in the genome and are associated with repetitive DNA derived from retro-transposons. Conclusions We employed the full complement of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses as well as structural prediction methods to identify and characterize the members of the CSEPs superfamily in B. graminis f

  5. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Eman M.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2018-01-01

    The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays) against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanideratum). The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays) for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169) exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73) of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169) of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl) and 62% (104/169) secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated cucurbits

  6. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Khalaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanideratum. The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169 exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73 of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169 of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl and 62% (104/169 secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated

  7. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Khalaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanidermatum. The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169 exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73 of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169 of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl and 62% (104/169 secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated

  8. Germ line transmission of a yeast artificial chromosome spanning the murine [alpha][sub 1](I) collagen locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, W.M.; Dausman, J.; Beard, C.; Jaenisch, R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Johnson, C.; Lawrence, J.B. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (United States))

    1993-03-26

    Molecular complementation of mutant phenotypes by transgenic technology is a potentially important tool for gene identification. A technology was developed to allow the transfer of a physically intact yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) into the germ line of the mouse. A purified 150-kilobase YAC encompassing the murine gene Col1a1 was efficiently introduced into embryonic stem (ES) cells via lipofection. Chimeric founder mice were derived from two transfected ES cell clones. These chimeras transmitted the full length transgene through the germ line, generating two transgenic mouse strains. Transgene expression was visualized as nascent transcripts in interphase nuclei and quantitated by ribonuclease protection analysis. Both assays indicated that the transgene was expressed at levels comparable to the endogenous collagen gene. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Modular architecture of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP revealed by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Katharina; Galani, Kyriaki; Batisse, Claire; Prinz, Simone; Böttcher, Bettina

    2012-04-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein enzymes, which process RNA substrates including tRNA precursors for RNase P and 5.8 S rRNA precursors, as well as some mRNAs, for RNase MRP. The structures of RNase P and RNase MRP have not yet been solved, so it is unclear how the proteins contribute to the structure of the complexes and how substrate specificity is determined. Using electron microscopy and image processing we show that eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP have a modular architecture, where proteins stabilize the RNA fold and contribute to cavities, channels and chambers between the modules. Such features are located at strategic positions for substrate recognition by shape and coordination of the cleaved-off sequence. These are also the sites of greatest difference between RNase P and RNase MRP, highlighting the importance of the adaptation of this region to the different substrates.

  10. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA–protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA–protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes. PMID:22332141

  11. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  12. Conserved and variable domains of RNase MRP RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila López, Marcela; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Samuelsson, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is a eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of one RNA molecule and 7-10 protein subunits. One important function of MRP is to catalyze an endonucleolytic cleavage during processing of rRNA precursors. RNase MRP is evolutionary related to RNase P which is critical for tRNA processing. A large number of MRP RNA sequences that now are available have been used to identify conserved primary and secondary structure features of the molecule. MRP RNA has structural features in common with P RNA such as a conserved catalytic core, but it also has unique features and is characterized by a domain highly variable between species. Information regarding primary and secondary structure features is of interest not only in basic studies of the function of MRP RNA, but also because mutations in the RNA give rise to human genetic diseases such as cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

  13. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA-protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  14. Collective dynamics of protein hydration water by brillouin neutron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; De Francesco, Alessio; Petrillo, Caterina; Sacchetti, Francesco

    2009-04-08

    By a detailed experimental study of THz dynamics in the ribonuclease protein, we could detect the propagation of coherent collective density fluctuations within the protein hydration shell. The emerging picture indicates the presence of both a dispersing mode, traveling with a speed greater than 3000 m/s, and a nondispersing one, characterized by an almost constant energy of 6-7 meV. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2002, 89, 275501], the features of the dispersion curves closely resemble those observed in pure liquid water [Phys. Rev. E: Stat. Phys., Plasmas, Fluids, Relat. Interdiscip. Top. 2004, 69, 061203]. On the contrary, the observed damping factors are much larger than in bulk water, with the dispersing mode becoming overdamped at Q = 0.6 A(-1) already. Such novel experimental findings are discussed as a dynamic signature of the disordering effect induced by the protein surface on the local structure of water.

  15. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor α-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use

  16. AcEST: BP912187 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 Definition sp|P70079|KCRU_CHICK Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondrial OS=Ga...gnments: (bits) Value sp|P70079|KCRU_CHICK Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondr...ial O... 34 0.33 sp|Q9TTK8|KCRU_BOVIN Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondrial O... 33 0.74 sp|P46430|GSTT1...NH_SHESA Ribonuclease H OS=Shewanella sp. (strain ANA... 32 1.7 sp|P12532|KCRU_HUMAN Creatine kinase, ubiqui...tous mitochondrial O... 31 2.2 sp|P25809|KCRU_RAT Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondrial OS=... 31 2.8 sp|P30275|KCRU_MOUSE Creati

  17. Primer retention owing to the absence of RNase H1 is catastrophic for mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J Bradley; Akman, Gokhan; Wood, Stuart R; Sakhuja, Kiran; Cerritelli, Susana M; Moss, Chloe; Bowmaker, Mark R; Jacobs, Howard T; Crouch, Robert J; Holt, Ian J

    2015-07-28

    Encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, and its function is essential for mitochondrial DNA maintenance in the developing mouse. Here we define the role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication. Analysis of replicating mitochondrial DNA in embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase H1 reveals retention of three primers in the major noncoding region (NCR) and one at the prominent lagging-strand initiation site termed Ori-L. Primer retention does not lead immediately to depletion, as the persistent RNA is fully incorporated in mitochondrial DNA. However, the retained primers present an obstacle to the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ in subsequent rounds of replication and lead to the catastrophic generation of a double-strand break at the origin when the resulting gapped molecules are copied. Hence, the essential role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication is the removal of primers at the origin of replication.

  18. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine

    2015-01-01

    ) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer......Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA......-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer...

  19. A new technique of ion beam tritium labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Nianbao; Sheng Shugang; Yao Fuzeng

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a new technique is reported for tritium labelling of proteins, peptides and other nonvolatile organic compounds. A tritium ion beam is accelerated to bombard solid sample target for producing tritium exchange with hydrogen. The tritium labelling method has been applied to tritiated soybean trypsin inhibitor, ribonuclease A, elastin, pachyman and others totalled 11. After purifying by dialysis, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration, the tritiated proteins and polysaccharide were obtained with specific activity over 37 GBq/mmol, without decomposition and with biological activity well preserved. By amino acid analysis of tritiated protein it was shown that the relative specific radioactivities for His., Tyr. and Phe. residues were higher while those for Val., Ile. and Ser. residues were lower

  20. A new technique for ion beam tritium labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Nianbao; Sheng Shugang; Yao Fuzeng

    1990-06-01

    An advanced technique, the ion beam tritium labelling method (IBTL), used for labelling proteins, peptides and other nonvolatile organic compounds is introduced. In this method the excited tritium ion beam is accelerated and then bombs a solid sample target in which tritium exchanging for hydrogen is taken place. The IBTL has been used for preparation of tritiated soybean trypsin inhibitor, ribonuclease A, elastin and pachyman etc. After purifing by dialysis, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration, the tritiated proteins and polysaccharide were obtained with the specific activity over 37 GBq/mmol, the function of tritiated decomposition products was not found. The product was shown to have native biological activity. Amino acid analysis of tritiated protein showed that the relative specific radioactivities were higher for His., Tyr. and Phe. but lower for Val., Ile. and Ser

  1. Studies in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis: A Personal Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, A R

    2007-06-01

    By the early 1970s it had became apparent that the solid phase synthesis of ribonuclease A could not be generalized. Consequently, virtually every aspect of solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) was reexamined and improved during the decade of the 1970s. The sensitive detection and elimination of possible side reactions (amino acid insertion, N{sup {alpha}}-trifluoroacetylation, N{sup {alpha}{var_epsilon}}-alkylation) was examined. The quantitation of coupling efficiency in SPPS as a function of chain length was studied. A new and improved support for SPPS, the 'PAM-resin', was prepared and evaluated. These and many other studies from the Merrifield laboratory and elsewhere increased the general acceptance of SPPS leading to the 1984 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Bruce Merrifield.

  2. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2012-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Comparison of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA and the subcellular distribution of their proteins in normal human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Gustafson, W. C.; Thompson, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Basal, "insulin-independent" glucose uptake into skeletal muscle is provided by glucose transporters positioned at the plasma membrane. The relative amount of the three glucose transporters expressed in muscle has not been previously quantified. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) methods, we found in normal human muscle that GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA were expressed at 90 +/- 10, 46 +/- 4, and 156 +/- 12 copies/ng RNA, respectively. Muscle was fractionated by DNase digestion and differential sedimentation into membrane fractions enriched in plasma membranes (PM) or low-density microsomes (LDM). GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins were distributed 57% to 67% in LDM, whereas GLUT3 protein was at least 88% in the PM-enriched fractions. These data suggest that basal glucose uptake into resting human muscle could be provided in part by each of these three isoforms.

  4. Metabolic clearance of insulin from the cerebrospinal fluid in the anesthetized rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manin, M.; Broer, Y.; Balage, M.; Rostene, W.; Grizard, J.

    1990-01-01

    Infusion of 125I-(Tyr A14)-insulin at tracer doses into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulted in a slow rate of increase in the CSF-labeled insulin during the first 2 hours with a plateau thereafter. Labeled insulin was cleared from the CSF at a higher rate than 3H-inulin, a marker of CSF bulk flow. The labeled insulin was mainly distributed in all the ventricular and periventricular brain regions. Small amounts of degraded insulin appeared in the CSF. Coinfusion with an excess of unlabeled insulin impaired the clearance and degradation of labeled insulin. It also inhibited the labeling in medial hypothalamus, olfactory bulbs and brain stem. In contrast, coinfusion of ribonuclease B (used to test the specificity of uptake) was without any effect. It was concluded that there is an active insulin intake from CSF into brain specific compartments that is presumably essential for the effects of insulin on brain function

  5. TCA precipitation and ethanol/HCl single-step purification evaluation: One-dimensional gel electrophoresis, bradford assays, spectrofluorometry and Raman spectroscopy data on HSA, Rnase, lysozyme - Mascots and Skyline data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balkis Eddhif

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here are related to the research paper entitled “Study of a Novel Agent for TCA Precipitated Proteins Washing - Comprehensive Insights into the Role of Ethanol/HCl on Molten Globule State by Multi-Spectroscopic Analyses” (Eddhif et al., submitted for publication [1]. The suitability of ethanol/HCl for the washing of TCA-precipitated proteins was first investigated on standard solution of HSA, cellulase, ribonuclease and lysozyme. Recoveries were assessed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Bradford assays and UPLC-HRMS. The mechanistic that triggers protein conformational changes at each purification stage was then investigated by Raman spectroscopy and spectrofluorometry. Finally, the efficiency of the method was evaluated on three different complex samples (mouse liver, river biofilm, loamy soil surface. Proteins profiling was assessed by gel electrophoresis and by UPLC-HRMS.

  6. Differential regulation of renal prostaglandin receptor mRNAs by dietary salt intake in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Mann, Birgitte; Skøtt, O

    1999-01-01

    and cells by ribonuclease protection assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Functional correlates were studied by measurement of PGE2-induced cAMP formation and renin secretion in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells isolated from animals on various salt intakes. RESULTS: EP1 and EP3......BACKGROUND: In this study, we tested the hypothesis that prostaglandin (PG) receptor expression in the rat kidney is subject to physiological regulation by dietary salt intake. METHODS: Rats were fed diets with 0.02 or 4% NaCl for two weeks. PG receptor expression was assayed in kidney regions...... did not affect the expression of EP1 or IP receptors, whereas EP4 transcripts in glomeruli were increased twofold by salt deprivation. Consistent with this, we found that PGE2-evoked cAMP production and renin secretion by JG cells from salt-deprived animals were significantly higher compared...

  7. Schistosome-derived omega-1 drives Th2 polarization by suppressing protein synthesis following internalization by the mannose receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Bart; Hussaarts, Leonie; Driessen, Nicole N.; Meevissen, Moniek H.J.; Schramm, Gabriele; van der Ham, Alwin J.; van der Hoeven, Barbara; Scholzen, Thomas; Burgdorf, Sven; Mohrs, Markus; Pearce, Edward J.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Haas, Helmut; Smits, Hermelijn H.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-1, a glycosylated T2 ribonuclease (RNase) secreted by Schistosoma mansoni eggs and abundantly present in soluble egg antigen, has recently been shown to condition dendritic cells (DCs) to prime Th2 responses. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unknown. We show in this study by site-directed mutagenesis of omega-1 that both the glycosylation and the RNase activity are essential to condition DCs for Th2 polarization. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that omega-1 is bound and internalized via its glycans by the mannose receptor (MR) and subsequently impairs protein synthesis by degrading both ribosomal and messenger RNA. These experiments reveal an unrecognized pathway involving MR and interference with protein synthesis that conditions DCs for Th2 priming. PMID:22966004

  8. A376S in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers increased risk of virological failure to nevirapine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paredes, Roger; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Bannister, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Background. The clinical relevance of mutations in the connection subdomain and the ribonuclease (RNase) H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is uncertain. Methods. The risk of virological failure to nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was evaluated...... in NNRTI-naive patients who started NNRTIs in the EuroSIDA study after July 1997 according to preexisting substitutions in the connection subdomain and the RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. An observed association between A376S and virological failure was further investigated by testing in vitro NNRTI...... = .013). A376S conferred selective low-level nevirapine resistance in vitro, and led to greater affinity for double-stranded DNA. Conclusions. The A376S substitution in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 RT causes selective nevirapine resistance and confers an increased risk of virological failure...

  9. Energy transfer mechanisms in photobiological reactions. Final report, 1 April 1960--31 March 1979. [Photodynamic processes in selected biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spikes, J.D.

    1979-03-31

    This project was concerned primarily with studies of the mechanisms of the sensitized photooxidation of selected biomolecules using a variety of phtosensitizers. Such reactions are often termed photodynamic processes. In particular we have carried out steady-state kinetic studies, flash photolysis and spectral studies, and product formation studies of the sensitized photooxidation of the five susceptible amino acids (cycteine, histidine, methonine, tryptophan, and tyrosine) and their derivatives, as well as purines and pyrimidines. A number of studies were also carried out on the mechanisms of the photodynamic inactivation of enzymes (trypsin, ribonuclease, lysozyme). Mechanism of photosensitization were studied using a variety of sensitizers including flavins, porphyrins, and a number of synthetic dyes (substituted fluoresceins, acridines, thyazines).

  10. Isolation of a cDNA for a Growth Factor of Vascular Endothelial Cells from Human Lung Cancer Cells: Its Identity with Insulin‐like Growth Factor II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Koichi; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Tobita, Masato; Kikyo, Nobuaki; Yazaki, Yoshio

    1995-01-01

    We have found growth‐promoting activity for vascular endothelial cells in the conditioned medium of a human lung cancer cell line, T3M‐11. Purification and characterization of the growth‐promoting activity have been carried out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel‐exclusion chromatography. The activity migrated as a single peak just after ribonuclease. It did not bind to a heparin affinity column. These results suggest that the activity is not a heparin‐binding growth factor (including fibroblast growth factors) or a vascular endothelial growth factor. To identify the molecule exhibiting the growth‐promoting activity, a cDNA encoding the growth factor was isolated through functional expression cloning in COS‐1 cells from a cDNA library prepared from T3M‐11 cells. The nucleotide sequence encoded by the cDNA proved to be identical with that of insulin‐like growth factor II. PMID:7730145

  11. Comparison of the thermal stabilization of proteins by oligosaccharides and monosaccharide mixtures: Measurement and analysis in the context of excluded volume theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Ilyas; Minton, Allen P; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2018-06-01

    The thermal stability of apo α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and lysozyme was measured in the presence of mixtures of glucose, fructose, and galactose. Mixtures of these monosaccharides in the appropriate stoichiometric ratio were found to have a greater stabilizing effect on each of the two proteins than equal weight/volume concentrations of di- tri- and tetrasaccharides with identical subunit composition (sucrose, trehalose, raffinose, and stachyose). The excluded volume model for the effect of a single saccharide on the stability of a protein previously proposed by Beg et al. [Biochemistry 54 (2015) 3594] was extended to treat the case of saccharide mixtures. The extended model predicts quantitatively the stabilizing effect of all monosaccharide mixtures on α-LA and lysozyme reported here, as well as previously published results obtained for ribonuclease A [Biophys. Chem. 138 (2008) 120] to within experimental uncertainty. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Isolation of a cotton NADP(H oxidase homologue induced by drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEPOMUCENO ALEXANDRE LIMA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify and isolate genes that are differentially expressed in four selected cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. genotypes contrasting according to their tolerance to water deficit. The genotypes studied were Siokra L-23, Stoneville 506, CS 50 and T-1521. Physiological, morphological and developmental changes that confer drought tolerance in plants must have a molecular genetic basis. To identify and isolate the genes, the mRNA Differential Display (DD technique was used. Messenger RNAs differentially expressed during water deficit were identified, isolated, cloned and sequenced. The cloned transcript A12B15-5, a NADP(H oxidase homologue, was up regulated only during the water deficit stress and only in Siokra L-23, a drought tolerant genotype. Ribonuclease protection assay confirmed that transcription.

  14. Detection of Reaction Intermediates in Mg2+-Dependent DNA Synthesis and RNA Degradation by Time-Resolved X-Ray Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Nadine L; Gao, Yang; Wu, Jinjun; Yang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Structures of enzyme-substrate/product complexes have been studied for over four decades but have been limited to either before or after a chemical reaction. Recently using in crystallo catalysis combined with X-ray diffraction, we have discovered that many enzymatic reactions in nucleic acid metabolism require additional metal ion cofactors that are not present in the substrate or product state. By controlling metal ions essential for catalysis, the in crystallo approach has revealed unprecedented details of reaction intermediates. Here we present protocols used for successful studies of Mg 2+ -dependent DNA polymerases and ribonucleases that are applicable to analyses of a variety of metal ion-dependent reactions. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Incorporation of uridine-H3 into healthy and tobacco necrosis virus-infected mesophyll cells of Chenopodium amaranticolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccioli, G.; Rubies-Autonel, C.

    1975-01-01

    Tritiated uridine was selectively incorporated into the nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm of actinomycin D-treated Chenopodium amaranticolor cells locally infected with a strain of tobacco necrosis virus (TNV), 3 days after inoculation. Healthy cells did not show such an incorporation. Chloroplasts, in both types of cells, were free of label. Treatment with pancreatic ribonuclease removed the label completely in the majority of nuclei and nucleoli of infected cells. Since infectivity tests showed that AMD treatment increased virus multiplication by 10-12%, it is conceivable to think that the incorporation observed was due to virus synthesis. Preliminary infectivity experiments also showed that treatment of the cells with cycloheximide inhibited virus multiplication up to 80%, while chloramphenicol increased such multiplication. Our results lead to the conclusion that nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm but not chloroplasts are the sites involved in the synthesis of TNV. (orig.) [de

  16. Crystal structure and functional characterization of SF216 from Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Neul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Yoo-Sup; Won, Hyung-Sik; Seo, Min-Duk

    2017-11-01

    Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes highly infectious bacterial dysentery in humans. Here, we solved the crystal structure of SF216, a hypothetical protein from the S. flexneri 5a strain M90T, at 1.7 Å resolution. The crystal structure of SF216 represents a homotrimer stabilized by intersubunit interactions and ion-mediated electrostatic interactions. Each subunit consists of three β-strands and five α-helices with the β-β-β-α-α-α-α-α topology. Based on the structural information, we also demonstrate that SF216 shows weak ribonuclease activity by a fluorescence quenching assay. Furthermore, we identify potential druggable pockets (putative hot spots) on the surface of the SF216 structure by computational mapping. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Nucleic acids--genes, drugs, molecular lego and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Chemically modified nucleic acids find widespread use as tools in research, as diagnostic reagents and even as pharmaceutical compounds. On the background of antisense research and development, the synthesis and evaluation of modified oligonucleotides was intensively pursued in the early to mid nineties in corporate research of former Ciba. Most of these efforts concentrated on the development of sugar and/or backbone-modified derivatives for pharmaceutical applications. Additionally, oligonucleotide metal conjugates were investigated with the goal to develop artificial ribonucleases. Since the turn of the millennium also the potential of non-nucleosidic and non-hydrogen bonding building blocks has increasingly been recognized. Such derivatives possess unique properties that may have an impact in the fields of materials and genetic research. In this brief account, we take a personal look back on some past as well as some recent results.

  18. Fluorescence-based high-throughput screening of dicer cleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Katerina; Sedlak, David; Bartunek, Petr; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Production of small RNAs by ribonuclease III Dicer is a key step in microRNA and RNA interference pathways, which employ Dicer-produced small RNAs as sequence-specific silencing guides. Further studies and manipulations of microRNA and RNA interference pathways would benefit from identification of small-molecule modulators. Here, we report a study of a fluorescence-based in vitro Dicer cleavage assay, which was adapted for high-throughput screening. The kinetic assay can be performed under single-turnover conditions (35 nM substrate and 70 nM Dicer) in a small volume (5 µL), which makes it suitable for high-throughput screening in a 1536-well format. As a proof of principle, a small library of bioactive compounds was analyzed, demonstrating potential of the assay.

  19. Cell extracts of propionic acid bacteria reactivate cells of Escherichia coli inactivated by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, L.I.; Nikitenko, G.V.; Khodzhaev, E.Yu.; Ponomareva, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Cell extracts of three Propionibacterium shermanii strains were shown to exert a reactivating effect on cells of E. coli AB 1157 inactivated by ultraviolet radiation. The reactivating effect was revealed after both preincubation and postincubation of the irradiated cells with the extracts. The effect increased with a decrease of the survival rate within the range of 1.8-0.006%. The protective factor (or factors) is dialyzable and thermolabile; it was detected both in the fraction of soluble proteins and in the fraction of nucleoproteins and nucleic acids. The protective properties of dialyzate disappear after incubation with proteinase K and trypsin, decrease after incubation with α-amylase, deoxyribonuclease-1, or ribonuclease, and do not change under the influence of lipase. The reactivating factor is believed to be of a polypeptide nature

  20. Molecular computation: RNA solutions to chess problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulhammer, D; Cukras, A R; Lipton, R J; Landweber, L F

    2000-02-15

    We have expanded the field of "DNA computers" to RNA and present a general approach for the solution of satisfiability problems. As an example, we consider a variant of the "Knight problem," which asks generally what configurations of knights can one place on an n x n chess board such that no knight is attacking any other knight on the board. Using specific ribonuclease digestion to manipulate strands of a 10-bit binary RNA library, we developed a molecular algorithm and applied it to a 3 x 3 chessboard as a 9-bit instance of this problem. Here, the nine spaces on the board correspond to nine "bits" or placeholders in a combinatorial RNA library. We recovered a set of "winning" molecules that describe solutions to this problem.

  1. Transcriptome wide annotation of eukaryotic RNase III reactivity and degradation signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Gagnon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Detection and validation of the RNA degradation signals controlling transcriptome stability are essential steps for understanding how cells regulate gene expression. Here we present complete genomic and biochemical annotations of the signals required for RNA degradation by the dsRNA specific ribonuclease III (Rnt1p and examine its impact on transcriptome expression. Rnt1p cleavage signals are randomly distributed in the yeast genome, and encompass a wide variety of sequences, indicating that transcriptome stability is not determined by the recurrence of a fixed cleavage motif. Instead, RNA reactivity is defined by the sequence and structural context in which the cleavage sites are located. Reactive signals are often associated with transiently expressed genes, and their impact on RNA expression is linked to growth conditions. Together, the data suggest that Rnt1p reactivity is triggered by malleable RNA degradation signals that permit dynamic response to changes in growth conditions.

  2. Transcriptome Wide Annotation of Eukaryotic RNase III Reactivity and Degradation Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jules; Lavoie, Mathieu; Catala, Mathieu; Malenfant, Francis; Elela, Sherif Abou

    2015-01-01

    Detection and validation of the RNA degradation signals controlling transcriptome stability are essential steps for understanding how cells regulate gene expression. Here we present complete genomic and biochemical annotations of the signals required for RNA degradation by the dsRNA specific ribonuclease III (Rnt1p) and examine its impact on transcriptome expression. Rnt1p cleavage signals are randomly distributed in the yeast genome, and encompass a wide variety of sequences, indicating that transcriptome stability is not determined by the recurrence of a fixed cleavage motif. Instead, RNA reactivity is defined by the sequence and structural context in which the cleavage sites are located. Reactive signals are often associated with transiently expressed genes, and their impact on RNA expression is linked to growth conditions. Together, the data suggest that Rnt1p reactivity is triggered by malleable RNA degradation signals that permit dynamic response to changes in growth conditions. PMID:25680180

  3. Systemic signature of the lung response to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus is a frequent cause of severe bronchiolitis in children. To improve our understanding of systemic host responses to RSV, we compared BALB/c mouse gene expression responses at day 1, 2, and 5 during primary RSV infection in lung, bronchial lymph nodes, and blood. We identified a set of 53 interferon-associated and innate immunity genes that give correlated responses in all three murine tissues. Additionally, we identified blood gene signatures that are indicative of acute infection, secondary immune response, and vaccine-enhanced disease, respectively. Eosinophil-associated ribonucleases were characteristic for the vaccine-enhanced disease blood signature. These results indicate that it may be possible to distinguish protective and unfavorable patient lung responses via blood diagnostics.

  4. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  5. Dicer Is Required for Normal Cerebellar Development and to Restrain Medulloblastoma Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Zindy

    Full Text Available Dicer, a ribonuclease III enzyme, is required for the maturation of microRNAs. To assess its role in cerebellar and medulloblastoma development, we genetically deleted Dicer in Nestin-positive neural progenitors and in mice lacking one copy for the Sonic Hedgehog receptor, Patched 1. We found that conditional loss of Dicer in mouse neural progenitors induced massive Trp53-independent apoptosis in all proliferative zones of the brain and decreased proliferation of cerebellar granule progenitors at embryonic day 15.5 leading to abnormal cerebellar development and perinatal lethality. Loss of one copy of Dicer significantly accelerated the formation of mouse medulloblastoma of the Sonic Hedgehog subgroup in Patched1-heterozygous mice. We conclude that Dicer is required for proper cerebellar development, and to restrain medulloblastoma formation.

  6. Fbs1 protects the malfolded glycoproteins from the attack of peptide:N-glycanase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Hirao, Takeshi; Sakata, Eri; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kurimoto, Eiji; Yoshida, Yukiko; Suzuki, Tadashi; Tanaka, Keiji; Kato, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Fbs1 is a cytosolic lectin putatively operating as a chaperone as well as a substrate-recognition subunit of the SCF Fbs1 ubiquitin ligase complex. To provide structural and functional basis of preferential binding of Fbs1 to unfolded glycoproteins, we herein characterize the interaction of Fbs1 with a heptapeptide carrying Man 3 GlcNAc 2 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and other biochemical methods. Inspection of the NMR data obtained by use of the isotopically labeled glycopeptide indicated that Fbs1 interacts with sugar-peptide junctions, which are shielded in native glycoprotein, in many cases, but become accessible to Fbs1 in unfolded glycoproteins. Furthermore, Fbs1 was shown to inhibit deglycosylation of denatured ribonuclease B by a cytosolic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase). On the basis of these data, we suggest that Fbs1 captures malfolded glycoproteins, protecting them from the attack of PNGase, during the chaperoning or ubiquitinating operation in the cytosol

  7. Removal of hepatitis C virus-infected cells by a zymogenized bacterial toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Shapira

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and has become a global health threat. No HCV vaccine is currently available and treatment with antiviral therapy is associated with adverse side effects. Moreover, there is no preventive therapy for recurrent hepatitis C post liver transplantation. The NS3 serine protease is necessary for HCV replication and represents a prime target for developing anti HCV therapies. Recently we described a therapeutic approach for eradication of HCV infected cells that is based on protein delivery of two NS3 protease-activatable recombinant toxins we named "zymoxins". These toxins were inactivated by fusion to rationally designed inhibitory peptides via NS3-cleavable linkers. Once delivered to cells where NS3 protease is present, the inhibitory peptide is removed resulting in re-activation of cytotoxic activity. The zymoxins we described suffered from two limitations: they required high levels of protease for activation and had basal activities in the un-activated form that resulted in a narrow potential therapeutic window. Here, we present a solution that overcame the major limitations of the "first generation zymoxins" by converting MazF ribonuclease, the toxic component of the E. coli chromosomal MazEF toxin-antitoxin system, into an NS3-activated zymoxin that is introduced to cells by means of gene delivery. We constructed an expression cassette that encodes for a single polypeptide that incorporates both the toxin and a fragment of its potent natural antidote, MazE, linked via an NS3-cleavable linker. While covalently paired to its inhibitor, the ribonuclease is well tolerated when expressed in naïve, healthy cells. In contrast, activating proteolysis that is induced by even low levels of NS3, results in an eradication of NS3 expressing model cells and HCV infected cells. Zymoxins may thus become a valuable tool in eradicating cells infected by intracellular pathogens that

  8. Removal of Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Cells by a Zymogenized Bacterial Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Assaf; Shapira, Shiran; Gal-Tanamy, Meital; Zemel, Romy; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Benhar, Itai

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and has become a global health threat. No HCV vaccine is currently available and treatment with antiviral therapy is associated with adverse side effects. Moreover, there is no preventive therapy for recurrent hepatitis C post liver transplantation. The NS3 serine protease is necessary for HCV replication and represents a prime target for developing anti HCV therapies. Recently we described a therapeutic approach for eradication of HCV infected cells that is based on protein delivery of two NS3 protease-activatable recombinant toxins we named “zymoxins”. These toxins were inactivated by fusion to rationally designed inhibitory peptides via NS3-cleavable linkers. Once delivered to cells where NS3 protease is present, the inhibitory peptide is removed resulting in re-activation of cytotoxic activity. The zymoxins we described suffered from two limitations: they required high levels of protease for activation and had basal activities in the un-activated form that resulted in a narrow potential therapeutic window. Here, we present a solution that overcame the major limitations of the “first generation zymoxins” by converting MazF ribonuclease, the toxic component of the E. coli chromosomal MazEF toxin-antitoxin system, into an NS3-activated zymoxin that is introduced to cells by means of gene delivery. We constructed an expression cassette that encodes for a single polypeptide that incorporates both the toxin and a fragment of its potent natural antidote, MazE, linked via an NS3-cleavable linker. While covalently paired to its inhibitor, the ribonuclease is well tolerated when expressed in naïve, healthy cells. In contrast, activating proteolysis that is induced by even low levels of NS3, results in an eradication of NS3 expressing model cells and HCV infected cells. Zymoxins may thus become a valuable tool in eradicating cells infected by intracellular pathogens that express

  9. Barnase as a new therapeutic agent triggering apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Edelweiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNases are currently studied as non-mutagenic alternatives to the harmful DNA-damaging anticancer drugs commonly used in clinical practice. Many mammalian RNases are not potent toxins due to the strong inhibition by ribonuclease inhibitor (RI presented in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In search of new effective anticancer RNases we studied the effects of barnase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, on human cancer cells. We found that barnase is resistant to RI. In MTT cell viability assay, barnase was cytotoxic to human carcinoma cell lines with half-inhibitory concentrations (IC(50 ranging from 0.2 to 13 microM and to leukemia cell lines with IC(50 values ranging from 2.4 to 82 microM. Also, we characterized the cytotoxic effects of barnase-based immunoRNase scFv 4D5-dibarnase, which consists of two barnase molecules serially fused to the single-chain variable fragment (scFv of humanized antibody 4D5 that recognizes the extracellular domain of cancer marker HER2. The scFv 4D5-dibarnase specifically bound to HER2-positive cells and was internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis. The intracellular localization of internalized scFv 4D5-dibarnase was determined by electronic microscopy. The cytotoxic effect of scFv 4D5-dibarnase on HER2-positive human ovarian carcinoma SKOV-3 cells (IC(50 = 1.8 nM was three orders of magnitude greater than that of barnase alone. Both barnase and scFv 4D5-dibarnase induced apoptosis in SKOV-3 cells accompanied by internucleosomal chromatin fragmentation, membrane blebbing, the appearance of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, and the activation of caspase-3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that barnase is a potent toxic agent for targeting to cancer cells.

  10. In-Depth Characterization of Protein Disulfide Bonds by Online Liquid Chromatography-Electrochemistry-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzar, Linda; Nicolardi, Simone; Rutten, Julie W.; Oberstein, Saskia A. J. Lesnik; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are an important class of protein post-translational modifications, yet this structurally crucial modification type is commonly overlooked in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches. Recently, the benefits of online electrochemistry-assisted reduction of protein S-S bonds prior to MS analysis were exemplified by successful characterization of disulfide bonds in peptides and small proteins. In the current study, we have combined liquid chromatography (LC) with electrochemistry (EC) and mass analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS in an online LC-EC-MS platform to characterize protein disulfide bonds in a bottom-up proteomics workflow. A key advantage of a LC-based strategy is the use of the retention time in identifying both intra- and interpeptide disulfide bonds. This is demonstrated by performing two sequential analyses of a certain protein digest, once without and once with electrochemical reduction. In this way, the "parent" disulfide-linked peptide detected in the first run has a retention time-based correlation with the EC-reduced peptides detected in the second run, thus simplifying disulfide bond mapping. Using this platform, both inter- and intra-disulfide-linked peptides were characterized in two different proteins, ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B. In order to prevent disulfide reshuffling during the digestion process, proteins were digested at a relatively low pH, using (a combination of) the high specificity proteases trypsin and Glu-C. With this approach, disulfide bonds in ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B were comprehensively identified and localized, showing that online LC-EC-MS is a useful tool for the characterization of protein disulfide bonds.

  11. Characterization of pneumococcal purpura-producing principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, C; Kreger, A

    1980-07-01

    Purpura was grossly observable in albino mice 6 to 8 h after the intraperitoneal injection of sterile, deoxyribonuclease-treated, cell-free extracts prepared by sodium deoxycholate-induced lysis, sonic disruption, Parr bomb treatment, autolysis without sodium deoxycholate, or alternate freezing and thawing of washed suspensions of Streptococcus pneumoniae type I. Cell-free extracts obtained from sonically disrupted, heat-killed cells (100 degrees C for 20 min) did not contain purpurogenic activity. The reaction was maximal at approximately 24 h postinjection, started to fade slowly after 24 to 48 h, and usually was not grossly observable by 4 to 6 days postinjection. The purpura-producing principle (PPP) in the cell-free extract was purified by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, protamine sulfate precipitation, Sepharose 6B gel filtration, wheat germ lectin-Sepharose 6MB affinity chromatography, ribonuclease and trypsin treatment, and a second Sepharose 6B gel filtration step. The final preparation (i) contained glucosamine (5.6%), muramic acid (8.0%), neutral carbohydrate (12.8%), phosphate (8.0%), orcinol-reactive material (6.0%), and Lowry-reactive material (1.6%), and (ii) was free of detectable amounts of deoxyribonucleic acid, capsular polysaccharide, neuraminidase, cytolysin, and hyaluronidase. The isoelectric point and molecular size of the PPP were approximately pI 3.0 and several million daltons, respectively, and the activity remained in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation for 1 day at 105,000 x g. PPP activity was destroyed by incubation with egg white lysozyme and sodium metaperiodate but was resistant to trypsin, pronase, alpha-amylase, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, alkaline phosphatase, pancreatic lipase, 7% trichloroacetic acid, 6 M urea, autoclaving (121 degrees C) for 30 min, and mild acid and alkali exposure. Our observations indicate that the PPP requires intact beta-1,4-glucosidic linkages for activity and support the working

  12. A PR-4 gene identified from Malus domestica is involved in the defense responses against Botryosphaeria dothidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Suhua; Dong, Chaohua; Li, Baohua; Dai, Hongyi

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related protein-4 (PR-4) family is a group of proteins with a Barwin domain in C-terminus and generally thought to be involved in plant defense responses. However, their detailed roles are poorly understood in defense of apple plant against pathogenic infection. In the present study, a new PR-4 gene (designated as MdPR-4) was identified from Malus domestica, and its roles in defense responses of apple were investigated. The open reading frame of MdPR-4 gene is of 447 bp encoding a protein of 148 amino acids with a Barwin domain in C-terminus and a signal peptide of 26 amino acids in N-terminus. Sequence and structural analysis indicated that MdPR-4 protein belongs to class II of PR-4 family. The high-level expression of MdPR-4 was observed in flowers and leaves as revealed by quantitative real time PCR. The temporal expression analysis demonstrated that MdPR-4 expression could be up-regulated by Botryosphaeria dothidea infection and salicylic acid (SA) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment, but suppressed by diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DIECA). In vitro assays, recombinant MdPR-4 protein exhibited ribonuclease activity specific for single strand RNA and significant inhibition to hyphal growth of three apple pathogenic fungi B. dothidea, Valsa ceratosperma and Glomerella cingulata. Moreover, the inhibition was reduced by the presence of 5'-ADP. Taken all together, the results indicate that MdPR-4 protein is involved in the defense responses of apple against pathogenic attack by directly inhibiting hyphal growth, and the inhibition is correlated with its ribonuclease activity, where as MdPR-4 expression is regulated by both SA and JA signaling pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional Requirements for DjlA- and RraA-Mediated Enhancement of Recombinant Membrane Protein Production in the Engineered Escherichia coli Strains SuptoxD and SuptoxR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialama, Dimitra; Delivoria, Dafni Chrysanthi; Michou, Myrsini; Giannakopoulou, Artemis; Skretas, Georgios

    2017-06-16

    In previous work, we have generated the engineered Escherichia coli strains SuptoxD and SuptoxR, which upon co-expression of the effector genes djlA or rraA, respectively, are capable of suppressing the cytotoxicity caused by membrane protein (MP) overexpression and of producing dramatically enhanced yields for a variety of recombinant MPs of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Here, we investigated the functional requirements for DnaJ-like protein A (DjlA)- and regulator of ribonuclease activity A (RraA)-mediated enhancement of recombinant MP production in these strains and show that: (i) DjlA and RraA act independently, that is, the beneficial effects of each protein on recombinant MP production occur through a mechanism that does not involve the other, and in a non-additive manner; (ii) full-length and membrane-bound DjlA is required for exerting its beneficial effects on recombinant MP production in E. coli SuptoxD; (iii) the MP production-promoting properties of DjlA in SuptoxD involve the action of the molecular chaperone DnaK but do not rely on the activation of the regulation of capsular synthesis response, a well-established consequence of djlA overexpression; (iv) the observed RraA-mediated effects in E. coli SuptoxR involve the ribonucleolytic activity of RNase E, but not that of its paralogous ribonuclease RNase G; and (v) DjlA and RraA are unique among similar E. coli proteins in their ability to promote bacterial recombinant MP production. These observations provide important clues about the molecular requirements for suppressed toxicity and enhanced MP accumulation in SuptoxD/SuptoxR and will guide future studies aiming to decipher the exact mechanism of DjlA- and RraA-mediated enhancement of recombinant MP production in these strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cloning, expression and location of RNase9 in human epididymis

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    Lin YQ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian spermatozoa become fully motile and fertile during transit through the luminal fluid of the epididymis. At least 200 proteins are present in the epididymal lumen, but the potential roles of these luminal proteins in male fertility are unknown. Investigation of the function of these proteins will elucidate the mechanism of sperm maturation, and also provide new drug targets for male contraception. We cloned RNase9 from a human epididymis cDNA library for characterization and analysis of its functions. Findings It was predicted that human RNase9 gene was located on chromosome 14q11.2 and encoded a 205 amino acids protein with a signal peptide of 26 amino acids at the N-terminus. The protein had eight conserved cysteine residues characteristic of the RNase A family members and several potential post-translational modification sites. At the transcriptional level, RNase9 was expressed in a wide variety of tissues, and the expression was higher in men than in boys. RNase9 was localized to the post-equatorial region of the sperms' head. Immunofluorescence staining showed that RNase9 protein was present mostly in the epithelium of the epididymal tubule. Recombinant RNase9 had no ribonuclease activity. In addition, RNase9 had no detectable effect on sperm motility and fertilization as demonstrated by blocking spermatozoa with anti-RNase9 polyclonal serum. Conclusion RNase9 is expressed in a wide variety of tissues. It is located on the post-equatorial region of the sperm head and the epithelium of epididymal tubule. Although RNase9 belongs to the RNase A family, it has no ribonuclease activity.

  15. Elevated pressure improves the extraction and identification of proteins recovered from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue surrogates.

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    Carol B Fowler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic studies of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues are frustrated by the inability to extract proteins from archival tissue in a form suitable for analysis by 2-D gel electrophoresis or mass spectrometry. This inability arises from the difficulty of reversing formaldehyde-induced protein adducts and cross-links within FFPE tissues. We previously reported the use of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from a hen egg-white lysozyme tissue surrogate, a model system developed to study formalin fixation and histochemical processing.In this study, we demonstrate the utility of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from FFPE mouse liver tissue and a complex multi-protein FFPE tissue surrogate comprised of hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine carbonic anhydrase, bovine ribonuclease A, bovine serum albumin, and equine myoglobin (55∶15∶15∶10∶5 wt%. Mass spectrometry of the FFPE tissue surrogates retrieved under elevated pressure showed that both the low and high-abundance proteins were identified with sequence coverage comparable to that of the surrogate mixture prior to formaldehyde treatment. In contrast, non-pressure-extracted tissue surrogate samples yielded few positive and many false peptide identifications. Studies with soluble formalin-treated bovine ribonuclease A demonstrated that pressure modestly inhibited the rate of reversal (hydrolysis of formaldehyde-induced protein cross-links. Dynamic light scattering studies suggest that elevated hydrostatic pressure and heat facilitate the recovery of proteins free of formaldehyde adducts and cross-links by promoting protein unfolding and hydration with a concomitant reduction in the average size of the protein aggregates.These studies demonstrate that elevated hydrostatic pressure treatment is a promising approach for improving the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues in a form suitable for proteomic analysis.

  16. Elevated Pressure Improves the Extraction and Identification of Proteins Recovered from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Carol B.; Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Moore, Cedric D.; O'Leary, Timothy J.; Mason, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteomic studies of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are frustrated by the inability to extract proteins from archival tissue in a form suitable for analysis by 2-D gel electrophoresis or mass spectrometry. This inability arises from the difficulty of reversing formaldehyde-induced protein adducts and cross-links within FFPE tissues. We previously reported the use of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from a hen egg-white lysozyme tissue surrogate, a model system developed to study formalin fixation and histochemical processing. Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrate the utility of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from FFPE mouse liver tissue and a complex multi-protein FFPE tissue surrogate comprised of hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine carbonic anhydrase, bovine ribonuclease A, bovine serum albumin, and equine myoglobin (55∶15∶15∶10∶5 wt%). Mass spectrometry of the FFPE tissue surrogates retrieved under elevated pressure showed that both the low and high-abundance proteins were identified with sequence coverage comparable to that of the surrogate mixture prior to formaldehyde treatment. In contrast, non-pressure-extracted tissue surrogate samples yielded few positive and many false peptide identifications. Studies with soluble formalin-treated bovine ribonuclease A demonstrated that pressure modestly inhibited the rate of reversal (hydrolysis) of formaldehyde-induced protein cross-links. Dynamic light scattering studies suggest that elevated hydrostatic pressure and heat facilitate the recovery of proteins free of formaldehyde adducts and cross-links by promoting protein unfolding and hydration with a concomitant reduction in the average size of the protein aggregates. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that elevated hydrostatic pressure treatment is a promising approach for improving the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues in a form

  17. RNA virus interference via CRISPR/Cas13a system in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Aman, Rashid

    2017-11-04

    CRISPR/Cas systems confer immunity against invading nucleic acids and phages in bacteria and archaea. CRISPR/Cas13a (known previously as C2c2) is a class 2 type VI-A ribonuclease capable of targeting and cleaving single stranded RNA (ssRNA) molecules of the phage genome. Here, we employ CRISPR/Cas13a to engineer interference with an RNA virus, Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV), in plants. CRISPR/Cas13a produced interference against green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing TuMV in transient assays and stable overexpression lines of Nicotiana benthamiana. crRNAs targeting the HC-Pro and GFP sequences exhibited better interference than those targeting other regions such as coat protein (CP) sequence. Cas13a can also process pre-crRNAs into functional crRNAs. Our data indicate that CRISPR/Cas13a can be used for engineering interference against RNA viruses, providing a potential novel mechanism for RNA-guided immunity against RNA viruses, and for other RNA manipulations in plants.

  18. Plant cell wall architecture. Final report, 1 June 1994--30 October 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The authors have successfully finished the DOE-supported project entitled ``Plant cell wall architecture.`` During the funding period (June 1, 1994--October 30, 1996), they have published 6 research papers and 2 review articles. A brief description of these accomplishments is outlined as follows: (1) Improved and extended tissue printing techniques to reveal different surface and wall architectures, and to localized proteins and RNA. (2) Identification of an auxin- and cytokinin-regulated gene from Zinnia which is mainly expressed in cambium. (3) It was found that caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase is involved in an alternative methylation pathway of lignin biosynthesis. (4) It was found that two different O-methyltransferases involved in lignification are differentially regulated in different lignifying tissues during development. They propose a scheme of monolignol biosynthesis combining both methylation pathways. (5) Identification of cysteine and serine proteases which are preferentially expressed during xylogenesis. This is the first report to identify an autolysis-associated cDNA in plants. (6) Characterization of two ribonuclease genes which are induced during xylogenesis and by wounding. (7) Isolation of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase gene and analysis of its expression patterns during lignification.

  19. GAMETOPHYTE DEFECTIVE 1, a putative subunit of RNases P/MRP, is essential for female gametogenesis and male competence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-Qi; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Long, Yan-Ping; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2012-01-01

    RNA biogenesis, including biosynthesis and maturation of rRNA, tRNA and mRNA, is a fundamental process that is critical for cell growth, division and differentiation. Previous studies showed that mutations in components involved in RNA biogenesis resulted in abnormalities in gametophyte and leaf development in Arabidopsis. In eukaryotes, RNases P/MRP (RNase mitochondrial RNA processing) are important ribonucleases that are responsible for processing of tRNA, and transcription of small non-coding RNAs. Here we report that Gametophyte Defective 1 (GAF1), a gene encoding a predicted protein subunit of RNases P/MRP, AtRPP30, plays a role in female gametophyte development and male competence. Embryo sacs were arrested at stages ranging from FG1 to FG7 in gaf1 mutant, suggesting that the progression of the gametophytic division during female gametogenesis was impaired in gaf1 mutant. In contrast, pollen development was not affected in gaf1. However, the fitness of the mutant pollen tube was weaker than that of the wild-type, leading to reduced transmission through the male gametes. GAF1 is featured as a typical RPP30 domain protein and interacts physically with AtPOP5, a homologue of RNases P/MRP subunit POP5 of yeast. Together, our data suggest that components of the RNases P/MRP family, such as RPP30, play important roles in gametophyte development and function in plants.

  20. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  1. Interactions between subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP support a conserved eukaryotic RNase P/MRP architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, Tanya V; Gordon, James M B; Bennett, Hayley J; Karahalios, Panagiotis; Bukowski, John-Paul; Walker, Scott C; Engelke, David R; Avis, Johanna M

    2007-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is an endonuclease, related to RNase P, which functions in eukaryotic pre-rRNA processing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RNase MRP comprises an RNA subunit and ten proteins. To improve our understanding of subunit roles and enzyme architecture, we have examined protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions in vitro, complementing existing yeast two-hybrid data. In total, 31 direct protein-protein interactions were identified, each protein interacting with at least three others. Furthermore, seven proteins self-interact, four strongly, pointing to subunit multiplicity in the holoenzyme. Six protein subunits interact directly with MRP RNA and four with pre-rRNA. A comparative analysis with existing data for the yeast and human RNase P/MRP systems enables confident identification of Pop1p, Pop4p and Rpp1p as subunits that lie at the enzyme core, with probable addition of Pop5p and Pop3p. Rmp1p is confirmed as an integral subunit, presumably associating preferentially with RNase MRP, rather than RNase P, via interactions with Snm1p and MRP RNA. Snm1p and Rmp1p may act together to assist enzyme specificity, though roles in substrate binding are also indicated for Pop4p and Pop6p. The results provide further evidence of a conserved eukaryotic RNase P/MRP architecture and provide a strong basis for studies of enzyme assembly and subunit function.

  2. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Robert D; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2015-09-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA-RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P. © 2015 Fagerlund et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Preparation of surface imprinted core-shell particles via a metal chelating strategy: specific recognition of porcine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qinran; Li, Senwu; Liu, Lukuan; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of molecularly imprinted core-shell microparticles via a metal chelating strategy that assists in the creation of selective recognition sites for albumin. Porcine serum albumin (PSA) was immobilized on silica beads via copper(II) chelation interaction. A solution containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacrylic acid as the monomers was mixed with the above particles, and free radical polymerization was performed at 25 °C. Copper ion and template were then removed to obtain PSA-imprinted core-shell particles (MIPs) with a typical diameter of 5 μm. The binding capacity of such MIP was 8.9 mg protein per gram of MIPs, and the adsorption equilibrium was established within <20 min. The imprinting factor for PSA reached 2.6 when the binding capacity was 7.7 mg protein per gram of MIPs. The use of such MIPs enabled PSA to be selectively recognized even in presence of the competitive proteins ribonuclease B, cytochrome c, and myoglobin. The results indicate that this imprinting strategy for protein may become a promising method to prepare MIPs for protein recognition. (author)

  4. Isolation of RNA for dot hybridization by heparin-DNase I treatment of whole cell lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Z; Wu, C

    1987-08-15

    We have developed a new procedure for the rapid preparation of undegraded total RNA from cultured cells for specific quantitation by dot blotting analysis. Pelleted cells are resuspended in hypotonic solution containing a ribonuclease inhibitor and heparin and disrupted by freeze-thaw. Heparin is employed as an agent for nuclear lysis, dissociation of chromosomal protein, and release of mRNA from rough endoplasmic reticulum. We eliminate chromosomal DNA by digestion with DNase I and denature the RNA in the lysate with formaldehyde. After centrifugation to remove debris, the supernatant is used directly for dot blotting. All manipulations are performed in the same microfuge tube and recovery of RNA is quantitative. The procedure is especially useful for processing large numbers of samples. We illustrate its versatility by analysis of specific RNAs in Drosophila, rat, and human cell lines. In reconstruction experiments, less than 80 molecules per cell of a small RNA (beta-globin) can be detected under highly stringent hybridization conditions, using only moderately labeled double-stranded plasmid DNA probes and short film exposures.

  5. The pangenome of the genus Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2017-07-01

    The pangenome for the genus Clostridium sensu stricto, which was obtained using highly curated and annotated genomes from 16 species is presented; some of these cause disease, while others are used for the production of added-value chemicals. Multilocus sequencing analysis revealed that species of this genus group into at least two clades that include non-pathogenic and pathogenic strains, suggesting that pathogenicity is dispersed across the phylogenetic tree. The core genome of the genus includes 546 protein families, which mainly comprise those involved in protein translation and DNA repair. The GS-GOGAT may represent the central pathway for generating organic nitrogen from inorganic nitrogen sources. Glycerol and glucose metabolism genes are well represented in the core genome together with a set of energy conservation systems. A metabolic network comprising proteins/enzymes, RNAs and metabolites, whose topological structure is a non-random and scale-free network with hierarchically structured modules was built. These modules shed light on the interactions between RNAs, proteins and metabolites, revealing biological features of transcription and translation, cell wall biosynthesis, C1 metabolism and N metabolism. Network analysis identified four nodes that function as hubs and bottlenecks, namely, coenzyme A, HPr kinases, S-adenosylmethionine and the ribonuclease P-protein, suggesting pivotal roles for them in Clostridium. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. VapC toxins drive cellular dormancy under uranium stress for the extreme thermoacidophile Metallosphaera prunae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arpan; Wheaton, Garrett H; Counts, James A; Ijeomah, Brenda; Desai, Jigar; Kelly, Robert M

    2017-07-01

    When abruptly exposed to toxic levels of hexavalent uranium, the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera prunae, originally isolated from an abandoned uranium mine, ceased to grow, and concomitantly exhibited heightened levels of cytosolic ribonuclease activity that corresponded to substantial degradation of cellular RNA. The M. prunae transcriptome during 'uranium-shock' implicated VapC toxins as possible causative agents of the observed RNA degradation. Identifiable VapC toxins and PIN-domain proteins encoded in the M. prunae genome were produced and characterized, three of which (VapC4, VapC7, VapC8) substantially degraded M. prunae rRNA in vitro. RNA cleavage specificity for these VapCs mapped to motifs within M. prunae rRNA. Furthermore, based on frequency of cleavage sequences, putative target mRNAs for these VapCs were identified; these were closely associated with translation, transcription, and replication. It is interesting to note that Metallosphaera sedula, a member of the same genus and which has a nearly identical genome sequence but not isolated from a uranium-rich biotope, showed no evidence of dormancy when exposed to this metal. M. prunae utilizes VapC toxins for post-transcriptional regulation under uranium stress to enter a cellular dormant state, thereby providing an adaptive response to what would otherwise be a deleterious environmental perturbation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Non-Coding RNAs in Saliva: Emerging Biomarkers for Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Majem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is a complex body fluid that comprises secretions from the major and minor salivary glands, which are extensively supplied by blood. Therefore, molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, etc., present in plasma could be also present in saliva. Many studies have reported that saliva body fluid can be useful for discriminating several oral diseases, but also systemic diseases including cancer. Most of these studies revealed messenger RNA (mRNA and proteomic biomarker signatures rather than specific non-coding RNA (ncRNA profiles. NcRNAs are emerging as new regulators of diverse biological functions, playing an important role in oncogenesis and tumor progression. Indeed, the small size of these molecules makes them very stable in different body fluids and not as susceptible as mRNAs to degradation by ribonucleases (RNases. Therefore, the development of a non-invasive salivary test, based on ncRNAs profiles, could have a significant applicability to clinical practice, not only by reducing the cost of the health system, but also by benefitting the patient. Here, we summarize the current status and clinical implications of the ncRNAs present in human saliva as a source of biological information.

  8. GAMETOPHYTE DEFECTIVE 1, a putative subunit of RNases P/MRP, is essential for female gametogenesis and male competence in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Qi Wang

    Full Text Available RNA biogenesis, including biosynthesis and maturation of rRNA, tRNA and mRNA, is a fundamental process that is critical for cell growth, division and differentiation. Previous studies showed that mutations in components involved in RNA biogenesis resulted in abnormalities in gametophyte and leaf development in Arabidopsis. In eukaryotes, RNases P/MRP (RNase mitochondrial RNA processing are important ribonucleases that are responsible for processing of tRNA, and transcription of small non-coding RNAs. Here we report that Gametophyte Defective 1 (GAF1, a gene encoding a predicted protein subunit of RNases P/MRP, AtRPP30, plays a role in female gametophyte development and male competence. Embryo sacs were arrested at stages ranging from FG1 to FG7 in gaf1 mutant, suggesting that the progression of the gametophytic division during female gametogenesis was impaired in gaf1 mutant. In contrast, pollen development was not affected in gaf1. However, the fitness of the mutant pollen tube was weaker than that of the wild-type, leading to reduced transmission through the male gametes. GAF1 is featured as a typical RPP30 domain protein and interacts physically with AtPOP5, a homologue of RNases P/MRP subunit POP5 of yeast. Together, our data suggest that components of the RNases P/MRP family, such as RPP30, play important roles in gametophyte development and function in plants.

  9. Use of Carbon -14 and Phosphorus -32 to study phosphorus acquisition efficiency in crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Renu; Vengavasi, Krishnapriya

    2017-01-01

    Low bioavailability of phosphorus (P) in soils is one of the major limiting factors to crop production throughout the world. P nutrition improves yield, with significant influences on the above- (leaf area, photosynthesis, dry matter accumulation, leaf P content) and below-ground (root morphology, exudation, symbiosis) processes (Pandey et al., 2015). Plants, however, are known to possess potential adaptive mechanisms at morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels to overcome P deficiency. Such adaptive mechanisms mainly include an increase in total root length and root hair growth (Pandey et al., unpublished), enhancement of organic acids (Vengavasi and Pandey, 2016a, b), acid phosphatase (Pandey, 2006) and ribonuclease (RNase) secretion into the rhizosphere (Hocking, 2001), increase in expression of proteins such as phosphatase, inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter, RNase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPcase) in plant tissues (Ragothama, 1999). Of all the above, rhizosphere acidification provides maximum exploration of soil volume around the rooting zone leading to conversion of non-available nutrients into available forms thus, resulting in enhanced uptake efficiency

  10. A novel family of sequence-specific endoribonucleases associated with the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Brown, Greg; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Proudfoot, Michael; Makarova, Kira S; Kudritska, Marina; Kochinyan, Samvel; Wang, Shuren; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek; Koonin, Eugene V; Edwards, Aled M; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2008-07-18

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) together with the associated CAS proteins protect microbial cells from invasion by foreign genetic elements using presently unknown molecular mechanisms. All CRISPR systems contain proteins of the CAS2 family, suggesting that these uncharacterized proteins play a central role in this process. Here we show that the CAS2 proteins represent a novel family of endoribonucleases. Six purified CAS2 proteins from diverse organisms cleaved single-stranded RNAs preferentially within U-rich regions. A representative CAS2 enzyme, SSO1404 from Sulfolobus solfataricus, cleaved the phosphodiester linkage on the 3'-side and generated 5'-phosphate- and 3'-hydroxyl-terminated oligonucleotides. The crystal structure of SSO1404 was solved at 1.6A resolution revealing the first ribonuclease with a ferredoxin-like fold. Mutagenesis of SSO1404 identified six residues (Tyr-9, Asp-10, Arg-17, Arg-19, Arg-31, and Phe-37) that are important for enzymatic activity and suggested that Asp-10 might be the principal catalytic residue. Thus, CAS2 proteins are sequence-specific endoribonucleases, and we propose that their role in the CRISPR-mediated anti-phage defense might involve degradation of phage or cellular mRNAs.

  11. Updates in the Development of ImmunoRNases for the Selective Killing of Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Jordaan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Targeted cancer therapy includes, amongst others, antibody-based delivery of toxic payloads to selectively eliminate tumor cells. This payload can be either a synthetic small molecule drug composing an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC or a cytotoxic protein composing an immunotoxin (IT. Non-human cytotoxic proteins, while potent, have limited clinical efficacy due to their immunogenicity and potential off-target toxicity. Humanization of the cytotoxic payload is essential and requires harnessing of potent apoptosis-inducing human proteins with conditional activity, which rely on targeted delivery to contact their substrate. Ribonucleases are attractive candidates, due to their ability to induce apoptosis by abrogating protein biosynthesis via tRNA degradation. In fact, several RNases of the pancreatic RNase A superfamily have shown potential as anti-cancer agents. Coupling of a human RNase to a humanized antibody or antibody derivative putatively eliminates the immunogenicity of an IT (now known as a human cytolytic fusion protein, hCFP. However, RNases are tightly regulated in vivo by endogenous inhibitors, controlling the ribonucleolytic balance subject to the cell’s metabolic requirements. Endogenous inhibition limits the efficacy with which RNase-based hCFPs induce apoptosis. However, abrogating the natural interaction with the natural inhibitors by mutation has been shown to significantly enhance RNase activity, paving the way toward achieving cytolytic potency comparable to that of bacterial immunotoxins. Here, we review the immunoRNases that have undergone preclinical studies as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  12. Updates in the Development of ImmunoRNases for the Selective Killing of Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordaan, Sandra; Akinrinmade, Olusiji A; Nachreiner, Thomas; Cremer, Christian; Naran, Krupa; Chetty, Shivan; Barth, Stefan

    2018-03-05

    Targeted cancer therapy includes, amongst others, antibody-based delivery of toxic payloads to selectively eliminate tumor cells. This payload can be either a synthetic small molecule drug composing an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) or a cytotoxic protein composing an immunotoxin (IT). Non-human cytotoxic proteins, while potent, have limited clinical efficacy due to their immunogenicity and potential off-target toxicity. Humanization of the cytotoxic payload is essential and requires harnessing of potent apoptosis-inducing human proteins with conditional activity, which rely on targeted delivery to contact their substrate. Ribonucleases are attractive candidates, due to their ability to induce apoptosis by abrogating protein biosynthesis via tRNA degradation. In fact, several RNases of the pancreatic RNase A superfamily have shown potential as anti-cancer agents. Coupling of a human RNase to a humanized antibody or antibody derivative putatively eliminates the immunogenicity of an IT (now known as a human cytolytic fusion protein, hCFP). However, RNases are tightly regulated in vivo by endogenous inhibitors, controlling the ribonucleolytic balance subject to the cell's metabolic requirements. Endogenous inhibition limits the efficacy with which RNase-based hCFPs induce apoptosis. However, abrogating the natural interaction with the natural inhibitors by mutation has been shown to significantly enhance RNase activity, paving the way toward achieving cytolytic potency comparable to that of bacterial immunotoxins. Here, we review the immunoRNases that have undergone preclinical studies as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  13. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Xiu Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession, and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities.

  14. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for monitoring adenosine 5'-monophosphate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Eric A

    2015-08-15

    A number of biologically important enzymes release adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a product, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like ligases, DNA ligases, coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, polyA deadenylases, and ribonucleases. In contrast to the abundance of assays available for monitoring the conversion of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, there are relatively few assays for monitoring the conversion of ATP (or cAMP) to AMP. In this article, we describe a homogeneous assay that continuously monitors the production of AMP. Specifically, we have coupled the conversion of AMP to inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) (by AMP deaminase) to the oxidation of IMP (by IMP dehydrogenase). This results in the reduction of oxidized nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH), allowing AMP formation to be monitored by the change in the absorbance at 340 nm. Changes in AMP concentrations of 5 μM or more can be reliably detected. The ease of use and relatively low expense make the AMP assay suitable for both high-throughput screening and kinetic analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural mechanisms of human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eKitano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The RecQ family DNA helicases WRN (Werner syndrome protein and BLM (Bloom syndrome protein play a key role in protecting the genome against deleterious changes. In humans, mutations in these proteins lead to rare genetic diseases associated with cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. WRN and BLM are distinguished from other helicases by possessing signature tandem domains toward the C terminus, referred to as the RecQ C-terminal (RQC and helicase-and-ribonuclease D-C-terminal (HRDC domains. Although the precise function of the HRDC domain remains unclear, the previous crystal structure of a WRN RQC-DNA complex visualized a central role for the RQC domain in recognizing, binding and unwinding DNA at branch points. In particular, a prominent hairpin structure (the β-wing within the RQC winged-helix motif acts as a scalpel to induce the unpairing of a Watson-Crick base pair at the DNA duplex terminus. A similar RQC-DNA interaction was also observed in the recent crystal structure of a BLM-DNA complex. I review the latest structures of WRN and BLM, and then provide a docking simulation of BLM with a Holliday junction. The model offers an explanation for the efficient branch migration activity of the RecQ family toward recombination and repair intermediates.

  16. Binase Immobilized on Halloysite Nanotubes Exerts Enhanced Cytotoxicity toward Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Khodzhaeva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many ribonucleases (RNases are considered as promising tools for antitumor therapy because of their selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. Binase, the RNase from Bacillus pumilus, triggers apoptotic response in cancer cells expressing RAS oncogene which is mutated in a large percentage of prevalent and deadly malignancies including colorectal cancer. The specific antitumor effect of binase toward RAS-transformed cells is due to its direct binding of RAS protein and inhibition of downstream signaling. However, the delivery of proteins to the intestine is complicated by their degradation in the digestive tract and subsequent loss of therapeutic activity. Therefore, the search of new systems for effective delivery of therapeutic proteins is an actual task. This study is aimed to the investigation of antitumor effect of binase immobilized on natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs. Here, we have developed the method of binase immobilization on HNTs and optimized the conditions for the enzyme loading and release (i; we have found the non-toxic concentration of pure HNTs which allows to distinguish HNTs- and binase-induced cytotoxic effects (ii; using dark-field and fluorescent microscopy we have proved the absorption of binase-loaded HNTs on the cell surface (iii and demonstrated that binase-halloysite nanoformulations possessed twice enhanced cytotoxicity toward tumor colon cells as compared to the cytotoxicity of binase itself (iv. The enhanced antitumor activity of biocompatible binase-HNTs complex confirms the advisability of its future development for clinical practice.

  17. Pollen-expressed F-box gene family and mechanism of S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) in Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassa, Hidenori; Kakui, Hiroyuki; Minamikawa, Mai

    2010-03-01

    Many species of Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae exhibit S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI) in which pistil-part specificity is controlled by S locus-encoded ribonuclease (S-RNase). Although recent findings revealed that S locus-encoded F-box protein, SLF/SFB, determines pollen-part specificity, how these pistil- and pollen-part S locus products interact in vivo and elicit the SI reaction is largely unclear. Furthermore, genetic studies suggested that pollen S function can differ among species. In Solanaceae and the rosaceous subfamily Maloideae (e.g., apple and pear), the coexistence of two different pollen S alleles in a pollen breaks down SI of the pollen, a phenomenon known as competitive interaction. However, competitive interaction seems not to occur in the subfamily Prunoideae (e.g., cherry and almond) of Rosaceae. Furthermore, the effect of the deletion of pollen S seems to vary among taxa. This review focuses on the potential differences in pollen-part function between subfamilies of Rosaceae, Maloideae, and Prunoideae, and discusses implications for the mechanistic divergence of the S-RNase-based SI.

  18. Tracking the elusive 5' exonuclease activity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii RNase J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liponska, Anna; Jamalli, Ailar; Kuras, Richard; Suay, Loreto; Garbe, Enrico; Wollman, Francis-André; Laalami, Soumaya; Putzer, Harald

    2018-04-01

    Chlamydomonas RNase J is the first member of this enzyme family that has endo- but no intrinsic 5' exoribonucleolytic activity. This questions its proposed role in chloroplast mRNA maturation. RNA maturation and stability in the chloroplast are controlled by nuclear-encoded ribonucleases and RNA binding proteins. Notably, mRNA 5' end maturation is thought to be achieved by the combined action of a 5' exoribonuclease and specific pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR) that block the progression of the nuclease. In Arabidopsis the 5' exo- and endoribonuclease RNase J has been implicated in this process. Here, we verified the chloroplast localization of the orthologous Chlamydomonas (Cr) RNase J and studied its activity, both in vitro and in vivo in a heterologous B. subtilis system. Our data show that Cr RNase J has endo- but no significant intrinsic 5' exonuclease activity that would be compatible with its proposed role in mRNA maturation. This is the first example of an RNase J ortholog that does not possess a 5' exonuclease activity. A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed a number of potential interaction partners but three of the most promising candidates tested, failed to induce the latent exonuclease activity of Cr RNase J. We still favor the hypothesis that Cr RNase J plays an important role in RNA metabolism, but our findings suggest that it rather acts as an endoribonuclease in the chloroplast.

  19. Identification of a mutant locus that bypasses the BsgA protease requirement for social development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, John K; Hager, Elizabeth; Gill, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    The BsgA protease is required for the earliest morphological changes observed in Myxococcus xanthus development. We hypothesize that the BsgA protease is required to cleave an inhibitor of the developmental program, and isolation of genetic bypass suppressors of a bsgA mutant was used to identify signaling components controlling development downstream of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was created by transposon mutagenesis of a bsgA mutant followed by screening for strains that could develop despite the absence of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was able to aggregate, form fruiting bodies, and partially restored the production of viable spores in comparison to the parental bsgA mutant. The bsgA Tn5Ω955 strain partially restored developmental expression to a subset of genes normally induced during development, and expressed one developmentally induced fusion at higher amounts during vegetative growth in comparison to wild-type cells. The transposon in strain M955 was localized to a Ribonuclease D homolog that appears to exist in an operon with a downstream aminopeptidase-encoding gene. The identification of a third distinct bypass suppressor of the BsgA protease suggests that the BsgA protease may regulate a potentially complex pathway during the initiation of the M. xanthus developmental program. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Design, synthesis and biological evaluations of N-Hydroxy thienopyrimidine-2,4-diones as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankanala, Jayakanth; Kirby, Karen A; Huber, Andrew D; Casey, Mary C; Wilson, Daniel J; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is the only HIV enzymatic function not targeted by current antiviral drugs. Although various chemotypes have been reported to inhibit HIV RNase H, few have shown significant antiviral activities. We report herein the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel N-hydroxy thienopyrimidine-2,3-dione chemotype (11) which potently and selectively inhibited RNase H with considerable potency against HIV-1 in cell culture. Current structure-activity-relationship (SAR) identified analogue 11d as a nanomolar inhibitor of RNase H (IC 50  = 0.04 μM) with decent antiviral potency (EC 50  = 7.4 μM) and no cytotoxicity (CC 50  > 100 μM). In extended biochemical assays compound 11d did not inhibit RT polymerase (pol) while inhibiting integrase strand transfer (INST) with 53 fold lower potency (IC 50  = 2.1 μM) than RNase H inhibition. Crystallographic and molecular modeling studies confirmed the RNase H active site binding mode. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct, rapid RNA sequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peattie, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The original methods of RNA sequence analysis were based on enzymatic production and chromatographic separation of overlapping oligonucleotide fragments from within an RNA molecule followed by identification of the mononucleotides comprising the oligomer. Over the past decade the field of nucleic acid sequencing has changed dramatically, however, and RNA molecules now can be sequenced in a variety of more streamlined fashions. Most of the more recent advances in RNA sequencing have involved one-dimensional electrophoretic separation of 32 P-end-labeled oligoribonucleotides on polyacrylamide gels. In this chapter the author discusses two of these methods for determining the nucleotide sequences of RNA molecules rapidly: the chemical method and the enzymatic method. Both methods are direct and degradative, i.e., they rely on fragmatic and chemical approaches should be utilized. The single-strand-specific ribonucleases (A, T 1 , T 2 , and S 1 ) provide an efficient means to locate double-helical regions rapidly, and the chemical reactions provide a means to determine the RNA sequence within these regions. In addition, the chemical reactions allow one to assign interactions to specific atoms and to distinguish secondary interactions from tertiary ones. If the RNA molecule is small enough to be sequenced directly by the enzymatic or chemical method, the probing reactions can be done easily at the same time as sequencing reactions

  2. In Plant Activation: An Inducible, Hyperexpression Platform for Recombinant Protein Production in Plants[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L.; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A.; Harding, Robert M.; Dale, James L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe a novel protein production platform that provides both activation and amplification of transgene expression in planta. The In Plant Activation (INPACT) system is based on the replication machinery of tobacco yellow dwarf mastrevirus (TYDV) and is essentially transient gene expression from a stably transformed plant, thus combining the advantages of both means of expression. The INPACT cassette is uniquely arranged such that the gene of interest is split and only reconstituted in the presence of the TYDV-encoded Rep/RepA proteins. Rep/RepA expression is placed under the control of the AlcA:AlcR gene switch, which is responsive to trace levels of ethanol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun) plants containing an INPACT cassette encoding the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter had negligible background expression but accumulated very high GUS levels (up to 10% total soluble protein) throughout the plant, within 3 d of a 1% ethanol application. The GUS reporter was replaced with a gene encoding a lethal ribonuclease, barnase, demonstrating that the INPACT system provides exquisite control of transgene expression and can be adapted to potentially toxic or inhibitory compounds. The INPACT gene expression platform is scalable, not host-limited, and has been used to express both a therapeutic and an industrial protein. PMID:23839786

  3. RNA virus interference via CRISPR/Cas13a system in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Aman, Rashid

    2018-01-04

    CRISPR/Cas systems confer immunity against invading nucleic acids and phages in bacteria and archaea. CRISPR/Cas13a (known previously as C2c2) is a class 2 type VI-A ribonuclease capable of targeting and cleaving single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) molecules of the phage genome. Here, we employ CRISPR/Cas13a to engineer interference with an RNA virus, Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV), in plants.CRISPR/Cas13a produces interference against green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing TuMV in transient assays and stable overexpression lines of Nicotiana benthamiana. CRISPR RNA (crRNAs) targeting the HC-Pro and GFP sequences exhibit better interference than those targeting other regions such as coat protein (CP) sequence. Cas13a can also process pre-crRNAs into functional crRNAs.Our data indicate that CRISPR/Cas13a can be used for engineering interference against RNA viruses, providing a potential novel mechanism for RNA-guided immunity against RNA viruses and for other RNA manipulations in plants.

  4. Harnessing CRISPR/Cas systems for programmable transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation

    KAUST Repository

    Mahas, Ahmed

    2017-11-29

    Genome editing has enabled broad advances and novel approaches in studies of gene function and structure; now, emerging methods aim to precisely engineer post-transcriptional processes. Developing precise, efficient molecular tools to alter the transcriptome holds great promise for biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Different approaches have been employed for targeted degradation of RNA species in eukaryotes, but they lack programmability and versatility, thereby limiting their utility for diverse applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been harnessed for genome editing in many eukaryotic species and, using a catalytically inactive Cas9 variant, the CRISPR/dCas9 system has been repurposed for transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have used other CRISPR/Cas systems for targeted RNA degradation and RNA-based manipulations. For example, Cas13a, a Type VI-A endonuclease, has been identified as an RNA-guided RNA ribonuclease and used for manipulation of RNA. Here, we discuss different modalities for targeted RNA interference with an emphasis on the potential applications of CRISPR/Cas systems as programmable transcriptional regulators for broad uses, including functional biology, biotechnology, and synthetic biology applications.

  5. Two tandem RNase III cleavage sites determine betT mRNA stability in response to osmotic stress in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minji Sim

    Full Text Available While identifying genes regulated by ribonuclease III (RNase III in Escherichia coli, we observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA, which encodes a transporter mediating the influx of choline, are dependent on cellular concentrations of RNase III. In the present study, we also observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA are dependent on RNase III activity upon exposure to osmotic stress, indicating the presence of cis-acting elements controlled by RNase III in betT mRNA. Primer extension analyses of betT mRNA revealed two tandem RNase III cleavage sites in its stem-loop region, which were biochemically confirmed via in vitro cleavage assays. Analyses of cleavage sites suggested the stochastic selection of cleavage sites by RNase III, and mutational analyses indicated that RNase III cleavage at either site individually is insufficient for efficient betT mRNA degradation. In addition, both the half-life and abundance of betT mRNA were significantly increased in association with decreased RNase III activity under hyper-osmotic stress conditions. Our findings demonstrate that betT mRNA stability is controlled by RNase III at the post-transcriptional level under conditions of osmotic stress.

  6. Selective amplification and sequencing of cyclic phosphate-containing RNAs by the cP-RNA-seq method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shozo; Morichika, Keisuke; Kirino, Yohei

    2016-03-01

    RNA digestions catalyzed by many ribonucleases generate RNA fragments that contain a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate (cP) at their 3' termini. However, standard RNA-seq methods are unable to accurately capture cP-containing RNAs because the cP inhibits the adapter ligation reaction. We recently developed a method named cP-RNA-seq that is able to selectively amplify and sequence cP-containing RNAs. Here we describe the cP-RNA-seq protocol in which the 3' termini of all RNAs, except those containing a cP, are cleaved through a periodate treatment after phosphatase treatment; hence, subsequent adapter ligation and cDNA amplification steps are exclusively applied to cP-containing RNAs. cP-RNA-seq takes ∼6 d, excluding the time required for sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, which are not covered in detail in this protocol. Biochemical validation of the existence of cP in the identified RNAs takes ∼3 d. Even though the cP-RNA-seq method was developed to identify angiogenin-generating 5'-tRNA halves as a proof of principle, the method should be applicable to global identification of cP-containing RNA repertoires in various transcriptomes.

  7. Gradient-free determination of isoelectric points of proteins on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łapińska, Urszula; Saar, Kadi L; Yates, Emma V; Herling, Therese W; Müller, Thomas; Challa, Pavan K; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-08-30

    The isoelectric point (pI) of a protein is a key characteristic that influences its overall electrostatic behaviour. The majority of conventional methods for the determination of the isoelectric point of a molecule rely on the use of spatial gradients in pH, although significant practical challenges are associated with such techniques, notably the difficulty in generating a stable and well controlled pH gradient. Here, we introduce a gradient-free approach, exploiting a microfluidic platform which allows us to perform rapid pH change on chip and probe the electrophoretic mobility of species in a controlled field. In particular, in this approach, the pH of the electrolyte solution is modulated in time rather than in space, as in the case for conventional determinations of the isoelectric point. To demonstrate the general approachability of this platform, we have measured the isoelectric points of representative set of seven proteins, bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin, ribonuclease A, ovalbumin, human transferrin, ubiquitin and myoglobin in microlitre sample volumes. The ability to conduct measurements in free solution thus provides the basis for the rapid determination of isoelectric points of proteins under a wide variety of solution conditions and in small volumes.

  8. The structure of the human interferon alpha/beta receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, G; Gardiner, K; Proudhon, D; Vielh, E; Uzé, G

    1992-02-05

    Using the cDNA coding for the human interferon alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR), the IFNAR gene has been physically mapped relative to the other loci of the chromosome 21q22.1 region. 32,906 base pairs covering the IFNAR gene have been cloned and sequenced. Primer extension and solution hybridization-ribonuclease protection have been used to determine that the transcription of the gene is initiated in a broad region of 20 base pairs. Some aspects of the polymorphism of the gene, including noncoding sequences, have been analyzed; some are allelic differences in the coding sequence that induce amino acid variations in the resulting protein. The exon structure of the IFNAR gene and of that of the available genes for the receptors of the cytokine/growth hormone/prolactin/interferon receptor family have been compared with the predictions for the secondary structure of those receptors. From this analysis, we postulate a common origin and propose an hypothesis for the divergence from the immunoglobulin superfamily.

  9. Identification, genealogical structure and population genetics of S-alleles in Malus sieversii, the wild ancestor of domesticated apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X; Cai, Z; Liu, W; Ge, S; Tang, L

    2017-09-01

    The self-incompatibility (SI) gene that is specifically expressed in pistils encodes the SI-associated ribonuclease (S-RNase), functioning as the female-specificity determinant of a gametophytic SI system. Despite extensive surveys in Malus domestica, the S-alleles have not been fully investigated for Malus sieversii, the primary wild ancestor of the domesticated apple. Here we screened the M. sieversii S-alleles via PCR amplification and sequencing, and identified 14 distinct alleles in this species. By contrast, nearly 40 are present in its close wild relative, Malus sylvestris. We further sequenced 8 nuclear genes to provide a neutral reference, and investigated the evolution of S-alleles via genealogical and population genetic analyses. Both shared ancestral polymorphism and an excess of non-synonymous substitution were detected in the S-RNases of the tribe Maleae in Rosaceae, indicating the action of long-term balancing selection. Approximate Bayesian Computations based on the reference neutral loci revealed a severe bottleneck in four of the six studied M. sieversii populations, suggesting that the low number of S-alleles found in this species is mainly the result of diversity loss due to a drastic population contraction. Such a bottleneck may lead to ambiguous footprints of ongoing balancing selection detected at the S-locus. This study not only elucidates the constituents and number of S-alleles in M. sieversii but also illustrates the potential utility of S-allele number shifts in demographic inference for self-incompatible plant species.

  10. SIMS of transfer ribonucleic acid molecules encapsulated between free-standing graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoturov, Dmitriy S; Geng, Sheng; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Kim, Hansoo; Schweikert, Emile A

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the authors used cluster-secondary ion mass spectrometry method to investigate the preserved transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) encapsulated between two free-standing graphene sheets. Single impacts of 50 keV C60 (2+) projectiles generated the emission of tRNA fragment ions in the transmission direction for mass selection and detection in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is extremely unstable and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation by ribonucleases. Employing graphene to isolate RNA from the environment, the authors prevent the aforementioned process. Encapsulation was achieved by drop casting a solution of tRNA, prepared using deuterated water, onto one graphene sheet and covering it with another. The event-by-event bombardment/detection mode allowed us to use colocalization analysis method to characterize the tRNA and its immediate environment. The authors found that upon drying, tRNA agglomerated into nanostructures ∼60 nm in diameter via formation and subsequent drying of aqua cells. The tRNA nanoagglomerates had a density of ∼42 structures per μm(2) with coverage of ∼12% of the surface area. In addition, trace amounts of water remained mostly around the tRNA nanoagglomerates, probably in the form of hydration.

  11. Fungal Ribotoxins: A Review of Potential Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Olombrada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungi establish a complex network of biological interactions with other organisms in nature. In many cases, these involve the production of toxins for survival or colonization purposes. Among these toxins, ribotoxins stand out as promising candidates for their use in biotechnological applications. They constitute a group of highly specific extracellular ribonucleases that target a universally conserved sequence of RNA in the ribosome, the sarcin-ricin loop. The detailed molecular study of this family of toxic proteins over the past decades has highlighted their potential in applied research. Remarkable examples would be the recent studies in the field of cancer research with promising results involving ribotoxin-based immunotoxins. On the other hand, some ribotoxin-producer fungi have already been studied in the control of insect pests. The recent role of ribotoxins as insecticides could allow their employment in formulas and even as baculovirus-based biopesticides. Moreover, considering the important role of their target in the ribosome, they can be used as tools to study how ribosome biogenesis is regulated and, eventually, may contribute to a better understanding of some ribosomopathies.

  12. Friends or Foes? Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides and proteins in human skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonsaba, François; Kiatsurayanon, Chanisa; Chieosilapatham, Panjit; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2017-11-01

    Host defense peptides/proteins (HDPs), also known as antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs), are key molecules in the cutaneous innate immune system. AMPs/HDPs historically exhibit broad-spectrum killing activity against bacteria, enveloped viruses, fungi and several parasites. Recently, AMPs/HDPs were shown to have important biological functions, including inducing cell proliferation, migration and differentiation; regulating inflammatory responses; controlling the production of various cytokines/chemokines; promoting wound healing; and improving skin barrier function. Despite the fact that AMPs/HDPs protect our body, several studies have hypothesized that these molecules actively contribute to the pathogenesis of various skin diseases. For example, AMPs/HDPs play crucial roles in the pathological processes of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, rosacea, acne vulgaris, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. Thus, AMPs/HDPs may be a double-edged sword, promoting cutaneous immunity while simultaneously initiating the pathogenesis of some skin disorders. This review will describe the most common skin-derived AMPs/HDPs (defensins, cathelicidins, S100 proteins, ribonucleases and dermcidin) and discuss the biology and both the positive and negative aspects of these AMPs/HDPs in skin inflammatory/infectious diseases. Understanding the regulation, functions and mechanisms of AMPs/HDPs may offer new therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of various skin disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Molecular mechanism of the S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility in fruit trees of Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassa, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is a major obstacle for stable fruit production in fruit trees of Rosaceae. SI of Rosaceae is controlled by the S locus on which at least two genes, pistil S and pollen S, are located. The product of the pistil S gene is a polymorphic and extracellular ribonuclease, called S-RNase, while that of the pollen S gene is a protein containing the F-box motif, SFB (S haplotype-specific F-box protein)/SFBB (S locus F-box brothers). Recent studies suggested that SI of Rosaceae includes two different systems, i.e., Prunus of tribe Amygdaleae exhibits a self-recognition system in which its SFB recognizes self-S-RNase, while tribe Pyreae (Pyrus and Malus) shows a non-self-recognition system in which many SFBB proteins are involved in SI, each recognizing subset of non-self-S-RNases. Further biochemical and biological characterization of the S locus genes, as well as other genes required for SI not located at the S locus, will help our understanding of the molecular mechanisms, origin, and evolution of SI of Rosaceae, and may provide the basis for breeding of self-compatible fruit tree cultivars.

  14. Functional analysis of virion host shutoff protein of pseudorabies virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.-W.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Wong, M.-L.; Lin, J.-W.; Chang, T.-J.

    2004-01-01

    During lytic infection, the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of alphaherpesviruses causes the degradation of mRNAs nonspecifically. In this work, we cloned the vhs gene (UL41 open reading frame) of pseudorabies virus (PRV; TNL strain) by PCR, and its nucleotide sequences were determined. The PCR product of vhs gene was subcloned into the prokaryotic pET32b expression vector, and production of the recombinant vhs protein was examined by SDS-PAGE. Result of Western blotting demonstrated that our recombinant vhs protein reacted with antiserum against a synthetic peptide of 17 amino acids of the vhs protein. After purification with nickel-chelate affinity chromatography, the purified recombinant vhs protein exhibited in vitro ribonuclease activity as expected. We further cloned the vhs gene into eukaryotic expression vectors and investigated the intracellular function of vhs protein by DNA transfection. By transient trasfection and CAT assay, we found the CAT activity was reduced in the presence of vhs, indicating that degradation of mRNA of the CAT gene was caused by the vhs. Furthermore, our results showed that the plaque formation of pseudorabies virus was blocked by exogenous vhs. Taken together, we have cloned the vhs gene of pseudorabies virus (TNL strain) and conducted functional analysis of the recombinant vhs protein in vitro as well as in vivo

  15. The RNA Exosome Channeling and Direct Access Conformations Have Distinct In Vivo Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeil Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The RNA exosome is a 3′–5′ ribonuclease complex that is composed of nine core subunits and an essential catalytic subunit, Rrp44. Two distinct conformations of Rrp44 were revealed in previous structural studies, suggesting that Rrp44 may change its conformation to exert its function. In the channeling conformation, (Rrp44ch, RNA accesses the active site after traversing the central channel of the RNA exosome, whereas in the other conformation, (Rrp44da, RNA gains direct access to the active site. Here, we show that the Rrp44da exosome is important for nuclear function of the RNA exosome. Defects caused by disrupting the direct access conformation are distinct from those caused by channel-occluding mutations, indicating specific functions for each conformation. Our genetic analyses provide in vivo evidence that the RNA exosome employs a direct-access route to recruit specific substrates, indicating that the RNA exosome uses alternative conformations to act on different RNA substrates.

  16. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Li Xincang; Li Lu; Wang Jinxing; Jin Wenrui

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10 -14 mol L -1 . Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  17. Evolution of primary and secondary structures in 5S and 5.8S rRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    The secondary structure of Bombyx mori 5S rRNA was studied using the sing-strand specific S1 nuclease and the base pair specific cobra venom ribonuclease. The RNA was end-labeled with [ 32 P] at either the 5' or 3' end and sequenced using enzymatic digestion techniques. These enzymatic data coupled with thermodynamic structure prediction were used to generate a secondary structure for 5S rRNA. A computer algorithm has been implemented to aid in the comparison of a large set of homologous RNAs. Eukaryotic 5S rRNA sequences from thirty four diverse species were compared by (1) alignment or the sequences, (2) the positions of substitutions were located with respect to the aligned sequence and secondary structure, and (3) the R-Y model of base stacking was used to study stacking pattern relationships in the structure. Eukaryotic 5S rRNA was found to have significant sequence variation throughout much of the molecule while maintaining a relatively constant secondary structure. A detailed analysis of the sequence and structure variability in each region of the molecule is presented

  18. A technique for determining the deuterium/hydrogen contrast map in neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    A difference in the neutron scattering length between hydrogen and deuterium leads to a high density contrast in neutron Fourier maps. In this study, a technique for determining the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) contrast map in neutron macromolecular crystallography is developed and evaluated using ribonuclease A. The contrast map between the D2O-solvent and H2O-solvent crystals is calculated in real space, rather than in reciprocal space as performed in previous neutron D/H contrast crystallography. The present technique can thus utilize all of the amplitudes of the neutron structure factors for both D2O-solvent and H2O-solvent crystals. The neutron D/H contrast maps clearly demonstrate the powerful detectability of H/D exchange in proteins. In fact, alternative protonation states and alternative conformations of hydroxyl groups are observed at medium resolution (1.8 Å). Moreover, water molecules can be categorized into three types according to their tendency towards rotational disorder. These results directly indicate improvement in the neutron crystal structure analysis. This technique is suitable for incorporation into the standard structure-determination process used in neutron protein crystallography; consequently, more precise and efficient determination of the D-atom positions is possible using a combination of this D/H contrast technique and standard neutron structure-determination protocols.

  19. cDNA-SRAP and Its Application in Differential Gene Expression Analysis: A Case Study in Erianthus arundinaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youxiong Que

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Erianthus arundinaceum is a wild relative species of sugarcane. The aim of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of cDNA-SRAP for differential gene expression and to explore the molecular mechanism of drought resistance in E. arundinaceum. cDNA-SRAP technique, for the first time, was applied in the analysis of differential gene expression in E. arundinaceum under drought stress. In total, eight differentially expressed genes with length of 185–427 bp were successfully isolated (GenBank Accession numbers: EU071770, EU071772, EU071774, EU071776, EU071777, EU071779, EU071780, and EU071781. Based on their homologies with genes in GenBank, these genes were assumed to encode ribonuclease III, vacuolar protein, ethylene insensitive protein, aerobactin biosynthesis protein, photosystem II protein, glucose transporter, leucine-rich repeat protein, and ammonia monooxygenase. Real-time PCR analysis on the expression profiling of gene (EU071774 encoding ethylene-insensitive protein and gene (EU071781 encoding ammonia monooxygenase revealed that the expression of these two genes was upregulated both by PEG and ABA treatments, suggesting that they may involve in the drought resistance of E. arundinaceum. This study constitutes the first report of genes activated in E. arundinaceum by drought stress and opens up the application of cDNA-SRAP in differential gene expression analysis in E. arundinaceum under certain stress conditions.

  20. A Specific Hepatic Transfer RNA for Phosphoserine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Pekka H.; Bernfield, Merton R.

    1970-01-01

    Radioactive O-phosphoryl-L-serine was detected after alkaline deacylation of rat and rooster liver [3H]seryl-tRNA acylated in vitro with homologous synthetases. Ribonuclease treatment of this tRNA yielded a compound with the properties of phosphoseryl-adenosine. Benzoylated DEAE-cellulose chromatography of seryl-tRNA yielded four distinct peaks, only one of which contained phosphoserine. A unique fraction for phosphoserine was also found on chromatography of nonacylated tRNA. In ribosome binding studies, this fraction responded very slightly with poly(U,C), but not with any of the known serine trinucleotide codons. Substantial incorporation of [3H]-serine into protein from this tRNA species was observed in an aminoacyl-tRNA dependent polysomal system derived from chick oviducts. No phosphoserine was found in Escherichia coli or yeast seryl-tRNA acylated with homologous enzymes, nor in E. coli seryl-tRNA acylated with liver synthetase. In the absence of tRNA, free phosphoserine was not formed in reaction mixtures, which suggests that phosphoseryl-tRNA arises by phosphorylation of the unique seryl-tRNA species. These results demonstrate a discrete tRNASer species in rat and rooster liver containing phosphoserine and suggest that this tRNA is involved in ribosomal polypeptide synthesis. PMID:4943179

  1. A Solvatochromic Model Calibrates Nitriles’ Vibrational Frequencies to Electrostatic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Sayan; Fried, Stephen D.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions provide a primary connection between a protein’s three-dimensional structure and its function. Infrared (IR) probes are useful because vibrational frequencies of certain chemical groups, such as nitriles, are linearly sensitive to local electrostatic field, and can serve as a molecular electric field meter. IR spectroscopy has been used to study electrostatic changes or fluctuations in proteins, but measured peak frequencies have not been previously mapped to total electric fields, because of the absence of a field-frequency calibration and the complication of local chemical effects such as H-bonds. We report a solvatochromic model that provides a means to assess the H-bonding status of aromatic nitrile vibrational probes, and calibrates their vibrational frequencies to electrostatic field. The analysis involves correlations between the nitrile’s IR frequency and its 13C chemical shift, whose observation is facilitated by a robust method for introducing isotopes into aromatic nitriles. The method is tested on the model protein Ribonuclease S (RNase S) containing a labeled p-CN-Phe near the active site. Comparison of the measurements in RNase S against solvatochromic data gives an estimate of the average total electrostatic field at this location. The value determined agrees quantitatively with MD simulations, suggesting broader potential for the use of IR probes in the study of protein electrostatics. PMID:22694663

  2. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G. Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the ‘footprint’ of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7.

  3. Prokaryotic Argonautes - variations on the RNA interference theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Oost, John; Swarts, Daan C.; Jore, Matthijs M.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) has been a major scientific breakthrough. This RNA-guided RNA interference system plays a crucial role in a wide range of regulatory and defense mechanisms in eukaryotes. The key enzyme of the RNAi system is Argonaute (Ago), an endo-ribonuclease that uses a small RNA guide molecule to specifically target a complementary RNA transcript. Two functional classes of eukaryotic Ago have been described: catalytically active Ago that cleaves RNA targets complementary to its guide, and inactive Ago that uses its guide to bind target RNA to down-regulate translation efficiency. A recent comparative genomics study has revealed that Argonaute-like proteins are also encoded by prokaryotic genomes. Interestingly, there is a lot of variation among these prokaryotic Argonaute (pAgo) proteins with respect to domain architecture: some resemble the eukaryotic Ago (long pAgo) containing a complete or disrupted catalytic site, while others are truncated versions (short pAgo) that generally contain an incomplete catalytic site. Prokaryotic Agos with an incomplete catalytic site often co-occur with (predicted) nucleases. Based on this diversity, and on the fact that homologs of other RNAi-related protein components (such as Dicer nucleases) have never been identified in prokaryotes, it has been predicted that variations on the eukaryotic RNAi theme may occur in prokaryotes. PMID:28357239

  4. Harnessing CRISPR/Cas systems for programmable transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation

    KAUST Repository

    Mahas, Ahmed; Neal Stewart, C.; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing has enabled broad advances and novel approaches in studies of gene function and structure; now, emerging methods aim to precisely engineer post-transcriptional processes. Developing precise, efficient molecular tools to alter the transcriptome holds great promise for biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Different approaches have been employed for targeted degradation of RNA species in eukaryotes, but they lack programmability and versatility, thereby limiting their utility for diverse applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been harnessed for genome editing in many eukaryotic species and, using a catalytically inactive Cas9 variant, the CRISPR/dCas9 system has been repurposed for transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have used other CRISPR/Cas systems for targeted RNA degradation and RNA-based manipulations. For example, Cas13a, a Type VI-A endonuclease, has been identified as an RNA-guided RNA ribonuclease and used for manipulation of RNA. Here, we discuss different modalities for targeted RNA interference with an emphasis on the potential applications of CRISPR/Cas systems as programmable transcriptional regulators for broad uses, including functional biology, biotechnology, and synthetic biology applications.

  5. Association between SNPs in microRNA-machinery genes and tuberculosis susceptibility in Chinese Tibetan population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xingbo; Li, Siyue; QuCuo, MeiLang; Zhou, MeiLang; Zhou, Yi; Hu, Xin; Zhou, Juan; Lu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jun; Hua, Wei; Ye, Yuanxin; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Lanlan

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality caused by infectious agents worldwide. Although our current understanding of the pathogenesis of TB is far from clear, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting a genetic contribution to the etiology of TB. By analyzing 294 TB cases and 287 healthy controls in a Chinese Tibetan population, we used a candidate gene approach to evaluate the association between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10719, rs3757, rs3742330, rs636832, rs7813, and rs3744741) in microRNA machinery genes and TB susceptibility. The genotypic distributions of rs3757 and rs3744741 in controls were not in accordance with the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (P microRNA-632 (miR-632) and that the G allele alters the affinity of microRNA-mRNA binding by disrupting the local structure of dicer 1, ribonuclease type III (DICER) mRNA, presumably allowing for upregulated DICER expression. Taken together, our data suggest that common genetic variations DICER may influence TB risk, possibly through miR-632-mediated regulation. Replication of our studies in other populations will strengthen our understanding of this association.

  6. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xincang [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Lu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Jinxing [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin Wenrui, E-mail: jwr@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-01-24

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10{sup -14} mol L{sup -1}. Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  7. Towards tricking a pathogen's protease into fighting infection: the 3D structure of a stable circularly permuted onconase variant cleavedby HIV-1 protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Callís

    Full Text Available Onconase® is a highly cytotoxic amphibian homolog of Ribonuclease A. Here, we describe the construction of circularly permuted Onconase® variants by connecting the N- and C-termini of this enzyme with amino acid residues that are recognized and cleaved by the human immunodeficiency virus protease. Uncleaved circularly permuted Onconase® variants are unusually stable, non-cytotoxic and can internalize in human T-lymphocyte Jurkat cells. The structure, stability and dynamics of an intact and a cleaved circularly permuted Onconase® variant were determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and provide valuable insight into the changes in catalytic efficiency caused by the cleavage. The understanding of the structural environment and the dynamics of the activation process represents a first step toward the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of diseases related to pathogens expressing a specific protease. By taking advantage of the protease's activity to initiate a cytotoxic cascade, this approach is thought to be less susceptible to known resistance mechanisms.

  8. Response of tissue lysosomes in Gamma-irradiated rats and possible modulation through diclofenac treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.H.S.; Abu-Ghadeer, A.R.M.; Osman, S.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of pre and post-irradiation treatment of rats with diclofenac (5 mg kg-1) for modulating the damaging effect of radiation on tissue lysosomes was investigated. The parameters used for this study were the activity level of acid phosphatase (ACP) and acid ribonuclease (RNase) activities, both being hydrolytic enzymes of lysosomes. The activities of ACP and RNase in liver, spleen, intestine, kidney, lung and brain were determined at different times up to 14 days after irradiation (4(Gy). Lysosomal affection was represented by time dependent significant increase in ACP activity in all the tissue homogenates of the investigated organs 3, 7 and 14 days after irradiation at 4 Gy. Gamma irradiation at 4 Gy resulted also in a significant rise in RNase activity of all the tissue organs 3 days post-irradiation. However, gradual decrease in the enzyme activity was recorded 7 and 14 days following irradiation. Diclofenac, pre (as prophylactic) and post (as therapeutic) irradiation treatment of rats successfully restored the increase in the enzymatic activities of ACP and RNase nearly to their normal levels in all the investigated organs. The beneficial effect of diclofenac inhibited completely the effect of irradiation at 14 days post-exposure. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Reactions of tobacco genotypes with different antioxidant capacities to powdery mildew and Tobacco mosaic virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullner, Gábor; Juhász, Csilla; Németh, Adél; Barna, Balázs

    2017-10-01

    The interactions of powdery mildew (Golovinomyces orontii) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with tobacco lines having down or upregulated antioxidants were investigated. Xanthi-nc, its salicylic acid-deficient NahG mutant, a paraquat-sensitive Samsun (PS) and its paraquat tolerant (PT) mutant were used. Cell membrane damage caused by H 2 O 2 was significantly higher in NahG than Xanthi, whereas it was lower in PT than in PS. Leakage of ions from PT was reduced by the powdery mildew infection. On the other hand TMV inoculation led to a 6-fold and 2-fold elevation of ion leakage from hypersensitive resistant NahG and Xanthi leaves, respectively, whereas ion leakage increased slightly from susceptible PS leaves. G. orontii infection induced ribonuclease (RNase) enzyme activity in extracts from Xanthi and NahG (about 200-250% increase) and weakly (about 20-30% increase) from PS and PT lines. Pre-treatment with protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine or protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid very strongly inhibited mildew development on tobacco lines. Our experiments suggest that protein kinases inhibited by staurosporine seem to be important factors, while protein phosphatases inhibited by okadaic acid play less significant role in TMV-induced lesion development. Both powdery mildew and TMV infections up-regulated the expression of PR-1b, PR-1c and WRKY12 genes in all tobacco lines to various extents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: The Role of Angiogenin, a Secreted RNase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela M. Aparicio-Erriu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of motoneurons. The precise molecular and cellular basis for neuronal death is not yet well established, but the contemporary view is that it is a culmination of multiple aberrant biological processes. Among the proposed mechanisms of motoneuron degeneration, alterations in the homeostasis of RNA binding proteins (RBP and the consequent changes in RNA metabolism have received attention recently.The ribonuclease, angiogenin was one of the first RBPs associated with familial and sporadic ALS. It is enriched in motoneurons under physiological conditions, and is required for motoneuron survival under stress conditions. Furthermore, delivery of angiogenin protects cultured motoneurons against stress-induced injury, and significantly increases the survival of motoneurons in SODG93A mice. In this overview on the role of angiogenin in RNA metabolism and in the control of motoneuron survival, we discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms of angiogenin dysfunction relevant to ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. We also discuss recent evidence demonstrating that angiogenin secreted from stressed motoneurons may alter RNA metabolism in astrocytes.

  11. Differential amplicons (ΔAmp)-a new molecular method to assess RNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, J; Švec, D; Lott, E; Kubista, M; Sjöback, R

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of the mRNA in clinical samples has major impact on the quality of measured expression levels. This is independent of the measurement technique being next generation sequencing (NGS), Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or microarray profiling. If mRNA is highly degraded or damaged, measured data will be very unreliable and the whole study is likely a waste of time and money. It is therefore common strategy to test the quality of RNA in samples before conducting large and costly studies. Most methods today to assess the quality of RNA are ignorant to the nature of the RNA and, therefore, reflect the integrity of ribosomal RNA, which is the dominant species, rather than of mRNAs, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, which usually are the species of interest. Here, we present a novel molecular approach to assess the quality of the targeted RNA species by measuring the differential amplification (ΔAmp) of an Endogenous RNase Resistant (ERR) marker relative to a reference gene, optionally combined with the measurement of two amplicons of different lengths. The combination reveals any mRNA degradation caused by ribonucleases as well as physical, chemical or UV damage. ΔAmp has superior sensitivity to common microfluidic electrophoretic methods, senses the integrity of the actual targeted RNA species, and allows for a smoother and more cost efficient workflow.

  12. Differential amplicons (ΔAmp—a new molecular method to assess RNA integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Björkman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrity of the mRNA in clinical samples has major impact on the quality of measured expression levels. This is independent of the measurement technique being next generation sequencing (NGS, Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR or microarray profiling. If mRNA is highly degraded or damaged, measured data will be very unreliable and the whole study is likely a waste of time and money. It is therefore common strategy to test the quality of RNA in samples before conducting large and costly studies. Most methods today to assess the quality of RNA are ignorant to the nature of the RNA and, therefore, reflect the integrity of ribosomal RNA, which is the dominant species, rather than of mRNAs, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, which usually are the species of interest. Here, we present a novel molecular approach to assess the quality of the targeted RNA species by measuring the differential amplification (ΔAmp of an Endogenous RNase Resistant (ERR marker relative to a reference gene, optionally combined with the measurement of two amplicons of different lengths. The combination reveals any mRNA degradation caused by ribonucleases as well as physical, chemical or UV damage. ΔAmp has superior sensitivity to common microfluidic electrophoretic methods, senses the integrity of the actual targeted RNA species, and allows for a smoother and more cost efficient workflow.

  13. Extract of grapefruit-seed reduces acute pancreatitis induced by ischemia/reperfusion in rats: possible implication of tissue antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, A; Warzecha, Z; Konturek, S J; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Pawlik, W W; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Naskalski, J W

    2004-12-01

    Grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been shown to exert antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity possibly due to the presence of naringenin, the flavonoid with cytoprotective action on the gastric mucosa. No study so far has been undertaken to determine whether this GSE is also capable of preventing acute pancreatic damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which is known to result from reduction of anti-oxidative capability of pancreatic tissue, and whether its possible preventive effect involves an antioxidative action of this biocomponent. In this study carried out on rats with acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis induced by 30 min partial pancreatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion, the GSE or vehicle (vegetable glycerin) was applied intragastrically in gradually increasing amounts (50-500 microl) 30 min before I/R. Pretreatment with GSE decreased the extent of pancreatitis with maximal protective effect of GSE at the dose 250 microl. GSE reduced the pancreatitis-evoked increase in serum lipase and poly-C specific ribonuclease activity, and attenuated the marked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. GSE administered alone increased significantly pancreatic tissue content of lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkens, and when administered before I/R, GSE reduced the pancreatitis-induced lipid peroxidation. We conclude that GSE exerts protective activity against I/R-induced pancreatitis probably due to the activation of antioxidative mechanisms in the pancreas and the improvement of pancreatic blood flow.

  14. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value.

  15. Effect of RNase E deficiency on translocon protein synthesis in an RNase E-inducible strain of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Patricia B; Thuraisamy, Thujitha; Richards, Jamie; Belasco, Joel G

    2017-07-06

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a food-borne pathogen that assembles a type III secretion system (T3SS) on its surface. The last portion of the T3SS, called the 'translocon', is composed of a filament and a pore complex that is inserted into the membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. The genes encoding the translocon (espADB) are part of the LEE4 operon. Their expression is regulated by a complex post-transcriptional mechanism that involves the processing of LEE4 mRNA by the essential endoribonuclease RNase E. Here, we report the construction of an EHEC strain (TEA028-rne) in which RNase E can be induced by adding IPTG to the culture medium. EHEC cells deficient in RNase E displayed an abnormal morphology and slower growth, in agreement with published observations in E. coli K-12. Under those conditions, EspA and EspB were produced at higher concentrations, and protein secretion still occurred. These results indicate that RNase E negatively regulates translocon protein synthesis and demonstrate the utility of E. coli strain TEA028-rne as a tool for investigating the influence of this ribonuclease on EHEC gene expression in vitro. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Strategies for protection and experiments on repair of irradiated sulfhydryl enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Zipper, P.

    1991-01-01

    The investigation of sulfur-containing biomolecules, especially of sulfhydryl proteins, is of particular interest in radiation biology. Sulfhydryl enzymes are useful objects for studying both structural and functional changes caused by radiation. In this context oxidation of enzyme sulfhydryl, inactivation (continuing in the post-irradiation phase), subunit cross-linking, enzyme aggregation, fragmentation, unfolding etc. may be mentioned. For their studies the authors used primarily malate synthase (MS), an enzyme with essential sulfhydryl, which was X-irradiated in aqueous solution in the absence or presence of a variety of additives (thiols, antioxienzymes, typical radical scavengers, inorganic salts, buffer components, substrates, products, substrate and product analogues). Radiation-induced effects were registered during irradiation, after stop of irradiation, and in the post-radiation (p.r.) phase 30 or 60 h p.r. using, e.g., small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses (PAGEs), and activity measurements. Repair experiments were initiated by p.r. addition of dithiothreitol (DTT). For comparison, some of the experiments were also carried out with two additional sulfhydryl enzymes (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) and two disulfide containing proteins (ribonuclease A, serum albumin). 9 refs., 6 figs

  17. Crystal structure of the RNase T1 Gp c U complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arni, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Full text. Ribonuclease T 1 (RNase T 1 ; EC 3.1.27.3) a member of an extensive gene family of orthologous enzymes from fungi and bacteria that display sequence and structural homology. RNase T 1 is a guanine specific extracellular enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae that cleaves single stranded RNA by catalytic transesterification of 3,5 diester links to 2,3 cyclic diesters at guanylyl residues followed by their catalytic hydrolysis to corresponding 3 monoester. It has been suggested that subsites at both the 5 and 3 sides of a cleavable guanylyl residue in RNA substrates exist. The structure of the monomeric RNase T 1 2 guanosine mono phosphate was determined at 1.9 A resolution using syncrotron radiation (Arni et al. 1987) and revealed the specific interactions at the base recognition and catalytic sites (Arni et al., 1988). The structure of native RNase T 1 indicated the conformational changes of the amino acids forming the base recognition site (Arni et al., 1992). This protein has now been crystallized with Gpc U (Guanylyl (3,6) 6 deoxyhomouridine) which is an isosteric phosphonate analogue of the RNA fragment GpU (Guanylyl (3,5) Uridine), with the 5 oxygen of the uridine moiety replaced by a methylene. The structure has been determined and refined at 2.0 A resolution and indicates the existence of subsites and a novel ribose interaction. (author)

  18. Multi-target activity of Hemidesmus indicus decoction against innovative HIV-1 drug targets and characterization of Lupeol mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Francesca; Mandrone, Manuela; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Carli, Ilaria; Distinto, Simona; Corona, Angela; Lianza, Mariacaterina; Piano, Dario; Tacchini, Massimo; Maccioni, Elias; Cottiglia, Filippo; Saccon, Elisa; Poli, Ferruccio; Parolin, Cristina; Tramontano, Enzo

    2017-08-31

    Despite the availability of several anti-retrovirals, there is still an urgent need for developing novel therapeutic strategies and finding new drugs against underexplored HIV-1 targets. Among them, there are the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) function and the cellular α-glucosidase, involved in the control mechanisms of N-linked glycoproteins formation in the endoplasmic reticulum. It is known that many natural compounds, such as pentacyclic triterpenes, are a promising class of HIV-1 inhibitors. Hence, here we tested the pentacyclic triterpene Lupeol, showing that it inhibits the HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H function. We then performed combination studies of Lupeol and the active site RNase H inhibitor RDS1759, and blind docking calculations, demonstrating that Lupeol binds to an HIV-1 RT allosteric pocket. On the bases of these results and searching for potential multitarget active drug supplement, we also investigated the anti-HIV-1 activity of Hemidesmus indicus, an Ayurveda medicinal plant containing Lupeol. Results supported the potential of this plant as a valuable multitarget active drug source. In fact, by virtue of its numerous active metabolites, H. indicus was able to inhibit not only the RT-associated RNase H function, but also the HIV-1 RT-associated RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity and the cellular α-glucosidase. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Structures and Functions of Pestivirus Glycoproteins: Not Simply Surface Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fun-In Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses, which include economically important animal pathogens such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and classical swine fever virus, possess three envelope glycoproteins, namely Erns, E1, and E2. This article discusses the structures and functions of these glycoproteins and their effects on viral pathogenicity in cells in culture and in animal hosts. E2 is the most important structural protein as it interacts with cell surface receptors that determine cell tropism and induces neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. All three glycoproteins are involved in virus attachment and entry into target cells. E1-E2 heterodimers are essential for viral entry and infectivity. Erns is unique because it possesses intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase activity that can inhibit the production of type I interferons and assist in the development of persistent infections. These glycoproteins are localized to the virion surface; however, variations in amino acids and antigenic structures, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and RNase activity can ultimately affect the virulence of pestiviruses in animals. Along with mutations that are driven by selection pressure, antigenic differences in glycoproteins influence the efficacy of vaccines and determine the appropriateness of the vaccines that are currently being used in the field.

  20. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a {beta}-turn and an {alpha}-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the {alpha}-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences.

  1. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a β-turn and an α-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the α-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences

  2. Protein flexibility: coordinate uncertainties and interpretation of structural differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashin, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander-rashin@hotmail.com [BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States); LH Baker Center for Bioinformatics and Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, 112 Office and Lab Building, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Rashin, Abraham H. L. [BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States); Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 22371 BPO WAY, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8123 (United States); Jernigan, Robert L. [LH Baker Center for Bioinformatics and Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, 112 Office and Lab Building, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Criteria for the interpretability of coordinate differences and a new method for identifying rigid-body motions and nonrigid deformations in protein conformational changes are developed and applied to functionally induced and crystallization-induced conformational changes. Valid interpretations of conformational movements in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography require that the movement magnitudes exceed their uncertainty threshold. Here, it is shown that such thresholds can be obtained from the distance difference matrices (DDMs) of 1014 pairs of independently determined structures of bovine ribonuclease A and sperm whale myoglobin, with no explanations provided for reportedly minor coordinate differences. The smallest magnitudes of reportedly functional motions are just above these thresholds. Uncertainty thresholds can provide objective criteria that distinguish between true conformational changes and apparent ‘noise’, showing that some previous interpretations of protein coordinate changes attributed to external conditions or mutations may be doubtful or erroneous. The use of uncertainty thresholds, DDMs, the newly introduced CDDMs (contact distance difference matrices) and a novel simple rotation algorithm allows a more meaningful classification and description of protein motions, distinguishing between various rigid-fragment motions and nonrigid conformational deformations. It is also shown that half of 75 pairs of identical molecules, each from the same asymmetric crystallographic cell, exhibit coordinate differences that range from just outside the coordinate uncertainty threshold to the full magnitude of large functional movements. Thus, crystallization might often induce protein conformational changes that are comparable to those related to or induced by the protein function.

  3. Hexose rearrangements upon fragmentation of N-glycopeptides and reductively aminated N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhrer, Manfred; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Deelder, André M

    2009-06-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry of glycans and glycoconjugates in protonated form is known to result in rearrangement reactions leading to internal residue loss. Here we studied the occurrence of hexose rearrangements in tandem mass spectrometry of N-glycopeptides and reductively aminated N-glycans by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS and ESI-ion trap-MS/MS. Fragmentation of proton adducts of oligomannosidic N-glycans of ribonuclease B that were labeled with 2-aminobenzamide and 2-aminobenzoic acid resulted in transfer of one to five hexose residues to the fluorescently tagged innermost N-acetylglucosamine. Glycopeptides from various biological sources with oligomannosidic glycans were likewise shown to undergo hexose rearrangement reactions, resulting in chitobiose cleavage products that have acquired one or two hexose moieties. Tryptic immunoglobulin G Fc-glycopeptides with biantennary N-glycans likewise showed hexose rearrangements resulting in hexose transfer to the peptide moiety retaining the innermost N-acetylglucosamine. Thus, as a general phenomenon, tandem mass spectrometry of reductively aminated glycans as well as glycopeptides may result in hexose rearrangements. This characteristic of glycopeptide MS/MS has to be considered when developing tools for de novo glycopeptide structural analysis.

  4. Melanocortin-4 receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in rat cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, Kathleen G; Jenny Wu, C-S; Dumont, Laurence M; Wild, J Martin

    2003-12-01

    We determined melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R) mRNA ontogeny in the rat using in situ hybridization and a rat MC4-R riboprobe and showed numerous peripheral sites of expression for MC4-R. The developing heart showed MC4-R mRNA expression as early as embryonic day (E) 14. In the lungs of E16-E20 fetuses, the cells surrounding developing bronchi expressed relatively strong in situ signal. Muscles associated with the respiratory system such as diaphragm and intercostal muscle expressed MC4-R mRNA as early as E14. Occipital and tongue muscles, in particular the genioglossus, showed diffuse signal at E15-E20. In the eye, a discrete signal was detected in an outer neuroblastic layer which may correspond to retina or extraocular muscle. Developing limb buds expressed relatively strong signal at E14, whereas skull bone and joint capsules of the paw of the forelimb showed signal at E18-E20. Using RT-PCR and ribonuclease protection assays, we determined that MC4-R mRNA is also expressed in adult rat heart, lung, kidney, and testis. The expression of the MC4-R in cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems supports functional roles for the MC4-R in addition to its roles in appetite, weight control, and regulation of linear growth.

  5. Urinary tract infection: recent insight into the evolutionary arms race between uropathogenic Escherichia coli and our immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Sebastian; Jobin, Katarzyna; Kurts, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections worldwide. Humans evolved various immune-dependent and independent defense mechanisms, while pathogens evolved multiple virulence factors to fight back. This article summarizes recent findings regarding the arms race between hosts and pathogens in UTIs. It was recently reported that macrophage subsets regulate neutrophil-mediated defense in primary UTIs but seem to subvert adaptive immunity upon re-infection. Moreover, some bacterial strains can survive inside macrophages, leading to recurrent infections. Inflammasome activation results in infected host cell death and pathogen release, facilitating the removal of intracellular bacteria. As a counteraction, some bacteria evolved mechanisms to disrupt inflammasome activation. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells are further effectors that can lyse infected epithelial cells and release intracellular bacteria. Once released, the bacteria are phagocytosed by neutrophils. However, some bacteria can inhibit neutrophil migration and deprive neutrophils of nutrients. Furthermore, the complement system, considered generally bactericidal, is exploited by the bacteria for cellular invasion. Another weapon against UTI is antimicrobial peptides, e.g. ribonuclease 7, but its production is inhibited by certain bacterial strains. Thus the arms race in UTI is ongoing, and knowing the enemy's methods can help in developing new drugs to win the race. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure of a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) family protein from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of a novel MACPF protein, which may play a role in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to host environments in the human gut, was determined and analyzed. Membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) proteins are transmembrane pore-forming proteins that are important in both human immunity and the virulence of pathogens. Bacterial MACPFs are found in diverse bacterial species, including most human gut-associated Bacteroides species. The crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF-domain-containing protein BT-3439 (Bth-MACPF) from B. thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the mammalian intestinal microbiota, has been determined. Bth-MACPF contains a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and two novel C-terminal domains that resemble ribonuclease H and interleukin 8, respectively. The entire protein adopts a flat crescent shape, characteristic of other MACPF proteins, that may be important for oligomerization. This Bth-MACPF structure provides new features and insights not observed in two previous MACPF structures. Genomic context analysis infers that Bth-MACPF may be involved in a novel protein-transport or nutrient-uptake system, suggesting an important role for these MACPF proteins, which were likely to have been inherited from eukaryotes via horizontal gene transfer, in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to the host environment

  7. Comparison of preribosomal RNA processing pathways in yeast, plant and human cells - focus on coordinated action of endo- and exoribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Sikorski, Pawel J; Zakrzewska-Placzek, Monika

    2017-07-01

    Proper regulation of ribosome biosynthesis is mandatory for cellular adaptation, growth and proliferation. Ribosome biogenesis is the most energetically demanding cellular process, which requires tight control. Abnormalities in ribosome production have severe consequences, including developmental defects in plants and genetic diseases (ribosomopathies) in humans. One of the processes occurring during eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis is processing of the ribosomal RNA precursor molecule (pre-rRNA), synthesized by RNA polymerase I, into mature rRNAs. It must not only be accurate but must also be precisely coordinated with other phenomena leading to the synthesis of functional ribosomes: RNA modification, RNA folding, assembly with ribosomal proteins and nucleocytoplasmic RNP export. A multitude of ribosome biogenesis factors ensure that these events take place in a correct temporal order. Among them are endo- and exoribonucleases involved in pre-rRNA processing. Here, we thoroughly present a wide spectrum of ribonucleases participating in rRNA maturation, focusing on their biochemical properties, regulatory mechanisms and substrate specificity. We also discuss cooperation between various ribonucleolytic activities in particular stages of pre-rRNA processing, delineating major similarities and differences between three representative groups of eukaryotes: yeast, plants and humans. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Reversible conformational transition gives rise to 'zig-zag' temperature dependence of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky VYu; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Siksnis, V A; Grinberg VYa; Burova, T V; Levashov, A V; Mozhaev, V V

    1994-01-15

    We have obtained unusual 'zig-zag' temperature dependencies of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation (k(in)) of enzymes (alpha-chymotrypsin, covalently modified alpha-chymotrypsin, and ribonuclease) in a plot of log k(in) versus reciprocal temperature (Arrhenius plot). These dependencies are characterized by the presence of both ascending and descending linear portions which have positive and negative values of the effective activation energy (Ea), respectively. A kinetic scheme has been suggested that fits best for a description of these zig-zag dependencies. A key element of this scheme is the temperature-dependent reversible conformational transition of enzyme from the 'low-temperature' native state to a 'high-temperature' denatured form; the latter form is significantly more stable against irreversible thermoinactivation than the native enzyme. A possible explanation for a difference in thermal stabilities is that low-temperature and high-temperature forms are inactivated according to different mechanisms. Existence of the suggested conformational transition was proved by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The values of delta H and delta S for this transition, determined from calorimetric experiments, are highly positive; this fact underlies a conclusion that this heat-induced transition is caused by an unfolding of the protein molecule. Surprisingly, in the unfolded high-temperature conformation, alpha-chymotrypsin has a pronounced proteolytic activity, although this activity is much smaller than that of the native enzyme.

  9. Origin of allelic diversity in antirrhinum S locus RNases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y; Carpenter, R; Dickinson, H G; Coen, E S

    1996-01-01

    In many plant species, self-incompatibility (SI) is genetically controlled by a single multiallelic S locus. Previous analysis of S alleles in the Solanaceae, in which S locus ribonucleases (S RNases) are responsible for stylar expression of SI, has demonstrated that allelic diversity predated speciation within this family. To understand how allelic diversity has evolved, we investigated the molecular basis of gametophytic SI in Antirrhinum, a member of the Scrophulariaceae, which is closely related to the Solanaceae. We have characterized three Antirrhinum cDNAs encoding polypeptides homologous to S RNases and shown that they are encoded by genes at the S locus. RNA in situ hybridization revealed that the Antirrhinum S RNase are primarily expressed in the stylar transmitting tissue. This expression is consistent with their proposed role in arresting the growth of self-pollen tubes. S alleles from the Scrophulariaceae form a separate group from those of the Solanaceae, indicating that new S alleles have been generated since these families separated (approximately 40 million years). We propose that the recruitment of an ancestral RNase gene into SI occurred during an early stage of angiosperm evolution and that, since that time, new alleles subsequently have arisen at a low rate. PMID:8672882

  10. An evaluation of the RNase H inhibitory effects of Vietnamese medicinal plant extracts and natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Bui Huu; Nhut, Nguyen Duy; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Quang, Tran Hong; Thanh Ngan, Nguyen Thi; Thuy Luyen, Bui Thi; Huong, Tran Thu; Wilson, Jennifer; Beutler, John A; Ban, Ninh Khac; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Kim, Young Ho

    2011-10-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a severe pandemic disease especially prevalent in poor and developing countries. Thus, developing specific, potent antiviral drugs that restrain infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a major cause of AIDS, remains an urgent priority. This study evaluated 32 extracts and 23 compounds from Vietnamese medicinal plants for their inhibitory effects against HIV-1 ribonuclease H (RNase H) and their role in reversing the cytopathic effects of HIV. The plants were air-dried and extracted in different solvent systems to produce plant extracts. Natural compounds were obtained as previously published. Samples were screened for RNase H inhibition followed by a cytopathic assay. Data were analyzed using the Microsoft Excel. At 50 μg/mL, 11 plant extracts and five compounds inhibited over 90% of RNase H enzymatic activity. Methanol extracts from Phyllanthus reticulatus and Aglaia aphanamixis leaves inhibited RNase H activity by 99 and 98%, respectively, whereas four extracts showed modest protection against the cytopathic effects of HIV. The screening results demonstrated that the butanol (BuOH) extract of Celastrus orbiculata leaves, methanol (MeOH) extracts of Glycosmis stenocarpa stems, Eurya ciliata leaves, and especially P. reticulatus leaves showed potential RNase H inhibition and protection against the viral cytopathic effects of HIV-1. Further chemical investigations should be carried out to find the active components of these extracts and compounds as potential anti-HIV drug candidates.

  11. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  12. Optimization of RNA Extraction from Rat Pancreatic Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Dastgheib

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optimized RNA extraction from tissues and cell lines consists of four main stages regardless of the method of extraction: 1 homogenizing, 2 effective denaturation of proteins from RNA, 3 inactivation of ribonuclease, and 4 removal of any DNA, protein, and carbohydrate contamination. Isolation of undamaged intact RNA is challenging when the related tissue contains high levels of RNase. Various technical difficulties occur during extraction of RNA from pancreatic tissue due to spontaneous autolysis. Since standard routine protocols yield unacceptable results in pancrease, we have designed a simple method for RNA extraction by comparing different protocols. Methods: We obtained 20-30 mg pancreatic tissues in less than 2 min from 30 rats. Several methods were performed to extract RNA from pancreatic tissue and evaluate its integrity. All methods were performed three times to obtain reproducible results. Results: Immersing pancreatic tissue in RNA-later for 24 h at -80ºC yielded high quality RNA by using the TriPure reagent which was comparable to the commercial RNeasy Micro Kit. The quality of RNA was evaluated by spectrophotometer, electrophoresis and RT-PCR. We separated intact 28S and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA when our procedure was compared with the RNeasy Micro Kit. Finally, full length of the actin gene was amplified by RT-PCR. Conclusion: We designed a simple, fast, cost-effective method for complete RNA extraction from the least amount of quantitatively intact pancreatic tissue

  13. Transglycosidase-like activity of Mucor hiemalis endoglycosidase mutants enabling the synthesis of glycoconjugates using a natural glycan donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Kouta; Katoh, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    Glycan conversion of glycoprotein via the transglycosylation activity of endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase is a promising chemoenzymatic technology for the production of glycoproteins including bio-medicines with a homogeneous glycoform. Although Endo-M is a key enzyme in this process, its product undergoes rehydrolysis, which leads to a lower yield, and limits the practical application of this enzyme. We developed several Endo-M mutant enzymes including N175Q with glycosynthase-like activity and/or transglycosidase-like activity. We found that the Endo-M N175H mutant showed glycosynthase-like activity comparable to N175Q as well as transglycosidase-like activity superior to N175Q. Using a natural sialylglycopeptide as a donor substrate, N175H readily transferred the sialo-glycan onto an N-acetylglucosamine residue attached to bovine ribonuclease B (RNase B), yielding a nonnative sialoglycosylated RNase B. These results demonstrate that use of Endo-M N175H is an alternative glycoengineering technique, which provides a relatively high yield of transglycosylation product and avoids the laborious synthesis of a sugar oxazoline as a donor substrate. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Characterization of the guinea pig 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta5-Delta4-isomerase expressed in the adrenal gland and gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, Francine; Sanchez, Rocio; Ricketts, Marie-Louise; Labrie, Yvan; Laudet, Vincent; Simard, Jacques

    2005-11-01

    The guinea pig adrenal gland, analogous to the human, possesses the capacity to synthesize C(19) steroids. In order to further understand the control of guinea pig adrenal steroidogenesis we undertook the characterization of the guinea pig 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta(5)-Delta(4)-isomerase (3beta-HSD) expressed in the adrenal gland. A cDNA clone encoding guinea pig 3beta-HSD isolated from a guinea pig adrenal library is predicted to encode a protein of 373 amino acid residues and 41,475Da. Ribonuclease protection assay suggests that this cDNA corresponds to the predominant, if not the sole, mRNA species detectable in total RNA from the guinea pig adrenal gland, ovary and testis. The guinea pig 3beta-HSD shows a similar affinity for both pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone, and in addition, a 17beta-HSD type II-like activity was also observed. A phylogenetical analysis of the 3beta-HSD gene family demonstrates that the guinea pig is in a parallel branch to the myomorpha group supporting the hypothesis that the guinea pig lineage has branched off after the divergence among primates, artiodactyls and rodents, suggesting the paraphyly of the order rodentia.

  15. The innate defense antimicrobial peptides hBD3 and RNase7 are induced in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by classical inflammatory cytokines but not Th17 cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgey, Christine; Kern, Winfried V; Römer, Winfried; Sakinc, Türkan; Rieg, Siegbert

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are multifunctional effector molecules of innate immunity. In this study we investigated whether endothelial cells actively contribute to innate defense mechanisms by expression of antimicrobial peptides. We therefore stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with inflammatory cytokines, Th17 cytokines, heat-inactivated bacteria, bacterial conditioned medium (BCM) of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus sanguinis, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Stimulation with single cytokines induced discrete expression of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) by IFN-γ or IL-1β and of ribonuclease 7 (RNase7) by TNF-α without any effects on LL-37 gene expression. Stronger hBD3 and RNase7 induction was observed after combined stimulation with IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ and was confirmed by high hBD3 and RNase7 peptide levels in cell culture supernatants. In contrast, Th17 cytokines or stimulation with LTA did not result in AMP production. Moreover, only BCM of an invasive S. aureus bacteremia isolate induced hBD3 in HUVEC. We conclude that endothelial cells actively contribute to prevent dissemination of pathogens at the blood-tissue-barrier by production of AMPs that exhibit microbicidal and immunomodulatory functions. Further investigations should focus on tissue-specific AMP induction in different endothelial cell types, on pathogen-specific induction patterns and potentially involved pattern-recognition receptors of endothelial cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. PDB2Graph: A toolbox for identifying critical amino acids map in proteins based on graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam, Niloofar; Khakzad, Hamed; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    The integrative and cooperative nature of protein structure involves the assessment of topological and global features of constituent parts. Network concept takes complete advantage of both of these properties in the analysis concomitantly. High compatibility to structural concepts or physicochemical properties in addition to exploiting a remarkable simplification in the system has made network an ideal tool to explore biological systems. There are numerous examples in which different protein structural and functional characteristics have been clarified by the network approach. Here, we present an interactive and user-friendly Matlab-based toolbox, PDB2Graph, devoted to protein structure network construction, visualization, and analysis. Moreover, PDB2Graph is an appropriate tool for identifying critical nodes involved in protein structural robustness and function based on centrality indices. It maps critical amino acids in protein networks and can greatly aid structural biologists in selecting proper amino acid candidates for manipulating protein structures in a more reasonable and rational manner. To introduce the capability and efficiency of PDB2Graph in detail, the structural modification of Calmodulin through allosteric binding of Ca(2+) is considered. In addition, a mutational analysis for three well-identified model proteins including Phage T4 lysozyme, Barnase and Ribonuclease HI, was performed to inspect the influence of mutating important central residues on protein activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological Activities of Aerial Parts Extracts of Euphorbia characias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Barbara Pisano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-HIV, and cholinesterase inhibitory activities of aqueous and alcoholic extracts from leaves, stems, and flowers of Euphorbia characias. The extracts showed a high antioxidant activity and were a good source of total polyphenols and flavonoids. Ethanolic extracts from leaves and flowers displayed the highest inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, showing potential properties against Alzheimer’s disease. Antimicrobial assay showed that leaves and flowers extracts were active against all Gram-positive bacteria tested. The ethanolic leaves extract appeared to have the strongest antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus with MIC value of 312.5 μg/mL followed by Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus that also exhibited good sensitivity with MIC values of 1250 μg/mL. Moreover, all the extracts possessed anti-HIV activity. The ethanolic flower extract was the most potent inhibitor of HIV-1 RT DNA polymerase RNA-dependent and Ribonuclease H with IC50 values of 0.26 and 0.33 μg/mL, respectively. The LC-DAD metabolic profile showed that ethanolic leaves extract contains high levels of quercetin derivatives. This study suggests that Euphorbia characias extracts represent a good source of natural bioactive compounds which could be useful for pharmaceutical application as well as in food system for the prevention of the growth of food-borne bacteria and to extend the shelf-life of processed foods.

  18. A Low-Cost and Portable Dual-Channel Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Liu, Yun; Chen, Shimeng; Wang, Fang; Peng, Wei

    2017-12-04

    A miniaturization and integration dual-channel fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system was proposed and demonstrated in this paper. We used a yellow light-emitting diode (LED, peak wavelength 595 nm) and built-in web camera as a light source and detector, respectively. Except for the detection channel, one of the sensors was used as a reference channel to compensate nonspecific binding and physical absorption. We packaged the LED and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors together, which are flexible enough to be applied to mobile devices as a compact and portable system. Experimental results show that the normalized intensity shift and refractive index (RI) of the sample have a good linear relationship in the RI range from 1.328 to 1.348. We used this sensor to monitor the reversible, specific interaction between lectin concanavalin A (Con A) and glycoprotein ribonuclease B (RNase B), which demonstrate its capabilities of specific identification and biochemical samples concentration detection. This sensor system has potential applications in various fields, such as medical diagnosis, public health, food safety, and environment monitoring.

  19. Alanine Counteracts the Destabilizing Effect that Urea has on RNase-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowhan, Rimpy K; Ali, Fasil; Bhat, Mohd Y; Rahman, Safikur; Singh, Laishram R; Ahmad, Faizan; Dar, Tanveer A

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that organisms use and accumulate methylamine osmolytes to prevent urea's damaging effect on protein stability and activity. However, urea-rich cells not only accumulate methylamines but also many other methylated and non-methylated compounds as well. But, so far it is not known whether osmolytes that are not accumulated in urea-rich cells could also confer urea-counteracting properties. We investigated the behavior of a non-methylamine osmolyte, alanine for its counteracting effect against urea denaturation of a model protein, ribonuclease A (RNase-A). We have measured structure and thermodynamic parameters (Tm, ΔHm, and ΔGD°) of RNase-A in the presence of alanine, urea and their combination. The results were also compared with the ability of glycine (osmolyte lacking one methyl group when compared with alanine) to counter urea's effect on protein stability. We observed that alanine but not glycine counteracts urea's harmful effect on RNase-A stability. The results indicated that alanine (in addition to methylamine osmolytes) may serve as an alternate urea-counteractant. Since glycine fails to protect RNase-A from urea's destabilizing effect, it seems that methylation to glycine might have some evolutionary significance to protect proteins against harmful effects of urea.

  20. From Cells to Virus Particles: Quantitative Methods to Monitor RNA Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Ferrer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In cells, positive strand RNA viruses, such as Retroviridae, must selectively recognize their full-length RNA genome among abundant cellular RNAs to assemble and release particles. How viruses coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both RNA and protein components to the assembly sites of infectious particles at the cell surface remains a long-standing question. The mechanisms ensuring packaging of genomic RNA are essential for viral infectivity. Since RNA packaging impacts on several essential functions of retroviral replication such as RNA dimerization, translation and recombination events, there are many studies that require the determination of RNA packaging efficiency and/or RNA packaging ability. Studies of RNA encapsidation rely upon techniques for the identification and quantification of RNA species packaged by the virus. This review focuses on the different approaches available to monitor RNA packaging: Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase-coupled polymerase chain reaction as well as the most recent RNA imaging and sequencing technologies. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of these approaches will be discussed in order to help the investigator to choose the most appropriate technique. Although the review was written with the prototypic simple murine leukemia virus (MLV and complex human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in mind, the techniques were described in order to benefit to a larger community.

  1. Development of a Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) Based, High Throughput Screening Feasible Method for the Identification of PDE12 Activity Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Samuel; Bucher, Hannes; Nickolaus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology has been widely used to establish high throughput screens (HTS) for a range of targets in the pharmaceutical industry. PDE12 (aka. 2'- phosphodiesterase) has been published to participate in the degradation of oligoadenylates that are involved in the establishment of an antiviral state via the activation of ribonuclease L (RNAse-L). Degradation of oligoadenylates by PDE12 terminates these antiviral activities, leading to decreased resistance of cells for a variety of viral pathogens. Therefore inhibitors of PDE12 are discussed as antiviral therapy. Here we describe the use of the yttrium silicate SPA bead technology to assess inhibitory activity of compounds against PDE12 in a homogeneous, robust HTS feasible assay using tritiated adenosine-P-adenylate ([3H]ApA) as substrate. We found that the used [3H]ApA educt, was not able to bind to SPA beads, whereas the product [3H]AMP, as known before, was able to bind to SPA beads. This enables the measurement of PDE12 activity on [3H]ApA as a substrate using a wallac microbeta counter. This method describes a robust and high throughput capable format in terms of specificity, commonly used compound solvents, ease of detection and assay matrices. The method could facilitate the search for PDE12 inhibitors as antiviral compounds.

  2. Deep Sequence Analysis of AgoshRNA Processing Reveals 3' A Addition and Trimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwig, Alex; Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Jongejan, Aldo; van Kampen, Antonius Hubertus; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-07-14

    The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, in which microprocessor and Dicer collaborate to process microRNAs (miRNA), was recently expanded by the description of alternative processing routes. In one of these noncanonical pathways, Dicer action is replaced by the Argonaute2 (Ago2) slicer function. It was recently shown that the stem-length of precursor-miRNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) molecules is a major determinant for Dicer versus Ago2 processing. Here we present the results of a deep sequence study on the processing of shRNAs with different stem length and a top G·U wobble base pair (bp). This analysis revealed some unexpected properties of these so-called AgoshRNA molecules that are processed by Ago2 instead of Dicer. First, we confirmed the gradual shift from Dicer to Ago2 processing upon shortening of the hairpin length. Second, hairpins with a stem larger than 19 base pair are inefficiently cleaved by Ago2 and we noticed a shift in the cleavage site. Third, the introduction of a top G·U bp in a regular shRNA can promote Ago2-cleavage, which coincides with a loss of Ago2-loading of the Dicer-cleaved 3' strand. Fourth, the Ago2-processed AgoshRNAs acquire a short 3' tail of 1-3 A-nucleotides (nt) and we present evidence that this product is subsequently trimmed by the poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN).

  3. Immunohistochemical identification of messenger RNA-related proteins in basophilic inclusions of adult-onset atypical motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kengo; Ito, Hidefumi; Nakano, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Yoshimi; Wate, Reika; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2008-10-01

    This report concerns an immunohistochemical investigation on RNA-related proteins in the basophilic inclusions (BIs) from patients with adult-onset atypical motor neuron disease. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of the motor cortex and the lumbar spinal cord were examined. The BIs appeared blue in color with H&E and Nissl stain, and pink with methylgreen-pyronin stain. Ribonuclease pretreatment abolished the methylgreen-pyronin staining, suggesting that the BIs contained RNA. Immunohistochemically, the BIs were distinctly labeled with the antibodies against poly(A)-binding protein 1, T cell intracellular antigen 1, and ribosomal protein S6. These proteins are essential constituents of stress granules. In contrast, the BIs were not immunoreactive for ribosomal protein L28 and decapping enzyme 1, which are core components of transport ribonucleoprotein particles and processing bodies, respectively. Moreover, the BIs were not immunopositive for TDP-43. Our results imply that translation attenuation could be involved in the processes of BI formation in this disorder.

  4. THE NISSL SUBSTANCE OF LIVING AND FIXED SPINAL GANGLION CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitch, Arline D.; Moses, Montrose J.

    1957-01-01

    Living chick spinal ganglion neurons grown for 19 to 25 days in vitro were photographed with a color-translating ultraviolet microscope (UV-91) at 265, 287, and 310 mµ. This instrument was unique in permitting rapid accumulation of ultraviolet information with minimal damage to the cell. In the photographs taken at 265 mµ of the living neurons, discrete ultraviolet-absorbing cytoplasmic masses were observed which were found to be virtually unchanged in appearance after formalin fixation. These were identical with the Nissl bodies of the same cells seen after staining with basic dyes. The correlation of ultraviolet absorption, ribonuclease extraction, and staining experiments with acid and basic dyes confirmed the ribonucleoprotein nature of these Nissl bodies in the living and fixed cells. No change in distribution or concentration of ultraviolet-absorbing substance was observed in the first 12 ultraviolet photographs of a neuron, and it is concluded that the cells had not been subjected to significant ultraviolet damage during the period of photography. On the basis of these observations, as well as previous findings with phase contrast microscopy, it is concluded that Nissl bodies preexist in the living neuron as discrete aggregates containing high concentrations of nucleoprotein. PMID:13438929

  5. RNA degradation in Archaea and Gram-negative bacteria different from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Klug, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Exoribonucleolytic and endoribonucleolytic activities are important for controlled degradation of RNA and contribute to the regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by influencing the half-lives of specific messenger RNAs. The RNA half-lives are determined by the characteristics of the RNA substrates and by the availability and the properties of the involved proteins-ribonucleases and assisting polypeptides. Much is known about RNA degradation in Eukarya and Bacteria, but there is limited information about RNA-degrading enzymes and RNA destabilizing or stabilizing elements in the domain of the Archaea. The recent progress in the understanding of the structure and function of the archaeal exosome, a protein complex with RNA-degrading and RNA-tailing capabilities, has given some first insights into the mechanisms of RNA degradation in the third domain of life and into the evolution of RNA-degrading enzymes. Moreover, other archaeal RNases with degrading potential have been described and a new mechanism for protection of the 5'-end of RNA in Archaea was discovered. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on RNA degradation in the Archaea. Additionally, RNA degradation mechanisms in Rhodobacter capsulatus and Pseudomonas syringae are compared to those in the major model organism for Gram-negatives, Escherichia coli, which dominates our view on RNA degradation in Bacteria.

  6. A Commensal Strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis Overexpresses Membrane Proteins Associated with Pathogenesis When Grown in Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Águila-Arcos, S; Ding, S; Aloria, K; Arizmendi, J M; Fearnley, I M; Walker, J E; Goñi, F M; Alkorta, I

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as one of the major nosocomial pathogens associated with infections of implanted medical devices. The most important factor in the pathogenesis of these infections is the formation of bacterial biofilms. Bacteria grown in biofilms are more resistant to antibiotics and to the immune defence system than planktonic bacteria. In these infections, the antimicrobial therapy usually fails and the removal of the biofilm-coated implanted device is the only effective solution. In this study, three proteomic approaches were performed to investigate membrane proteins associated to biofilm formation: (i) sample fractionation by gel electrophoresis, followed by isotopic labelling and LC-MS/MS analysis, (ii) in-solution sample preparation, followed by isotopic labelling and LC-MS/MS analysis and (iii) in-solution sample preparation and label-free LC-MS/MS analysis. We found that the commensal strain S. epidermidis CECT 231 grown in biofilms expressed higher levels of five membrane and membrane-associated proteins involved in pathogenesis: accumulation-associated protein, staphylococcal secretory antigen, signal transduction protein TRAP, ribonuclease Y and phenol soluble modulin beta 1 when compared with bacteria grown under planktonic conditions. These results indicate that a commensal strain can acquire a pathogenic phenotype depending on the mode of growth.

  7. Isolation of intact RNA from murine CD4+ T cells after intracellular cytokine staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Porcelli, Steven A

    2018-05-01

    Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) is a powerful method for identifying functionally distinct lymphocyte subsets, and for isolating these by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Although transcriptomic analysis of cells sorted on the basis of ICS has many potential applications, this is rarely performed because of the difficulty in isolating intact RNA from cells processed using standard fixation and permeabilization buffers for ICS. To address this issue, we compared three buffers shown previously to preserve RNA in nonhematopoietic cells subjected to intracellular staining for their effects on RNA isolated from T lymphocytes processed for ICS. Our results showed that buffers containing the recombinant ribonuclease inhibitor RNasin or high molar concentrations of salt yielded intact RNA from fixed and permeabilized T cells. As proof of principle, we successfully used the buffer containing RNasin to isolate intact RNA from CD4 + T cells that were sorted by FACS on the basis of specific cytokine production, thus demonstrating the potential of this approach for coupling ICS with transcriptomic analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of wheat endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 and its application in Chinese steamed bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang; Wang, JingJing; Hou, Yi; Huang, Yan-Bo; Wang, JiaJia; Li, Cunzhi; Guo, ShiJun; Li, Lin; Hu, Song-Qing

    2018-08-01

    This study investigated characteristics of recombinant wheat Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 (wEro1) and its influence on Chinese steamed bread (CSB) qualities. The purified wEro1 monomer, which contained two conserved redox active motif sites, bound to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor with a molecular weight of ∼47 kDa. wEro1 catalyzed the reduction of both bound and free FAD, and its reduction activity of free FAD reached 7.8 U/mg. Moreover, wEro1 catalyzed the oxidation of dithiothreitol and wheat protein disulfide isomerase (wPDI). Both glutathione and the reduced ribonuclease could work as electron donors for wEro1 in catalyzing the oxidation of wPDI. Additionally, wEro1 supplementation improved the CSB qualities with an increased specific volume of CSB and decreased crumb hardness, which was attributed to water-insoluble wheat proteins increasing and gluten network strengthening. The results give an understanding of the properties and function of wEro1 to facilitate its application especially in the flour-processing industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of microRNA activity by semi-microRNAs (smiRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle ePlante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ribonuclease Dicer plays a central role in the microRNA pathway by catalyzing the formation of 19 to 24-nucleotide (nt long microRNAs. Subsequently incorporated into Ago2 effector complexes, microRNAs are known to regulate messenger RNA (mRNA translation. Whether shorter RNA species derived from microRNAs exist and play a role in mRNA regulation remains unknown. Here, we report the serendipitous discovery of a 12-nt long RNA species corresponding to the 5’ region of the microRNA let-7, and tentatively termed semi-microRNA, or smiRNA. Using a smiRNA derived from the precursor of miR-223 as a model, we show that 12-nt long smiRNA species are devoid of any direct mRNA regulatory activity, as assessed in a reporter gene activity assay in transfected cultured human cells. However, smiR-223 was found to modulate the ability of the microRNA from which it derives to mediate translational repression or cleavage of reporter mRNAs. Our findings suggest that smiRNAs may be generated along the microRNA pathway and participate to the control of gene expression by regulating the activity of the related full-length mature microRNA in vivo.

  10. Ascorbic acid glycation of lens proteins produces UVA sensitizers similar to those in human lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortwerth, B.J.; Linetsky, Mikhail; Olesen, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble calf lens proteins were extensively glycated during a 4 week incubation with ascorbic acid in the presence of oxygen. Amino acids analysis of the dialyzed proteins removed at weekly intervals showed an increasing loss of lysine, arginine and histidine, consistent with the extensive protein cross-linking observed. Irradiation of the dialyzed samples with UVA light (1.0 kJ/cm 2 total illumination through a 338 nm cutoff filter) caused an increasing loss of tryptophan, an additional loss of histidine and the production of micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. No alteration in amino acid content and no photolytic effects were seen in proteins incubated without ascorbic acid in proteins incubated with glucose for 4 weeks. The rate of hydrogen peroxide formation was linear with each glycated sample with a maximum production of 25 nmol/mg protein illuminated. The possibility that the sensitizer activity was due to an ascorbate-induced oxidation of tryptophan was eliminated by the presence of a heavy metal ion chelator during the incubation and by showing equivalent effects with ascorbate-incubated ribonuclease A, which is devoid of tryptophan. The ascorbate-incubated samples displayed increasing absorbance at wavelengths above 300 nm and increasing fluorescence (340/430) as glycation proceeded. The spectra of the 4 week glycated proteins were identical to those obtained with a solubilized water-insoluble fraction from human lens, which is known to have UVA sensitizer activity. (Author)

  11. Guanidinium chloride induction of partial unfolding in amide proton exchange in RNase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, S L; Baldwin, R L

    1993-11-05

    Amide (NH) proton exchange rates were measured in 0.0 to 0.7 M guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) for 23 slowly exchanging peptide NH protons of ribonuclease A (RNase A) at pH* 5.5 (uncorrected pH measured in D2O), 34 degrees C. The purpose was to find out whether GdmCl induces exchange through binding to exchange intermediates that are partly or wholly unfolded. It was predicted that, when the logarithm of the exchange rate is plotted as a function of the molarity of GdmCl, the slope should be a measure of the amount of buried surface area exposed to GdmCl in the exchange intermediate. The results indicate that these concentrations of GdmCl do induce exchange by means of a partial unfolding mechanism for all 23 protons; this implies that exchange reactions can be used to study the unfolding and stability of local regions. Of the 23 protons, nine also show a second mechanism of exchange at lower concentrations of GdmCl, a mechanism that is nearly independent of GdmCl concentration and is termed "limited structural fluctuation."

  12. Deep Sequencing Reveals the Complete Genome and Evidence for Transcriptional Activity of the First Virus-Like Sequences Identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Villacreses

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1. High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs: ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%–73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV, Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP; ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs, AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq. Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant.

  13. SERS detection of biomolecules using lithographed nanoparticles towards a reproducible SERS biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Catalina; Guillot, Nicolas; Chapelle, Marc Lamy de la [Laboratoire CSPBAT (FRE 3043), UFR SMBH, Universite Paris XIII, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny (France); Shen, Hong; Toury, Timothee, E-mail: marc.lamydelachapelle@univ-paris13.fr [ICD-LNIO-UMR, CNRS 6279, Universite de technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, F-10010 Troyes (France)

    2010-11-26

    In this paper we highlight the accurate spectral detection of bovine serum albumin and ribonuclease-A using a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on gold nanocylinders obtained by electron-beam lithography (EBL). The nanocylinders have diameters from 100 to 180 nm with a gap of 200 nm. We demonstrate that optimizing the size and the shape of the lithographed gold nanocylinders, we can obtain SERS spectra of proteins at low concentration. This SERS study enabled us to estimate high enhancement factors (10{sup 5} for BSA and 10{sup 7} for RNase-A) of important bands in the protein Raman spectrum measured for 1 mM concentration. We demonstrate that, to reach the highest enhancement, it is necessary to optimize the SERS signal and that the main parameter of optimization is the LSPR position. The LSPR have to be suitably located between the laser excitation wavelength, which is 632.8 nm, and the position of the considered Raman band. Our study underlines the efficiency of gold nanocylinder arrays in the spectral detection of proteins.

  14. Self-assembly of protein-based biomaterials initiated by titania nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstater, Jacob H; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Wu, Yue

    2013-12-03

    Protein-based biomaterials are a promising strategy for creating robust highly selective biocatalysts. The assembled biomaterials must sufficiently retain the near-native structure of proteins and provide molecular access to catalytically active sites. These requirements often exclude the use of conventional assembly techniques, which rely on covalent cross-linking of proteins or entrapment within a scaffold. Here we demonstrate that titania nanotubes can initiate and template the self-assembly of enzymes, such as ribonuclease A, while maintaining their catalytic activity. Initially, the enzymes form multilayer thick ellipsoidal aggregates centered on the nanotube surface; subsequently, these nanosized entities assemble into a micrometer-sized enzyme material that has enhanced enzymatic activity and contains as little as 0.1 wt % TiO2 nanotubes. This phenomenon is uniquely associated with the active anatase (001)-like surface of titania nanotubes and does not occur on other anatase nanomaterials, which contain significantly fewer undercoordinated Ti surface sites. These findings present a nanotechnology-enabled mechanism of biomaterial growth and open a new route for creating stable protein-based biomaterials and biocatalysts without the need for chemical modification.

  15. Ovarian embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare manifestation of the DICER1 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, Leanne; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Traubici, Jeffrey; Malkin, David; Arseneau, Jocelyne; Stewart, Colin J R; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Priest, John R; Foulkes, William D

    2015-06-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Certain ERMSs are associated with the DICER1 syndrome, a tumor predisposition syndrome caused by germ-line DICER1 mutations. Characteristic somatic mutations have also been identified in DICER1-associated tumor types. These "hotspot" mutations affect the catalytic activity of the DICER1 ribonuclease IIIb domain. Primary ovarian ERMS (oERMS) is extremely rare. We present a case of a 6-year-old girl with an oERMS harboring 2 DICER1 mutations. The girl also exhibited other DICER1 phenotypes: cystic nephroma (CN) and multinodular goiter. Somatic investigations of the CN identified a hotspot DICER1 mutation different from that in the oERMS. Significantly, the CN presented at 12 years of age, which is much older than the previously reported age range of susceptibility. This report documents the occurrence of DICER1 mutations in a case of oERMS, expanding the spectrum of DICER1-associated tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chiral recognition of proteins having L-histidine residues on the surface with lanthanide ion complex incorporated-molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Lokman; Uzek, Recep; Senel, Serap; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-08-01

    In this study, lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles were synthesized. A combination of three novel approaches was applied for the purpose. First, lanthanide ions [Terbium(III)] were complexed with N-methacryloyl-L-histidine (MAH), polymerizable derivative of L-histidine amino acid, in order to incorporate the complex directly into the polymeric backbone. At the second stage, L-histidine molecules imprinted nanoparticles were utilized instead of whole protein imprinting in order to avoid whole drawbacks such as fragility, complexity, denaturation tendency, and conformation dependency. At the third stage following the first two steps mentioned above, imprinted L-histidine was coordinated with cupric ions [Cu(II)] to conduct the study under mild conditions. Then, molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles synthesized were used for L-histidine adsorption from aqueous solution to optimize conditions for adsorption and fluorimetric detection. Finally, usability of nanoparticles was investigated for chiral biorecognition using stereoisomer, D-histidine, racemic mixture, D,L-histidine, proteins with surface L-histidine residue, lysozyme, cytochrome C, or without ribonuclease A. The results revealed that the proposed polymerization strategy could make significant contribution to the solution of chronic problems of fluorescent component introduction into polymers. Additionally, the fluorescent nanoparticles reported here could be used for selective separation and fluorescent monitoring purposes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of the Specific Interactors of the Human Lariat RNA Debranching Enzyme 1 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Masaki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step for gene expression. We have been analyzing post-splicing intron turnover steps in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report protein interaction between human Debranching enzyme 1 (hDbr1 and several factors found in the Intron Large (IL complex, which is an intermediate complex of the intron degradation pathway. The hDbr1 protein specifically interacts with xeroderma pigmentosum, complementeation group A (XPA-binding protein 2 (Xab2. We also attempted to identify specific interactors of hDbr1. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments followed by mass spectrometry analysis identified a novel protein as one of the specific interactors of hDbr1. This protein is well conserved among many species and shows the highest similarity to yeast Drn1, so it is designated as human Dbr1 associated ribonuclease 1 (hDrn1. hDrn1 directly interacts with hDbr1 through protein–protein interaction. Furthermore, hDrn1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, as hDbr1 protein does. These findings suggest that hDrn1 has roles in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which are highly likely to involve hDbr1.

  18. Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using MALDI-TOF MS: strong correlation between signal strength and glycoform quantities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Mysling, Simon; Højrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique, but its quantitative accuracy lacks documentation. Thus, a systematic study of widely different glycopeptides was perf......Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique, but its quantitative accuracy lacks documentation. Thus, a systematic study of widely different glycopeptides...... was performed to determine the relationship between the relative abundances of the individual glycoforms and the MALDI-TOF MS signal strength. Glycopeptides derived from glycoproteins containing neutral glycans (ribonuclease B, IgG, and ovalbumin) were initially profiled and yielded excellent and reproducible...... quantitation (correlation coefficient r = 0.9958, n = 5) when evaluated against a normal phase HPLC 2-AB glycan profile. Similarly, precise quantitation was observed for various forms of N-glycans (free, permethylated, and fluorescence-labeled) using MS. In addition, three different sialoglycopeptides from...

  19. Effects of buffer ionization in protein transition volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung; Heerklotz, Heiko; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2010-05-01

    Protein denaturation events are generally associated with a change in the state of ionization of abnormally titrating groups and, therefore, are coupled with changes in buffer ionization/neutralization equilibria. Consequently, buffer ionization should influence the measured change in volume accompanying protein denaturation. Changes in volume accompanying protein denaturation reflect the differential packing and hydration of polypeptide chains in their native and denatured conformations while also describing the pressure stability of proteins. A characteristic feature of conformational transitions of globular proteins is a near zero change in volume that is comparable in magnitude with the volume of ionization of biologically relevant buffers. Thus, the impact of buffer ionization on the volume of protein denaturation could be very significant with the potential to affect not only its magnitude but also its sign. To investigate this point quantitatively, we performed pressure perturbation calorimetric (PPC) studies of lysozyme and ribonuclease A at pH 3.0 in four buffers differing in their ionization volumes. Our results identify buffer ionization as an important determinant of protein transition volume that needs to be carefully taken into account. We emphasize that the importance of our results is not limited to PPC measurements but is more general and applies to all volumetric investigations, in particular, extending to the derivation of the pressure-temperature phase diagram of protein stability.

  20. Structures and Functions of Pestivirus Glycoproteins: Not Simply Surface Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fun-In; Deng, Ming-Chung; Huang, Yu-Liang; Chang, Chia-Yi

    2015-06-29

    Pestiviruses, which include economically important animal pathogens such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and classical swine fever virus, possess three envelope glycoproteins, namely Erns, E1, and E2. This article discusses the structures and functions of these glycoproteins and their effects on viral pathogenicity in cells in culture and in animal hosts. E2 is the most important structural protein as it interacts with cell surface receptors that determine cell tropism and induces neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. All three glycoproteins are involved in virus attachment and entry into target cells. E1-E2 heterodimers are essential for viral entry and infectivity. Erns is unique because it possesses intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase) activity that can inhibit the production of type I interferons and assist in the development of persistent infections. These glycoproteins are localized to the virion surface; however, variations in amino acids and antigenic structures, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and RNase activity can ultimately affect the virulence of pestiviruses in animals. Along with mutations that are driven by selection pressure, antigenic differences in glycoproteins influence the efficacy of vaccines and determine the appropriateness of the vaccines that are currently being used in the field.

  1. Förster-type energy transfer as a probe for changes in local fluctuations of the protein matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, B; Matkó, J; Papp, S; Hevessy, J; Welch, G R; Damjanovich, S

    1984-07-17

    Much evidence, on both theoretical and experimental sides, indicates the importance of local fluctuations (in energy levels, conformational substates, etc.) of the macromolecular matrix in the biological activity of proteins. We describe here a novel application of the Förster-type energy-transfer process capable of monitoring changes both in local fluctuations and in conformational states of macromolecules. A new energy-transfer parameter, f, is defined as an average transfer efficiency, [E], normalized by the actual average quantum efficiency of the donor fluorescence, [phi D]. A simple oscillator model (for a one donor-one acceptor system) is presented to show the sensitivity of this parameter to changes in amplitudes of local fluctuations. The different modes of averaging (static, dynamic, and intermediate cases) occurring for a given value of the average transfer rate, [kt], and the experimental requirements as well as limitations of the method are also discussed. The experimental tests were performed on the ribonuclease T1-pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate conjugate (a one donor-one acceptor system) by studying the change of the f parameter with temperature, an environmental parameter expectedly perturbing local fluctuations of proteins. The parameter f increased with increasing temperature as expected on the basis of the oscillator model, suggesting that it really reflects changes of fluctuation amplitudes (significant changes in the orientation factor, k2, as well as in the spectral properties of the fluorophores can be excluded by anisotropy measurements and spectral investigations). Possibilities of the general applicability of the method are also discussed.

  2. Multiple RNA processing defects and impaired chloroplast function in plants deficient in the organellar protein-only RNase P enzyme.

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    Wenbin Zhou

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA precursors undergo endoribonucleolytic processing of their 5' and 3' ends. 5' cleavage of the precursor transcript is performed by ribonuclease P (RNase P. While in most organisms RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein that harbors a catalytically active RNA component, human mitochondria and the chloroplasts (plastids and mitochondria of seed plants possess protein-only RNase P enzymes (PRORPs. The plant organellar PRORP (PRORP1 has been characterized to some extent in vitro and by transient gene silencing, but the molecular, phenotypic and physiological consequences of its down-regulation in stable transgenic plants have not been assessed. Here we have addressed the function of the dually targeted organellar PRORP enzyme in vivo by generating stably transformed Arabidopsis plants in which expression of the PRORP1 gene was suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi. PRORP1 knock-down lines show defects in photosynthesis, while mitochondrial respiration is not appreciably affected. In both plastids and mitochondria, the effects of PRORP1 knock-down on the processing of individual tRNA species are highly variable. The drastic reduction in the levels of mature plastid tRNA-Phe(GAA and tRNA-Arg(ACG suggests that these two tRNA species limit plastid gene expression in the PRORP1 mutants and, hence, are causally responsible for the mutant phenotype.

  3. Tombusvirus-yeast interactions identify conserved cell-intrinsic viral restriction factors

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    Zsuzsanna eSasvari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat viral infections, plants possess innate and adaptive immune pathways, such as RNA silencing, R gene and recessive gene-mediated resistance mechanisms. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRF are also involved in limiting plant virus replication. This review discusses novel CIRFs with antiviral functions, many of them RNA-binding proteins or affecting the RNA binding activities of viral replication proteins. The CIRFs against tombusviruses have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is developed as an advanced model organism. Grouping of the identified CIRFs based on their known cellular functions and subcellular localization in yeast reveals that TBSV replication is limited by a wide variety of host gene functions. Yeast proteins with the highest connectivity in the network map include the well-characterized Xrn1p 5’-3’ exoribonuclease, Act1p actin protein and Cse4p centromere protein. The protein network map also reveals an important interplay between the pro-viral Hsp70 cellular chaperone and the antiviral co-chaperones, and possibly key roles for the ribosomal or ribosome-associated factors. We discuss the antiviral functions of selected CIRFs, such as the RNA binding nucleolin, ribonucleases, WW-domain proteins, single- and multi-domain cyclophilins, TPR-domain co-chaperones and cellular ion pumps. These restriction factors frequently target the RNA-binding region in the viral replication proteins, thus interfering with the recruitment of the viral RNA for replication and the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase. Although many of the characterized CIRFs act directly against TBSV, we propose that the TPR-domain co-chaperones function as guardians of the cellular Hsp70 chaperone system, which is subverted efficiently by TBSV for viral replicase assembly in the absence of the TPR-domain co-chaperones.

  4. Interferons: between structure and function

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    Katarzyna Bandurska

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a family of proteins that are released by a variety of cells in response to infections caused by viruses. Currently, we distinguish three types of interferons. They are classified based on the nucleotide sequence, interaction with specific receptors, chromosomal location, structure and physicochemical properties. The following interferons are classified as type I: α, β, ω, κ, ε, ζ, τ, δ, ν. They are recognized and bound by a receptor formed by two peptides, IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2. Representative of type II interferons is interferon-γ. It binds to a receptor composed of chains IFNGR-1 and IFNGR-2. The recently classified type III interferons comprise IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, and IFN-λ3. They act on receptors formed by λR1 IFN-and IL-10R2 subunits. A high level of antiviral protection is achieved by IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Antiviral activity of interferons is based on the induction and regulation of innate and acquired immune mechanisms. By binding to transmembrane receptors, IFN interacts with target cells mainly by activating the JAK/STAT, but also other signaling pathways. This leads to induction and activation of many antiviral agents, such as protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR, ribonuclease 2-5A pathway, and Mx proteins, as well as numerous apoptotic pathways. As a result of the protective effect of interferons, the virus binding to cells and viral particles penetration into cells is stopped, and the release of the nucleocapsid from an envelope is suppressed. Disruption of transcription and translation processes of the structural proteins prevents the formation of virions or budding of viruses, and as a result degradation of the viral mRNA; the started processes inhibit the chain synthesis of viral proteins and therefore further stimulate the immune system cells.

  5. Photomonomerization of pyrimidine dimers by indoles and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Huang, C.W.; Hinman, L.; Gordon, M.P.; Deranleau, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Model systems for the study of photoreactivation have been developed that utilize a variety of indole derivatives. These systems can split uracil cis-syn cyclobutadipyrimidine, either free or in RNA, when irradiated at wavelengths absorbed only by the indole moiety. The ability of indole compounds to split dimers is closely related to their electronic properties. Those of high electron-donor capacity such as indole, 3-methylindole, indole-3-acetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophan and tryptophan are good photosensitizers, with efficacy in that order. Indoles with electron-withdrawing substituents such as indole-3-carboxylic acid, indole-3-aldehyde and oxindole are inactive in the monomerization reaction. These findings support the proposed mechanism that the photosensitized monomerization occurs as a result of electron transfer from the excited indole molecules to the pyrimidine bases. Proteins containing fully exposed tryptophan residues (chicken egg white lysozyme and bovine diisopropylphosphoryltrypsin) also cause the splitting of the /sup 14/C-labeled dimers under the same conditions. In the case of lysozyme the quantum yield of monomerization is similar to that of free tryptophan. Much of the monomerization ability of lysozyme was lost after the solvent-available tryptophan had been oxidized by treatment with N-bromosuccinimide. Bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A, a protein devoid of tryptophan, failed to exhibit photosensitized monomerization of uracil dimers. The biological implication of these reactions involving a protein with an exposed tryptophan residue is discussed. Although indoles are able to split the dimers in RNA, they fail to photoreactivate uv-damaged TMV-RNA. Indole-3-acetic acid, 3-methylindole and 5-hydroxytryptophan rapidly inactive viral RNA when irradiated at 313 nm, possibly because of side reactions.

  6. Chiral recognition of proteins having L-histidine residues on the surface with lanthanide ion complex incorporated-molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzun, Lokman; Uzek, Recep; Şenel, Serap; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-01-01

    In this study, lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles were synthesized. A combination of three novel approaches was applied for the purpose. First, lanthanide ions [Terbium(III)] were complexed with N-methacryloyl-L-histidine (MAH), polymerizable derivative of L-histidine amino acid, in order to incorporate the complex directly into the polymeric backbone. At the second stage, L-histidine molecules imprinted nanoparticles were utilized instead of whole protein imprinting in order to avoid whole drawbacks such as fragility, complexity, denaturation tendency, and conformation dependency. At the third stage following the first two steps mentioned above, imprinted L-histidine was coordinated with cupric ions [Cu(II)] to conduct the study under mild conditions. Then, molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles synthesized were used for L-histidine adsorption from aqueous solution to optimize conditions for adsorption and fluorimetric detection. Finally, usability of nanoparticles was investigated for chiral biorecognition using stereoisomer, D-histidine, racemic mixture, D,L-histidine, proteins with surface L-histidine residue, lysozyme, cytochrome C, or without ribonuclease A. The results revealed that the proposed polymerization strategy could make significant contribution to the solution of chronic problems of fluorescent component introduction into polymers. Additionally, the fluorescent nanoparticles reported here could be used for selective separation and fluorescent monitoring purposes. Highlights: • Lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles • Direct incorporation of the fluorescent complex into polymeric backbone. • Imprinting by assistance of cupric ion coordination into nanoparticles • Evaluation of the chiral biorecognition ability of nanoparticles • Simultaneous selective separation and fluorescent monitoring

  7. Dissociation of 5' proximal helical regions in messenger RNAs by eukaryotic initiation factors 4F, 4A, and 4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thach, R.E.; Lawson, T.G.; Lee, K.A.; Abramson, R.D.; Merrick, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Ray, et al. demonstrated that the susceptibility of mRNAs to cleavage by ribonucleases is greatly increased by eIF-4A and eIF-4F in an ATP-dependent reaction, and that this reaction is enhanced by the presence of eIF-4B. They now report direct evidence for the dissociation of helical regions at the 5' ends of mRNAs by these factors. Helices were generated at the 5' ends of reovirus and rabbit globin mRNAs by hybridizing to them 32 P-labeled cDNA pentadecamers. The dissociation of the cDNAs from the mRNAs was monitored by Sephadex gel filtration. Addition of eIF-4F to hybrids caused the dissociation of small amounts of cDNAs, and this dissociation required ATP. Addition of eIF-4B stimulated this activity. Neither eIF-4B nor eIF-4A alone caused significant ATP-dependent dissociation, but they did so in combination. Interestingly, cDNAs that were hybridized to 5' distal regions were dissociated with efficiencies and rates similar to those of 5' proximal cDNAs. The presence of unlabelled cDNAs hybridized 5' proximally did not affect distal cDNA dissociation. These results confirm the earlier suggestion that eIF-4A, eIF-4B and eIF-4F play important roles in the disruption of mRNA secondary structure during initiation

  8. Zidovudine (AZT monotherapy selects for the A360V mutation in the connection domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

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    Jessica H Brehm

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated in vitro that zidovudine (AZT selects for A371V in the connection domain and Q509L in ribonuclease H (RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT which, together with the thymidine analog mutations D67N, K70R and T215F, confer greater than 100-fold AZT resistance. The goal of the current study was to determine whether AZT monotherapy in HIV-1 infected patients also selects the A371V, Q509L or other mutations in the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 RT.Full-length RT sequences in plasma obtained pre- and post-therapy were compared in 23 participants who received AZT monotherapy from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group study 175. Five of the 23 participants reached a primary study endpoint. Mutations significantly associated with AZT monotherapy included K70R (p = 0.003 and T215Y (p = 0.013 in the polymerase domain of HIV-1 RT, and A360V (p = 0.041 in the connection domain of HIV-1 RT. HIV-1 drug susceptibility assays demonstrated that A360V, either alone or in combination with thymidine analog mutations, decreased AZT susceptibility in recombinant viruses containing participant-derived full-length RT sequences or site-directed mutant RT. Biochemical studies revealed that A360V enhances the AZT-monophosphate excision activity of purified RT by significantly decreasing the frequency of secondary RNase H cleavage events that reduce the RNA/DNA duplex length and promote template/primer dissociation.The A360V mutation in the connection domain of RT was selected in HIV-infected individuals that received AZT monotherapy and contributed to AZT resistance.

  9. Malazy, a degenerate, species-specific transposable element in Cercospora zeae-maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Won-Bo; Dunkle, Larry D

    2005-01-01

    Two fungal pathogens, Cercospora zeae-maydis Groups I and II, cause gray leaf spot of maize. During the sequencing of a cosmid library from C. zeae-maydis Group I, we discovered a sequence with high similarity to Maggy, a transposable element from Magnaporthe grisea. The element from C. zeae-maydis, named Malazy, contained 194-base-pair terminal repeats and sequences with high similarity to reverse transcriptase and integrase, components of the POL gene in the gypsy-like retrotransposons in fungi. Sequences with similarity to other POL gene components, protease and ribonuclease, were not detected in Malazy. A single copy of the element was detected by PCR and Southern analyses in all six North American isolates of C. zeae-maydis Group I but was not detected in the four isolates of C. zeae-maydis Group II from three continents or in phylogenetically related species. Fragments of the core domains of reverse transcriptase and integrase contained a high frequency of stop codons that were conserved in all six isolates of Group I. Additional C:G to T:A transitions in occasional isolates usually were silent mutations, while two resulted in isolate-specific stop codons. The absence of Malazy from related species suggests that it was acquired after the divergence of C. zeae-maydis Groups I and II. The high frequency of stop codons and the presence of a single copy of the element suggest that it was inactivated soon after it was acquired. Because the element is inactive and because reading frames for other genes were not found in sequences flanking the element, Malazy does not appear to be the cause of differences leading to speciation or genetic diversity between C. zeae-maydis Groups I and II.

  10. Aneuploidy in benign tumors and nonneoplastic lesions of musculoskeletal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Skjeldal, S; Pettersen, E O; Melvik, J E; Larsen, T E

    1994-02-15

    Aneuploidy in DNA flow cytometry (FCM) of musculoskeletal tumors is generally considered to be a sign of malignancy. Previously, giant cell tumor of the bone has been reported to contain aneuploid (near-diploid) DNA stemlines. Otherwise, only spordic cases have been reported. The authors wanted to study the relationships among DNA FCM, histology, and clinical course of nonmalignant musculoskeletal lesions. Twenty-eight histologically benign tumors and seven nonneoplastic lesions were subjected to DNA FCM: After tissue preparation mechanically and with ribonuclease and trypsin, the isolated nuclei were stained with propidium iodine using chicken and rainbow trout erythrocytes as controls. In the DNA FCM histograms, ploidy and cell cycle fractions were determined using a computerized mathematical model. The histologic diagnoses were made without knowledge of the DNA FCM results. Aneuploidy was found in eight lesions. A shoulder in the diploid peak, suggesting a diploid and a near-diploid population, was found in DNA histograms of a condensing osteitis of the clavicle (a benign inflammatory process) and of a giant cell tumor of bone. The latter lesion also had a tetraploid population. Six benign tumors--two enchondromas, one osteochondroma, one subcutaneous and one intramuscular lipoma, and a calcifying aponeurotic fibroma--showed clear aneuploidy with separate peaks. The S-phase fraction was less than 10% in all cases. The highest aneuploid population, DNA index = 1.70, in a subcutaneous lipoma, was small, with an undetectable S phase. Despite nonradical operations in seven lesions, no recurrences were observed during a median follow-up of 49 months (range, 28-73 months). Small aneuploid populations with low DNA synthetic activity may be compatible with a benign histologic picture and uneventful clinical course of the musculoskeletal lesion.

  11. Involvement of microRNAs in physiological and pathological processes in the lung

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    Kriegova Eva

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To date, at least 900 different microRNA (miRNA genes have been discovered in the human genome. These short, single-stranded RNA molecules originate from larger precursor molecules that fold to produce hairpin structures, which are subsequently processed by ribonucleases Drosha/Pasha and Dicer to form mature miRNAs. MiRNAs play role in the posttranscriptional regulation of about one third of human genes, mainly via degradation of target mRNAs. Whereas the target mRNAs are often involved in the regulation of diverse physiological processes ranging from developmental timing to apoptosis, miRNAs have a strong potential to regulate fundamental biological processes also in the lung compartment. However, the knowledge of the role of miRNAs in physiological and pathological conditions in the lung is still limited. This review, therefore, summarizes current knowledge of the mechanism, function of miRNAs and their contribution to lung development and homeostasis. Besides the involvement of miRNAs in pulmonary physiological conditions, there is evidence that abnormal miRNA expression may lead to pathological processes and development of various pulmonary diseases. Next, the review describes current state-of-art on the miRNA expression profiles in smoking-related diseases including lung cancerogenesis, in immune system mediated pulmonary diseases and fibrotic processes in the lung. From the current research it is evident that miRNAs may play role in the posttranscriptional regulation of key genes in human pulmonary diseases. Further studies are, therefore, necessary to explore miRNA expression profiles and their association with target mRNAs in human pulmonary diseases.

  12. Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 expression in human breast and prostate cancer cases, and its regulation by sex steroid hormones

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    Cláudio Jorge Maia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 is an interferon-induced protein characterised by its capacity to catalyse the synthesis of 2ʹ-5ʹ-linked oligomers of adenosine from adenosine triphosphate (2-5A. The 2-5A binds to a latent Ribonuclease L (RNase L, which subsequently dimerises into its active form and may play an important role in the control of cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, our research group identified OAS1 as a differentially-expressed gene in breast and prostate cancer cell lines when compared to normal cells. This study evaluates: i the expression of OAS1 in human breast and prostate cancer specimens; and ii the effect of sex steroid hormones in regulating the expression of OAS1 in breast (MCF-7 and prostate (LNCaP cancer cell lines. The obtained results showed that OAS1 expression was down-regulated in human infiltrative ductal carcinoma of breast, adenocarcinoma of prostate, and benign prostate hyperplasia, both at mRNA and protein level. In addition, OAS1 expression was negatively correlated with the progression of breast and prostate cancer. With regards to the regulation of OAS1 gene, it was demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E2 down-regulates OAS1 gene in MCF-7 cell lines, an effect that seems to be dependent on the activation of oestrogen receptor (ER. On the other hand, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment showed no effect on the expression of OAS1 in LNCaP cell lines. The lower levels of OAS1 in breast and prostate cancer cases indicated that the OAS1/RNaseL apoptotic pathway may be compromised in breast and prostate tumours. Moreover, the present findings suggested that this effect may be enhanced by oestrogen in ER-positive breast cancers.

  13. The RNA binding protein HuR does not interact directly with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and does not affect reverse transcription in vitro

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    Gronenborn Angela M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lemay et al recently reported that the RNA binding protein HuR directly interacts with the ribonuclease H (RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT and influences the efficiency of viral reverse transcription (Lemay et al., 2008, Retrovirology 5:47. HuR is a member of the embryonic lethal abnormal vision protein family and contains 3 RNA recognition motifs (RRMs that bind AU-rich elements (AREs. To define the structural determinants of the HuR-RT interaction and to elucidate the mechanism(s by which HuR influences HIV-1 reverse transcription activity in vitro, we cloned and purified full-length HuR as well as three additional protein constructs that contained the N-terminal and internal RRMs, the internal and C-terminal RRMs, or the C-terminal RRM only. Results All four HuR proteins were purified and characterized by biophysical methods. They are well structured and exist as monomers in solution. No direct protein-protein interaction between HuR and HIV-1 RT was detected using NMR titrations with 15N labeled HuR variants or the 15N labeled RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. Furthermore, HuR did not significantly affect the kinetics of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro, even on RNA templates that contain AREs. Conclusions Our results suggest that HuR does not impact HIV-1 replication through a direct protein-protein interaction with the viral RT.

  14. Aging-induced dysregulation of dicer1-dependent microRNA expression impairs angiogenic capacity of rat cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Zoltan; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Sosnowska, Danuta; Toth, Peter; Gautam, Tripti; Podlutsky, Andrej; Csiszar, Agnes; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Age-related impairment of angiogenesis is likely to play a central role in cerebromicrovascular rarefaction and development of vascular cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. To test the hypothesis that dysregulation of Dicer1 (ribonuclease III, a key enzyme of the microRNA [miRNA] machinery) impairs endothelial angiogenic capacity in aging, primary cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs) were isolated from young (3 months old) and aged (24 months old) Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats. We found an age-related downregulation of Dicer1 expression both in CMVECs and in small cerebral vessels isolated from aged rats. In aged CMVECs, Dicer1 expression was increased by treatment with polyethylene glycol-catalase. Compared with young cells, aged CMVECs exhibited altered miRNA expression profile, which was associated with impaired proliferation, adhesion to vitronectin, collagen and fibronectin, cellular migration (measured by a wound-healing assay using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing technology), and impaired ability to form capillary-like structures. Overexpression of Dicer1 in aged CMVECs partially restored miRNA expression profile and significantly improved angiogenic processes. In young CMVECs, downregulation of Dicer1 (siRNA) resulted in altered miRNA expression profile associated with impaired proliferation, adhesion, migration, and tube formation, mimicking the aging phenotype. Collectively, we found that Dicer1 is essential for normal endothelial angiogenic processes, suggesting that age-related dysregulation of Dicer1-dependent miRNA expression may be a potential mechanism underlying impaired angiogenesis and cerebromicrovascular rarefaction in aging.

  15. Design, synthesis and antiviral evaluation of novel heteroarylcarbothioamide derivatives as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H and RDDP functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Angela; Onnis, Valentina; Deplano, Alessandro; Bianco, Giulia; Demurtas, Monica; Distinto, Simona; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Alcaro, Stefano; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2017-08-31

    In the continuous effort to identify new HIV-1 inhibitors endowed with innovative mechanisms, the dual inhibition of different viral functions would provide a significant advantage against drug-resistant variants. The HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is the only viral-encoded enzymatic activity that still lacks an efficient inhibitor. We synthesized a library of 3,5-diamino-N-aryl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbothioamide and 4-amino-5-benzoyl-N-phenyl-2-(substituted-amino)-1H-pyrrole-3-carbothioamide derivatives and tested them against RNase H activity. We identified the pyrazolecarbothioamide derivative A15, able to inhibit viral replication and both RNase H and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (RDDP) RT-associated activities in the low micromolar range. Docking simulations hypothesized its binding to two RT pockets. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that, with respect to wt RT, V108A substitution strongly reduced A15 IC50 values (12.6-fold for RNase H inhibition and 4.7-fold for RDDP), while substitution A502F caused a 9.0-fold increase in its IC50 value for RNase H, not affecting the RDDP inhibition, reinforcing the hypothesis of a dual-site inhibition. Moreover, A15 retained good inhibition potency against three non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant enzymes, confirming a mode of action unrelated to NNRTIs and suggesting its potential as a lead compound for development of new HIV-1 RT dual inhibitors active against drug-resistant viruses. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Salt bridge as a gatekeeper against partial unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzman, Mark W; Essex, Morgan E; Park, Chiwook

    2016-05-01

    Salt bridges are frequently observed in protein structures. Because the energetic contribution of salt bridges is strongly dependent on the environmental context, salt bridges are believed to contribute to the structural specificity rather than the stability. To test the role of salt bridges in enhancing structural specificity, we investigated the contribution of a salt bridge to the energetics of native-state partial unfolding in a cysteine-free version of Escherichia coli ribonuclease H (RNase H*). Thermolysin cleaves a protruding loop of RNase H(*) through transient partial unfolding under native conditions. Lys86 and Asp108 in RNase H(*) form a partially buried salt bridge that tethers the protruding loop. Investigation of the global stability of K86Q/D108N RNase H(*) showed that the salt bridge does not significantly contribute to the global stability. However, K86Q/D108N RNase H(*) is greatly more susceptible to proteolysis by thermolysin than wild-type RNase H(*) is. The free energy for partial unfolding determined by native-state proteolysis indicates that the salt bridge significantly increases the energy for partial unfolding by destabilizing the partially unfolded form. Double mutant cycles with single and double mutations of the salt bridge suggest that the partially unfolded form is destabilized due to a significant decrease in the interaction energy between Lys86 and Asp108 upon partial unfolding. This study demonstrates that, even in the case that a salt bridge does not contribute to the global stability, the salt bridge may function as a gatekeeper against partial unfolding that disturbs the optimal geometry of the salt bridge. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  17. Accumulation of dsRNA in endosomes contributes to inefficient RNA interference in the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, June-Sun; Gurusamy, Dhandapani; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2017-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) efficiency varies among insects studied. The barriers for successful RNAi include the presence of double-stranded ribonucleases (dsRNase) in the lumen and hemolymph that could potentially digest double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and the variability in the transport of dsRNA into and within the cells. We recently showed that the dsRNAs are transported into lepidopteran cells, but they are not processed into small interference RNAs (siRNAs) because they are trapped in acidic bodies. In the current study, we focused on the identification of acidic bodies in which dsRNAs accumulate in Sf9 cells. Time-lapse imaging studies showed that dsRNAs enter Sf9 cells and accumulate in acidic bodies within 20 min after their addition to the medium. CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA also accumulated in the midgut and fat body dissected from Spodoptera frugiperda larvae with similar patterns observed in Sf9 cells. Pharmacological inhibitor assays showed that the dsRNAs use clathrin mediated endocytosis pathway for transport into the cells. We investigated the potential dsRNA accumulation sites employing LysoTracker and double labeling experiments using the constructs to express a fusion of green fluorescence protein with early or late endosomal marker proteins and CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA. Interestingly, CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA accumulated predominantly in early and late endosomes. These data suggest that entrapment of internalized dsRNA in endosomes is one of the major factors contributing to inefficient RNAi response in lepidopteran insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RNASEK is required for internalization of diverse acid-dependent viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Brent A; Yasunaga, Ari; Panda, Debasis; Tartell, Michael A; Hopkins, Kaycie C; Hensley, Scott E; Cherry, Sara

    2015-06-23

    Viruses must gain entry into cells to establish infection. In general, viruses enter either at the plasma membrane or from intracellular endosomal compartments. Viruses that use endosomal pathways are dependent on the cellular factors that control this process; however, these genes have proven to be essential for endogenous cargo uptake, and thus are of limited value for therapeutic intervention. The identification of genes that are selectively required for viral uptake would make appealing drug targets, as their inhibition would block an early step in the life cycle of diverse viruses. At this time, we lack pan-antiviral therapeutics, in part because of our lack of knowledge of such cellular factors. RNAi screening has begun to reveal previously unknown genes that play roles in viral infection. We identified dRNASEK in two genome-wide RNAi screens performed in Drosophila cells against West Nile and Rift Valley Fever viruses. Here we found that ribonuclease kappa (RNASEK) is essential for the infection of human cells by divergent and unrelated positive- and negative-strand-enveloped viruses from the Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, Bunyaviridae, and Orthomyxoviridae families that all enter cells from endosomal compartments. In contrast, RNASEK was dispensable for viruses, including parainfluenza virus 5 and Coxsackie B virus, that enter at the plasma membrane. RNASEK is dispensable for attachment but is required for uptake of these acid-dependent viruses. Furthermore, this requirement appears specific, as general endocytic uptake of transferrin is unaffected in RNASEK-depleted cells. Therefore, RNASEK is a potential host cell Achilles' heel for viral infection.

  19. Increasing protein stability by improving beta-turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2009-11-15

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving beta-turns. We studied 22 beta-turns in nine proteins with 66-370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some beta-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein, Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase alpha-subunit, and Maltose binding protein. Of the 15 single proline mutations, 11 increased stability (Average = 0.8 +/- 0.3; Range = 0.3-1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. On the basis of this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing nonproline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II beta-turns and at the i position in Type II beta-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the phi angle is near -60 degrees for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in beta-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in beta-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving beta-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The Alleviation of Heat Damage to Photosystem II and Enzymatic Antioxidants by Exogenous Spermidine in Tall Fescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb is a typical cool-season grass that is widely used in turf and pasture. However, high temperature as an abiotic stress seriously affects its utilization. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of spermidine (Spd on heat stress response of tall fescue. The samples were exposed to 22°C (normal condition or 44°C (heat stress for 4 h. The results showed that exogenous Spd partially improved the quality of tall fescue leaves under normal temperature conditions. Nevertheless, after heat stress treatment, exogenous Spd significantly decreased the electrolyte leakage of tall fescue leaves. Spd also profoundly reduced the H2O2 and O2⋅- content and increased antioxidant enzymes activities. In addition, PAs can also regulate antioxidant enzymes activities including SOD, POD, and APX which could help to scavenge ROS. Moreover, application of Spd could also remarkably increase the chlorophyll content and had a positive effect on the chlorophyll α fluorescence transients under high temperature. The Spd reagent enhanced the performance of photosystem II (PSII as observed by the JIP-test. Under heat stress, the Spd profoundly improved the partial potentials at the steps of energy bifurcations (PIABS and PItotal and the quantum yields and efficiencies (φP0, δR0, φR0, and γRC. Exogenous Spd could also reduce the specific energy fluxes per QA- reducing PSII reaction center (RC (TP0/RC and ET0/RC. Additionally, exogenous Spd improved the expression level of psbA and psbB, which encoded the proteins of PSII core reaction center complex. We infer that PAs can stabilize the structure of nucleic acids and protect RNA from the degradation of ribonuclease. In brief, our study indicates that exogenous Spd enhances the heat tolerance of tall fescue by maintaining cell membrane stability, increasing antioxidant enzymes activities, improving PSII, and relevant gene expression.

  1. Ionizing radiation damage to the folded chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12: repair of double-strand breaks in deoxyribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, M.K.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskevy, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The extremely gentle lysis and unfolding procedures that have been developed for the isolation of nucleoid deoxyribonucleic acid yield undamaged, replicating genomes, thus permitting direct measurement of the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks at biologically significant doses of ionizing radiation. Repair of ionizing radiation damage to folded chromosomes of Escherichia coli K-12 strain AB2497 was observed within 2 to 3 h of post-irradiation incubation in growth medium. Such behavior was not observed after post-irradiation incubation in growth medium of a recA13 strain (strain AB2487). A model based on recombinational repair is proposed to explain the formation of 2,200 to 2,300S material during early stages of incubation and to explain subsequent changes in the gradient profiles. Association of unrepaired DNA with the plasma membrane is proposed to explain the formation of a peak of rapidly sedimenting material (greater than 3,100S) during the later stage of repair. Direct evidence of repair of double-strand breaks during post-irradiation incubation in growth medium was obtained from gradient profiles of DNA from ribonuclease-digested chromosomes. The sedimentation coefficient of broken molecules was restored to the value of unirradiated DNA after 2 to 3 h of incubation, and the fraction of the DNA repaired in this fashion was equal to the fraction of cells that survived at the same dose. An average of 2.7 double-strand breaks per genome per lethal event was observed, suggesting that one to two double-strand breaks per genome are repairable in E. coli K-12 strain AB2497

  2. The Alleviation of Heat Damage to Photosystem II and Enzymatic Antioxidants by Exogenous Spermidine in Tall Fescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Hu, Tao; Amombo, Erick; Wang, Guangyang; Xie, Yan; Fu, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea Schreb) is a typical cool-season grass that is widely used in turf and pasture. However, high temperature as an abiotic stress seriously affects its utilization. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of spermidine (Spd) on heat stress response of tall fescue. The samples were exposed to 22°C (normal condition) or 44°C (heat stress) for 4 h. The results showed that exogenous Spd partially improved the quality of tall fescue leaves under normal temperature conditions. Nevertheless, after heat stress treatment, exogenous Spd significantly decreased the electrolyte leakage of tall fescue leaves. Spd also profoundly reduced the H 2 O 2 and O 2 ⋅- content and increased antioxidant enzymes activities. In addition, PAs can also regulate antioxidant enzymes activities including SOD, POD, and APX which could help to scavenge ROS. Moreover, application of Spd could also remarkably increase the chlorophyll content and had a positive effect on the chlorophyll α fluorescence transients under high temperature. The Spd reagent enhanced the performance of photosystem II (PSII) as observed by the JIP-test. Under heat stress, the Spd profoundly improved the partial potentials at the steps of energy bifurcations (PI ABS and PI total ) and the quantum yields and efficiencies (φP 0 , δR 0 , φR 0 , and γRC). Exogenous Spd could also reduce the specific energy fluxes per Q A - reducing PSII reaction center (RC) (TP 0 /RC and ET 0 /RC). Additionally, exogenous Spd improved the expression level of psbA and psbB , which encoded the proteins of PSII core reaction center complex. We infer that PAs can stabilize the structure of nucleic acids and protect RNA from the degradation of ribonuclease. In brief, our study indicates that exogenous Spd enhances the heat tolerance of tall fescue by maintaining cell membrane stability, increasing antioxidant enzymes activities, improving PSII, and relevant gene expression.

  3. Biocompatible and colloidally stabilized mPEG-PE/calcium phosphate hybrid nanoparticles loaded with siRNAs targeting tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pei; Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, He; Li, Yaogang; Duan, Yourong

    2016-01-19

    Calcium phosphate nanoparticles are safe and effective delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), as a result of their excellent biocompatibility. In this work, mPEG-PE (polyethylene glycol-L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine) was synthesized and used to prepare nanoparticles composed of mPEG-PE and calcium phosphate for siRNA delivery. Calcium phosphate and mPEG-PE formed the stable hybrid nanoparticles through self-assembly resulting from electrostatic interaction in water. The average size of the hybrid nanoparticles was approximately 53.2 nm with a negative charge of approximately -16.7 mV, which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability in serum and could protect siRNA from ribonuclease (RNase) degradation. The cellular internalization of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles was evaluated in SMMC-7721 cells using a laser scanning confocal microscope (CLSM) and flow cytometry. The hybrid nanoparticles could efficiently deliver siRNA to cells compared with free siRNA. Moreover, the in vivo distribution of Cy5-siRNA-loaded hybrid nanoparticles was observed after being injected into tumor-bearing nude mice. The nanoparticles concentrated in the tumor regions through an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect based on the fluorescence intensities of tissue distribution. A safety evaluation of the nanoparticles was performed both in vitro and in vivo demonstrating that the hybrid nanoparticle delivery system had almost no toxicity. These results indicated that the mPEG-PE/CaP hybrid nanoparticles could be a stable, safe and promising siRNA nanocarrier for anticancer therapy.

  4. Genetic diversity and epidemiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmenegger, E.G; Meyers, T.R.; Burton, T.O.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    Forty-two infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates from Alaska were analyzed using the ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequencing. RPA analyses, utilizing 4 probes, N5, N3 (N gene), GF (G gene), and NV (NV gene), determined that the haplotypes of all 3 genes demonstrated a consistent spatial pattern. Virus isolates belonging to the most common haplotype groups were distributed throughout Alaska, whereas isolates in small haplotype groups were obtained from only 1 site (hatchery, lake, etc.). The temporal pattern of the GF haplotypes suggested a 'genetic acclimation' of the G gene, possibly due to positive selection on the glycoprotein. A pairwise comparison of the sequence data determined that the maximum nucleotide diversity of the isolates was 2.75% (10 mismatches) for the NV gene, and 1.99% (6 mismatches) for a 301 base pair region of the G gene, indicating that the genetic diversity of IHNV within Alaska is notably lower than in the more southern portions of the IHNV North American range. Phylogenetic analysis of representative Alaskan sequences and sequences of 12 previously characterized IHNV strains from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, California (USA) and British Columbia (Canada) distinguished the isolates into clusters that correlated with geographic origin and indicated that the Alaskan and British Columbia isolates may have a common viral ancestral lineage. Comparisons of multiple isolates from the same site provided epidemiological insights into viral transmission patterns and indicated that viral evolution, viral introduction, and genetic stasis were the mechanisms involved with IHN virus population dynamics in Alaska. The examples of genetic stasis and the overall low sequence heterogeneity of the Alaskan isolates suggested that they are evolutionarily constrained. This study establishes a baseline of genetic fingerprint patterns and sequence groups representing the genetic diversity of Alaskan IHNV isolates. This

  5. My 65 years in protein chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheraga, Harold A

    2015-05-01

    This is a tour of a physical chemist through 65 years of protein chemistry from the time when emphasis was placed on the determination of the size and shape of the protein molecule as a colloidal particle, with an early breakthrough by James Sumner, followed by Linus Pauling and Fred Sanger, that a protein was a real molecule, albeit a macromolecule. It deals with the recognition of the nature and importance of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions in determining the structure, properties, and biological function of proteins until the present acquisition of an understanding of the structure, thermodynamics, and folding pathways from a linear array of amino acids to a biological entity. Along the way, with a combination of experiment and theoretical interpretation, a mechanism was elucidated for the thrombin-induced conversion of fibrinogen to a fibrin blood clot and for the oxidative-folding pathways of ribonuclease A. Before the atomic structure of a protein molecule was determined by x-ray diffraction or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, experimental studies of the fundamental interactions underlying protein structure led to several distance constraints which motivated the theoretical approach to determine protein structure, and culminated in the Empirical Conformational Energy Program for Peptides (ECEPP), an all-atom force field, with which the structures of fibrous collagen-like proteins and the 46-residue globular staphylococcal protein A were determined. To undertake the study of larger globular proteins, a physics-based coarse-grained UNited-RESidue (UNRES) force field was developed, and applied to the protein-folding problem in terms of structure, thermodynamics, dynamics, and folding pathways. Initially, single-chain and, ultimately, multiple-chain proteins were examined, and the methodology was extended to protein-protein interactions and to nucleic acids and to protein-nucleic acid interactions. The ultimate results led to an understanding

  6. Primary glia expressing the G93A-SOD1 mutation present a neuroinflammatory phenotype and provide a cellular system for studies of glial inflammation

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    Qi Min

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Detailed study of glial inflammation has been hindered by lack of cell culture systems that spontaneously demonstrate the "neuroinflammatory phenotype". Mice expressing a glycine → alanine substitution in cytosolic Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (G93A-SOD1 associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS demonstrate age-dependent neuroinflammation associated with broad-spectrum cytokine, eicosanoid and oxidant production. In order to more precisely study the cellular mechanisms underlying glial activation in the G93A-SOD1 mouse, primary astrocytes were cultured from 7 day mouse neonates. At this age, G93A-SOD1 mice demonstrated no in vivo hallmarks of neuroinflammation. Nonetheless astrocytes cultured from G93A-SOD1 (but not wild-type human SOD1-expressing transgenic mouse pups demonstrated a significant elevation in either the basal or the tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα-stimulated levels of proinflammatory eicosanoids prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4; inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and •NO (indexed by nitrite release into the culture medium; and protein carbonyl products. Specific cytokine- and TNFα death-receptor-associated components were similarly upregulated in cultured G93A-SOD1 cells as assessed by multiprobe ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs for their mRNA transcripts. Thus, endogenous glial expression of G93A-SOD1 produces a metastable condition in which glia are more prone to enter an activated neuroinflammatory state associated with broad-spectrum increased production of paracrine-acting substances. These findings support a role for active glial involvement in ALS and may provide a useful cell culture tool for the study of glial inflammation.

  7. Studies on a photoreactivating enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A photoreactivating enzyme was purified from Schneider's Line No. 2 Drosophila melanogaster cultured cells. DEAE cellulose chromatography with high potassium phosphate buffer conditions was used to separate nucleic acids from the protein component of the crude cell extract. The protein pass-through fraction from DEAE cellulose was chromatographed on phosphocellulose followed by hydroxylapatite, using linear potassium phosphate gradients to elute the enzyme. Gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 resulted in a 4500-fold purification of the enzyme with a final recovery of 4%. The enzyme has an apparent gel filtration molecular weight of 32,900 (+/- 1350 daltons) and an isoelectric pH of 4.9. Optimum ionic strength for activity is 0.17 at pH 6.5 in potassium phosphate buffer. The action spectrum for photoreactivation in Drosophila has an optimum at 365 nm with a response to wavelengths in the range of 313 to 465 nm. Drosophila photoreactivating enzyme contains an essential RNA that is necessary for activity in vitro. The ability of the enzyme to photoreactivate dimers in vitro is abolished by treatment of the enzyme with ribonucleases, or by disruption of the enzyme-RNA complex by electrophoresis or adsorption to DEAE cellulose. The essential RNA is heterogeneous in size but contains a 10-12 base region that may interact with the active site of the enzyme, and thus is protected from degradation by contaminating RNase activities during purification. The RNA is thought to stabilize the photoreactivating enzyme by maintaining the enzyme in the proper configuration for binding to dimer-containing DNA. It is not known whether this RNA is essential for in vivo photoreactivation

  8. Perceptron learning of pairwise contact energies for proteins incorporating the amino acid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Muyoung; Kim, Suhkmann; Moon, Eun-Joung; Cheon, Mookyung; Chung, Kwanghoon; Chang, Iksoo

    2005-07-01

    Although a coarse-grained description of proteins is a simple and convenient way to attack the protein folding problem, the construction of a global pairwise energy function which can simultaneously recognize the native folds of many proteins has resulted in partial success. We have sought the possibility of a systematic improvement of this pairwise-contact energy function as we extended the parameter space of amino acids, incorporating local environments of amino acids, beyond a 20×20 matrix. We have studied the pairwise contact energy functions of 20×20 , 60×60 , and 180×180 matrices depending on the extent of parameter space, and compared their effect on the learnability of energy parameters in the context of a gapless threading, bearing in mind that a 20×20 pairwise contact matrix has been shown to be too simple to recognize the native folds of many proteins. In this paper, we show that the construction of a global pairwise energy function was achieved using 1006 training proteins of a homology of less than 30%, which include all representatives of different protein classes. After parametrizing the local environments of the amino acids into nine categories depending on three secondary structures and three kinds of hydrophobicity (desolvation), the 16290 pairwise contact energies (scores) of the amino acids could be determined by perceptron learning and protein threading. These could simultaneously recognize all the native folds of the 1006 training proteins. When these energy parameters were tested on the 382 test proteins of a homology of less than 90%, 370 (96.9%) proteins could recognize their native folds. We set up a simple thermodynamic framework in the conformational space of decoys to calculate the unfolded fraction and the specific heat of real proteins. The different thermodynamic stabilities of E.coli ribonuclease H (RNase H) and its mutants were well described in our calculation, agreeing with the experiment.

  9. Interactions of glycine betaine with proteins: insights from volume and compressibility measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Yuen Lai; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2013-01-29

    We report the first application of volume and compressibility measurements to characterization of interactions between cosolvents (osmolytes) and globular proteins. Specifically, we measure the partial molar volumes and adiabatic compressibilities of cytochrome c, ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and ovalbumin in aqueous solutions of the stabilizing osmolyte glycine betaine (GB) at concentrations between 0 and 4 M. The fact that globular proteins do not undergo any conformational transitions in the presence of GB provides an opportunity to study the interactions of GB with proteins in their native states within the entire range of experimentally accessible GB concentrations. We analyze our resulting volumetric data within the framework of a statistical thermodynamic model in which each instance of GB interaction with a protein is viewed as a binding reaction that is accompanied by release of four water molecules. From this analysis, we calculate the association constants, k, as well as changes in volume, ΔV(0), and adiabatic compressibility, ΔK(S0), accompanying each GB-protein association event in an ideal solution. By comparing these parameters with similar characteristics determined for low-molecular weight analogues of proteins, we conclude that there are no significant cooperative effects involved in interactions of GB with any of the proteins studied in this work. We also evaluate the free energies of direct GB-protein interactions. The energetic properties of GB-protein association appear to scale with the size of the protein. For all proteins, the highly favorable change in free energy associated with direct protein-cosolvent interactions is nearly compensated by an unfavorable free energy of cavity formation (excluded volume effect), yielding a modestly unfavorable free energy for the transfer of a protein from water to a GB/water mixture.

  10. Effect of homeopathic treatment on gene expression in Copenhagen rat tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Rajeshkumar, N V; Sharma, Anuj; Warren, Jim; Singh, Anoop K; Ives, John A; Gaddipati, Jaya P; Maheshwari, Radha K; Jonas, Wayne B

    2006-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the inability to undergo apoptosis is an important factor in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Agents that induce apoptosis may inhibit tumor growth and provide therapeutic benefit. In a recent study, the authors found that certain homeopathic treatments produced anticancer effects in an animal model. In this study, the authors examined the immunomodulating and apoptotic effects of these remedies. The authors investigated the effect of a homeopathic treatment regimen containing Conium maculatum, Sabal serrulata, Thuja occidentalis, and a MAT-LyLu Carcinosin nosode on the expression of cytokines and genes that regulate apoptosis. This was assessed in prostate cancer tissues, extracted from animals responsive to these drugs, using ribonuclease protection assay or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant changes in mRNA levels of the apoptotic genes bax, bcl-2, bcl-x, caspase-1, caspase-2, caspase-3, Fas, FasL, or the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-beta, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, IL-2, and interferon-gamma in prostate tumor and lung metastasis after treatment with homeopathic medicines. This study indicates that treatment with the highly diluted homeopathic remedies does not alter the gene expression in primary prostate tumors or in lung metastasis. The therapeutic effect of homeopathic treatments observed in the in vivo experiments cannot be explained by mechanisms based on distinct alterations in gene expression related to apoptosis or cytokines. Future research should explore subtle modulations in the expression of multiple genes in different biological pathways.

  11. Folding machineries displayed on a cation-exchanger for the concerted refolding of cysteine- or proline-rich proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dae-Hee

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli has been most widely used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. However, over-production of heterologous proteins in E. coli frequently leads to their misfolding and aggregation yielding inclusion bodies. Previous attempts to refold the inclusion bodies into bioactive forms usually result in poor recovery and account for the major cost in industrial production of desired proteins from recombinant E. coli. Here, we describe the successful use of the immobilized folding machineries for in vitro refolding with the examples of high yield refolding of a ribonuclease A (RNase A and cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO. Results We have generated refolding-facilitating media immobilized with three folding machineries, mini-chaperone (a monomeric apical domain consisting of residues 191–345 of GroEL and two foldases (DsbA and human peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase by mimicking oxidative refolding chromatography. For efficient and simple purification and immobilization simultaneously, folding machineries were fused with the positively-charged consecutive 10-arginine tag at their C-terminal. The immobilized folding machineries were fully functional when assayed in a batch mode. When the refolding-facilitating matrices were applied to the refolding of denatured and reduced RNase A and CHMO, both of which contain many cysteine and proline residues, RNase A and CHMO were recovered in 73% and 53% yield of soluble protein with full enzyme activity, respectively. Conclusion The refolding-facilitating media presented here could be a cost-efficient platform and should be applicable to refold a wide range of E. coli inclusion bodies in high yield with biological function.

  12. RNase H2 Loss in Murine Astrocytes Results in Cellular Defects Reminiscent of Nucleic Acid-Mediated Autoinflammation

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    Kareen Bartsch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aicardi–Goutières syndrome (AGS is a rare early onset childhood encephalopathy caused by persistent neuroinflammation of autoimmune origin. AGS is a genetic disorder and >50% of affected individuals bear hypomorphic mutations in ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2. All available RNase H2 mouse models so far fail to mimic the prominent CNS involvement seen in AGS. To establish a mouse model recapitulating the human disease, we deleted RNase H2 specifically in the brain, the most severely affected organ in AGS. Although RNase H2ΔGFAP mice lacked the nuclease in astrocytes and a majority of neurons, no disease signs were apparent in these animals. We additionally confirmed these results in a second, neuron-specific RNase H2 knockout mouse line. However, when astrocytes were isolated from brains of RNase H2ΔGFAP mice and cultured under mitogenic conditions, they showed signs of DNA damage and premature senescence. Enhanced expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs represents the most reliable AGS biomarker. Importantly, primary RNase H2ΔGFAP astrocytes displayed significantly increased ISG transcript levels, which we failed to detect in in vivo in brains of RNase H2ΔGFAP mice. Isolated astrocytes primed by DNA damage, including RNase H2-deficiency, exhibited a heightened innate immune response when exposed to bacterial or viral antigens. Taken together, we established a valid cellular AGS model that utilizes the very cell type responsible for disease pathology, the astrocyte, and phenocopies major molecular defects observed in AGS patient cells.

  13. Characterization of a spliced exon product of herpes simplex type-1 latency-associated transcript in productively infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Wen; Mukerjee, Ruma; Gartner, Jared J.; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2006-01-01

    The latency-associated transcripts (LATs) of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) are the only viral RNAs accumulating during latent infections in the sensory ganglia of the peripheral nervous system. The major form of LAT that accumulates in latently infected neurons is a 2 kb intron, spliced from a much less abundant 8.3 primary transcript. The spliced exon mRNA has been hard to detect. However, in this study, we have examined the spliced exon RNA in productively infected cells using ribonuclease protection (RPA), and quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays. We were able to detect the LAT exon RNA in productively infected SY5Y cells (a human neuronal cell line). The level of the LAT exon RNA was found to be approximately 5% that of the 2 kb intron RNA and thus is likely to be relatively unstable. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays were used to examine the LAT exon RNA and its properties. They confirmed that the LAT exon mRNA is present at a very low level in productively infected cells, compared to the levels of other viral transcripts. Furthermore, experiments showed that the LAT exon mRNA is expressed as a true late gene, and appears to be polyadenylated. In SY5Y cells, in contrast to most late viral transcripts, the LAT exon RNA was found to be mainly nuclear localized during the late stage of a productive infection. Interestingly, more LAT exon RNA was found in the cytoplasm in differentiated compared to undifferentiated SY5Y cells, suggesting the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the LAT exon RNA and its related function may be influenced by the differentiation state of cells

  14. Evolution and thermodynamics of the slow unfolding of hyperstable monomeric proteins

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    Koga Yuichi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolding speed of some hyperthermophilic proteins is dramatically lower than that of their mesostable homologs. Ribonuclease HII from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis (Tk-RNase HII is stabilized by its remarkably slow unfolding rate, whereas RNase HI from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus (Tt-RNase HI unfolds rapidly, comparable with to that of RNase HI from Escherichia coli (Ec-RNase HI. Results To clarify whether the difference in the unfolding rate is due to differences in the types of RNase H or differences in proteins from archaea and bacteria, we examined the equilibrium stability and unfolding reaction of RNases HII from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (Tm-RNase HII and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa-RNase HII and RNase HI from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI. These proteins from hyperthermophiles are more stable than Ec-RNase HI over all the temperature ranges examined. The observed unfolding speeds of all hyperstable proteins at the different denaturant concentrations studied are much lower than those of Ec-RNase HI, which is in accordance with the familiar slow unfolding of hyperstable proteins. However, the unfolding rate constants of these RNases H in water are dispersed, and the unfolding rate constant of thermophilic archaeal proteins is lower than that of thermophilic bacterial proteins. Conclusions These results suggest that the nature of slow unfolding of thermophilic proteins is determined by the evolutionary history of the organisms involved. The unfolding rate constants in water are related to the amount of buried hydrophobic residues in the tertiary structure.

  15. MTH1745, a protein disulfide isomerase-like protein from thermophilic archaea, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicum involving in stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xia; Lv, Zhen-Mei; Zhao, Yang; Min, Hang; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2008-01-01

    MTH1745 is a putative protein disulfide isomerase characterized with 151 amino acid residues and a CPAC active-site from the anaerobic archaea Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicum. The potential functions of MTH1745 are not clear. In the present study, we show a crucial role of MTH1745 in protecting cells against stress which may be related to its functions as a disulfide isomerase and its chaperone properties. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses, the level of MTH1745 messenger RNA (mRNA) in the thermophilic archaea M. thermoautotrophicum was found to be stress-induced in that it was significantly higher under low (50 degrees C) and high (70 degrees C) growth temperatures than under the optimal growth temperature for the organism (65 degrees C). Additionally, the expression of MTH1745 mRNA was up-regulated by cold shock (4 degrees C). Furthermore, the survival of MTH1745 expressing Escherichia coli cells was markedly higher than that of control cells in response to heat shock (51.0 degrees C). These results indicated that MTH1745 plays an important role in the resistance of stress. By assay of enzyme activities in vitro, MTH1745 also exhibited a chaperone function by promoting the functional folding of citrate synthase after thermodenaturation. On the other hand, MTH1745 was also shown to function as a disulfide isomerase on the refolding of denatured and reduced ribonuclease A. On the basis of its single thioredoxin domain, function as a disulfide isomerase, and its chaperone activity, we suggest that MTH1745 may be an ancient protein disulfide isomerase. These studies may provide clues to the understanding of the function of protein disulfide isomerase in archaea.

  16. The exoribonuclease Polynucleotide Phosphorylase influences the virulence and stress responses of yersiniae and many other pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Rosenzweig

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are incessantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stressors threatening their existence. Therefore, bacterial pathogens must possess mechanisms to successfully subvert host immune defenses as well as overcome the stress associated with host-cell encounters. To achieve this, bacterial pathogens typically experience a genetic re-programming whereby anti-host/stress factors become expressed and eventually translated into effector proteins. In that vein, the bacterial host-cell induced stress-response is similar to any other abiotic stress to which bacteria respond by up-regulating specific stress-responsive genes. Following the stress encounter, bacteria must degrade unnecessary stress responsive transcripts through RNA decay mechanisms. The 3 pathogenic yersiniae (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudo-tuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica are all psychrotropic bacteria capable of growth at 4˚C; however, cold growth is dependent on the presence of an exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase. PNPase has also been implicated as a virulence factor in several notable pathogens including the salmonellae, Helicobacter pylori, and the yersiniae (where it typically influences the type three secretion system. Further, PNPase has been shown to associate with ribonuclease E (endoribonuclease, RhlB (RNA helicase, and enolase (glycolytic enzyme in several Gram-negative bacteria forming a large, multi-protein complex known as the RNA degradosome. This review will highlight studies demonstrating the influence of PNPase on the virulence potentials and stress responses of various bacterial pathogens as well as focusing on the degradosome- dependent and -independent roles played by PNPase in yersiniae stress responses.

  17. Trehalose-6-Phosphate-Mediated Toxicity Determines Essentiality of OtsB2 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vitro and in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Korte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose biosynthesis is considered an attractive target for the development of antimicrobials against fungal, helminthic and bacterial pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The most common biosynthetic route involves trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P synthase OtsA and T6P phosphatase OtsB that generate trehalose from ADP/UDP-glucose and glucose-6-phosphate. In order to assess the drug target potential of T6P phosphatase, we generated a conditional mutant of M. tuberculosis allowing the regulated gene silencing of the T6P phosphatase gene otsB2. We found that otsB2 is essential for growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro as well as for the acute infection phase in mice following aerosol infection. By contrast, otsB2 is not essential for the chronic infection phase in mice, highlighting the substantial remodelling of trehalose metabolism during infection by M. tuberculosis. Blocking OtsB2 resulted in the accumulation of its substrate T6P, which appears to be toxic, leading to the self-poisoning of cells. Accordingly, blocking T6P production in a ΔotsA mutant abrogated otsB2 essentiality. T6P accumulation elicited a global upregulation of more than 800 genes, which might result from an increase in RNA stability implied by the enhanced neutralization of toxins exhibiting ribonuclease activity. Surprisingly, overlap with the stress response caused by the accumulation of another toxic sugar phosphate molecule, maltose-1-phosphate, was minimal. A genome-wide screen for synthetic lethal interactions with otsA identified numerous genes, revealing additional potential drug targets synergistic with OtsB2 suitable for combination therapies that would minimize the emergence of resistance to OtsB2 inhibitors.

  18. Climate Clever Clovers: New Paradigm to Reduce the Environmental Footprint of Ruminants by Breeding Low Methanogenic Forages Utilizing Haplotype Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parwinder Kaur

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitigating methane production by ruminants is a significant challenge to global livestock production. This research offers a new paradigm to reduce methane emissions from ruminants by breeding climate-clever clovers. We demonstrate wide genetic diversity for the trait methanogenic potential in Australia’s key pasture legume, subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.. In a bi-parental population the broadsense heritability in methanogenic potential was moderate (H2 = 0.4 and allelic variation in a region of Chr 8 accounted for 7.8% of phenotypic variation. In a genome-wide association study we identified four loci controlling methanogenic potential assessed by an in vitro fermentation system. Significantly, the discovery of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP on Chr 5 in a defined haplotype block with an upstream putative candidate gene from a plant peroxidase-like superfamily (TSub_g18548 and a downstream lectin receptor protein kinase (TSub_g18549 provides valuable candidates for an assay for this complex trait. In this way haplotype variation can be tracked to breed pastures with reduced methanogenic potential. Of the quantitative trait loci candidates, the DNA-damage-repair/toleration DRT100-like protein (TSub_g26967, linked to avoid the severity of DNA damage induced by secondary metabolites, is considered central to enteric methane production, as are disease resistance (TSub_g26971, TSub_g26972, and TSub_g18549 and ribonuclease proteins (TSub_g26974, TSub_g26975. These proteins are good pointers to elucidate the genetic basis of in vitro microbial fermentability and enteric methanogenic potential in subterranean clover. The genes identified allow the design of a suite of markers for marker-assisted selection to reduce rumen methane emission in selected pasture legumes. We demonstrate the feasibility of a plant breeding approach without compromising animal productivity to mitigate enteric methane emissions, which is one of the most

  19. Systemic RNA delivery to dendritic cells exploits antiviral defence for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Lena M.; Diken, Mustafa; Haas, Heinrich; Kreiter, Sebastian; Loquai, Carmen; Reuter, Kerstin C.; Meng, Martin; Fritz, Daniel; Vascotto, Fulvia; Hefesha, Hossam; Grunwitz, Christian; Vormehr, Mathias; Hüsemann, Yves; Selmi, Abderraouf; Kuhn, Andreas N.; Buck, Janina; Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Rae, Richard; Attig, Sebastian; Diekmann, Jan; Jabulowsky, Robert A.; Heesch, Sandra; Hassel, Jessica; Langguth, Peter; Grabbe, Stephan; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-06-01

    Lymphoid organs, in which antigen presenting cells (APCs) are in close proximity to T cells, are the ideal microenvironment for efficient priming and amplification of T-cell responses. However, the systemic delivery of vaccine antigens into dendritic cells (DCs) is hampered by various technical challenges. Here we show that DCs can be targeted precisely and effectively in vivo using intravenously administered RNA-lipoplexes (RNA-LPX) based on well-known lipid carriers by optimally adjusting net charge, without the need for functionalization of particles with molecular ligands. The LPX protects RNA from extracellular ribonucleases and mediates its efficient uptake and expression of the encoded antigen by DC populations and macrophages in various lymphoid compartments. RNA-LPX triggers interferon-α (IFNα) release by plasmacytoid DCs and macrophages. Consequently, DC maturation in situ and inflammatory immune mechanisms reminiscent of those in the early systemic phase of viral infection are activated. We show that RNA-LPX encoding viral or mutant neo-antigens or endogenous self-antigens induce strong effector and memory T-cell responses, and mediate potent IFNα-dependent rejection of progressive tumours. A phase I dose-escalation trial testing RNA-LPX that encode shared tumour antigens is ongoing. In the first three melanoma patients treated at a low-dose level, IFNα and strong antigen-specific T-cell responses were induced, supporting the identified mode of action and potency. As any polypeptide-based antigen can be encoded as RNA, RNA-LPX represent a universally applicable vaccine class for systemic DC targeting and synchronized induction of both highly potent adaptive as well as type-I-IFN-mediated innate immune mechanisms for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, Richard Wood [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by 31P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 Å of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an α-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  1. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by [sup 31]P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 [Angstrom] of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an [alpha]-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  2. Expression of somatotropin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in bovine tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucy, M.C.; Boyd, C.K.; Koenigsfeld, A.T.; Okamura, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    The somatotropin receptor mRNA is controlled by at least two different gene promoters that generate 2 two variants with different exon 1 sequences (1A and 1B). The location of 1A and 1B somatotropin receptor mRNA within cattle tissues and, hence, the tissue specificity of the 1A and 1B promoters are unknown. In addition, the cDNA sequence of the 1B somatotropin receptor has not been determined. Our objective, therefore, was to sequence a cDNA for the 1B somatotropin receptor and to analyze bovine tissues for expression of 1A and 1B somatotropin receptor mRNA. Twenty adult tissues and six fetal tissues were collected at slaughter from each of four cows and two fetuses. Messenger RNA was analyzed using ribonuclease protection assays. The adult liver expressed both 1A and 1B mRNA. All other adult tissues expressed 1B mRNA but not 1A mRNA. The greatest amount of 1B mRNA was detected in liver and adipose (abdominal and subcutaneous) tissues. Other tissues had approximately one-half to one-tenth of the amount of 1B mRNA in the liver or adipose tissue. Fetal tissues (including fetal liver) expressed 1B mRNA and not 1A mRNA. Based on cDNA sequencing, the protein encoded by the 1A and 1B mRNA was nearly identical. We concluded that 1A somatotropin receptor mRNA is specific to adult bovine liver. Other adult and fetal bovine tissues expressed 1B somatotropin receptor mRNA with a predicted protein sequence that was similar to the 1A somatotropin receptor

  3. Dansyl labeling and bidimensional mass spectrometry to investigate protein carbonylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmese, Angelo; De Rosa, Chiara; Marino, Gennaro; Amoresano, Angela

    2011-01-15

    Carbonylation is a non-enzymatic irreversible post-translational modification. The adduction of carbonyl groups to proteins is due to the presence of excess of ROS in cells. Carbonylation of specific amino acid side chains is one of the most abundant consequences of oxidative stress; therefore, the determination of carbonyl groups content in proteins is regarded as a reliable way to estimate the cellular damage caused by oxidative stress. This paper reports a novel RIGhT (Reporter Ion Generating Tag) (A. Amoresano, G. Monti, C. Cirulli, G. Marino. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2006, 20, 1400) approach for selective labeling of carbonyl groups in proteins using dansylhydrazide, coupled with selective analysis by bidimensional mass spectrometry. We first applied this approach to ribonuclease A and lysozyme as model proteins. According to the so-called 'gel-free procedures', the analysis is carried out at the level of peptides following tryptic digest of the whole protein mixture. Modified RNaseA was analyzed in combined MS(2) and MS(3) scan mode, to specifically select the dansylated species taking advantage of the dansyl-specific fragmentation pathways. This combination allowed us to obtain a significant increase in signal/noise ratio and a significant increase in sensitivity of analysis, due to the reduction of duty cycle of the mass spectrometer. The unique signal obtained was correlated to peptide 1-10 of RNaseA carbonylated and labeled by dansylhydrazide. This strategy represents the first method leading to the direct identification of the carbonylation sites in proteins, thus indicating the feasibility of this strategy to investigate protein carbonylation in a proteomic approach. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Labeling of eukaryotic messenger RNA 5' terminus with phosphorus -32: use of tobacco acid pyrophosphatase for removal of cap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockard, R.E.; Rieser, L.; Vournakis, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing appreciation of the potential applications of 5'- 32 P-end-labeled mRNA, not only for screening recombinant clones and mapping gene structure, but also for revealing possible nucleotide sequence and structural signals within mRNA molecules themselves, which may be important for eukaryotic mRNA processing and turnover and for controlling differential rates of translational initiation. Three major problems, however, have retarded progress in this area, lack of methods for efficient and reproducible removal of m7G5ppp5'-cap structures, which maintain the integrity of an RNA molecule; inability to generate a sufficient amount of labeled mRNA, owing to the limited availability of most pure mRNA species; and the frequent problem of RNA degradation during in vitro end-labeling owing to RNAse contamination. The procedures presented here permit one to decap and label minute quantities of mRNA, effectively. Tobacco acid pyrophosphatase is relatively efficient in removing cap structures from even nanogram quantities of available mRNA, and enough radioactivity can be easily generated from minute amounts ofintact mRNA with very high-specific-activity [gamma- 32 P]ATP and the inhibition of ribonuclease contamination with diethylpyrocarbonate. These procedures can be modified and applied to almost any other type of RNA molecule as well. In Section III of this volume, we explore in detail how effectively 5'-end-labeled mRNA can be used not only for nucleotide sequence analysis, but also for mapping mRNA secondary structure

  5. Genetic and genomic analysis of RNases in model cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jeffrey C; Gordon, Gina C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are diverse photosynthetic microbes with the ability to convert CO2 into useful products. However, metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria remains challenging because of the limited resources for modifying the expression of endogenous and exogenous biochemical pathways. Fine-tuned control of protein production will be critical to optimize the biological conversion of CO2 into desirable molecules. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are labile intermediates that play critical roles in determining the translation rate and steady-state protein concentrations in the cell. The majority of studies on mRNA turnover have focused on the model heterotrophic bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. These studies have elucidated many RNA modifying and processing enzymes and have highlighted the differences between these Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In contrast, much less is known about mRNA turnover in cyanobacteria. We generated a compendium of the major ribonucleases (RNases) and provide an in-depth analysis of RNase III-like enzymes in commonly studied and diverse cyanobacteria. Furthermore, using targeted gene deletion, we genetically dissected the RNases in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, one of the fastest growing and industrially attractive cyanobacterial strains. We found that all three cyanobacterial homologs of RNase III and a member of the RNase II/R family are not essential under standard laboratory conditions, while homologs of RNase E/G, RNase J1/J2, PNPase, and a different member of the RNase II/R family appear to be essential for growth. This work will enhance our understanding of native control of gene expression and will facilitate the development of an RNA-based toolkit for metabolic engineering in cyanobacteria.

  6. Gene expression response of A253 human salivary cell line to radiation, Cis-Pt, and EGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.; Paunesku, T.; Mittal, B.; Dyck, P.; Pauloski, B.; Rademaker, A.; Logemann, J.; Quigg, R.

    2003-01-01

    We are interested in long and short term effects of head and neck cancers treatment, and prior to the studies of patient samples, experiments were designed to observe treatment effects in cultured cells, and examine gene expression profiles from A253 human salivary cells (derived from a head and neck tumor) following exposure to gamma-rays, cisplatin (cis-Pt), and a combination of either with epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment. A253 cells were treated by: 2 Gy or 10 Gy of γ-rays (Cs137 source, 77 cGy/min), Cis-Pt at 50 μ/mL, and EGF at 40 ng/mL. RNAs were processed and hybridized with Affymetrix Hu95A arrays according to the manufacturer's instructions. Data were scanned and analyzed and we found significant differences in the expression patterns of numerous genes were observed. Some of the more interesting genes are: Requeim [a protein required for apoptosis]; Cyclin D1 (prad1/bcl1) [a cyclin that can function as an oncogene]; FK506 Binding Protein [which may be competing with TGF-beta type I receptor for binding with FK506 thus acting against this powerful immunosuppressant]; Thioredoxin (TXN) [an oxidoreductase with multiple in vitro substrates, including ribonuclease, choriogonadotropins, coagulation factors, glucocorticoid receptor, and insulin]; Glutathione Peroxidase (GPX) [whose role in protection against oxidative stress was long ago well documented]; Aquaporin 3 (AQP3) [protein with a water-channel function that was confirmed by functional expression in Xenopus oocytes]; Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 1A (EIF1A) [a translation factor, proposed as a candidate gene for Turner syndrome]; and finally Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 6 (IGFBP6) [an autocrine growth inhibitor shown to inhibit growth of HaCat cells and other keratinocyte cell lines

  7. Molecular docking, QSAR and ADMET based mining of natural compounds against prime targets of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Jaykant; Patel, Shivani; Sinha, Sonam; Sharma, Sonal; Srivastava, Anshu; Chhabria, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2018-01-07

    AIDS is one of the multifaceted diseases and this underlying complexity hampers its complete cure. The toxicity of existing drugs and emergence of multidrug-resistant virus makes the treatment worse. Development of effective, safe and low-cost anti-HIV drugs is among the top global priority. Exploration of natural resources may give ray of hope to develop new anti-HIV leads. Among the various therapeutic targets for HIV treatment, reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, GP120, and ribonuclease are the prime focus. In the present study, we predicted potential plant-derived natural molecules for HIV treatment using computational approach, i.e. molecular docking, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR), and ADMET studies. Receptor-ligand binding studies were performed using three different software for precise prediction - Discovery studio 4.0, Schrodinger and Molegrow virtual docker. Docking scores revealed that Mulberrosides, Anolignans, Curcumin and Chebulic acid are promising candidates that bind with multi targets of HIV, while Neo-andrographolide, Nimbolide and Punigluconin were target-specific candidates. Subsequently, QSAR was performed using biologically proved compounds which predicted the biological activity of compounds. We identified Anolignans, Curcumin, Mulberrosides, Chebulic acid and Neo-andrographolide as potential natural molecules for HIV treatment from results of molecular docking and 3D-QSAR. In silico ADMET studies showed drug-likeness of these lead molecules. Structure similarities of identified lead molecules were compared with identified marketed drugs by superimposing both the molecules. Using in silico studies, we have identified few best fit molecules of natural origin against identified targets which may give new drugs to combat HIV infection after wet lab validation.

  8. PARN and TOE1 Constitute a 3′ End Maturation Module for Nuclear Non-coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahyeon Son

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN and target of EGR1 protein 1 (TOE1 are nuclear granule-associated deadenylases, whose mutations are linked to multiple human diseases. Here, we applied mTAIL-seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq to systematically identify the substrates of PARN and TOE1 and elucidate their molecular functions. We found that PARN and TOE1 do not modulate the length of mRNA poly(A tails. Rather, they promote the maturation of nuclear small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. PARN and TOE1 act redundantly on some ncRNAs, most prominently small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs. scaRNAs are strongly downregulated when PARN and TOE1 are compromised together, leading to defects in small nuclear RNA (snRNA pseudouridylation. They also function redundantly in the biogenesis of telomerase RNA component (TERC, which shares sequence motifs found in H/ACA box scaRNAs. Our findings extend the knowledge of nuclear ncRNA biogenesis, and they provide insights into the pathology of PARN/TOE1-associated genetic disorders whose therapeutic treatments are currently unavailable. : By analyzing the 3′ termini of transcriptome, Son et al. reveal the targets of PARN and TOE1, two nuclear deadenylases with disease associations. Both deadenylases are involved in nuclear small non-coding RNA maturation, but not in mRNA deadenylation. Their combined activity is particularly important for biogenesis of scaRNAs and TERC. Keywords: PARN, TOE1, CAF1Z, deadenylase, 3′ end maturation, adenylation, deadenylation, scaRNA, TERC

  9. Identifying airway sensitizers: cytokine mRNA profiles induced by various anhydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plitnick, L.M.; Loveless, S.E.; Ladics, G.S.; Holsapple, M.P.; Smialowicz, R.J.; Woolhiser, M.R.; Anderson, P.K.; Smith, C.; Selgrade, M.J.K.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to low molecular weight (LMW) chemicals in the workplace has been linked to a variety of respiratory effects. Within the LMW chemicals, one of the major classes involved in these effects are the acid anhydrides. The immunological basis of respiratory hypersensitivity involves CD4+ cells. By virtue of their induction of cytokines typical of CD4+ T-helper type 2 (Th2) cells--interleukin (IL)-4, 10, and 13--respiratory sensitizers may be identified and differentiated from contact sensitizers which induce Th1 cytokines (IL-2 and IFN-γ). Our previous work suggested that the ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) was useful in identifying the respiratory sensitizer, trimellitic anhydride (TMA), based on quantitative differences in Th2 cytokine mRNA as compared to the contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB). Therefore, the purpose of the studies described in this report was to expand the chemicals tested in the RPA. To this end, four acid anhydrides with known respiratory sensitization potential, TMA, maleic anhydride (MA), phthalic anhydride (PA) and hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA), were tested. Although previously determined to induce immunologically equivalent responses in a local lymph node assay (LLNA), the initial dose chosen (2.5%) failed to induce Th2 cytokine mRNA expression. To determine if the lack of cytokine expression was related to dose, LLNAs were conducted at higher doses for each of the anhydrides. The highest doses evaluated (four- to six-fold higher than those used in the initial RPA) gave equivalent proliferative responses for the various anhydrides and were used for subsequent RPA testing. At these higher doses, significant increases in Th2 versus Th1 cytokine mRNA were observed for all anhydrides tested. These results suggest that the RPA has the potential to serve as a screen for the detection of LMW airway sensitizing chemicals. However, the basis for selecting immunologically equivalent doses may require some modification

  10. Allelic diversity of S-RNase at the self-incompatibility locus in natural flowering cherry populations (Prunus lannesiana var. speciosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S; Mukai, Y

    2004-03-01

    In the Rosaceae family, which includes Prunus, gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) is controlled by a single multiallelic locus (S-locus), and the S-locus product expressed in the pistils is a glycoprotein with ribonuclease activity (S-RNase). Two populations of flowering cherry (Prunus lannesiana var. speciosa), located on Hachijo Island in Japan's Izu Islands, were sampled, and S-allele diversity was surveyed based on the sequence polymorphism of S-RNase. A total of seven S-alleles were cloned and sequenced. The S-RNases of flowering cherry showed high homology to those of Prunus cultivars (P. avium and P. dulcis). In the phylogenetic tree, the S-RNases of flowering cherry and other Prunus cultivars formed a distinct group, but they did not form species-specific subgroups. The nucleotide substitution pattern in S-RNases of flowering cherry showed no excess of nonsynonymous substitutions relative to synonymous substitutions. However, the S-RNases of flowering cherry had a higher Ka/Ks ratio than those of other Prunus cultivars, and a subtle heterogeneity in the nucleotide substitution rates was observed among the Prunus species. The S-genotype of each individual was determined by Southern blotting of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA, using cDNA for S-RNase as a probe. A total of 22 S-alleles were identified. All individuals examined were heterozygous, as expected under GSI. The allele frequencies were, contrary to the expectation under GSI, significantly unequal. The two populations studied showed a high degree of overlap, with 18 shared alleles. However, the allele frequencies differed considerably between the two populations.

  11. Complete chloroplast genome of Gracilaria firma (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta), with discussion on the use of chloroplast phylogenomics in the subclass Rhodymeniophycidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Poh-Kheng; Lin, Showe-Mei; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Liu, Li-Chia; Chen, Chien-Ming; Pai, Tun-Wen

    2017-01-06

    The chloroplast genome of Gracilaria firma was sequenced in view of its role as an economically important marine crop with wide industrial applications. To date, there are only 15 chloroplast genomes published for the Florideophyceae. Apart from presenting the complete chloroplast genome of G. firma, this study also assessed the utility of genome-scale data to address the phylogenetic relationships within the subclass Rhodymeniophycidae. The synteny and genome structure of the chloroplast genomes across the taxa of Eurhodophytina was also examined. The chloroplast genome of Gracilaria firma maps as a circular molecule of 187,001 bp and contains 252 genes, which are distributed on both strands and consist of 35 RNA genes (3 rRNAs, 30 tRNAs, tmRNA and a ribonuclease P RNA component) and 217 protein-coding genes, including the unidentified open reading frames. The chloroplast genome of G. firma is by far the largest reported for Gracilariaceae, featuring a unique intergenic region of about 7000 bp with discontinuous vestiges of red algal plasmid DNA sequences interspersed between the nblA and cpeB genes. This chloroplast genome shows similar gene content and order to other Florideophycean taxa. Phylogenomic analyses based on the concatenated amino acid sequences of 146 protein-coding genes confirmed the monophyly of the classes Bangiophyceae and Florideophyceae with full nodal support. Relationships within the subclass Rhodymeniophycidae in Florideophyceae received moderate to strong nodal support, and the monotypic family of Gracilariales were resolved with maximum support. Chloroplast genomes hold substantial information that can be tapped for resolving the phylogenetic relationships of difficult regions in the Rhodymeniophycidae, which are perceived to have experienced rapid radiation and thus received low nodal support, as exemplified in this study. The present study shows that chloroplast genome of G. firma could serve as a key link to the full resolution of

  12. Effects of interferon on cultured cells persistently infected with viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M

    1986-01-01

    The role of interferon (IFN) in viral persistence at the cellular level was investigated. Two types of persistent infections were chosen. The first type was cell lines which contained hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA (PLC/PRF/5 and Hep 3B cells) uninfected control hepatoma cells, (Mahlavu, HA22T and Hep G2 cells) or simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA (C2, C6, C11 cells) and control uninfected (CV-1 cells). In the second type of infection Vero cells persistently infected with SSPE or Sendai virus were used. The aim of this work was to determine what effect IFN had in these infections in terms of its antiviral and antiproliferative effects; which of the two major IFN-induced pathways, E enzyme or protein kinase were induced; whether there were any differences in sensitivity to IFN between the DNA and RNA virus persistent infections. The anti-viral effect of IFN was examined by its ability to inhibit Sindbis virus replication using a radioimmunoassay system. The antiproliferative effect of IFN was determined by cell counting and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. The activation of the ribonuclease F, determined by the inhibition of /sup 3/H-leucine incorporation after introduction of 2-5 actin into the cells, was variable, being activated in all cell lines with the exception of the PLC/PRF/5, Hep 3B and Hep G2 cells. Major differences between the two DNA persistent infections and the two RNA persistent infections were found. No correlation was found between the presence of HBV or SV40 persistent infections and the sensitivity of the cell lines to IFN. Both the SSPE and Sendai virus persistent infections were resistant to the antiviral and antiproliferative effect of IFN.

  13. Human recombinant RNASET2-induced inflammatory response and connective tissue remodeling in the medicinal leech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranzini, Nicolò; Pedrini, Edoardo; Girardello, Rossana; Tettamanti, Gianluca; de Eguileor, Magda; Taramelli, Roberto; Acquati, Francesco; Grimaldi, Annalisa

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated that the RNASET2 gene is involved in the control of tumorigenicity in ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, a role in establishing a functional cross-talk between cancer cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment has been unveiled for this gene, based on its ability to act as an inducer of the innate immune response. Although several studies have reported on the molecular features of RNASET2, the details on the mechanisms by which this evolutionarily conserved ribonuclease regulates the immune system are still poorly defined. In the effort to clarify this aspect, we report here the effect of recombinant human RNASET2 injection and its role in regulating the innate immune response after bacterial challenge in an invertebrate model, the medicinal leech. We found that recombinant RNASET2 injection induces fibroplasias, connective tissue remodeling and the recruitment of numerous infiltrating cells expressing the specific macrophage markers CD68 and HmAIF1. The RNASET2-mediated chemotactic activity for macrophages has been further confirmed by using a consolidated experimental approach based on injection of the Matrigel biomatrice (MG) supplemented with recombinant RNASET2 in the leech body wall. One week after injection, a large number of CD68 + and HmAIF-1 + macrophages massively infiltrated MG sponges. Finally, in leeches challenged with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or with the environmental bacteria pathogen Micrococcus nishinomiyaensis, numerous macrophages migrating to the site of inoculation expressed high levels of endogenous RNASET2. Taken together, these results suggest that RNASET2 is likely involved in the initial phase of the inflammatory response in leeches.

  14. Poly A tail length analysis of in vitro transcribed mRNA by LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverly, Michael; Hagen, Caitlin; Slack, Olga

    2018-02-01

    The 3'-polyadenosine (poly A) tail of in vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA was studied using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Poly A tails were cleaved from the mRNA using ribonuclease T1 followed by isolation with dT magnetic beads. Extracted tails were then analyzed by LC-MS which provided tail length information at single-nucleotide resolution. A 2100-nt mRNA with plasmid-encoded poly A tail lengths of either 27, 64, 100, or 117 nucleotides was used for these studies as enzymatically added poly A tails showed significant length heterogeneity. The number of As observed in the tails closely matched Sanger sequencing results of the DNA template, and even minor plasmid populations with sequence variations were detected. When the plasmid sequence contained a discreet number of poly As in the tail, analysis revealed a distribution that included tails longer than the encoded tail lengths. These observations were consistent with transcriptional slippage of T7 RNAP taking place within a poly A sequence. The type of RNAP did not alter the observed tail distribution, and comparison of T3, T7, and SP6 showed all three RNAPs produced equivalent tail length distributions. The addition of a sequence at the 3' end of the poly A tail did, however, produce narrower tail length distributions which supports a previously described model of slippage where the 3' end can be locked in place by having a G or C after the poly nucleotide region. Graphical abstract Determination of mRNA poly A tail length using magnetic beads and LC-MS.

  15. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1974-01-01

    Work during the past year has been focused on three areas related to the cellular effects of radiation. Radiation effects on RNA and the regulation of gene expression and amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were studied. Studies on the radiation response of RNA in growing and confluent cells were continued. We have derived radiation survival curves and demonstrated repair of potentially lethal damage in 3T3 cells. Studies of giant cell formation and turnover of ribosomal RNA in irradiated cells has demonstrated differences in growing and confluent cells. We have sought evidence consistent with our hypothesis for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression with segments of RNA reutilized to prime new RNA synthesis. Data derived from the turnover of ribosomal RNA and the methylation pattern of ribosomal RNA during turnover are consistent with the possibility that a segment of 18s ribosomal RNA is being conserved during new RNA synthesis. We were unable to show reutilization of the 5' trinucleotide of 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA but did find a ribonuclease resistant oligonucleotide in 18s RNA which appeared to be reutilized. In studies of amino acid nucleic-acid interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy we have been able to successfully synthesize an amidate and begin an examination of the intramolecular interactions. We have also studied intermolecular interactions betweentryptophan and nucleoside monophosphates and found upfield shifts which provide evidence for preferential stacking of the 6-membered ring of tryptophan with adenine and evidence for specific geometry of interactions of tryptophan with cytosine. (U.S.)

  16. Deep Sequence Analysis of AgoshRNA Processing Reveals 3’ A Addition and Trimming

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    Alex Harwig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RNA interference (RNAi pathway, in which microprocessor and Dicer collaborate to process microRNAs (miRNA, was recently expanded by the description of alternative processing routes. In one of these noncanonical pathways, Dicer action is replaced by the Argonaute2 (Ago2 slicer function. It was recently shown that the stem-length of precursor-miRNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA molecules is a major determinant for Dicer versus Ago2 processing. Here we present the results of a deep sequence study on the processing of shRNAs with different stem length and a top G·U wobble base pair (bp. This analysis revealed some unexpected properties of these so-called AgoshRNA molecules that are processed by Ago2 instead of Dicer. First, we confirmed the gradual shift from Dicer to Ago2 processing upon shortening of the hairpin length. Second, hairpins with a stem larger than 19 base pair are inefficiently cleaved by Ago2 and we noticed a shift in the cleavage site. Third, the introduction of a top G·U bp in a regular shRNA can promote Ago2-cleavage, which coincides with a loss of Ago2-loading of the Dicer-cleaved 3’ strand. Fourth, the Ago2-processed AgoshRNAs acquire a short 3’ tail of 1–3 A-nucleotides (nt and we present evidence that this product is subsequently trimmed by the poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN.

  17. Controlling nonspecific protein adsorption in a plug-based microfluidic system by controlling interfacial chemistry using fluorous-phase surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, L Spencer; Song, Helen; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2005-02-01

    Control of surface chemistry and protein adsorption is important for using microfluidic devices for biochemical analysis and high-throughput screening assays. This paper describes the control of protein adsorption at the liquid-liquid interface in a plug-based microfluidic system. The microfluidic system uses multiphase flows of immiscible fluorous and aqueous fluids to form plugs, which are aqueous droplets that are completely surrounded by fluorocarbon oil and do not come into direct contact with the hydrophobic surface of the microchannel. Protein adsorption at the aqueous-fluorous interface was controlled by using surfactants that were soluble in fluorocarbon oil but insoluble in aqueous solutions. Three perfluorinated alkane surfactants capped with different functional groups were used: a carboxylic acid, an alcohol, and a triethylene glycol group that was synthesized from commercially available materials. Using complementary methods of analysis, adsorption was characterized for several proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen), including enzymes (ribonuclease A (RNase A) and alkaline phosphatase). These complementary methods involved characterizing adsorption in microliter-sized droplets by drop tensiometry and in nanoliter plugs by fluorescence microscopy and kinetic measurements of enzyme catalysis. The oligoethylene glycol-capped surfactant prevented protein adsorption in all cases. Adsorption of proteins to the carboxylic acid-capped surfactant in nanoliter plugs could be described by using the Langmuir model and tensiometry results for microliter drops. The microfluidic system was fabricated using rapid prototyping in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Black PDMS microfluidic devices, fabricated by curing a suspension of charcoal in PDMS, were used to measure the changes in fluorescence intensity more sensitively. This system will be useful for microfluidic bioassays, enzymatic kinetics, and protein crystallization, because it does not require

  18. Optimized sample preparation for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of soluble proteins from chicken bursa of Fabricius

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    Zheng Xiaojuan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE is a powerful method to study protein expression and function in living organisms and diseases. This technique, however, has not been applied to avian bursa of Fabricius (BF, a central immune organ. Here, optimized 2-DE sample preparation methodologies were constructed for the chicken BF tissue. Using the optimized protocol, we performed further 2-DE analysis on a soluble protein extract from the BF of chickens infected with virulent avibirnavirus. To demonstrate the quality of the extracted proteins, several differentially expressed protein spots selected were cut from 2-DE gels and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Results An extraction buffer containing 7 M urea, 2 M thiourea, 2% (w/v 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS, 50 mM dithiothreitol (DTT, 0.2% Bio-Lyte 3/10, 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF, 20 U/ml Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I, and 0.25 mg/ml Ribonuclease A (RNase A, combined with sonication and vortex, yielded the best 2-DE data. Relative to non-frozen immobilized pH gradient (IPG strips, frozen IPG strips did not result in significant changes in the 2-DE patterns after isoelectric focusing (IEF. When the optimized protocol was used to analyze the spleen and thymus, as well as avibirnavirus-infected bursa, high quality 2-DE protein expression profiles were obtained. 2-DE maps of BF of chickens infected with virulent avibirnavirus were visibly different and many differentially expressed proteins were found. Conclusion These results showed that method C, in concert extraction buffer IV, was the most favorable for preparing samples for IEF and subsequent protein separation and yielded the best quality 2-DE patterns. The optimized protocol is a useful sample preparation method for comparative proteomics analysis of chicken BF tissues.

  19. Specific repression of mutant K-RAS by 10-23 DNAzyme: Sensitizing cancer cell to anti-cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.-H.; Wang, T.-H.; Au, L.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Point mutations of the Ras family are frequently found in human cancers at a prevalence rate of 30%. The most common mutation K-Ras(G12V), required for tumor proliferation, survival, and metastasis due to its constitutively active GTPase activity, has provided an ideal target for cancer therapy. 10-23 DNAzyme, an oligodeoxyribonucleotide-based ribonuclease consisting of a 15-nucleotide catalytical domain flanked by two target-specific complementary arms, has been shown to effectively cleave the target mRNA at purine-pyrimidine dinucleotide. Taking advantage of this specific property, 10-23 DNAzyme was designed to cleave mRNA of K-Ras(G12V)(GGU → GUU) at the GU dinucleotide while left the wild-type (WT) K-Ras mRNA intact. The K-Ras(G12V)-specific 10-23 DNAzyme was able to reduce K-Ras(G12V) at both mRNA and protein levels in SW480 cell carrying homozygous K-Ras(G12V). No effect was observed on the WT K-Ras in HEK cells. Although K-Ras(G12V)-specific DNAzymes alone did not inhibit proliferation of SW480 or HEK cells, pre-treatment of this DNAzyme sensitized the K-Ras(G12V) mutant cells to anti-cancer agents such as doxorubicin and radiation. These results offer a potential of using allele-specific 10-23 DNAzyme in combination with other cancer therapies to achieve better effectiveness on cancer treatment.

  20. Analysis of non-typeable Haemophilous influenzae VapC1 mutations reveals structural features required for toxicity and flexibility in the active site.

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    Brooke Hamilton

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved mechanisms that allow them to survive in the face of a variety of stresses including nutrient deprivation, antibiotic challenge and engulfment by predator cells. A switch to dormancy represents one strategy that reduces energy utilization and can render cells resistant to compounds that kill growing bacteria. These persister cells pose a problem during treatment of infections with antibiotics, and dormancy mechanisms may contribute to latent infections. Many bacteria encode toxin-antitoxin (TA gene pairs that play an important role in dormancy and the formation of persisters. VapBC gene pairs comprise the largest of the Type II TA systems in bacteria and they produce a VapC ribonuclease toxin whose activity is inhibited by the VapB antitoxin. Despite the importance of VapBC TA pairs in dormancy and persister formation, little information exists on the structural features of VapC proteins required for their toxic function in vivo. Studies reported here identified 17 single mutations that disrupt the function of VapC1 from non-typeable H. influenzae in vivo. 3-D modeling suggests that side chains affected by many of these mutations sit near the active site of the toxin protein. Phylogenetic comparisons and secondary mutagenesis indicate that VapC1 toxicity requires an alternative active site motif found in many proteobacteria. Expression of the antitoxin VapB1 counteracts the activity of VapC1 mutants partially defective for toxicity, indicating that the antitoxin binds these mutant proteins in vivo. These findings identify critical chemical features required for the biological function of VapC toxins and PIN-domain proteins.

  1. Pepper pathogenesis-related protein 4c is a plasma membrane-localized cysteine protease inhibitor that is required for plant cell death and defense signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) type III effector AvrBsT triggers programmed cell death (PCD) and activates the hypersensitive response (HR) in plants. Here, we isolated and identified the plasma membrane localized pathogenesis-related (PR) protein 4c gene (CaPR4c) from pepper (Capsicum annuum) leaves undergoing AvrBsT-triggered HR cell death. CaPR4c encodes a protein with a signal peptide and a Barwin domain. Recombinant CaPR4c protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited cysteine protease-inhibitor activity and ribonuclease (RNase) activity. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that CaPR4c localized to the plasma membrane in plant cells. CaPR4c expression was rapidly and specifically induced by avirulent Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient expression of CaPR4c caused HR cell death in pepper leaves, which was accompanied by enhanced accumulation of H2 O2 and significant induction of some defense-response genes. Deletion of the signal peptide from CaPR4c abolished the induction of HR cell death, indicating a requirement for plasma membrane localization of CaPR4c for HR cell death. CaPR4c silencing in pepper disrupted both basal and AvrBsT-triggered resistance responses, and enabled Xcv proliferation in infected leaves. H2 O2 accumulation, cell-death induction, and defense-response gene expression were distinctly reduced in CaPR4c-silenced pepper. CaPR4c overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred greater resistance against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. These results collectively suggest that CaPR4c plays an important role in plant cell death and defense signaling. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. MCPIP1 contributes to the toxicity of proteasome inhibitor MG-132 in HeLa cells by the inhibition of NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalniak, Lukasz; Dziendziel, Monika; Jura, Jolanta

    2014-10-01

    Recently, we have shown that the treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 results in the induction of expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 induced protein 1 (MCPIP1). MCPIP1 is a ribonuclease, responsible for the degradation of transcripts encoding certain pro-inflammatory cytokines. The protein is also known as an inhibitor of NF-κB transcription factor. Thanks to its molecular properties, MCPIP1 is considered as a regulator of inflammation, differentiation, and survival. Using siRNA technology, we show here that MCPIP1 expression contributes to the toxic properties of MG-132 in HeLa cells. The inhibition of proteasome by MG-132 and epoxomicin markedly increased MCPIP1 expression. While MG-132 induces HeLa cell death, down-regulation of MCPIP1 expression by siRNA partially protects HeLa cells from MG-132 toxicity and restores Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, inhibited by MG-132 treatment. Inversely, overexpression of MCPIP1 decreased constitutive activity of NF-κB and limited the survival of HeLa cells, as we have shown in the previous study. Interestingly, although MG-132 decreased the expression of IκBα and increased p65 phosphorylation, the inhibition of constitutive NF-κB activity was observed in MG-132-treated cells. Since the elevated constitutive activity of NF-κB is one of the mechanisms providing increased survival of cancer cells, including HeLa cells, we propose that death-promoting properties of MCPIP1 in MG-132-treated HeLa cells may, at least partially, derive from the negative effect on the constitutive NF-κB activity.

  3. Lack of S-RNase-Based Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility in Orchids Suggests That This System Evolved after the Monocot-Eudicot Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ce Niu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (SI is found in approximately 40% of flowering plant species and at least 100 families. Although orchids belong to the largest angiosperm family, only 10% of orchid species present SI and have gametophytic SI (GSI. Furthermore, a majority (72% of Dendrobium species, which constitute one of the largest Orchidaceae genera, show SI and have GSI. However, nothing is known about the molecular mechanism of GSI. The S-determinants of GSI have been well characterized at the molecular level in Solanaceae, Rosaceae, and Plantaginaceae, which use an S-ribonuclease (S-RNase-based system. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Orchidaceae uses a similar S-RNase to those described in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae SI species. In this study, two SI species (Dendrobium longicornu and D. chrysanthum were identified using fluorescence microscopy. Then, the S-RNase- and SLF-interacting SKP1-like1 (SSK1-like genes present in their transcriptomes and the genomes of Phalaenopsis equestris, D. catenatum, Vanilla shenzhenica, and Apostasia shenzhenica were investigated. Sequence, phylogenetic, and tissue-specific expression analyses revealed that none of the genes identified was an S-determinant, suggesting that Orchidaceae might have a novel SI mechanism. The results also suggested that RNase-based GSI might have evolved after the split of monocotyledons (monocots and dicotyledons (dicots but before the split of Asteridae and Rosidae. This is also the first study to investigate S-RNase-based GSI in monocots. However, studies on gene identification, differential expression, and segregation analyses in controlled crosses are needed to further evaluate the genes with high expression levels in GSI tissues.

  4. Aminotryptophan-containing barstar: structure--function tradeoff in protein design and engineering with an expanded genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Marina; Lepthien, Sandra; Golbik, Ralph; Budisa, Nediljko

    2006-07-01

    The indole ring of the canonical amino acid tryptophan (Trp) possesses distinguished features, such as sterical bulk, hydrophobicity and the nitrogen atom which is capable of acting as a hydrogen bond donor. The introduction of an amino group into the indole moiety of Trp yields the structural analogs 4-aminotryptophan ((4-NH(2))Trp) and 5-aminotryptophan ((5-NH(2))Trp). Their hydrophobicity and spectral properties are substantially different when compared to those of Trp. They resemble the purine bases of DNA and share their capacity for pH-sensitive intramolecular charge transfer. The Trp --> aminotryptophan substitution in proteins during ribosomal translation is expected to result in related protein variants that acquire these features. These expectations have been fulfilled by incorporating (4-NH(2))Trp and (5-NH(2))Trp into barstar, an intracellular inhibitor of the ribonuclease barnase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The crystal structure of (4-NH(2))Trp-barstar is similar to that of the parent protein, whereas its spectral and thermodynamic behavior is found to be remarkably different. The T(m) value of (4-NH(2))Trp- and (5-NH(2))Trp-barstar is lowered by about 20 degrees Celsius, and they exhibit a strongly reduced unfolding cooperativity and substantial loss of free energy in folding. Furthermore, folding kinetic study of (4-NH(2))Trp-barstar revealed that the denatured state is even preferred over native one. The combination of structural and thermodynamic analyses clearly shows how structures of substituted barstar display a typical structure-function tradeoff: the acquirement of unique pH-sensitive charge transfer as a novel function is achieved at the expense of protein stability. These findings provide a new insight into the evolution of the amino acid repertoire of the universal genetic code and highlight possible problems regarding protein engineering and design by using an expanded genetic code.

  5. Chiral recognition of proteins having L-histidine residues on the surface with lanthanide ion complex incorporated-molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzun, Lokman, E-mail: lokman@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06381, Ankara (Turkey); Uzek, Recep; Şenel, Serap [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06381, Ankara (Turkey); Say, Ridvan [Anadolu University, Department of Chemistry, 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06381, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-08-01

    In this study, lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles were synthesized. A combination of three novel approaches was applied for the purpose. First, lanthanide ions [Terbium(III)] were complexed with N-methacryloyl-L-histidine (MAH), polymerizable derivative of L-histidine amino acid, in order to incorporate the complex directly into the polymeric backbone. At the second stage, L-histidine molecules imprinted nanoparticles were utilized instead of whole protein imprinting in order to avoid whole drawbacks such as fragility, complexity, denaturation tendency, and conformation dependency. At the third stage following the first two steps mentioned above, imprinted L-histidine was coordinated with cupric ions [Cu(II)] to conduct the study under mild conditions. Then, molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles synthesized were used for L-histidine adsorption from aqueous solution to optimize conditions for adsorption and fluorimetric detection. Finally, usability of nanoparticles was investigated for chiral biorecognition using stereoisomer, D-histidine, racemic mixture, D,L-histidine, proteins with surface L-histidine residue, lysozyme, cytochrome C, or without ribonuclease A. The results revealed that the proposed polymerization strategy could make significant contribution to the solution of chronic problems of fluorescent component introduction into polymers. Additionally, the fluorescent nanoparticles reported here could be used for selective separation and fluorescent monitoring purposes. Highlights: • Lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles • Direct incorporation of the fluorescent complex into polymeric backbone. • Imprinting by assistance of cupric ion coordination into nanoparticles • Evaluation of the chiral biorecognition ability of nanoparticles • Simultaneous selective separation and fluorescent monitoring.

  6. Compaction of a Bacterial Group I Ribozyme Coincides with the Assembly of Core Helices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Salas, U.; Rangan, P.; Krueger, S.; Briber, R.; Thirumalai, D.; Woodson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Counterions are critical to the self-assembly of RNA tertiary structure because they neutralize the large electrostatic forces which oppose the folding process. Changes in the size and shape of the Azoarcus group I ribozyme as a function of Mg 2+ and Na + concentration were followed by small angle neutron scattering. In low salt buffer, the RNA was expanded, with an average radius of gyration (R g ) of 53 ± 1 Angstroms. A highly cooperative transition to a compact form (R g = 31.5 ± 0.5 Angstroms) was observed between 1.6 and 1.7 mM MgCl 2 . The collapse transition, which is unusually sharp in Mg 2+ , has the characteristics of a first-order phase transition. Partial digestion with ribonuclease T1 under identical conditions showed that this transition correlated with the assembly of double helices in the ribozyme core. Fivefold higher Mg 2+ concentrations were required for self-splicing, indicating that compaction occurs before native tertiary interactions are fully stabilized. No further decrease in Rg was observed between 1.7 and 20 mM MgCl 2 , indicating that the intermediates have the same dimensions as the native ribozyme, within the uncertainty of the data (± 1 Angstroms). A more gradual transition to a final R g of approximately 33.5 Angstroms was observed between 0.45 and 2 M NaCl. This confirms the expectation that monovalent ions not only are less efficient in charge neutralization but also contract the RNA less efficiently than multivalent ions

  7. Profile of small interfering RNAs from cotton plants infected with the polerovirus Cotton leafroll dwarf virus

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    Schrago Carlos EG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In response to infection, viral genomes are processed by Dicer-like (DCL ribonuclease proteins into viral small RNAs (vsRNAs of discrete sizes. vsRNAs are then used as guides for silencing the viral genome. The profile of vsRNAs produced during the infection process has been extensively studied for some groups of viruses. However, nothing is known about the vsRNAs produced during infections of members of the economically important family Luteoviridae, a group of phloem-restricted viruses. Here, we report the characterization of a population of vsRNAs from cotton plants infected with Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV, a member of the genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae. Results Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs from leaves of CLRDV-infected cotton plants revealed that the vsRNAs were 21- to 24-nucleotides (nt long and that their sequences matched the viral genome, with higher frequencies of matches in the 3- region. There were equivalent amounts of sense and antisense vsRNAs, and the 22-nt class of small RNAs was predominant. During infection, cotton Dcl transcripts appeared to be up-regulated, while Dcl2 appeared to be down-regulated. Conclusions This is the first report on the profile of sRNAs in a plant infected with a virus from the family Luteoviridae. Our sequence data strongly suggest that virus-derived double-stranded RNA functions as one of the main precursors of vsRNAs. Judging by the profiled size classes, all cotton DCLs might be working to silence the virus. The possible causes for the unexpectedly high accumulation of 22-nt vsRNAs are discussed. CLRDV is the causal agent of Cotton blue disease, which occurs worldwide. Our results are an important contribution for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this and related diseases.

  8. Profile of small interfering RNAs from cotton plants infected with the polerovirus Cotton leafroll dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tatiane F; Romanel, Elisson A C; Andrade, Roberto R S; Farinelli, Laurent; Østerås, Magne; Deluen, Cécile; Corrêa, Régis L; Schrago, Carlos E G; Vaslin, Maite F S

    2011-08-24

    In response to infection, viral genomes are processed by Dicer-like (DCL) ribonuclease proteins into viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) of discrete sizes. vsRNAs are then used as guides for silencing the viral genome. The profile of vsRNAs produced during the infection process has been extensively studied for some groups of viruses. However, nothing is known about the vsRNAs produced during infections of members of the economically important family Luteoviridae, a group of phloem-restricted viruses. Here, we report the characterization of a population of vsRNAs from cotton plants infected with Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), a member of the genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae. Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs) from leaves of CLRDV-infected cotton plants revealed that the vsRNAs were 21- to 24-nucleotides (nt) long and that their sequences matched the viral genome, with higher frequencies of matches in the 3- region. There were equivalent amounts of sense and antisense vsRNAs, and the 22-nt class of small RNAs was predominant. During infection, cotton Dcl transcripts appeared to be up-regulated, while Dcl2 appeared to be down-regulated. This is the first report on the profile of sRNAs in a plant infected with a virus from the family Luteoviridae. Our sequence data strongly suggest that virus-derived double-stranded RNA functions as one of the main precursors of vsRNAs. Judging by the profiled size classes, all cotton DCLs might be working to silence the virus. The possible causes for the unexpectedly high accumulation of 22-nt vsRNAs are discussed. CLRDV is the causal agent of Cotton blue disease, which occurs worldwide. Our results are an important contribution for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this and related diseases.

  9. Cooperative role of calnexin and TigA in Aspergillus oryzae glycoprotein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Seko, Akira; Takeda, Yoichi; Kikuma, Takashi; Ito, Yukishige

    2015-10-01

    Calnexin (CNX), known as a lectin chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), specifically recognizes G1M9GN2-proteins and facilitates their proper folding with the assistance of ERp57 in mammalian cells. However, it has been left unidentified how CNX works in Aspergillus oryzae, which is a filamentous fungus widely exploited in biotechnology. In this study, we found that a protein disulfide isomerase homolog TigA can bind with A. oryzae CNX (AoCNX), which was revealed to specifically recognize monoglucosylated glycans, similarly to CNX derived from other species, and accelerate the folding of G1M9GN2-ribonuclease (RNase) in vitro. For refolding experiments, a homogeneous monoglucosylated high-mannose-type glycoprotein G1M9GN2-RNase was chemoenzymatically synthesized from G1M9GN-oxazoline and GN-RNase. Denatured G1M9GN2-RNase was refolded with highest efficiency in the presence of both soluble form of AoCNX and TigA. TigA contains two thioredoxin domains with CGHC motif, mutation analysis of which revealed that the one in N-terminal regions is involved in binding to AoCNX, while the other in catalyzing protein refolding. The results suggested that in glycoprotein folding process of A. oryzae, TigA plays a similar role as ERp57 in mammalian cells, as a partner protein of AoCNX. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Telomere-related lung fibrosis is diagnostically heterogeneous but uniformly progressive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Chad A; Batra, Kiran; Torrealba, Jose; Kozlitina, Julia; Glazer, Craig S; Aravena, Carlos; Meyer, Keith; Raghu, Ganesh; Collard, Harold R; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2016-12-01

    Heterozygous mutations in four telomere-related genes have been linked to pulmonary fibrosis, but little is known about similarities or differences of affected individuals.115 patients with mutations in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) (n=75), telomerase RNA component (TERC) (n=7), regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) (n=14) and poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) (n=19) were identified and clinical data were analysed.Approximately one-half (46%) had a multidisciplinary diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); others had unclassifiable lung fibrosis (20%), chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (12%), pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (10%), interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features (7%), an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (4%) and connective tissue disease-related interstitial fibrosis (3%). Discordant interstitial lung disease diagnoses were found in affected individuals from 80% of families. Patients with TERC mutations were diagnosed at an earlier age than those with PARN mutations (51±11 years versus 64±8 years; p=0.03) and had a higher incidence of haematological comorbidities. The mean rate of forced vital capacity decline was 300 mL·year -1 and the median time to death or transplant was 2.87 years. There was no significant difference in time to death or transplant for patients across gene mutation groups or for patients with a diagnosis of IPF versus a non-IPF diagnosis.Genetic mutations in telomere related genes lead to a variety of interstitial lung disease (ILD) diagnoses that are universally progressive. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  11. Structural and kinetic mapping of side-chain exposure onto the protein energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Rachel; Schmidt, Kierstin L; Harbury, Pehr B; Marqusee, Susan

    2011-06-28

    Identification and characterization of structural fluctuations that occur under native conditions is crucial for understanding protein folding and function, but such fluctuations are often rare and transient, making them difficult to study. Native-state hydrogen exchange (NSHX) has been a powerful tool for identifying such rarely populated conformations, but it generally reveals no information about the placement of these species along the folding reaction coordinate or the barriers separating them from the folded state and provides little insight into side-chain packing. To complement such studies, we have performed native-state alkyl-proton exchange, a method analogous to NSHX that monitors cysteine modification rather than backbone amide exchange, to examine the folding landscape of Escherichia coli ribonuclease H, a protein well characterized by hydrogen exchange. We have chosen experimental conditions such that the rate-limiting barrier acts as a kinetic partition: residues that become exposed only upon crossing the unfolding barrier are modified in the EX1 regime (alkylation rates report on the rate of unfolding), while those exposed on the native side of the barrier are modified predominantly in the EX2 regime (alkylation rates report on equilibrium populations). This kinetic partitioning allows for identification and placement of partially unfolded forms along the reaction coordinate. Using this approach we detect previously unidentified, rarely populated conformations residing on the native side of the barrier and identify side chains that are modified only upon crossing the unfolding barrier. Thus, in a single experiment under native conditions, both sides of the rate-limiting barrier are investigated.

  12. Temporal dynamics of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea phosphoproteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Lim, Sooa; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K

    2014-05-01

    Actinomycetes undergo a dramatic reorganization of metabolic and cellular machinery during a brief period of growth arrest ("metabolic switch") preceding mycelia differentiation and the onset of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. This study explores the role of phosphorylation in coordinating the metabolic switch in the industrial actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A total of 109 phosphopeptides from 88 proteins were detected across a 150-h fermentation using open-profile two-dimensional LC-MS proteomics and TiO(2) enrichment. Quantitative analysis of the phosphopeptides and their unphosphorylated cognates was possible for 20 pairs that also displayed constant total protein expression. Enzymes from central carbon metabolism such as putative acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, isocitrate lyase, and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase changed dramatically in the degree of phosphorylation during the stationary phase, suggesting metabolic rearrangement for the reutilization of substrates and the production of polyketide precursors. In addition, an enzyme involved in cellular response to environmental stress, trypsin-like serine protease (SACE_6340/NC_009142_6216), decreased in phosphorylation during the growth arrest stage. More important, enzymes related to the regulation of protein synthesis underwent rapid phosphorylation changes during this stage. Whereas the degree of phosphorylation of ribonuclease Rne/Rng (SACE_1406/NC_009142_1388) increased during the metabolic switch, that of two ribosomal proteins, S6 (SACE_7351/NC_009142_7233) and S32 (SACE_6101/NC_009142_5981), dramatically decreased during this stage of the fermentation, supporting the hypothesis that ribosome subpopulations differentially regulate translation before and after the metabolic switch. Overall, we show the great potential of phosphoproteomic studies to explain microbial physiology and specifically provide evidence of dynamic protein phosphorylation events across the developmental cycle of

  13. Temporal Dynamics of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea Phosphoproteome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Lim, SooA; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycetes undergo a dramatic reorganization of metabolic and cellular machinery during a brief period of growth arrest (“metabolic switch”) preceding mycelia differentiation and the onset of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. This study explores the role of phosphorylation in coordinating the metabolic switch in the industrial actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A total of 109 phosphopeptides from 88 proteins were detected across a 150-h fermentation using open-profile two-dimensional LC-MS proteomics and TiO2 enrichment. Quantitative analysis of the phosphopeptides and their unphosphorylated cognates was possible for 20 pairs that also displayed constant total protein expression. Enzymes from central carbon metabolism such as putative acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, isocitrate lyase, and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase changed dramatically in the degree of phosphorylation during the stationary phase, suggesting metabolic rearrangement for the reutilization of substrates and the production of polyketide precursors. In addition, an enzyme involved in cellular response to environmental stress, trypsin-like serine protease (SACE_6340/NC_009142_6216), decreased in phosphorylation during the growth arrest stage. More important, enzymes related to the regulation of protein synthesis underwent rapid phosphorylation changes during this stage. Whereas the degree of phosphorylation of ribonuclease Rne/Rng (SACE_1406/NC_009142_1388) increased during the metabolic switch, that of two ribosomal proteins, S6 (SACE_7351/NC_009142_7233) and S32 (SACE_6101/NC_009142_5981), dramatically decreased during this stage of the fermentation, supporting the hypothesis that ribosome subpopulations differentially regulate translation before and after the metabolic switch. Overall, we show the great potential of phosphoproteomic studies to explain microbial physiology and specifically provide evidence of dynamic protein phosphorylation events across the developmental cycle of

  14. Two distinct promoters drive transcription of the human D1A dopamine receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H; Minowa, M T; Mouradian, M M

    1996-10-11

    The human D1A dopamine receptor gene has a GC-rich, TATA-less promoter located upstream of a small, noncoding exon 1, which is separated from the coding exon 2 by a 116-base pair (bp)-long intron. Serial 3'-deletions of the 5'-noncoding region of this gene, including the intron and 5'-end of exon 2, resulted in 80 and 40% decrease in transcriptional activity of the upstream promoter in two D1A-expressing neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-MC and NS20Y, respectively. To investigate the function of this region, the intron and 245 bp at the 5'-end of exon 2 were investigated. Transient expression analyses using various chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs showed that the transcriptional activity of the intron is higher than that of the upstream promoter by 12-fold in SK-N-MC cells and by 5.5-fold in NS20Y cells in an orientation-dependent manner, indicating that the D1A intron is a strong promoter. Primer extension and ribonuclease protection assays revealed that transcription driven by the intron promoter is initiated at the junction of intron and exon 2 and at a cluster of nucleotides located 50 bp downstream from this junction. The same transcription start sites are utilized by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs employed in transfections as well as by the D1A gene expressed within the human caudate. The relative abundance of D1A transcripts originating from the upstream promoter compared with those transcribed from the intron promoter is 1.5-2.9 times in SK-N-MC cells and 2 times in the human caudate. Transcript stability studies in SK-N-MC cells revealed that longer D1A mRNA molecules containing exon 1 are degraded 1.8 times faster than shorter transcripts lacking exon 1. Although gel mobility shift assay could not detect DNA-protein interaction at the D1A intron, competitive co-transfection using the intron as competitor confirmed the presence of trans-acting factors at the intron. These data taken together indicate that the human D1A gene has

  15. Smad2 and Smad6 as predictors of overall survival in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snitcovsky Igor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To test if the expression of Smad1-8 mRNAs were predictive of survival in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Patients and Methods We analyzed, prospectively, the expression of Smad1-8, by means of Ribonuclease Protection Assay in 48 primary, operable, oral SCC. In addition, 21 larynx, 10 oropharynx and 4 hypopharynx SCC and 65 matched adjacent mucosa, available for study, were also included. For survival analysis, patients were categorized as positive or negative for each Smad, according to median mRNA expression. We also performed real-time quantitative PCR (QRTPCR to asses the pattern of TGFβ1, TGFβ2, TGFβ3 in oral SCC. Results Our results showed that Smad2 and Smad6 mRNA expression were both associated with survival in Oral SCC patients. Cox Multivariate analysis revealed that Smad6 positivity and Smad2 negativity were both predictive of good prognosis for oral SCC patients, independent of lymph nodal status (P = 0.003 and P = 0.029, respectively. In addition, simultaneously Smad2- and Smad6+ oral SCC group of patients did not reach median overall survival (mOS whereas the mOS of Smad2+/Smad6- subgroup was 11.6 months (P = 0.004, univariate analysis. Regarding to TGFβ isoforms, we found that Smad2 mRNA and TGFβ1 mRNA were inversely correlated (p = 0.05, R = -0.33, and that seven of the eight TGFβ1+ patients were Smad2-. In larynx SCC, Smad7- patients did not reach mOS whereas mOS of Smad7+ patients were only 7.0 months (P = 0.04. No other correlations were found among Smad expression, clinico-pathological characteristics and survival in oral, larynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx or the entire head and neck SCC population. Conclusion Smad6 together with Smad2 may be prognostic factors, independent of nodal status in oral SCC after curative resection. The underlying mechanism which involves aberrant TGFβ signaling should be better clarified in the future.

  16. Dis3- and exosome subunit-responsive 3′ mRNA instability elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Daniel L.; Hou, Dezhi; Gross, Robert H.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Successful use of a novel RNA-specific bioinformatic tool, RNA SCOPE. ► Identified novel 3′ UTR cis-acting element that destabilizes a reporter mRNA. ► Show exosome subunits are required for cis-acting element-mediated mRNA instability. ► Define precise sequence requirements of novel cis-acting element. ► Show that microarray-defined exosome subunit-regulated mRNAs have novel element. -- Abstract: Eukaryotic RNA turnover is regulated in part by the exosome, a nuclear and cytoplasmic complex of ribonucleases (RNases) and RNA-binding proteins. The major RNase of the complex is thought to be Dis3, a multi-functional 3′–5′ exoribonuclease and endoribonuclease. Although it is known that Dis3 and core exosome subunits are recruited to transcriptionally active genes and to messenger RNA (mRNA) substrates, this recruitment is thought to occur indirectly. We sought to discover cis-acting elements that recruit Dis3 or other exosome subunits. Using a bioinformatic tool called RNA SCOPE to screen the 3′ untranslated regions of up-regulated transcripts from our published Dis3 depletion-derived transcriptomic data set, we identified several motifs as candidate instability elements. Secondary screening using a luciferase reporter system revealed that one cassette—harboring four elements—destabilized the reporter transcript. RNAi-based depletion of Dis3, Rrp6, Rrp4, Rrp40, or Rrp46 diminished the efficacy of cassette-mediated destabilization. Truncation analysis of the cassette showed that two exosome subunit-sensitive elements (ESSEs) destabilized the reporter. Point-directed mutagenesis of ESSE abrogated the destabilization effect. An examination of the transcriptomic data from exosome subunit depletion-based microarrays revealed that mRNAs with ESSEs are found in every up-regulated mRNA data set but are underrepresented or missing from the down-regulated data sets. Taken together, our findings imply a potentially novel mechanism of m

  17. Nature of the Charged-Group Effect on the Stability of the C-Peptide Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Kevin R.; Kim, Peter S.; Brems, David N.; Marqusee, Susan; York, Eunice J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Stewart, John M.; Baldwin, Robert L.

    1985-04-01

    The residues responsible for the pH-dependent stability of the helix formed by the isolated C-peptide (residues 1-13 of ribonuclease A) have been identified by chemical synthesis of analogues and measurement of their helix-forming properties. Each of the residues ionizing between pH 2 and pH 8 has been replaced separately by an uncharged residue. Protonation of Glu-2- is responsible for the sharp decrease in helix stability between pH 5 and pH 2, and deprotonation of His-12+ causes a similar decrease between pH 5 and pH 8. Glu-9- is not needed for helix stability. The results cannot be explained by the Zimm-Bragg model and host-guest data for α -helix formation, which predict that the stability of the C-peptide helix should increase when Glu-2- is protonated or when His-12+ is deprotonated. Moreover, histidine+ is a strong helix-breaker in host-guest studies. In proteins, acidic and basic residues tend to occur at opposite ends of α -helices: acidic residues occur preferentially near the NH2-terminal end and basic residues near the COOH-terminal end. A possible explanation, based on a helix dipole model, has been given [Blagdon, D. E. & Goodman, M. (1975) Biopolymers 14, 241-245]. Our results are consistent with the helix dipole model and they support the suggestion that the distribution of charged residues in protein helices reflects the helix-stabilizing propensity of those residues. Because Glu-9 is not needed for helix stability, a possible Glu-9-\\cdots His-12+ salt bridge does not contribute significantly to helix stability. The role of a possible Glu-2-\\cdots Arg-10+ salt bridge has not yet been evaluated. A charged-group effect on α -helix stability in water has also been observed in a different peptide system [Ihara, S., Ooi, T. & Takahashi, S. (1982) Biopolymers 21, 131-145]: block copolymers containing (Ala)20 and (Glu)20 show partial helix formation at low temperatures, pH 7.5, where the glutamic acid residues are ionized. (Glu)20(Ala)20Phe forms a

  18. Spring viremia of carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahne, W.; Bjorklund, H.V.; Essbauer, S.; Fijan, N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    against SVCV react with the homologous virus in serum neutralization, immunofluorescence, immunoperoxidase, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, but they cross-react to various degrees with the pike fry rhabdovirus (PFR), suggesting the 2 viruses are closely related. However, SVCV and PFR can be distinguished by certain serological tests and molecular methods such as the ribonuclease protection assay.

  19. Germline mutation in RNASEL predicts increased risk of head and neck, uterine cervix and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Eskerod Madsen

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: THE BACKGROUND: Ribonuclease L (RNASEL, encoding the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A-dependent RNase L, is a key enzyme in the interferon induced antiviral and anti-proliferate pathway. Mutations in RNASEL segregate with the disease in prostate cancer families and specific genotypes are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Infection by human papillomavirus (HPV is the major risk factor for uterine cervix cancer and for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC. HPV, Epstein Barr virus (EBV and sequences from mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV have been detected in breast tumors, and the presence of integrated SV40 T/t antigen in breast carcinomas correlates with an aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis. A genetic predisposition could explain why some viral infections persist and induce cancer, while others disappear spontaneously. This points at RNASEL as a strong susceptibility gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the implication of an abnormal activity of RNase L in the onset and development of viral induced cancers, the study was initiated by searching for germline mutations in patients diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer. The rationale behind is that close to 100% of the cervix cancer patients have a persistent HPV infection, and if a defective RNase L were responsible for the lack of ability to clear the HPV infection, we would expect to find a wide spectrum of mutations in these patients, leading to a decreased RNase L activity. The HPV genotype was established in tumor DNA from 42 patients diagnosed with carcinoma of the uterine cervix and somatic tissue from these patients was analyzed for mutations by direct sequencing of all coding and regulatory regions of RNASEL. Fifteen mutations, including still uncharacterized, were identified. The genotype frequencies of selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs established in the cervix cancer patients were compared between 382 patients

  20. A star-shaped poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-based antifouling coating: Application in investigation of the interaction between acetaminophen and bovine serum albumin by frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haiqin; Zhang, Chong; Mao, Ke; Wang, Yanmei

    2017-08-01

    In this work, an antifouling capillary modified with star-shaped poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-based copolymer was used to study the interaction between acetaminophen (APAP) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis (FACE). The star-shaped copolymer, poly(ethylene imine)-graft-poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (PEI-g-PMOXA), was immobilized onto the fused-silica capillary inner wall via dopamine-assisted co-deposition strategy, yielding a PEI-g-PMOXA/polydopamine (PDA)-coated antifouling capillary, i.e., an antifouling capillary coated with the PEI-g-PMOXA/PDA co-deposited film. Electroosmotic flow (EOF) mobility of the PEI-g-PMOXA/PDA-coated capillary was almost zero in a wide pH range (3.0-10.0), while the EOF mobility of bare capillary was much larger and increased significantly with pH increasing. When the PEI-g-PMOXA/PDA-coated capillary was exploited to separate a protein mixture including cytochrome c, lysozyme, ribonuclease A and α-chymotrypsinogen A, the theoretical plate numbers were of five orders of magnitude which were about ten-fold higher over those obtained with bare capillary; in addition, the RSD values of migration time were mostly less than 0.7% (30 consecutive runs) which were much smaller than those of bare capillary (c.a. 5.7%). The protein-resistant PEI-g-PMOXA/PDA-coated capillary was then used to investigate the interaction between APAP and BSA by FACE, the binding constant and number of binding sites at 25°C and pH 7.4 (Tris/HCl buffer of 25mM) were 1.39×10 4 M -1 and 1.08, respectively, which were comparable to the results determined by fluorescence spectroscopic measurement (3.18×10 4 M -1 and 1.19, respectively). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irigoyen, Nerea; Firth, Andrew E; Jones, Joshua D; Chung, Betty Y-W; Siddell, Stuart G; Brierley, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  2. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Irigoyen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV, are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59, a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the

  3. One Peptide Reveals the Two Faces of α-Helix Unfolding-Folding Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Cruz, Pedro F; Arnaut, Luis G; Brito, Rui M M; Serpa, Carlos

    2018-04-12

    The understanding of fast folding dynamics of single α-helices comes mostly from studies on rationally designed peptides displaying sequences with high helical propensity. The folding/unfolding dynamics and energetics of α-helix conformations in naturally occurring peptides remains largely unexplored. Here we report the study of a protein fragment analogue of the C-peptide from bovine pancreatic ribonuclease-A, RN80, a 13-amino acid residue peptide that adopts a highly populated helical conformation in aqueous solution. 1 H NMR and CD structural studies of RN80 showed that α-helix formation displays a pH-dependent bell-shaped curve, with a maximum near pH 5, and a large decrease in helical content in alkaline pH. The main forces stabilizing this short α-helix were identified as a salt bridge formed between Glu-2 and Arg-10 and the cation-π interaction involving Tyr-8 and His-12. Thus, deprotonation of Glu-2 or protonation of His-12 are essential for the RN80 α-helix stability. In the present study, RN80 folding and unfolding were triggered by laser-induced pH jumps and detected by time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry (PAC). The photoacid proton release, amino acid residue protonation, and unfolding/folding events occur at different time scales and were clearly distinguished using time-resolved PAC. The partial unfolding of the RN80 α-helix, due to protonation of Glu-2 and consequent breaking of the stabilizing salt bridge between Glu-2 and Arg-10, is characterized by a concentration-independent volume expansion in the sub-microsecond time range (0.8 mL mol -1 , 369 ns). This small volume expansion reports the cost of peptide backbone rehydration upon disruption of a solvent-exposed salt bridge, as well as backbone intrinsic expansion. On the other hand, RN80 α-helix folding triggered by His-12 protonation and subsequent formation of a cation-π interaction leads to a microsecond volume contraction (-6.0 mL mol -1 , ∼1.7 μs). The essential role of two

  4. Characterization of mitochondrial injury after cardiac arrest (COMICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Liu, Xiaowen; Andersen, Lars W; Rittenberger, Jon C; Abella, Benjamin S; Gaieski, David F; Ornato, Joseph P; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Cocchi, Michael N; Abbate, Antonio; Uber, Amy; Clore, John; Peberdy, Mary Anne; Callaway, Clifton W

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial injury post-cardiac arrest has been described in pre-clinical settings but the extent to which this injury occurs in humans remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased levels of mitochondrial biomarkers would be associated with mortality and neurological morbidity in post-cardiac arrest subjects. We performed a prospective multicenter study of post-cardiac arrest subjects. Inclusion criteria were comatose adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mitochondrial biomarkers were measured at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48h after return of spontaneous circulation as well as in healthy controls. Out of 111 subjects enrolled, 102 had evaluable samples at 0h. Cardiac arrest subjects had higher baseline cytochrome c levels compared to controls (2.18ng/mL [0.74, 7.74] vs. 0.16ng/mL [0.03, 0.91], p<0.001), and subjects who died had higher 0h cytochrome c levels compared to survivors (3.66ng/mL [1.40, 14.9] vs. 1.27ng/mL [0.16, 2.37], p<0.001). There were significantly higher Ribonuclease P (RNaseP) (3.3 [1.2, 5.7] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.2], p<0.001) and Beta-2microglobulin (B2M) (12.0 [1.0, 22.9], vs. 0.6 [0.6, 1.3], p<0.001) levels in cardiac arrest subjects at baseline compared to the control subjects. There were no differences between survivors and non-survivors for mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA. Cytochrome c was increased in post- cardiac arrest subjects compared to controls, and in post-cardiac arrest non-survivors compared to survivors. Nuclear DNA and cell free DNA was increased in plasma of post-cardiac arrest subjects. There were no differences in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA between survivors and non-survivors. Mitochondrial injury markers showed mixed results in the post-cardiac arrest period. Future research needs to investigate these differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide precursor is processed solely by prohormone convertase 4 in the gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Mbikay, M; Arimura, A

    2000-10-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is abundant not only in the brain, but also in the testis. Immunohistochemical studies have shown that PACAP-LI in rat testis is expressed stage specifically in spermatids. This suggests that testicular PACAP participates in the regulatory mechanism of spermatogenesis. Additionally, the ovary contains a relatively small amount of PACAP, conceivably involved in the regulation of folliculogenesis. PACAP is synthesized as a preprohormone and is processed by prohormone convertases, such as PC1, PC2, and PC4. PC4 is expressed only in the testis and ovary, where neither PC1 nor PC2 is expressed. However, whether PC4 is the sole endoprotease for the PACAP precursor in the gonads remains unknown. Recent studies using PC4-transgenic mice revealed that male PC4-null mice exhibited severely impaired fertility, although spermatogenesis appeared to be normal. The female PC4-null mice exhibited delayed folliculogenesis in the ovaries. To examine whether PC4 is the sole processing enzyme for the PACAP precursor in the gonads, we analyzed testicular and ovarian extracts from the PC4-null and wild-type mice for PACAP (PACAP38 and PACAP27) and its messenger RNA using reverse phase HPLC combined with specific RIAs and ribonuclease protection assay, respectively. For RIAs, three different polyclonal antisera with different recognition sites were used to identify PACAP38, PACAP27, and its precursor. Neither the testis nor the ovary from the PC4-null mice expressed PACAP38 or PACAP27, but the levels of PACAP transcripts in the testis and ovary of homozygous PC4-deficient mice were considerably elevated compared with those of the wild-type and heterozygous animals. The findings indicate that PC4 is the sole processing enzyme for the precursor of PACAP in the testis and ovary of mice. The possibility that the absence of bioactive PACAP in the testis and ovary of PC4-null mice caused severely impaired fertility in the males and

  6. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  7. PRMT5 restricts hepatitis B virus replication through epigenetic repression of covalently closed circular DNA transcription and interference with pregenomic RNA encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Jieliang; Wu, Min; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Min; Yue, Lei; Li, Yaming; Liu, Jiangxia; Li, Baocun; Shen, Fang; Wang, Yang; Bai, Lu; Protzer, Ulrike; Levrero, Massimo; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. The covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) minichromosome, which serves as the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, plays a key role in viral persistence. While accumulating evidence suggests that cccDNA transcription is regulated by epigenetic machinery, particularly the acetylation of cccDNA-bound histone 3 (H3) and H4, the potential contributions of histone methylation and related host factors remain obscure. Here, by screening a series of methyltransferases and demethylases, we identified protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) as an effective restrictor of HBV transcription and replication. In cell culture-based models for HBV infection and in liver tissues of patients with chronic HBV infection, we found that symmetric dimethylation of arginine 3 on H4 on cccDNA was a repressive marker of cccDNA transcription and was regulated by PRMT5 depending on its methyltransferase domain. Moreover, PRMT5-triggered symmetric dimethylation of arginine 3 on H4 on the cccDNA minichromosome involved an interaction with the HBV core protein and the Brg1-based human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler, which resulted in down-regulation of the binding of RNA polymerase II to cccDNA. In addition to the inhibitory effect on cccDNA transcription, PRMT5 inhibited HBV core particle DNA production independently of its methyltransferase activity. Further study revealed that PRMT5 interfered with pregenomic RNA encapsidation by preventing its interaction with viral polymerase protein through binding to the reverse transcriptase-ribonuclease H region of polymerase, which is crucial for the polymerase-pregenomic RNA interaction. PRMT5 restricts HBV replication through a two-part mechanism including epigenetic suppression of cccDNA transcription and interference with pregenomic RNA encapsidation; these findings improve the understanding of epigenetic regulation of HBV transcription and host

  8. Autoantibodies to the Rpp25 component of the Th/To complex are the most common antibodies in patients with systemic sclerosis without antibodies detectable by widely available commercial tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Michael; Satoh, Minoru; Hudson, Marie; Baron, Murray; Chan, Jason Y F; Chan, Edward K L; Wick, James; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2014-07-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) occur in up to 95% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). In most, SSc-associated antibodies are detected (i.e., centromere, topoisomerase I, RNA polymerase III, PM/Scl, Ro52/TRIM21, and U1RNP). Ribonuclease P protein subunit p25, (Rpp25) is an autoantigenic component of the Th/To complex. The contribution of anti-Th/To and anti-Rpp25 antibodies to ANA positivity in patients with SSc remains unknown. Sera from 873 patients with SSc were tested for ANA, and SSc-associated antibodies were measured. Samples without antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA; n = 53, ANA+/ENA-), were analyzed by immunoprecipitation (IP) and metabolically labeled proteins and for anti-Rpp25 antibodies (n = 50) by a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) and Rpp25 ELISA. Anti-Th/To antibodies occurred in 19/53 (36%), as determined by IP, and were the most common autoantibody in ANA+/ENA- SSc. Of those samples, 50/53 were available for additional testing by CLIA and ELISA. Anti-Rpp25 antibodies were detected in 12 (24% CLIA) or 10 (20% ELISA) of 50 patients. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed similar discrimination between Th/To IP-positive (n = 19) and -negative samples (n = 31) by CLIA and ELISA (area under the curve 0.90 vs 0.87; p = 0.6691). The positive percent agreement between IP and CLIA or ELISA was 12/19 (63.2%, 95% CI 38.4-83.7%) or 10/19 (52.6%, 95% CI 73.3-94.2%), respectively. Negative percent agreement was 100% for both assays. Autoantibodies to the Th/To autoantigen are important in patients with SSc who have been considered negative for SSc-specific or SSc-associated antibodies by widely available commercial assays. Rpp25 can be considered a major target of anti-Th/To antibodies. Assays detecting anti-Th/To and anti-Rpp25 antibodies may be important in SSc.

  9. mRNA processing in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory center on basic enzymatic reactions of RNA. Still undefined are reactions involved in the conversion of precursors of mRA (pre-mRNA) to mRNA in eukaryotes. The pre-mRNA is called heterogeneous nuclear RNA and is 2 to 6 times larger than mRNA. The conversion, called splicing, involves a removal of internal sequences called introns by endoribonuclease action followed by a rejoining of the 3'- and 5'-end fragments, called exons, by ligating activity. It has not been possible yet to study the enzymes involved in vitro. Also undefined are reactions involved in the turnover or discarding of certain of the pre-mRNA molecules. Yeast is a simple eukaryote and may be expected to have the same, but perhaps simpler, processing reactions as the higher eukaryotes. Two enzymes involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in yeast are under investigation. Both enzymes have been partially purified from ribonucleoprotein particles of yeast. The first is a unique decapping enzyme which cleaves [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp [ 14 C]RNA-poly (A) of yeast, yielding [ 3 H]m 7 GDP and is suggested by the finding that the diphosphate product, m 7 GpppA(G), and UDP-glucose are not hydrolyzed. The second enzyme is an endoribonuclease which converts both the [ 3 H] and [ 14 C] labels of [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) from an oligo(dT)-cellulose bound form to an unbound, acid-insoluble form. Results show that the stimulation involves an interaction of the labeled RNA with the small nuclear RNA. The inhibition of the enzyme by ethidium bromide and its stimulation by small nuclear RNA suggest that it may be a processing ribonuclease, requiring specific double-stranded features in its substrate. The characterization of the unique decapping enzyme and endoribonuclease may help to understand reactions involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in eukaryotes

  10. Cullin1-P is an Essential Component of Non-Self Recognition System in Self-Incompatibility in Petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Ken-Ichi; Tsukahara, Mai; Fujii, Sota; Murase, Kohji; Wada, Yuko; Entani, Tetsuyuki; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji

    2016-11-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) in flowering plants is a genetic reproductive barrier to distinguish self- and non-self pollen to promote outbreeding. In Solanaceae, self-pollen is rejected by the ribonucleases expressed in the styles (S-RNases), via its cytotoxic function. On the other side, the male-determinant is the S-locus F-box proteins (SLFs) expressed in pollen. Multiple SLFs collaboratively detoxify non-self S-RNases, therefore, non-self recognition is the mode of self-/non-self discrimination in Solanaceae. It is considered that SLFs function as a substrate-recognition module of the Skp1-Cullin1-F-box (SCF) complex that inactivates non-self S-RNases via their polyubiquitination, which leads to degradation by 26S proteasome. In fact, PhSSK1 (Petunia hybrida SLF-interacting Skp1-like1) was identified as a specific component of SCF SLF and was shown to be essential for detoxification of S-RNase in Petunia However, different molecules are proposed as the candidate Cullin1, another component of SCF SLF , and there is as yet no definite conclusion. Here, we identified five Cullin1s from the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from the male reproductive organ in Petunia Among them, only PhCUL1-P was co-immunoprecipitated with S 7 -SLF2. In vitro protein-binding assay suggested that PhSSK1 specifically forms a complex with PhCUL1-P in an SLF-dependent manner. Knockdown of PhCUL1-P suppressed fertility of transgenic pollen in cross-compatible pollination in the functional S-RNase-dependent manner. These results suggested that SCF SLF selectively uses PhCUL1-P. Phylogeny of Cullin1s indicates that CUL1-P is recruited into the SI machinery during the evolution of Solanaceae, suggesting that the SI components have evolved differently among species in Solanaceae and Rosaceae, despite both families sharing the S-RNase-based SI. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For

  11. Citoquímica de inclusões intranucleares associadas ao vírus do mosaico amarelo do salsão Cytochemical studies of the intranuclear inclusions associated with the celery yellow mosaic virus (CYMV

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    Neusa D. da Cruz

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudos citoquímicos, ao nível do microscópio óptico, foram efetuados para determinar a natureza química de inclusões intranucleares, de aspecto fibroso, induzidas pelo vírus do mosaico amarelo do salsão na maioria de suas hospedeiras. Os testes citoquímicos foram conduzidos em material foliar fresco ou fixado (aldeído glutárico, Carnoy 3:1 ou Bouin, tendo sido feitas as seguintes reações: hematoxilina férrica (testemunha; Sudan IV e Azul do Nilo (lipídios; iodo-iodeto (amido; Feulgen, Azur B e verde-de-metila-pironina (ácidos nucleicos; ninidrina-Schiff e "Fast Green", este último em soluções ácida e alcalina (proteínas. Os testes com verde-de-metila-pironina, Azur B e ninidrina-Schiff foram combinados com digestão enzimática pela ribonuclease ou pepsina. Os dados obtidos sugerem que, dentro da sensibilidade dos testes realizados, a inclusão contenha proteína, mas não tenha amido, lipídios ou ácidos nucleicos. Isso permite supor, portanto, que essas inclusões não sejam formadas de partículas de vírus.Cytochemical studies at optical microscopic level were made to determine the chemical nature of intranuclear inclusions with fibrous aspect which were induced by the celery yellow mosaic virus (CYMV in most of its hosts. The cytochemical tests were carried on fresh as well on fixed foliar material, fixation being in glutaric aldeid, Carnoy 3:1 or Bouin. The following reactions were tried: ferric haematoxylin (control; Sudan IV and Nile blue (for lipids; iodine ioduret (for starch; Feulgen, azur B and methyl green-pyronin (for nucleic acids; ninhydrin-Schiff and fast-green, the latter in acid and in alcaline solution (for protein. The tests with methyl green-pyronin, azur B and ninhydrin-Schiff were combined with enzimatic digestion with RNase or pepsin. The results suggest that, within the sensibility of the tests, the inclusion contains protein but does not contain starch, lipids or nucleic acids. This permit to

  12. Apoptosis-related molecules and radiation response in human oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teni, Tanuja; Mallick, Sanchita; Palve, Vinayak; Yasser, Mohd; Pawar, Sagar; Kannan, Sadhana; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Kane, Shubhada

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the tumor cells to respond to radiotherapy depends upon their intrinsic radiosensitivity, which may be partly governed by molecules of the intrinsic cell death pathway. To identify the defects in this pathway in oral cancers, transcript expression analysis of the pathway members was done using the Ribonuclease protection assay in oral cell lines and tumors. The intrinsic apoptosis pathway was found to be deregulated in oral cell lines and majority of oral tumors with altered expression of Mcl-l, bclxl, survivin, p53 and p16 mRNA. To identify factors associated with radiosensitivity, differential gene expression profiles of radiation-treated versus untreated oral cell lines of differing radiosensitivities was carried out. To assess the predictive value of above altered molecules in radiotherapy outcome in oral cancer patients, pretreated biopsies from thirty nine oral cancer patients were examined for the expression of the apoptotic markers using immunohistochemistry and their expression was correlated with the clinico pathological parameters. High expression of Mcl-1 (p = 0.05) and PCNA (p = 0.007) was seen to be associated with poor disease free survival. High expression of Bcl-xL was associated with poor response to radiotherapy treatment. PCNA (p=0.04) and Mcl-1 (p=0.05) emerged as independent prognostic markers for predicting disease free survival in oral cancers treated with primary radiotherapy. A predominant overexpression of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1L over pro-apoptotic Mcl-1S isoform was observed in the oral cancer cell lines and oral tumors. An inverse correlation was observed between Mcl-1L expression and apoptosis induction in AW8507 cell line post-radiation treatment supporting its pro-survival role. A rapid and short induction of Mcl-1L versus sustained induction of Mcl-1L was observed in the relatively more radiosensitive FBM versus AW8507 respectively. siRNA treatment in combination with IR demonstrated significant induction of apoptosis

  13. Glutamate Induced Thermal Equilibrium Intermediate and Counteracting Effect on Chemical Denaturation of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumalla, Bramhini; Prabhu, N Prakash

    2018-01-25

    When organisms are subjected to stress conditions, one of their adaptive responses is accumulation of small organic molecules called osmolytes. These osmolytes affect the structure and stability of the biological macromolecules including proteins. The present study examines the effect of a negatively charged amino acid osmolyte, glutamate (Glu), on two model proteins, ribonuclease A (RNase A) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA), which have positive and negative surface charges at pH 7, respectively. These proteins follow two-state unfolding transitions during both heat and chemical induced denaturation processes. The addition of Glu stabilizes the proteins against temperature and induces an early equilibrium intermediate during unfolding. The stability is found to be enthalpy-driven, and the free energy of stabilization is more for α-LA compared to RNase A. The decrease in the partial molar volume and compressibility of both of the proteins in the presence of Glu suggests that the proteins attain a more compact state through surface hydration which could provide a more stable conformation. This is also supported by molecule dynamic simulation studies which demonstrate that the water density around the proteins is increased upon the addition of Glu. Further, the intermediates could be completely destabilized by lower concentrations (∼0.5 M) of guanidinium chloride and salt. However, urea subverts the Glu-induced intermediate formed by α-LA, whereas it only slightly destabilizes in the case of RNase A which has a positive surface charge and could possess charge-charge interactions with Glu. This suggests that, apart from hydration, columbic interactions might also contribute to the stability of the intermediate. Gdm-induced denaturation of RNase A and α-LA in the absence and the presence of Glu at different temperatures was carried out. These results also show the Glu-induced stabilization of both of the proteins; however, all of the unfolding transitions followed two

  14. SmD1 Modulates the miRNA Pathway Independently of Its Pre-mRNA Splicing Function.

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    Xiao-Peng Xiong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous regulatory RNAs that play a key role in myriad biological processes. Upon transcription, primary miRNA transcripts are sequentially processed by Drosha and Dicer ribonucleases into ~22-24 nt miRNAs. Subsequently, miRNAs are incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs that contain Argonaute (AGO family proteins and guide RISC to target RNAs via complementary base pairing, leading to post-transcriptional gene silencing by a combination of translation inhibition and mRNA destabilization. Select pre-mRNA splicing factors have been implicated in small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways in fission yeast, worms, flies and mammals, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we show that SmD1, a core component of the Drosophila small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP implicated in splicing, is required for miRNA biogenesis and function. SmD1 interacts with both the microprocessor component Pasha and pri-miRNAs, and is indispensable for optimal miRNA biogenesis. Depletion of SmD1 impairs the assembly and function of the miRISC without significantly affecting the expression of major canonical miRNA pathway components. Moreover, SmD1 physically and functionally associates with components of the miRISC, including AGO1 and GW182. Notably, miRNA defects resulting from SmD1 silencing can be uncoupled from defects in pre-mRNA splicing, and the miRNA and splicing machineries are physically and functionally distinct entities. Finally, photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP analysis identifies numerous SmD1-binding events across the transcriptome and reveals direct SmD1-miRNA interactions. Our study suggests that SmD1 plays a direct role in miRNA-mediated gene silencing independently of its pre-mRNA splicing activity and indicates that the dual roles of splicing factors in post-transcriptional gene regulation may be

  15. BIOLOGICAL FUNCTION OF TOMBUSVIRUS-ENCODED SUPPRESSOR OF RNA SILENCING IN PLANTS

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    Omarov R.T.

    2012-08-01

    viral RNA and thus permit maintenance of viral RNA for systemic invasion. Evidence in support of this notion is that infection of N. benthamiana with P19-deficient tombusviral mutants was associated with the assembly of a discrete, high molecular weight RISC-like complex, which contains virus-derived siRNAs and exhibits specific ribonuclease activity.

  16. Atividade de fosfatases em gramíneas forrageiras em resposta à disponibilidade de fósforo no solo e à altura de corte das plantas Phosphatase activity in forage grasses as influenced by soil phosphorus availability and plant cutting height

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    Flancer Novais Nunes

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A eficiência de utilização de um nutriente, expressa pela relação entre a biomassa produzida e a quantidade absorvida, é uma importante característica adaptativa das plantas, particularmente daquelas cultivadas em solos com baixa disponibilidade desse nutriente. Maior eficiência de utilização de P (EUP é conferida pela maior taxa de remobilização de P, que consiste na translocação desse nutriente para regiões de maior demanda metabólica na planta. Maiores taxas de remobilização têm sido associadas a maiores atividades das enzimas: fosfatase ácida (APase e ribonuclease (RNase. Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a atividade dessas enzimas em plantas de Brachiaria decumbens, pouco exigente, e de Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia, mais exigente em P, cultivadas em solos que receberam diferentes doses desse nutriente e submetidas a diferentes alturas de corte. O ensaio foi realizado em casa de vegetação, utilizando amostra do horizonte B de um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo argiloso. Os tratamentos resultaram da combinação fatorial das duas gramíneas, das doses de 100, 200 e 500 mg dm-3 de P e das três alturas de corte: sem corte e corte a 15 e 30 cm a partir da superfície do solo para Brachiaria; e sem corte e corte a 20 e 40 cm para Panicum. As unidades experimentais consistiram de vasos com 10 dm³ de solo, com 10 plantas. Os resultados indicaram que não houve diferença significativa na produção de biomassa das duas gramíneas, mas a adição de P propiciou maior produção e maior teor desse nutriente na parte aérea de ambas. As plantas submetidas a cortes mais severos apresentaram menor produção e maiores teores de P na parte aérea. Ocorreu efeito negativo das doses de P na atividade da APase e da RNase nas duas forrageiras. As plantas cultivadas com a menor dose de P apresentaram maior atividade dessas enzimas e maior EUP. A atividade de ambas as fosfatases decresceu com a idade das plantas. No tratamento com o corte mais

  17. Consideracões sobre a natureza, desenvolvimento e transmissão de Cytamoeba bacterifera Labbé, 1894 de Leptodactylus ocellatus Considerations about the nature, development and transmission of Cytamoeba bacterifera Labbé, 1894 from Leptodactylus ocellatus

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    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de fornecer dados para o esclarecimento do controvertido problema da natureza de Cytamoeba bacterifera freqüentemente encontrada nos eritrócitos de Leptodactylus ocellatus, realizamos alguns testes citoquímicos. Demonstramos a presença do ácido ribonucleico e polissacarídeos não digeríveis pela ptialina em sua estrutura. Com o método de Feulgen, teste de referência para a caracterização do ácido desoxirribonucleico, obtivemos principlemnte resultados negativos; porém, um parasito com fraca e difusa positividade e algumas reações duvidosas também foram encontrados. Ao emrpegarmos o Verde Metila-Pironina, mesmo após o tratamento pela ribonuclease, e o Azul de Toluidina, também depois da ação desta enzima, não conseguimos confimar a presença de ADN. Como os elementos constituintes de C. bacterifera são minúsculos e, às vezes, não evidenciáveis, é possível que seu teor de ADN, porventura existente, seja muito pequeno e, conseqüentemente, de difícil demonstração por métodos cujos resultados são observados sob microscopia ótica, além de poder ficar facilmente encoberto por outras substâncias. Não estamos propensos a admitir uma provável natureza virótica para Cytamoeba baseados, principalmente, em alguns de seus aspectos estruturais (figs. 8, 15, 17 e 18 e na ausência de alteração no núcleo das células parasitadas. Apesar de não termos comprovado a presença de ADN, achamos possível que C. bacterifera seja um aglomerado intracitoplasmático de organismos modificados, cujas dimensões situam-se nas proximidades do limite de resolução do microscópio ótico, relacionados com as bactérias, assim como são, por exemplo, os Clamídios e as Riquétsias. Observamos o desenvolvimento de Cytamoeba em rã mantida em cativeiro por três meses e semanalmente examinada; constatamos decréscimo paulatino da parasitemia inicial e também que os seus tipos estruturais e medidas não estavam

  18. N348I in the connection domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers zidovudine and nevirapine resistance.

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    Soo-Huey Yap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytically active 66-kDa subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT consists of DNA polymerase, connection, and ribonuclease H (RNase H domains. Almost all known RT inhibitor resistance mutations identified to date map to the polymerase domain of the enzyme. However, the connection and RNase H domains are not routinely analysed in clinical samples and none of the genotyping assays available for patient management sequence the entire RT coding region. The British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (the Centre genotypes clinical isolates up to codon 400 in RT, and our retrospective statistical analyses of the Centre's database have identified an N348I mutation in the RT connection domain in treatment-experienced individuals. The objective of this multidisciplinary study was to establish the in vivo relevance of this mutation and its role in drug resistance.The prevalence of N348I in clinical isolates, the time taken for it to emerge under selective drug pressure, and its association with changes in viral load, specific drug treatment, and known drug resistance mutations was analysed from genotypes, viral loads, and treatment histories from the Centre's database. N348I increased in prevalence from below 1% in 368 treatment-naïve individuals to 12.1% in 1,009 treatment-experienced patients (p = 7.7 x 10(-12. N348I appeared early in therapy and was highly associated with thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs M41L and T215Y/F (p < 0.001, the lamivudine resistance mutations M184V/I (p < 0.001, and non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI resistance mutations K103N and Y181C/I (p < 0.001. The association with TAMs and NNRTI resistance mutations was consistent with the selection of N348I in patients treated with regimens that included both zidovudine and nevirapine (odds ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.43-4.81. The appearance of N348I was associated with a significant increase in viral load (p < 0.001, which

  19. Transcriptional Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals the Impact of Variation of a Single Transcription Factor on Differential Gene Expression in 4NQO, Fermentable, and Nonfermentable Carbon Sources

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    Xiaoqing Rong-Mullins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolism can change the potency of a chemical’s tumorigenicity. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO is a tumorigenic drug widely used on animal models for cancer research. Polymorphisms of the transcription factor Yrr1 confer different levels of resistance to 4NQO in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To study how different Yrr1 alleles regulate gene expression leading to resistance, transcriptomes of three isogenic S. cerevisiae strains carrying different Yrr1 alleles were profiled via RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with sequencing (ChIP-Seq in the presence and absence of 4NQO. In response to 4NQO, all alleles of Yrr1 drove the expression of SNQ2 (a multidrug transporter, which was highest in the presence of 4NQO resistance-conferring alleles, and overexpression of SNQ2 alone was sufficient to overcome 4NQO-sensitive growth. Using shape metrics to refine the ChIP-Seq peaks, Yrr1 strongly associated with three loci including SNQ2. In addition to a known Yrr1 target SNG1, Yrr1 also bound upstream of RPL35B; however, overexpression of these genes did not confer 4NQO resistance. RNA-Seq data also implicated nucleotide synthesis pathways including the de novo purine pathway, and the ribonuclease reductase pathways were downregulated in response to 4NQO. Conversion of a 4NQO-sensitive allele to a 4NQO-resistant allele by a single point mutation mimicked the 4NQO-resistant allele in phenotype, and while the 4NQO resistant allele increased the expression of the ADE genes in the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway, the mutant Yrr1 increased expression of ADE genes even in the absence of 4NQO. These same ADE genes were only increased in the wild-type alleles in the presence of 4NQO, indicating that the point mutation activated Yrr1 to upregulate a pathway normally only activated in response to stress. The various Yrr1 alleles also influenced growth on different carbon sources by altering the function of the mitochondria

  20. Multifuntional Nanotherapeutics for the Combinatorial Drug and Gene Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Breanne

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV glioma, is the most common primary brain tumor, affecting about 3 out of 100,000 persons per year in the United States. GBM accounts for about 80% of primary malignant brain tumors, and is also the most aggressive of malignant brain tumors. With exhaustive treatment, survival only averages between 12 and 15 months, with a 2-year survival rate less than 25%. New therapeutic strategies are necessary to improve the outcomes of this disease. Chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA alkylating agent, is used as a first-line of treatment for GBM. However, GBM tumors develop resistance to TMZ over time due to increased expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a gene responsible for DNA repair. We previously developed cationic, amphiphilic copolymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-g-polyethylenimine (PgP) and demonstrated its utility for nucleic acid delivery. Here, we examine the ability of PgP polyplexes to overcome TMZ resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy through combination drug and gene therapy for GBM treatment. In this study, we evaluated the ability of PgP to deliver siRNA targeting to MGMT (siMGMT), a gene responsible for drug resistance in GBM. Our results demonstrated that PgP effectively forms stable complex with siRNA and protects siRNAs from heparin competition assay, serum- and ribonuclease-mediated degradation, confirming the potential of the polyplex for in vivo delivery. Results from MTT assays showed that PgP/siRNA polyplexes exhibited minimal cytotoxicity compared to untreated cells when incubated with T98G human GBM cells. We also demonstrated that PgP/siMGMT polyplexes mediate knockdown of MGMT protein as well as a significant ˜56% and ˜68% knockdown of MGMT mRNA in T98G GBM cells compared to cells treated with PgP complexed with non-targeting siRNA (siNT) at a 60:1 and 80:1 nitrogen:phosphate (N:P) ratio, respectively. Further, co-incubation of PgP/siMGMT polyplexes with TMZ

  1. Reconocimiento alogénico: su papel protector durante la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana tipo1 (VIH-1

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    María Teresa Rugeles López

    2004-03-01

    mesothelial cells and biliary ductal plate epithelial cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 1999; 96: 8585–8590

    8. BRUHL P, KERSCHBAUM A, ZIMMERMAN K, EIBL MM, MANNHALTER JW. Allostimulated lymphocytes inhibit replication of HIV type 1. AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 12, 31–37 Science 1996; 270: 1811–1815

    9. RUGELES MT, TRUBEY CM, BEDOYA VI, PINTO LA, OPPENHEIM JJ, RYBAK SM, and SHEARER GM. Ribonuclease is partly responsible for the HIV-1 inhibitory effect activated by HLA alloantigen recognition. AIDS 2003; 17: 481–486

    10. ROSENBERG HF and DOMACHOWSKE JB. Eosinophils, eosinophil ribonucleases, and their role in host defense against respiratory virus pathogens. J. Leukoc. Biol. 2001; 70: 691–698

    11. YOULE R.J, WU YN, MIKULSKI SM, SHOGEN K, HAMILTON RS, NEWTON D, et al. RNase inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus infection of H9 cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 1994; 91: 6012–6016

    12. LEE-HUANG S, HUANG PL, SUN Y, KING HF, NLITHE DL and CHEN HC. Lysozyme and RNases as anti-HIV components in ?-core preparations of human chorionic gonadotropin. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 1999; 96: 2678– 2681

    13. HARBOUR-MCMENAMIN D, SMITH E, and BLALOCK E. Production of immunoreactive chorionic gonadotropin during mixed lymphocyte reactions: a possible selective mechanism for genetic diversity. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 1986; 83: 6834

  2. Increased cell survival by inhibition of BRCA1 using an antisense approach in an estrogen responsive ovarian carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annab, Lois A; Hawkins, Rebecca E; Solomon, Greg; Barrett, J Carl; Afshari, Cynthia A

    2000-01-01

    phosphoprotein that is regulated in response to DNA damaging agents [5,6,7] and in response to estrogen-induced growth [8,9,10,11]. Germline mutations that cause breast and ovarian cancer predisposition frequently result in truncated and presumably inactive BRCA1 protein [12]. BG-1 cells were derived from a patient with stage III, poorly differentiated ovarian adenocarcinoma [13]. This cell line, which expresses wild-type BRCA1, is estrogen responsive and withdrawal of estrogen results in eventual cell death. Previous studies suggest that BRCA1 is stimulated as a result of estrogen treatment [8,9,10,11], and also that BRCA1 may be involved in the cell death process [14]. Therefore, we examined the effect of reduction of BRCA1 levels in BG-1 cells on the cellular response to hormone depletion as well as estrogen stimulation. The results suggest that reduced levels of BRCA1 correlates with a survival advantage when BG-1 cells are placed under growth-restrictive and hormone-depleted conditions. In optimum growth conditions, significantly reduced levels of BRCA1 correlates with enhanced growth both in vitro and in vivo. To test the hypothesis that BRCA1 may play a role in the regulation of ovarian tumor cell death as well as in the inhibition of ovarian cell proliferation. The estrogen receptor-positive, BG-1 cell line [13], which contains an abundant amount of estrogen receptors (600 fmoles/100 μg DNA), was infected using a pLXSN retroviral vector (provided by AD Miller) containing an inverted partial human cDNA 900-base-pair sequence of BRCA1 (from nucleotide 121 in exon 1 to nucleotide 1025 in exon 11, accession #U14680). After 2 weeks of selection in 800 μg/ml of geneticin-G418 (Gibco/Life Technologies, Gaithersburg, MD, USA), BG-1 G418-resistant colonies were pooled, or individually isolated, and assayed for growth in the presence or absence of supplemented estrogen. Virally infected pooled populations of BG-1 cells were examined for BRCA1 message levels by ribonuclease