WorldWideScience

Sample records for rhodococcus erythropolis d-1

  1. [Expression of acylamidase gene in Rhodococcus erythropolis strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, K V; Novikov, A D; Riabchenko, L E; Ianenko, A S

    2014-09-01

    The expression of a new acylamidase gene from R. erythropolis 37 was studied in Rhodococcus erythropolis strains. This acylamidase, as a result of its unique substrate specificity, can hydrolyse N-substituted amides (4'-nitroacetanilide, N-isopropylacrylamide, N'N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide). A new expression system based on the use of the promoter region of nitrilhydratase genes from R. rhodochrous M8 was created to achieve constitutive synthesis of acylamidase in R. erythropolis cells. A fourfold improvement in the acylamidase activity of recombinant R. erythropolis cells as compared with the parent wild-type strain was obtained through the use of the new expression system.

  2. Kinetic mechanism of putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis (PuO) is a flavin-containing amine oxidase from the monoamine oxidase family that performs oxidative deamination of aliphatic diamines. In this study we report pre-steady-state kinetic analyses of the enzyme with the use of single-and double-mixing st

  3. Kinetic mechanism of putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis (PuO) is a flavin-containing amine oxidase from the monoamine oxidase family that performs oxidative deamination of aliphatic diamines. In this study we report pre-steady-state kinetic analyses of the enzyme with the use of single-and double-mixing

  4. Kinetic mechanism of putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata M; Heuts, Dominic P H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-10-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis (PuO) is a flavin-containing amine oxidase from the monoamine oxidase family that performs oxidative deamination of aliphatic diamines. In this study we report pre-steady-state kinetic analyses of the enzyme with the use of single- and double-mixing stopped-flow spectroscopy and putrescine as a substrate. During the fast and irreversible reductive half-reaction no radical intermediates were observed, suggesting a direct hydride transfer from the substrate to the FAD. The rate constant of flavin reoxidation depends on the ligand binding; when the imine product was bound to the enzyme the rate constant was higher than with free enzyme species. Similar results were obtained with product-mimicking ligands and this indicates that a ternary complex is formed during catalysis. The obtained kinetic data were used together with steady-state rate equations derived for ping-pong, ordered sequential and bifurcated mechanisms to explore which mechanism is operative. The integrated analysis revealed that PuO employs a bifurcated mechanism due to comparable rate constants of product release from the reduced enzyme and reoxidation of the reduced enzyme-product complex.

  5. [Antiadhesive potencial of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017 biosurfactants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirog, T P; Gritsenko, N A; Konon, A D; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinskaia, G A

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017 biosurfactants (surface-active substances, SAS) with different degree of purification on attachment of bacteria (Escherichia coli IEM-1, Bacillus subtilis BT-2, Proteus vulgaris BT-1, Staphylococcus aureus BMC-1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P-55, Enterobacter cloacae AC-22, Erwinia aroidaeae B-433), yeasts (Candida albicans D-6) and fungi (Aspergillus niger P-3, Fusarium culmorum T-7) to the abiotic surfaces (glass, plastic, ceramics, steel, linoleum) was studied. The dependence of microorganisms adhesion on degree of SAS purification (supernatant, purified SAS solution), SAS concentration (0,04-1,25 mg/ml), type of surface and test-cultures was established. The adhesion of majority investigated bacterial cells after treatment of abiotic surfaces with supernatant of cultural liquid with SAS concentration 0,06-0,25 mg/ml was on the average 20-45, yeasts C. albicans D-6--30-75% and was less than that purified SAS solution with the same concentration. Higher antiadhesive activity of supernatant as compared to purified SAS solution testifies to possibility of exception of the expensive stage of isolation and purification at obtaining of preparations with antiadhesive properties.

  6. Bio desulfurization of a system containing synthetic fuel by rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277; Remocao de compostos sulfurosos de sitema bifasico contendo combustivel sintetico por Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maass, Danielle; Souza, Antonio Augusto Ulson de; Souza, Selene Maria de Arruda Guelli Ulson de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    For decades the burning of fossil fuels released a lot of pollutants in the atmosphere. Among the most harmful is sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), which reacts with the moisture in the air and turns into sulfuric acid, being the main cause of acid rain. Acid rain is very harmful to animal and plant kingdoms; accelerates the corrosion's processes of buildings and monuments, and causes serious health problems for humans. As a result, many countries have reformed their legislation to require the sale of fuels with very low sulfur content. The existing processes of desulfurization are not capable of removing sulfur so low. Therefore, there has developed a new process called bio desulfurization. In this process, the degradation of sulfur occurs through the action of microorganisms that act as catalysts. The bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis has emerged as one of the most promising for bio desulfurization because it removes the sulfur without breaking the benzene rings, thereby maintaining the potential energy of the same. Using dibenzothiophene as a model of sulfur compounds, the products of the bio desulfurization process are 2- hydroxybiphenyl and sulfate. In this study we sought to examine the desulfurizing capacity of national Rhodococcus erythropolis strain ATCC4277 in a batch reactor using concentrations of organic phase (n-dodecane) of 20 and 80% (v/v). Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC4277 was capable of degrading DBT in 93.3 and 98.0% in the presence of 20 and 80% (v/v) of synthetic fuel, respectively. (author)

  7. Discovery and characterization of a putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hellemond, Erik W.; van Dijk, Marianne; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2008-01-01

    A gene encoding a putrescine oxidase (PuORh, EC 1.4.3.10) was identified from the genome of Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540. The gene was cloned in the pBAD vector and overexpressed at high levels in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was shown to be a soluble dimeric flavoprotein consisting

  8. Discovery and characterization of a putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hellemond, Erik W.; van Dijk, Marianne; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    A gene encoding a putrescine oxidase (PuORh, EC 1.4.3.10) was identified from the genome of Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540. The gene was cloned in the pBAD vector and overexpressed at high levels in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was shown to be a soluble dimeric flavoprotein consisting

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2, an Actinobacterium Isolated from a Cadmium-Contaminated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Eleonora; Wood, Jennifer L.; Fox, Edward M.; Liu, Wuxing

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2 is a rhizobacterium isolated from a heavy metal–contaminated environment. The 6.2-Mb annotated genome sequence shows that this strain harbors genes associated with heavy-metal resistance and xenobiotics degradation. PMID:27795276

  10. Desulfurization activity and reusability of magnetite nanoparticle-coated Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardania, Hassan; Raheb, Jamshid; Mohammad-Beigi, Hossein; Rasekh, Behnam; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2013-01-01

    The application of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles to the separation of desulfurizing bacterial cells and their influence on the desulfurization activity and reusability of the two bacterial strains Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via the reverse coprecipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the magnetite nanoparticles had sizes of 5.35 ± 1.13 (F1 nanoparticles) and 8.74 ± 1.18 nm (F2 nanoparticles) when glycine was added during the synthesis of nanoparticles and when it was absent from the reaction mixture, respectively. Glycine was added after the synthesis of both F1 and F2 nanoparticles to stabilize the nanoparticle dispersion. TEM images of cells treated with magnetite nanoparticles indicated that F1 nanoparticles were immobilized on the surface of bacterial cells more evenly than the F2 nanoparticles. Desulfurization activities of the F1 magnetite nanoparticle-coated R. erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 cells (with sulfur-removal percentage values of 70 ± 4 and 73 ± 3, respectively), as examined with the spectrophotometric Gibbs assay (based on dibenzothiophene degradation and sulfur-removal percentage), were not significantly different from those for the free bacterial cells (67 ± 3 and 69 ± 4, respectively). These results indicate that magnetite nanoparticles cannot affect the desulfurization activity of cells examined in this work. Isolation of bacterial cells from the suspension using a magnet and evaluation of desulfurization activity of separated cells showed that Fe3 O4 nanoparticles can provide a high-efficiency recovery of bacterial cells from a suspension, with the reused magnetite nanoparticle-coated bacterial cells being able to maintain their desulfurization activity efficiently. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. [Cloning of new acylamidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis and its expression in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, K V; Ianenko, A S

    2013-10-01

    The gene for new Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 acylamidase, which possesses unique substrate specificity, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. Substrates for this enzyme are not only simple amides, such as acetamide and propionamide, but also N-substituted amides, such as 4'-nitroacetanilide. The 1431-bp gene was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells on pET16b plasmid under the control of a promoter of the φ 10 gene from the T7 phage. The molecular mass of recombinant acylamidase in E. coli was 55 kDa, which corresponded to that of native acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37. Recombinant acylamidase was able to hydrolize N-substituted amides. A search of a nucleotide database and multiple alignment revealed that acylamidase belonged to the Amidase protein family PF01425, but its nucleotide and amino acid sequences differed significantly from those of the described amidases.

  12. [Cloning and analysis of a new aliphatic amidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, K V; Karpova, I Yu; Epremyan, A S; Yanenko, A S

    2014-10-01

    A new aliphatic amidase gene (ami), having a level of similarity with the nearest homologs of no more than 77%, was identified in the Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 strain, which is able to hydrolyze a wide range of amides. The amidase gene was cloned within a 3.7 kb chromosomal locus, which also contains putative acetyl-CoA ligase and ABC-type transportergenes. The structure of this locus in the R. erythropolis TA37 strain differs from the structure of loci in other Rhodococcus strains. The amidase gene is expressed in Escherichia coli cells. It was demonstrated that amidase (generated in the recombinant strain) efficiently hydrolyzes acetamide (aliphatic anmide) and does not use 4'-nitroacetanilide (N-substituted amide) as a substrate. Insertional inactivation of the amidase gene in the R. erythropolis TA37 strain results in a considerable decrease (by at least 6-7 times) in basal amidase activity, indicating functional amidase activity in the R. erythropolis TA37 strain.

  13. Improvement of Biodesulfurization Rate of Alginate Immobilized Rhodococcus erythropolis R1

    OpenAIRE

    Derikvand, Peyman; Etemadifar, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sulfur oxides released from the burning of oil causes severe environmental pollution. The sulfur can be removed via the 4S pathway in biodesulfurization (BDS). Immobilization approaches have been developed to prevent cell contamination of oil during the BDS process. Objectives: The encapsulation of Rhodococcus erythropolis R1 in calcium alginate beads was studied in order to enhance conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to 2-hydroxy biphenyl (2-HBP) as the final product. Also the e...

  14. Response of Rhodococcus erythropolis strain IBBPo1 to toxic organic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Marilena Stancu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, there has been a lot of interest in the utilization of rhodococci in the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated environments. This study investigates the response of Rhodococcus erythropolis IBBPo1 cells to 1% organic solvents (alkanes, aromatics. A combination of microbiology, biochemical, and molecular approaches were used to examine cell adaptation mechanisms likely to be pursued by this strain after 1% organic solvent exposure. R. erythropolis IBBPo1 was found to utilize 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene as the sole carbon source. Modifications in cell viability, cell morphology, membrane permeability, lipid profile, carotenoid pigments profile and 16S rRNA gene were revealed in R. erythropolis IBBPo1 cells grown 1 and 24 h on minimal medium in the presence of 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene. Due to its environmental origin and its metabolic potential, R. erythropolis IBBPo1 is an excellent candidate for the bioremediation of soils contaminated with crude oils and other toxic compounds. Moreover, the carotenoid pigments produced by this nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium have a variety of other potential applications.

  15. Biodegradation Waste of the Stations Service by Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Héctor Pucci

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The strain Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp was isolated from turbine oil contaminated soil from northern San Cruz province, Argentina. Because of its potential in bioremediation, the aim was to know the abilities for degradation of pure compounds and mixtures of hydrocarbons, as well as degradation in the presence and absence of diesel nitrogen measured by gas chromatography.The strain possesses the ability to use diesel, kerosene, lubricating oil, pristane, hexane, heptane, octane, pentadecane and hexadecane. R. erythropolis ohp-al-gp has excellent potential for bioremediation of hydrocarbons, which are conflictives as lubricating oils, their potential use in removing mud from washing engines or gas stations would be its most important application. The degradation rate in optimal culture conditions, gives it an additional advantage. It also has a low degradation in the absence of nitrogen, a frequent limiting factor in Patagonian soils. BIODEGRADACIÓN DE RESIDUOS DE ESTACIONES DE SERVICIO Y LAVADEROS INDUSTRIALES POR LA CEPA Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp. La cepa Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp fue aislada de un suelo contaminado con aceite de turbinas de la zona norte de la provincia de San Cruz, Argentina. Dado su potencial en la bioremediación, el objetivo del trabajo fue conocer las habilidades para la degradación de compuestos puros y mezclas de hidrocarburos, como también degradación en presencia y ausencia de nitrógeno de gasoil medido por cromatografía gaseosa. La cepa posee la capacidad de utilización de los siguientes hidrocarburos:gasoil, kerosene, aceite lubricante, pristano, hexano, heptano, octano, pentadecano y hexadecano. La cepa R. erythropolis ohp-algp presenta un excelente potencial de biorremediación de hidrocarburos conflictivos como son los aceites lubricantes, su posible empleo en la eliminación de barros provenientes de lavados de motores o de estaciones de servicio sería su aplicaci

  16. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a novel monoterpene epsilon-lactone hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Bergmans, van der C.J.B.; Werf, van der M.J.

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ε-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is

  17. Role of Interfacial Tensions in the Translocation of Rhodococcus erythropolis during Growth in a Two Phase Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sharma, Prashant K.; Sunairi, Michio; Kishi, Emi; Sugita, Kazushige; van der Mei, Henny C.; Nakajima, Mutsuyasu; Busscher, Henk J.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 is an alkane-degrading bacterium, which grows well in media containing high concentrations of alkanes. These properties give the organism potential in the bioremediation of various environments contaminated by alkanes. In this study, we report the translocation of R. ery

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2, an Actinobacterium Isolated from a Cadmium-Contaminated Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Eleonora; Wood, Jennifer L; Fox, Edward M; Liu, Wuxing; Franks, Ashley E

    2016-10-20

    Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2 is a rhizobacterium isolated from a heavy metal-contaminated environment. The 6.2-Mb annotated genome sequence shows that this strain harbors genes associated with heavy-metal resistance and xenobiotics degradation. Copyright © 2016 Egidi et al.

  19. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a novel monoterpene e-lactone hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Bergmans, C.J.B. van der; Werf, M.J. van der

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ε-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is

  20. Transcriptome of the quorum-sensing signal-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis responds differentially to virulent and avirulent Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasiborski, A; Mondy, S; Chong, T-M; Barbey, C; Chan, K-G; Beury-Cirou, A; Latour, X; Faure, D

    2015-05-01

    Social bacteria use chemical communication to coordinate and synchronize gene expression via the quorum-sensing (QS) regulatory pathway. In Pectobacterium, a causative agent of the blackleg and soft-rot diseases on potato plants and tubers, expression of the virulence factors is collectively controlled by the QS-signals N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHLs). Several soil bacteria, such as the actinobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis, are able to degrade NAHLs, hence quench the chemical communication and virulence of Pectobacterium. Here, next-generation sequencing was used to investigate structural and functional genomics of the NAHL-degrading R. erythropolis strain R138. The R. erythropolis R138 genome (6.7 Mbp) contained a single circular chromosome, one linear (250 kbp) and one circular (84 kbp) plasmid. Growth of R. erythropolis and P. atrosepticum was not altered in mixed-cultures as compared with monocultures on potato tuber slices. HiSeq-transcriptomics revealed that no R. erythropolis genes were differentially expressed when R. erythropolis was cultivated in the presence vs absence of the avirulent P. atrosepticum mutant expI, which is defective for QS-signal synthesis. By contrast 50 genes (atrosepticum. Among them, quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase-PCR confirmed that the expression of some alkyl-sulfatase genes decreased in the presence of a virulent P. atrosepticum, as well as deprivation of organic sulfur such as methionine, which is a key precursor in the synthesis of NAHL by P. atrosepticum.

  1. Long-term repeated biodesulfurization by immobilized Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, M.; Kawamoto, T.; Tanaka, A. [Kyoto Univ., Yoshida (Japan). Dept. of Synthetic Chemistry and Biological Chemistry; Fujino, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Maruhashi, K. [Advanced Technology and Research Inst., Petroleum Energy Center, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In this study, biodesulfurization (BDS) was carried out using immobilized Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 in n-tetradecane containing dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a model oil (n-tetradecane/immobilized cell biphasic system). The cells were immobilized by entrapping them with calcium alginate, agar, photo-crosslinkable resin prepolymers (ENT-4000 and ENTP-4000), and urethane prepolymers (PU-3 and PU-6); and it was found that ENT-4000-immobilized cells had the highest DBT desulfurization activity in the model oil system without leakage of cells from the support. Furthermore, ENT-4000-immobilized cells could catalyze BDS repeatedly in this system for more than 900 h with reactivation; and recovery of both the biocatalyst and the desulfurized model oil was easy. This study would give a solution to the problems in BDS, such as the troublesome process of recovering desulfurized oil and the short life of BDS biocatalysts. (orig.)

  2. Formaldehyde removal in synthetic and industrial wastewater by Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A; Lopategi, A; Prieto, M; Serra, J L; Llama, M J

    2002-02-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis strain UPV-1 is able to grow on phenol as the only carbon and energy source and to remove formaldehyde completely from both synthetic and industrial wastewater. The rate of formaldehyde removal is independent of either initial biomass or formaldehyde concentration. The presence of viable, intact cells is strictly necessary for this removal to take place. Discontinuous and continuous formaldehyde-feed systems were successfully tested with synthetic wastewater in shaken flasks. Once biodegradation was well established in model synthetic wastewater, a real wastewater sample was obtained from a local phenolic and melamine resin-manufacturing company. Incubation of biomass with this wastewater at subtoxic concentrations of formaldehyde resulted in the complete removal of the pollutant. Parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand and toxicity, were assessed as indicators of wastewater cleanup progress.

  3. Biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus erythropolis and its application to oil removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Jardim Pacheco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different nutrients on biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus erythropolis was investigated. Increasing the concentration of phosphate buffer from 30 up through 150 mmol/L stimulated an increase in biosurfactant production, which reached a maximum concentration of 285 mg/L in shaken flasks. Statistical analysis showed that glycerol, NaNO3,MgSO4 and yeast extract had significant effects on production. The results were confirmed in a batchwise bioreactor, and semi-growth-associated production was detected. Reduction in the surface tension, which indicates the presence of biosurfactant, reached a value of 38 mN/m at the end of 35 hours. Use of the produced biosurfactant for washing crude oil-contaminated soil showed that 2 and 4 times the critical micellar concentration (CMC were able to remove 97 and 99% of the oil, respectively, after 1 month of impregnation.

  4. A new acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 can hydrolyze N-substituted amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, K V; Zalunin, I A; Kotlova, E K; Yanenko, A S

    2010-08-01

    A new acylamidase was isolated from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 and characterized. N-Substituted acrylamides (isopropyl acrylamide, N,N-dimethyl-aminopropyl acrylamide, and methylene-bis-acrylamide), acid para-nitroanilides (4'-nitroacetanilide, Gly-pNA, Ala-pNA, Leu-pNA), and N-acetyl derivatives of glycine, alanine, and leucine are good substrates for this enzyme. Aliphatic amides (acetamide, acrylamide, isobutyramide, n-butyramide, and valeramide) are also used as substrates but with less efficiency. The enzyme subunit mass by SDS-PAGE is 55 kDa. Maximal activity is exhibited at pH 7-8 and 55°C. The enzyme is stable for 15 h at 22°C and for 0.5 h at 45°C. The Michaelis constant (K(m)) is 0.25 mM with Gly-pNA and 0.55 mM with Ala-pNA. The acylamidase activity is suppressed by inhibitors of serine proteases (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate) but is not suppressed by inhibitors of aliphatic amidases (acetaldehyde and nitrophenyl disulfides). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the acylamidase is highly homologous to those of two putative amidases detected from sequenced R. erythropolis genomes. It is suggested that the acylamidase together with the detected homologs forms a new class within the amidase signature family.

  5. Expression control of nitrile hydratase and amidase genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis and substrate specificities of the enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucká, Lenka; Volkova, Olga; Pavlík, Adam; Kaplan, Ondřej; Kracík, Martin; Nešvera, Jan; Martínková, Ludmila; Pátek, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial amidases and nitrile hydratases can be used for the synthesis of various intermediates and products in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and for the bioremediation of toxic pollutants. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of the amidase and nitrile hydratase genes of Rhodococcus erythropolis and test the stereospecific nitrile hydratase and amidase activities on chiral cyanohydrins. The nucleotide sequences of the gene clusters containing the oxd (aldoxime dehydratase), ami (amidase), nha1, nha2 (subunits of the nitrile hydratase), nhr1, nhr2, nhr3 and nhr4 (putative regulatory proteins) genes of two R. erythropolis strains, A4 and CCM2595, were determined. All genes of both of the clusters are transcribed in the same direction. RT-PCR analysis, primer extension and promoter fusions with the gfp reporter gene showed that the ami, nha1 and nha2 genes of R. erythropolis A4 form an operon transcribed from the Pami promoter and an internal Pnha promoter. The activity of Pami was found to be weakly induced when the cells grew in the presence of acetonitrile, whereas the Pnha promoter was moderately induced by both the acetonitrile or acetamide used instead of the inorganic nitrogen source. However, R. erythropolis A4 cells showed no increase in amidase and nitrile hydratase activities in the presence of acetamide or acetonitrile in the medium. R. erythropolis A4 nitrile hydratase and amidase were found to be effective at hydrolysing cyanohydrins and 2-hydroxyamides, respectively.

  6. Characteristics of dibenzothiophene desulfurization by Rhodococcus erythropolis R1 and its Dsz-negative mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Etemadifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biodesulfurization is used as a selective method for lowering the sulfur content of petroleum products. Materials and methods: A sulfur-oxidation bacterial strain named Rhodococcus erythropolis R1 (NCBI GenBank Accession No. GU570564 was used in this study for desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT. Results: The induced culture of strain R1 was able to produce 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2- HBP from DBT followed 4S pathway without further degrading carbon backbone. This process confirmed by gas chromatography (GC analysis. The specific activity of DBT desulfurization by R1 was 45 µM (g dry wt-1 h-1. The addition of Tween 80 as surfactant and glycerol as carbon source determines a 100% rate of DBT-desulfurization during 3 days. The heavy plasmid detected in R1 strain carries dsz genes responsible for biodesulfurization of DBT that was shown by PCR reaction. The mutant strains which had lost this plasmid also had lost desulfurization phenotype. Both mutant and wild strain were sensitive to high concentration of 2-HBP and some antibiotics. Discussion and conclusion: Strain R1 desulfurize DBT through the sulfur-specific degradation pathway or 4S pathway with the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur (C-S bonds without reducing the energy content. Addition of surfactant enhanced the desulfurization of DBT by increasing its bioavailability and also could improve the growth and desulfurization rate. The location of desulfurization genes was on a heavy plasmid in strain R1. Based on the results of this study, R. erythropolis R1 could serve as a model system for efficient biodesulfurization of petroleum oil without reducing the energy value.

  7. Enhanced production of amidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis MTCC 1526 by medium optimisation using a statistical experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Bhalchandra K; Mutalik, Snehal R; Joshi, Renuka M; Nene, Sanjay N; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2009-05-01

    In the present work, statistical experimental methodology was used to enhance the production of amidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis MTCC 1526. R. erythropolis MTCC 1526 was selected through screening of seven strains of Rhodococcus species. The Placket-Burman screening experiments suggested that sorbitol as carbon source, yeast extract and meat peptone as nitrogen sources, and acetamide as amidase inducer are the most influential media components. The concentrations of these four media components were optimised using a face-centred design of response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum medium composition for amidase production was found to contain sorbitol (5 g/L), yeast extract (4 g/L), meat peptone (2.5 g/L), and acetamide (12.25 mM). Amidase activities before and after optimisation were 157.85 units/g dry cells and 1,086.57 units/g dry cells, respectively. Thus, use of RSM increased production of amidase from R. erythropolis MTCC 1526 by 6.88-fold.

  8. Desulfurization metabolite of Rhodococcus erythropolis LSSE8-1 and its related desulfurizational gene fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Zhongxuan; LUO Mingfang; LI Xin; XING Jianmin; LIU Huizhou

    2003-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis LSSE8-1 is a newly isolated biodesulfurizaion strain from the soil of Chishui gas field, Guizhou Province, China. The analysis of its metabolism product shows that the strain is a kind of biocatalyst able to oxidize dibenzothiophene (DBT) to 2-hydroxydi- phenyl (HBP), and therefore the sulfur in DBT is selectively removed. By using DBTO2 (dibenzothiophene 5,5-dioxide) as substrate, both DBT and HBP are found in the culture, which shows that the reaction from DBT to DBTO2 is reversible in the cell. While using 0.5 mmol/L DBT as control, 0.01-0.4 mmol/L DBTO2 shows poisonous effect to the cell, which will explain why there is no DBTO2 accumulation in the process of biodesulfurization. After treatment by lysozme, the plasmid DNA of the strain is isolated by alkaline method to be used as the template of PCR reaction. Three dsz gene fragments of 1.3, 1.0 and 1.2 kb respectively were amplified. Each fragment is ligate with PGEM-T vector, and cloned into E. coli. DH5α. The clone DNA is sequenced and the result shows that dsz related genes are highly conservative. The identities of dszA and dszB with respect to IGTS8 are 100%, and the identity of dszC with that of IGTS8 is 99%.

  9. Production of biosurfactant by hydrocarbon degrading Rhodococcus ruber and Rhodococcus erythropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bicca Flávio Correa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available There is world wide concern about the liberation of hydrocarbons in the environment, both from industrial activities and from accidental spills of oil and oilrelated compounds. Biosurfactants, which are natural emulsifiers of hydrocarbons, are produced by some bacteria, fungi and yeast. They are polymers, totally or partially extracellular, with an amphipathyc structure, which allows them to form micelles that accumulate at the interface between liquids of different polarities such as water and oil. This process is based upon the ability of biosurfactants to reduce surface tension, blocking the formation of hydrogen bridges and certain hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. The ability of biosurfactant production by five strains of Rhodococcus isolated from oil prospecting sites was evaluated. Surface tension measurement and emulsifying index were used to quantify biosurfactant production. The influence of environmental conditions was also investigated - pH, temperature, medium composition, and type of carbon source - on cell growth and biosurfactant production. Strain AC 239 was shown to be a potential producer, attaining 63% of emulsifying index for a Diesel-water binary system. It could be used, either directly on oil spills in contained environments, or for the biotechnological production of biosurfactant.

  10. Rhodococcus erythropolis and Its γ-Lactone Catabolic Pathway: An Unusual Biocontrol System That Disrupts Pathogen Quorum Sensing Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Latour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus erythropolis is an environmental Gram-positive Actinobacterium with a versatile metabolism involved in various bioconversions and degradations. Rhodococci are best known for their great potential in numerous decontamination and industrial processes. However, they can also prevent plant disease by disrupting quorum sensing-based communication of Gram-negative soft-rot bacteria, by degrading N-acyl-homoserine lactone signaling molecules. Such biocontrol activity results partly from the action of the γ-lactone catabolic pathway. This pathway is responsible for cleaving the lactone bond of a wide range of compounds comprising a γ-butyrolactone ring coupled to an alkyl or acyl chain. The aliphatic products of this hydrolysis are then activated and enter fatty acid metabolism. This short pathway is controlled by the presence of the γ-lactone, presumably sensed by a TetR-like transcriptional regulator, rather than the presence of the pathogen or the plant-host in the environment of the Rhodococci. Both the density and biocontrol activity of R. erythropolis may be boosted in crop systems. Treatment with a cheap γ-lactone stimulator, for example, the food flavoring γ-caprolactone, induces the activity in the biocontrol agent, R. erythropolis, of the pathway degrading signaling molecules; such treatments thus promote plant protection.

  11. Purification and characterization of a Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 involved in three different monoterpene degradation pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, van der M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase (BVMO), catalysing the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent oxidation of the monocyclic monoterpene ketones 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. Monocyclic monoterpene ketone mono-oxygenase (MMK

  12. Purification and characterization of a Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 involved in three different monocyclic monoterpene degradation pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, M.J. van der

    2000-01-01

    A Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase (BVMO), catalysing the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent oxidation of the monocyclic monoterpene ketones 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. Monocyclic monoterpene ketone mono-oxygenase (MMK

  13. THE COMPOSITION OF ALFALFA, WHEAT AND RADISH ROOT EXUDATES AND THEIR IMPACT ON RHODOCOCCUS ERYTHROPOLIS RCM АС-2017D BIOMASS GROWTH

    OpenAIRE

    Otroshko D. N.; Volchenko N. N.; Samkov A. A.; Khudokormov A. A.

    2016-01-01

    In root exudates of alfalfa, wheat and radish we have found 12 amino acids. As well as 5 organic acids were identified. In the variant with exudates of wheat as the sole source of carbon and energy maximum titer of microorganism Rhodococcus erythropolis RCM Ac-2017D were observed

  14. THE COMPOSITION OF ALFALFA, WHEAT AND RADISH ROOT EXUDATES AND THEIR IMPACT ON RHODOCOCCUS ERYTHROPOLIS RCM АС-2017D BIOMASS GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otroshko D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In root exudates of alfalfa, wheat and radish we have found 12 amino acids. As well as 5 organic acids were identified. In the variant with exudates of wheat as the sole source of carbon and energy maximum titer of microorganism Rhodococcus erythropolis RCM Ac-2017D were observed

  15. Identification of phenylalkane derivatives when Mycobacterium neoaurum and Rhodococcus erythropolis were cultured in the presence of various phenylalkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Susanne; Mikolasch, Annett; Schauer, Frieder

    2012-01-01

    Phenylalkanes are ubiquitously found in nature as pollutants originating from oil, gas oil and petrol. Rising commercial demand for mineral oil fractions has led to the increased prevalence of environmental contamination, whereby these particular hydrocarbons are encountered by bacteria which have subsequently developed sophisticated metabolic routes for purposes of degradation. Herein a detailed analysis of these metabolic pathways in the degradation of phenylalkanes by Mycobacterium neoaurum and Rhodococcus erythropolis highlighted preponderance for the formation of certain metabolites of which 17 were identified and whereby striking differences were noticed depending specifically upon the length of the substrate's alkyl chain. Although the degradation of even-numbered phenylalkane substrates was assumed to result in the generation of phenylacetic acid formed due to substrate terminal oxidation and subsequent β-oxidation, cultures of M. neoaurum and R. erythropolis were determined in an extracellular accumulation of odd-numbered acidic metabolites, suggesting a simultaneous presence of sub-terminal degradation mechanisms. However, results obtained from biotransformation assays containing even-chained phenylalkanoic acid intermediates as substrates revealed exclusive β-oxidative mechanisms and no generation of odd-numbered degradation products. R. erythropolis in contrast to M. neoaurum also proved viable for hydroxylation of the aromatic ring of metabolites. Interestingly, the generation of phenylacetic acid and subsequently 2-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid was monitored and entailed the presence of the lactone intermediate 2-coumaranone. These results enhance our understanding of the degradation of phenylalkanes and illustrate the potential application of such species in the bioremediation of these common environmental pollutants and in the strains' diverse abilities to transform mineral oil compounds to new valuable products.

  16. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection.

  17. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Barbey

    Full Text Available The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection.

  18. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600ppm) in 3months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  19. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  20. Biodegradation of benzo[α]pyrene, toluene, and formaldehyde from the gas phase by a consortium of Rhodococcus erythropolis and Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Paulina; Cáceres, Manuel; Scott, Felipe; Díaz-Robles, Luis; Aroca, Germán; Vergara-Fernández, Alberto

    2017-07-06

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important indoor contaminants. Their hydrophobic nature hinders the possibility of biological abatement using biofiltration. Our aim was to establish whether the use of a consortium of Fusarium solani and Rhodococcus erythropolis shows an improved performance (in terms of mineralization rate and extent) towards the degradation of formaldehyde, as a slightly polar VOC; toluene, as hydrophobic VOC; and benzo[α]pyrene (BaP) as PAH at low concentrations compared to a single-species biofilm in serum bottles with vermiculite as solid support to mimic a biofilter and to relate the possible improvements with the surface hydrophobicity and partition coefficient of the biomass at three different temperatures. Results showed that the hydrophobicity of the surface of the biofilms was affected by the hydrophobicity of the carbon source in F. solani but it did not change in R. erythropolis. Similarly, the partition coefficients of toluene and BaP in F. solani biomass (both as pure culture and consortium) show a reduction of up to 38 times compared to its value in water, whereas this reduction was only 1.5 times in presence of R. erythropolis. Despite that increments in the accumulated CO2 and its production rate were found when F. solani or the consortium was used, the mineralization extent of toluene was below 25%. Regarding BaP degradation, the higher CO2 production rates and percent yields were obtained when a consortium of F. solani and R. erythropolis was used, despite a pure culture of R. erythropolis exhibits poor mineralization of BaP.

  1. Optimizing Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation by Flavonoid-Induced Cells of the Rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh My Pham

    Full Text Available There is evidence that many plant secondary metabolites may act as signal molecules to trigger the bacterial ability to metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs during the rhizoremediation process. However, the bases for the PCB rhizoremediation process are still largely unknown. The rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is unable to use flavanone as a growth substrate. However, on the basis of an assay that monitors the amount of 4-chlorobenzoate produced from 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells grown co-metabolically on flavanone plus sodium acetate, this flavonoid was previously found to be a potential inducer of the U23A biphenyl catabolic pathway. In this work, and using the same assay, we identified ten other flavonoids that did not support growth, but that acted as inducers of the U23A biphenyl pathway, and we confirmed flavonoid induction of the biphenyl catabolic pathway using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR on the bphA gene. We also examined the effect of the growth co-substrate on flavonoid induction. Sodium acetate was replaced by glucose, mannose, sucrose, or mannitol, which are sugars found in plant root exudates. The data showed that the level of induction of strain U23A biphenyl-degrading enzymes was significantly influenced by the nature and concentration of the flavonoid in the growth medium, as well as by the substrate used for growth. Sucrose allowed for an optimal induction response for most flavonoids. Some flavonoids, such as flavone and isoflavone, were better inducers of the biphenyl catabolic enzymes than biphenyl itself. We also found that all flavonoids tested in this work were metabolized by strain U23A during co-metabolic growth, but that the metabolite profiles, as well as the level of efficiency of degradation, differed for each flavonoid. To obtain insight into how flavonoids interact with strain U23A to promote polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB degradation, we determined the concentration of

  2. BIODEGRADACIÓN DE RESIDUOS DE ESTACIONES DE SERVICIO Y LAVADEROS INDUSTRIALES POR LA CEPA Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSCAR HÉCTOR PUCCI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La cepa Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp fue aislada de un suelo contaminado con aceite de turbinas de la zona norte de la provincia de San Cruz, Argentina. Dado su potencial en la bioremediación, el objetivo del trabajo fue conocer las habilidades para la degradación de compuestos puros y mezclas de hidrocarburos, como también degradación en presencia y ausencia de nitrógeno de gasoil medido por cromatografía gaseosa. La cepa posee la capacidad de utilización de los siguientes hidrocarburos: gasoil, kerosene, aceite lubricante, pristano, hexano, heptano, octano, pentadecano y hexadecano. La cepa R. erythropolis ohp-al- gp presenta un excelente potencial de biorremediación de hidrocarburos conflictivos como son los aceites lubricantes, su posible empleo en la eliminación de barros provenientes de lavados de motores o de estaciones de servicio sería su aplicación más im- portante. La velocidad de degradación, en condiciones óptimas de cultivo, le confiere una ventaja adicional. Además, posee una degradación baja en ausencia de nitrógeno, factor limitante y frecuente en los suelos patagónicos.

  3. OIL- DEGRADING STRAIN RHODOCOCCUS ERYTHROPOLIS B2 AS A BASE OF BIOPREPARATION USED FOR ELIMINATION OF HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATES AND SOIL RECULTIVATION Нефтеокисляющий штамм rhodococcus erythropolis b2 как основа создания биопрепарата для ликвидации углеводородных загрязнений и рекультивации земель

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaseva E. V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the biotechnological properties of the oil-degrading strain Rhodococcus erythropolis B2, which allow us to use microorganism B2 as a base of biopreparation: hydrocarbon- destructive potential, growth characteristics on the different media, producing phytohormones and biosurfactants, adhesive and floatation activity, and also laboratory and field tests

  4. INDUSTRIAL WASTE BIOCONVERSION INTO SURFACTANTS BY Rhodococcus erythropolis ІMV Ас-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ІMV В-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii ІMV В-7405

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to realize an alternative processing of toxic industrial waste into surfactants by strains Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 for remediation of environment. The studied strains were grown in liquid media containing such sources of carbon as waste (fried sunflower oil, technical glycerol (by-product of biodiesel production, and aromatic compounds. The synthesis of surfactants was evaluated by emulsification index, conditional concentration of surfactants and concentration of extracellular surfactants, which was determined gravimetrically after their extraction from supernatant by the mixture of methanol and chloroform. The concentration of oil in water and soil was analyzed by gravimetric method after extraction with hexane. It was shown that with increasing concentration of the inoculum up to 10−15% and two times increase of nitrogen source content in medium containing 7−8% (v/v of crude glycerol, concentration of surfactants synthesized by R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B 7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 was 3.4; 5.0 and 5.3 g/l, respectively, that is 1.6−1.7 times higher as compared with values on basal medium with the same content of substrate. The maximum concentration (3.9−4.3 g/l of surfactants synthesized by A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 on fried sunflower oil (4% was achieved by using the inoculum grown on refined oil. The ability of R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 to decompose aromatic compounds (phenol, naphthalene, toluene, hexachlorobenzene, benzoic and N-phenylanthranilic acid with simultaneous synthesis of extracellular metabolites with surface-active and emulsifying properties was established. In the presence of surfactants in the form of culture liquid (5−10%, the degree of degradation of complex oil with heavy metal (Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, 0.01−0.5 mmol

  5. Enhanced translocation and growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 in the alkane phase of aqueous-alkane two phase cultures were mediated by GroEL2 overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takihara, Hayato; Ogihara, Jun; Yoshida, Takao; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakajima, Mutsuyasu; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sunairi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that R. erythropolis PR4 translocated from the aqueous to the alkane phase, and then grew in two phase cultures to which long-chain alkanes had been added. This was considered to be beneficial for bioremediation. In the present study, we investigated the proteins involved in the translocation of R. erythropolis PR4. The results of our proteogenomic analysis suggested that GroEL2 was upregulated more in cells that translocated inside of the pristane (C19) phase than in those located at the aqueous-alkane interface attached to the n-dodecane (C12) surface. PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) and PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) strains were constructed to confirm the effects of the upregulation of GroEL2 in translocated cells. The expression of GroEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) was 15.5-fold higher than that in PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) in two phase cultures containing C12. The growth and cell surface lipophilicity of PR4 were enhanced by the introduction of pK4-EL2-1. These results suggested that the plasmid overexpression of groEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) led to changes in cell localization, enhanced growth, and increased cell surface lipophilicity. Thus, we concluded that the overexpression of GroEL2 may play an important role in increasing the organic solvent tolerance of R. erythropolis PR4 in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures.

  6. Transfer of Tsukamurella wratislaviensis Goodfellow et a. 1995 to the genus Rhodococcus as Rhodococcus wratislaviensis comb. nov..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Michael; Chun, Jongsik; Stackebrandt, Erko; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M

    2002-05-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to clarify the taxonomic position of the type strain (N805T) of Tsukamurella wratislaviensis. This organism showed a combination of phenotypic properties, notably chemotaxonomic markers, consistent with its classification in the genus Rhodococcus. Comparative 16S rDNA sequencing studies indicated that strain 805T falls into the Rhodococcus erythropolis subclade, where it forms a monophyletic group with the type strains of Rhodococcus opacus and Rhodococcus percolatus. The close relationship between these strains was underpinned by the results of mycolic acid analyses. However, strain N805T was distinguished from the R. opacus and R. percolatus strains in DNA-DNA pairing experiments and by using a range of phenotypic properties. In light of these studies, it is clear that strain N805T is misclassified in the genus Tsukamurella. It is, therefore, proposed that Tsukamurella wratislaviensis Goodfellow et al. 1995 be transferred to the genus Rhodococcus as Rhodococcus wratislaviensis comb. nov..

  7. Rhodococcus equi foal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noah D

    2014-12-01

    Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi is an important cause of disease and death in foals. This article reviews current knowledge of the epidemiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control of R equi pneumonia in foals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic analyses confirm close relatedness between Rhodococcus defluvii and Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagii)

    OpenAIRE

    Sangal, Vartul; Jones, Amanda; GOODFELLOW, Michael; Hoskisson, Paul; Kämpfer, Peter; Sutcliffe, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus defluvii strain Ca11T was isolated from a bioreactor involved in extensive phosphorus removal. We have sequenced the whole genome of this strain and our comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses confirm its close relatedness with Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagii) strains, which share >80% of the gene content. The R. equi virulence plasmid is absent though most of the chromosomal R. equi virulence-associated genes are present in R. defluvii Ca11T. These data suggest that al...

  9. Gene cloning and nucleotide sequencing and properties of a cocaine esterase from Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, M M; Rosser, S J; Basran, A; Bruce, N C

    2000-03-01

    A strain of Rhodococcus designated MB1, which was capable of utilizing cocaine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth, was isolated from rhizosphere soil of the tropane alkaloid-producing plant Erythroxylum coca. A cocaine esterase was found to initiate degradation of cocaine, which was hydrolyzed to ecgonine methyl ester and benzoate; both of these esterolytic products were further metabolized by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1. The structural gene encoding a cocaine esterase, designated cocE, was cloned from Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1 genomic libraries by screening recombinant strains of Rhodococcus erythropolis CW25 for growth on cocaine. The nucleotide sequence of cocE corresponded to an open reading frame of 1,724 bp that codes for a protein of 574 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of cocaine esterase has a region of similarity with the active serine consensus of X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidases, suggesting that the cocaine esterase is a serine esterase. The cocE coding sequence was subcloned into the pCFX1 expression plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant cocaine esterase was purified to apparent homogeneity and was found to be monomeric, with an M(r) of approximately 65,000. The apparent K(m) of the enzyme (mean +/- standard deviation) for cocaine was measured as 1.33 +/- 0.085 mM. These findings are of potential use in the development of a linked assay for the detection of illicit cocaine.

  10. Genomic analyses confirm close relatedness between Rhodococcus defluvii and Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangal, Vartul; Jones, Amanda L; Goodfellow, Michael; Hoskisson, Paul A; Kämpfer, Peter; Sutcliffe, Iain C

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus defluvii strain Ca11(T) was isolated from a bioreactor involved in extensive phosphorus removal. We have sequenced the whole genome of this strain, and our comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses confirm its close relatedness with Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagii) strains, which share >80 % of the gene content. The R. equi virulence plasmid is absent though most of the chromosomal R. equi virulence-associated genes are present in R. defluvii Ca11(T). These data suggest that although R. defluvii is an environmental organism, it has the potential to colonize animal hosts.

  11. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Lasagni, Marina; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain.

  12. Rhodococcus equi: A pathogen in immunocompetent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is an uncommon human pathogen known to cause lung infections in immunocompromised patients. We report two cases of Rhodococcus infections in immunocompetent individuals, who were treated successfully.

  13. Cloning and expressing DBT (dibenzothiophene) monooxygenase gene(dszC) from Rhodococcus sp.DS-3 in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ting; LI Shanshan; LI Guoqiang; WANG Renjing; LIANG Fenglai; LIU Rulin

    2006-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT) monooxygenase (DszC)catalysis,the first and also the key step in the microbial DBT desulfurization,is the conversion of DBT to DBT sulfone (DBTO2).In this study,dszC of a DBT-desulfiaizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp.DS-3 was cloned by PCR.The sequence cloned was 99% homologous to Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 that was reported in the Genebank.The gene dszC could be overexpressed effectively after being inserted into plasmid pET28a and transformed into E.coli BL21 strain.The expression amount of DszC was about 20% of total supernatant at low temperature.The soluble DszC in the supematant was purified by Ni2+ chelating His-Tag resin column and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to electronics purity.Only one band was detected by Western-blotting,which is for the antibody released in mouse against purified DszC in the expression product of BL21 (DE3,paC5) and Rhodococcus sp.DS-3.The activity of purified DszC was 0.36 U.DszC can utilize the organic compound such as DBT and methyl-DBT,hut not DBT derivates such as DBF,which has no sulfur or inorganic sulfur.

  14. Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) biodegradation by a syntrophic association of Rhodococcus sp. IFP 2042 and Bradyrhizobium sp. IFP 2049 isolated from a polluted aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Digabel, Yoann; Demanèche, Sandrine; Benoit, Yves; Vogel, Timothy M; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) enrichment was obtained by adding contaminated groundwater to a mineral medium containing ETBE as the sole carbon and energy source. ETBE was completely degraded to biomass and CO2 with a transient production of tert-butanol (TBA) and a final biomass yield of 0.37 ± 0.08 mg biomass (dry weight).mg(-1) ETBE. Two bacterial strains, IFP 2042 and IFP 2049, were isolated from the enrichment, and their 16S rRNA genes (rrs) were similar to Rhodococcus sp. (99 % similarity to Rhodococcus erythropolis) and Bradyrhizobium sp. (99 % similarity to Bradyrhizobium japonicum), respectively. Rhodococcus sp. IFP 2042 degraded ETBE to TBA, and Bradyrhizobium sp. IFP 2049 degraded TBA to biomass and CO2. A mixed culture of IFP 2042 and IFP 2049 degraded ETBE to CO2 with a biomass yield similar to the original ETBE enrichment (0.31 ± 0.02 mg biomass.mg(-1) ETBE). Among the genes previously described to be involved in ETBE, MTBE, and TBA degradation, only alkB was detected in Rhodococcus sp. IFP 2042 by PCR, and none were detected in Bradyrhizobium sp. IFP 2049.

  15. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length alkanes at low temperatures by a psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyte, L.G.; Hawari, J.; Zhou, E.; Bourbonniere, L.; Greer, C.W. [NRC-Biotechnology Research Inst., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Inniss, W.E. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    1998-07-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5 C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C{sub 10} to C{sub 21} alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5 C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5 C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-do-decanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25 C.

  16. Rhodococcus equi Infections in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, L K; Clark, S D; Díaz-Delgado, J; Lawhon, S D; Edwards, J F

    2017-01-01

    Five cases of Rhodococcus equi infection in dogs were identified from 2003 to 2014. Three of the dogs had severe, internal lesions attributable to R. equi that have not been previously described: endophthalmitis, endocarditis, and suppurative pleuropneumonia. Isolates from 4 of the dogs were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for Rhodococcus virulence-associated plasmid (vap) genes. One isolate was vapA-positive, 2 lacked a virulence plasmid, and 1 carried the novel vapN-associated plasmid (pVAPN) recently characterized in bovine isolates. The pVAPN plasmid has not been described in isolates cultured from companion animals. Four of the dogs either were receiving immunosuppressive drugs or had endocrinopathies. R. equi has the potential to cause significant infections in dogs, and immunocompromised animals should be considered at risk for infection.

  17. Nitrile hydratase of Rhodococcus erythropolis: characterization of the enzyme and the use of whole cells for biotransformation of nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Ashwini L; Banoth, Linga; Meena, Vachan Singh; Singh, Amit; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, U C

    2013-08-01

    The intracellular cobalt-type nitrile hydratase was purified from the bacterium Rhodococcuserythropolis. The pure enzyme consisted of two subunits of 29 and 30 kDa. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 65 kDa. At 25 °C the enzyme had a half-life of 25 h. The Michaelis-Menten constants Km and vmax for the enzyme were 0.624 mM and 5.12 μmol/min/mg, respectively, using 3-cyanopyridine as the substrate. The enzyme-containing freely-suspended bacterial cells and the cells immobilized within alginate beads were evaluated for converting the various nitriles to amides. In a packed bed reactor, alginate beads (2 % alginate; 3 mm bead diameter) containing 200 mg/mL of cells, achieved a conversion of >90 % for benzonitrile and 4-cyanopyridine in 38 h (25 °C, pH 7.0) at a feed substrate concentration of 100 mM. The beads could be reused for up to six reaction cycles.

  18. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, W.R.; Singer, M.E.

    1990-08-28

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors. 2 figs.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance in Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisek, Agata A; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Witkowski, Lucjan; Binek, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important etiologic agent of respiratory- and non-respiratory tract infections, diseases of animals and humans. Therapy includes the use of various group of chemotherapeutic agents, however resistance acquirement is quite common. To date there is no preferred treatment protocol for infections caused by isolates resistant to macrolides and rifampicin. The resistance acquirement is a result of many molecular mechanisms, some of which include alterations in the cell envelope composition and structure, activity of the efflux pumps, enzymatic destruction or inactivation of antibiotics, and changes in the target site. This paper contains an overview of antimicrobial susceptibility of R. equi, and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for antimicrobial resistance in this particular microorganism.

  20. Rhodococcus defluvii sp. nov., isolated from wastewater of a bioreactor and formal proposal to reclassify [Corynebacterium hoagii] and Rhodococcus equi as Rhodococcus hoagii comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpfer, P; Dott, W; Martin, K; Glaeser, S P

    2014-03-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, non-endospore-forming rod-shaped bacterium, strain Ca11(T), was isolated from a bioreactor with extensive phosphorus removal and was studied in detail for its taxonomic allocation. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed closest sequence similarity of the strain to type strains of [Corynebacterium hoagii] and Rhodococcus equi (98.9%), Rhodococcus koreensis and Rhodococcus wratislaviensis (both 98.4%), Rhodococcus opacus and Rhodococcus canchipurensis (both 98.0%) followed by Rhodococcus kunmingensis and Rhodococcus imtechensis (97.7%). Phylogenetic trees showed a distinct clustering of strain Ca11(T) with the type strains of [C. hoagii], R. equi, and R. kunmingensis separate to all other species of the genus Rhodococcus. The quinone system of strain Ca11(T) was composed of dihydrogenated menaquinones with 8 (major amount) as well as 7 and 6 isoprenoid units [MK-8(H2), MK-7(H2), MK-6(H2)]. The polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, one unknown phospholipid and an unidentified glycolipid. The fatty acid profile was similar to that reported for R. equi and contained major amounts of C16:0, C18:1ω9c and 10-methyl C18:0, supporting the allocation of the strain to the genus Rhodococcus. Physiological and biochemical characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization with type strains of the most closely related species allowed clear phenotypic and genotypic differentiation of the isolate. On the basis of these results, strain Ca11(T) ( = DSM 45893(T) = LMG 27563(T)) represents a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, with the proposed name Rhodococcus defluvii sp. nov. In addition, a polyphasic taxonomic analysis of [Corynebacterium hoagii] DSM 20295(T) and Rhodococcus equi DSM 20307(T) indicated that the two strains belong to the same species, for which the name Rhodococcus hoagii comb. nov. takes priority, according to the Rules of the

  1. Genetic Susceptibility to Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, C M; Dindot, S V; Foster, M J; Cohen, N D

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal foals. Much effort has been made to identify preventative measures and new treatments for R. equi with limited success. With a growing focus in the medical community on understanding the genetic basis of disease susceptibility, investigators have begun to evaluate the interaction of the genetics of the foal with R. equi. This review describes past efforts to understand the genetic basis underlying R. equi susceptibility and tolerance. It also highlights the genetic technology available to study horses and describes the use of this technology in investigating R. equi. This review provides readers with a foundational understanding of candidate gene approaches, single nucleotide polymorphism-based, and copy number variant-based genome-wide association studies, and next generation sequencing (both DNA and RNA). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Bio-surfactants production from low cost substrate and degradation of diesel oil by a Rhodococcus strain; Production de biosurfactants sur un substrat economique et degradation du gasoil par une souche du genre Rhodococcus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadouk, Z.; Tazerouti, A. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Lab. de Synthese Organique, Faculte de Chimie, Algiers (Algeria); Sadouk, Z.; Hacene, H. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Lab. de Microbiologie, Faculte des Sciences Biologiques, Algiers (Algeria)

    2008-07-01

    The ability of a Rhodococcus strain to produce surface-active agents from residual sunflower frying oil (RSFO) has been screened in batch cultures. During cultivation with RSFO at the concentration 3% (vol/vol), the strain has synthesized extra-cellular compounds which increase the E{sub 24} emulsion index of the culture medium up to 63%. In their crude form, these substances lower the surface tension of water until 31.9 mN m{sup -1}. The exponential growth with RSFO as the sole carbon source has developed at a specific growth rate {mu} = 0.55 d{sup -1}. The critical micelle concentration of the crude product reached the value 287 mg L{sup -1} ({gamma}CMC = 31.9 mN m{sup -1}). After methyl-esterification, the lipid fraction of bio-surfactants has been analyzed by GC-MS in EI, which reveals the presence of fatty acid methyl esters. The microorganism was also cultivated with the diesel oil as the sole carbon source at the concentration 1% (vol/vol): the active growth phase has developed at rate = 0.02 d{sup -1}, without production of emulsifying substance: the microorganism seems to develop different modes of substrate uptake, according to the nature of the carbon source. The potential use of surface-active agents synthesized on RSFO by Rhodococcus erythropolis 16 LM.USTHB is in the oil industry with minimum purity specification, so that crude preparation could be used, at low cost, in clean-up of hydrocarbons contaminated sites and for enhanced oil recovery. (authors)

  3. Severe Rhodococcus equi pneumonia: case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Gaub, J

    1991-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an aerobic, gram-positive, non-motile pleomorphic bacillus infecting immunocompromised patients. Forty-nine cases of Rhodococcus equi infection have been reported, mainly in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A case in which Rhodococcus equi caused...... severe pulmonary infection, the most common presentation, is described. Clinically, patients have symptoms of pneumonia with hemoptysis as a prominent feature. X-ray will often show a cavitating upper-lobe infiltrate, resembling infection with mycobacteria. Rhodococcus equi is easily cultured from blood......-term antibiotic treatment with erythromycin plus rifampicin, or vancomycin in combination with either of these antibiotics....

  4. Mycotoxin-degradation profile of Rhodococcus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserháti, M; Kriszt, B; Krifaton, Cs; Szoboszlay, S; Háhn, J; Tóth, Sz; Nagy, I; Kukolya, J

    2013-08-16

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites that may have mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects. These substances frequently contaminate agricultural commodities despite efforts to prevent them, so successful detoxification tools are needed. The application of microorganisms to biodegrade mycotoxins is a novel strategy that shows potential for application in food and feed processing. In this study we investigated the mycotoxin degradation ability of thirty-two Rhodococcus strains on economically important mycotoxins: aflatoxin B1, zearalenone, fumonisin B1, T2 toxin and ochratoxin A, and monitored the safety of aflatoxin B1 and zearalenone degradation processes and degradation products using previously developed toxicity profiling methods. Moreover, experiments were performed to analyse multi-mycotoxin-degrading ability of the best toxin degrader/detoxifier strains on aflatoxin B1, zearalenone and T2 toxin mixtures. This enabled the safest and the most effective Rhodococcus strains to be selected, even for multi-mycotoxin degradation. We concluded that several Rhodococcus species are effective in the degradation of aromatic mycotoxins and their application in mycotoxin biodetoxification processes is a promising field of biotechnology.

  5. Severe Rhodococcus equi pneumonia: case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Gaub, J

    1991-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an aerobic, gram-positive, non-motile pleomorphic bacillus infecting immunocompromised patients. Forty-nine cases of Rhodococcus equi infection have been reported, mainly in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A case in which Rhodococcus equi caused...... severe pulmonary infection, the most common presentation, is described. Clinically, patients have symptoms of pneumonia with hemoptysis as a prominent feature. X-ray will often show a cavitating upper-lobe infiltrate, resembling infection with mycobacteria. Rhodococcus equi is easily cultured from blood...... or sputum on standard media, but is frequently regarded as a contaminant. Mortality from Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is high (25%) and early surgical intervention has been recommended. Based on this review, the benefit of surgery seems dubious, whereas good results have been obtained using long...

  6. Treatment of Infections Caused by Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Steeve

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi remains an important cause of disease and death in foals. The combination of a macrolide (erythromycin, azithromycin, or clarithromycin) with rifampin remains the recommended therapy for foals with clinical signs of infection caused by R equi. Most foals with small, subclinical ultrasonographic pulmonary lesions associated with R equi recover without therapy, and administration of antimicrobial agents to these subclinically affected foals does not hasten lesion resolution relative to administration of a placebo. Resistance to macrolides and rifampin in isolates of R equi is increasing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, F S; Jacqueline DESTAIN; Delvigne, Frank; Druart, P.; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons. With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegrada...

  8. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, F. S.; Destain, Jacqueline; Delvigne, Frank; Druart, P.; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons. With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegrada...

  9. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1

    OpenAIRE

    Semboung Lang, Firmin; Destain, Jacqueline; Delvigne, Frank; Druart, Philippe; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons.With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biolo...

  10. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed.

  11. Use of whole genome sequences to develop a molecular phylogenetic framework for Rhodococcus fascians and the Rhodococcus genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L. Creason

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The accurate diagnosis of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria requires a stable species classification. Rhodococcus fascians is the only documented member of its ill-defined genus that is capable of causing disease on a wide range of agriculturally important plants. Comparisons of genome sequences generated from isolates of Rhodococcus associated with diseased plants revealed a level of genetic diversity consistent with them representing multiple species. To test this, we generated a tree based on more than 1700 homologous sequences from plant-associated isolates of Rhodococcus, and obtained support from additional approaches that measure and cluster based on genome similarities. Results were consistent in supporting the definition of new Rhodococcus species within clades containing phytopathogenic members. We also used the genome sequences, along with other rhodococcal genome sequences to construct a molecular phylogenetic tree as a framework for resolving the Rhodococcus genus. Results indicated that Rhodococcus has the potential for having 20 species and also confirmed a need to revisit the taxonomic groupings within Rhodococcus.

  12. [Periprosthetic joint infection caused by Rhodococcus equi. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallai, Imre; Péterfy, Nóra; Sanatkhani, Mohammad; Bejek, Zoltán; Antal, Imre; Prinz, Gyula; Kristóf, Katalin; Skaliczki, Gábor

    2017-07-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a rare pathogen in humans causing infections mostly in immunocompromised hosts. We present the first case of periprosthetic joint infection caused by Rhodococcus equi. An 88-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic with a history of fever and right hip pain. The patient had multiple hip surgeries including total joint arthroplasty and revision for aseptic loosening on the right side. He was immunocompetent, but his additional medical history was remarkable for diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy and stroke with hemiplegia resulting in immobilization. Radiography showed stable components, joint aspirate yielded Rhodococcus equi. Irrigation and debridement was proposed, but the patient refused any surgical intervention. Therefore antibiotic therapy was administered. At the last follow-up the patient is free of complaints but the C-reactive protein level is still elevated. This case illustrates the possible role of Rhodococcus equi in medical device-associated infections. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(27): 1071-1074.

  13. Study of lysozyme resistance in Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Laurent; Bidaud, Pauline; Goux, Didier; Benachour, Abdellah; Laugier, Claire; Petry, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Lysozyme is an important and widespread component of the innate immune response that constitutes the first line of defense against bacterial pathogens. The bactericidal effect of this enzyme relies on its capacity to hydrolyze the bacterial cell wall and also on a nonenzymatic mechanism involving its cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) properties, which leads to membrane permeabilization. In this paper, we report our findings on the lysozyme resistance ability of Rhodococcus equi, a pulmonary pathogen of young foals and, more recently, of immunocompromised patients, whose pathogenic capacity is conferred by a large virulence plasmid. Our results show that (i) R. equi can be considered to be moderately resistant to lysozyme, (ii) the activity of lysozyme largely depends on its muramidase action rather than on its CAMP activity, and (iii) the virulence plasmid confers part of its lysozyme resistance capacity to R. equi. This study is the first one to demonstrate the influence of the virulence plasmid on the stress resistance capacity of R. equi and improves our understanding of the mechanisms enabling R. equi to resist the host defenses.

  14. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  15. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  16. Unusual Extrapulmonary Rhodococcus Equi Infection in a Kidney Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotti, Giovanni; Barabani, Caterina; Dodi, Ferdinando; Bertocchi, Massimo; Mondello, Rosalia; Cupo, Pierpaolo; Santori, Gregorio; Palombo, Domenico; Fontana, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a well-recognized pathogen in veterinary medicine that can also affect immuno-compromised human subjects. The most common clinical features in humans include necrotizing pneumonia with subacute pulmonary disease, progressive cough, chest pain and fever. We report a case of a 49-year-old kidney transplant patient who developed a Rhodococcus equi infection characterized by multiple abscesses of the soft tissues and muscles without any respiratory manifestation. Combining specific antibiotic therapy and surgical management of the abscesses without immunosuppression discontinuation led to a complete recovery of both patient and graft.

  17. Topological strings in d < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Verlinde, Herman; Verlinde, Erik

    1991-03-01

    We calculate correlation functions in minimal topological field theories. These twisted versions of N = 2 minimal models have recently been proposed to describe d < 1 matrix models, once coupled to topological gravity. In our calculation we make use of the Landau-Ginzburg formulation of the N = 2 models, and we find a direct relation between the Landau-Ginzburg superpotential and the KdV differential operator. Using this correspondence we show that the minimal topological models are in perfect agreement with the matrix models as solved in terms of the KdV hierarchy. This proves the equivalence at tree-level of topological and ordinary string thoery in d < 1.

  18. Management of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns I

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Imogen Johns Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, UK Abstract: Rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, is the most important cause of pneumonia in foals aged 3 weeks to 5 months. The disease occurs worldwide, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality on endemically affected farms. Foals appear to become infected early in life, but clinical signs are typically delayed until 1–3 months of age because of the insidious nature of the disease. Although pneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation, up to 74% of foals may concurrently have extrapulmonary disorders, including both extrapulmonary infections (abdominal abscessation, colitis, osteomyelitis and immune-mediated disorders (nonseptic synovitis, uveitis. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical signs and abnormalities on hematologic screening and thoracic imaging in an appropriately aged foal and is confirmed by bacteriologic culture of the organism. Management of R. equi infections, in particular on farms with endemic disease, combines appropriate treatment of affected foals with preventative measures targeted at preventing infection and identifying foals before the development of severe disease. The combination of rifampin and a macrolide antimicrobial is recommended for treatment, as the combination is synergistic, reaches high intracellular concentrations, and should minimize the development of antimicrobial resistance. The prognosis for survival for foals with R. equi pneumonia is good, especially in foals mildly or subclinically affected, as is the prognosis for future athletic performance. Screening for early identification before the development of clinical signs has been advocated on endemically affected farms, although the most appropriate method, the timing of screening, and the selection of foals requiring treatment have yet to be determined. Recent evidence suggests that

  19. Severe Rhodococcus equi pneumonia: case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Gaub, J

    1991-01-01

    or sputum on standard media, but is frequently regarded as a contaminant. Mortality from Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is high (25%) and early surgical intervention has been recommended. Based on this review, the benefit of surgery seems dubious, whereas good results have been obtained using long...

  20. Gene Cluster Encoding Cholate Catabolism in Rhodococcus spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn, William W.; Wilbrink, Maarten H.; Casabon, Israel; Stewart, Gordon R.; Liu, Jie; van der Geize, Robert; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are highly abundant steroids with important functions in vertebrate digestion. Their catabolism by bacteria is an important component of the carbon cycle, contributes to gut ecology, and has potential commercial applications. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grows well on cholate, as

  1. Rhodococcus equi Parte 2: imunologia e profilaxia Rhodococcus equi Part 2: immunology and profilaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Rusca Correa Porto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi é um patógeno ubíquo e habitante da flora intestinal dos equinos de importância na neonatologia equina. Todos os potros são expostos à doença ao nascimento, porém alguns a desenvolvem e outros não. Este artigo revisa características da resposta imune, tanto em adultos competentes quanto em potros suscetíveis ao patógeno. A resposta imune humoral é abordada, incluindo uma discussão sobre o uso do plasma hiperimune como ferramenta profilática. O papel dos mecanismos de imunidade inata na suscetibilidade de alguns potros ao R. equi é também abordado. Da mesma maneira, os componentes envolvidos na resposta cito-mediada são revisados, com atenção particular às pesquisas direcionadas ao desenvolvimento de uma vacina efetiva para ser utilizada em potros.Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen in equine neonatology that is ubiquitous and a normal intestinal inhabitant of equines. All foals are exposed at birth, however, some foals develop disease and others do not. This article reviews concepts of the equine immune response, both in the immune adult and susceptible neonate, with respect to this pathogen. Humoral immune responses are addressed, with a discussion on the use of hyperimmune plasma as a prophylactic tool. The role that innate immune mechanisms play in the susceptibility of some foals to R. equi infection is also highlighted. Likewise, cell-mediated immune components are reviewed, with particular attention directed towards research to develop an effective vaccine for foals.

  2. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences for Rhodococcus fascians D188 and Draft Sequences for Rhodococcus Isolates PBTS 1 and PBTS 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamler, Rio A.; Vereecke, Danny; Zhang, Yucheng; Schilkey, Faye; Devitt, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians, a phytopathogen that alters plant development, inflicts significant losses in plant production around the world. We report here the complete genome sequence of R. fascians D188, a well-characterized model isolate, and Rhodococcus species PBTS (pistachio bushy top syndrome) 1 and 2, which were shown to be responsible for a disease outbreak in pistachios. PMID:27284129

  3. Topological strings in d < 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, R.; Verlinde, H. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Joseph Henry Labs.); Verlinde, E. (California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Inst. for Theoretical Physics)

    1991-03-18

    We calculate correlation functions in minimal topological field theories. These twisted versions of N = 2 minimal models have recently been proposed to describe d < 1 matrix models, once coupled to topological gravity. In our calculation we make use of the Landau-Ginzburg formulation of the N = 2 models, and we find a direct relation between the Landau-Ginzburg superpotential and the KdV differential operator. Using this correspondence we show that the minimal topological models are in perfect agreement with the matrix models as solved in terms of the KdV hierarchy. This proves the equivalence at tree-level of topological and ordinary string theory in d < 1. (orig.).

  4. Geodesics in (Rn, d1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KILIÇ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The notion of geodesic, which may be regarded as an extension of the line segment in Euclidean geometry to the space we study in, has an important place in many branches of geometry, such as Riemannian geometry, Metric geometry, to name but a few. In this article, the concept of geodesic in a metric space will be introduced, then geodesics in the space (Rn, d1 will be characterized. Furthermore, some examples will be presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the main result.

  5. Rhodococcus equi (Prescottella equi) vaccines; the future of vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, C; Vanniasinkam, T; Ndi, S; Barton, M D

    2015-09-01

    For decades researchers have been targeting prevention of Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagui/Prescottella equi) by vaccination and the horse breeding industry has supported the ongoing efforts by researchers to develop a safe and cost effective vaccine to prevent disease in foals. Traditional vaccines including live, killed and attenuated (physical and chemical) vaccines have proved to be ineffective and more modern molecular-based vaccines including the DNA plasmid, genetically attenuated and subunit vaccines have provided inadequate protection of foals. Newer, bacterial vector vaccines have recently shown promise for R. equi in the mouse model. This article describes the findings of key research in R. equi vaccine development and looks at alternative methods that may potentially be utilised.

  6. Quantitative aspects of fecal Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi in foals.

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, S.; Ohkura, H; Watanabe, Y.; Tsubaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative aspects of fecal Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi in newborn foals for 12 weeks after birth were investigated on two horse breeding farms. R. equi was found in the feces of foals during week 1 of life. The greatest numbers of R. equi were present in the feces of foals during the first 8 weeks of their lives, which coincides with the age when foals are most liable to be exposed to R. equi.

  7. Rhodococcus equi isolation from sputum of patients with suspected tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo da Silva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen associated with pulmonary, invasive or systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. We report the identification of 51 R. equi isolates found in sputum samples of 546 individuals suspected to have pulmonary tuberculosis in two Public Health Hospital Units in Brazil. The epidemiology of R. equi infection as well as the phenotypic identification and drug susceptibility profile of isolates are described in this paper.

  8. Pangenome and Phylogenomic Analysis of the Pathogenic Actinobacterium Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Elisa; MacArthur, Iain; Scortti, Mariela; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Giguère, Steeve; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2016-10-23

    We report a comparative study of 29 representative genomes of the animal pathogen Rhodococcus equi The analyses showed that R. equi is genetically homogeneous and clonal, with a large core genome accounting for ≈80% of an isolates' gene content. An open pangenome, even distribution of accessory genes among the isolates, and absence of significant core-genome recombination, indicated that gene gain/loss is a main driver of R. equi genome evolution. Traits previously predicted to be important in R. equi physiology, virulence and niche adaptation were part of the core genome. This included the lack of a phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate transport system (PTS), unique among the rhodococci except for the closely related Rhodococcus defluvii, reflecting selective PTS gene loss in the R. equi-R. defluvii sublineage. Thought to be asaccharolytic, rbsCB and glcP non-PTS sugar permease homologues were identified in the core genome and, albeit inefficiently, R. equi utilized their putative substrates, ribose and (irregularly) glucose. There was no correlation between R. equi whole-genome phylogeny and host or geographical source, with evidence of global spread of genomovars. The distribution of host-associated virulence plasmid types was consistent with the exchange of the plasmids (and corresponding host shifts) across the R. equi population, and human infection being zoonotically acquired. Phylogenomic analyses demonstrated that R. equi occupies a central position in the Rhodococcus phylogeny, not supporting the recently proposed transfer of the species to a new genus.

  9. Seroprevalence of Rhodococcus equi in horses in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Tirosh-Levy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of pneumonia in foals and has extensive clinical, economic and possibly zoonotic consequences. This bacterium survives well in the environment and may be considered as normal flora of adult horses. Certain strains of this bacterium are extremely virulent in foals, and early identification and intervention is crucial for prognosis. Rhodococcus equi is endemic in many parts of the world and occasionally isolated in Israel. This study was designed to evaluate R. equi seroprevalence in adult horses in Israel to indirectly indicate the potential level of exposure of susceptible foals. Sera were collected from 144 horses during spring 2011 and from 293 horses during fall 2014, and the presence of antibodies against virulent R. equi was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Equine seroprevalence of R. equi was found to be 7.6% in 2011 and 5.1% in 2014. Only one farm had seropositive horses in 2011, whereas several farms had seropositive horses in 2014. No significant risk factors for seropositivity were found. Rhodococcus equi appears to be endemic in Israel. This is the first survey of R. equi in Israel that provides information on the epidemiology of this important bacterium.

  10. Seroprevalence of Rhodococcus equi in horses in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Gürbilek, Sevil E; Tel, Osman Y; Keskin, Oktay; Steinman, Amir

    2017-06-26

    Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of pneumonia in foals and has extensive clinical, economic and possibly zoonotic consequences. This bacterium survives well in the environment and may be considered as normal flora of adult horses. Certain strains of this bacterium are extremely virulent in foals, and early identification and intervention is crucial for prognosis. Rhodococcus equi is endemic in many parts of the world and occasionally isolated in Israel. This study was designed to evaluate R. equi seroprevalence in adult horses in Israel to indirectly indicate the potential level of exposure of susceptible foals. Sera were collected from 144 horses during spring 2011 and from 293 horses during fall 2014, and the presence of antibodies against virulent R. equi was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Equine seroprevalence of R. equi was found to be 7.6% in 2011 and 5.1% in 2014. Only one farm had seropositive horses in 2011, whereas several farms had seropositive horses in 2014. No significant risk factors for seropositivity were found. Rhodococcus equi appears to be endemic in Israel. This is the first survey of R. equi in Israel that provides information on the epidemiology of this important bacterium.

  11. Purification and Properties of p-Hydroxybenzoate Hydroxylases from Rhodococcus Strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jadan, A.P.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Golovleva, L.A.; Golovlev, E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus catabolize p-hydroxybenzoate (PHB) through the initial formation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate. High levels of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) activity are induced in six different Rhodococcus species when these strains are grown on PHB as sole carbon

  12. Main: D1GMAUX28 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D1GMAUX28 S000328 20-Feb-2002 (last modified) uchi D1; DNase I protected sequence f...ound in the soybean (G.m.) auxin responsive gene, Aux28, promoter; D1 and D4 share a very similar core seque...nce TAGTXXCTGT and TAGTXCTGT, respectively; D1/D4-like sequence were identified in several other auxin-respo...tors; GmGT-2 are down-regulated by light in a phytochrome-dependent manner; See 000331; Auxin; Aux28; GT-2; phytochrome; D1; hypocotyl; soybean (Glycine max) ACAGTTACTA ...

  13. Caprine vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Rhodococcus equi : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Kabongo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been reports of Rhodococcus equi infections in goats in Australia, America and India. In this study, R. equi was isolated from an inflamed vertebra in a Boer goat in South Africa. At autopsy, there was a purulent inflammatory reaction in the 1st cervical vertebra. Histopathologically, a neutrophilic infiltration was encountered in the bone. Aerobic culture of swabs collected from the abscesses yielded R. equi in pure culture that was identified on biochemical tests. R. equi has become important as the cause of an opportunistic infection in people suffering from HIV.

  14. Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Devi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi , previously known as Corynebacterium equi, is one of the most important causes of zoonotic infection in grazing animals. Increased cases of human infection with R. equi have been reported especially in immunocompromised patients. Infection in immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We report a case of R. equi bacteremia in a 26-day-old immunocompetent infant with recurrent swellings on different parts of the body. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever report of R. equi bacteremia from an immunocompetent patient from Northern India.

  15. Isolation and characterization of Rhodococcus sp. Y22 and its potential application to tobacco processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Duan, Yan-Qin; Dong, Jin-Yan; Zhe, Wei; Wang, Le; Li, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2009-04-01

    A novel nicotine-degrading bacterium, strain Y22, was isolated and identified as Rhodococcus sp. Y22 based on its 16S rDNA sequence and morphological and biochemical features. The isolate could utilize nicotine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Nicotine (1.0g/L) was degraded by Rhodococcus sp. Y22 within 52h at 28 degrees C and pH 7.0. Preparation of resting cells from nicotine-induced cultures was found to rapidly and efficiently degrade nicotine from solutions as well as from tobacco leaves. Therefore, Rhodococcus sp. Y22 has the potential to degrade nicotine during tobacco leave processing.

  16. Cavitary Rhodococcus equi pneumonia with endobronchial granulomas: report of an unusual case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidvi, Shabnam A.; Brudnicki, Adele R. [Department of Radiology, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY (United States); Chowdhury, M.Ishraq; Beneck, Debra [Department of Pathology, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY (United States)

    2003-02-01

    An unusual case of cavitary Rhodococcus equi pneumonia with endobronchial granulomas in congenital HIV infection is presented. The clinical features and radiological manifestations of pulmonary R. equi infection are discussed.

  17. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, R.A.; Ravinal, R.C.; Costa, R.S.; Lima, M.S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tucci, S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Muglia, V.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Reis, R.B. Dos [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, G.E.B. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  18. Bacteremia por Rhodococcus equi em paciente com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida: relato de caso Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Secchi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi é um importante agente de infecções zoonóticas, podendo causar sérias infecções em humanos, principalmente em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Neste estudo, nós relatamos o caso de uma bacteremia fatal devido a Rhodococcus equi em paciente com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (HIV positivo.Rhodococcus equi is an important agent for zoonotic infections, and may cause serious infections in humans, especially immunocompromised patients. In this study, a case of fatal bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV positive is reported.

  19. Resistance studies of erythromycin and rifampin for Rhodococcus equi over a 10-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study sought to determine whether an increase in resistance of Rhodococcus equi to the antibiotics rifampin and erythromycin occurred over a 10-year period. This was carried out by the use of E test strips for rifampin and erythromycin to determine the MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration values of Rhodococcus equi to this combination of antibiotics. The findings of this study indicated that there was an increase in resistance of Rhodococcus equi to rifampin and erythromycin over the 10-year period. The MIC for rifampin increased from 0.081 μg/ml in 1996 to 0.187 μg/ml in 2006 and from 0.258 μg/ml for erythromycin during the years prior to 2000 to 0.583 μg/ml in 2006. This finding suggests that there may be a problem in the treatment of Rhodococcus equi infections in foals in the future, particularly as the number of drugs available for treatment of Rhodococcus equi infection is limited because of the intracellular capabilities of this bacterium. Antibiotics used in its treatment have to be able to penetrate the polysaccharide cell wall of Rhodococcus equi as well as the alveolar macrophages in which the bacterium is capable of surviving.

  20. Coaggregation between Rhodococcus and Acinetobacter strains isolated from the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Sharifzadeh, Shahab; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Rickard, Alexander H

    2015-07-01

    In this study, coaggregation interactions between Rhodococcus and Acinetobacter strains isolated from food-processing surfaces were characterized. Rhodococcus sp. strain MF3727 formed intrageneric coaggregates with Rhodococcus sp. strain MF3803 and intergeneric coaggregates with 2 strains of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (MF3293, MF3627). Stronger coaggregation between A. calcoaceticus MF3727 and Rhodococcus sp. MF3293 was observed after growth in batch culture at 30 °C than at 20 °C, after growth in tryptic soy broth than in liquid R2A medium, and between cells in exponential and early stationary phases than cells in late stationary phase. The coaggregation ability of Rhodococcus sp. MF3727 was maintained even after heat and Proteinase K treatment, suggesting its ability to coaggregate was protein independent whereas the coaggregation determinants of the other strains involved proteinaceous cell-surface-associated polymers. Coaggregation was stable at pH 5-9. The mechanisms of coaggregation among Acinetobacter and Rhodococcus strains bare similarity to those displayed by coaggregating bacteria of oral and freshwater origin, with respect to binding between proteinaceous and nonproteinaceous determinants and the effect of environmental factors on coaggregation. Coaggregation may contribute to biofilm formation on industrial food surfaces, protecting bacteria against cleaning and disinfection.

  1. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Ursi, Pasqualina; Milanesi, Luciano; Di Canito, Alessandra; Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Fedi, Stefano; Presentato, Alessandro; Zannoni, Davide; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and environmental decontamination

  2. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orro, Alessandro; Cappelletti, Martina; D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Milanesi, Luciano; Di Canito, Alessandra; Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Fedi, Stefano; Presentato, Alessandro; Zannoni, Davide; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and environmental decontamination

  3. Rhodococcus equi infection after reduction mammaplasty in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Sandkovsky

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of infections caused by R. equi occur in hosts with some degree of cell-mediated immunodeficiency. Immunocompetent individuals are infrequently affected and usually present with localized disease. Infections of the skin or related structures are uncommon and are usually related to environmental contamination. The microbiology laboratory plays a key role in the identification of the organism since it may be mistaken for common skin flora. We describe a 31 year-old woman without medical problems who presented nine weeks after breast reduction with right breast cellulitis and purulent drainage from the surgical wound. She underwent incision and drainage, and cultures of the wound yielded Rhodococcus equi. The patient completed six weeks of antimicrobial therapy with moxifloxacin and rifampin with complete resolution.

  4. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Giles

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  5. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  6. Production, Purification and Characterization of Tannase from Rhodococcus NCIM 2891

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiem H. Nadaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The study was done with the objective of tannic acid degradation by tannase from the Rhodococcus NCIM 2891 which is actually a desulfurizing bacteria. Rhodococcus NCIM 2891cultivated in medium containing 0.1% Tannic acid, produced tannase which showed maximum activity after 24 h. The enzyme was purified by DEAE cellulose ion exchange chromatography and was shown to be dimeric in nature it has two subunits as Tannase I and Tannase II, having specific activities of 0.23 U/mg of protein and 0.295 U/mg of protein, respectively. Both the enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 6 and 30ºC. The Km of both enzymes was 0.034 and 0.040 mM respectively and Vmax of both enzymes were found to be 40 and 45 U/mL, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis of purified proteins fraction revealed that their molecular weights are 60 and 62 kDa. Tannase I was completely inhibited by 10 mM Hg2+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Co2+ and Tannase I and II both was completely inhibited by1 mM Hg2+ alone. The DNA damage- protecting activity of tannic acid and product obtained after tannic acid hydrolysis was assessed bringing about the DNA damage with H2O2 + UV exposure in absence of the hydrolyzed products of tannic acid. The experiment was carried out by using agarose gel electrophoresis to analyze DNA damage in presence of H2O2 + UV. However, there was no damage of DNA by H2O2 + UV exposure in presence of the hydrolysis products.

  7. Degradation of a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives by Rhodococcus aetherivorans and Rhodococcus wratislaviensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, Marc; Labbé, Diane; Thouand, Gérald; Greer, Charles W; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    Two strains, identified as Rhodococcus wratislaviensis IFP 2016 and Rhodococcus aetherivorans IFP 2017, were isolated from a microbial consortium that degraded 15 petroleum compounds or additives when provided in a mixture containing 16 compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, octane, hexadecane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane [isooctane], cyclohexane, cyclohexanol, naphthalene, methyl tert-butyl ether [MTBE], ethyl tert-butyl ether [ETBE], tert-butyl alcohol [TBA], and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate [2-EHN]). The strains had broad degradation capacities toward the compounds, including the more recalcitrant ones, MTBE, ETBE, isooctane, cyclohexane, and 2-EHN. R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 degraded and mineralized to different extents 11 of the compounds when provided individually, sometimes requiring 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN) as a cosolvent. R. aetherivorans IFP 2017 degraded a reduced spectrum of substrates. The coculture of the two strains degraded completely 13 compounds, isooctane and 2-EHN were partially degraded (30% and 73%, respectively), and only TBA was not degraded. Significant MTBE and ETBE degradation rates, 14.3 and 116.1 mumol of ether degraded h(-1) g(-1) (dry weight), respectively, were measured for R. aetherivorans IFP 2017. The presence of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEXs) had a detrimental effect on ETBE and MTBE biodegradation, whereas octane had a positive effect on the MTBE biodegradation by R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016. BTEXs had either beneficial or detrimental effects on their own degradation by R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016. Potential genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation in the two strains were identified and partially sequenced.

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0178 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0178 ref|YP_345668.1| putative disulfide bond formation protein [Rhodo...coccus erythropolis PR4] dbj|BAE46176.1| putative disulfide bond formation protein [Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4] YP_345668.1 1.3 28% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-1170 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-1170 ref|NP_898745.1| putative cadmium resistance protein (CadA) [Rhod...ococcus erythropolis] gb|AAP74015.1| putative cadmium resistance protein (CadA) [Rhodococcus erythropolis] NP_898745.1 0.14 29% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0548 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-0548 ref|ZP_04385008.1| putative proline rich protein [Rhodococcus ery...thropolis SK121] gb|EEN87711.1| putative proline rich protein [Rhodococcus erythropolis SK121] ZP_04385008.1 2e-06 37% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1289 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1289 ref|YP_345534.1| putative transporter, SulP family [Rhodococcus e...rythropolis PR4] dbj|BAE46042.1| putative transporter, SulP family [Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4] YP_345534.1 5e-93 74% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1289 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1289 ref|YP_345530.1| putative transporter, SulP family [Rhodococcus e...rythropolis PR4] dbj|BAE46038.1| putative transporter, SulP family [Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4] YP_345530.1 5e-92 74% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0715 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0715 ref|ZP_04383545.1| antigenic cell wall protein MP2 [Rhodococcus e...rythropolis SK121] gb|EEN89170.1| antigenic cell wall protein MP2 [Rhodococcus erythropolis SK121] ZP_04383545.1 5e-48 33% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-04-0619 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-04-0619 ref|YP_002764791.1| hypothetical protein RER_13440 [Rhodococcus e...rythropolis PR4] dbj|BAH32052.1| hypothetical protein [Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4] YP_002764791.1 1e-10 34% ...

  15. D=1 supergravity and spinning particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holten, J.W. van

    1995-10-06

    In this paper I review the multiplet calculus of N-1, D=1 local supersymmetry with applications to the construction of models for spinning particles in background fields, and models with space-time supersymmetry. New features include a non-linear realization of the local supersymmetry algebra and the coupling to anti-symmetric tensor fields of both odd and even rank. The non-linear realization allows the construction of a D=1 cosmological-constant term, which provides a mass term in the equations of motion. (orig.).

  16. The correct name of the taxon that contains the type strain of Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, B J

    2014-01-01

    Based on a nomenclatural point of view, the name Rhodococcus equi is associated, as required by the Bacteriological Code, with a defined position, rank and circumscription. A search of the literature indicates that the name Rhodococcus equi (Magnusson 1923) Goodfellow and Alderson 1977 has also been shown to be a synonym of Corynebacterium equi Magnusson 1923, Corynebacterium hoagii (Morse 1912) Eberson 1918 and Nocardia restricta (Turfitt 1944) McClung 1974. Application of the rules of the Bacteriological Code together with the currently inferred taxonomic concept associated with the species bearing the name Rhodococcus equi indicates that this is not the correct name of this taxon and the use of that name in the context of a circumscription that includes the type strain of the species Corynebacterium hoagii is contrary to the Rules of the Code.

  17. 42 CFR 52d.1 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.1 Applicability. The regulations in this part apply to grants under the Clinical Cancer Education Program authorized by section 404(a)(4) of the Public Health Service Act, to... neoplastic disease and the preventive measures and diagnostic and therapeutic skills necessary to...

  18. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, J; Madarame, H; Takai, S; Jose, S; Wernery, U

    2011-04-21

    Rhodococcus (R). equi, a recognized pathogen in horses, is emerging as a human opportunistic pathogen, especially in immunocompromized people. It affects also New World camelids, but there are no reports of R. equi infection in Old World camelids yet. Four cases of disseminated R. equi infection in adult breeding dromedaries occurred at one camel farm near Dubai within 16 months of each other. At necropsy the lungs were diffusely consolidated with large caseous areas. Histology revealed severe suppurative to necrotising pneumonia with multiple encapsulated abscesses. Immunohistochemistry enabled the detection of 15- to 17-kDa antigens (VapA) of R. equi in the lung sections. High numbers of R. equi were isolated from the lung lesions as well as from liver, spleen and mediastinal lymph nodes, indicative of septicaemia. The isolated strains were PCR-positive for the specific virulence plasmid (VapA-Gen) of R. equi, indicating virulent strains and containing an 85-kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of disseminated R. equi infection in Old World camelids. Since adult camels in general do not suffer from bacterial caused pneumonia (except tuberculosis), this is a new emerging disease for camels.

  19. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi isolates in equines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabyia Javed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of Rhodococcus equi in equines and their environment in Jammu (R.S. Pura, Katra, molecular characterization and to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern of R. equi. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected from equines. The organism was isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and was later confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of R. equi isolates was done by 16S rRNA gene amplification followed by virulence associated protein A (Vap A gene amplification. Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics, viz., amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During the study, 9 R. equi isolates were identified on the basis of cultural and biochemical tests. In the polymerase chain reaction based detection, 3 among the 9 rhodococcal isolates were positive for species-specific 16S rRNA gene and revealed amplicon of 450 bp for confirmation of 16S rRNA gene. None of the sample was found positive for Vap A gene. In antibiogram, R. equi isolates were found sensitive for amoxicillin, while some isolates were also found resistant to the most conventional antibiotic penicillin G. Conclusion: From this study, it was concluded that R. equi infection is prevalent in equines in Jammu region of India and the indiscriminate use of the antibiotics is leading toward the development of resistant strains of R. equi.

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Rhodococcus equi isolated from sputum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo da Silva

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rhodococcus equi is an opportunistic pathogen, causing rhodococcosis, a condition that can be confused with tuberculosis. Often, without identifying M. tuberculosis, physicians initiate empiric treatment for tuberculosis. R. equi and M. tuberculosis have different susceptibility to drugs. Identification of R. equi is based on a variety of phenotypic, chromatographic, and genotypic characteristics. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to characterize bacterial isolates from sputum samples suggestive of R. equi. METHODS: The phenotypic identification included biochemical assays; thin-layer chromatography (TLC and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were used for genotypic identification. RESULTS: Among 78 Gram-positive and partially acid-fast bacilli isolated from the sputum of tuberculosis-suspected patients, 51 were phenotypically and genotypically characterized as R. equi based on literature data. Mycolic acid analysis showed that all suspected R. equi had compounds with a retention factor (Rf between 0.4-0.5. Genotypic characterization indicated the presence of the choE gene 959 bp fragments in 51 isolates CAMP test positive. Twenty-two CAMP test negative isolates were negative for the choE gene. Five isolates presumptively identified as R. equi, CAMP test positive, were choE gene negative, and probably belonged to other bacterial species. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic and molecular techniques used constitute a good methodological tool to identify R. equi.

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Rhodococcus equi isolated from sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paulo da; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Sato, Daisy Nakamura; Silva, Jaqueline Otero; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Carneiro, Ana Maria Machado; Leite, Sergio Roberto de Andrade; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an opportunistic pathogen, causing rhodococcosis, a condition that can be confused with tuberculosis. Often, without identifying M. tuberculosis, physicians initiate empiric treatment for tuberculosis. R. equi and M. tuberculosis have different susceptibility to drugs. Identification of R. equi is based on a variety of phenotypic, chromatographic, and genotypic characteristics. This study aimed to characterize bacterial isolates from sputum samples suggestive of R. equi. The phenotypic identification included biochemical assays; thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used for genotypic identification. Among 78 Gram-positive and partially acid-fast bacilli isolated from the sputum of tuberculosis-suspected patients, 51 were phenotypically and genotypically characterized as R. equi based on literature data. Mycolic acid analysis showed that all suspected R. equi had compounds with a retention factor (R(f)) between 0.4-0.5. Genotypic characterization indicated the presence of the choE gene 959bp fragments in 51 isolates CAMP test positive. Twenty-two CAMP test negative isolates were negative for the choE gene. Five isolates presumptively identified as R. equi, CAMP test positive, were choE gene negative, and probably belonged to other bacterial species. The phenotypic and molecular techniques used constitute a good methodological tool to identify R. equi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Hemodialysis catheter related rhodococcus bacteremia in immunocompetent host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Dalal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi (R. equi is an uncommon cause of infection in immunocompetent individuals. We describe a case of R. equi bacteremia associated with hemodialysis (HD catheter in an immunocompetent patient. A 38-year-old female with end-stage renal disease (ESRD of uncertain etiology, on HD for the past 15 months who was previously healthy otherwise, was admitted with the complaints of intermittent fever, mild nausea and occasional vomiting for two weeks. Last HD was performed four days earlier through a tunneled right internal jugular permacath. Clinically the patient was afebrile and in no acute distress. She was hemodynamically stable with no peripheral stigmata of an endovascular infection. Physical examination was essentially normal. Initially, the patient was treated with intravenous vancomycin with each HD, retaining the catheter. However, due to persistently positive blood cultures, HD catheter had to be removed. The patient became afebrile and nausea and vomiting resolved. She improved clinically, and repeated surveillance blood cultures done after the removal of catheter were reported negative. Subsequently, a new HD catheter was inserted for her. Although R. equi is an uncommon cause of infection in immunocompetent individuals, it does occur with considerable mortality and morbidity, and a high index of clinical suspicion is required to recognize this infection in immunocompetent individuals.

  3. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-05

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi isolates in equines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Rabyia; Taku, A K; Sharma, R K; Badroo, Gulzaar Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to determine the occurrence of Rhodococcus equi in equines and their environment in Jammu (R.S. Pura, Katra), molecular characterization and to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern of R. equi. A total of 96 nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected from equines. The organism was isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and was later confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of R. equi isolates was done by 16S rRNA gene amplification followed by virulence associated protein A (Vap A) gene amplification. Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics, viz., amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. During the study, 9 R. equi isolates were identified on the basis of cultural and biochemical tests. In the polymerase chain reaction based detection, 3 among the 9 rhodococcal isolates were positive for species-specific 16S rRNA gene and revealed amplicon of 450 bp for confirmation of 16S rRNA gene. None of the sample was found positive for Vap A gene. In antibiogram, R. equi isolates were found sensitive for amoxicillin, while some isolates were also found resistant to the most conventional antibiotic penicillin G. From this study, it was concluded that R. equi infection is prevalent in equines in Jammu region of India and the indiscriminate use of the antibiotics is leading toward the development of resistant strains of R. equi.

  5. Rhodococcus equi: the many facets of a pathogenic actinomycete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Boland, José A; Giguère, Steeve; Hapeshi, Alexia; MacArthur, Iain; Anastasi, Elisa; Valero-Rello, Ana

    2013-11-29

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil-dwelling pathogenic actinomycete that causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary pyogranulomatous infections in a variety of animal species and people. Young foals are particularly susceptible and develop a life-threatening pneumonic disease that is endemic at many horse-breeding farms worldwide. R. equi is a facultative intracellular parasite of macrophages that replicates within a modified phagocytic vacuole. Its pathogenicity depends on a virulence plasmid that promotes intracellular survival by preventing phagosome-lysosome fusion. Species-specific tropism of R. equi for horses, pigs and cattle appears to be determined by host-adapted virulence plasmid types. Molecular epidemiological studies of these plasmids suggest that human R. equi infection is zoonotic. Analysis of the recently determined R. equi genome sequence has identified additional virulence determinants on the bacterial chromosome. This review summarizes our current understanding of the clinical aspects, biology, pathogenesis and immunity of this fascinating microbe with plasmid-governed infectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi isolates in equines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Rabyia; Taku, A. K.; Sharma, R. K.; Badroo, Gulzaar Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of Rhodococcus equi in equines and their environment in Jammu (R.S. Pura, Katra), molecular characterization and to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern of R. equi. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected from equines. The organism was isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and was later confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of R. equi isolates was done by 16S rRNA gene amplification followed by virulence associated protein A (Vap A) gene amplification. Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics, viz., amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During the study, 9 R. equi isolates were identified on the basis of cultural and biochemical tests. In the polymerase chain reaction based detection, 3 among the 9 rhodococcal isolates were positive for species-specific 16S rRNA gene and revealed amplicon of 450 bp for confirmation of 16S rRNA gene. None of the sample was found positive for Vap A gene. In antibiogram, R. equi isolates were found sensitive for amoxicillin, while some isolates were also found resistant to the most conventional antibiotic penicillin G. Conclusion: From this study, it was concluded that R. equi infection is prevalent in equines in Jammu region of India and the indiscriminate use of the antibiotics is leading toward the development of resistant strains of R. equi. PMID:28246441

  7. Identification and characterization of o-xylene-degrading Rhodococcus spp. which were dominant species in the remediation of o-xylene-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Hironori; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Mattison, Richard G; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2007-02-01

    Soils contaminated with o-xylene were more difficult to bioremediate than those contaminated with other BTEX hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene and p-xylene). In order to identify microorganisms responsible for o-xylene degradation in soil, microbial community structure analyses were carried out with two soil samples in the presence of o-xylene and mineral nutrients. In two different soil samples, Rhodococcus opacus became abundant. We were also able to isolate o-xylene degrading Rhodococcus species from these soil samples. A primer set was developed to specifically detect a cluster of this Rhodococcus group including isolated Rhodococcus strains, Rhodococcus opacus and Rhodococcus koreensis. The growth of this bacterial group in an o-xylene-contaminated soil was followed by competitive PCR (cPCR). The decrease in o-xylene clearly paralleled the growth of the Rhodococcus group.

  8. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Orro

    Full Text Available In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and

  9. Susceptibility testing of Rhodococcus equi: An interlaboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenberg, Anne; Kaspar, Heike; Feßler, Andrea T; Werckenthin, Christiane; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    Due to the importance of antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) for veterinary diagnostics, a standardised protocol for AST of Rhodococcus equi by broth microdilution has recently been developed and approved by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The aim of the present study was to test this protocol in an interlaboratory comparative study for its fitness for use in routine laboratory diagnostics. All of the 18 participating laboratories determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of two R. equi strains against 24 antimicrobial agents. The modal MIC values were determined and the acceptable ranges were set as the modal MIC ±1 dilution step. The R. equi field strain Rh110 showed a slightly better performance than the type strain R. equi ATCC(®) 25729. For the different antimicrobial agents tested, the percentage of MIC values within the acceptable ranges varied from 75.9 to 100% for R. equi ATCC(®) 25729, and from 85.2 to 100% for R. equi Rh110. The most homogeneous MIC results (i.e. modal MIC ±1 dilution step) were obtained for oxacillin and vancomycin, while the most divergent results were seen with cefotaxime and ceftiofur. Using a success rate of at least 80% of the strain-specific MICs being within the acceptable ranges as an arbitrary cut-off, only one of the participating laboratories failed to reach this cut-off value for one of the two R. equi strains. Thus, we consider the new protocol fit for use in routine AST of R. equi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in a patient with Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikić, Dragan; Djordjević, Zoran; Sekulović, Leposava; Kojić, Miroslav; Tomanović, Branka

    2014-03-01

    Rhodococcus (R) equi is an opportunistic, uncommon human pathogen that causes mainly infection in immunocompromised hosts. The disease is usually presented as subacute pneumonia that is mostly cavitary and sometimes bacteremic. We reported the extremly rare case of a 43-year-old woman with Hodgkin lymphoma, who developed R equi pulmonary infection after recieving multiple courses of chemotherapy. Secondary, the patient developed bacteremia, leading to sepsis and dissemination of R equi infection in many extrapulmonary sites. At addmission the patient was febrile, tachypnoic, tachycardic, hypotensive, with fa cial edema, splenomegaly, positive meningeal signs, left hemiparesis and paraparesis. Laboratory data included erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) > 140 mm/h, C-reactive protein (CRP) 143.0 mg/L, red blood cells (RBC) 2.14 x 10(12)/L, whyite blood cells (WBC) 2.8 x 10(9)/L, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 706 U/L, serum albumin 26 g/L, sodium 127 mmol/L and potassium 2.7 mmol/L. Blood culture and culture of sputum and empyema were positive for R equi. Imaging studies demonstrated a large right cavitary pneumonia and abscess, empyema, pericarditis, mediastinal and intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy, brain and psoas abscesses, osteomyelitis and spondylodiscitis. The patient recovered completely after a 12-month treatment with combinations of parenteral and oral antibiotics (meropenem, vancomycin, teicoplanin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, macrolides etc), including drainage of abscesses and empyema. Eight years after completition of the treatment the patient was without recurrence of R equi infection and lymphoma. Since the eradication od R equi is very difficult, it is very important to make the diagnosis and initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy as soon as possible.

  11. Rhodococcus Infection in Solid Organ and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Heredia, Ella J.; Nellore, Anoma; Kotton, Camille N.; Kaul, Daniel R.; Morris, Michele I.; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Shah, Harshal; Park, Seo Young; Nguyen, M. Hong; Razonable, Raymund R.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a case–control study of 18 US transplant recipients with Rhodococcus infection and 36 matched controls. The predominant types of infection were pneumonia and bacteremia. Diabetes mellitus and recent opportunistic infection were independently associated with disease. Outcomes were generally favorable except for 1 relapse and 1 death. PMID:28221102

  12. Rhodococcus equi infection after alemtuzumab therapy for T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, Jan J.; Sprenger, Herman G.; Van Assen, Sander; Leduc, Dominique; Daenen, Simon M.G.J.; Arends, Jan P.; van der Werf, Tjipke

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, mainly known from veterinary medicine as a pathogen in domestic animals, can also cause infections in immunocompromised humans, especially in those with defects in cellular immunity. Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, causes lymphocytopenia by eliminating CD52-positive

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Propane- and Butane-Oxidizing Actinobacterium Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231

    OpenAIRE

    Ivshina, Irena B.; Kuyukina, Maria S.; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya V.; Barbe, Valérie; Fischer, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    We report a draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231, isolated from a water spring near an oil-extracting enterprise (Perm region, Russian Federation). This sequence provides important insights into the genetic mechanisms of propane and n-butane metabolism, organic sulfide and beta-sitosterol biotransformation, glycolipid biosurfactant production, and heavy metal resistance in actinobacteria.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Propane- and Butane-Oxidizing Actinobacterium Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivshina, Irena B; Kuyukina, Maria S; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya V; Barbe, Valérie; Fischer, Cécile

    2014-12-11

    We report a draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231, isolated from a water spring near an oil-extracting enterprise (Perm region, Russian Federation). This sequence provides important insights into the genetic mechanisms of propane and n-butane metabolism, organic sulfide and beta-sitosterol biotransformation, glycolipid biosurfactant production, and heavy metal resistance in actinobacteria.

  15. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in a kidney transplant patient without initial pulmonary involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette C.; van Meurs, Matijs; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in solid organ transplant recipients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common finding. We report a case of a 42-year-old female kidney transplant recipient who developed multiple disseminated abscesses caused by R. equ

  16. Reduction Kinetics of 3-Hydroxybenzoate 6-Hydroxylase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sucharitakul, J.; Wongnate, T.; Montersino, S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Chaiyen, P.

    2012-01-01

    3-Hydroxybenzoate 6-hydroxylase (3HB6H) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-specific flavoprotein monooxygenase involved in microbial aromatic degradation. The enzyme catalyzes the para hydroxylation of 3-hydroxybenzoate (3-HB) to 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (2,5-DHB

  17. Characterization of the Gene Cluster Involved in Isoprene Metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. Strain AD45

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T.; Leemhuis, Hans; Lutje Spelberg, Jeffrey H.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2000-01-01

    The genes involved in isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis of an 8.5-kb DNA fragment showed the presence of 10 genes of which 2 encoded enzymes which were previously found to be involved in isoprene degradation:

  18. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in a kidney transplant patient without initial pulmonary involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette C.; van Meurs, Matijs; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in solid organ transplant recipients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common finding. We report a case of a 42-year-old female kidney transplant recipient who developed multiple disseminated abscesses caused by R.

  19. Studies on a new candidate vaccine for Rhodococcus equi infections in foals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Anton A. C.; Grommen, Ries; Hessels, Gerda; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus (R.) equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals up to 5 months of age. Despite the great need for a prophylactic measure against this devastating disease, no commercial vaccine is available. Today only long-term and cumbersome

  20. Rhodococcus equi infection after alemtuzumab therapy for T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, Jan J.; Sprenger, Herman G.; Van Assen, Sander; Leduc, Dominique; Daenen, Simon M.G.J.; Arends, Jan P.; van der Werf, Tjipke

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, mainly known from veterinary medicine as a pathogen in domestic animals, can also cause infections in immunocompromised humans, especially in those with defects in cellular immunity. Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, causes lymphocytopenia by eliminating CD52-positive

  1. Cloning, expression, and enzymatic activity evaluation of cholesterol oxidase gene isolated from a native Rhodococcus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Esmaeil Lashgarian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (CHO is one of the valuable enzymes that play an important role in: measurement of serum cholesterol, food industry as a biocatalyst and agriculture as a biological larvicide. This enzyme was produced by several bacterial strains. Wild type enzyme produced by Rhodococcus sp. secret two forms of CHO enzyme: extra cellular and membrane bound type which its amount is low and unstable. The goal of the study was cloning, expression, and enzymatic activity evaluation of cholesterol oxidase gene isolated from a native Rhodococcus sp. CHO gene was isolated from native bacteria and cloned into pET23a. In the next step, the construct was expressed in E.coli BL21 and induced by different concentration of IPTG ranges from 0.1 - 0.9 mM. This gene contains 1642 bp and encodes a protein consists of 533 amino acids. It has about 96 % homology with CHO gene isolated from Rhodococcus equi. The high expression was obtained in 0.5 mM concentration of IPTG after 4 hour induction. This recombinant enzyme had a molecular weight of 55 kDa, that secretion of intra cellular type is much more than extracellular form. The optimum pH and temperature conditions for the recombinant enzyme were 7.5 and 45°C, respectively. CHO enzyme obtained from Rhodococcus sp. is a cheap enzyme with medical and industrial applications that can be produced easily and purified in large scale with simple methods.

  2. Functional annotation and characterization of 3-hydroxybenzoate 6-hydroxylase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montersino, S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 contains an unusually large number of oxygenase encoding genes. Many of these genes have yet an unknown function, implying that a notable part of the biochemical and catabolic biodiversity of this Gram-positive soil actinomycete is still elusive. Here we present

  3. Genome-based exploration of the specialized metabolic capacities of the genus Rhodococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceniceros, Ana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Petrusma, Mirjan; Medema, Marnix H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus are well known for their ability to degrade a large range of organic compounds. Some rhodococci are free-living, saprophytic bacteria; others are animal and plant pathogens. Recently, several studies have shown that their genomes encode putative pathways

  4. Genome-based exploration of the specialized metabolic capacities of the genus Rhodococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceniceros, Ana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Petrusma, Mirjan; Medema, Marnix H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus are well known for their ability to degrade a large range of organic compounds. Some rhodococci are free-living, saprophytic bacteria; others are animal and plant pathogens. Recently, several studies have shown that their genomes encode putative pathways

  5. Isolation and characterization of RDX-degrading Rhodococcus species from a contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Anat; Adar, Eilon; Nejidat, Ali; Ronen, Zeev

    2011-09-01

    Groundwater contamination by the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a global problem. Israel's coastal aquifer was contaminated with RDX. This aquifer is mostly aerobic and we therefore sought aerobic bacteria that might be involved in natural attenuation of the compound in the aquifer. RDX-degrading bacteria were captured by passively sampling the indigenous bacteria onto sterile sediments placed within sampling boreholes. Aerobic RDX biodegradation potential was detected in the sediments sampled from different locations along the plume. RDX degradation with the native sampled consortium was accompanied by 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal formation. Two bacterial strains of the genus Rhodococcus were isolated from the sediments and identified as aerobic RDX degraders. The xplA gene encoding the cytochrome P450 enzyme was partially (~500 bp) sequenced from both isolates. The obtained DNA sequences had 99% identity with corresponding gene fragments of previously isolated RDX-degrading Rhodococcus strains. RDX degradation by both strains was prevented by 200 μM of the cytochrome P450 inhibitor metyrapone, suggesting that cytochrome P450 indeed mediates the initial step in RDX degradation. RDX biodegradation activity by the T7 isolate was inhibited in the presence of nitrate or ammonium concentrations above 1.6 and 5.5 mM, respectively (100 mg l(-1)) while the T9N isolate's activity was retarded only by ammonium concentrations above 5.5 mM. This study shows that bacteria from the genus Rhodococcus, potentially degrade RDX in the saturated zone as well, following the same aerobic degradation pathway defined for other Rhodococcus species. RDX-degrading activity by the Rhodococcus species isolate T9N may have important implications for the bioremediation of nitrate-rich RDX-contaminated aquifers.

  6. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause

  7. StyA1 and StyA2B from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP: a Multifunctional Styrene Monooxygenase System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tischler, D.; Kermer, R.; Groning, J.A.D.; Kaschabek, S.R.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Schlomann, M.

    2010-01-01

    Two-component flavoprotein monooxygenases are emerging biocatalysts that generally consist of a monooxygenase and a reductase component. Here we show that Rhodococcus opacus 1CP encodes a multifunctional enantioselective flavoprotein monooxygenase system composed of a single styrene monooxygenase (S

  8. Complete Genome of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans SB3094, a Methyl-Ethyl-Ketone-Degrading Bacterium Used for Bioaugmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Albertsen, Mads; D'Imperio, Seth;

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans SB3094, a methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK)-degrading strain used for bioaugmentation relating to the treatment of wastewater contamination with petrochemical hydrocarbons. The genome highlights important features for bioaugmentation...

  9. Infecção pulmonar pelo Rhodococcus equi na síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida: Aspectos na tomografia computadorizada Rhodococcus equi infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Computed tomography aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Marchiori

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar os aspectos na tomografia computadorizada da pneumonia pelo Rhodococcus equi em sete pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo das tomografias de sete pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida e infecção pelo Rhodococcus equi. RESULTADOS: Os achados mais freqüentes foram: consolidação (n = 7 com escavação (n = 6, opacidades em vidro fosco (n = 6, nódulos do espaço aéreo (n = 4 e nódulos centrolobulares com árvore em brotamento (n = 3. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados mais comuns na infecção pulmonar pelo Rhodococcus equi em pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida foram as consolidações escavadas.OBJECTIVE: To present the computed tomography aspects of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in seven patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. METHODS: A retrospective study of the computed tomography scans of seven patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Rhodococcus equi infection. RESULTS: The most common findings were consolidation (n = 7, consolidation with cavitation (n = 6, ground glass opacities (n = 6, peribronchial nodules (n = 4 and centrilobular nodules presenting a "tree-in-bud" pattern (n = 3. CONCLUSION: The most common finding in patients with Rhodococcus equi pulmonary infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was consolidation with cavitation.

  10. Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dockyu; Kim, Young-Soo; Kim, Seong-Ki; Kim, Si Wouk; Zylstra, Gerben J; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Eungbin

    2002-07-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17 was isolated from soil and analyzed for the ability to grow on o-xylene as the sole carbon and energy source. Although DK17 cannot grow on m- and p-xylene, it is capable of growth on benzene, phenol, toluene, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, and other alkylbenzene isomers. One UV-generated mutant strain, DK176, simultaneously lost the ability to grow on o-xylene, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, toluene, and benzene, although it could still grow on phenol. The mutant strain was also unable to oxidize indole to indigo following growth in the presence of o-xylene. This observation suggests the loss of an oxygenase that is involved in the initial oxidation of the (alkyl)benzenes tested. Another mutant strain, DK180, isolated for the inability to grow on o-xylene, retained the ability to grow on benzene but was unable to grow on alkylbenzenes due to loss of a meta-cleavage dioxygenase needed for metabolism of methyl-substituted catechols. Further experiments showed that DK180 as well as the wild-type strain DK17 have an ortho-cleavage pathway which is specifically induced by benzene but not by o-xylene. These results indicate that DK17 possesses two different ring-cleavage pathways for the degradation of aromatic compounds, although the initial oxidation reactions may be catalyzed by a common oxygenase. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 300-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry clearly show that DK180 accumulates 3,4-dimethylcatechol from o-xylene and both 3- and 4-methylcatechol from toluene. This means that there are two initial routes of oxidation of toluene by the strain. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated the presence of two large megaplasmids in the wild-type strain DK17, one of which (pDK2) was lost in the mutant strain DK176. Since several other independently derived mutant strains unable to grow on alkylbenzenes are also missing pDK2, the genes encoding the initial steps in alkylbenzene

  11. Biodegradation of RDX and MNX with Rhodococcus sp. Strain DN22: New Insights into the Degradation Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY / VOL. 44, NO. 24, 2010 10.1021/es1023724  2010 American Chemical Society Published on Web 11/24/2010 Report...exclusively; how- FIGURE 1. Time course of aerobic biodegradation of RDX with Rhodococcus sp. DN22 VOL. 44, NO. 24, 2010 / ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 9...water (H216O) (C) or H218O (D). 9332 9 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY / VOL. 44, NO. 24, 2010 Degradation of MNX with Rhodococcus sp. strain

  12. Rhodococcus equi pericarditis in a patient living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundelly, Praveen; Thornton, Alice; Greenberg, Richard N; McCormick, Malkanthie; Myint, Thein

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, previously called Corynebacterium equi, is known to cause pneumonia in foals and swine. Although it was known to cause infection rarely in humans, R equi infection in humans has increased with the advent of HIV and increased use of immunosuppressants. We report a case of a 48-year-old male patient with newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS presenting with recurrent R equi bacteremia, pericardial effusion, and pericardial cyst. The infection was treated with drainage of the pericardial effusion and cyst and 2 weeks of intravenous vancomycin and 6 months of oral azithromycin and levofloxacin. Rhodococcus equi causes pericarditis and pericardial effusion. It can be effectively treated with debridement, drainage, and a prolonged course of antibiotics. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility should be checked as resistance to antibiotics can develop, especially if drainage is inadequate.

  13. Biodegradation and metabolic pathway of nicotine in Rhodococcus sp. Y22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaowei; Ma, Guanghui; Duan, Yanqing; Zhu, Donglai; Chen, Yongkuan; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2016-11-01

    Nicotine in tobacco is harmful to health and the environment, so there is an environmental requirement to remove nicotine from tobacco and tobacco wastes. In this study, the biotransformation of nicotine by Rhodococcus sp. Y22 was investigated, and three metabolites (NIC1, NIC4 and NIC5) were isolated by column separation, preparative TLC and solid plate's method, respectively. NIC1 was identified as 6-hydoxynicotine based on the results of NMR, MS, HPLC-UV and HRESIMS analysis; NIC4 was a novel compound and identified as 5-(3-methyl-[1,3]oxazinan-2-ylidene)-5H-pyridin-2-one based on the results of NMR, MS and UV analysis; NIC5 was identified as nicotine blue based on the results of NMR and MS analysis. Meanwhile, two metabolites NIC2 and NIC3 were identified as 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine and 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine by HRESIMS analysis, respectively. According to these metabolites, the possible pathway of nicotine degradation by Rhodococcus sp. Y22 was proposed. The nicotine can be transformed to nicotine blue through two pathways (A and B), and 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine is the key compound, which can be converted to 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine (pathway A) and 5-(3-methyl-[1,3]oxazinan-2-ylidene)-5H-pyridin-2-one (pathway B), respectively. Moreover, the encoding gene of nicotine dehydrogenase, ndh, was amplified from Rhodococcus sp. Y22, and its transcriptional level could be up-regulated obviously under nicotine induction. Our studies reported the key metabolites and possible biotransformation pathway of nicotine in Rhodococcus sp. Y22, and provided new insights into the microbial metabolism of nicotine.

  14. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of erythromycin and rifampin for Rhodococcus equi during the years 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Caitriona S; Buckley, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram positive, intracellular pathogen of foals worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increasing resistance occurring in Rhodococcus equi towards the antibiotics rifampin and erythromycin over a seven year period. The investigation was carried out with the use of E test strips (epsilometers) for rifampin and erythromycin in order to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) values of Rhodococcus equi to these antibiotics. The main results of this study found that the mean MICs were higher for erythromycin than for rifampin for every year analysed apart from 2008. The results highlight that 75 % (6/8) of the mean MICs for erythromycin were above the threshold of susceptibility of 0.5 μg/ml and one of the yearly mean MICs for rifampin (2008) was above the level of ≤ 1 μg/ml. Two soil samples analysed had high MIC values of 2 μg/ml and 3 μg/ml for rifampin and erythromycin respectively. These samples can be said to have acquired resistance as they are above 1 μg/ml. The significance of these findings is that R. equi is already a problematic pathogen to treat and if the bacteria keeps gaining resistance to these antibiotics at rate that has been shown over the last decade, then a new form of treatment will have to be introduced. Further research into the genomics of Rhodococcus equi will, in time, shed more light on possible alternatives such as vaccines or new, more effective antimicrobials.

  15. Effect of extracellular polymeric substances on the mechanical properties of Rhodococcus

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Rhodococcus RC291 were measured using force spectroscopy equipped with a bacterial cell probe. Rhodococcal cells in the late growth stage of development were found to have greater adhesion to a silicon oxide surface than those in the early growth stage. This is because there are more extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that contain nonspecific binding sites available on the cells of late growth stage. It is found that EPS in the late exponential phase are les...

  16. The detection and phylogenetic analysis of the alkane 1-monooxygenase gene of members of the genus Rhodococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táncsics, András; Benedek, Tibor; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Veres, Péter G; Farkas, Milán; Máthé, István; Márialigeti, Károly; Kukolya, József; Lányi, Szabolcs; Kriszt, Balázs

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring and anthropogenic petroleum hydrocarbons are potential carbon sources for many bacteria. The AlkB-related alkane hydroxylases, which are integral membrane non-heme iron enzymes, play a key role in the microbial degradation of many of these hydrocarbons. Several members of the genus Rhodococcus are well-known alkane degraders and are known to harbor multiple alkB genes encoding for different alkane 1-monooxygenases. In the present study, 48 Rhodococcus strains, representing 35 species of the genus, were investigated to find out whether there was a dominant type of alkB gene widespread among species of the genus that could be used as a phylogenetic marker. Phylogenetic analysis of rhodococcal alkB gene sequences indicated that a certain type of alkB gene was present in almost every member of the genus Rhodococcus. These alkB genes were common in a unique nucleotide sequence stretch absent from other types of rhodococcal alkB genes that encoded a conserved amino acid motif: WLG(I/V/L)D(G/D)GL. The sequence identity of the targeted alkB gene in Rhodococcus ranged from 78.5 to 99.2% and showed higher nucleotide sequence variation at the inter-species level compared to the 16S rRNA gene (93.9-99.8%). The results indicated that the alkB gene type investigated might be applicable for: (i) differentiating closely related Rhodococcus species, (ii) properly assigning environmental isolates to existing Rhodococcus species, and finally (iii) assessing whether a new Rhodococcus isolate represents a novel species of the genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial biodiesel production from oil palm biomass hydrolysate using marine Rhodococcus sp. YHY01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Kim, Junyoung; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Hyun Joong; Jeon, Jong-Min; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Yun-Gon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2017-06-01

    The effect of various biomass derived inhibitors (i.e. furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin, 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (4-HB) and acetate) was investigated for fatty acid accumulation in Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01. Rhodococcus sp. YHY01 was able to utilize acetate, vanillin, and 4-HB for biomass production and fatty acid accumulation. The IC50 value for furfural (3.1mM), HMF (3.2mM), vanillin (2.0mM), 4-HB (2.7mM) and acetate (3.7mM) was calculated. HMF and vanillin affect fatty acid composition and increase saturated fatty acid content. Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01 cultured with empty fruit bunch hydrolysate (EFBH) as the main carbon source resulted in enhanced biomass (20%) and fatty acid productivity (37%), in compression to glucose as a carbon source. Overall, this study showed the beneficial effects of inhibitory molecules on growth and fatty acid production, and support the idea of biomass hydrolysate utilization for biodiesel production by avoiding complex efforts to remove inhibitory compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Medial prefrontal D1 dopamine neurons control food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Benjamin B; Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Liu, Rong-Jian; Gianessi, Carol A; Brayton, Catherine E; Grimaldi, David M; Sarhan, Maysa; Guarnieri, Douglas J; Deisseroth, Karl; Aghajanian, George K; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2014-02-01

    Although the prefrontal cortex influences motivated behavior, its role in food intake remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate a role for D1-type dopamine receptor-expressing neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the regulation of feeding. Food intake increases activity in D1 neurons of the mPFC in mice, and optogenetic photostimulation of D1 neurons increases feeding. Conversely, inhibition of D1 neurons decreases intake. Stimulation-based mapping of prefrontal D1 neuron projections implicates the medial basolateral amygdala (mBLA) as a downstream target of these afferents. mBLA neurons activated by prefrontal D1 stimulation are CaMKII positive and closely juxtaposed to prefrontal D1 axon terminals. Finally, photostimulating these axons in the mBLA is sufficient to increase feeding, recapitulating the effects of mPFC D1 stimulation. These data describe a new circuit for top-down control of food intake.

  19. Characteristics of stably expressed human dopamine D1a and D1b receptors: atypical behavior of the dopamine D1b receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U B; Norby, B; Jensen, Anders A.

    1994-01-01

    Human dopamine D1a and D1b receptors were stably expressed in Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) or Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. [3H]SCH23390 saturation experiments indicated the presence of only a single binding site in the D1a expressing cell line with a Kd of 0.5 nM. In D1b expressing cell lines...... for these receptors. Besides SCH 23390, only NNC 112, fluphenazine and bulbocapnine were able to discriminate between the two states of the D1b receptor. In case of the D1a receptor, the Ki values obtained in binding experiments were very similar to Ki values obtained from inhibition of dopamine stimulated adenylyl...... cyclase. In the D1b expressing cell line, the Ki values obtained from inhibition of the dopamine stimulated adenylyl cyclase indicated a significantly better correlation with the state of the D1b receptor showing high affinity for antagonists. In agreement with observations from binding experiments...

  20. Characteristics of stably expressed human dopamine D1a and D1b receptors: atypical behavior of the dopamine D1b receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U B; Norby, B; Jensen, Anders A.

    1994-01-01

    Human dopamine D1a and D1b receptors were stably expressed in Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) or Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. [3H]SCH23390 saturation experiments indicated the presence of only a single binding site in the D1a expressing cell line with a Kd of 0.5 nM. In D1b expressing cell lines...... for these receptors. Besides SCH 23390, only NNC 112, fluphenazine and bulbocapnine were able to discriminate between the two states of the D1b receptor. In case of the D1a receptor, the Ki values obtained in binding experiments were very similar to Ki values obtained from inhibition of dopamine stimulated adenylyl...... cyclase. In the D1b expressing cell line, the Ki values obtained from inhibition of the dopamine stimulated adenylyl cyclase indicated a significantly better correlation with the state of the D1b receptor showing high affinity for antagonists. In agreement with observations from binding experiments...

  1. Quantized Faraday effect in 3D+1 and 2D+1 systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, L Cruz; Rojas, H Perez; Querts, E Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    We study Faraday rotation in the quantum relativistic limit. Starting from the photon self-energy in the presence of a constant magnetic field the rotation of the polarization vector of a plane electromagnetic wave which travel along the fermion-antifermion gas is studied. The connection between Faraday Effect and Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) is discussed. The Faraday Effect is also investigated for a massless relativistic 2D+1 fermion system which is derived by using the compactification along the dimension parallel to the magnetic field. Faraday angle shows a quantized behavior as Hall conductivity in two and three dimensions.

  2. Analysis list: Nr1d1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nr1d1 Adipocyte,Cardiovascular,Liver,Neural + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp.../kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr1d1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr1d1.5.tsv http://db...archive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr1d1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr1d1....Adipocyte.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr1d1.C...ardiovascular.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr1d1.Liver.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosc

  3. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  4. Biodegradation of cyanide by acetonitrile-induced cells of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Ibrahim, Abdul Latif; Cass, Anthony E G

    2013-01-01

    A Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M isolate was shown to detoxify cyanide successfully, suggesting the presence of an intrinsic property in the bacterium which required no prior cyanide exposure for induction of this property. However, in order to promote growth, Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M was fully acclimatized to cyanide after 7 successive subcultures in 0.1 mM KCN for 30 days. To further shorten the lag phase and simultaneously increase the tolerance towards higher cyanide concentrations, the bacterium was induced with various nitrile compounds sharing a similar degradatory pathway to cyanide. Acetonitrile emerged as the most favored inducer and the induced cells were able to degrade 0.1 mM KCN almost completely within 18 h. With the addition of subsequent aliquots of 0.1 mM KCN a shorter period for complete removal of cyanide was required, which proved to be advantageous economically. Both resting cells and crude enzyme of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M were able to biodegrade cyanide to ammonia and formate without the formation of formamide, implying the identification of a simple hydrolytic cyanide degradation pathway involving the enzyme cyanidase. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Since the recent advancement in the application of biological methods in treating cyanide-bearing wastewater has been promising, the discovery of this new bacterium will add value by diversifying the existing microbial populations capable of cyanide detoxification.

  5. A New Zearalenone Biodegradation Strategy Using Non-Pathogenic Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszt, Rókus; Krifaton, Csilla; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Cserháti, Mátyás; Kriszt, Balázs; Kukolya, József; Czéh, Árpád; Fehér-Tóth, Szilvia; Török, Lívia; Szőke, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, Krisztina J.; Barna, Teréz; Ferenczi, Szilamér

    2012-01-01

    Zearalenone (hereafter referred to as ZEA) is a nonsteroidal estrogenic mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium spp. on cereal grains. ZEA is one of the most hazardous natural endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) which induces hyper estrogenic responses in mammals. This can result in reproductive disorders in farm animals as well as in humans. Consequently, detoxification strategies for contaminated crops are crucial for food safety. In this study we have developed a bacterial based detoxification system using a non-pathogen Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Following 5 days treatment of ZEA with R. pyridinivorans K408 strain HPLC analyses showed an 87.21% ZEA-degradation efficiency of the bacterial enzyme systems. In another approach, the strain biotransformation ability has also been confirmed by a bioluminescent version of the yeast estrogen screening system (BLYES), which detected an 81.75% of biodegradability of ZEA, in a good agreement with the chemical analyses. Furthermore, the capacity of R. pyridinivorans to eliminate the estrogenic effects of ZEA was tested by using an immature uterotrophic assay. Prepubertal female rats were treated with vehicle (olive oil), 17β-estradiol, ZEA (0.1-1-5-10 mg/kg body weight) and LB broth containing 500 mg/l ZEA that has already been incubated with or without Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Uterine weights were measured and the mRNA level changes relating to apelin, aquaporin 5, complement component 2, and calbindin-3 genes were measured by qRT-PCR. These genes represent the major pathways that are affected by estromimetic compounds. Zearalenone feeding significantly increased the uterus weight in a dose dependent manner and at the same time upregulated complement component 2 and calbindin-3 expression as well as decreased apelin and aquaporin 5 mRNA levels comparable to that seen in 17β-estradiol exposed rats. In contrast, LB broth in which ZEA was incubated with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 prior to

  6. Catabolism of 1,3-dinitrobenzene by Rhodococcus sp. QT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickel, O; Knackmuss, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 1,3-dinitrobenzene-degrading Rhodococcus strain QT-1 was isolated under nitrogen limiting conditions from contaminated soil samples. Experimental data indicate tha 1,3-dinitrobenzene is metabolized via 4-nitrocatechol. Both compounds were oxidized by resting cells and nitro groups were completely eliminated as nitrite. Strain QT-1 utilizes both 1,3-dinitrobenzene and 4-nitrocatechol as source of nitrogen in the absence as well as in the presence of high amounts of ammonia. Growth on 4-nitrocatechol does not induce the enzyme(s) for the initial oxidation of 1,3-dinitrobenzene.

  7. Activity of clarithromycin or rifampin alone or in combination against experimental Rhodococcus equi infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Alexandra J; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hondalus, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of mice with the combination of clarithromycin with rifampin resulted in a significantly lower number of Rhodococcus equi CFU in the organs of mice than treatment with either drug alone or placebo. There was no significant difference in the number of R. equi CFU between mice treated with clarithromycin monotherapy, rifampin monotherapy, or placebo. The combination of clarithromycin with rifampin conferred a clear advantage over either drug as monotherapy in this model of chronic R. equi infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. vanO, a new glycopeptide resistance operon in environmental Rhodococcus equi isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudeta, Dereje Dadi; Moodley, Arshnee; Bortolaia, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    We describe sequence and gene organization of a new glycopeptide resistance operon (vanO) in Rhodococcus equi from soil. The vanO operon has low homology to enterococccal van operons and harbors a vanHOX cluster transcribed in opposite direction to the vanS-vanR regulatory system and comprised...... between three open reading frames with unknown function. This finding has clinical interest since glycopeptides are used to treat R. equi infections and resistance has been reported in clinical isolates....

  9. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  10. Pneumonia due to Rhodococcus equi in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuri de França Bonilha

    Full Text Available The authors reported a lung infection by Rhodococcus equi in a 25 years-old male patient admitted to hospital with cough, dyspnea, fever, and previous diagnosis of pleural effusion. R. equi was isolated from pleural fluid and the patient acquired nosocomial infection by Acinetobacter baumannii, isolated from chest drain. The patient was treated with antibiotics. During hospitalization, he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma of precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma subtype in biopsy of pleura. After undergoing surgery for pulmonary decortication for drain empyema, the patient died due to septicemia.

  11. Biodegradation of Variable-Chain-Length Alkanes at Low Temperatures by a Psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, Lyle G; Hawari, Jalal; Zhou, Edward; Bourbonnière, Luc; Inniss, William E.; Charles W Greer

    1998-01-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5°C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C10 to C21 alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substi...

  12. Waiting time distribution in M/D/1 queueing systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Villy Bæk; Staalhagen, Lars

    1999-01-01

    The well-known formula for the waiting time distribution of M/D/1 queueing systems is numerically unsuitable when the load is close to 1.0 and/or the results for a large waiting time are required. An algorithm for any load and waiting time is presented, based on the state probabilities of M/D/1...

  13. A Leaf-Inhabiting Endophytic Bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. KB6, Enhances Sweet Potato Resistance to Black Rot Disease Caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Jo, Sung Hee; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Kwon, Suk Yoon; An, Donghwan; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-03-01

    Rhodococcus species have become increasingly important owing to their ability to degrade a wide range of toxic chemicals and produce bioactive compounds. Here, we report isolation of the Rhodococcus sp. KB6, which is a new leaf-inhabiting endophytic bacterium that suppresses black rot disease in sweet potato leaves. We determined the 7.0 Mb draft genome sequence of KB6 and have predicted 19 biosynthetic gene clusters for secondary metabolites, including heterobactins, which are a new class of siderophores. Notably, we showed the first internal colonization of host plants with Rhodococcus sp. KB6 and discuss its potential as a biocontrol agent for sustainable agriculture.

  14. Metabolomics of the bio-degradation process of aflatoxin B1 by actinomycetes at an initial pH of 6.0

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eshelli, Manal; Harvey, Linda; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; McNeil, Brian

    2015-01-01

    .... Different processes have been used to degrade AFB1. In this study, biological degradation of AFB1 was carried out using three Actinomycete species, Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277, Streptomyces lividans TK 24...

  15. Insight on RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus strains using 13C and 15N kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Anat; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2013-01-02

    The explosive Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is known to be degraded aerobically by various isolates of the Rhodococcus species, with denitration being the key step, mediated by Cytochrome P450. Our study aimed at gaining insight into the RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus species and comparing isotope effects associated with RDX degradation by distinct Rhodococcus strains. For these purposes, enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes throughout RDX denitration was studied for three distinct Rhodococcus strains, isolated from soil and groundwater in an RDX-contaminated site. The observable (15)N enrichment throughout the reaction, together with minor (13)C enrichment, suggests that N-N bond cleavage is likely to be the key rate-limiting step in the reaction. The similarity in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect between the three tested strains suggests that either isotope-masking effects are negligible, or are of a similar extent for all tested strains. The lack of variability in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect allows the interpretation of environmental studies with greater confidence.

  16. Structural insights into substrate specificity and solvent tolerance in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber DSM 44541.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabec, Martin; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Tauber, Katharina C; Steinkellner, Georg; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Grogan, Gideon; Gruber, Karl

    2010-09-14

    The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber reveals possible reasons for its remarkable tolerance to organic co-solvents and suggests new directions for structure-informed mutagenesis to produce enzymes of altered substrate specificity or improved selectivity.

  17. A novel method to generate unmarked gene deletions in the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi using 5-fluorocytosine conditional lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geize, R.; de Jong, W.; Hessels, G. I.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method to efficiently generate unmarked in-frame gene deletions in Rhodococcus equi was developed, exploiting the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) by the action of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) enzymes. The opportunistic, intracellular

  18. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pu

  19. Expression, purification and kinetic characterization of recombinant benzoate dioxygenase from Rhodococcus ruber UKMP-5M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Tavakoli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, benzoate dioxygenase from Rhodococcus ruber UKMP-5M was catalyzed by oxidating the benzene ring to catechol and other derivatives. The benzoate dioxygenase (benA gene from Rhodococcus ruber UKMP-5M was then expressed, purified, characterized, The benA gene was amplified (642 bp, and the product was cloned into a pGEM-T vector.The recombinant plasmid pGEMT-benA was digested by double restriction enzymes BamHI and HindIII to construct plasmid pET28b-benA and was then ligated into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3. The recombinant E. coli was induced with 0.5 mM isopropyl β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG at 22˚C to produce benzoate dioxygenase. The enzyme was then purified by ion exchange chromatography after 8 purification folds. The resulting product was 25 kDa, determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Benzoate dioxygenase activity was found to be 6.54 U/mL and the optimal pH and temperature were 8.5 and 25°C, respectively. Maximum velocity (Vmax and Michaelis constant (Km were 7.36 U/mL and 5.58 µM, respectively. The end metabolite from the benzoate dioxygenase reaction was cyclohexane dione, which was determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS.

  20. Trans-membrane transport of fluoranthene by Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1 and optimization of uptake process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wang, Hongqi; Hua, Fei; Su, Mengyuan; Zhao, Yicun

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism of transport of (14)C-fluoranthene by Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1, a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from crude oil-polluted soil, was examined. Our finding demonstrated that the mechanism for fluoranthene travel across the cell membrane in Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1 requires energy. Meanwhile, the transport of fluoranthene involves concurrent catabolism of (14)C, that leading to the generation of significant amount of (14)CO2. Combined with trans-membrane transport dynamic and response surface methodology, a significant influence of temperature, pH and salinity on cellular uptake rate was screened by Plackett-Burman design. Then, Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize and enhanced the trans-membrane transport process. The results predicted by Box-Behnken design indicated that the maximum cellular uptake rate of fluoranthene could be achieve to 0.308μmolmin(-1)mg(-1)·protein (observed) and 0.304μmolmin(-1)mg(-1)·protein (predicted) when the initial temperature, pH and salinity were set at 20°C, 9% and 1%, respectively.

  1. Role of amine oxidase expression to maintain putrescine homeostasis in Rhodococcus opacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alexander; Barnes, Nicole; Speight, Robert; Morris, Peter C; Keane, Mark A

    2013-04-10

    While applications of amine oxidases are increasing, few have been characterised and our understanding of their biological role and strategies for bacteria exploitation are limited. By altering the nitrogen source (NH4Cl, putrescine and cadaverine (diamines) and butylamine (monoamine)) and concentration, we have identified a constitutive flavin dependent oxidase (EC 1.4.3.10) within Rhodococcus opacus. The activity of this oxidase can be increased by over two orders of magnitude in the presence of aliphatic diamines. In addition, the expression of a copper dependent diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.22) was observed at diamine concentrations>1mM or when cells were grown with butylamine, which acts to inhibit the flavin oxidase. A Michaelis-Menten kinetic treatment of the flavin oxidase delivered a Michaelis constant (KM)=190μM and maximum rate (kcat)=21.8s(-1) for the oxidative deamination of putrescine with a lower KM (=60μM) and comparable kcat (=18.2s(-1)) for the copper oxidase. MALDI-TOF and genomic analyses have indicated a metabolic clustering of functionally related genes. From a consideration of amine oxidase specificity and sequence homology, we propose a putrescine degradation pathway within Rhodococcus that utilises oxidases in tandem with subsequent dehydrogenase and transaminase enzymes. The implications of PUT homeostasis through the action of the two oxidases are discussed with respect to stressors, evolution and application in microbe-assisted phytoremediation or bio-augmentation.

  2. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  3. Conjugal transfer of a virulence plasmid in the opportunistic intracellular actinomycete Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, V N; Harding, W C; Willingham-Lane, J M; Hondalus, M K

    2012-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular, Gram-positive, soilborne actinomycete which can cause severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia with abscessation in young horses (foals) and in immunocompromised people, such as persons with AIDS. All strains of R. equi isolated from foals and approximately a third isolated from humans contain a large, ~81-kb plasmid which is essential for the intramacrophage growth of the organism and for virulence in foals and murine in vivo model systems. We found that the entire virulence plasmid could be transferred from plasmid-containing strains of R. equi (donor) to plasmid-free R. equi strains (recipient) at a high frequency and that plasmid transmission reestablished the capacity for intracellular growth in macrophages. Plasmid transfer required living cells and cell-to-cell contact and was unaffected by the presence of DNase, factors pointing to conjugation as the major means of genetic transfer. Deletion of a putative relaxase-encoding gene, traA, located in the proposed conjugative region of the plasmid, abolished plasmid transfer. Reversion of the traA mutation restored plasmid transmissibility. Finally, plasmid transmission to other Rhodococcus species and some additional related organisms was demonstrated. This is the first study showing a virulence plasmid transfer in R. equi, and it establishes a mechanism by which the virulence plasmid can move among bacteria in the soil.

  4. Enhanced biofilm production by a toluene-degrading Rhodococcus observed after exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Tess S; Higgins, Christopher P; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2015-05-05

    This study focuses on interactions between aerobic soil-derived hydrocarbon degrading bacteria and a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates that are found in aqueous film-forming foams used for fire suppression. No effect on toluene degradation rate or induction time was observed when active cells of Rhodococcus jostii strain RHA1 were exposed to toluene and a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) at concentrations near the upper bounds of groundwater relevance (11 PFAAs at 10 mg/L each). However, exposure to aqueous PFAA concentrations above 2 mg/L (each) was associated with enhanced aggregation of bacterial cells and significant increases in extracellular polymeric substance production. Flocculation was only observed during exponential growth and not elicited when PFAAs were added to resting incubations; analogous flocculation was also observed in soil enrichments. Aggregation was accompanied by 2- to 3-fold upregulation of stress-associated genes, sigF3 and prmA, during growth of this Rhodococcus in the presence of PFAAs. These results suggest that biological responses, such as microbial stress and biofilm formation, could be more prominent than suppression of co-contaminant biodegradation in subsurface locations where poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances occur with hydrocarbon fuels.

  5. Drotaverine hydrochloride degradation using cyst-like dormant cells of Rhodococcus ruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivshina, Irena B; Mukhutdinova, Anna N; Tyumina, Helena A; Vikhareva, Helena V; Suzina, Nataliya E; El'-Registan, Galina I; Mulyukin, Andrey L

    2015-03-01

    This work has a focus on adaptive capabilities of the actinobacterium Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 326 to cope with drotaverine hydrochloride (DH), a known pharmaceutical pollutant. Cultivation of R. ruber in a nitrogen-limited medium with incubation at the ambient temperature resulted in the formation of cyst-like dormant cells (CLDCs). They maintained viability for 2-7 months, possessed the undetectable respiratory activity and elevated resistance to heating, and had a specific morphology. CLDCs are regarded to ensure long-term survival in various habitats and may be used as storage formulations. R. ruber IEGM 326 was tolerant to DH (MIC, 200 mg/l) and displayed different abilities to degrade this compound, depending on inoculum, temperature, and the presence of glucose as co-oxidized substrate. Thus, the loss of DH (20 mg/l) over 48 h at the optimal temperature (27 ± 2 °C) was 5-8 % in the absence of glucose after inoculating with vegetative cells. The addition of glucose (5 g/l) increased DH degradation up to 46 %. Noteworthy, CLDCs as inoculum were advantageous over vegetative cells to degrade DH at the non-optimal temperature (35 ± 2 °C) at reduced bulk respiratory activity. The obtained results are promising to improve the biodegrading capabilities of other Rhodococcus strains.

  6. Biodegradation of drotaverine hydrochloride by free and immobilized cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IEGM 608.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivshina, I B; Vikhareva, E V; Richkova, M I; Mukhutdinova, A N; Karpenko, Ju N

    2012-10-01

    Drotaverine [1-(3,4-diethoxybenzylidene)-6,7-diethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] hydrochloride, an antispasmodic drug derived from benzylisoquinoline was evaluated for its biodegradability using a bacterial strain Rhodococcus rhodochrous IEGM 608. The experiments were performed under aerobic conditions with rhodococci cultures able to degrade drotaverine. In the presence of glucose, the removal efficiency of drotaverine by free Rhodoccocus cells pre-grown with isoquinoline was above 80 % (200 mg/l, initial concentration) after 25 days. Rhodococcus immobilization on hydrophobized sawdust enhanced the biodegradation process, with the most marked drotaverine loss being observed during the first 5 days of fermentation. High metabolic activity of rhodococcal cells towards drotaverine was confirmed respirometrically. GC-MS analysis of transformation products resulting from drotaverine biodegradation revealed 3,4-diethoxybenzoic acid, 3,4-diethoxybenzaldehyde and 3,4-diethoxybenzoic acid ethyl ester which were detected in the culture medium until drotaverine completely disappeared. Based on these major and other minor metabolites, putative pathways for drotaverine biodegradation were proposed. The obtained data broadened the spectrum of organic xenobiotics oxidized by Rhodoccocus bacteria and proved their potential in decontamination of natural ecosystems from pharma pollutants.

  7. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko [Laboratory for Molecular Ecotoxicology, Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Fent, Karl [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Department of Environmental System Sciences, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Smital, Tvrtko, E-mail: smital@irb.hr [Laboratory for Molecular Ecotoxicology, Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  8. Cloning, overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 3-ketosteroid Delta(4)-(5 alpha)-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterwijk, Niels; Knol, Jan; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert; Dijkstra, Bauke

    2011-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid dehydrogenases are flavoproteins which play key roles in steroid ring degradation. The enzymes are abundantly present in actinobacteria, including the catabolic powerhouse Rhodococcus jostii and the pathogenic species R. equi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene for 3-ketosteroid

  9. Cold adaptive traits revealed by comparative genomic analysis of the eurypsychrophile Rhodococcus sp. JG3 isolated from high elevation McMurdo Dry Valley permafrost, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goordial, Jacqueline; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Zolotarov, Yevgen; de Bethencourt, Luis; Ronholm, Jennifer; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Stromvik, Martina; Greer, Charles W; Bakermans, Corien; Whyte, Lyle

    2016-02-01

    The permafrost soils of the high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys are the most cold, desiccating and oligotrophic on Earth. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is one of very few bacterial isolates from Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost, and displays subzero growth down to -5°C. To understand how Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is able to survive extreme permafrost conditions and be metabolically active at subzero temperatures, we sequenced its genome and compared it to the genomes of 14 mesophilic rhodococci. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possessed a higher copy number of genes for general stress response, UV protection and protection from cold shock, osmotic stress and oxidative stress. We characterized genome wide molecular adaptations to cold, and identified genes that had amino acid compositions favourable for increased flexibility and functionality at low temperatures. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possesses multiple complimentary strategies which may enable its survival in some of the harshest permafrost on Earth.

  10. The D$_1$ enigma and its physical origin

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, J O

    2016-01-01

    The D$_1$ enigma is an anomaly, which was first observed on the Sun as a symmetric polarization peak centered in the core of the sodium D$_1$ line that is expected to be intrinsically unpolarizable. To resolve this problem the underlying physics was later explored in the laboratory for D$_1$ scattering at potassium vapor. The experiment showed that the scattering phase matrix element $P_{21}$ is positive while $P_{22}$ is negative, although standard quantum scattering theory predicts that both should be zero. This experimental contradiction is currently the main manifestation of the D$_1$ enigma. Subsequent theoretical studies showed that such polarization effects may arise if scattering theory is extended to allow for interference effects due to level splittings of the ground state, in contrast to standard scattering theory, which only allows for interferences from level splittings of the intermediate state. Previous attempts to implement this idea had to rely on heuristic arguments to allow modeling of the ...

  11. Simultaneous species-specific PCR detection and viability testing of poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel-entrapped Rhodococcus spp. after their exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Serebrennikova, Marina K; Rubtsova, Ekaterina V; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya V

    2013-08-01

    A method of simultaneous species-specific PCR detection and viability testing of poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel-entrapped Rhodococcus spp. was developed that allowed the estimation of immobilized Rhodococcus opacus and Rhodococcus ruber survival after their exposure to petroleum hydrocarbon mixture. Spectrophotometric INT assay revealed high tolerance of gel-immobilized rhodococci to petroleum hydrocarbons, while among two Rhodococcus strains studied, R. ruber tolerated better to hydrocarbons compared to R. opacus. These findings were confirmed by respirometry results that showed increased respiratory activity of gel-immobilized Rhodococcus strains after 10-day incubation with 3% (v/v) petroleum hydrocarbon mixture. Moreover, jointly incubated rhodococcal strains demonstrated higher oxidative activities toward petroleum hydrocarbons than individual strains. Both Rhodococcus species were recovered successfully in cryogel granules using 16S rDNA-targeted PCR, even though the granules were previously stained with INT and extracted with ethanol. The method developed can be used for rapid detection and monitoring of gel-immobilized bacterial inocula in bioreactors or contaminated soil systems.

  12. Evidence against dopamine D1/D2 receptor heteromers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Aliya L.; Yano, Hideaki; Trifilieff, Pierre; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Biezonski, Dominik; Mészáros, József; Sibley, David R.; Kellendonk, Christoph; Sonntag, Kai C.; Graham, Devon L.; Colbran, Roger J.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hetero-oligomers of G-protein-coupled receptors have become the subject of intense investigation because their purported potential to manifest signaling and pharmacological properties that differ from the component receptors makes them highly attractive for the development of more selective pharmacological treatments. In particular, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors have been proposed to form hetero-oligomers that couple to Gαq proteins, and SKF83959 has been proposed to act as a biased agonist that selectively engages these receptor complexes to activate Gαq and thus phospholipase C. D1/D2 heteromers have been proposed as relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and schizophrenia. We used in vitro bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), ex vivo analyses of receptor localization and proximity in brain slices, and behavioral assays in mice to characterize signaling from these putative dimers/oligomers. We were unable to detect Gαq or Gα11 protein coupling to homomers or heteromers of D1 or D2 receptors using a variety of biosensors. SKF83959-induced locomotor and grooming behaviors were eliminated in D1 receptor knockout mice, verifying a key role for D1-like receptor activation. In contrast, SKF83959-induced motor responses were intact in D2 receptor and Gαq knockout mice, as well as in knock-in mice expressing a mutant Ala286-CaMKIIα, that cannot autophosphorylate to become active. Moreover, we found that in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, even in neurons in which D1 and D2 receptor promoters are both active, the receptor proteins are segregated and do not form complexes. These data are not compatible with SKF83959 signaling through Gαq or through a D1–D2 heteromer and challenge the existence of such a signaling complex in the adult animals that we used for our studies. PMID:25560761

  13. Dopamine D1 receptor involvement in latent inhibition and overshadowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew J D; Thur, Karen E; Cassaday, Helen J

    2012-11-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) manifests as poorer conditioning to a stimulus that has previously been experienced without consequence. There is good evidence of dopaminergic modulation of LI, as the effect is reliably disrupted by the indirect dopamine (DA) agonist amphetamine. The disruptive effects of amphetamine on LI are reversed by both typical and atypical antipsychotics, which on their own are able to facilitate LI. However, the contribution of different DA receptors to these effects is poorly understood. Amphetamine effects on another stimulus selection procedure, overshadowing, have been suggested to be D1-mediated. Thus, in the current experiments, we systematically investigated the role of D1 receptors in LI. First, we tested the ability of the full D1 agonist SKF 81297 to abolish LI and compared the effects of this drug on LI and overshadowing. Subsequently, we examined whether the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 can lead to the emergence of LI under conditions that do not produce the effect in normal animals (weak pre-exposure). Finally, we tested the ability of SCH 23390 to block amphetamine-induced disruption of LI. We found little evidence that direct stimulation of D1 receptors abolishes LI (although there was some attenuation of LI at 0.4 mg/kg SKF 81297). Similarly, SCH 23390 failed to enhance LI. However, SCH 23390 did block amphetamine-induced disruption of LI. These data indicate that, while LI may be unaffected by selective manipulation of activity at D1 receptors, the effects of amphetamine on LI are to some extent dependent on actions at D1 receptors.

  14. Characterization of Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain J3 that degrades 4-nitrocatechol and other nitroaromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátilová, Jitka; Tvrzová, Ludmila; Durnová, Eva; Spröer, Cathrin; Sedlácek, Ivo; Neca, Jirí; Nemec, Miroslav

    2005-02-01

    The bacterial strain J3 was isolated from soil by selective enrichment on mineral medium containing 4-nitrocatechol as the sole carbon and energy source. This strain was identified as Rhodococcus wratislaviensis on the basis of morphology, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characterization and complete sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene. The isolated bacterium could utilize 4-nitrocatechol, 3-nitrophenol and 5-nitroguaiacol as sole carbon and energy sources. Stoichiometric release of nitrites was measured during degradation of 4-nitrocatechol both in growing cultures and for stationary phase cells. The J3 strain was unable to degrade 4-nitroguaiacol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid, 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzoic acid and 2,3-difluoro-6-nitrophenol. The J3 strain is deposited in the Czech Collection of Microorganisms as CCM 4930.

  15. A real-time impedance based method to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra A Miranda-CasoLuengo

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and the causative agent of foal pneumonia. R. equi virulence is usually assessed by analyzing intracellular growth in macrophages by enumeration of bacteria following cell lysis, which is time consuming and does not allow for a high throughput analysis. This paper describes the use of an impedance based real-time method to characterize proliferation of R. equi in macrophages, using virulent and attenuated strains lacking the vapA gene or virulence plasmid. Image analysis suggested that the time-dependent cell response profile (TCRP is governed by cell size and roundness as well as cytoxicity of infecting R. equi strains. The amplitude and inflection point of the resulting TCRP were dependent on the multiplicity of infection as well as virulence of the infecting strain, thus distinguishing between virulent and attenuated strains.

  16. Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in the foal--part 1: pathogenesis and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Gary

    2012-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is a worldwide infectious disease of major concern to the equine breeding industry. The disease typically manifests in foals as pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Inhalation of aerosolised virulent R. equi from the environment and intracellular replication within alveolar macrophages are essential components of the pathogenesis of R. equi pneumonia in the foal. Recently documented evidence of airborne transmission between foals indicates the potential for an alternative contagious route of disease transmission. In the first of this two-part review, the complexity of the host, pathogen and environmental interactions that underpin R. equi pneumonia will be discussed through an exploration of current understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of R. equi pneumonia in the foal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immune Reconstitution Syndrome secondary to Rhodococcus equi infection in a patient with HIV and Burkitt's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darraj, Majid; Fainstein, Rachel; Kasper, Ken; Keynan, Yoav

    Immune Reconstitution Syndrome (IRIS) has been associated with a variety of infections in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, we are reporting the first case of IRIS secondary to Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) in a patient with HIV. We report the case of a 48-year-old male found to have HIV infection in the setting of Burkitt's lymphoma. While on anti-retroviral therapy and chemotherapy, he had developed IRIS secondary to R. equi that manifested as a cavitating pneumonia. This report outlines the successful management of the R. equi infection with the use of a combination of antibiotics, radiographic follow up and suppressive antibiotic while on chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Equid herpesvirus 1 and rhodococcus equi coinfection in a foal with bronchointerstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ecija, Alejandro; Mendoza, Francisco Javier; Estepa, José Carlos; Bautista, María José; Pérez, José

    2016-10-01

    A 2-month-old foal with septic shock and severe respiratory distress was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Due to poor prognosis, the foal was euthanized. Histopathology showed lesions suggestive of Rhodococcus equi infection associated with a diffuse interstitial infiltrate of foamy macrophages and syncytial cells presenting large acidophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies, fibrin exudates and hyaline membranes. Bacteriological examination from lung and respiratory exudates confirmed R. equi infection, whilst immunohistochemistry and PCR yielded a positive result for Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1). Several etiologies have been proposed for bronchointerstitial pneumonia in foals, although a multifactorial origin for this lesional pattern could be possible. This work is the first one describing a combined EHV-1 and R. equi infection in a foal affected with bronchointerstitial pneumonia.

  19. Mutant prevention concentration and mutant selection window for 10 antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Guldbech, Kristen

    2013-10-25

    The objectives of this study were to determine the mutant prevention concentration (MPC), time above the MPC and mutant selection window for 10 antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi and to determine if the combination of a macrolide with rifampin would decrease emergence of resistant mutants. Antimicrobial agents investigated (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, and doxycycline) were selected based on in vitro activity and frequency of use in foals or people infected with R. equi. Each antimicrobial agent or combination of agents was evaluated against four virulent strains of R. equi. MPC were determined using an agar plate assay. Pharmacodynamic parameters were calculated using published plasma and pulmonary pharmacokinetic variables. There was a significant (Pequi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Susceptibility profile of Brazilian Rhodococcus equi isolates against azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Trevisan Gressler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi infection treatment is usually a macrolide (azithromycin - AZM, clarithromycin - CLR and erythromycin - ERY and rifampicin combination. However, resistance cases have been reported, especially for ERY. In view of the need of a study about Brazilian isolates susceptibility profile, this study aimed to characterize the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the macrolides - AZM, CLR and ERY - against 44 R. equi isolates. It was found all isolates CLR and AZM sensitive; however, for ERY, 27% (12/44 were classified as intermediate sensitivity. R. equi Brazilian isolates used here showed a large susceptibility profile, except against ERY, for which it was observed some resistance evidence. In order to avoid failures in the equine rhodococcosis therapy it was highlighted the importance of microbiological culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing in vitro before beginning treatment

  1. Rhodococcus equi human clinical isolates enter and survive within human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Vivas, J; Pilares-Ortega, L; Remuzgo-Martínez, S; Padilla, D; Gutiérrez-Díaz, J L; Navas-Méndez, J

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an emerging opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people, especially those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathogen resides primarily within lung macrophages of infected patients, which may explain in part its ability to escape normal pulmonary defense mechanisms. Despite numerous studies as a pulmonary pathogen in foals, where a plasmid seems to play an important role in virulence, information on the pathogenesis of this pathogen in humans is still scarce. In this study, fluorescence microscopy and vancomycin protection assays were used to investigate the ability of R. equi human isolates to adhere to and to invade the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. Our findings indicate that some R. equi clinical strains are capable of adhering, entering and surviving within the alveolar cell line, which may contribute to the pathogen persistence in lung tissues. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A real-time impedance based method to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra A; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Lieggi, Nora T; Luo, Haixia; Simpson, Jeremy C; Meijer, Wim G

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and the causative agent of foal pneumonia. R. equi virulence is usually assessed by analyzing intracellular growth in macrophages by enumeration of bacteria following cell lysis, which is time consuming and does not allow for a high throughput analysis. This paper describes the use of an impedance based real-time method to characterize proliferation of R. equi in macrophages, using virulent and attenuated strains lacking the vapA gene or virulence plasmid. Image analysis suggested that the time-dependent cell response profile (TCRP) is governed by cell size and roundness as well as cytoxicity of infecting R. equi strains. The amplitude and inflection point of the resulting TCRP were dependent on the multiplicity of infection as well as virulence of the infecting strain, thus distinguishing between virulent and attenuated strains.

  3. Antibiotic failure in a renal transplant patient with Rhodococcus equi infection: an indication for surgical lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursales, A; Klein, J A; Beal, S G; Koch, M; Clement-Kruzel, S; Melton, L B; Spak, C W

    2014-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that causes infrequent but challenging infections in immunocompromised individuals, few of which have been described in solid organ transplant recipients. Common clinical presentations include indolent cough, fever, and dyspnea, with necrotizing pneumonia and cavitation. We report a case of a dense right upper lung pneumonia with resultant R. equi bacteremia in a renal transplant recipient. Our patient initially responded to antibiotic treatment with resolution of bacteremia and clinical recovery, followed by interval progression in her right upper lobe consolidation on follow-up computed tomography scans. She underwent lobectomy for definitive therapy with resolution of symptoms. Lobectomy can be utilized in isolated infection after antibiotic failure with excellent clinical outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Tuberculosis-like pneumonias by the aerobic actinomycetes Rhodococcus, Tsukamurella and Gordonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Fazii, Paolo; Favaro, Marco; Astolfi, Daniela; Polilli, Ennio; Pompilio, Arianna; Vannucci, Mariangela; D'Amario, Claudio; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Fontana, Carla; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2012-05-01

    The order Actinomycetales includes phylogenetically diverse but morphologically similar aerobic and anaerobic organisms, exhibiting filamentous branching structures which fragment into rods or coccoid forms. Lung pathogens of the order comprise Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Corynebacterium, Actinomyces, Kytococcus, Rothia, Williamsia, as well as Gordonia, Tsukamurella and Rhodococcus. Particularly, members of the last three genera are uncommon aerobic agents of lung cavitations and tuberculosis(TB)-like syndromes, that should be carefully considered in the aetiology of parenchymal lesions. Correct identification of such organisms is hard to obtain, but is crucial to provide patients with adequate diagnose and treatment. Then, this review aims to unearth their airway tropism, as well as their clinical impact as agents of lung disease. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The fas operon of Rhodococcus fascians encodes new genes required for efficient fasciation of host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, M; Vereecke, D; Temmerman, W; Van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1994-01-01

    Three virulence loci (fas, att, and hyp) of Rhodococcus fascians D188 have been identified on a 200-kb conjugative linear plasmid (pFiD188). The fas locus was delimited to a 6.5-kb DNA fragment by insertion mutagenesis, single homologous disruptive recombination, and in trans complementation of different avirulent insertion mutants. The locus is arranged as a large operon containing six open reading frames whose expression is specifically induced during the interaction with host plants. One predicted protein is homologous to P-450 cytochromes from actinomycetes. The putative ferredoxin component is of a novel type containing additional domains homologous to transketolases from chemoautotrophic, photosynthetic, and methylotrophic microorganisms. Genetic analysis revealed that fas encodes, in addition to the previously identified ipt, at least two new genes that are involved in fasciation development, one of which is only required on older tobacco plants. PMID:8169198

  6. Nitrile Hydratase and Amidase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous Hydrolyze Acrylic Fibers and Granular Polyacrylonitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, M. M.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Robra, K.-H.; Gübitz, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 produced nitrile hydratase (320 nkat mg of protein−1) and amidase activity (38.4 nkat mg of protein−1) when grown on a medium containing propionitrile. These enzymes were able to hydrolyze nitrile groups of both granular polyacrylonitriles (PAN) and acrylic fibers. Nitrile groups of PAN40 (molecular mass, 40 kDa) and PAN190 (molecular mass, 190 kDa) were converted into the corresponding carbonic acids to 1.8 and 1.0%, respectively. In contrast, surfacial nitrile groups of acrylic fibers were only converted to the corresponding amides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 16% of the surfacial nitrile groups were hydrolyzed by the R. rhodochrous enzymes. Due to the enzymatic modification, the acrylic fibers became more hydrophilic and thus, adsorption of dyes was enhanced. This was indicated by a 15% increase in the staining level (K/S value) for C.I. Basic Blue 9. PMID:10742253

  7. Infecção pulmonar por "Rhodococcus equi": relato dos dois primeiros casos brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEVERO LUIZ CARLOS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available O Rhodococcus equi, principal agente da rodococose, é um cocobacilo pleomórfico, gram-positivo e aeróbio, que infecta humanos por via inalatória ou transcutânea e se manifesta clinicamente como abscesso pulmonar. Relatam-se os dois primeiros casos brasileiros da doença. Ambos os pacientes eram imunocomprometidos e apresentavam quadro infeccioso pulmonar. O primeiro tinha AIDS e apresentava pneumonia cavitada em lobo superior esquerdo, que teve evolução fatal. O segundo tinha doença de Goodpasture, insuficiência renal crônica e fazia uso de corticosteróides. Apresentava uma lesão pulmonar escavada no lobo superior direito, que foi tratada com sulfametoxazol-trimetoprim, com resolução do processo.

  8. Bioconversion of acrylonitrile to acrylamide using polyacrylamide entrapped cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, J; Prasad, S; Sharma, N N; Bhalla, T C

    2010-09-01

    The nitrile hydratase (NHase) of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 catalyzed the conversion of acrylonitrile to acrylamide. The resting cells (having NHase activity) (8 %; 1 mL corresponds to 22 mg dry cell mass, DCM) were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel containing 12.5 % acrylamide, 0.6 % bisacrylamide, 0.2 % diammonium persulfate and 0.4 % TEMED. The polyacrylamide entrapped cells (1.12 mg DCM/mL) completely converted acrylonitrile in 3 h at 10 °C, using 0.1 mol/L potassium phosphate buffer. In a partitioned fed batch reactor, 432 g/L acrylamide was accumulated after 1 d. The polyacrylamide discs were recycled up to 3×; 405, 210 and 170 g/L acrylamide was produced in 1st, 2nd and 3rd recycling reactions. In four cycles, a total of 1217 g acrylamide was produced by recycling the same mass of entrapped cells.

  9. The genome of a pathogenic rhodococcus: cooptive virulence underpinned by key gene acquisitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Letek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the genome of the facultative intracellular parasite Rhodococcus equi, the only animal pathogen within the biotechnologically important actinobacterial genus Rhodococcus. The 5.0-Mb R. equi 103S genome is significantly smaller than those of environmental rhodococci. This is due to genome expansion in nonpathogenic species, via a linear gain of paralogous genes and an accelerated genetic flux, rather than reductive evolution in R. equi. The 103S genome lacks the extensive catabolic and secondary metabolic complement of environmental rhodococci, and it displays unique adaptations for host colonization and competition in the short-chain fatty acid-rich intestine and manure of herbivores--two main R. equi reservoirs. Except for a few horizontally acquired (HGT pathogenicity loci, including a cytoadhesive pilus determinant (rpl and the virulence plasmid vap pathogenicity island (PAI required for intramacrophage survival, most of the potential virulence-associated genes identified in R. equi are conserved in environmental rhodococci or have homologs in nonpathogenic Actinobacteria. This suggests a mechanism of virulence evolution based on the cooption of existing core actinobacterial traits, triggered by key host niche-adaptive HGT events. We tested this hypothesis by investigating R. equi virulence plasmid-chromosome crosstalk, by global transcription profiling and expression network analysis. Two chromosomal genes conserved in environmental rhodococci, encoding putative chorismate mutase and anthranilate synthase enzymes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly coregulated with vap PAI virulence genes and required for optimal proliferation in macrophages. The regulatory integration of chromosomal metabolic genes under the control of the HGT-acquired plasmid PAI is thus an important element in the cooptive virulence of R. equi.

  10. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant.

  11. Induction of leafy galls in Acacia mearnsii De Wild seedlings infected by Rhodococcus fascians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Quoirin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Plantlets of blackwattle (Acacia mearnsii De Wild were inoculated with the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians and cultured in vitro. Leafy galls appeared at the cotyledonary nodes in 75% of the infected plants. The galls were separated from the plants and cultured on a medium containing three-quarters-strength MS salts (Murashige and Skoog, 1962, MS vitamins, 2% sucrose and an antibiotic (cephalothin, supplemented with or without 0.2% activated charcoal. Histological studies conducted from the sixth to the twenty-second day after plant infection revealed the presence of newly formed meristematic centers, first in the axillary region, then on the petioles and lamina of the leaflets around the apical meristem. Approximately 37% of the galls developed one shoot with both concentrations of cephalothin.Plantas recém germinadas de acácia negra (Acacia mearnsii De Wild. foram inoculadas com a bactéria Rhodococcus fascians e cultivadas in vitro. Galhas cobertas por folhas apareceram na altura do nó cotiledonar em 75% das plantas infectadas. As galhas foram separadas das plantas e cultivadas num meio de cultura contendo os sais do meio MS (Murashige e Skoog, 1962 reduzidos a 3/4, as vitaminas do mesmo meio, 2% de sacarose e um antibiótico (cefalotina, adicionado ou não de 0,2% de carvão ativo. Estudos histológicos realizados entre o sexto e o vigésimo segundo dia depois da inoculação, revelaram a presença de centros meristemáticos novos, primeiro nas regiões axilares, em seguida nos pecíolos e limbos dos folíolos ao redor do meristema apical. Aproximadamente 37% das galhas desenvolveram um broto na presença de cefalotina.

  12. The Genome of a Pathogenic Rhodococcus: Cooptive Virulence Underpinned by Key Gene Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letek, Michal; González, Patricia; MacArthur, Iain; Rodríguez, Héctor; Freeman, Tom C.; Valero-Rello, Ana; Blanco, Mónica; Buckley, Tom; Cherevach, Inna; Fahey, Ruth; Hapeshi, Alexia; Holdstock, Jolyon; Leadon, Desmond; Navas, Jesús; Ocampo, Alain; Quail, Michael A.; Sanders, Mandy; Scortti, Mariela M.; Prescott, John F.; Fogarty, Ursula; Meijer, Wim G.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Vázquez-Boland, José A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the genome of the facultative intracellular parasite Rhodococcus equi, the only animal pathogen within the biotechnologically important actinobacterial genus Rhodococcus. The 5.0-Mb R. equi 103S genome is significantly smaller than those of environmental rhodococci. This is due to genome expansion in nonpathogenic species, via a linear gain of paralogous genes and an accelerated genetic flux, rather than reductive evolution in R. equi. The 103S genome lacks the extensive catabolic and secondary metabolic complement of environmental rhodococci, and it displays unique adaptations for host colonization and competition in the short-chain fatty acid–rich intestine and manure of herbivores—two main R. equi reservoirs. Except for a few horizontally acquired (HGT) pathogenicity loci, including a cytoadhesive pilus determinant (rpl) and the virulence plasmid vap pathogenicity island (PAI) required for intramacrophage survival, most of the potential virulence-associated genes identified in R. equi are conserved in environmental rhodococci or have homologs in nonpathogenic Actinobacteria. This suggests a mechanism of virulence evolution based on the cooption of existing core actinobacterial traits, triggered by key host niche–adaptive HGT events. We tested this hypothesis by investigating R. equi virulence plasmid-chromosome crosstalk, by global transcription profiling and expression network analysis. Two chromosomal genes conserved in environmental rhodococci, encoding putative chorismate mutase and anthranilate synthase enzymes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly coregulated with vap PAI virulence genes and required for optimal proliferation in macrophages. The regulatory integration of chromosomal metabolic genes under the control of the HGT–acquired plasmid PAI is thus an important element in the cooptive virulence of R. equi. PMID:20941392

  13. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Murzin, Alexey G. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Meijer, Wim G. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Wilkinson, Anthony J., E-mail: tony.wilkinson@york.ac.uk [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  14. The genome of a pathogenic rhodococcus: cooptive virulence underpinned by key gene acquisitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Letek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the genome of the facultative intracellular parasite Rhodococcus equi, the only animal pathogen within the biotechnologically important actinobacterial genus Rhodococcus. The 5.0-Mb R. equi 103S genome is significantly smaller than those of environmental rhodococci. This is due to genome expansion in nonpathogenic species, via a linear gain of paralogous genes and an accelerated genetic flux, rather than reductive evolution in R. equi. The 103S genome lacks the extensive catabolic and secondary metabolic complement of environmental rhodococci, and it displays unique adaptations for host colonization and competition in the short-chain fatty acid-rich intestine and manure of herbivores--two main R. equi reservoirs. Except for a few horizontally acquired (HGT pathogenicity loci, including a cytoadhesive pilus determinant (rpl and the virulence plasmid vap pathogenicity island (PAI required for intramacrophage survival, most of the potential virulence-associated genes identified in R. equi are conserved in environmental rhodococci or have homologs in nonpathogenic Actinobacteria. This suggests a mechanism of virulence evolution based on the cooption of existing core actinobacterial traits, triggered by key host niche-adaptive HGT events. We tested this hypothesis by investigating R. equi virulence plasmid-chromosome crosstalk, by global transcription profiling and expression network analysis. Two chromosomal genes conserved in environmental rhodococci, encoding putative chorismate mutase and anthranilate synthase enzymes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly coregulated with vap PAI virulence genes and required for optimal proliferation in macrophages. The regulatory integration of chromosomal metabolic genes under the control of the HGT-acquired plasmid PAI is thus an important element in the cooptive virulence of R. equi.

  15. The hydroxamate siderophore rhequichelin is required for virulence of the pathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Casoluengo, Raúl; Coulson, Garry B; Miranda-Casoluengo, Aleksandra; Vázquez-Boland, José A; Hondalus, Mary K; Meijer, Wim G

    2012-12-01

    We previously showed that the facultative intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi produces a nondiffusible and catecholate-containing siderophore (rhequibactin) involved in iron acquisition during saprophytic growth. Here, we provide evidence that the rhbABCDE cluster directs the biosynthesis of a hydroxamate siderophore, rhequichelin, that plays a key role in virulence. The rhbC gene encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase that is predicted to produce a tetrapeptide consisting of N(5)-formyl-N(5)-hydroxyornithine, serine, N(5)-hydroxyornithine, and N(5)-acyl-N(5)-hydroxyornithine. The other rhb genes encode putative tailoring enzymes mediating modification of ornithine residues incorporated into the hydroxamate product of RhbC. Transcription of rhbC was upregulated during growth in iron-depleted medium, suggesting that it plays a role in iron acquisition. This was confirmed by deletion of rhbCD, rendering the resulting strain R. equi SID2 unable to grow in the presence of the iron chelator 2,2-dipyridyl. Supernatant of the wild-type strain rescued the phenotype of R. equi SID2. The importance of rhequichelin in virulence was highlighted by the rapid increase in transcription levels of rhbC following infection and the inability of R. equi SID2 to grow within macrophages. Unlike the wild-type strain, R. equi SID2 was unable to replicate in vivo and was rapidly cleared from the lungs of infected mice. Rhequichelin is thus a key virulence-associated factor, although nonpathogenic Rhodococcus species also appear to produce rhequichelin or a structurally closely related compound. Rhequichelin biosynthesis may therefore be considered an example of cooption of a core actinobacterial trait in the evolution of R. equi virulence.

  16. Genome-based exploration of the specialized metabolic capacities of the genus Rhodococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceniceros, Ana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Petrusma, Mirjan; Medema, Marnix H

    2017-08-09

    Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus are well known for their ability to degrade a large range of organic compounds. Some rhodococci are free-living, saprophytic bacteria; others are animal and plant pathogens. Recently, several studies have shown that their genomes encode putative pathways for the synthesis of a large number of specialized metabolites that are likely to be involved in microbe-microbe and host-microbe interactions. To systematically explore the specialized metabolic potential of this genus, we here performed a comprehensive analysis of the biosynthetic coding capacity across publicly available rhododoccal genomes, and compared these with those of several Mycobacterium strains as well as that of their mutual close relative Amycolicicoccus subflavus. Comparative genomic analysis shows that most predicted biosynthetic gene cluster families in these strains are clade-specific and lack any homology with gene clusters encoding the production of known natural products. Interestingly, many of these clusters appear to encode the biosynthesis of lipopeptides, which may play key roles in the diverse environments were rhodococci thrive, by acting as biosurfactants, pathogenicity factors or antimicrobials. We also identified several gene cluster families that are universally shared among all three genera, which therefore may have a more 'primary' role in their physiology. Inactivation of these clusters by mutagenesis might help to generate weaker strains that can be used as live vaccines. The genus Rhodococcus thus provides an interesting target for natural product discovery, in view of its large and mostly uncharacterized biosynthetic repertoire, its relatively fast growth and the availability of effective genetic tools for its genomic modification.

  17. Rhodococcus sp.BX2菌对乙腈的降解特性及降解途径研究%Characteristics and pathway of acetonitrile degradation by Rhodococcus sp.BX2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晶; 熊明华; 成小松; 李悦; 臧海莲; 李春艳

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp.BX2菌降解乙腈的特性及其降解途径进行了研究.结果显示,在底物浓度为800mg·L-1,接种量为1.0%,培养温度为35℃,环境pH为7.5的条件下,16h时Rhodococcus sp.BX2菌对乙腈的降解率为95.98%;添加葡萄糖可在培养初期加快Rhodococcus sp.BX2菌的生长和对乙腈的降解,蔗糖、乙酰胺和尿素对其影响不大.将BX2菌接种到含有高乙腈浓度(25000mg·L-1)的合成废水中,培养180h后,乙腈降解率可达88.59%.在催化反应60min后,Rhodococcus sp.BX2腈水合酶与腈水解酶的总酶活可达到422.81U·mL-1,对其相关基因序列的分析结果表明,Rhodococcus sp.BX2中同时存在腈水解酶基因和腈水合酶基因,因此,确定乙腈的降解主要由腈水合酶途径完成,可能同时存在腈水解酶的降解途径.%The characteristics and pathway of acetonitrile degradation by Rhodococcus sp.BX2 were investigated in this study. Results showed that with the initial acetonitrile concentration of 800 mg · L-1, the degradation rate was 95.98% in 16 hours under the condition of inoculum 1.0%, 35 ℃ and pH value 7.5.Glucose could accelerate the degradation of acetonitrile in the initial period, while sucrose, acetamide and urea had slight impact. The degradation rate could reach 88.59% when BX2 was cultured in the synthetic wastewater with high concentration of acetonitrile (25000 mg · L-1) for 180 hours. Total enzyme activities was 422.81 U · mL-1 when incubated for 60 minutes. The results of related genes sequence showed that Rhodococcus sp BX2 had both nitrile hydrolase gene and nitrile hydratase gene. The degradation pathway of acetonitrile by Rhodococcus sp. BX2 was mainly nitrile hydratase (NHase), with possible pathway of the nitrile hydrolase.

  18. Design activities on helical DEMO reactor FFHR-d1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, A., E-mail: sagara.akio@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Goto, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Yanagi, N.; Tanaka, T.; Tamura, H.; Sakamoto, R.; Tanaka, M.; Tsumori, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mitarai, O. [Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Imagawa, S.; Muroga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conceptual design studies of the helical DEMO reactor FFHR-d1 have been conducted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design window analyses with core plasma and engineering designs have been carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer R and Ds on blanket, magnet, tritium control, fuelling and heating systems are discussed. - Abstract: Based on high-density and high-temperature plasma experiments in the large helical device (LHD), conceptual design studies of the LHD-type helical DEMO reactor FFHR-d1 have been conducted by integrating wide-ranged R and D activities on core plasmas and reactor technologies through cooperative researches under the fusion engineering research project, which has been launched newly in NIFS. Current activities for the FFHR-d1 in this project are presented on design window analyses with designs on core plasma, neutronics for liquid blankets, continuous helical magnets, pellet fueling, tritium systems and plasma heating devices.

  19. Anti-atherosclerotic action of vascular D1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Hanehira, T; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1999-04-01

    1. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation are believed to play key roles in atherosclerosis. To elucidate the role of vascular dopamine D1-like (D1 and D5) receptors in atherosclerosis, the effects of dopamine and the specific D1-like receptor agonists SKF 38393 and YM 435 on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-mediated VSMC migration, proliferation and hypertrophy were investigated. 2. We observed that cell stimulated by 5 ng/mL PDGF-BB showed increased migration, proliferation and hypertrophy. These effects were prevented by co-incubation with dopamine, SKF 38393 or YM 435 at 1-10 mumol/L and this prevention was reversed by Sch 23390 (1-10 mumol/L), a specific D1-like receptor antagonist. These actions of D1-like receptor agonists were mimicked by 1-10 mumol/L forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, and 0.1-1 mmol/L 8-bromo-cAMP. The actions were blocked by the specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino) ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulphonamide (H 89), but were not blocked by its negative control N-[2-(N-formyl-p-chlorocinnamylamino) ethyl]-5-isoquinoline sulphonamide (H 85). Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (5 ng/mL)-mediated activation of phospholipase D (PLD), protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity was significantly suppressed by co-incubation with dopamine. 3. These results suggest that vascular D1-like receptor agonists inhibit migration, proliferation and hypertrophy of VSMC, possibly through the activation of PKA and the suppression of activated PLD, PKC and MAPK activity.

  20. Inducing Expression and Reaction Characteristic of Nitrile Hydratase from Rhodococcus sp. SHZ-1%Rhodococcus sp.SHZ-1腈水合酶的诱导表达和稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王超; 张根林; 徐小琳; 李春

    2007-01-01

    Inducing expression and the reaction characteristic of nitrile hydratase (NHase) from Rhodococcus sp.SHZ-1 were investigated. The results showed that the expression of NHase was greatly enhanced with the cooperation of acrylonitrile and ammonium chloride as inducer in the medium and the specific activity of NHase was increased of 44%. Then the temperature, pH, concentration of acrylonitrile and acrylamide were evaluated, which affected the activity and reaction characteristic of NHase. It was found that the temperature and concentration of acrylamide were the most important factors for the catalyzation of NHase. The optimal catalysis temperature of NHase from Rhodococcus sp. SHZ-1 was 30℃, and the activation energy of the hydration of NHase was 90.2kJ·mol-1 in the temperature range from 5℃ to 30℃. Km of NHase was 0.095mol.L-1 using acrylonitrile(AN)as substrate, and NHase activity was inhibited seriously when acrylonitrile concentration was up to 40g·L-1, the substrate inhibition constant Ki is 0.283mol·L-1. Moreover, the NHase from Rhodococcus sp. SHZ-1 had very strong tolerance to acrylamide, in which the final concentration of acrylamide reached to 642g·L-1 and the residual activity of NHase still maintained 8.6% of the initial enzyme activity.

  1. [Effects of nitriles and amides on the growth and the nitrile hydratase activity of the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A Iu; Kuznetsova, M V; Ovechkina, G V; Kozlov, S V; Maksimova, Iu G; Demakov, V A

    2003-01-01

    Effects of some nitriles and amides, as well as glucose and ammonium, on the growth and the nitrile hydratase (EC 4.2.1.84) activity of the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1 isolated from soil were studied. The activity of nitrile hydratase mainly depended on carbon and nitrogen supply to cells. The activity of nitrile hydratase was high in the presence of glucose and ammonium at medium concentrations and decreased at concentrations of glucose more than 0.3%. Saturated unsubstituted aliphatic nitriles and amides were found to be a good source of nitrogen and carbon. However, the presence of nitriles and amides in the medium was not absolutely necessary for the expression of the activity of nitrile hydratase isolated from the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1.

  2. In adult female hamsters hypothyroidism stimulates D1 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D1 receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroidism affects cardiopulmonary regulation and function of dopaminergic receptors. Here we evaluated effects of 5 months of hypothyroidism on dopamine D1 receptor modulation of breathing in female hamsters using a D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Euthyroid hamsters (EH) served as controls. Results indicated that hypothyroid female hamsters (HH) exhibited decreased body weights and minute ventilation (VE) following hypoxia due to decreased frequency of breathing (F). Moreover, SCH 23390 administration in HH increased VE by increasing tidal volume during exposure to air, hypoxia and following hypoxia. Relative to vehicle, SCH 23390 treatment decreased body temperature and hypoxic VE responsiveness in both groups. In EH, SCH 23390 decreased F in air, hypoxia and post hypoxia, and VE during hypoxia trended to decrease (P=0.053). Finally, expression of D1 receptor protein was not different between the two groups in any region evaluated. Thus, hypothyroidism in older female hamsters affected D1 receptor modulation of ventilation differently relative to euthyroid animals, but not expression of D1 receptors.

  3. Isolation and identification of berberine and berberrubine metabolites by berberine-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Takeda, Hisashi; Wakana, Daigo; Sato, Fumihiko; Hosoe, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the finding of a novel berberine (BBR)-utilizing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100, we investigated the degradation of BBR and its analog berberrubine (BRU). Resting cells of BD7100 demethylenated BBR and BRU, yielding benzeneacetic acid analogs. Isolation of benzeneacetic acid analogs suggested that BD7100 degraded the isoquinoline ring of the protoberberine skeleton. This work represents the first report of cleavage of protoberberine skeleton by a microorganism.

  4. Infecção por Rhodococcus em doente imunocompetente - a propósito de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O Rhodococcus equi raramente causa infecção no humano, sendo que a maioria dos casos descritos estão associados a doentes imunodeprimidos. Os autores apresentam o caso de um homem de 65 anos que foi admitido no serviço de urgência por agravamento da dispneia habitual, tosse e febre. Foi internado com o diagnóstico de sépsis com ponto de partida respiratório em pneumonia de focos múltiplos e peritonite. Medicado empiricamente com ceftriaxone, com melhoria clínica. Isolamento no líquido ascítico de Rhodococcus spp. Cumpriu 2 meses de antibioterapia com doxiciclina, com boa evolução clínica, analítica e radiológica. Os autores apresentam este caso dada a raridade da situação e pretendem realçar a necessidade de um elevado índice de suspeição para o diagnóstico da infecção por este agente em doentes imunocompetentes. Abstract: Rhodococcus equi rarely causes human infection, and most of the described cases are associated with immunosuppressed patients. The authors present a 65-year-old man who was admitted to the emergency department with worsening of dyspnoea, cough and fever. He was admitted with a diagnosis of sepsis with respiratory starting point in multiple foci pneumonia and peritonitis. He was medicated empirically with ceftriaxone, with clinical improvement. Isolation in the ascites fluid of Rhodococcus spp. He completed two months of antibiotic treatment with doxycycline, with clinical, analytical and radiological improvement. The authors present this case due to the rarity of the situation and highlight the need for a high index of suspicion for the infection diagnosis by this agent in immunocompetent patients.

  5. Identificação diferencial de Rhodococcus equi e Dietzia maris em bubalinos Differential identification of Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia maris in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Viana

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados 24 isolados bacterianos oriundos de leite e pele de búfalas (Bubalus bubalis, os quais foram previamente identificados como Rhodococcus equi com o auxílio de fenotipia concisa. Testes fenotípicos complementares e ferramentas moleculares foram utilizados com o objetivo de caracterizar esses isolados, bem como diferenciá-los de outros microrganismos intimamente relacionados. Observaram-se três fenótipos distintos, porém a identificação dos isolados foi inconclusiva. Apenas um dos isolados foi comprovado como sendo R. equi com a realização da PCR espécie-específica, sequenciamento e análise dos fragmentos de DNA. Os demais isolados só foram identificados pelo sequenciamento de fragmento do gene que codifica a região 16S do rRNA universal de bactérias, indicando tratar-se de Dietzia maris. O perfil de susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos revelou maior resistência dos isolados de D. maris para oxacilina (96% e rifampicina (87%. O isolado de R. equi apresentou resistência à amicacina, oxacilina, penicilina, rifampicina e tetraciclina. Alerta-se para o risco da incorreta identificação dos isolados baseados em testes fenotípicos concisos e para a necessidade de utilização de testes complementares para diferenciação entre R. equi e D. maris.Twenty-four bacterial isolates from milk and skin of buffalo females (Bubalus bubalis, which previously had been identified as Rhodococcus equi by using a restricted number of phenotypical tests for bacterial characterization, were analyzed. The goal of this study was to perform the characterization of these isolates, as well as the differentiation of other microorganisms closely related by using additional phenotypical tests and molecular tools. Based on the phenotypical results, three different biotypes were obtained. However, the identification of the isolates was inconclusive. Only one of the isolates was confirmed as R. equi by the PCR specifically for this species, as

  6. Analysis and optimization of triacylglycerol synthesis in novel oleaginous Rhodococcus and Streptomyces strains isolated from desert soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttig, Annika; Hauschild, Philippa; Madkour, Mohamed H; Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Almakishah, Naief H; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-05-10

    As oleaginous microorganisms represent an upcoming novel feedstock for the biotechnological production of lipids or lipid-derived biofuels, we searched for novel, lipid-producing strains in desert soil. This was encouraged by the hypothesis that neutral lipids represent an ideal storage compound, especially under arid conditions, as several animals are known to outlast long periods in absence of drinking water by metabolizing their body fat. Ten lipid-accumulating bacterial strains, affiliated to the genera Bacillus, Cupriavidus, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces, were isolated from arid desert soil due to their ability to synthesize poly(β-hydroxybutyrate), triacylglycerols or wax esters. Particularly two Streptomyces sp. strains and one Rhodococcus sp. strain accumulate significant amounts of TAG under storage conditions under optimized cultivation conditions. Rhodococcus sp. A27 and Streptomyces sp. G49 synthesized approx. 30% (w/w) fatty acids from fructose or cellobiose, respectively, while Streptomyces isolate G25 reached a cellular fatty acid content of nearly 50% (w/w) when cultivated with cellobiose. The stored triacylglycerols were composed of 30-40% branched fatty acids, such as anteiso-pentadecanoic or iso-hexadecanoic acid. To date, this represents by far the highest lipid content described for streptomycetes. A biotechnological production of such lipids using (hemi)cellulose-derived raw material could be used to obtain sustainable biodiesel with a high proportion of branched-chain fatty acids to improve its cold-flow properties and oxidative stability.

  7. On the D1-D5 conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert

    2000-03-01

    I give a review of some aspects of the D1-D5 conformal field theory that is dual to string theory on AdS 3 . Particular attention is paid to the gravitational interpretation of the elliptic genus as a sum over 3-manifolds.

  8. 17 CFR 270.35d-1 - Investment company names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Investment company names. 270... (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.35d-1 Investment company names. (a... words “United States” or “U.S. government.” (2) Names suggesting investment in certain investments...

  9. 26 CFR 31.3231(d)-1 - Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Railroad Retirement Tax Act (Chapter 22, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3231(d)-1 Service....

  10. Underground storage tank 511-D1U1 closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains the closure plan for diesel fuel underground storage tank 511-D1U1 and appendices containing supplemental information such as staff training certification and task summaries. Precision tank test data, a site health and safety plan, and material safety data sheets are also included.

  11. Prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is required for temporal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Land, Benjamin B; Solder, John E; Deisseroth, Karl; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2012-12-11

    Temporal control, or how organisms guide movements in time to achieve behavioral goals, depends on dopamine signaling. The medial prefrontal cortex controls many goal-directed behaviors and receives dopaminergic input primarily from the midbrain ventral tegmental area. However, this system has never been linked with temporal control. Here, we test the hypothesis that dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area to the prefrontal cortex influence temporal control. Rodents were trained to perform a fixed-interval timing task with an interval of 20 s. We report several results: first, that decreasing dopaminergic neurotransmission using virally mediated RNA interference of tyrosine hydroxylase impaired temporal control, and second that pharmacological disruption of prefrontal D1 dopamine receptors, but not D2 dopamine receptors, impaired temporal control. We then used optogenetics to specifically and selectively manipulate prefrontal neurons expressing D1 dopamine receptors during fixed-interval timing performance. Selective inhibition of D1-expressing prefrontal neurons impaired fixed-interval timing, whereas stimulation made animals more efficient during task performance. These data provide evidence that ventral tegmental dopaminergic projections to the prefrontal cortex influence temporal control via D1 receptors. The results identify a critical circuit for temporal control of behavior that could serve as a target for the treatment of dopaminergic diseases.

  12. Rescue of cyclin D1 deficiency by knockin cyclin E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, Y.; Whoriskey, W.; Park, M.Y.; Bronson, R.T.; Medema, R.H.; Li, T.; Weinberg, R.A.; Sicinski, P.

    1999-01-01

    D-type cyclins and cyclin E represent two very distinct classes of mammalian G1 cyclins. We have generated a mouse strain in which the coding sequences of the cyclin D1 gene (Ccnd1) have been deleted and replaced by those of human cyclin E (CCNE). In the tissues and cells of these mice, the expressi

  13. Electrified Fluctuations in D1$\\bot$D3 and D1$\\bot$D5 Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Douari, Jamila

    2008-01-01

    We present the physical phenomenon of the subject discussed in the paper \\cite{fluc}. In that paper we dealt with the fluctuations of funnel solutions of intersecting D1 and D3 branes and the electric field $E$ was considered as very high value causing the results to be non-physical. In the present work, the variation interval of $E$ is to be $[0,\\frac{1}{\\lambda}[$. Then, we extend the study to discuss the overall transverse fluctuations of electrified funnel solutions of D1$\\bot$D5 system in the flat background. The boundary conditions are found to be Neumann boundary conditions.

  14. Rhodococcus equi: sorologia e avaliação da transferência passiva de anticorpos para potros Rhodococcus equi: serology and evaluation of passive antibody transference to foals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lazzari

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando esclarecer alguns aspectos relacionados à sorologia e a transferência passiva de anticorpos contra o Rhodococcus equi em potros, foram testadas pela técnica de imunodifusão em gel de ágar (IDGA amostras de soro e colostro de duas populações distintas de eqüinos. A primeira população era constituída por 59 potros e suas mães, de um haras onde não se efetuava a vacinação contra esta bactéria. Do total de potros. 32,2% (19/59 mostraram anticorpos contra este agente. No colostro foram detectados anticorpos em 30,5% (18/59 das amostras, entretanto, não se observou transferência passiva de anticorpos. A segunda população, constituída por 12 éguas prenhas, foi submetida à vacinação contra o Rhodococcus equi, sendo testados soro e colostro das éguas e soro de seus respectivos potros. Antes da vacinação todas as fêmeas mostraram-se soronegativas. Após, 91,6% (11/12 foram positivas ao teste de IDGA. Nas amostras de colostro e soro dos potros, os percentuais de positividade foram de 75% (9/12 e 66,7% (8/12, respectivamente. Observou-se a transferência passiva de anticorpos para os potros, tendo esta, relação com a ingestão de colostro positivo.Two equine populations were evaluated in relation to serology and passive antibodies against Rhodococcus equi. The first population had 59 foals with no history of mare vaccination against Rhodococcus equi. The foals sera samples and the mare colostrum were examined with the agar gel immunodiffusion test. Antibodies were detected in 32.2% of the foals and also 30.5% (18/59 of colostrum samples examined. However, no passive antibody transfer was observed. The second population, 12 pregnant mares were vaccinated against Rhodococcus equi. Before the vaccination, all mares were seronegative. After vaccination, 91.6% (11/12 of the vaccinated mares were positive on the serologic test. In mare colostrum and foals sera, positive results were 75% (9/12 and 66.7% (8/12 respectively

  15. D1-D5-P microstates at the cap

    CERN Document Server

    Giusto, Stefano; Mathur, Samir D; Turton, David

    2012-01-01

    The geometries describing D1-D5-P bound states in string theory have three regions: flat asymptotics, an anti-de Sitter throat, and a 'cap' region at the bottom of the throat. We identify the CFT description of a known class of supersymmetric D1-D5-P microstate geometries which describe degrees of freedom in the cap region. The class includes both regular solutions and solutions with conical defects, and generalizes configurations with known CFT descriptions: a parameter related to spectral flow in the CFT is generalized from integer to fractional values. We provide strong evidence for this identification by comparing the massless scalar excitation spectrum between gravity and CFT and finding exact agreement.

  16. New D1-D5-P geometries from string amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Giusto, Stefano; Turton, David

    2011-01-01

    We derive the long range supergravity fields sourced by a D1-D5-P bound state from disk amplitudes for massless closed string emission. We suggest that since the parameter controlling the string perturbation expansion for this calculation decreases with distance from the bound state, the resulting asymptotic fields are valid even in the regime of parameters in which there is a classical black hole solution with the same charges. The supergravity fields differ from the black hole solution by multipole moments and are more general than those contained within known classes of solutions in the literature, whilst still preserving four supersymmetries. Our results support the conjecture that the black hole solution should be interpreted as a coarse-grained description rather than an exact description of the gravitational field sourced by D1-D5-P bound states in this regime of parameters.

  17. Vacuum polarization in $d+{1/2}$ dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Fosco, C D; Roditi, I

    2004-01-01

    We study the main properties of the one-loop vacuum polarization function ($\\Pi_{\\alpha \\beta}$) for spinor $QED$ in `$d + {1/2}$ dimensions', i.e., with fields defined on ${\\mathcal M} \\subset {\\mathbb R}^{d+1}$ such that ${\\mathcal M} = \\{(x_0,...,x_d) | x_{d}\\geq 0 \\}$, with bag-like boundary conditions on the boundary $\\partial{\\mathcal M} = \\{(x_0,...,x_d) | x_{d}= 0 \\}$. We obtain an exact expression for the induced current due to an external constant electric field normal to the boundary. We show that, for the particular case of 2+1 dimensions, there is a transverse component for the induced current, which is localized on a region close to $\\partial{\\mathcal M}$. This current is a parity breaking effect purely due to the boundary.

  18. Influence of Plasmid Type on the Replication of Rhodococcus equi in Host Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Hondalus, Mary K

    2016-01-01

    The soil-dwelling, saprophytic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi is a multihost, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages. When inhaled by susceptible foals, it causes severe bronchopneumonia. It is also a pathogen of pigs, which may develop submaxillary lymphadenitis upon exposure. R. equi isolates obtained from foals and pigs possess conjugative plasmids housing a pathogenicity island (PAI) containing a novel family of genes of unknown function called the virulence-associated protein or vap family. The PAI regions of the equine and swine plasmids differ in vap gene composition, with equine isolates possessing six vap genes, including the major virulence determinant vapA, while the PAIs of swine isolates house vapB and five other unique vap genes. Possession of the pVAPA-type virulence plasmid by equine isolates bestows the capacity for intramacrophage replication essential for disease development in vivo. Swine isolates of R. equi are largely unstudied. Here, we show that R. equi isolates from pigs, carrying pVAPB-type plasmids, are able to replicate in a plasmid-dependent manner in macrophages obtained from a variety of species (murine, swine, and equine) and anatomical locations. Similarly, equine isolates carrying pVAPA-type plasmids are capable of replication in swine macrophages. Plasmid swapping between equine and swine strains through conjugation did not alter the intracellular replication capacity of the parental strain, indicating that coevolution of the plasmid and chromosome is not crucial for this attribute. These results demonstrate that while distinct plasmid types exist among R. equi isolates obtained from equine and swine sources, this tropism is not determined by host species-specific intramacrophage replication capabilities. IMPORTANCE This work greatly advances our understanding of the opportunistic pathogen Rhodococcus equi, a disease agent of animals and immunocompromised people. Clinical isolates from diseased foals carry a

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09946-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 2e-18 AM946017_8( AM946017 |pid:none) Rhodococcus erythropolis aldoxime ... 96 2e-18 AB105912_8( AB105912 ...|pid:none) Rhodococcus globerulus aldoxime me... 96 2e-18 AJ278349_4( AJ278349 |p

  20. Evaluation of D-1 tape and cassette characteristics: Moisture content of Sony and Ampex D-1 tapes when delivered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Gary

    Commercial D-1 cassette tapes and their associated recorders were designed to operate in broadcast studios and record in accordance with the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) 607 digital video standards. The D-1 recorder resulted in the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) standards 224 to 228 and is the first digital video recorder to be standardized for the broadcast industry. The D-1 cassette and associated media are currently marketed for broadcast use. The recorder was redesigned for data applications and is in the early stages of being evaluated. The digital data formats used are specified in MIL-STD-2179 and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) X3.175-190 standard. In early 1990, the National Media Laboratory (NML) was asked to study the effects of time, temperature, and relative humidity on commercial D-1 cassettes. The environmental range to be studied was the one selected for the Advanced Tactical Air Reconnaissance System (ATARS) program. Several discussions between NML personnel, ATARS representatives, recorder contractors, and other interested parties were held to decide upon the experimental plan to be implemented. Review meetings were held periodically during the course of the experiment. The experiments were designed to determine the dimensional stability of the media and cassette since this is one of the major limiting factors of helical recorders when the media or recorders are subjected to non-broadcasting environments. Measurements were also made to characterize each sample of cassettes to give preliminary information on which purchase specifications could be developed. The actual tests performed on the cassettes and media before and after aging fall into the general categories listed.

  1. Prevalence and Antibiogram study of Rhodococcus equi in equines of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Irfan Ahmad; Kumar, Bablu; Taku, Anil; Bhardwaj, Rajinder Kumar; Bhat, Mohd Altaf; Badroo, Gulzar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Rhodococcus equi infection in equines of Jammu and Kashmir, India, and evaluate the zoonotic threat posed by this organism to equine owners and tourists. One hundred and forty-one samples (98 samples from adult animals ≥5 years old and 43 samples from foals less than 6 months old) were collected in duplicate from nasopharyngeal tract of equines for isolation and direct PCR. A total of 12 isolates of R. equi were recovered, of which 9 were from foals and 3 from adult animals. Therefore, the present study recorded prevalence rates of 20.93% and 3.06% among foals and adult equines respectively. The prevalence rates were found to be 25.58% and 4.08% by 16S rRNA species-specific PCR among foals and adult animals respectively. Thus, the PCR-based assay was found to be more sensitive and helped in quick detection of R. equi than the culture based method which is time consuming and laborious. However, the culture-based method is still preferred due to some limitations of PCR. The antibiogram of the isolates revealed that erythromycin and rifampicin were the most effective antimicrobials with 100% sensitivity, followed by amoxicillin (66.67%), lincomycin (58.3%) and kanamycin (58.3%). The results also revealed that resistance was highest for penicillin G (50%), followed by kanamycin (25%) and streptomycin (25%).

  2. Engineering L-arabinose metabolism in triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus for lignocellulosic fuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiko; Plassmeier, Jens; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Advanced biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass have been considered as a potential solution for the issues of energy sustainability and environmental protection. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are potential precursors for the production of lipid-based liquid biofuels. Rhodococcus opacus PD630 can accumulate large amounts of TAGs when grown under physiological conditions of high carbon and low nitrogen. However, R. opacus PD630 does not utilize the sugar L-arabinose present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, we report the engineering of R. opacus to produce TAGs on L-arabinose. We constructed a plasmid (pASC8057) harboring araB, araD and araA genes derived from a Streptomyces bacterium, and introduced the genes into R. opacus PD630. One of the engineered strains, MITAE-348, was capable of growing on high concentrations (up to 100 g/L) of L-arabinose. MITAE-348 was grown in a defined medium containing 16 g/L L-arabinose or a mixture of 8 g/L L-arabinose and 8 g/L D-glucose. In a stationary phase occurring 3 days post-inoculation, the strain was able to completely utilize the sugar, and yielded 2.0 g/L for L-arabinose and 2.2 g/L for L-arabinose/D-glucose of TAGs, corresponding to 39.7% or 42.0%, respectively, of the cell dry weight.

  3. Rhodococcus equi infection in HIV-positive subjects: a retrospective analysis of 24 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlotti, M; Zoboli, G; Moscatelli, G L; Magnani, G; Maserati, R; Borghi, V; Andreoni, M; Libanore, M; Bonazzi, L; Piscina, A; Ciammarughi, R

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes a rare infection in immunocompromised hosts. We describe 24 cases of infection in patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Pneumonia was always the first manifestation of R. equi infection, but extrapulmonary involvement was also observed. The main sources of bacteria were sputum, bronchial washings and blood. The strains isolated were mainly susceptible to erythromycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, rifampicin, imipenem and aminoglycosides. Initial treatment should involve an intravenously administered antibiotic combination therapy including imipenem or vancomycin or teicoplanin, followed by orally administered maintenance combination therapy. Drug combinations should be investigated for serum bactericidal activity in vitro. Surgery does not increase survival time and should only be performed in cases that do not respond to antibiotic treatment. Presumptive risks of infection (contact with horses or farm dust, or cohabiting with people affected by R. equi infection) were present in more than 50% of patients. This finding, and the frequency of bacteria in the sputum, are not sufficient proof of transmission between humans, but do suggest the need for respiratory isolation of patients affected by R. equi pneumonia.

  4. Evaluation of the Conformational Stability of Recombinant Desulfurizing Enzymes from a Newly Isolated Rhodococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravicini, Federica; Brocca, Stefania; Lotti, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways of aerobic bacteria able to assimilate sulfur can provide biocatalysts for biodesulfurization of petroleum and of other sulfur-containing pollutants. Of major interest is the so-called "4S pathway," in that C-S bonds are specifically cleaved leaving the carbon skeleton of substrates intact. This pathway is carried out by four enzymes, named Dsz A, B, C, and D. In view of a possible application of recombinant Dsz enzymes in biodesulfurization treatments, we have investigated the structural features of enzymes cloned from a Rhodococcus strain isolated from polluted environmental samples and their resistance to temperature (20-95 °C) and to organic solvents (5, 10, and 20 % v/v methanol, acetonitrile, hexane, and toluene). Changes in protein structures were assessed by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that all Dsz proteins are unfolded by temperatures in the range 45-60 °C and by all solvents tested, with the most dramatic effect being produced by toluene. These results suggest that stabilization of the biocatalysts by protein engineering will be necessary for developing biodesulfurization technologies based on Dsz enzymes.

  5. Enzymatic degradation of aliphatic nitriles by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2, a versatile nitrile-degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shumei; An, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yi; Hou, Ning; Feng, Lu; Huang, Xinning; Li, Chunyan

    2015-06-01

    Nitriles are common environmental pollutants, and their removal has attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be the most acceptable method for removal. In this work, we investigated the biodegradation of three aliphatic nitriles (acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and crotononitrile) by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 and the expression of their corresponding metabolic enzymes. This organism can utilize all three aliphatic nitriles as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, resulting in the complete degradation of these compounds. The degradation kinetics were described using a first-order model. The degradation efficiency was ranked according to t1/2 as follows: acetonitrile>trans-crotononitrile>acrylonitrile>cis-crotononitrile. Only ammonia accumulated following the three nitriles degradation, while amides and carboxylic acids were transient and disappeared by the end of the assay. mRNA expression and enzyme activity indicated that the tested aliphatic nitriles were degraded via both the inducible NHase/amidase and the constitutive nitrilase pathways, with the former most likely preferred. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferretti Francesca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection.

  7. Rhodococcus sp. Q5, a novel agarolytic bacterium isolated from printing and dyeing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zehua; Peng, Lin; Chen, Mei; Li, Mengying

    2012-09-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. Q5, was isolated from printing and dyeing wastewater using a mineral salts agar plate containing agar as the sole carbon source. The bacterium grew from pH 4.0 to 9.0, from 15 to 35°C, and in NaCl concentrations of 0-5 %; optimal values were pH 6.0, 30°C, and 1 % NaCl. Maximal agarase production was observed at pH 6.0 and 30°C. The bacterium did not require NaCl for growth or agarase production. The agarase secreted by Q5 was inducible by agar and was repressed by all simple sugars tested except lactose. Strain Q5 could hydrolyze starch but not cellulose or carboxymethyl cellulose. Agarase activity could also be detected in the medium when lactose or starch was the sole source of carbon and energy. Strain Q5 could grow in nitrogen-free mineral media; an organic nitrogen source was more effective than inorganic carbon sources for growth and agarase production. Addition of more organic nitrogen (peptone) to the medium corresponded with reduced agarase activity.

  8. Transcriptional Response of Rhodococcus aetherivorans I24 to Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Contaminated Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Puglisi, Edoardo

    2010-04-06

    We used a microarray targeting 3,524 genes to assess the transcriptional response of the actinomycete Rhodococcus aetherivorans I24 in minimal medium supplemented with various substrates (e. g., PCBs) and in both PCB-contaminated and non-contaminated sediment slurries. Relative to the reference condition (minimal medium supplemented with glucose), 408 genes were upregulated in the various treatments. In medium and in sediment, PCBs elicited the upregulation of a common set of 100 genes, including gene-encoding chaperones (groEL), a superoxide dismutase (sodA), alkyl hydroperoxide reductase protein C (ahpC), and a catalase/peroxidase (katG). Analysis of the R. aetherivorans I24 genome sequence identified orthologs of many of the genes in the canonical biphenyl pathway, but very few of these genes were upregulated in response to PCBs or biphenyl. This study is one of the first to use microarrays to assess the transcriptional response of a soil bacterium to a pollutant under conditions that more closely resemble the natural environment. Our results indicate that the transcriptional response of R. aetherivorans I24 to PCBs, in both medium and sediment, is primarily directed towards reducing oxidative stress, rather than catabolism. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. Effect of proteases on biofilm formation of the plastic-degrading actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber C208.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilan, Irit; Sivan, Alex

    2013-05-01

    In most habitats, the vast majority of microbial populations form biofilms on solid surfaces, whether natural or artificial. These biofilms provide either increased physical support and/or a source of nutrients. Further modifications and development of biofilms are regulated by signal molecules secreted by the cells. Because synthetic polymers are not soluble in aqueous solutions, biofilm-producing bacteria may biodegrade such materials more efficiently than planktonic strains. Bacterial biofilms comprise bacterial cells embedded in self-secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Revealing the roles of each component of the EPS will enable further insight into biofilm development and the EPS structure-function relationship. A strain of Rhodococcus ruber (C208) displayed high hydrophobicity and formed a dense biofilm on the surface of polyethylene films while utilizing the polyolefin as carbon and energy sources. This study investigated the effects of several proteases on C208 biofilm formation and stability. The proteolysis of C208 biofilm gave conflicting results. Trypsin significantly reduced biofilm formation, and the resultant biofilm appeared monolayered. In contrast, proteinase K enhanced biofilm formation, which was robust and multilayered. Presumably, proteinase K degraded self-secreted proteases or quorum-sensing peptides, which may be involved in biofilm detachment processes, leading to a multilayered, nondispersed biofilm.

  10. Emulsification of crude oil by an alkane-oxidizing Rhodococcus species isolated from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredholt, H.; Bruheim, P.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Scince and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Josefsen, K.; Vatland, A. [SINTEF SI, Oslo (Norway). Industrial Chemistry Div.

    1998-04-01

    A Rhodococcus species, which has proven to be the best of 99 oil-emulsifying bacteria isolated from seawater, was characterized. This bacterium produced very stable oil-in-water emulsions from different crude oils with various content of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, by utilizing C{sub 1}1 and C{sub 3}3 n-alkanes as carbon and energy sources. Bacteria that produce stable emulsions are often able to adhere strongly to hydrocarbons or hydrophobic surfaces. It was at these surfaces that extensive emulsification of the residual oil and accumulation of acidic oxidation products occurred. The acidic products were consumed in a second step. This step was characterized by linear growth and an increasing number of cells growing in the water phase. The most extensive emulsification occurred at the end of the exponential phase. There was no evidence of surfactants at the end of the exponential phase, however, a polymeric compound with emulsifying activity, tightly bound to the oil droplets, was isolated, suggesting that the emulsification resulted from the release of the hydrophobic cell surface discarded during growth limitations. 38 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Identification of novel extracellular protein for PCB/biphenyl metabolism in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atago, Yuki; Shimodaira, Jun; Araki, Naoto; Bin Othman, Nor'azizi; Zakaria, Zuriati; Fukuda, Masao; Futami, Junichiro; Hara, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (RHA1) degrades polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) via co-metabolism with biphenyl. To identify the novel open reading frames (ORFs) that contribute to PCB/biphenyl metabolism in RHA1, we compared chromatin immunoprecipitation chip and transcriptomic data. Six novel ORFs involved in PCB/biphenyl metabolism were identified. Gene deletion mutants of these 6 ORFs were made and were tested for their ability to grow on biphenyl. Interestingly, only the ro10225 deletion mutant showed deficient growth on biphenyl. Analysis of Ro10225 protein function showed that growth of the ro10225 deletion mutant on biphenyl was recovered when exogenous recombinant Ro10225 protein was added to the culture medium. Although Ro10225 protein has no putative secretion signal sequence, partially degraded Ro10225 protein was detected in conditioned medium from wild-type RHA1 grown on biphenyl. This Ro10225 fragment appeared to form a complex with another PCB/biphenyl oxidation enzyme. These results indicated that Ro10225 protein is essential for the formation of the PCB/biphenyl dioxygenase complex in RHA1.

  12. High-level expression in Corynebacterium glutamicum of nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous for acrylamide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Suk; Han, Sang-Soo; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Bu-Youn; Huh, Jong-Pil; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-01

    The nhhBAG gene of Rhodococcus rhodochrous M33 that encodes nitrile hydratase (NHase), converting acrylonitrile into acrylamide, was cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum under the control of an ilvC promoter. The specific enzyme activity in recombinant C. glutamicum cells was about 13.6 μmol/min/mg dry cell weight (DCW). To overexpress the NHase, five types of plasmid variants were constructed by introducing mutations into 80 nucleotides near the translational initiation region (TIR) of nhhB. Of them, pNBM4 with seven mutations showed the highest NHase activity, exhibiting higher expression levels of NhhB and NhhA than wild-type pNBW33, mainly owing to decreased secondary-structure stability and an introduction of a conserved Shine-Dalgarno sequence in the translational initiation region. In a fed-batch culture of recombinant Corynebacterium cells harboring pNBM4, the cell density reached 53.4 g DCW/L within 18 h, and the specific and total enzyme activities were estimated to be 37.3 μmol/min/mg DCW and 1,992 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The use of recombinant Corynebacterium cells for the production of acrylamide from acrylonitrile resulted in a conversion yield of 93 % and a final acrylamide concentration of 42.5 % within 6 h when the total amount of fed acrylonitrile was 456 g.

  13. Removal of o-xylene using biofilter inoculated with Rhodococcus sp. BTO62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Euisoon; Hirai, Mitsuyo; Shoda, Makoto

    2008-03-21

    Rhodococcus sp. BTO62 was isolated from activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant as an o-xylene-degrading microorganism. BOT62 degraded not only o-xylene, but also benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylenes and styrene (BTEXS). A laboratory scale biofilter packed with Biosol as packing material, which is made from foamed waste glass mixed with corrugated cardboard, was inoculated with strain BTO62 and operated to remove relatively high loading of o-xylene at different space velocities under non-sterile and sterile conditions. The o-xylene elimination capacity to maintain more than 90% removal efficiency was 41g/m3/h under sterile condition, but it enhanced to 160g/m3/h under non-sterile condition. This indicates possibilities of the role of other contaminants for degradation of o-xylene and the degradation of intermediate products of o-xylene by contaminants. Quick recovery of o-xylene degradation was observed after shutdown of o-xylene gas supply and mineral medium circulation for 10-30 days.

  14. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages.

  15. [Rhodococcus equi infection in AIDS patients: retrospective analysis of 13 patients in Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Marcelo; Solari, Rubén; De Carolis, Luis; Palmieri, Omar; Rollet, Raquel; Shah, Haroun N

    2014-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram positive coccoid rod that causes pulmonary infections in immunosuppressed patients. We retrospectively analyzed epidemiological, clinical, microbiological, radiological, and immunological features as well as the outcomes of 13 AIDS patients with R. equi infection. Between January 1994 and December 2012, 13 patients attending the AIDS department of the Infectious Diseases reference hospital in Buenos Aires were diagnosed with R. equi infection. All were men, the median age was 27 years. At the time of diagnosis, the median of CD4+ T cell counts was 11 cells/μl Twelve patients presented pulmonary disease with isolation of the microorganism from sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage; in the other patient the diagnosis was postmortem with positive culture of cerebrospinal fluid. The most frequent clinical manifestations were fever, haemoptysis, and weight loss. The predominant radiological finding was lobe consolidation with cavitation. Nine patients died after a median survival of 5.5 months. In all of them, cultures persisted positive until the last admission. The other 4 patients did continue clinical follow-ups. The insidious course of R. equi disease and the difficulties in the isolation of the microorganism contribute to the delay in the diagnosis and to the high mortality rate of this opportunistic infection.

  16. Immunogenicity of an electron beam inactivated Rhodococcus equi vaccine in neonatal foals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela I Bordin

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi. No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals.

  17. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for detecting virulent Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuta; Niwa, Hidekazu; Higuchi, Tohru; Katayama, Yoshinari

    2016-09-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the most important causative bacterium of severe pneumonia in foals. We report herein the development of a specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, which targets a gene encoding vapA for detecting virulent R. equi The detection limit of the LAMP assay was 10(4) colony forming units (CFU)/mL, which was equal to 10 CFU/reaction. The clinical efficacy of the LAMP assay was compared with those of 2 published PCR-based methods: nested PCR and quantitative real-time (q)PCR. Agreements between bacterial culture, which is the gold standard for detection of R. equi, and each of the 3 molecular tests were measured by calculating a kappa coefficient. The kappa coefficients of the LAMP (0.760), nested PCR (0.583), and qPCR (0.888) indicated substantial agreement, moderate agreement, and almost perfect agreement, respectively. Although the clinical efficacy of LAMP was not the best among the 3 methods tested, LAMP could be more easily introduced into less well-equipped clinics because it does not require special equipment (such as a thermocycler) for gene amplification. Veterinary practitioners could diagnose R. equi pneumonia more quickly by using LAMP and could use the results to select an appropriate initial treatment. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Biofilm formation by Rhodococcus equi and putative association with macrolide resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia T. Gressler

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen, which cause severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and tuberculosis-like lesions in humans. Its ability to form biofilm was described in strains isolated from chronic diseases associated to treatment failures in humans. This study aimed to verify the biofilm formation by 113 R. equi isolated from equine samples (clinical and fecal using two different methods (biofilm-culturing with and without additional glucose and epifluorescence microscopy. We also aimed to determine the efficacy of azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin on R. equi in established biofilm. We found 80.5% (26/41 and 63% (58/72 biofilm-positive isolates, in fecal and clinical samples, respectively. The additional glucose increased the biofilm formation by R. equi fecal samples, but not by clinical samples. The antimicrobials tested herein were not able to eradicate R. equi in biofilm even at higher concentrations. This is the first study showing the biofilm formation by R. equi isolated from equine samples. Our findings indicate that R. equi biofilm-producers may be more resistant to the antimicrobials evaluated. Further studies are warranted to test this hypothesis.

  19. Rhodococcus equi venous catheter infection: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahleh Zeina

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that was initially isolated from horses and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans with impaired cellular immunity. However, this pathogen is underestimated as a challenging antagonist and is frequently considered to be a mere contaminant despite the potential for life-threatening infections. Most case reports have occurred in immunocompromised patients who have received organ transplants (for example kidney, heart, bone marrow or those with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Infections often manifest as pulmonary involvement or soft tissue abscesses. Bacteremia related to R. equi infections of tunneled central venous catheters has rarely been described. Case presentation We report the case of a 63-year-old non-transplant recipient, non-HIV infected Caucasian woman with endometrial carcinoma who developed recurrent bloodstream infections and septic shock due to R. equi and ultimately required the removal of her port catheter, a subcutaneous implantable central venous catheter. We also review the medical literature related to human infections with R. equi. Conclusion R. equi should be considered a serious pathogen, not a contaminant, particularly in an immunocompromised patient who presents with a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. Counseling patients with central venous catheters who participate in activities involving exposure to domesticated animals is recommended.

  20. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines in human lung epithelial cells during Rhodococcus equi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Pilares-Ortega, Lilian; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Lorena; Aranzamendi-Zaldunbide, Maitane; Padilla, Daniel; Icardo, Jose Manuel; Ramos-Vivas, Jose

    2013-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people. While the interaction of R. equi with macrophages has been comprehensively studied, little is known about its interactions with non-phagocytic cells. Here, we characterized the entry process of this bacterium into human lung epithelial cells. The invasion is inhibited by nocodazole and wortmannin, suggesting that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and microtubule cytoskeleton are important for invasion. Pre-incubation of R. equi with a rabbit anti-R. equi polyclonal antiserum resulted in a dramatic reduction in invasion. Also, the invasion process as studied by immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy indicates that R. equi make initial contact with the microvilli of the A549 cells, and at the structural level, the entry process was observed to occur via a zipper-like mechanism. Infected lung epithelial cells upregulate the expression of cytokines IL-8 and IL-6 upon infection. The production of these pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly enhanced in culture supernatants from cells infected with non-mucoid plasmid-less strains when compared with cells infected with mucoid strains. These results demonstrate that human airway epithelial cells produce pro-inflammatory mediators against R. equi isolates.

  1. The sensor kinase MprB is required for Rhodococcus equi virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Iain; Parreira, Valeria R; Lepp, Dion; Mutharia, Lucy M; Vazquez-Boland, José A; Prescott, John F

    2011-01-10

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil bacterium and, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a member of the mycolata. Through possession of a virulence plasmid, it has the ability to infect the alveolar macrophages of foals, resulting in pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia. The virulence plasmid has an orphan two-component system (TCS) regulatory gene, orf8, mutation of which completely attenuates virulence. This study attempted to find the cognate sensor kinase (SK) of orf8. Annotation of the R. equi strain 103 genome identified 23 TCSs encoded on the chromosome, which were used in a DNA microarray to compare TCS gene transcription in murine macrophage-like cells to growth in vitro. This identified six SKs as significantly up-regulated during growth in macrophages. Mutants of these SKs were constructed and their ability to persist in macrophages was determined with one SK, MprB, found to be required for intracellular survival. The attenuation of the mprB- mutant, and its complementation, was confirmed in a mouse virulence assay. In silico analysis of the R. equi genome sequence identified an MprA binding box motif homologous to that of M. tuberculosis, on mprA, pepD, sigB and sigE. The results of this study also show that R. equi responds to the macrophage environment differently from M. tuberculosis. MprB is the first SK identified as required for R. equi virulence and intracellular survival. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recovery and subsequent characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate from Rhodococcus equi cells grown on crude palm kernel oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Altaee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus equi was isolated from fertile soil, and mineral salt media (MM and trace elements were used to provide the necessary elements for its growth and PHB production in addition to using crude palm kernel oil (CPKO 1% as the carbon source. Gas chromatography (GC demonstrated that the composition of the recovered biopolymer was homopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB. The strain of the present study has a dry biomass of 1.43 (g/l with 38% PHB, as determined by GC. The recovered PHB was characterized by NMR to study the chemical structure. In addition, DSC and TGA were used to study the thermal properties of the recovered polymer, where the melting temperature (Tm was 173 °C, the glass transition temperature (Tg was 2.79 °C, and the decomposition temperature (Td was 276 °C. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC was used to study the molecular mass of the recovered PHB in addition to comparing the results with other studies using different bacteria and substrates, where the molecular weight was 642 kDa, to enable its usage in many applications. The present study demonstrated the use of an inexpensive substrate for PHB production, i.e., using gram-positive bacteria to produce PHB polymer with characterization.

  3. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  4. The Rhodococcus equi virulence protein VapA disrupts endolysosome function and stimulates lysosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofe, Adam P; Davis, Luther J; Whittingham, Jean L; Latimer-Bowman, Elizabeth C; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Pryor, Paul R

    2017-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) is an important pulmonary pathogen in foals that often leads to the death of the horse. The bacterium harbors a virulence plasmid that encodes numerous virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) including VapA that is essential for intracellular survival inside macrophages. However, little is known about the precise function of VapA. Here, we demonstrate that VapA causes perturbation to late endocytic organelles with swollen endolysosome organelles having reduced Cathepsin B activity and an accumulation of LBPA, LC3 and Rab7. The data are indicative of a loss of endolysosomal function, which leads cells to upregulate lysosome biogenesis to compensate for the loss of functional endolysosomes. Although there is a high degree of homology of the core region of VapA to other Vap proteins, only the highly conserved core region of VapA, and not VapD of VapG, gives the observed effects on endolysosomes. This is the first demonstration of how VapA works and implies that VapA aids R. equi survival by reducing the impact of lysosomes on phagocytosed bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Immunogenicity of an electron beam inactivated Rhodococcus equi vaccine in neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Angela I; Pillai, Suresh D; Brake, Courtney; Bagley, Kaytee B; Bourquin, Jessica R; Coleman, Michelle; Oliveira, Fabiano N; Mwangi, Waithaka; McMurray, David N; Love, Charles C; Felippe, Maria Julia B; Cohen, Noah D

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam) inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi). No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals.

  6. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingham, Jean L; Blagova, Elena V; Finn, Ciaran E; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P; Leech, Andrew P; Walton, Paul H; Murzin, Alexey G; Meijer, Wim G; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2014-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-D-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  7. Diversion of phagosome trafficking by pathogenic Rhodococcus equi depends on mycolic acid chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Tobias; von Bargen, Kristine; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Huth, Gitta; Holst, Otto; Wohlmann, Jens; Becken, Ulrike; Dykstra, Tobias; Söhl, Kristina; Lindner, Buko; Prescott, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2013-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a close relative of Mycobacterium spp. and a facultative intracellular pathogen which arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages before the late endocytic stage. We have screened a transposon mutant library of R. equi for mutants with decreased capability to prevent phagolysosome formation. This screen yielded a mutant in the gene for β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein)-synthase A (KasA), a key enzyme of the long-chain mycolic acid synthesizing FAS-II system. The longest kasA mutant mycolic acid chains were 10 carbon units shorter than those of wild-type bacteria. Coating of non-pathogenic E. coli with purified wild-type trehalose dimycolate reduced phagolysosome formation substantially which was not the case with shorter kasA mutant-derived trehalose dimycolate. The mutant was moderately attenuated in macrophages and in a mouse infection model, but was fully cytotoxic.Whereas loss of KasA is lethal in mycobacteria, R. equi kasA mutant multiplication in broth was normal proving that long-chain mycolic acid compounds are not necessarily required for cellular integrity and viability of the bacteria that typically produce them. This study demonstrates a central role of mycolic acid chain length in diversion of trafficking by R. equi. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Aliphatic amidase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34: Purification, characterization and application in synthesis of acrylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Neerja; Kumar, Vijay; Sharma, Nirmal Kant; Thakur, Shikha; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2016-01-01

    An intracellular aliphatic amide degrading inducible amidase produced by Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 was characterized and acrylic acid synthesis from acrylamide was carried out using whole cell amidase. A bioprocess was developed at 50 ml fed batch reaction using 400 mM acrylamide feeding at an interval of 30 min resulted in the production of 4 g acrylic acid with volumetric and catalytic productivity of 80 g/l and 19 g/g/h respectively. The amidase of this organism had molecular weight of 40 kDa and was purified to 8.5 fold with 8% yield. This enzyme was active within the temperature range of 30 to 60 °C, with optimum temperature 45 °C and pH 7.5. The Vmax, Km, and kcat of purified amidase were calculated as 250 U/mg protein, 4.5 mM, and 166 sec-1 for acrylamide. The enzyme showed tolerance to metal chelating agent (EDTA) and was strongly inhibited by heavy metal ions Hg2+, Ag2+, Cu2+ and Co2+. R. rhodochrous PA-34 amidase preferentially hydrolyzed small aliphatic toxic amide such as acrylamide. Thus, the amidase of R. rhodochrous PA-34 is promising biocatalyst for the synthesis of industrially important acids and biodegradation of toxic amides.

  9. Cloning and characterization of a gene cluster for cyclododecanone oxidation in Rhodococcus ruber SC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostichka, K; Thomas, S M; Gibson, K J; Nagarajan, V; Cheng, Q

    2001-11-01

    Biological oxidation of cyclic ketones normally results in formation of the corresponding dicarboxylic acids, which are further metabolized in the cell. Rhodococcus ruber strain SC1 was isolated from an industrial wastewater bioreactor that was able to utilize cyclododecanone as the sole carbon source. A reverse genetic approach was used to isolate a 10-kb gene cluster containing all genes required for oxidative conversion of cyclododecanone to 1,12-dodecanedioic acid (DDDA). The genes required for cyclododecanone oxidation were only marginally similar to the analogous genes for cyclohexanone oxidation. The biochemical function of the enzymes encoded on the 10-kb gene cluster, the flavin monooxygenase, the lactone hydrolase, the alcohol dehydrogenase, and the aldehyde dehydrogenase, was determined in Escherichia coli based on the ability to convert cyclododecanone. Recombinant E. coli strains grown in the presence of cyclododecanone accumulated lauryl lactone, 12-hydroxylauric acid, and/or DDDA depending on the genes cloned. The cyclododecanone monooxygenase is a type 1 Baeyer-Villiger flavin monooxygenase (FAD as cofactor) and exhibited substrate specificity towards long-chain cyclic ketones (C11 to C15), which is different from the specificity of cyclohexanone monooxygenase favoring short-chain cyclic compounds (C5 to C7).

  10. Induction and development of the oil emulsifying system in an alkane oxidizing Rhodococcus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredholt, H.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Biotechnology, Trondheim, (Norway)

    1999-08-01

    There is a potential use of oil emulsifying bacteria for the clean-up of oil-contaminated natural environments, and oil transport and storage systems. The control mechanisms of the emulsifying abilities in these bacteria are important in relation to the optimization of such processes. A study was conducted to investigate the physiological criteria for the formation of the emulsifying activity in Rhodococcus sp. strain 094, which forms a hydrophobic cell surface when cultivated on alkanes, permitting oil-associated exponential growth. The ability of this bacteria to produce oil emulsifying agents is clearly inducible by crude oil or a number of single hydrophobic compounds. Before the cells are able to emulsify the oil, they must pass through a relatively short induction period followed by a longer period of synthesis of hydrophobic surface parts, coinciding with cell proliferation. The latter is due to the required coordination with new cell wall synthesis. If the cells are allowed to produce sufficient amounts of hydrophobic cell surface parts, they commence to emulsify the oil efficiently when the hydrophobic factor is released from the cell surface as part of their change to a more hydrophillic state. All the positive inducers were hydrophobic alkyl derivatives, and with one exception, also substrate for growth. Many of the better inducers were alkanes, and would require an alkane oxidizing system to be used by the cells. 14 ref., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  11. Effect of extracellular polymeric substances on the mechanical properties of Rhodococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, Yu; Zhang, Zhenyu J; Morales-García, Ana L; Mears, Matthew; Tarmey, Drew S; Edyvean, Robert G; Banwart, Steven A; Geoghegan, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical properties of Rhodococcus RC291 were measured using force spectroscopy equipped with a bacterial cell probe. Rhodococcal cells in the late growth stage of development were found to have greater adhesion to a silicon oxide surface than those in the early growth stage. This is because there are more extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that contain nonspecific binding sites available on the cells of late growth stage. It is found that EPS in the late exponential phase are less densely bound but consist of chains able to extend further into their local environment, while the denser EPS at the late stationary phase act more to sheath the cell. Contraction and extension of the EPS could change the density of the binding sites, and therefore affect the magnitude of the adhesion force between the EPS and the silicon oxide surface. By treating rhodococcal EPS as a surface-grafted polyelectrolyte layer and using scaling theory, the interaction between EPS and a solid substrate was modelled for the cell approaching the surface which revealed that EPS possess a large capacity to store charge. Changing the pH of the surrounding medium acts to change the conformation of EPS chains.

  12. Phenotypic mutants of the intracellular actinomycete Rhodococcus equi created by in vivo Himar1 transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Joseph; Hondalus, Mary K

    2003-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised people and a major cause of pneumonia in young horses. An effective live attenuated vaccine would be extremely useful in the prevention of R. equi disease in horses. Toward that end, we have developed an efficient transposon mutagenesis system that makes use of a Himar1 minitransposon delivered by a conditionally replicating plasmid for construction of R. equi mutants. We show that Himar1 transposition in R. equi is random and needs no apparent consensus sequence beyond the required TA dinucleotide. The diversity of the transposon library was demonstrated by the ease with which we were able to screen for auxotrophs and mutants with pigmentation and capsular phenotypes. One of the pigmentation mutants contained an insertion in a gene encoding phytoene desaturase, an enzyme of carotenoid biosynthesis, the pathway necessary for production of the characteristic salmon color of R. equi. We identified an auxotrophic mutant with a transposon insertion in the gene encoding a putative dual-functioning GTP cyclohydrolase II-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase, an enzyme essential for riboflavin biosynthesis. This mutant cannot grow in minimal medium in the absence of riboflavin supplementation. Experimental murine infection studies showed that, in contrast to wild-type R. equi, the riboflavin-requiring mutant is attenuated because it is unable to replicate in vivo. The mutagenesis methodology we have developed will allow the characterization of R. equi virulence mechanisms and the creation of other attenuated strains with vaccine potential.

  13. Emulsification potential of a newly isolated biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavandi, Mahmoud; Mohebali, Ghasemali; Haddadi, Azam; Shakarami, Heidar; Nuhi, Ashrafossadat

    2011-02-01

    An indigenous biosurfactant producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6 was isolated from Iranian oil contaminated soil using an efficient enrichment and screening method. During growth on sucrose and several hydrocarbon substrates as sole carbon source, the bacterium could produce biosurfactants. As a result of biosurfactant synthesis, the surface tension of the growth medium was reduced from 68mNm(-1) to values below 30mNm(-1). The biosurfactant was capable of forming stable emulsions with various hydrocarbons ranging from pentane to light motor oil. Preliminary chemical characterization revealed that the TA6 biosurfactant consisted of extracellular lipids and glycolipids. The biosurfactant was stable during exposure to high salinity (10% NaCl), elevated temperatures (120°C for 15min) and within a wide pH range (4.0-10.0). The culture broth was effective in recovering up to 70% of the residual oil from oil-saturated sand packs which indicates the potential value of the biosurfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial O-methylation of halogen-substituted phenols. [Rhodococcus; Acinetobacter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, A.S.; Remberger, M.; Neilson, A.H.

    1987-04-01

    Two strains of bacteria capable of carrying out the O-methylation of phenolic compounds, one from the gram-positive genus Rhodococcus and one from the gram-negative genus Acinetobacter, were used to examine the O-methylation of phenols carrying fluoro-, chloro-, and bromo-substituents. Zero-order rates of O-methylation were calculated from data for the chloro- and bromophenols; there was no simple relationship between the rate of reaction and the structure of the substrates, and significant differences were observed in the responses of the two test organisms. For the gram-negative strain, the pattern of substitution was as important as the number of substituents. Hexachlorophene was resistant to O-methylation by both strains, and tetrabromobisphenol-A was O-methylated only by the gram-positive strain. It is suggested that in the natural environment, bacterial O-methylation of phenols carrying electron-attracting substituents might be a significant alternative to biodegradation.

  15. Biofilm formation and partial biodegradation of polystyrene by the actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber: biodegradation of polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Roi; Sivan, Alex

    2008-11-01

    Polystyrene, which is one of the most utilized thermoplastics, is highly durable and is considered to be non-biodegradable. Hence, polystyrene waste accumulates in the environment posing an increasing ecological threat. In a previous study we have isolated a biofilm-producing strain (C208) of the actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber that degraded polyethylene films. Formation of biofilm, by C208, improved the biodegradation of polyethylene. Consequently, the present study aimed at monitoring the kinetics of biofilm formation by C208 on polystyrene, determining the physiological activity of the biofilm and analyzing its capacity to degrade polystyrene. Quantification of the biofilm biomass was performed using a modified crystal violet (CV) staining or by monitoring the protein content in the biofilm. When cultured on polystyrene flakes, most of the bacterial cells adhered to the polystyrene surface within few hours, forming a biofilm. The growth of the on polystyrene showed a pattern similar to that of a planktonic culture. Furthermore, the respiration rate, of the biofilm, exhibited a pattern similar to that of the biofilm growth. In contrast, the respiration activity of the planktonic population showed a constant decline with time. Addition of mineral oil (0.005% w/v), but not non-ionic surfactants, increased the biofilm biomass. Extended incubation of the biofilm for up to 8 weeks resulted in a small reduction in the polystyrene weight (0.8% of gravimetric weight loss). This study demonstrates the high affinity of C208 to polystyrene which lead to biofilm formation and, presumably, induced partial biodegradation.

  16. Calcium carbonate formation on mica supported extracellular polymeric substance produced by Rhodococcus opacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra; Czemierska, Magdalena; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from Rhodococcus opacus bacterial strain was used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation using the vapour diffusion method. The total exopolymer and water-soluble exopolymer fraction of different concentrations were spread on the mica surface by the spin-coating method. The obtained layers were characterized using the atomic force microscopy measurement and XPS analysis. The effects of polymer concentration, initial pH of calcium chloride solution and precipitation time on the obtained crystals properties were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the precipitated minerals. It was found that the type of precipitated CaCO3 polymorph and the crystal size depend on the kind of EPS fraction. The obtained results indicates that the water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth, whereas the total EPS stabilizes vaterite and this effect is stronger at basic pH. It seems to be due to different contents of the functional group of EPS fractions.

  17. Molecular characterization of zebrafish Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1), a novel organic anion-transporting polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2013-11-22

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily includes a group of polyspecific transporters that mediate transport of large amphipathic, mostly anionic molecules across cell membranes of eukaryotes. OATPs/Oatps are involved in the disposition and elimination of numerous physiological and foreign compounds. However, in non-mammalian species, the functional properties of Oatps remain unknown. We aimed to elucidate the role of Oatp1d1 in zebrafish to gain insights into the functional and structural evolution of the OATP1/Oatp1 superfamily. We show that diversification of the OATP1/Oatp1 family occurs after the emergence of jawed fish and that the OATP1A/Oatp1a and OATP1B/Oatp1b subfamilies appeared at the root of tetrapods. The Oatp1d subfamily emerged in teleosts and is absent in tetrapods. The zebrafish Oatp1d1 is similar to mammalian OATP1A/Oatp1a and OATP1B/Oatp1b members, with the main physiological role in transport and balance of steroid hormones. Oatp1d1 activity is dependent upon pH gradient, which could indicate bicarbonate exchange as a mode of transport. Our analysis of evolutionary conservation and structural properties revealed that (i) His-79 in intracellular loop 3 is conserved within OATP1/Oatp1 family and is crucial for the transport activity; (ii) N-glycosylation impacts membrane targeting and is conserved within the OATP1/Oatp1 family with Asn-122, Asn-133, Asn-499, and Asn-512 residues involved; (iii) the evolutionarily conserved cholesterol recognition interaction amino acid consensus motif is important for membrane localization; and (iv) Oatp1d1 is present in dimeric and possibly oligomeric form in the cell membrane. In conclusion, we describe the first detailed characterization of a new Oatp transporter in zebrafish, offering important insights into the functional evolution of the OATP1/Oatp1 family and the physiological role of Oatp1d1.

  18. Gamma-caprolactone stimulates growth of quorum-quenching Rhodococcus populations in a large-scale hydroponic system for culturing Solanum tuberosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirou, Amélie; Raffoux, Aurélie; Diallo, Stéphanie; Latour, Xavier; Dessaux, Yves; Faure, Denis

    2011-11-01

    Bacteria degrading quorum sensing (QS) signals have been proposed as biocontrol agents able to quench QS-dependent expression of virulence symptoms caused by Pectobacterium on potato plants. We report here that gamma-caprolactone (GCL) treatment stimulated growth of the native QS-degrading bacterial community in an industrial plant hydroponic system for culturing Solanum tuberosum. Post-GCL treatment, QS-degrading bacteria were mainly identified as Rhodococcus isolates, while Agrobacterium isolates dominated under similar untreated conditions. Most of the assayed Rhodococcus isolates exhibited efficient biocontrol activity for protecting potato tubers. Analytical chemistry approach revealed the rapid degradation of GCL introduced in the plant cultures.

  19. Infecção pulmonar pelo Rhodococcus equi na síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida: Aspectos na tomografia computadorizada

    OpenAIRE

    Edson Marchiori; Renato Gonçalves de Mendonça; Domenico Capone; Elza Maria de Cerqueira; Arthur Soares Souza Júnior; Gláucia Zanetti; Dante Escuissato; Emerson Gasparetto

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Apresentar os aspectos na tomografia computadorizada da pneumonia pelo Rhodococcus equi em sete pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo das tomografias de sete pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida e infecção pelo Rhodococcus equi. RESULTADOS: Os achados mais freqüentes foram: consolidação (n = 7) com escavação (n = 6), opacidades em vidro fosco (n = 6), nódulos do espaço aéreo (n = 4) e nódulos centrolobulares com árvore em...

  20. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  1. ECRH launching scenario in FFHR-d1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Kota; Kubo, Shin; Shimozuma, Takashi; Yoshimura, Yasuo; Igami, Hiroe; Takahashi, Hiromi; Tsujimura, Tohru; Makino, Ryohhei

    2016-10-01

    ECRH is promising as a principal heating system in a prototype helical reactor FFHR-d1 where the heating power of 80 MW is required to bring the plasma parameter to break even condition. To generate the plasma and bring it to ignition condition in FFHR-d1, it is effective to heat the under/over-dense plasma with normal ECRH or Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW). Normal ECRH is well established but heating via EBW need sophisticated injection control. EBW can be excited via the O(ordinary)-X(extraordinary)-B(EBW) mode conversion process by launching the ordinary wave from the low field side to plasma cut-off layer with optimum injection angle, and the range of injection angle to get high OXB mode conversion rate is called OXB mode conversion window. Since the window position can change as the plasma parameter, it is necessary to optimize the injection angle so as to aim the window in response to the plasma parameters. Candidates of antenna positions are determined by optimum injection points on the plasma facing wall calculated by the injection angle. Given such picked up area, detailed analysis using ray-tracing calculations and engineering antenna design will be performed.

  2. Second Spectrum of Na I D1 Observed with THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommier, V.; Molodij, G.

    2006-12-01

    The second solar spectrum (spectrum of the linear polarization observed near the solar limb in a quiet region) of Na I D1 has always been found antisymmetrical when observed with THEMIS tep{b12 TB01,b12 BM02}. The same holds also for atlas of tet{b12 Ga00}. On the contrary, tet{b12 SK97} and tet{b12 St00} observed a differently shaped profile, showing a central peak. We investigated in depth our treatment of THEMIS data, in particular looking for possible beam misalignments, by observing other unpolarized lines, but we have failed to put in evidence any misalignment. We discuss these complementary observations. In addition, we present a structure in the V/I profile of Na I D1 and D2, which we have repeatedly observed, and which we suggest be due to the Kemp effect (the alignement-to-orientation transfer that occurs in the transition from the Zeeman effect to the Paschen-Back effect).

  3. Functional divergence of HBHA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its evolutionary relationship with TadA from Rhodococcus opacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranconi, Mariana P; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2016-08-01

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630 and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 are oleaginous bacteria able to synthesize and accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG) in lipid bodies (LB). Highly relevant to the structure of LB is a protein homologous to heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) (called TadA in rhodococci), which is a virulence factor found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. HBHA is an adhesin involved in binding to non-phagocytic cells and extrapulmonary dissemination. We observed a conserved synteny of three genes encoding a transcriptional regulator (TR), the HBHA protein and a membrane protein (MP) between TAG-accumulating actinobacteria belonging to Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Nocardia and Dietzia genera, among others. A 354 bp-intergenic spacing containing a SigF-binding site was found between hbha and the TR genes in M. tuberculosis, which was absent in genomes of other investigated actinobacteria. Analyses of available "omic" information revealed that TadA and TR were co-induced in rhodococci under TAG-accumulating conditions; whereas in M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, HBHA and TR were regulated independently under stress conditions occurring during infection. We also found differences in protein lengths, domain content and distribution between HBHA and TadA proteins from mycobacteria and rhodococci, which may explain their different roles in cells. Based on the combination of results obtained in model actinobacteria, we hypothesize that HBHA and TadA proteins originated from a common ancestor, but later suffered a process of functional divergence during evolution. Thus, rhodococcal TadA probably has maintained its original role; whereas HBHA may have evolved as a virulence factor in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  4. Biodegradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 to N-isopropylammelide with subsequent assessment of toxicity of biodegraded metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Parag D; Phugare, Swapnil S; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2014-02-01

    Atrazine is a persistent organic pollutant in the environment which affects not only terrestrial and aquatic biota but also human health. Since its removal from the environment is needed, atrazine biodegradation is achieved in the present study using the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 isolated from soil, long-term treated with atrazine. The bacterium was capable of degrading about 75 % atrazine in liquid medium having pH 7 under aerobic and dark condition within 7 days. The degradation ability of the bacterium at various temperatures (20-60 °C), pH (range 3-11), carbon (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, lactose, and maltose), and nitrogen (ammonium molybdate, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, and urea) sources were studied for triumph optimum atrazine degradation. The results indicate that atrazine degradation at higher concentrations (100 ppm) was pH and temperature dependent. However, glucose and potassium nitrate were optimum carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Atrazine biodegradation analysis was carried out by using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (LC/Q-TOF-MS) techniques. LC/Q-TOF-MS analysis revealed formation of various intermediate metabolites including hydroxyatrazine, N-isopropylammelide, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deisopropyldeethylatrazine which was helpful to propose biochemical degradation pathway of atrazine. Furthermore, the toxicological studies of atrazine and its biodegraded metabolites were executed on earthworm Eisenia foetida as a model organism with respect to enzymatic (SOD and Catalase) antioxidant defense mechanism and lipid peroxidation studies. These results suggest innocuous degradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 in nontoxic form. Therefore the Rhodococcus sp.BCH2 could prove a valuable source for the eco-friendly biodegradation of atrazine pesticide.

  5. Biosynthesis of storage compounds by Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and global identification of genes involved in their metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rost Enrique

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the genus Rhodococcus are frequently found in soil and other natural environments and are highly resistant to stresses common in those environments. The accumulation of storage compounds permits cells to survive and metabolically adapt during fluctuating environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide bioinformatic analysis of key genes encoding metabolism of diverse storage compounds by Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and to examine its ability to synthesize and accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG, wax esters, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA, glycogen and polyphosphate (PolyP. Results We identified in the RHA1 genome: 14 genes encoding putative wax ester synthase/acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes (WS/DGATs likely involved in TAG and wax esters biosynthesis; a total of 54 genes coding for putative lipase/esterase enzymes possibly involved in TAG and wax ester degradation; 3 sets of genes encoding PHA synthases and PHA depolymerases; 6 genes encoding key enzymes for glycogen metabolism, one gene coding for a putative polyphosphate kinase and 3 putative exopolyphosphatase genes. Where possible, key amino acid residues in the above proteins (generally in active sites, effectors binding sites or substrate binding sites were identified in order to support gene identification. RHA1 cells grown under N-limiting conditions, accumulated TAG as the main storage compounds plus wax esters, PHA (with 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate monomers, glycogen and PolyP. Rhodococcus members were previously known to accumulate TAG, wax esters, PHAs and polyP, but this is the first report of glycogen accumulation in this genus. Conclusion RHA1 possess key genes to accumulate diverse storage compounds. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions lipids are the principal storage compounds. An extensive capacity to synthesize and metabolize storage compounds appears to contribute versatility to RHA1 in its

  6. Comparison of D1´- and D1-containing PS II reaction centre complexes under different environmental conditions in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Tim S; Hanning, Kyrin R; Chua, Jocelyn P S; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Summerfield, Tina C

    2016-08-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, the D1 protein of Photosystem II is the primary target of photodamage and environmental stress can accelerate this process. The cyanobacterial response to stress includes transcriptional regulation of genes encoding D1, including low-oxygen-induction of psbA1 encoding the D1´ protein in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The psbA1 gene is also transiently up-regulated in high light, and its deletion has been reported to increase ammonium-induced photoinhibition. Therefore we investigated the role of D1´-containing PS II centres under different environmental conditions. A strain containing only D1´-PS II centres under aerobic conditions exhibited increased sensitivity to ammonium chloride and high light compared to a D1-containing strain. Additionally a D1´-PS II strain was outperformed by a D1-PS II strain under normal conditions; however, a strain containing low-oxygen-induced D1´-PS II centres was more resilient under high light than an equivalent D1 strain. These D1´-containing centres had chlorophyll a fluorescence characteristics indicative of altered forward electron transport and back charge recombination with the donor side of PS II. Our results indicate D1´-PS II centres are important in the reconfiguration of thylakoid electron transport in response to high light and low oxygen. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. 17 CFR 270.12d1-3 - Exemptions for investment companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(F) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Exemption from sales charge limits. A registered investment company (“acquiring fund”) that relies on... company (“acquired fund”) may offer or sell any security it issues through a principal underwriter or... companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(F) of the Act. 270.12d1-3 Section 270.12d1-3 Commodity and...

  8. 4d N=1 from 6d (1,0)

    CERN Document Server

    Razamat, Shlomo S; Zafrir, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    We study the geometry of 4d N=1 SCFT's arising from compactification of 6d (1,0) SCFT's on a Riemann surface. We show that the conformal manifold of the resulting theory is characterized, in addition to moduli of complex structure of the Riemann surface, by the choice of a connection for a vector bundle on the surface arising from flavor symmetries in 6d. We exemplify this by considering the case of 4d N=1 SCFT's arising from M5 branes probing Z_k singularity compactified on a Riemann surface. In particular, we study in detail the four dimensional theories arising in the case of two M5 branes on Z_2 singularity. We compute the conformal anomalies and indices of such theories in 4d and find that they are consistent with expectations based on anomaly and the moduli structure derived from the 6 dimensional perspective.

  9. Analysis of microgravity measurements performed during D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, H.; Jilg, R.; Merbold, U.

    Characteristic features and results of D1 μg-measurements are discussed as performed in the Material Science Double Rack (MSDR) and MEDEA. The μg-data are analysed with respect to selected mission events such as thruster firings for attitude control, operations of Spacelab experiment facilities, vestibular experiments and crew activities. The origins are divided into orbit, vehicle and experiment induced perturbations. It has been found that the μg-environment is dictated mainly by payload induced perturbations. To reduce the μg-level, the design of some experiment facilities has to be improved. In addition, strongly disturbing experiments and very sensitive investigations should be performed in separate mission phases.

  10. Genes involved in the degradation of ether fuels by bacteria of the Mycobacterium / Rhodococcus group; Genes impliques dans la degradation des ethers carburants par des bacteries du groupe Mycobacterium/Rhodococcus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beguin, P.; Chauvaux, S.; Miras, I. [Institut Pasteur, Unite Microbiologie et Environnement, URA 2172 CNRS, 75 - Paris (France); Francois, A.; Fayolle, F.; Monot, F. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), Dept. Biotechnologie et Chimie de la Biomasse, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    2003-08-01

    A cluster of genes encoding a cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system involved in the utilisation of ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) was cloned in Rhodococcus ruber IFP 2001. This cluster includes ethR, a putative regulator gene of the araC/xylS family; ethA, encoding a ferredoxin reductase; ethB, encoding a cytochrome P-450, ethC, encoding a ferredoxin; and ethD, which is required for the function of the monooxygenase system, but whose exact role is unknown. The ethRABCD cluster is flanked on either side by two identical copies of a class II transposon, which explains that it is lost at high frequency by homologous recombination when the strain is grown under non selective conditions. Two other, highly conserved clusters of eth genes were detected in the ETBE-utilizing strains Rhodococcus zopfii IFP 2005 and Mycobacterium sp. IFP 2009. In all cases, the eth locus is inserted in a different genomic context, suggesting that it may be transferred horizontally between different species and inserted at different sites in the genome. In addition, in R. zopfii IFP 2005, the downstream copy of the transposon carries a 117-bp (base pairs) deletion; in Mycobacterium sp. IFP 2009, the upstream copy is absent and the downstream copy is inserted 2771 bp closer to the ethRABCD cluster. (authors)

  11. Transcriptome-Based Identification of the Sinorhizobium meliloti NodD1 Regulon

    OpenAIRE

    Capela, Delphine; Carrere, Sébastien; Batut, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The NodD1 regulon of Sinorhizobium meliloti was determined through the analysis of the S. meliloti transcriptome in response to the plant flavone luteolin and the overexpression of nodD1. Nine new genes regulated by both NodD1 and luteolin were identified, demonstrating that NodD1 controls few functions behind nodulation in S. meliloti.

  12. Transcriptome-based identification of the Sinorhizobium meliloti NodD1 regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela, Delphine; Carrere, Sébastien; Batut, Jacques

    2005-08-01

    The NodD1 regulon of Sinorhizobium meliloti was determined through the analysis of the S. meliloti transcriptome in response to the plant flavone luteolin and the overexpression of nodD1. Nine new genes regulated by both NodD1 and luteolin were identified, demonstrating that NodD1 controls few functions behind nodulation in S. meliloti.

  13. Identification of genomic loci associated with Rhodococcus equi susceptibility in foals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole M McQueen

    Full Text Available Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of disease and death in foals. Although agent and environmental factors contribute to the incidence of this disease, the genetic factors influencing the clinical outcomes of R. equi pneumonia are ill-defined. Here, we performed independent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP- and copy number variant (CNV-based genome-wide association studies to identify genomic loci associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals. Foals at a large Quarter Horse breeding farm were categorized into 3 groups: 1 foals with R. equi pneumonia (clinical group [N = 43]; 2 foals with ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary lesions that never developed clinical signs of pneumonia (subclinical group [N = 156]; and, 3 foals without clinical signs or ultrasonographic evidence of pneumonia (unaffected group [N = 49]. From each group, 24 foals were randomly selected and used for independent SNP- and CNV-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The SNP-based GWAS identified a region on chromosome 26 that had moderate evidence of association with R. equi pneumonia when comparing clinical and subclinical foals. A joint analysis including all study foals revealed a 3- to 4-fold increase in odds of disease for a homozygous SNP within the associated region when comparing the clinical group with either of the other 2 groups of foals or their combination. The region contains the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 2 (TRPM2 gene, which is involved in neutrophil function. No associations were identified in the CNV-based GWAS. Collectively, these data identify a region on chromosome 26 associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals, providing evidence that genetic factors may indeed contribute to this important disease of foals.

  14. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in a patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rhodococcus (R equi is an opportunistic, uncommon human pathogen that causes mainly infection in immunocompromised hosts. The disease is usually presented as subacute pneumonia that is mostly cavitary and sometimes bacteremic. Case report. We reported the extremly rare case of a 43-year-old woman with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who developed R. equi pulmonary infection after recieving multiple courses of chemotherapy. Secondary, the patient developed bacteremia, leading to sepsis and dissemination of R. equi infection in many extrapulmonary sites. At addmission the patient was febrile, tachypnoic, tachycardic, hypotensive, with facial edema, splenomegaly, positive meningeal signs, left hemiparesis and paraparesis. Laboratory data included erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR > 140 mm/h, C-reactive protein (CRP 143.0 mg/L, red blood cells (RBC 2.14 × 1012/L, whyite blood cells (WBC 2.8 × 109/L, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH 706 U/L, serum albumin 26 g/L, sodium 127 mmol/L and potassium 2.7 mmol/L. Blood culture and culture of sputum and empyema were positive for R. equi. Imaging studies demonstrated a large right cavitary pneumonia and abscess, empyema, pericarditis, mediastinal and intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy, brain and psoas abscesses, osteomyelitis and spondylodiscitis. The patient recovered completely after a 12-month treatment with combinations of parenteral and oral antibiotics (meropenem, vancomycin, teicoplanin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, macrolides etc, including drainage of abscesses and empyema. Eight years after completition of the treatment the patient was without recurrence of R. equi infection and lymphoma. Conclusion. Since the eradication od R. equi is very difficult, it is very important to make the diagnosis and initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy as soon as possible.

  15. The effect of bacterial dose and foal age at challenge on Rhodococcus equi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, M; Loynachan, A; Sun, L; Oliveira, A; Breheny, P; Horohov, D W

    2013-12-27

    While Rhodococcus equi remains the most common cause of subacute or chronic granulomatous bronchopneumonia in foals, development of a relevant model to study R. equi infection has proven difficult. The objective of this study was to identify a challenge dose of R. equi that resulted in slow progressive disease, spontaneous regression of lung lesions and age-dependent susceptibility. Foals less than one-week of age were challenged intratracheally using either 10(6), 10(5), 10(4), 10(3) or 10(2) cfu of R. equi. Two doses (10(3) cfu and 10(5) cfu) were used to challenge 2 and 3-week-old, and 3 and 6-week-old foals, respectively. Physical examination, thoracic ultrasound and blood work were performed. Foals were euthanized at the end of the study or when clinical signs of pneumonia developed. All foals were necropsied and their lung lesions scored. Foals challenged with low concentrations of R. equi developed slow progressive pneumonia and approximately 50% of the foals recovered spontaneously. Likewise, macroscopic (>1cm diameter) pyogranulomatous lesions were only observed when low doses of R. equi were used. Clinical pneumonia was not seen after low dose challenge in the 3-week-old foals or in the 6-week-old foals. This study demonstrates that the use of low doses of R. equi to challenge neonatal foals provides an improved model for studying this disease. Furthermore, susceptibility to R. equi infection was shown to diminish early in the foal's life, as has been reported in the field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Seroepidemiological survey of Rhodococcus equi infection in asymptomatic horses and donkeys from southeast Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Tel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available n order to assess the level of Rhodococcus equi infection in southeast Turkey, 679 sera from healthy foals and adult horses and 78 sera from donkeys were tested by indirect ELISA using a R. equi reference strain (ATCC 33701 as antigen. Eighty (11.7 % sera from horses and 9 (11.5 % sera from donkeys with titres >0.85 were positive. The prevalence of seropositive horses in Sanliurfa Province was higher than in Diyarbakir Province; 56 (13.9 % horses in Sanliurfa Province and 24 (8.7 % horses in Diyarbakir Province were defined as seropositive. In Sanliurfa Province 14.5 % of female (n = 343 and 10.1 % of male (n = 59 horses tested were defined as seropositive, while in Diyarbakir Province more males (11.4 %, n = 114 were seropositive than females (6.7 %, n = 163. Horses 1 to 5 years of age were found to have the highest seropositivity rate in both provinces. A total of 78 sera from donkeys were investigated in Sanliurfa Province, of which 9 (11.5 % were positive by ELISA. Among the 9 positive sera, 6 (12.8 % were from donkeys 1-5 years old and 3 (13.6 % were from donkeys >5years of age. Nopositive sera were found in donkeys less than 1 year old. Five(12.5 % sera of females and 4(10.5 % sera of males tested were positive. These results indicate the existence of R. equi in the horse populations in Sanliurfa and Diyarbakir Provinces. Similar infection rates were found for donkeys in Sanliurfa. This suggests the importance of serological surveys to diagnose R. equi infection in the region and to prevent the zoonotic risk.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Rhodococcus equi in slaughtered swine, cattle and horses in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Takai, Shinji; Kizerwetter-Świda, Magdalena; Kita, Jerzy

    2016-05-27

    Rhodococcus equi is an emerging zoonotic presumably foodborne pathogen. Since the data on the worldwide prevalence of R. equi in meat animals are scarce, the present study aimed to investigate the molecular epidemiology of R. equi in swine, cattle and horse carcasses intended for human consumption in Poland. Totally 1028 lymph node samples were examined. R. equi was isolated from 26.6 % (105/395) swine and 1.3 % (3/234) bovine healthy submaxillary lymph nodes. In horses, R. equi was isolated only from 0.5 % (1/198) samples of middle tracheo-branchiales lymph node while no lymphocentrum retropharyngeum sample was positive (0/198). The purulent lesions were observed only in 0.8 % swine submaxillary lymph nodes samples (3/398) and in two of them R. equi was detected. All bovine and most of swine isolates (98.1 %) were vapB-positive. 87.9 % of swine isolates carried 95-kb type 5 plasmid, 3.7 % type 1 and plasmid types: 4, 7, 10, 11, 21, 31 were carried by a single isolate (0.9 %). All bovine isolates carried VAPB type 26. Single horse isolate was vapA-positive and carried plasmid VAPA 85-kb type I. The prevalence of vapB-positive R. equi in investigated healthy swine intended for human consumption was very high. Not only swine, but also even apparently healthy cattle or horse carcasses should be considered as a potential source of R. equi for humans, especially in countries where undercooked or raw beef or horsemeat is traditionally consumed.

  18. MICs of 32 antimicrobial agents for Rhodococcus equi isolates of animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenberg, Anne; Feßler, Andrea T; Erol, Erdal; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Stamm, Ivonne; Böse, Reinhard; Heusinger, Anton; Klarmann, Dieter; Werckenthin, Christiane; Schwarz, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the MICs of 32 antimicrobial agents for 200 isolates of Rhodococcus equi of animal origin by applying a recently described broth microdilution protocol, and to investigate isolates with distinctly elevated rifampicin MICs for the genetic basis of rifampicin resistance. The study included 200 R. equi isolates, including 160 isolates from horses and 40 isolates from other animal sources, from the USA and Europe. MIC testing of 32 antimicrobial agents or combinations thereof followed a recently published protocol. A novel PCR protocol for the joint amplification of the three rpoB regions in which rifampicin resistance-mediating mutations have been reported was applied to isolates with elevated rifampicin MICs. The amplicons were sequenced and screened for mutations. Susceptibility testing revealed a rather uniform distribution of MICs for most of the antimicrobial agents tested. The lowest MICs were seen for clarithromycin, rifampicin and imipenem. Six isolates (3%) exhibited distinctly higher MICs of rifampicin than the remaining 194 isolates. In five of these six isolates, single bp exchanges, which resulted in the amino acid exchanges Gln513Leu, Asp516Val, His526Asp or Ser531Leu, were detected in the rifampicin resistance-determining region 1 of the rpoB gene, with Gln513Leu representing a novel substitution for R. equi. This study shows the MIC distribution of 32 antimicrobial agents for a large collection of R. equi isolates of animal origin from two continents. Isolates that exhibited distinctly elevated MICs of rifampicin were only rarely detected.

  19. Systemic and respiratory oxidative stress in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J; Po, E; Celi, P; Muscatello, G

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is most simply defined as an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants. Oxidative stress has been suggested to play roles in various equine respiratory diseases and the significance of OS in the pathogenesis of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is unknown. To measure and relate biomarkers of OS to lesions consistent with R. equi pneumonia. Case-control study. Various OS biomarkers were measured from blood and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) samples collected from 26 foals between 1 and 2 months of age (n = 12 cases and n = 14 controls) on 2 Thoroughbred farms endemically affected by R. equi pneumonia. Foals were defined as cases (positive) or controls (negative) based on ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary abscessation (>15 mm in diameter). Haematology and biochemistry testing was also performed on blood samples collected from the foals. Comparison of biomarkers and key haematological and biochemical markers of inflammation between the groups was performed using 2 sample t tests. Derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) were significantly greater in case foals than in control foals (P = 0.027) and the oxidative stress index (OSI) was higher in case foals (P = 0.014). Hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) concentrations in EBC were significantly greater in case foals than in control foals (P = 0.002). Meanwhile, there were no significant differences in traditional measures of inflammation between the 2 groups. Measuring OS in both blood and EBC provided useful information in the early diagnosis of R. equi pneumonia. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  20. Air sampling in the breathing zone of neonatal foals for prediction of subclinical Rhodococcus equi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken, C; Muscatello, G; Freestone, J; Anderson, G A; Browning, G F; Gilkerson, J R

    2012-03-01

    Disease caused by Rhodococcus equi is a significant burden to the horse breeding industry worldwide. Early detection of rhodococcal pneumonia, albeit important to minimise treatment costs, is difficult because of the insidious nature of the disease and the lack of definitive diagnostic tests. To investigate air sampling from the breathing zone of neonatal foals as a predictor of subsequent rhodococcal pneumonia. Air samples were collected from the breathing zone of 53 neonatal foals (age ≤10 days) and again at the time of routine ultrasonographic screening for R. equi pneumonia (age 1-2 months). Pneumonia was diagnosed ultrasonographically in 23% of foals. Virulent R. equi was detected in air from the breathing zone of 19% of neonatal foals and 45% of foals at age 1-2 months. There was no association between virulent R. equi in the breathing zone of foals and the subsequent ultrasonographic diagnosis of rhodococcal pneumonia. The median concentration of virulent R. equi in the breathing zone of both neonates (0 [range 0-4] colony-forming units [cfu]/250 l) and older foals (0 [range 0-3] cfu/250 l) was not significantly different from that in background air samples (0 [range 0-6] cfu/250 l). There was no difference in the concentration of virulent R. equi in the breathing zone of older foals that were diagnosed with rhodococcal pneumonia or clinically normal foals. Detection of virulent R. equi in air from the breathing zone was not a positive predictor of rhodococcal pneumonia in foals up to age ≤2 months. Selective culture of air samples from the breathing zone of young foals is not better at diagnosing rhodococcal pneumonia than early ultrasonographic screening. However, culture of air samples from the breathing zone of older foals remains a useful herd-based epidemiological tool. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Identification of genomic loci associated with Rhodococcus equi susceptibility in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Cole M; Doan, Ryan; Dindot, Scott V; Bourquin, Jessica R; Zlatev, Zlatomir Z; Chaffin, M Keith; Blodgett, Glenn P; Ivanov, Ivan; Cohen, Noah D

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of disease and death in foals. Although agent and environmental factors contribute to the incidence of this disease, the genetic factors influencing the clinical outcomes of R. equi pneumonia are ill-defined. Here, we performed independent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and copy number variant (CNV)-based genome-wide association studies to identify genomic loci associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals. Foals at a large Quarter Horse breeding farm were categorized into 3 groups: 1) foals with R. equi pneumonia (clinical group [N = 43]); 2) foals with ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary lesions that never developed clinical signs of pneumonia (subclinical group [N = 156]); and, 3) foals without clinical signs or ultrasonographic evidence of pneumonia (unaffected group [N = 49]). From each group, 24 foals were randomly selected and used for independent SNP- and CNV-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The SNP-based GWAS identified a region on chromosome 26 that had moderate evidence of association with R. equi pneumonia when comparing clinical and subclinical foals. A joint analysis including all study foals revealed a 3- to 4-fold increase in odds of disease for a homozygous SNP within the associated region when comparing the clinical group with either of the other 2 groups of foals or their combination. The region contains the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 2 (TRPM2) gene, which is involved in neutrophil function. No associations were identified in the CNV-based GWAS. Collectively, these data identify a region on chromosome 26 associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals, providing evidence that genetic factors may indeed contribute to this important disease of foals.

  2. Use of Liposomal Gentamicin for Treatment of 5 Foals with Experimentally Induced Rhodococcus equi Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N D; Giguère, S; Burton, A J; Rocha, J N; Berghaus, L J; Brake, C N; Bordin, A I; Coleman, M C

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effects of, and bacterial resistance to, macrolides used to treat Rhodococcus equi infections have prompted search for clinically effective alternative antimicrobials. Liposomal gentamicin (LG) is effective against R. equi in vitro and decreases tissue concentrations of R. equi in experimentally infected mice. Effectiveness of LG treatment of foals with R. equi pneumonia, however, has not been described. Liposomal gentamicin is safe and effective for treating foals with R. equi pneumonia. Ten foals with experimentally induced R. equi pneumonia. Pilot treatment trial. Foals with pneumonia induced by intrabronchial instillation of R. equi were randomly allocated to receive either clarithromycin combined with rifampin (CLR + RIF) PO or LG IV, and followed by daily physical examinations and weekly thoracic ultrasonography and serum creatinine concentration determinations until the resolution of clinical signs. Treatment success was defined as the resolution of clinical signs and ultrasonographically identified pulmonary abscesses. All 10 foals were successfully treated. Two of 5 foals treated with LG developed azotemia within 1 week; LG was discontinued and treatment switched to CLR + RIF for these foals. None of the CLR + RIF treated foals developed azotemia. Liposomal gentamicin IV can be effective for treatment of R. equi pneumonia, but nephrotoxicity indicates that an alternative dosing interval or route (such as nebulization) will be needed before LG is adequately safe for clinical use. Larger comparative trials will be needed to evaluate the relative efficacy of a safer LG dosage regimen. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. IcgA is a virulence factor of Rhodococcus equi that modulates intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Coulson, Garry B; Miranda-Casoluengo, Aleksandra A; Miranda-Casoluengo, Raúl; Hondalus, Mary K; Meijer, Wim G

    2014-05-01

    Virulence of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi depends on a 21.3-kb pathogenicity island located on a conjugative plasmid. To date, the only nonregulatory pathogenicity island-encoded virulence factor identified is the cell envelope-associated VapA protein. Although the pathogenicity islands from porcine and equine R. equi isolates have undergone major rearrangements, the virR operon (virR-icgA-vapH-orf7-virS) is highly conserved in both, suggesting these genes play an important role in pathogenicity. VirR and VirS are transcriptional regulators controlling expression of pathogenicity island genes, including vapA. Here, we show that while vapH and orf7 are dispensable for intracellular growth of R. equi, deletion of icgA, formerly known as orf5, encoding a major facilitator superfamily transport protein, elicited an enhanced growth phenotype in macrophages and a significant reduction in macrophage viability, while extracellular growth in broth remained unaffected. Transcription of virS, located downstream of icgA, and vapA was not affected by the icgA deletion during growth in broth or in macrophages, showing that the enhanced growth phenotype caused by deletion of icgA was not mediated through abnormal transcription of these genes. Transcription of icgA increased 6-fold within 2 h following infection of macrophages and remained significantly higher 48 h postinfection compared to levels at the start of the infection. The major facilitator superfamily transport protein IcgA is the first factor identified in R. equi that negatively affects intracellular replication. Aside from VapA, it is only the second pathogenicity island-encoded structural protein shown to play a direct role in intracellular growth of this pathogenic actinomycete.

  4. Effects of opsonization of Rhodococcus equi on bacterial viability and phagocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Dominic R; Nydam, Daryl V; Price, Christopher T; Graham, James E; Cynamon, Michael H; Divers, Thomas J; Felippe, Maria Julia B

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effect of opsonization of Rhodococcus equi with R. equi-specific antibodies in plasma on bacterial viability and phagocyte activation in a cell culture model of infection. Neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages from 6 healthy 1-week-old foals and 1 adult horse. Foal and adult horse phagocytes were incubated with either opsonized or nonopsonized bacteria. Opsonization was achieved by use of plasma containing high or low concentrations of R. equi-specific antibodies. Phagocyte oxidative burst activity was measured by use of flow cytometry, and macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production was measured via an ELISA. Extracellular and intracellular bacterial viability was measured with a novel R. equi-luciferase construct that used a luminometer. Opsonized bacteria increased oxidative burst activity in adult horse phagocytes, and neutrophil activity was dependent on the concentration of specific antibody. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in macrophages infected with opsonized bacteria. Opsonization had no significant effect on bacterial viability in macrophages; however, extracellular bacterial viability was decreased in broth containing plasma with R. equi-specific antibodies, compared with viability in broth alone. The use of plasma enriched with specific antibodies for the opsonization of R. equi increased the activation of phagocytes and decreased bacterial viability in the extracellular space. Although opsonized R. equi increased TNF-α secretion and oxidative burst in macrophages, additional factors may be necessary for effective intracellular bacterial killing. These data have suggested a possible role of plasma antibody in protection of foals from R. equi pneumonia.

  5. Chloroquine inhibits Rhodococcus equi replication in murine and foal alveolar macrophages by iron-starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressler, Leticia T; Bordin, Angela I; McQueen, Cole M; Cohen, Noah D; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2016-05-30

    Rhodococcus equi preferentially infects macrophages causing pyogranulomatous pneumonia in young foals. Both the vapA and rhbC genes are up-regulated in an iron (Fe)-deprived environment, such as that found within macrophages. Chloroquine (CQ) is a drug widely used against malaria that suppresses the intracellular availability of Fe in eukaryotic cells. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of CQ to inhibit replication of virulent R. equi within murine (J774A.1) and foal alveolar macrophages (AMs) and to verify whether the mechanism of inhibition could be Fe-deprivation-dependent. CQ effect on R. equi extracellular survival and toxicity to J774A.1 were evaluated. R. equi survival within J774A.1 and foal AMs was evaluated under CQ (10 and 20μM), bovine saturated transferrin (bHTF), and bovine unsaturated transferrin (bATF) exposure. To explore the action mechanism of CQ, the superoxide anion production, the lysozyme activity, as well as the relative mRNA expression of vapA and rhbC were examined. CQ at≤20μM had no effect on R. equi extracellular multiplication and J774A.1 viability. Exposure to CQ significantly and markedly reduced survival of R. equi within J774A.1 and foal AMs. Treatment with bHTF did not reverse CQ effect on R. equi. Exposure to CQ did not affected superoxide anion production or lysozyme activity, however vapA and rhbC expression was significantly increased. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that intracellular availability of Fe is required for R. equi survival, and our initial hypothesis that CQ can limit replication of R. equi in J774A.1 and foal AMs, most likely by Fe starvation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro synergy, pharmacodynamics, and postantibiotic effect of 11 antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Steeve; Lee, Elise A; Guldbech, Kristen M; Berghaus, Londa J

    2012-11-09

    There are no studies investigating interactions between clarithromycin or azithromycin and rifampin or other commonly used antimicrobial agents against virulent isolates of Rhodococcus equi. In addition, there is no published data on the postantibiotic effects (PAEs) and pharmacodynamics properties of antimicrobial agents against R. equi. The objectives were to assess in vitro interactions, pharmacodynamics, and PAEs of 11 antimicrobial agents belonging to various antimicrobial classes against R. equi. Antimicrobial agents investigated (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, ceftiofur, and doxycycline) were selected based on in vitro activity against large numbers of isolates of R. equi and frequency of use in foals or humans infected with R. equi. Three virulent strains of R. equi were evaluated by time-kill curves and checkerboard assays, and the postantibiotic effect was measured at 5×MIC. Only amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, and vancomycin were bactericidal against R. equi. Combinations including a macrolide (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin) and either rifampin or doxycycline, and the combination doxycycline-rifampin were synergistic. Combinations containing amikacin and erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, or rifampin and the combination gentamicin-rifampin were antagonistic. The PAEs of rifampin, erythromycin, clarithromycin, vancomycin, and doxycycline were relatively long with median values ranging between 4.5 and 6.5h. Azithromycin, gentamicin, and imipenem had intermediate PAEs ranging between 3.3 and 3.5h. Amikacin, enrofloxacin, and ceftiofur had shorter PAEs ranging between 1.3 and 2.1h. Gentamicin, amikacin, enrofloxacin, and doxycycline exhibited concentration-dependent activity whereas erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, imipenem, and vancomycin exhibited time-dependent activity against R. equi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B

  7. Mouse lung infection model to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence and vaccine protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Iglesias, Patricia; Scortti, Mariela; MacArthur, Iain; Hapeshi, Alexia; Rodriguez, Héctor; Prescott, John F; Vazquez-Boland, José A

    2014-08-06

    The pathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi causes severe purulent lung infections in foals and immunocompromised people. Although relatively unsusceptible to R. equi, mice are widely used for in vivo studies with this pathogen. The most commonly employed mouse model is based on systemic (intravenous) infection and determination of R. equi burdens in spleen and liver. Here, we investigated the murine lung for experimental infection studies with R. equi. Using a 10(7)CFU intranasal challenge in BALB/c mice, virulent R. equi consistently survived in quantifiable numbers up to 10 days in the lungs whereas virulence-deficient R. equi bacteria were rapidly cleared. An internally controlled virulence assay was developed in which the test R. equi strains are co-inoculated and monitored in the same mouse. Isogenic R. equi bacteria lacking either the plasmid vapA gene or the entire virulence plasmid were compared using this competitive assay. Both strains showed no significant differences in in vivo fitness in the lung, indicating that the single loss of the virulence factor VapA was sufficient to account for the full attenuation seen in the absence of the virulence plasmid. To test the adequacy of the lung infection model for monitoring R. equi vaccine efficacy, BALB/c mice were immunized with live R. equi and challenged intranasally. Vaccination conferred protection against acute pulmonary challenge with virulent R. equi. Our data indicate that the murine lung infection model provides a useful tool for both R. equi virulence and vaccine studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel transferable erm(46) determinant responsible for emerging macrolide resistance in Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Elisa; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hondalus, Mary K; Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; MacArthur, Iain; Cohen, Noah D; Roberts, Marilyn C; Vazquez-Boland, Jose A

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the molecular mechanism of macrolide resistance in the actinomycete Rhodococcus equi, a major equine pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in people. Macrolide-resistant (n = 62) and macrolide-susceptible (n = 62) clinical isolates of R. equi from foals in the USA were studied. WGS of 18 macrolide-resistant and 6 macrolide-susceptible R. equi was performed. Representative sequences of all known macrolide resistance genes identified to date were used to search the genome assemblies for putative homologues. PCR was used to screen for the presence of the identified resistance determinant in the rest of the isolates. Mating experiments were performed to verify mobility of the gene. A novel erm gene, erm(46), was identified in all sequenced resistant isolates, but not in susceptible isolates. There was complete association between macrolide resistance and the presence of erm(46) as detected by PCR screening of all 124 clinical isolates of R. equi. Expression of erm(46) in a macrolide-susceptible strain of R. equi induced high-level resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B, but not to other classes of antimicrobial agents. Transfer of erm(46) to macrolide-susceptible R. equi was confirmed. The transfer frequency ranged from 3 × 10(-3) to 1 × 10(-2). This is the first molecular characterization of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B in R. equi. Resistance was due to the presence of a novel erm(46) gene mobilizable likely by conjugation, which has spread among equine isolates of R. equi in the USA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Gallium maltolate as an alternative to macrolides for treatment of presumed Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noah D; Slovis, Nathan M; Giguère, Steeve; Baker, Samantha; Chaffin, M Keith; Bernstein, Lawrence R

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant isolates of Rhodococcus equi are emerging, prompting the search for clinically effective alternative antimicrobials. The proportion of foals with ultrasonographic evidence of pneumonia presumed to be caused by R. equi that had a successful outcome when administered gallium maltolate (GaM) PO would not be more than 10% inferior (ie, lower) than that of foals receiving standard treatment. Fifty-four foals with subclinical pulmonary abscesses among 509 foals at 6 breeding farms in Kentucky. Controlled, randomized, prospective noninferiority study. Foals with ultrasonographic lesions >1 cm in diameter (n = 54) were randomly allocated to receive per os either clarithromycin combined with rifampin (CLR+R) or GaM, and followed up for 28 days by daily physical inspections and weekly (n = 1 farm) or biweekly (n = 4 farms) thoracic ultrasound examinations by individuals unaware of treatment-group assignments. Treatment success was defined as resolution of ultrasonographically identified pulmonary abscesses within 28 days of initiating treatment. Noninferiority was defined as a 90% confidence interval for the observed difference in CLR+R minus GaM that was ≤10%. The proportion of GaM-treated foals that resolved (70%; 14/20) was similar to that of foals treated with CLR+R (74%; 25/34), but we failed to demonstrate noninferiority for GaM relative to CLR+R; however, GaM was noninferior to CLR+R treatment when results from a noncompliant farm were excluded. Gallium maltolate is not inferior to macrolides for treating foals with subclinical pneumonia. Use of GaM might reduce pressure for macrolide-resistance in R. equi. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Plasmid Profiles of Virulent Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Infected Foals in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Marcin; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Jarosz, Łukasz; Kato, Kiyoko; Hieda, Yu; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important bacterial pathogen in foals up to 6 months old, widespread in horse farms all over the world. It was found that only virulent R. equi strains expressing 15-17 kDa virulence-associated protein (VapA) and having large virulence plasmid of 85-90 kb containing vapA gene are pathogenic for horses. To date, 12 plasmid types have been reported in VapA positive strains from horses. There are no data concerning plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains isolated from horses and horse farm environment. The aim of the study is to determine plasmid profiles of virulent R. equi strains isolated in Poland from dead foals as well as from soil samples taken from horse breeding farms. Plasmid profiles of 10 clinical strains derived from 8 farms and 11 environmental strains from 3 farms, confirmed as virulent by PCR, were compared with 12 reference strains containing the known plasmid size and type. Plasmid DNAs were analysed by digestion with the restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII for detailed comparison and estimation of plasmid sizes. The results of RFLP analysis revealed that all except one isolates used in the study are classified as VapA 85 kb type I plasmid. One strain harboured VapA 87 kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains. The results of our preliminary investigations on horse farms located in central and eastern Poland indicate that the virulent R. equi strains thus far isolated from diseased foals and horse farms environment represent a highly uniform plasmid pattern.

  11. Relationship of mixed bacterial infection to prognosis in foals with pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, S; Jordan, L M I; Glass, K; Cohen, N D

    2012-01-01

    Isolation of multiple bacterial species is common in foals with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia. There is no association between isolation of other microorganisms and outcome. 155 foals with pneumonia caused by R. equi. Case records of foals diagnosed with R. equi pneumonia based on culture of the respiratory tract were reviewed at 2 referral hospitals (University of Florida [UF] and Texas A&M University [TAMU]). R. equi was cultured from a tracheobronchial aspirate (TBA) in 115 foals and from lung tissue in 38 foals. Survival was significantly higher at UF (71%; 70/99) than at TAMU (50%; 28/56). R. equi was significantly more likely to grow in pure cultures from samples obtained from foals at UF (55%; 54/99) than from foals at TAMU (23%; 13/56). Microorganisms cultured with R. equi included Gram-positive bacteria in 40, Gram-negative bacteria in 41, and fungi in 23 foals. The most common bacteria isolated were beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 26) and Escherichia coli (n = 18). Mixed infections were significantly more likely to be encountered in TBA than in lung tissue. Only foals from which R. equi was cultured from a TBA were included in the analysis for association between mixed infection and outcome. After adjusting for the effect of hospital using multivariate logistic regression, mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture, Gram-positive bacteria, beta-hemolytic streptococci, Gram-negative bacteria, enteric Gram-negative bacteria, nonenteric Gram-negative bacteria, and fungi were not significantly associated with outcome. Isolation of multiple bacteria or fungi from a TBA along with R. equi does not negatively impact prognosis. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  13. Laboratory-scale biofiltration of acrylonitrile by Rhodococcus rhodochrous DAP 96622 in a trickling bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Pierce, George E

    2009-07-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN), a volatile component of the waste generated during the production of acrylamide, also is often associated with aromatic contaminants such as toluene and styrene. Biofiltration, considered an effective technique for the treatment of volatile hydrocarbons, has not been used to treat volatile nitriles. An experimental laboratory-scale trickling bed bioreactor using cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DAP 96622 supported on granular activated carbon (GAC) was developed and evaluated to assess the ability of biofiltration to treat ACN. In addition to following the course of treatability of ACN, kinetics of ACN biodegradation during both recycle batch and open modes of operation by immobilized and free cells were evaluated. For fed-batch mode bioreactor with immobilized cells, almost complete ACN removal (>95%) was achieved at a flow rate of 0.1 microl/min ACN and 0.8 microl/min toluene (TOL) (for comparative purposes this is equivalent to 6.9 mg l(-1) h(-1) ACN and 83.52 mg l(-1) h(-1) TOL). In a single-pass mode bioreactor with immobilized cells, at ACN inlet loads of 100-200 mg l(-1) h(-1) and TOL inlet load of approximately 400 mg l(-1) h(-1), with empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 8 min, ACN removal efficiency was approximately 90%. The three-dimensional structure and characteristics of the biofilm were investigated using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). CLSM images revealed a robust and heterogeneous biofilm, with microcolonies interspersed with voids and channels. Analysis of the precise measurement of biofilm characteristics using COMSTAT agreed with the assumption that both biomass and biofilm thickness increased along the carbon column depth.

  14. Dopamine as a novel anti-migration factor of vascular smooth muscle cells through D1A and D1B receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the roles of rat vascular dopamine D1A and D1B receptors in vascular smooth muscle cell migration, the effect of antisense oligonucleotides to D1A receptors (+1 to +21 of rat D1A receptors) and to D1B receptors (-12 to +6 of rat D1B receptors) on dopamine-mediated suppression of platelet-derived growth factor BB-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell migration, evaluated by the Boyden's chamber method, was studied. Increased vascular smooth muscle cell migration by platelet-derived growth factor BB (5 ng/ml) was suppressed significantly by co-incubation with dopamine (0.025-10 micromol/l) (by 15-59%). This suppression by 10 micromol/l dopamine was reversed by D1A antisense oligonucleotides (46%) and D1B antisense oligonucleotides (51%), but by neither the sense nor the random sense oligodeoxynucleotides to these receptors. The suppression by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (21-51%) is dose dependent (1-10 micromol/l) and time dependent (0-4 h). Dopamine (10 micromol/l)-induced cyclic AMP formation is also suppressed by D1A antisense oligonucleotides (50%) and D1B antisense oligonucleotides (58%), but by neither the sense nor the random sense oligodeoxynucleotides to these receptors. The platelet-derived growth factor BB (5 ng/ml)-mediated activation of phospholipase D and protein kinase C activities were significantly suppressed by co-incubation with 10 micromol/l dopamine, which was reversed by D1A antisense oligonucleotides (45%) and D1B antisense oligonucleotides (50%) but by neither the sense nor the random sense oligodeoxynucleotides to these receptors. These results suggest that vascular D1A and D1B receptors inhibit migration of vascular smooth muscle cells, possibly through cyclic AMP activation and the suppression of phospholipase D and protein kinase C activities.

  15. Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269 3-Ketosteroid 9 alpha-Hydroxylase, a Two-Component Iron-Sulfur-Containing Monooxygenase with Subtle Steroid Substrate Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrusma, M.; Dijkhuizen, L.; van der Geize, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the biochemical characterization of a purified and reconstituted two-component 3-ketosteroid 9 alpha-hydroxylase (KSH). KSH of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269, consisting of a ferredoxin reductase (KshB) and a terminal oxygenase (KshA), was heterologously expressed in

  16. The Reaction Kinetics of 3-Hydroxybenzoate 6-Hydroxylase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 Provide an Understanding of the para-Hydroxylation Enzyme Catalytic Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sucharitakul, J.; Tongsook, C.; Pakotiprapha, D.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Chaiyen, P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxybenzoate 6-hydroxylase (3HB6H) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 is an NADH-specific flavoprotein monooxygenase that catalyzes the para-hydroxylation of 3-hydroxybenzoate (3HB) to form 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (2,5-DHB). Based on results from stopped-flow spectrophotometry, the reduced enzyme-3HB c

  17. Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269 3-Ketosteroid 9 alpha-Hydroxylase, a Two-Component Iron-Sulfur-Containing Monooxygenase with Subtle Steroid Substrate Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrusma, M.; Dijkhuizen, L.; van der Geize, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the biochemical characterization of a purified and reconstituted two-component 3-ketosteroid 9 alpha-hydroxylase (KSH). KSH of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269, consisting of a ferredoxin reductase (KshB) and a terminal oxygenase (KshA), was heterologously expressed in Escherichi

  18. Isolation and characterization of a rhodococcus species strain able to grow on ortho- and para-xylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jung Yeon; Kim, Dockyu; Bae, Hyun Won; Choi, Ki Young; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Eungbin

    2005-08-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain YU6 was isolated from soil for the ability to grow on o-xylene as the sole carbon and energy source. Unlike most other o-xylene-degrading bacteria, YU6 is able to grow on p-xylene. Numerous growth substrate range experiments, in addition to the ring-cleavage enzyme assay data, suggest that YU6 initially metabolizes o- and p-xylene by direct aromatic ring oxidation. This leads to the formation of dimethylcatechols, which was further degraded largely through meta-cleavage pathway. The gene encoding meta-cleavage dioxygenase enzyme was PCR cloned from genomic YU6 DNA using previously known gene sequence data from the o-xylene-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17. Subsequent sequencing of the 918-bp PCR product revealed a 98% identity to the gene, encoding methylcatechol 2,3-dioxygenase from DK17. PFGE analysis followed by Southern hybridization with the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene demonstrated that the gene is located on an approximately 560-kb megaplasmid, designated pJYJ1.

  19. Microaerophilic degradation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by three Rhodococcus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, M E; Perreault, N; Hawari, J

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the degradation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by three Rhodococcus strains under anaerobic, microaerophilic (RDX as the sole nitrogen source. RDX and RDX metabolite concentrations were measured over time. Under microaerophilic conditions, the bacteria degraded RDX, albeit about 60-fold slower than under fully aerobic conditions. Only the breakdown product, 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal (NDAB) accumulated to measurable concentrations under microaerophilic conditions. RDX degraded quickly under both aerated and static aerobic conditions (DO allowed to drop below 1 mg l(-1)) with the accumulation of both NDAB and methylenedinitramine (MEDINA). No RDX degradation was observed under strict anaerobic conditions. The Rhodococcus strains did not degrade RDX under strict anaerobic conditions, while slow degradation was observed under microaerophilic conditions. The RDX metabolite NDAB was detected under both microaerophilic and aerobic conditions, while MEDINA was detected only under aerobic conditions. IMPACT AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY: This work confirmed the production of MEDINA under aerobic conditions, which has not been previously associated with aerobic RDX degradation by these organisms. More importantly, it demonstrated that aerobic rhodococci are able to degrade RDX under a broader range of oxygen concentrations than previously reported.

  20. Development of ELISA test for determination of the level of antibodies against Rhodococcus equi in equine serum and colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Kaba, Jarosław; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Nowicki, Mariusz; Szaluś-Jordanow, Olga; Kita, Jerzy

    2012-10-15

    Rhodococcus equi infection occurs worldwide and is one of the major causes of losing foals in the first six months of life. The application of serological tests in the diagnostics of rhodococcosis is limited, however they play a crucial role in immunological studies. The objective of this study was to develop and standardize ELISA test for the determination of the level of antibodies against Rhodococcus equi in equine serum and colostrum.Bacterial cell lysate was used as antigen. The test was standardized on 175 sera obtained from adult horses kept on rhodococcosis-free and endemic farms. Positive and negative control sera were used. The test detected IgG antibodies mainly against VapA protein, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis. The test was easy to perform, did not require inactivation of sera and had low well-to-well variation. The shelf life of antigen-coated ELISA plates was 21 days.The test allowed to reveal significant increase of R. equi-specific antibodies in both serum and colostrum in response to the vaccination (p<0.001). Therefore it can be applied to the evaluation of efficacy of immunization. Moreover, no statistically significant difference in the baseline antibody level in adult horses from rhodococcosis-free and endemic farm was revealed (α=0.05). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella species by 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Sharon; Xiao, Meng; Sorrell, Tania; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shuo; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    The identification of fastidious aerobic Actinomycetes such as Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella has remained a challenge leading to clinically significant misclassifications. This study is intended to examine the feasibility of partial 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing for the identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella, and defined potential reference sequences for species from each of these genera. The 16S rRNA gene sequence based identification algorithm for species identification was used and enhanced by aligning test sequences with reference sequences from the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature. Conventional PCR based 16S rRNA gene sequencing and the alignment of the isolate 16S rRNA gene sequence with reference sequences accurately identified 100% of clinical strains of aerobic Actinomycetes. While partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of reference type strains matched with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 19 isolates in our data set, another 13 strains demonstrated a degree of polymorphism with a 1-4 bp difference in the regions of difference. 5'-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing, coupled with the assignment of well defined reference sequences to clinically relevant species of bacteria, can be a useful strategy for improving the identification of clinically relevant aerobic Actinomycetes.

  2. Individual or synchronous biodegradation of di-n-butyl phthalate and phenol by Rhodococcus ruber strain DP-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhixing; Niu, Chengzhen; Lu, Zhenmei, E-mail: lzhenmei@zju.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • A Rhodococcus ruber strain degraded DBP and phenol. • Degradation kinetics of DBP or phenol fit modified first-order models. • Degradation interaction between DBP and phenol was studied by strain DP-2. • The degradation genes transcriptional were quantified by RT-qPCR. - Abstract: The bacterial strain DP-2, identified as Rhodococcus ruber, is able to effectively degrade di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and phenol. Degradation kinetics of DBP and phenol at different initial concentrations revealed DBP and phenol degradation to fit modified first-order models. The half-life of DBP degradation ranged from 15.81 to 27.75 h and phenol degradation from 14.52 to 45.52 h under the initial concentrations of 600–1200 mg/L. When strain DP-2 was cultured with a mixture of DBP (800 mg/L) and phenol (700 mg/L), DBP degradation rate was found to be only slightly influenced; however, phthalic acid (PA) accumulated, and phenol degradation was clearly inhibited during synchronous degradation. Transcriptional levels of degradation genes, phenol hydroxylase (pheu) and phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase (pht), decreased significantly more during synchronous degradation than during individual degradation. Quantitative estimation of individual or synchronous degradation kinetics is essential to manage mixed hazardous compounds through biodegradation in industrial waste disposal.

  3. Identification of Rhodococcus equi lipids recognized by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Seth P.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Mealey, Robert H.; Alperin, Debra C.; Naka, Takashi; Goda, Reina

    2010-01-01

    Immune adult horses have CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that recognize and lyse Rhodococcus equi-infected cells in an equine lymphocyte alloantigen (ELA)-A [classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I]-unrestricted fashion. As protein antigens are MHC class I-restricted, the lack of restriction suggests that the bacterial antigens being recognized by the host are not proteins. The goals of this study were to test the hypothesis that these CTLs recognize unique R. equi cell-wall lipids related to mycobacterial lipids. Initial experiments showed that treatment of soluble R. equi antigen with broadly reactive proteases did not significantly diminish the ability of the antigen to stimulate R. equi-specific CTLs. R. equi-specific CTLs were also shown to lyse target cells (equine macrophages) pulsed with an R. equi lipid extract. Analysis of the R. equi lipid by TLC and MS (MALDI-TOF and ES) indicated that the extracted antigen consisted of three primary fractions: trehalose monomycolate (TMM), trehalose dimycolate (TDM) and cardiolipin (CL). ELA-A-mismatched cells pulsed with purified TMM and CL, but not the TDM fraction, were recognized and lysed by R. equi-specific CTLs. Because of their role in immune clearance and pathogenesis, transcription of the cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) was also measured in response to R. equi lipids by using real-time PCR; elevated IFN-γ, but not IL-4, was associated with host clearance of the bacteria. The whole-cell R. equi lipid and all three R. equi lipid fractions resulted in marked increases in IFN-γ transcription, but no increase in IL-4 transcription. Together, these data support the hypothesis that immune recognition of unique lipids in the bacterial cell wall is an important component of the protective immune response to R. equi. The results also identify potential lipid antigens not previously shown to be recognized by CTLs in an important, naturally occurring actinomycete

  4. Imaging and pathological findings of AIDS complicated by pulmonary Rhodococcus equi infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-jun; CHENG Jing-liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) infection commonly occurs in grazing areas,especially in patients with AIDS or with T-lymphocyte immuno-deficiencies. Literature reviews revealed that cases radiologically and pathologically diagnosed of AIDS complicated by R. equi infection are rare. This study aimed to investigate the imaging features and pathological basis of AIDS complicated by pulmonary R. equi infection.Methods A total of 13 cases of AIDS complicated by pulmonary R. equi infection were retrospectively analyzed based on their imaging,bacterial culture and pathological data,including 10 cases by chest CT scanning and X-ray radiology and 3 cases by only X-ray radiology. All 13 cases were definitely diagnosed by bacterial culture,including one by CT-guided pulmonary puncture with following H&E staining and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining for diagnostic biopsy and another one by bronchial biopsy with following H&E staining and PAS staining for pathological diagnosis. The imaging findings and the pathological findings of AIDS complicated by pulmonary R. equi infection were compared and evaluated.Results Totally 9 subjects (70%) had radiological demonstrations of central ball liked high density shadows in unilateral pulmonary hilus areas;10 (77%),cavities and liquefied levels;3 (23%),pleural effussion. The foci were found in pulmonary inner zone in 10 subjects (77%) and in pulmonary outer zone in one subject (7%). The pathological findings included intra-alveolar hemorrhage,lymphocyte infiltration and granulation tissue proliferation,which were in line with the pathological process of necrotic pneumonia. After 8-month follow-up of anti-R. equi therapy of these 13 cases,9 cases had obviously decreased or shrunk pulmonary cavities,one died,one missed follow-up,one completely absorbed foci and one did not receive reexaminations.Conclusions The radiological demonstrations of AIDS complicated by pulmonary R. equiinfection are central ball liked high density areas

  5. Haplotype variation of Glu-D1 locus and the origin of Glu-D1d allele conferring superior end-use qualities in common wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenying Dong

    Full Text Available In higher plants, seed storage proteins (SSPs are frequently expressed from complex gene families, and allelic variation of SSP genes often affects the quality traits of crops. In common wheat, the Glu-D1 locus, encoding 1Dx and 1Dy SSPs, has multiple alleles. The Glu-D1d allele frequently confers superior end-use qualities to commercial wheat varieties. Here, we studied the haplotype structure of Glu-D1 genomic region and the origin of Glu-D1d. Using seven diagnostic DNA markers, 12 Glu-D1 haplotypes were detected among common wheat, European spelt wheat (T. spelta, a primitive hexaploid relative of common wheat, and Aegilops tauschii (the D genome donor of hexaploid wheat. By comparatively analyzing Glu-D1 haplotypes and their associated 1Dx and 1Dy genes, we deduce that the haplotype carrying Glu-D1d was likely differentiated in the ancestral hexaploid wheat around 10,000 years ago, and was subsequently transmitted to domesticated common wheat and T. spelta. A group of relatively ancient Glu-D1 haplotypes was discovered in Ae. tauschii, which may serve for the evolution of other haplotypes. Moreover, a number of new Glu-D1d variants were found in T. spelta. The main steps in Glu-D1d differentiation are proposed. The implications of our work for enhancing the utility of Glu-D1d in wheat quality improvement and studying the SSP alleles in other crop species are discussed.

  6. Primer caso descrito en Chile de neumonía y colitis por Rhodococcus equi en un potrillo Rhodococcus equi pneumonia and colitis in a foal: First report in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes, E.; Gallego, R; A.M. CANAL; ARAYA, O.; E. CHAHUÁN; Thomas, P; Zamora, J

    2000-01-01

    Se describe, por primera vez en el país, el aislamiento de Rhodococcus equi a partir de una infección en un potrillo de 3 meses de edad, que sufría de enteritis y neumonía crónica. También, se dan a conocer las lesiones constatadas en el examen postmortem e histopatológico, consistentes en nódulos pulmonares múltiples con zonas de inflamación crónica, necrosis central con exudado purulento y nódulos linfáticos bronquiales aumentados de tamaño: hiperémicos y exudativos. Además, el colon mayor ...

  7. ANTIBODIES DETECTION TO RHODOCOCCUS EQUI IN VACCINATED MARES AND FOALS BY INDIRECT ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY DETECÇÃO DE ANTICORPOS ANTI-Rhodococcus equi EM ÉGUAS VACINADAS E POTROS PELO ENSAIO IMUNOENZIMÁTICO INDIRETO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Braga Martins

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The humoral immune response in ‘Brasileiro de Hipismo’ (BH breed and Breton mares was compared after using the Rhodococcus equi vaccine, and the effect of maternal immunoprophylaxis on antibody transfer to newborn foals through the colostrum was evaluated. Blood samples were obtained from 16 pregnant mares vaccinated against R. equi, 16 foals (offspring from vaccinated mares, 8 unvaccinated pregnant mares and 8 foals (offspring from control mares. R equi serum antibody titers were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA after the immunization of pregnant mares using two different antigens, APTX and the commercial vaccine. There was no difference in antibody production between the two breeds. Significant increase in R. equi antibody titers was observed in mares after vaccination (p<0.01, reaching a peak at foaling. Afterward, titers tended to decrease for up to 60 days after birth (dab and then remained constant until 150 dab. Significant antibody transfer to the vaccinated mares newborn foal occurred through the colostrum. A slight reduction in antibody titer was observed at 60 dab, after which titers remained constant for up to 150 dab. The commercial antigen detected significantly higher antibody titers than did APTX (p<0.01.

    KEY WORDS: Antibodies, ELISA, Rhodococcus equi, immunization, foals.
    Comparou-se a resposta imune humoral em éguas da raça Brasileiro de Hipismo (BH e Bretão, após a imunização com a vacina anti-Rhodococcus equi, bem como avaliou-se o efeito da imunoprofilaxia ativa materna na transferência de anticorpos pelo colostro em equinos recém-nascidos. Coletaram-se amostras sanguíneas de dezesseis éguas prenhes vacinadas contra R. equi, dezesseis potros filhos das éguas vacinadas, oito éguas prenhes não vacinadas e oito potros filhos das éguas não vacinadas. Determinou-se a titulação de anticorpos anti-R. equi utilizando-se o ensaio imunoenzimático indireto (ELISA com os dois

  8. Minimal inhibitory concentration of azithromycin in Rhodococcus equi strains isolated from foals Concentração inibitória mínima da azitromicina em linhagens de Rhodococcus equi isoladas de potros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Ribeiro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O perfil de sensibilidade microbiana e a concentração inibitória mínima (MIC da azitromicina para 42 cepas de Rhodococcus equi isoladas de potros, no Brasil, e em uma cepa-controle, foi avaliado, respectivamente, pelos métodos de difusão com discos e E-test. A azitromicina apresentou 100% de efetividade in vitro para todas as cepas em ambos os testes. As cepas de R. equi apresentaram MIC90 para azitromicina em valores <1.5µg/ml. Este estudo mostra a alta efetividade da azitromicina em linhagens de R. equi isoladas no Brasil, sugerindo o uso dessa droga como alternativa na terapia da rodococose em potros.

  9. Rhodococcus equi Parte 1: epidemiologia, manifestações clínicas, diagnóstico e tratamento Rhodococcus equi Part 1: epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Rusca Correa Porto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A rodococose é uma doença de distribuição mundial causada pelo Rhodococcus equi, responsável por taxas elevadas de mortalidade e grandes perdas econômicas relacionadas à pneumonia grave em potros com menos de seis meses de idade. Essa revisão inclui a etiologia, epidemiologia e patogenia da doença com atenção especial à proteína de superfície VapA, seu principal determinante de virulência. As principais manifestações clínicas são apresentadas, bem como os métodos diagnósticos e as suas aplicações, incluindo as novas estratégias em desenvolvimento. Da mesma maneira, as medidas terapêuticas mais utilizadas são também discutidas, abordando principalmente o uso de antibióticos capazes de penetrar nas formações abscedantes.Rodococosis is a disease that has a worldwide distribution caused by Rhodococcus equi. In foals under six months high mortality and great econimic losses are related to this bacterial pneumonia. This review includes the ethiology, epidemiology and pathogenesis of the disease with focus on the role of VapA, a surface protein, as the major determinant of virulence. The clinical manifestations are reviewed and diagnostic methods and their applications are commented, including new strategies that are still being developed. Likewise, the most common clinical therapies are discussed specially those using antibiotics that are known to penetrate in abcesses.

  10. 26 CFR 1.666(d)-1A - Information required from trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information required from trusts. 1.666(d)-1A Section 1.666(d)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(d)-1A Information required from trusts. (a)...

  11. 26 CFR 1.411(d)-1 - Coordination of vesting and discrimination requirements. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coordination of vesting and discrimination requirements. 1.411(d)-1 Section 1.411(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE.... § 1.411(d)-1 Coordination of vesting and discrimination requirements....

  12. 26 CFR 1.167(d)-1 - Agreement as to useful life and rates of depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... depreciation. 1.167(d)-1 Section 1.167(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(d)-1 Agreement as to useful life and rates of depreciation. After August 16... respect to the estimated useful life, method and rate of depreciation and treatment of salvage of...

  13. Cyclin D1 repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenguang; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Zhou, Jian Nian; Fu, Maofu; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Albanese, Chris; Li, Zhiping; Wu, Kongming; Hulit, James; Neumeister, Peter; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Brownlee, Michael; Scherer, Philipp E; Jones, Joan G; Whitney, Kathleen D; Donehower, Lawrence A; Harris, Emily L; Rohan, Thomas; Johns, David C; Pestell, Richard G

    2003-09-01

    The cyclin D1 gene is overexpressed in human breast cancers and is required for oncogene-induced tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor selectively activated by ligands of the thiazolidinedione class. PPAR gamma induces hepatic steatosis, and liganded PPAR gamma promotes adipocyte differentiation. Herein, cyclin D1 inhibited ligand-induced PPAR gamma function, transactivation, expression, and promoter activity. PPAR gamma transactivation induced by the ligand BRL49653 was inhibited by cyclin D1 through a pRB- and cdk-independent mechanism, requiring a region predicted to form an helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure. The cyclin D1 HLH region was also required for repression of the PPAR gamma ligand-binding domain linked to a heterologous DNA binding domain. Adipocyte differentiation by PPAR gamma-specific ligands (BRL49653, troglitazone) was enhanced in cyclin D1(-/-) fibroblasts and reversed by retroviral expression of cyclin D1. Homozygous deletion of the cyclin D1 gene, enhanced expression by PPAR gamma ligands of PPAR gamma and PPAR gamma-responsive genes, and cyclin D1(-/-) mice exhibit hepatic steatosis. Finally, reduction of cyclin D1 abundance in vivo using ponasterone-inducible cyclin D1 antisense transgenic mice, increased expression of PPAR gamma in vivo. The inhibition of PPAR gamma function by cyclin D1 is a new mechanism of signal transduction cross talk between PPAR gamma ligands and mitogenic signals that induce cyclin D1.

  14. Identification of Virulence-Associated Plasmids in Rhodococcus equi in Humans with and without Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Takai, Shinji; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Ferreira Camello, Thereza Cristina; Ohno, Ryoko; Okano, Hajime; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Virulence of Rhodococcus equi strains from 20 humans in Brazil was investigated by using a polymerase chain reaction to characterize isolates as virulent (VapA), intermediately virulent (VapB), and avirulent. Nine isolates were obtained from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive patients, six from HIV-negative patients, and five from patients of unknown status. Five isolates were VapB positive, four were VapA positive, and eleven were avirulent. Among the nine isolates from HIV-positive patients, five contained VapB plasmids and two contained VapA plasmids. Five VapB-positive isolates had the type 8 virulence plasmid. Eleven of the patients had a history of contact with livestock and/or a farm environment, and none had contact with pigs. PMID:21896813

  15. Gene Cloning and Characterization of Multiple Alkane Hydroxylase Systems in Rhodococcus Strains Q15 and NRRL B-16531

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The alkane hydroxylase systems of two Rhodococcus strains (NRRL B-16531 and Q15, isolated from different geographical locations) were characterized. Both organisms contained at least four alkane monooxygenase gene homologs (alkB1, alkB2, alkB3, and alkB4). In both strains, the alkB1 and alkB2 homologs were part of alk gene clusters, each encoding two rubredoxins (rubA1 and rubA2; rubA3 and rubA4), a putative TetR transcriptional regulatory protein (alkU1; alkU2), and, in the alkB1 cluster, a ...

  16. Biosynthesis of terephthalic acid, isophthalic acid and their derivatives from the corresponding dinitriles by tetrachloroterephthalonitrile-induced Rhodococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu-Cai; Wu, Ya-Dong; Pan, Xue-He; Ma, Cui-Luan

    2014-02-01

    The nitrilase from Rhodococcus sp. CCZU10-1 catalyses the hydrolysis of dinitriles to acids without the formation of amides and cyanocarboxylic acids. It was induced by benzonitrile and its analogues (tetrachloroterephthalonitrile > ε-caprolactam > benzonitrile > phenylacetonitrile), and had activity towards aromatic nitriles (terephthalonitrile > tetrachloroterephthalonitrile > isophthalonitrile > tetrachloroisophthalonitrile > tetrafluoroterephthalonitrile > benzonitrile). After the optimization, the highest nitrilase induction [311 U/(g DCW)] was achieved with tetrachloroterephthalonitrile (1 mM) in the medium after 24 h at 30 °C after optimum enzyme activity was at pH 6.8 and at 30 °C. Efficient biocatalyst recycling was achieved by cell immobilization in calcium alginate, with a product-to-biocatalyst ratios of 776 g terephthalic acid/g DCW and 630 g isophthalic acid/g DCW.

  17. Comparative genomic analyses reveal a lack of a substantial signature of host adaptation in Rhodococcus equi ('Prescottella equi').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangal, Vartul; Jones, Amanda L; Goodfellow, Michael; Sutcliffe, Iain C; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi ('Prescottella equi') is a pathogenic actinomycete primarily infecting horses but has emerged as an opportunistic human pathogen. We have sequenced the genome of the type strain of this species, R. equi strain C7(T) , and compared the genome with that of another foal isolate 103S and of a human isolate ATCC 33707. The R. equi strains are closely related to each other and yet distantly related to other rhodococci and Nocardia brasiliensis. The comparison of gene contents among R. equi strains revealed minor differences that could be associated with host adaptation from foals to humans, including the presence of a paa operon in the human isolate, which is potentially involved in pathogenesis. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Genomics of Rhodococcus equi Virulence Plasmids Indicates Host-Driven Evolution of the vap Pathogenicity Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Iain; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2017-05-01

    The conjugative virulence plasmid is a key component of the Rhodococcus equi accessory genome essential for pathogenesis. Three host-associated virulence plasmid types have been identified the equine pVAPA and porcine pVAPB circular variants, and the linear pVAPN found in bovine (ruminant) isolates. We recently characterized the R. equi pangenome (Anastasi E, et al. 2016. Pangenome and phylogenomic analysis of the pathogenic actinobacterium Rhodococcus equi. Genome Biol Evol. 8:3140-3148.) and we report here the comparative analysis of the virulence plasmid genomes. Plasmids within each host-associated type were highly similar despite their diverse origins. Variation was accounted for by scattered single nucleotide polymorphisms and short nucleotide indels, while larger indels-mostly in the plasticity region near the vap pathogencity island (PAI)-defined plasmid genomic subtypes. Only one of the plasmids analyzed, of pVAPN type, was exceptionally divergent due to accumulation of indels in the housekeeping backbone. Each host-associated plasmid type carried a unique PAI differing in vap gene complement, suggesting animal host-specific evolution of the vap multigene family. Complete conservation of the vap PAI was observed within each host-associated plasmid type. Both diversity of host-associated plasmid types and clonality of specific chromosomal-plasmid genomic type combinations were observed within the same R. equi phylogenomic subclade. Our data indicate that the overall strong conservation of the R. equi host-associated virulence plasmids is the combined result of host-driven selection, lateral transfer between strains, and geographical spread due to international livestock exchanges. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. An Invertron-Like Linear Plasmid Mediates Intracellular Survival and Virulence in Bovine Isolates of Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Rello, Ana; Hapeshi, Alexia; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Meijer, Wim G; MacArthur, Iain; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel host-associated virulence plasmid in Rhodococcus equi, pVAPN, carried by bovine isolates of this facultative intracellular pathogenic actinomycete. Surprisingly, pVAPN is a 120-kb invertron-like linear replicon unrelated to the circular virulence plasmids associated with equine (pVAPA) and porcine (pVAPB variant) R. equi isolates. pVAPN is similar to the linear plasmid pNSL1 from Rhodococcus sp. NS1 and harbors six new vap multigene family members (vapN to vapS) in a vap pathogenicity locus presumably acquired via en bloc mobilization from a direct predecessor of equine pVAPA. Loss of pVAPN rendered R. equi avirulent in macrophages and mice. Mating experiments using an in vivo transconjugant selection strategy demonstrated that pVAPN transfer is sufficient to confer virulence to a plasmid-cured R. equi recipient. Phylogenetic analyses assigned the vap multigene family complement from pVAPN, pVAPA, and pVAPB to seven monophyletic clades, each containing plasmid type-specific allelic variants of a precursor vap gene carried by the nearest vap island ancestor. Deletion of vapN, the predicted "bovine-type" allelic counterpart of vapA, essential for virulence in pVAPA, abrogated pVAPN-mediated intramacrophage proliferation and virulence in mice. Our findings support a model in which R. equi virulence is conferred by host-adapted plasmids. Their central role is mediating intracellular proliferation in macrophages, promoted by a key vap determinant present in the common ancestor of the plasmid-specific vap islands, with host tropism as a secondary trait selected during coevolution with specific animal species. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Berberine Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression through Proteasomal Degradation in Human Hepatoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ning Wang; Xuanbin Wang; Hor-Yue Tan; Sha Li; Chi Man Tsang; Sai-Wah Tsao; Yibin Feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the underlying mechanism on berberine-induced Cyclin D1 degradation in human hepatic carcinoma. We observed that berberine could suppress both in vitro and in vivo expression of Cyclin D1 in hepatoma cells. Berberine exhibits dose- and time-dependent inhibition on Cyclin D1 expression in human hepatoma cell HepG2. Berberine increases the phosphorylation of Cyclin D1 at Thr286 site and potentiates Cyclin D1 nuclear export to cytoplasm for proteasomal degrada...

  1. Alkanesulfonate degradation by novel strains of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Tsukamurella wratislaviensis and Rhodococcus sp., and evidence for an ethanesulfonate monooxygenase in A. xylosoxidans strain AE4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdlenbruch, B N; Kelly, D P; Murrell, J C

    2001-12-01

    Novel isolates of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Tsukamurella wratislaviensis and a Rhodococcus sp. are described. These grew with short-chain alkanesulfonates as their sole source of carbon and energy. T. wratislaviensis strain SB2 grew well with C(3)-C(6) linear alkanesulfonates, isethionate and taurine, Rhodococcus sp. strain CB1 used C(3)-C(10) linear alkanesulfonates, taurine and cysteate, but neither strain grew with ethanesulfonate. In contrast, A. xylosoxidans strain AE4 grew well with ethanesulfonate, making it the first bacterium to be described which can grow with this compound. It also grew with unsubstituted C(3)-C(5) alkanesulfonates and isethionate. Hydrolysis was excluded as a mechanism for alkanesulfonate metabolism in these strains; and evidence is given for a diversity of uptake and desulfonatase systems. We provide evidence for an initial monooxygenase-dependent desulfonation in the metabolism of ethanesulfonate and propanesulfonate by A. xylosoxidans strain AE4.

  2. Members of the genera Paenibacillus and Rhodococcus harbor genes homologous to enterococcal glycopeptide resistance genes vanA and vanB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, L.; Christensen, H.; Hasman, Henrik;

    2004-01-01

    Genes homologous to enterococcal glycopeptide resistance genes vanA and vanB were found in glycopeptide-resistant Paenibacillus and Rhodococcus strains from soil. The putative D-Ala:D-Lac ligase genes in Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus PT-2B1 and Paenibacillus apiarius PA-B2B were closely related...... to vanA (92 and 87%) and flanked by genes homologous to vanH and vanX in vanA operons....

  3. 红球菌在石油烃类物质降解中的作用%Progress in Petroleum Hydrocarbon Biodegradation by Rhodococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张光军; 方萍

    2013-01-01

    红球菌属是有机污染物降解的重要微生物之一.由于红球菌能够适应各种各样的底物环境,具有极强的有机溶剂耐受性和很宽的降解谱,同时它们还能通过产生表面活性剂和改变细胞表面组成结构来提升自身对于疏水性环境的适应能力,因此,红球菌在石油污染物降解及石油污染的生物修复等领域有着极其重要的应用价值.文章基于近年来在红球菌降解石油烃方面的研究进展,从红球菌适应疏水性环境的机制、石油烃中烷烃、环烷烃、芳香烃的降解途径等几个方面进行综述,同时对今后研究的方向进行了展望.%Rhodococcus as a sort of microbial for organic compounds biodegradation with strong organic solvent tolerance and wide degradation spectrum, can adapt to various substrates, as well as promoting its adaption to hydrophobic surroundings by producing surfactants or changing cell surface composition and structure.Due to the characteristics, Rhodococcus acts extremely important roles in oil pollution bioremediation.Based on progress in petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation by Rhodococcus, the adaption mechanism to hydrophobic environment, the degradation process of alkane, cycloparafin hydrocarbon and aromatics were reviewed.The prospect related to Rhodococcus in bioremediation in future was also proposed.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Strain Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10, a Potential Biodegrading and Antibacterial Bacterium Isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jo, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The organism showed mild antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This study reports the genome sequence of R. kyotonensis KB10. This bacterium contains an ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster and has the potential to degrade nitroaromatic compounds. The identified bacterium may be a suitable biocontrol agent and degrader of environmental pollutants. PMID:27389269

  5. ESTANDARIZACIÓN DE UNA PRUEBA DE PCR-RFLP PARA LA IDENTIFICACIÓN DE Rhodococcus rhodnii EN INSECTOS TRIATOMINOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rodríguez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Triatomines are insects of great importance for public health because they transmit the parasite Trypano-soma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas disease. These insects harbour intestinal symbiotic flora from theRhodococcus genus, which provide the nutrients lacking in the insect diet, nutrients which are essentialfor normal insect development and growth. Study of these bacteria is of special interest due to thepossibility of designing paratransgenesis control strategies as well as for implications that interactionsbetween these bacteria and parasites can develop inside triatomine insects. Taking into account thedifficulty in identifying bacteria from the Rhodococcus genus by traditional methods, in this work apolymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis wasstandardized to identify Rhodococcus rhodnii isolated from Rhodnius prolixus. Gene coding for bacterial16 S rRNA was amplified and obtained products were sequenced and digested with several restrictionenzymes. Results show a total correlation between number and size of the restriction fragments obtainedin vitro and in silico as well. Therefore, applicability of this PCR-RFLP assay for R. rhodnii identificationhas been demonstrated.

  6. Identification and Analysis of New Puroindoline Pina-D1o%Pina新等位变异Pina-D1o的分离及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘迪; 陈文杰; 张波; 刘登才; 刘宝龙; 张怀刚

    2015-01-01

    Puroindoline基因(Pina和Pinb)是控制小麦籽粒硬度的主效基因,决定小麦加工品质,分离该基因的新等位变异有利于小麦籽粒硬度性状的改良.采用同源克隆方法从节节麦(Aegilops tauschii,DD PI603224)中分离到一个Pina新等位变异Pina-D1o.生物信息学分析表明,该基因编码区全长447 bp,编码148个氨基酸残基,具有小麦族作物PinA蛋白所特有的WRWWKWWK色氨酸结构域和10个半胱氨酸所形成的5个二硫键结构.根据核苷酸序列构建的拓扑树,Pina-D1o与Pina-D1m、ina D1n相同,均由功能性等位变异Pina-D1a发生单基因突变而来,因而Pina-D1o有可能来源于Pina-D1a.可见,新等位变异类型Pina-D1o的发现可以为小麦的籽粒硬度改良提供基因资源.

  7. Cocaine disrupts histamine H3 receptor modulation of dopamine D1 receptor signaling: σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes as key targets for reducing cocaine's effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Moreno-Delgado, David; Navarro, Gemma; Hoffmann, Hanne M; Fuentes, Silvia; Rosell-Vilar, Santi; Gasperini, Paola; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Medrano, Mireia; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric; McCormick, Peter J

    2014-03-05

    The general effects of cocaine are not well understood at the molecular level. What is known is that the dopamine D1 receptor plays an important role. Here we show that a key mechanism may be cocaine's blockade of the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of D1 receptor function. This blockade requires the σ1 receptor and occurs upon cocaine binding to σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes. The cocaine-mediated disruption leaves an uninhibited D1 receptor that activates Gs, freely recruits β-arrestin, increases p-ERK 1/2 levels, and induces cell death when over activated. Using in vitro assays with transfected cells and in ex vivo experiments using both rats acutely treated or self-administered with cocaine along with mice depleted of σ1 receptor, we show that blockade of σ1 receptor by an antagonist restores the protective H3 receptor-mediated brake on D1 receptor signaling and prevents the cell death from elevated D1 receptor signaling. These findings suggest that a combination therapy of σ1R antagonists with H3 receptor agonists could serve to reduce some effects of cocaine.

  8. The Rab-GTPase-activating protein TBC1D1 regulates skeletal muscle glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szekeres, Ferenc; Chadt, Alexandra; Tom, Robby Z

    2012-01-01

    The Rab-GTPase-activating protein TBC1D1 has emerged as a novel candidate involved in metabolic regulation. Our aim was to determine whether TBC1D1 is involved in insulin as well as energy-sensing signals controlling skeletal muscle metabolism. TBC1D1-deficient congenic B6.SJL-Nob1.10 (Nob1.10(SJL...... be explained partly by a 50% reduction in GLUT4 protein, since proximal signaling at the level of Akt, AMPK, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) was unaltered. Paradoxically, in vivo insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake was increased in EDL and tibialis anterior muscle from TBC1D1-deficient mice....... In conclusion, TBC1D1 plays a role in regulation of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Moreover, functional TBC1D1 is required for AICAR- or contraction-induced metabolic responses, implicating a role in energy-sensing signals....

  9. EXPRESSION OF CYCLIN D1 AND CDK4 IN OSTEOSARCOMA OF THE JAWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司晓辉; 刘正

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze cyclin D1 and cyclin- dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) expression and their significance in osteosarcoma of the jaws. Methods: Immunohistochemical ABC method was used to detect the expression of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in 20 cases of osteosarcoma and 8 cases of osteochondroma of the jaws. Results: The positive rates of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were 65% (13/20) and 60% (12/20), respectively. There was significant positive correlation between cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression (gs=0.48, P<0.05). Both cyclin D1 and CDK4 were present in 1/8 (12.5%) osteochondroma. The positive rate was remarkably different between osteosarcoma and osteochondroma (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cyclin D1 and CDK4 are overexpressed in osteosarcoma of the jaws and closely related to its occurrence and development.

  10. PSD-95 expression controls l-DOPA dyskinesia through dopamine D1 receptor trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Gregory; Berthet, Amandine; Dehay, Benjamin; Li, Qin; Ladepeche, Laurent; Normand, Elisabeth; Dovero, Sandra; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Martin-Négrier, Marie-Laure; Chuan, Qin; Bloch, Bertrand; Choquet, Daniel; Boué-Grabot, Eric; Groc, Laurent; Bezard, Erwan

    2012-01-01

    l-DOPA–induced dyskinesia (LID), a detrimental consequence of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease, is associated with an alteration in dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and glutamate receptor interactions. We hypothesized that the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 plays a pivotal role in this process, as it interacts with D1R, regulates its trafficking and function, and is overexpressed in LID. Here, we demonstrate in rat and macaque models that disrupting the interaction between D1R and PSD-95 in the striatum reduces LID development and severity. Single quantum dot imaging revealed that this benefit was achieved primarily by destabilizing D1R localization, via increased lateral diffusion followed by increased internalization and diminished surface expression. These findings indicate that altering D1R trafficking via synapse-associated scaffolding proteins may be useful in the treatment of dyskinesia in Parkinson’s patients. PMID:23041629

  11. Aspectos epidemiológicos do Rhodococcus equi em eqüinos do Município de Bagé, RS, Brasil Epidemiological aspects of Rhodococcus equi in horses from Bagé county, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lazzari

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com o intuito de obter informações epidemiológicas sobre o Rhodococcus equi (R. equi em seis haras do município de Bagé, estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Foram coletadas 36 amostras de solo superficial e 143 de fezes de eqüinos, sendo semeadas em meio seletivo para o R. equi (NANAT e incubadas em aerobiose a 37°C por até 72 horas. Também foi coletada amostra de solo para determinação de pH e matéria orgânica (MO de cada haras. A identificação do R. equi baseou-se na pesquisa do "fator equi" e características morfológicas, tintoriais e bioquímicas. Isolou-se o microrganismo de 75% (27/36 das amostras de solo superficial e 66,43% (95/143 das amostras de fezes de eqüinos. O isolamento do R. equi em 100% dos haras analisados comprova a disseminação desta bactéria na região estudada. Os dados obtidos na análise de pH e MO do solo não demonstraram correlação com a taxa de isolamento do R. equi do solo superficial dos haras.Epidemiological aspects about Rhodococcus equi (R. equi at six horse-breeding farms from Bagé county, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were analysed. Soil samples (36 and equine feces (143 were collected. The objective was to verify the presence of R. equi in those samples. Six soil samples were also used for pH and organic matter (OM determination. R. equi identification was based on equi factor search and morfological, tintorial and biochemistry behavior. All the horse-breeding farms had the R. equi present in soil and feces samples. Soil yielded 75.00% (27/36 positive samples and 66.43% (95/143 of equine feces were positive. The results obtained for pH and OM from the soil had no correlation with the isolation of R. equi from soil samples of the different horse-breeding farms.

  12. Overexpression of PRL7D1 in Leydig Cells Causes Male Reproductive Dysfunction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaping; Su, Xingyu; Hao, Jie; Chen, Maoxin; Liu, Weijia; Liao, Xiaogang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-13

    Prolactin family 7, subfamily d, member 1 (PRL7D1) is found in mouse placenta. Our recent work showed that PRL7D1 is also present in mouse testis Leydig cells, and the expression of PRL7D1 in the testis exhibits an age-related increase. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice with Leydig cell-specific PRL7D1 overexpression to explore its function during male reproduction. Prl7d1 male mice exhibited subfertility as reflected by reduced sperm counts and litter sizes. The testes from Prl7d1 transgenic mice appeared histologically normal, but the frequency of apoptotic germ cells was increased. Prl7d1 transgenic mice also had lower testosterone concentrations than wild-type mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Prl7d1 transgenic mice have defects in the testicular expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) and hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase, 3 beta- and steroid delta-isomerase cluster (HSD3B). Further studies revealed that PRL7D1 overexpression affected the expression of transferrin (TF) in Sertoli cells. These results suggest that PRL7D1 overexpression could lead to increased germ cell apoptosis and exert an inhibitory effect on testosterone production in Leydig cells by reducing the expression of certain steroidogenic-related genes. In addition, PRL7D1 appears to have important roles in the function of Sertoli cells, which, in turn, affects male fertility. We conclude that the expression level of PRL7D1 is associated with the reproductive function of male mice.

  13. 26 CFR 1.45D-1 - New markets tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true New markets tax credit. 1.45D-1 Section 1.45D-1... Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45D-1 New markets tax credit. (a) Table...) Allowance of credit (1) In general (2) Credit allowance date (3) Applicable percentage (4) Amount paid at...

  14. Transcriptional regulation of renal dopamine D1 receptor function during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees A; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2015-05-01

    There exists a strong link between oxidative stress, renal dopaminergic system, and hypertension. It is reported that reactive oxygen species attenuate renal proximal tubular dopamine receptor (D1R) function, which disrupts sodium regulation and leads to hypertension. However, the mechanisms for renal D1R dysfunction are not clear. We investigated the role of redox-sensitive transcription factors AP1 and SP3 in transcriptional suppression of D1R gene and subsequent D1R signaling. Human kidney proximal tubular cells were treated with a pro-oxidant l-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) with and without an antioxidant tempol. In human kidney cells, BSO caused oxidative stress and reduced D1R mRNA and membrane receptor expression. Incubation of human kidney cells with SKF38393, a D1R agonist, caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of Na/K-ATPase. However, SKF38393 failed to inhibit Na/K-ATPase in BSO-treated cells. BSO increased AP1 and SP3 nuclear expression. Transfection with AP1- or SP3-specific siRNA abolished BSO-induced D1R downregulation. Treatment of rats with BSO for 4 weeks increased oxidative stress and SP3-AP1 expression and reduced D1R numbers in renal proximal tubules. These rats exhibited high blood pressure, and SKF38393 failed to inhibit proximal tubular Na/K-ATPase activity. Control rats were kept on tap water. Tempol per se had no effect on D1R expression or other signaling molecules but prevented BSO-induced oxidative stress, SP3-AP1 upregulation, and D1R dysfunction in both human kidney cells and rats. These data show that oxidative stress via AP1-SP3 activation suppresses D1R transcription and function. Tempol mitigates oxidative stress, blocks AP1-SP3 activation, and prevents D1R dysfunction and hypertension.

  15. Remote functionalization of SCH 39166: discovery of potent and selective benzazepine dopamine D1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, T K; Burnett, Duane A; Greenlee, William J; Smith, Michelle; Fawzi, Ahmad; Zhang, Hongtao; Lachowicz, Jean E

    2010-02-01

    A series of novel benzazepine derived dopamine D(1) antagonists have been discovered. These compounds are highly potent at D(1) and showed excellent selectivity over D(2) and D(4) receptors. SAR studies revealed that a variety of functional groups are tolerated on the D-ring of known tetracyclic benzazepine analog 2, SCH 39166, leading to compounds with nanomolar potency at D(1) and good selectivity over D(2)-like receptors.

  16. Striatal dopamine D1 receptor suppression impairs reward-associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Kerin K; Young, Jared W; Ji, Baohu; Nichols, David E; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2017-04-14

    Dopamine (DA) is required for reinforcement learning. Hence, disruptions in DA signaling may contribute to the learning deficits associated with psychiatric disorders. The DA D1 receptor (D1R) has been linked to learning and is a target for cognitive/motivational enhancement in patients with schizophrenia. Separating the striatal D1R contribution to learning vs. motivation, however, has been challenging. We suppressed striatal D1R expression in mice using a D1R-targeting short hairpin RNA (shRNA), delivered locally to the striatum via an adeno-associated virus (AAV). We then assessed reward- and punishment-associative learning using a probabilistic learning task and motivation using a progressive-ratio breakpoint procedure. We confirmed suppression of striatal D1Rs immunohistochemically and by testing locomotor activity after the administration of (+)-doxanthrine, a full D1R agonist, in control mice and those treated with the D1RshRNA. D1RshRNA-treated mice exhibited impaired reward-associative learning, while punishment-associative learning was spared. This deficit was unrelated to general learning impairments or amotivation, because the D1shRNA-treated mice exhibited normal Barnes maze learning and normal motivation in the progressive-ratio breakpoint procedure. Suppression of striatal D1Rs selectively impaired reward-associative learning whereas punishment-associative learning, aversion-motivated learning, and appetitive motivation were spared. Because patients with schizophrenia exhibit similar reward-associative learning deficits, D1R-targeted treatments should be investigated to improve reward learning in these patients.

  17. Observation of the $^1$S$_0$ to $^3$D$_1$ clock transition in $^{175}$Lu$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Kyle J; Roy, A; Paez, E; Wang, S; Barrett, M D

    2016-01-01

    We report the first laser spectroscopy of the $^1$S$_0$ to $^3$D$_1$ clock transition in $^{175}$Lu$^+$. Clock operation is demonstrated on three pairs of Zeeman transitions, one pair from each hyperfine manifold of the $^3$D$_1$ term. We measure the hyperfine intervals of the $^3$D$_1$ to 10 ppb uncertainty and infer the optical frequency averaged over the three hyperfine transitions to be 353.639 915 952 2 (6) THz. The lifetime of the $^3$D$_1$ state is inferred to be $174^{+23}_{-32}$ hours from the M1 coupling strength.

  18. New therapeutic strategies targeting D1-type dopamine receptors for neuropsychiatric disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Cho; Alberico, Stephanie L.; Emmons, Eric; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2017-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine acts via two major classes of receptors, D1-type and D2-type. D1 receptors are highly expressed in the striatum and can also be found in the cerebral cortex. Here we review the role of D1 dopamine signaling in two major domains: L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson’s disease and cognition in neuropsychiatric disorders. While there are many drugs targeting D2-type receptors, there are no drugs that specifically target D1 receptors. It has been difficult to use selective D1-receptor agonists for clinical applications due to issues with bioavailability, binding affinity, pharmacological kinetics, and side effects. We propose potential therapies that selectively modulate D1 dopamine signaling by targeting second messengers downstream of D1 receptors, allosteric modulators, or by making targeted modifications to D1-receptor machinery. The development of therapies specific to D1-receptor signaling could be a new frontier in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  19. Expression and therapeutic targeting of dopamine receptor-1 (D1R) in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherding, D C; Tong, W; Hugo, E R; Barnard, D F; Fox, S; LaSance, K; Shaughnessy, E; Ben-Jonathan, N

    2016-06-16

    Patients with advanced breast cancer often fail to respond to treatment, creating a need to develop novel biomarkers and effective therapeutics. Dopamine (DA) is a catecholamine that binds to five G protein-coupled receptors. We discovered expression of DA type-1 receptors (D1Rs) in breast cancer, thereby identifying these receptors as novel therapeutic targets in this disease. Strong to moderate immunoreactive D1R expression was found in 30% of 751 primary breast carcinomas, and was associated with larger tumors, higher tumor grades, node metastasis and shorter patient survival. DA and D1R agonists, signaling through the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) pathway, suppressed cell viability, inhibited invasion and induced apoptosis in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Fenoldopam, a peripheral D1R agonist that does not penetrate the brain, dramatically suppressed tumor growth in two mouse models with D1R-expressing xenografts by increasing both necrosis and apoptosis. D1R-expressing primary tumors and metastases in mice were detected by fluorescence imaging. In conclusion, D1R overexpression is associated with advanced breast cancer and poor prognosis. Activation of the D1R/cGMP/PKG pathway induces apoptosis in vitro and causes tumor shrinkage in vivo. Fenoldopam, which is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved to treat renal hypertension, could be repurposed as a novel therapeutic agent for patients with D1R-expressing tumors.

  20. Regulation of dopamine D1 receptor dynamics within the postsynaptic density of hippocampal glutamate synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Ladepeche

    Full Text Available Dopamine receptor potently modulates glutamate signalling, synaptic plasticity and neuronal network adaptations in various pathophysiological processes. Although key intracellular signalling cascades have been identified, the cellular mechanism by which dopamine and glutamate receptor-mediated signalling interplay at glutamate synapse remain poorly understood. Among the cellular mechanisms proposed to aggregate D1R in glutamate synapses, the direct interaction between D1R and the scaffold protein PSD95 or the direct interaction with the glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR have been proposed. To tackle this question we here used high-resolution single nanoparticle imaging since it provides a powerful way to investigate at the sub-micron resolution the dynamic interaction between these partners in live synapses. We demonstrate in hippocampal neuronal networks that dopamine D1 receptors (D1R laterally diffuse within glutamate synapses, in which their diffusion is reduced. Disrupting the interaction between D1R and PSD95, through genetical manipulation and competing peptide, did not affect D1R dynamics in glutamatergic synapses. However, preventing the physical interaction between D1R and the GluN1 subunit of NMDAR abolished the synaptic stabilization of diffusing D1R. Together, these data provide direct evidence that the interaction between D1R and NMDAR in synapses participate in the building of the dopamine-receptor-mediated signalling, and most likely to the glutamate-dopamine cross-talk.

  1. Effect of growth media on cell envelope composition and nitrile hydratase stability in Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP 96253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Trudy-Ann; Crow, Sidney A; Pierce, George E

    2012-11-01

    Rhodococcus is an important industrial microorganism that possesses diverse metabolic capabilities; it also has a cell envelope, composed of an outer layer of mycolic acids and glycolipids. Selected Rhodococcus species when induced are capable of transforming nitriles to the corresponding amide by the enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase), and subsequently to the corresponding acid via an amidase. This nitrile biochemistry has generated interest in using the rhodococci as biocatalysts. It was hypothesized that altering sugars in the growth medium might impact cell envelope components and have effects on NHase. When the primary carbon source in growth media was changed from glucose to fructose, maltose, or maltodextrin, the NHase activity increased. Cells grown in the presence of maltose and maltodextrin showed the highest activities against propionitrile, 197 and 202 units/mg cdw, respectively. Stability of NHase was also affected as cells grown in the presence of maltose and maltodextrin retained more NHase activity at 55 °C (45 and 23 %, respectively) than cells grown in the presence of glucose or fructose (19 and 10 %, respectively). Supplementation of trehalose in the growth media resulted in increased NHase stability at 55 °C, as cells grown in the presence of glucose retained 40 % NHase activity as opposed to 19 % without the presence of trehalose. Changes in cell envelope components, such mycolic acids and glycolipids, were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC), respectively. Changing sugars and the addition of inducing components for NHase, such as cobalt and urea in growth media, resulted in changes in mycolic acid profiles. Mycolic acid content increased 5 times when cobalt and urea were added to media with glucose. Glycolipids levels were also affected by the changes in sugars and addition of inducing components. This research demonstrates that carbohydrate selection impacts NHase activity and

  2. Biochemical characterization of Drosophila glutathione S-transferases D1 and D21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, A H; Tu, C P

    1994-11-11

    The genomic DNA for the two Drosophila genes, gstD1 and gstD21, were engineered for expression in Escherichia coli by polymerase chain reaction using a pair of specially designed primers. This newly designed expression system produced consistently high yields of the recombinant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by S-hexyl-GSH affinity chromatography. Consistent with their differences in size, GST D1 and GST D21 displayed different mobilities on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Circular dichroism spectrometry revealed some differences in the protein secondary structural organization between the two GST D isozymes. Polyclonal antibodies against GST D1 and GST D21 revealed that they are immunologically distinct from each other. The GST D1 antiserum cross-reacted weakly with GST D21, but the GST D21 antiserum had no detectable cross-reactivity with GST D1. The amino acid sequences of GST D1 and GST D21 have 70% identity. GST D1 is active toward CDNB with 17% of the catalytic efficiency of the human alpha GST121, whereas CDNB is a poor substrate for GST D21. Both GST D1 and GST D21 have similar levels of GSH peroxidase activity against cumene hydroperoxide. Another major difference in substrate specificities between GST D1 and GST D21 is in the activity of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) dehydrochlorinase, which exists only in the GST D1 isozyme. This is the first definitive demonstration that DDT dehydrochlorinase activity is an intrinsic property of a Drosophila GST. Our results suggest that GST D1 may play a role in DDT metabolism in Drosophila.

  3. Immunohistochemical comparison of cyclin D1 and P16 in odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Razavi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Cyclin D1 did show a higher staining intensity in UAs compared to the keratocysts, although the expression of P16 was similar in the studied groups. The invasive growth of OKC might be related to the state of expression of cyclin D1 and P16 in the epithelium of this cyst.

  4. Plexin D1 is ubiquitously expressed on tumor vessels and tumor cells in solid malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodink, I.; Verrijp, K.; Raats, J.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plexin D1 is expressed on both tumor-associated endothelium and malignant cells in a number of clinical brain tumors. Recently we demonstrated that Plexin D1 expression is correlated with tumor invasion level and metastasis in a human melanoma progression series. The objective of this st

  5. 26 CFR 1.430(d)-1 - Determination of target normal cost and funding target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of target normal cost and funding target. 1.430(d)-1 Section 1.430(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... of target normal cost and funding target. (a) In general—(1) Overview. This section sets forth rules...

  6. 26 CFR 1.669(d)-1A - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.669(d)-1A Section 1.669(d)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 §...

  7. Concerted Action of ANP and Dopamine D1-Receptor to Regulate Sodium Homeostasis in Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Fernandes-Cerqueira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The edema formation in nephrotic syndrome (NS is associated with a blunted response to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP. The natriuretic effects of ANP have been related to renal dopamine D1-receptors (D1R. We examined the interaction between ANP and renal D1R in rats with puromycin aminonucleoside-induced NS (PAN-NS. Urinary sodium, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP excretion, and D1R protein expression and localization in renal tubules were evaluated in PAN-NS and control rats before and during volume expansion (VE. The effects of zaprinast (phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, alone or in combination with Sch-23390 (D1R antagonist, were examined in both groups. The increased natriuresis and urinary cGMP excretion evoked by acute VE were blunted in PAN-NS despite increased levels of circulating ANP. This was accompanied in PAN-NS by a marked decrease of D1R expression in the renal tubules. Infusion of zaprinast in PAN-NS resulted in increased urinary excretion of cGMP and sodium to similar levels of control rats and increased expression of D1R in the plasma membrane of renal tubular cells. Combined administration of Sch-23390 and zaprinast prevented natriuresis and increased cGMP excretion induced by zaprinast alone. We conclude that D1R may play a major role in the ANP resistance observed in PAN-NS.

  8. Dissociable Hippocampal and Amygdalar D1-like receptor contribution to Discriminated Pavlovian conditioned approach learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E; Ryals, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning is an elementary form of reward-related behavioral adaptation. The mesolimbic dopamine system is widely considered to mediate critical aspects of reward-related learning. For example, initial acquisition of positively-reinforced operant behavior requires dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) activation in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and the ventral subiculum (vSUB). However, the role of D1R activation in these areas on appetitive, non-drug-related, Pavlovian learning is not currently known. In separate experiments, microinfusions of the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 (3.0 nmol/0.5 μL per side) into the amygdala and subiculum preceded discriminated Pavlovian conditioned approach (dPCA) training sessions. D1-like antagonism in all three structures impaired the acquisition of discriminated approach, but had no effect on performance after conditioning was asymptotic. Moreover, dissociable effects of D1-like antagonism in the three structures on components of discriminated responding were obtained. Lastly, the lack of latent inhibition in drug-treated groups may elucidate the role of D1-like in reward-related Pavlovian conditioning. The present data suggest a role for the D1 receptors in the amygdala and hippocampus in learning the significance of conditional stimuli, but not in the expression of conditional responses. PMID:26632336

  9. 17 CFR 270.30d-1 - Filing of copies of reports to shareholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of copies of reports to shareholders. 270.30d-1 Section 270.30d-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... shareholders. A registered management investment company, other than a small business investment...

  10. New cis-regulatory elements in the Rht-D1b locus region of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifteen gene-containing BACs with accumulated length of 1.82-Mb from the Rht-D1b locus region weresequenced and compared in detail with the orthologous regions of rice, sorghum, and maize. Our results show that Rht-D1b represents a conserved genomic region as implied by high gene sequence identity...

  11. 26 CFR 1.665(d)-1A - Taxes imposed on the trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxes imposed on the trust. 1.665(d)-1A Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(d)-1A Taxes imposed on the trust. (a) In general. (1)...

  12. 26 CFR 1.665(d)-1 - Taxes imposed on the trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxes imposed on the trust. 1.665(d)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.665(d)-1 Taxes imposed on the trust. (a) For the purpose of subpart D...

  13. Dissociable hippocampal and amygdalar D1-like receptor contribution to discriminated Pavlovian conditioned approach learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E; Ryals, Curtis

    2016-02-15

    Pavlovian conditioning is an elementary form of reward-related behavioral adaptation. The mesolimbic dopamine system is widely considered to mediate critical aspects of reward-related learning. For example, initial acquisition of positively-reinforced operant behavior requires dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) activation in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and the ventral subiculum (vSUB). However, the role of D1R activation in these areas on appetitive, non-drug-related, Pavlovian learning is not currently known. In separate experiments, microinfusions of the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 (3.0 nmol/0.5 μL per side) into the amygdala and subiculum preceded discriminated Pavlovian conditioned approach (dPCA) training sessions. D1-like antagonism in all three structures impaired the acquisition of discriminated approach, but had no effect on performance after conditioning was asymptotic. Moreover, dissociable effects of D1-like antagonism in the three structures on components of discriminated responding were obtained. Lastly, the lack of latent inhibition in drug-treated groups may elucidate the role of D1-like in reward-related Pavlovian conditioning. The present data suggest a role for the D1 receptors in the amygdala and hippocampus in learning the significance of conditional stimuli, but not in the expression of conditional responses.

  14. Translokin (Cep57) interacts with cyclin D1 and prevents its nuclear accumulation in quiescent fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Miró, Maria; Colomina, Neus; Fernández, Rita M H; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 because of altered trafficking or degradation is thought to contribute directly to neoplastic transformation and growth. Mechanisms of cyclin D1 localization in S phase have been studied in detail, but its control during exit from the cell cycle and quiescence is poorly understood. Here we report that translokin (Tlk), a microtubule-associated protein also termed Cep57, interacts with cyclin D1 and controls its nucleocytoplasmic distribution in quiescent cells. Tlk binds to regions of cyclin D1 also involved in binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), and a fraction of cyclin D1 associates to the juxtanuclear Tlk network in the cell. Downregulation of Tlk levels results in undue nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 and increased Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB under quiescence conditions. In turn, overexpression of Tlk prevents proper cyclin D1 accumulation in the nucleus of proliferating cells in an interaction-dependent manner, inhibits Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB and hinders cell cycle progression to S phase. We propose that the Tlk acts as a key negative regulator in the pathway that drives nuclear import of cyclin D1, thus contributing to prevent pRB inactivation and to maintain cellular quiescence.

  15. Direct demonstration of D1 dopamine receptors in the bovine parathyroid gland using the D1 selective antagonist (/sup 125/I)-SCH 23982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Sibley, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of D1 dopamine receptors in the parathyroid gland has been proposed based on the demonstration of dopaminergic regulation of adenylate cyclase activity and parathyroid hormone release in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Using a radioiodinated D1 selective antagonist (125I)-SCH 23982, we have now directly labeled and characterized the D1 dopamine receptors in bovine parathyroid gland membranes. (125I)-SCH 23982 binds in a saturable manner with high affinity and low nonspecific binding to membranes prepared from bovine parathyroid glands. D1 dopamine receptors are present in this preparation at a concentration of approximately 130 fMoles/mg protein and (125I)-SCH 23982 binding increases with increasing protein concentration in a linear fashion. Determination of the Kd using the association (k1) and dissociation (k-1) rate constants revealed good agreement with the Kd determined by saturation analysis (390 pM vs. 682 pM, respectively). Inhibition of 0.3 nM (125I)-SCH 23982 binding by a series of dopaminergic antagonists verified the D1 nature of this binding site, exhibiting appropriate affinities and rank order of potency. The competition curves of all antagonists exhibited Hill coefficients that were not significantly different from 1. Inhibition of (125I)-SCH 23982 binding by dopamine and other dopaminergic agonists revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist binding sites. Addition of 200 microM GppNHp effected a complete conversion of high affinity dopamine binding sites to a homogeneous population of low affinity dopamine sites. The D1 receptors identified in the parathyroid gland with (125I)-SCH 23982 appear to be pharmacologically identical with those previously characterized in the central nervous system.

  16. Analysis of the interaction proteins of PIH1D1%与PIH1D1相互作用的蛋白分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章元; 张业

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析细胞中与PIH1D1相互作用的蛋白.方法 构建稳定表达FLAG-HA双标签标记的PIH1D1蛋白的HEK293T细胞株,利用FLAG-HA串联亲和纯化(TAP)双标签纯化实验,对目的条带进行质谱分析.结果 成功构建稳定表达FLAG-HA双标签标记的PIH1D1细胞株.通过质谱分析得到了PIH1D1相互作用的蛋白数据,包括细胞质内RNA PolⅡ组装复合物成员RPAP3、UXT、PFD2和PFD6等,凋亡复合物成员MONAD/WDR92等,钙调蛋白信号通路中的PIP和CALM1以及代谢通路中的PKM和LCN1等.结论 PIH1D1与细胞中RPAP3、UXT、PFD2、PFD6、MONAD/WDR92、PIP、CALM1、PKM和LCN1等相互作用,提示PIH1D1可能参与细胞中RNApol Ⅱ组装、细胞凋亡、钙调蛋白通路等多种生理过程.

  17. Resolvin D1 prevents smoking-induced emphysema and promotes lung tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim KH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kang-Hyun Kim,1 Tai Sun Park,2,3 You-Sun Kim,1,3 Jae Seung Lee,2,3 Yeon-Mok Oh,2,3 Sang-Do Lee,2,3 Sei Won Lee2,3 1Asan Institute for Life Sciences, 2Department of Pulmonology and Critical Care Medicine, Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, 3Department of Pulmonology and Critical Care Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: Emphysema is an irreversible disease that is characterized by destruction of lung tissue as a result of inflammation caused by smoking. Resolvin D1 (RvD1, derived from docosahexaenoic acid, is a novel lipid that resolves inflammation. The present study tested whether RvD1 prevents smoking-induced emphysema and promotes lung tissue regeneration.Materials and methods: C57BL/6 mice, 8 weeks of age, were randomly divided into four groups: control, RvD1 only, smoking only, and smoking with RvD1 administration. Four different protocols were used to induce emphysema and administer RvD1: mice were exposed to smoking for 4 weeks with poly(I:C or to smoking only for 24 weeks, and RvD1 was injected within the smoking exposure period to prevent regeneration or after completion of smoking exposure to assess regeneration. The mean linear intercept and inflammation scores were measured in the lung tissue, and inflammatory cells and cytokines were measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.Results: Measurements of mean linear intercept showed that RvD1 significantly attenuated smoking-induced lung destruction in all emphysema models. RvD1 also reduced smoking-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, which causes the structural derangements observed in emphysema. In the 4-week prevention model, RvD1 reduced the smoking-induced increase in eosinophils and interleukin-6 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In the 24-week prevention model, RvD1 also reduced the increased neutrophils and total cell counts induced by smoking.Conclusion: RvD1

  18. NeuroD1: developmental expression and regulated genes in the rodent pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Estela M; Bailey, Michael J; Rath, Martin F

    2007-01-01

    NeuroD1/BETA2, a member of the bHLH transcription factor family, is known to influence the fate of specific neuronal, endocrine and retinal cells. We report here that NeuroD1 mRNA is highly abundant in the developing and adult rat pineal gland. Pineal expression begins in the 17-day embryo at which...... time it is also detectable in other brain regions. Expression in the pineal gland increases during the embryonic period and is maintained thereafter at levels equivalent to those found in the cerebellum and retina. In contrast, NeuroD1 mRNA decreases markedly in non-cerebellar brain regions during...... development. Pineal NeuroD1 levels are similar during the day and night, and do not appear to be influenced by sympathetic neural input. Gene expression analysis of the pineal glands from neonatal NeuroD1 knockout mice identifies 127 transcripts that are down-regulated (>twofold, p

  19. Cyclin D1 in the Liver: Role of Noncanonical Signaling in Liver Steatosis and Hormone Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Kelley G.; Gonzalez-Rosario, Janet; Thevenot, Paul T.; Cohen, Ari J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 is an important protein for cell cycle progression; however, functions independent of the cell cycle have been described in the liver. Cyclin D1 is also involved in DNA repair, is overexpressed in many cancers, and functions as a proto-oncogene. The lesser-known roles of Cyclin D1, specifically in hepatocytes, impact liver steatosis and hormone regulation in the liver. Methods: A comprehensive search of PubMed was conducted using the keywords Cyclin D1, steatosis, lipogenesis, and liver transplantation. In this article, we review the results from this literature search, with a focus on the role of Cyclin D1 in hepatic lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis, as well as the impact and function of this protein in hepatic steatosis. Results: Cyclin D1 represses carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and results in a decrease in transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC). Cyclin D1 also inhibits peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) which is involved in hepatic lipogenesis. Cyclin D1 inhibits both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) and represses transcription of lipogenic genes FAS and liver-type pyruvate kinase (Pklr), along with the gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Conclusion: Cyclin D1 represses multiple proteins involved in both lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Targeting Cyclin D1 to decrease hepatic steatosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or alcoholic fatty liver disease may help improve patient health and the quality of the donor liver pool.

  20. The role of MyoD1 and histone modifications in the activation of muscle enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Roy; Dynlacht, Brian D

    2013-08-01

    MyoD1 is a key regulator that orchestrates skeletal muscle differentiation through the regulation of gene expression. Although many studies have focused on its role in transcriptional control at gene promoters, less is known regarding the role of MyoD1 in the assembly of active enhancers. Here, we discuss novel data that point to the ability of MyoD1 to mediate the assembly of active enhancers that augment the transcription of genes essential for muscle development and lineage specification. Based on genome-wide studies of epigenetic marks that typify active enhancers, we recently identified the compendium of distal regulatory elements that dictate transcriptional programs during myogenesis. Superimposition of MyoD1 binding sites upon the locations of muscle enhancers revealed its unequivocal binding to a core region of nearly a third of condition-specific muscle enhancers. Further studies exploring deposition of enhancer-related epigenetic marks in myoblasts lacking MyoD1 demonstrate the dependence of muscle enhancer assembly on the presence of MyoD1. We propose a model wherein MyoD1 mediates recruitment of Set7, H3K4me1, H3K27ac, p300, and RNAP II to MyoD1-bound enhancers to establish condition-specific activation of muscle genes. Moreover, muscle enhancers are modulated through coordinated binding of transcription factors, including c-Jun, Jdp2, Meis, and Runx1, which are recruited to muscle enhancers in a MyoD1-dependent manner. Thus, MyoD1 and enhancer-associated transcription factors function coordinately to assemble and regulate enhancers, thereby augmenting expression of muscle-related genes.

  1. Plasmid profiles of virulent Rhodococcus equi isolates from soil environment on horse-breeding farms in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrai, L; Kira, K; Kono, A; Sasaki, Y; Kakuda, T; Tsubaki, S; Fodor, L; Varga, J; Taka, S

    2006-03-01

    The plasmid profiles of virulent Rhodococcus equi strains isolated on three horse-breeding farms located in different parts of Hungary were investigated. From 49 soil samples collected on the three farms, 490 R. equi isolates (10 from each sample) were obtained and tested for the presence of 15- to 17-kDa antigens (VapA) by immunoblotting and PCR. Ninety-eight VapA-positive isolates were detected from 30 of the 49 culture-positive samples with a prevalence ranging from 13.1% to 23.2%. Of the 98 virulent isolates, 70 contained an 85-kb type I plasmid, 13 contained an 87-kb type I plasmid, and 15 contained an 85-kb type III plasmid which had been uniquely isolated from soil isolates in the United States. This study demonstrates that the virulent form of R. equi is very widespread in the soil environment of these stud farms in Hungary and the plasmid pattern is different from farm to farm.

  2. Identification of pathogens and virulence profile of Rhodococcus equi and Escherichia coli strains obtained from sand of parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of pathogens of viral (Rotavirus, Coronavirus, parasitic (Toxocara spp. and bacterial (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Rhodococcus equi origin shed in feces, and the virulence profile of R. equi and E. coli isolates were investigated in 200 samples of sand obtained from 40 parks, located in central region of state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, using different diagnostic methods. From 200 samples analyzed, 23 (11.5% strains of R. equi were isolated. None of the R. equi isolates showed a virulent (vapA gene or intermediately virulent (vapB gene profiles. Sixty-three (31.5% strains of E. coli were identified. The following genes encoding virulence factors were identified in E. coli: eae, bfp, saa, iucD, papGI, sfa and hly. Phylogenetic classification showed that 63 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B1 (52.4%, A (25.4% and B2 (22.2%. No E. coli serotype O157:H7 was identified. Eggs of Toxocara sp. were found in three parks and genetic material of bovine Coronavirus was identified in one sample of one park. No Salmonella spp. and Rotavirus isolates were identified in the samples of sand. The presence of R. equi, Toxocara sp, bovine Coronavirus and virulent E. coli isolates in the environment of parks indicates that the sanitary conditions of the sand should be improved in order to reduce the risks of fecal transmission of pathogens of zoonotic potential to humans in these places.

  3. Rhodococcus fascians infection accelerates progression of tobacco BY-2 cells into mitosis through rapid changes in plant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeputte, Olivier; Vereecke, Danny; Mol, Adeline; Lenjou, Marc; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2007-01-01

    * To characterize plant cell cycle activation following Rhodococcus fascians infection, bacterial impact on cell cycle progression of tobacco BY-2 cells was investigated. * S-phase-synchronized BY-2 cells were cocultivated with R. fascians and cell cycle progression was monitored by measuring mitotic index, cell cycle gene expression and flow cytometry parameters. Cell cycle alteration was further investigated by cDNA-AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism). * It was shown that cell cycle progression of BY-2 cells was accelerated only upon infection with bacteria whose virulence gene expression was induced by a leafy gall extract. Thirty-eight BY-2 genes showed a differential expression within 6 h post-infection. Among these, seven were previously associated with specific plant cell cycle phases (in particular S and G2/M phases). Several genes also showed a differential expression during leafy gall formation. * R. fascians-infected BY-2 cells provide a simple model to identify plant genes related to leafy gall development. R. fascians can also be regarded as a useful biotic agent to alter cell cycle progression and, thereby, gain a better understanding of cell cycle regulation in plants.

  4. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryanti, Venty, E-mail: venty@mipa.uns.ac.id; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta, Central Java 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  5. Purification and characterization of a novel nitrilase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous K22 that acts on aliphatic nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Yanaka, N; Nagasawa, T; Yamada, H

    1990-01-01

    A novel nitrilase that preferentially catalyzes the hydrolysis of aliphatic nitriles to the corresponding carboxylic acids and ammonia was found in the cells of a facultative crotononitrile-utilizing actinomycete isolated from soil. The strain was taxonomically studied and identified as Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The nitrilase was purified, with 9.08% overall recovery, through five steps from a cell extract of the stain. After the last step, the purified enzyme appeared to be homogeneous, as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, analytical centrifugation, and double immunodiffusion in agarose. The relative molecular weight values for the native enzyme, estimated from the ultracentrifugal equilibrium and by high-performance liquid chromatography, were approximately 604,000 +/- 30,000 and 650,000, respectively, and the enzyme consisted of 15 to 16 subunits identical in molecular weight (41,000). The enzyme acted on aliphatic olefinic nitriles such as crotononitrile and acrylonitrile as the most suitable substrates. The apparent Km values for crotononitrile and acrylonitrile were 18.9 and 1.14 mM, respectively. The nitrilase also catalyzed the direct hydrolysis of saturated aliphatic nitriles, such as valeronitrile, 4-chlorobutyronitrile, and glutaronitrile, to the corresponding acids without the formation of amide intermediates. Hence, the R. rhodochrous K22 nitrilase is a new type distinct from all other nitrilases that act on aromatic and related nitriles. Images PMID:2394676

  6. Acrylamide synthesis using agar entrapped cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 in a partitioned fed batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Jog; Sharma, Nitya Nand; Prasad, Shreenath; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2008-01-01

    The nitrile hydratase (Nhase) induced cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 catalyzed the conversion of acrylonitrile to acrylamide. The cells of R. rhodochrous PA-34 immobilized in 2% (w/v) agar (1.76 mg dcw/ml agar matrix) exhibited maximum Nhase activity (8.25 U/mg dcw) for conversion of acrylonitrile to acrylamide at 10 degrees C in the reaction mixture containing 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.5), 8% (w/v) acrylonitrile and immobilized cells equivalent to 1.12 mg dcw (dry cell weight) per ml. In a partitioned fed batch reaction at 10 degrees C, using 1.12 g dcw immobilized cells in a final volume of 1 l, a total of 372 g of acrylonitrile was completely hydrated to acrylamide (498 g) in 24 h. From the above reaction mixture 87% acrylamide (432 g) was recovered through crystallization at 4 degrees C. By recycling the immobilized biocatalyst (six times), a total of 2,115 g acrylamide was produced.

  7. Identification of pathogens and virulence profile of Rhodococcus equi and Escherichia coli strains obtained from sand of parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M C; Takai, S; Leite, D S; Pinto, J P A N; Brandão, P E; Santarém, V A; Listoni, F J P; Da Silva, A V; Ribeiro, M G

    2013-01-01

    The identification of pathogens of viral (Rotavirus, Coronavirus), parasitic (Toxocara spp.) and bacterial (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Rhodococcus equi) origin shed in feces, and the virulence profile of R. equi and E. coli isolates were investigated in 200 samples of sand obtained from 40 parks, located in central region of state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, using different diagnostic methods. From 200 samples analyzed, 23 (11.5%) strains of R. equi were isolated. None of the R. equi isolates showed a virulent (vapA gene) or intermediately virulent (vapB gene) profiles. Sixty-three (31.5%) strains of E. coli were identified. The following genes encoding virulence factors were identified in E. coli: eae, bfp, saa, iucD, papGI, sfa and hly. Phylogenetic classification showed that 63 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B1 (52.4%), A (25.4%) and B2 (22.2%). No E. coli serotype O157:H7 was identified. Eggs of Toxocara sp. were found in three parks and genetic material of bovine Coronavirus was identified in one sample of one park. No Salmonella spp. and Rotavirus isolates were identified in the samples of sand. The presence of R. equi, Toxocara sp, bovine Coronavirus and virulent E. coli isolates in the environment of parks indicates that the sanitary conditions of the sand should be improved in order to reduce the risks of fecal transmission of pathogens of zoonotic potential to humans in these places.

  8. Association of perinatal exposure to airborne Rhodococcus equi with risk of pneumonia caused by R equi in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noah D; Chaffin, M Keith; Kuskie, Kyle R; Syndergaard, Melissa K; Blodgett, Glenn P; Takai, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether the concentrations of airborne virulent Rhodococcus equi in stalls housing foals during the first 2 weeks after birth are associated with subsequent development of R equi pneumonia in those foals. Air samples collected from foaling stalls and holding pens in which foals were housed during the first 2 weeks after birth. At a breeding farm in Texas, air samples (500 L each) were collected (January through May 2011) from stalls and pens in which 121 foals were housed on day 1 and on days 4, 7, and 14 after birth. For each sample, the concentration of airborne virulent R equi was determined with an immunoblot technique. The association between development of pneumonia and airborne R equi concentration was evaluated via random-effects Poisson regression analysis. Some air samples were not available for analysis. Of the 471 air samples collected from stalls that housed 121 foals, 90 (19%) contained virulent R equi. Twenty-four of 121 (20%) foals developed R equi pneumonia. Concentrations of virulent R equi in air samples from stalls housing foals that developed R equi pneumonia were significantly higher than those in samples from stalls housing foals that did not develop pneumonia. Accounting for disease effects, air sample concentrations of virulent R equi did not differ significantly by day after birth or by month of birth. Exposure of foals to airborne virulent R equi during the first 2 weeks after birth was significantly (and likely causally) associated with development of R equi pneumonia.

  9. Bronchopneumonia in wild boar (Sus scrofa) caused by Rhodococcus equi carrying the VapB type 8 plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vargas, Agueda Castagna; Monego, Fernanda; Gressler, Letícia Trevisan; de Avila Botton, Sônia; Lazzari, Andrea Maria; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Ecco, Roselene; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Takai, Shinji

    2013-03-25

    Rhodococcus equi is associated with pyogranulomatous infections, especially in foals, and this bacterium has also emerged as a pathogen for humans, particularly immunocompromised patients. R. equi infections in pigs, wild boar (Sus scrofa) and humans are mainly due to strains carrying the intermediate virulence (VapB) plasmid. In Brazil, R. equi carrying the VapB type 8 plasmid is the most common type recovered from humans co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). R. equi infection in pigs and wild boar is restricted predominantly to the lymphatic system, without any reports of pulmonary manifestations. This report describes the microbiological and histopathological findings, and molecular characterization of R. equi in two bronchopneumonia cases in wild boar using PCR and plasmid profile analysis by digestion with restriction endonucleases. The histological findings were suggestive of pyogranulomatous infection, and the plasmid profile of both R. equi isolates enabled the characterization of the strains as VapB type 8. This is the first report of bronchopneumonia in wild boar due to R. equi. The detection of the VapB type 8 plasmid in R. equi isolates emphasize that wild boar may be a potential source of pathogenic R. equi strains for humans.

  10. Transfer of the virulence-associated protein a-bearing plasmid between field strains of virulent and avirulent Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoughton, W; Poole, T; Kuskie, K; Liu, M; Bishop, K; Morrissey, A; Takai, S; Cohen, N

    2013-01-01

    Virulent and avirulent isolates of Rhodococcus equi coexist in equine feces and the environment and are a source of infection for foals. The extent to which plasmid transfer occurs among field strains is ill-defined and this information is important for understanding the epidemiology of R. equi infections of foals. To estimate the frequency of transfer of the virulence plasmid between virulent and avirulent strains of R. equi derived from foals and their environment. None. In vitro study; 5 rifampin-susceptible, virulent R. equi isolates obtained from clinically affected foals or air samples from a farm with a history of recurrent R. equi foal pneumonia were each mixed with 5 rifampin-resistant, avirulent isolates derived from soil samples, using solid medium, at a ratio of 10 donor cells (virulent) per recipient cell. Presumed transconjugates were detected by plating on media with rifampin and colony immunoblotting to detect the presence of the virulence-associated protein A. Three presumed transconjugates were detected among 2,037 recipient colonies, indicating an overall estimated transfer frequency of 0.15% (95% CI, 0.03–0.43%). All 3 transconjugates were associated with a single donor and 2 recipient strains. Genotyping and multiplex PCR of presumed transconjugates demonstrated transfer of the virulence-associated protein A-bearing plasmid between virulent and avirulent R. equi. Transfer of the virulence plasmid occurs with relatively high frequency. These findings could impact strategies to control or prevent R. equi through environmental management.

  11. Fasciation induction by the phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians depends upon a linear plasmid encoding a cytokinin synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, M; Messens, E; Caplan, A B; van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1992-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is a nocardiform bacteria that induces leafy galls (fasciation) on dicotyledonous and several monocotyledonous plants. The wild-type strain D188 contained a conjugative, 200 kb linear extrachromosomal element, pFiD188. Linear plasmid-cured strains were avirulent and reintroduction of this linear element restored virulence. Pulsed field electrophoresis indicated that the chromosome might also be a linear molecule of 4 megabases. Three loci involved in phytopathogenicity have been identified by insertion mutagenesis of this Fi plasmid. Inactivation of the fas locus resulted in avirulent strains, whereas insertions in the two other loci affected the degree of virulence, yielding attenuated (att) and hypervirulent (hyp) bacteria. One of the genes within the fas locus encoded an isopentenyltranferase (IPT) with low homology to analogous proteins from Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria. IPT activity was detected after expression of this protein in Escherichia coli cells. In R.fascians, ipt expression could only be detected in bacteria induced with extracts from fasciated tissue. R.fascians strains without the linear plasmid but containing this fas locus alone could not provoke any phenotype on plants, indicating additional genes from the linear plasmid were also essential for virulence. These studies, the first genetic analysis of the interaction of a Gram-positive bacterium with plants, suggest that a novel mechanism for plant tumour induction has evolved in R.fascians independently from the other branches of the eubacteria. Images PMID:1547783

  12. Adaptive response of Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 to salt and phenolic stress on the level of mycolic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fischer, Martin A; Kirsten, Sandra; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-12-01

    Mycolata form a group of Gram-positive bacteria with unique cell envelope structures that are known for their high tolerance against antibiotics and both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. An important part of the unique surface structure of the mycolata is the presence of long chain α-alkyl-β-hydroxy fatty acids, the mycolic acids. In order to investigate the adaptive changes in the mycolic acid composition, we investigated the composition of mycolic acids during the response both to osmotic stress caused by NaCl and to 4-chlorophenol in Rhodococcus opacus PWD4. This bacterium was chosen as it is known to adapt to different kinds of stresses. In addition, it is a potential biocatalyst in bioremediation as well as for biotechnological applications. In the present study, cells of R. opacus PWD4, grown in liquid cultures, responded to toxic concentrations of NaCl by increasing the ratio between mycolic acids and membrane phospholipid fatty acids (MA/PLFA-ratio). Cells reacted to both NaCl and 4-chlorophenol by decreasing both the average chain length and the unsaturation index of their mycolic acids. These changes in mycolic acid composition correlated with increases in cell surface hydrophobicity and saturation of membrane fatty acids, demonstrating the relation between mycolic acid and phospholipid synthesis and their contribution to cell surface properties of R. opacus PWD4.

  13. Rhodococcus aetherivorans IAR1, a new bacterial strain synthesizing poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) from toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Unno, Hajime

    2009-02-01

    Toluene is the volatile organic compound (VOC) that is most abundantly emitted to the environment. Here, we report a new bacterial strain, IAR1, which synthesizes polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from toluene as the sole carbon source. Using physiological tests and phylogenetic analysis, IAR1 was identified as Rhodococcus aetherivorans. Degradation of toluene by resting IAR1 cells followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The determined kinetic parameters showed that the degradation ability of IAR1 is slightly lower than that of Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5, which is highly effective for removing toluene from off-gas. PHA synthesized by IAR1 was identified as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) by 1H NMR and gas chromatography. During fed-batch cultivation of resting IAR1 cells, the principal monomer unit shifted from 3-hydroxybutyrate to 3-hydroxyvalerate. PHBV shows flexibility and toughness comparable to conventional thermoplastics, but its production usually requires supplying expensive precursors as a secondary carbon source. Therefore, employment of R. aetherivorans IAR1 in the production of PHBV from toluene as the sole carbon source is an attractive means for production of the practical copolymer. In addition, the utilization of waste toluene as a raw material for the polymer production will achieve further cost reduction alongside the effective utilization of waste material.

  14. Optimization of biosurfactant production in soybean oil by rhodococcus rhodochrous and its utilization in remediation of cadmium-contaminated solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Andriani, Dewi

    2016-02-01

    Biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus rhodochrous in soybean oil was developed, where the effect of medium composition and fermentation time were evaluated. The optimum condition for biosurfactant production was achieved when a medium containing 30 g/L TSB (tryptic soy broth) and 20% v/v soybean oil was used as media with 7 days of fermentation. Biosurfactant was identified as glycolipids type biosurfactant which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 896 mg/L. The biosurfactant had oil in water emulsion type and was able to reduce the surface tension of palm oil about 52% which could stabilize the emulsion up to 12 days. The batch removal of cadmium metal ion by crude and partially purified biosurfactants have been examined from synthetic aqueous solution at pH 6. The results exhibited that the crude biosurfactant had a much better adsorption ability of Cd(II) than that of partially purified biosurfactant. However, it was found that there was no significant difference in the adsorption of Cd(II) with 5 and 10 minutes of contact time. The results indicated that the biosurfactant could be used in remediation of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous solution.

  15. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  16. Inhibition of diethyl ether degradation in Rhodococcus sp. strain DEE5151 by glutaraldehyde and ethyl vinyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich

    2005-02-15

    Alkyl ether-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain DEE5151, isolated from activated sewage sludge, has an activity for the oxidation of a variety of alkyl ethers, aralkyl ethers and dibenzyl ether. The whole cell activity for diethyl ether oxidation was effectively inhibited by 2,3-dihydrofurane, ethyl vinyl ether and glutaraldehyde. Glutaraldehyde of less than 30 microM inhibited the activity by a competitive manner with the inhibition constant, K(I) of 7.07+/-1.36 microM. The inhibition type became mixed at higher glutaraldehyde concentrations >30 microM, probably due to the inactivation of the cell activity by the Schiff-base formation. Structurally analogous ethyl vinyl ether inhibited the diethyl ether oxidation activity in a mixed manner with decreasing the apparent maximum oxidation rate, v(max)(app), and increasing the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, K(M)(app). The mixed type inhibition by ethyl vinyl ether seemed to be introduced not only by the structure similarity with diethyl ether, but also by the reactivity of the vinyl ether with cellular components in the whole cell system.

  17. D1多巴胺受体与原发性高血压%D1 Dopamine Receptor and Essential Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李震; 曾春雨; 杨成明

    2006-01-01

    多巴胺可通过对肾脏水钠重吸收的调节作用,进而发挥对血压调控的影响,多巴胺功能障碍在原发性高血压发生过程中发挥重要的作用.在多巴胺受体的5个亚型中,D1受体的作用尤其引人注目.在体内钠负荷过载的情况下,刺激肾脏D1受体可调节超过50%的钠排量.原发性高血压状态下D1受体功能障碍,其发生的原因与D1 受体/G蛋白效应物复合体失偶联有关,而其失偶联的机制归因于G蛋白激酶4变异体存在所引起的G蛋白激酶活性增高.

  18. Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costanzo, L.; Drury, J; Christianson, D; Penning, T

    2009-01-01

    Human steroid 5{beta}-reductase (aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1D1) catalyzes reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-ene double bonds in steroid hormones and bile acid precursors. We have reported the structures of an AKR1D1-NADP{sup +} binary complex, and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-cortisone, AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-progesterone and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-testosterone ternary complexes at high resolutions. Recently, structures of AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone complexes showed that the product is bound unproductively. Two quite different mechanisms of steroid double bond reduction have since been proposed. However, site-directed mutagenesis supports only one mechanism. In this mechanism, the 4-pro-R hydride is transferred from the re-face of the nicotinamide ring to C5 of the steroid substrate. E120, a unique substitution in the AKR catalytic tetrad, permits a deeper penetration of the steroid substrate into the active site to promote optimal reactant positioning. It participates with Y58 to create a 'superacidic' oxyanion hole for polarization of the C3 ketone. A role for K87 in the proton relay proposed using the AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone structure is not supported.

  19. Berberine Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression through Proteasomal Degradation in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the underlying mechanism on berberine-induced Cyclin D1 degradation in human hepatic carcinoma. We observed that berberine could suppress both in vitro and in vivo expression of Cyclin D1 in hepatoma cells. Berberine exhibits dose- and time-dependent inhibition on Cyclin D1 expression in human hepatoma cell HepG2. Berberine increases the phosphorylation of Cyclin D1 at Thr286 site and potentiates Cyclin D1 nuclear export to cytoplasm for proteasomal degradation. In addition, berberine recruits the Skp, Cullin, F-box containing complex-β-Transducin Repeat Containing Protein (SCFβ-TrCP complex to facilitate Cyclin D1 ubiquitin-proteasome dependent proteolysis. Knockdown of β-TrCP blocks Cyclin D1 turnover induced by berberine; blocking the protein degradation induced by berberine in HepG2 cells increases tumor cell resistance to berberine. Our results shed light on berberine′s potential as an anti-tumor agent for clinical cancer therapy.

  20. Defective renal dopamine D1 receptor function contributes to hyperinsulinemia-mediated hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Banday, Anees; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2006-11-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is reported to play a role in hypertension, as abnormalities in blood pressure regulation and sodium handling exist in diabetes mellitus. Kidney dopamine promotes sodium excretion via the activation of renal D1 receptors. Because there is a close relationship between renal D1 receptor function and sodium excretion, it is hypothesized that a defect in this mechanism may contribute to decreased sodium excretion and hypertension during hyperinsulinemia. Renal D1 receptor function was studied in insulin-induced hypertension in male Sprague Dawley rats. Insulin pellets were implanted subcutaneously for controlled insulin release for three weeks; sham rats served as a control. Compared to control rats, insulin pellets increased plasma insulin levels by eight fold and decreased blood glucose by 40%. Insulin also caused a 22 mmHg increase in mean arterial blood pressure compared to control animals. The intravenous infusion of SKF-38393, a D1 receptor agonist, increased sodium excretion in control rats, but SKF-38393 failed to produce natriuresis in hyperinsulinemic animals. Renal proximal tubules from hyperinsulinemic rats had a reduced D1 receptor number, defective receptor-G protein coupling, and blunted SKF-38393 induced Na, K-ATPase inhibition. Insulin seems to reduce D1 receptor expression and coupling to the G-protein, leading to a reduced D1 receptor-mediated Na, K-ATPase inhibition, and a diminished natriuretic response to SKF-38393. These phenomena could account for sodium retention and hypertension associated with hyperinsulinemia.

  1. COMBINED DETECTION OF CYCLIN D1, P27 AND DNA CONTENT IN ESOPHAGEAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ping; YIN Yuan-qin; WANG Xiao-hua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expressions of cyclin D1 and p27 and DNA content in esophageal cancer and adjacent normal tissues, and to discuss the relationship between them. Methods: The cyclinD1 and p27 were detected by immunohistochemical staining; DNA content was measured by flow cytometry. Results: The positive expression rates of cyclinD1 and p27 in cancer were 45.8% and 33.3% respectively, the DNA content in the positive group of cyclinD1 was higher than that in the negative group of cyclinD1(1.54(0.21 versus 1.08(0.43, P<0.05), while the DNA content and SPF (S-phase fraction) in the positive group of p27 were lower than those in the negative group (1.10(0.19 and 5.56%(5.18% versus 1.66(0.28 and 19.78%(6.12%, P<0.05). Conclusion: The data show that the expression of cyclinD1 and p27 are related to the ontogenesis and progression of esophageal cancer. The combined detection of cyclinD1, p27 and DNA content may be indicators of diagnosis and assessment of esophageal cancer.

  2. Role of CyclinD1 and CDK4 in the Carcinogenesis Induced by Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE-XIA YAN; BING-CI LIU; XIANG-LIN SHI; BAO-RONG YOU; MING XU

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the role of cyclinD1 and CDK4 in malignant transformation of human fetal lung diploid fibroblast cell line(2BS) induced by silica. Methods Recombination vectors with sense and antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 were constructed, and then transfected into the malignant transformed cells induced by silica, respectively. At the same time, pXJ41-neo was used as the control. Results During the progress of the malignant transformation of 2BS cells induced by silica, cyclinD1 and CDK4 were overexpressed. Antisense RNA suppressed cyclinD1 and CDK4 gene expression in the antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 transfected cells. Antisense RNA led to cell cycle arrest, resulting in lengthened G1 phase (the percentages of cells in the G1 phase changed from 45.1% to 52.7% and 58.0% for cyclinD1 and CDK4 transfected cells, respectively), and eventually attenuated the increase of the proliferation of malignant transformed cells induced by silica. Compared with malignant transformed cells induced by silica, cells transfected with antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 showed obviously reduced growth rates. On the 8th day, the suppression rates were 58.69 and 77.43% (the growth rate of malignant transformed cells induced by silica was 100%), doubling time changed from 21.0 h to 31.4 h and 21.0 h to 42.7 h, respectively, the growth capacities on soft agar of cells transfected by antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 decreased obviously. Conclusion CyclinD1 and CDK4 play an important role in maintaining transformed phenotype of the cancer cells.

  3. Cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis via inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator PGC1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Kavita; Liu, Wan-Ju; Thompson, Keyata; Anders, Lars; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Dewi, Ruby; Buckley, Stephanie; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Polster, Brian; Dorsey, Susan G; Sun, Yezhou; Sicinski, Piotr; Girnun, Geoffrey D

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial to maintain normal blood glucose during periods of nutrient deprivation. Gluconeogenesis is controlled at multiple levels by a variety of signal transduction and transcriptional pathways. However, dysregulation of these pathways leads to hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. While the effects of various signaling pathways on gluconeogenesis are well established, the downstream signaling events repressing gluconeogenic gene expression are not as well understood. The cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1 is expressed in the liver, despite the liver being a quiescent tissue. The most well-studied function of cyclin D1 is activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), promoting progression of the cell cycle. We show here a novel role for cyclin D1 as a regulator of gluconeogenic and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) gene expression. In mice, fasting decreases liver cyclin D1 expression, while refeeding induces cyclin D1 expression. Inhibition of CDK4 enhances the gluconeogenic gene expression, whereas cyclin D1-mediated activation of CDK4 represses the gluconeogenic gene-expression program in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we show that cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis and OxPhos in part via inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC1α) activity in a CDK4-dependent manner. Indeed, we demonstrate that PGC1α is novel cyclin D1/CDK4 substrate. These studies reveal a novel role for cyclin D1 on metabolism via PGC1α and reveal a potential link between cell-cycle regulation and metabolic control of glucose homeostasis.

  4. Gastrin and D1 dopamine receptor interact to induce natriuresis and diuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Asico, Laureano D; Zheng, Shuo; Villar, Van Anthony M; He, Duofen; Zhou, Lin; Zeng, Chunyu; Jose, Pedro A

    2013-11-01

    Oral NaCl produces a greater natriuresis and diuresis than the intravenous infusion of the same amount of NaCl. Gastrin is the major gastrointestinal hormone taken up by renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. We hypothesized that renal gastrin and dopamine receptors interact to synergistically increase sodium excretion, an impaired interaction of which may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. In Wistar-Kyoto rats, infusion of gastrin induced natriuresis and diuresis, which was abrogated in the presence of a gastrin (cholecystokinin B receptor [CCKBR]; CI-988) or a D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH23390). Similarly, the natriuretic and diuretic effects of fenoldopam, a D1-like receptor agonist, were blocked by SCH23390, as well as by CI-988. However, the natriuretic effects of gastrin and fenoldopam were not observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The gastrin/D1-like receptor interaction was also confirmed in RPT cells. In RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto but not spontaneously hypertensive rats, stimulation of either D1-like receptor or gastrin receptor inhibited Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, an effect that was blocked in the presence of SCH23390 or CI-988. In RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats, CCKBR and D1 receptor coimmunoprecipitated, which was increased after stimulation of either D1 receptor or CCKBR in RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto rats; stimulation of one receptor increased the RPT cell membrane expression of the other receptor, effects that were not observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These data suggest that there is a synergism between CCKBR and D1-like receptors to increase sodium excretion. An aberrant interaction between the renal CCK BR and D1-like receptors (eg, D1 receptor) may play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  5. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure results in dysfunction of the renal dopamine D1 receptor in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinquan; Luo, Hao; Chen, Caiyu; Chen, Ken; Wang, Jialiang; Cai, Yue; Zheng, Shuo; Yang, Xiaoli; Zhou, Lin; Jose, Pedro A; Zeng, Chunyu

    2014-11-01

    Adverse environment in early life can modulate the adult phenotype, including blood pressure. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in utero results in increased blood pressure in the offspring, but the exact mechanisms are not clear. Studies have shown that the renal dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) plays an important role in maintaining sodium homeostasis and normal blood pressure; dysfunction of D1R is associated with oxidative stress and hypertension. In this study, we determined if dysfunction of the renal D1R is involved in fetal-programmed hypertension, and if oxidative stress contributes to this process. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (0.79 mg/kg) or saline at gestation days 8, 10, and 12. As compared with saline-injected (control) dams, offspring of LPS-treated dams had increased blood pressure, decreased renal sodium excretion, and increased markers of oxidative stress. In addition, offspring of LPS-treated dams had decreased renal D1R expression, increased D1R phosphorylation, and G protein-coupled receptor kinase type 2 (GRK2) and type 4 (GRK4) protein expression, and impaired D1R-mediated natriuresis and diuresis. All of the findings in the offspring of LPS-treated dams were normalized after treatment with TEMPOL, an oxygen free radical scavenger. In conclusion, prenatal LPS exposure, via an increase in oxidative stress, impairs renal D1R function and leads to hypertension in the offspring. Normalization of renal D1R function by amelioration of oxidative stress may be a therapeutic target of fetal programming of hypertension.

  6. Induction of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic differentiation by GluD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kyounghee; Yokoyama, Marie; Yamashita, Manami; Hirano, Tomoo

    2012-01-06

    The δ subfamily of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits consists of GluD1 and GluD2. GluD2, which is selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje neurons, has been shown to contribute to the formation of synapses between granule neurons and Purkinje neurons through interaction with Cbln1 (cerebellin precursor protein1) and presynaptic Neurexin. On the other hand, the synaptogenic activity of GluD1, which is expressed not in the cerebellum but in the hippocampus, remains to be characterized. Here, we report that GluD1 expressed in non-neuronal HEK cells, induced presynaptic differentiation of granule neurons through its N-terminal domain in co-cultures with cerebellar neurons, similarly to GluD2. We also show that GluD1 rescued the defect of synapse formation in GluD2-knockout Purkinje neurons, indicating the functional similarity of GluD1 and GluD2. In contrast, GluD1 expression alone did not induce presynaptic differentiation in co-cultures of HEK cells with hippocampal neurons. However, when Cbln1 was exogenously added to the culture medium, GluD1 induced presynaptic differentiation of not only glutamatergic presynaptic terminals but also GABAergic ones. Cbln1 is not expressed in hippocampal neurons but is expressed in entorhinal cortical neurons projecting to the hippocampus. In co-cultures of HEK cells expressing GluD1 and entorhinal cortical neurons, both glutamatergic and GABAergic presynaptic terminals were formed on the HEK cells without exogenous application of Cbln1. These results suggest that GluD1 might contribute to the formation of specific synapses in the hippocampus such as those formed by the projecting neurons of the entorhinal cortex.

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of bivalent ligands against A1-D1 receptor heteromers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian SHEN; Lei ZHANG; Wan-ling SONG; Tao MENG; Xin WANG; Lin CHEN; Lin-yin FENG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To design and synthesize bivalent ligands for adenosine A1-dopamine D1 receptor heteromers (A1-D1R),and evaluate their pharmacological activities.Methods:Bivalent ligands and their corresponding A1R monovalent ligands were designed and synthesized.The affinities of the bivalent ligands for A1R and D1R in rat brain membrane preparation were examined using radiolabeled binding assays.To demonstrate the formation of A1-D1R,fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was conducted in HEK293 cells transfected with D1-CFP and A1-YFP.Molecular modeling was used to analyze the possible mode of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions.Results:Two bivalent ligands for A1R and D1R (20a,20b),as well as the corresponding A1R monovalent ligands (21a,21b) were synthesized.In radiolabeled binding assays,the bivalent ligands showed affinities for A1R 10-100 times higher than those of the corresponding monovalent ligands.In FRET experiments,the bivalent ligands significantly increased the heterodimerization of A1R and D1R compared with the corresponding monovalent ligands.A heterodimer model with the interface of helixes 3,4,5 of A1R and helixes 1,6,7 from D1R was established with molecular modeling.The distance between the two ligand binding sites in the heterodimer model was approximately 48.4 (A),which was shorter than the length of the bivalent ligands.Conclusion:This study demonstrates the existence of A1-D1R in situ and a simultaneous interaction of bivalent ligands with both the receptors.

  8. Synthesis and herbicidal evaluation of novel benzothiazole derivatives as potential inhibitors of D1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tonghui; Sun, Jie; An, Lin; Zhang, Lixian; Han, Cuiping

    2016-04-01

    D1 protease is a C-terminal processing protease that has been predicted to be an ideal herbicidal target. Three novel series of benzothiazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their herbicidal activities against Brassica napus (rape) and Echinochloa crusgalli (barnyard grass). The preliminary bioassay indicated that most of the synthesized compounds possess promising D1 protease inhibitory activities and considerable herbicidal activities. Molecular docking was performed to position representative compounds into the active site of D1 protease to determine a probable binding model.

  9. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer signaling pathway in the brain: emerging physiological relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasbi Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine is an important catecholamine neurotransmitter modulating many physiological functions, and is linked to psychopathology of many diseases such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are the most abundant dopaminergic receptors in the striatum, and although a clear segregation between the pathways expressing these two receptors has been reported in certain subregions, the presence of D1-D2 receptor heteromers within a unique subset of neurons, forming a novel signaling transducing functional entity has been shown. Recently, significant progress has been made in elucidating the signaling pathways activated by the D1-D2 receptor heteromer and their potential physiological relevance.

  10. Discovery of new SCH 39166 analogs as potent and selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Li; Sasikumar, T K; Burnett, Duane A; Su, Jing; Tang, Haiqun; Ye, Yuanzan; Mazzola, Robert D; Zhu, Zhaoning; McKittrick, Brian A; Greenlee, William J; Fawzi, Ahmad; Smith, Michelle; Zhang, Hongtao; Lachowicz, Jean E

    2010-02-01

    A series of novel dopamine D(1) antagonists derived from functionalization of the D-ring of SCH 39166 were prepared. A number of these compounds displayed subnanomolar D(1) activity and more than 1000-fold selectivity over D(2). We found C-3 derivatization afforded compounds with superior overall profile in comparison to the C-2 and C-4 derivatization. A number of highly potent D(1) antagonists were discovered which have excellent selectivity over other dopamine receptors and improved PK profile compared to SCH 39166.

  11. [Recombination frequency in the locus Gli-D1 of common wheat T. aestivum L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozub, N A; Sozinov, I A; Sozinov, A A

    2003-01-01

    The recombination frequency at the gliadin locus Gli-D1 of common wheat was determined by the maximum likelihood method. Recombination was observed between the gene encoding the fastest omega-component of the allele Gli-D1j, and the genes encoding the other omega-gliadins of this allele. The frequency of recombination was 0.65 +/- 0.18% for the cross between the near-isogenic lines of winter common wheat with respect to gliadin loci Gli-D1-4 and Gli-B1-3 and 0.78 +/- 0.45% for the cross between the varieties Yunnat and B-16.

  12. Genomic and Functional Analyses of Rhodococcus equi Phages ReqiPepy6, ReqiPoco6, ReqiPine5, and ReqiDocB7 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summer, E. J.; Liu, M.; Gill, J. J.; Grant, M.; Chan-Cortes, T. N.; Ferguson, L.; Janes, C.; Lange, K.; Bertoli, M.; Moore, C.; Orchard, R. C.; Cohen, N. D.; Young, R.

    2011-01-01

    The isolation and results of genomic and functional analyses of Rhodococcus equi phages ReqiPepy6, ReqiDocB7, ReqiPine5, and ReqiPoco6 (hereafter referred to as Pepy6, DocB7, Pine5, and Poco6, respectively) are reported. Two phages, Pepy6 and Poco6, more than 75% identical, exhibited genome organization and protein sequence likeness to Lactococcus lactis phage 1706 and clostridial prophage elements. An unusually high fraction, 27%, of Pepy6 and Poco6 proteins were predicted to possess at least one transmembrane domain, a value much higher than the average of 8.5% transmembrane domain-containing proteins determined from a data set of 36,324 phage protein entries. Genome organization and protein sequence comparisons place phage Pine5 as the first nonmycobacteriophage member of the large Rosebush cluster. DocB7, which had the broadest host range among the four isolates, was not closely related to any phage or prophage in the database, and only 23 of 105 predicted encoded proteins could be assigned a functional annotation. Because of the relationship of Rhodococcus to Mycobacterium, it was anticipated that these phages should exhibit some of the features characteristic of mycobacteriophages. Traits that were identified as shared by the Rhodococcus phages and mycobacteriophages include the prevalent long-tailed morphology and the presence of genes encoding LysB-like mycolate-hydrolyzing lysis proteins. Application of DocB7 lysates to soils amended with a host strain of R. equi reduced recoverable bacterial CFU, suggesting that phage may be useful in limiting R. equi load in the environment while foals are susceptible to infection. PMID:21097585

  13. Ensaio imunoenzimático indireto (ELISA para detecção de anticorpos anti-Rhodococcus equi em potros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Carla Braga

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção ocasionada pelo Rhodococcus equi é responsável por elevadas taxas de mortalidade e grandes perdas econômicas na equideocultura. Diante da importância dessa enfermidade, este trabalho objetivou a padronização de um ensaio imunoenzimático indireto (ELISA teste para a detecção de anticorpos anti-Rhodococcus equi em potros (n=16 antes e após a ingestão de colostro de mães vacinadas. Nesse ensaio, foram utilizados dois tipos de antígenos de Rhodococcus equi, o APTX (proteína semi-purificada VapA, extraído pelo detergente Triton X e precipitado em acetona, e o comercial¹. Os resultados da titulação em bloco determinou a concentração ótima dos antígenos em 2,0mg/ml e a diluição única do soro 1:200 para soros de referências negativo, positivo e soros testes. Anticorpos de classe IgG anti-R.equi foram detectados nos potros após a ingestão do colostro até 150 dias de experimento. O antígeno comercial detectou títulos de anticorpos maiores e de maior persistência que o APTX. No entanto, para ambos os antígenos utilizados, o ELISA-teste demonstrou elevada sensibilidade.

  14. Differences in Rhodococcus equi Infections Based on Immune Status and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates in a Case Series of 12 Patients and Cases in the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundelly, Praveen; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ribes, Julie A; Thornton, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual zoonotic pathogen that can cause life-threatening diseases in susceptible hosts. Twelve patients with R. equi infection in Kentucky were compared to 137 cases reported in the literature. Although lungs were the primary sites of infection in immunocompromised patients, extrapulmonary involvement only was more common in immunocompetent patients (P equi-infected HIV patients was lower in the HAART era (8%) than in pre-HAART era (56%) (P equi infection should include a combination of two antibiotics, preferably selected from vancomycin, imipenem, clarithromycin/azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampin, or cotrimoxazole. Local antibiograms should be checked prior to using cotrimoxazole due to developing resistance.

  15. Dimetilsulfóxido - DMSO no teste de sensibilidade microbiana in vitro em cepas de Rhodococcus equi isoladas de afecções pulmonares em potros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Márcio Garcia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparou-se a sensibilidade microbiana in vitro de isolados de Rhodococcus equi pelo teste padrão de difusão com discos, com o modificado, pela adição de 5% de dimetilsulfóxido-DMSO. Observou-se aumento da sensibilidade do R. equi no teste com DMSO, frente a aminoglicosídeos (canamicina, amicacina, estreptomicina e ao cloranfenicol, enquanto para a eritromicina e derivados ß-lactâmicos (penicilina G, cefalosporinas, amoxicilina, oxacilina, constatou-se redução da sensibilidade do agente.

  16. ESTANDARIZACIÓN DE UNA PRUEBA DE PCR-RFLP PARA LA IDENTIFICACIÓN DE Rhodococcus rhodnii EN INSECTOS TRIATOMINOS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, J.; Laboratorio de Parasitología Molecular Departamento de Microbiología Facultad de Ciencias Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá; Pavía, P.; Laboratorio de Parasitología Molecular Departamento de Microbiología Facultad de Ciencias Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá; Calderón, C.; Laboratorio de Parasitología Molecular Departamento de Microbiología Facultad de Ciencias Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá; Montilla, M; Laboratorio de Parasitología, Investigación, Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogotá, Colombia.; Nicholls, R. S.; Laboratorio de Parasitología, Investigación, Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogotá, Colombia.; Puerta, C. J.; Laboratorio de Parasitología Molecular Departamento de Microbiología Facultad de Ciencias Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá

    2007-01-01

    Los triatominos son insectos de importancia en salud pública ya que transmiten el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi, agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas. Estos insectos en su flora intestinal contienen bacteriasdel género Rhodococcus, las cuales establecen una relación simbiótica con el triatomino aportándole suplementos nutritivos necesarios para su normal desarrollo y crecimiento. El estudio de estas bacterias tiene gran interés debido tanto a la posibilidad de diseñar estrategias de control ...

  17. Computation of the Electrical Double Layer Properties of Semipermeable Membranes in Multicomponent Electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wasserman, Evgeny; Felmy, Andrew R.

    1998-01-01

    A methodology is presented for calculating of the surface potential, Donnan potential, and ion concentration profiles for semipermeable microbial membranes that is valid for an arbitrary electrolyte composition. This model for surface potential, Donnan potential, and charge density was applied to recently reported experimental data for gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus brevis, Rhodococcus opacus, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Corynebacterium species. These calculations show that prev...

  18. CyclinD1 and Survivin expression in parotid gland tumors%CyclinD1和Survivin在腮腺肿瘤中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云杉

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the cell cycle protein (CyclinD1) and apoptosis inhibiting factor (Survivin) expression in parotid gland tumors in the relationship.MethodsSelect from October 19, 2012 to 2012 on July 19 days the hospital for treatment of 54 patients with parotid gland tumor pathological section. ResultsCyclinD1 in the normal group, benign tumor and malignant tumor group, the positive rate of 5.0%, 25.0% and 70.6%, respectively, expression increased obviously, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05), Survivin in the normal group, benign tumor and malignant tumor group were 0.0%, 30.0% and 67.6%, respectively, to express obviously increased, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). ConclusionCyclinD1 and Survivin in parotid gland tumor development played a synergy, can be used as important reference for diagnosis and treatment of parotid gland.%目的:探究细胞周期蛋白(CyclinD1)和凋亡抑制因子(Survivin)在腮腺肿瘤中的表达关系。方法选取自2012年10月19日~2014年7月19日来我院进行治疗的54例腮腺肿瘤患者的病理切片。结果 CyclinD1在常人组、良性肿瘤组和恶性肿瘤组的阳性率分别为5.0%、25.0%和70.6%,表现明显增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),Survivin在常人组、良性肿瘤组和恶性肿瘤组的阳性率分别为0.0%、30.0%和67.6%,表达明显增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 CyclinD1与Survivin在腮腺肿瘤的发展中起到了协同作用,可作为腮腺诊治的重要参考依据。

  19. 多巴胺D1受体在Sf9昆虫细胞中的表达及左旋氯代斯阔任对重组D1受体的激动作用%Expression of dopamine D1 receptor in Sf9 insect cells and agonism ofl-12-chloroscoulerine on recombinant D1 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    和友; 金文桥; 申庆祥; 陈新建; 金国章

    2003-01-01

    目的:在Sf9昆虫细胞中表达D1受体,并研究左旋氯代斯阔任对重组D1受体的激动作用.方法:构建含D1受体cDNA的重组杆状病毒,以其感染Sf9昆虫细胞得到D1受体表达.[3H]SCH23390受体结合检测重组D1受体的药理特性.[3H]SCH23390受体结合和cAMP测定实验检测左旋氯代斯阔任对重组D1受体的激动作用.结果:在Sf9昆虫细胞中成功表达D1受体,[3H]SCH23390与重组D1受体最大结合量(Bmax)为(0.94±0.06)nmol/g蛋白,[3H]SCH23390与重组D1受体的结合解离常数(Kd)为(1.9±0.3)nmol/L,其药理特性与小牛纹状体脑匀浆所得结果一致.左旋氯代斯阔任对重组D1受体有高亲和力,解离常数Ki为(6.3±1.4)nmol/L;并剂量依赖地引起胞内cAMP增加,EC50为0.72μmol/L(95%可信限为0.67-0.77 μmol/L),表现出D1激动作用.结论:在杆状病毒/昆虫细胞Sf9中,成功建立了D1受体异源表达系统.在细胞分子水平,直接证实了左旋氯代斯阔任对D1受体的激动作用.%AIM: To express dopamine D1 receptor in baculovirus-Sf9 cell system, and to investigate the effects ofl-12-chloroscoulerine (l-CSL) on the recombinant D1 receptor (D1R). METHODS: The recombinant baculovirus,Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus bearing D1R (AcNPV- D1R) was generated, and then was usedto produce recombinant D1R in Sf9 insect cells. Expression of D1R in Sf9 cells was monitored by [3H]SCH23390binding assay. The effects ofl-CSL on recombinant D1R were investigated by [3H]SCH23390 binding assay andcAMP assay. RESULTS: The recombinant baculovirus AcNPV bearing DiR cDNA was generated, and wassuccessfully expressed in Sf9 insect cells. The expression level of (Bmax) was (0.94±0.06) nmol/g protein. The Kdvalue of [3H]SCH23390 was (1.9±0.3) nmol/L, which was consistent with the previous results from calf striutamtissues. l-CSL had a high affinity to recombinant D1R with Ki value of (6.3±1.4) nmol/L, and increased theintracellular cAMP level in a

  20. Experimental Conditions: SE24_S1_M1_D1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rometry with 13C‑Labeling for Chemical Assignment of Sulfur-Containing Metabolites ...SE24_S1_M1_D1 SE24 Combination of Liquid Chromatography-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance-Mass Spect

  1. Inhibition of GSK3 attenuates dopamine D1 receptor agonist-induced hyperactivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2010-05-31

    Recent evidence suggests a critical role for the intracellular signaling protein glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) in hyperactivity associated with dopaminergic transmission. Here, we investigated whether activation of GSK3 is necessary for the expression of behaviors specifically produced by dopamine D1 receptor activation. To assess the role of GSK3 in dopamine D1 receptor-induced hyperactivity, mice were pretreated with the selective GSK3 inhibitor SB 216763 (0.25-7.5mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle prior to administration of the dopamine D1 receptor full-agonist SKF-82958 (1.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline control. Inhibition of GSK3 via SB 216763 dose-dependently reduced ambulatory and stereotypic activity produced by SKF-82958. These data implicate a role for GSK3 in the behavioral manifestations associated with dopamine D1 receptor activation.

  2. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  3. Microstates of D1–D5(-P black holes, as interacting D-branes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Morita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In our previous study (Morita et al., 2014 [1], we figured out that the thermodynamics of the near extremal black p-branes can be explained as the collective motions of gravitationally interacting elementary p-branes (the p-soup proposal. We test this proposal in the near-extremal D1–D5 and D1–D5-P black holes and show that their thermodynamics also can be explained in a similar fashion, i.e. via the collective motions of the interacting elementary D1-branes and D5-branes (and waves. It may imply that the microscopic origins of these intersecting black branes and the black p-brane are explained in the unified picture. We also argue the relation between the p-soup proposal and the conformal field theory calculations of the D1–D5(-P black holes in superstring theory.

  4. Microstates of D1-D5(-P) black holes as interacting D-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study [1] (1311.6540), we figured out that the thermodynamics of the near extremal black $p$-branes can be explained as the collective motions of gravitationally interacting elementary $p$-branes (the $p$-soup proposal). We test this proposal in the near-extremal D1-D5 and D1-D5-P black holes and show that their thermodynamics also can be explained in a similar fashion, i.e. via the collective motions of the interacting elementary D1-branes and D5-branes (and waves). It may imply that the microscopic origins of these intersecting black branes and the black $p$-brane are explained in the unified picture. We also argue the relation between the $p$-soup proposal and the conformal field theory calculations of the D1-D5(-P) black holes in superstring theory.

  5. Microstates of D1-D5(-P) black holes, as interacting D-branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Shiba, Shotaro

    2015-07-01

    In our previous study (Morita et al., 2014 [1]), we figured out that the thermodynamics of the near extremal black p-branes can be explained as the collective motions of gravitationally interacting elementary p-branes (the p-soup proposal). We test this proposal in the near-extremal D1-D5 and D1-D5-P black holes and show that their thermodynamics also can be explained in a similar fashion, i.e. via the collective motions of the interacting elementary D1-branes and D5-branes (and waves). It may imply that the microscopic origins of these intersecting black branes and the black p-brane are explained in the unified picture. We also argue the relation between the p-soup proposal and the conformal field theory calculations of the D1-D5(-P) black holes in superstring theory.

  6. Microstates of D1–D5(-P) black holes, as interacting D-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Takeshi, E-mail: morita.takeshi@shizuoka.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Shiba, Shotaro, E-mail: sshiba@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Maskawa Institute for Science and Culture, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo-Motoyama, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2015-07-30

    In our previous study (Morita et al., 2014 [1]), we figured out that the thermodynamics of the near extremal black p-branes can be explained as the collective motions of gravitationally interacting elementary p-branes (the p-soup proposal). We test this proposal in the near-extremal D1–D5 and D1–D5-P black holes and show that their thermodynamics also can be explained in a similar fashion, i.e. via the collective motions of the interacting elementary D1-branes and D5-branes (and waves). It may imply that the microscopic origins of these intersecting black branes and the black p-brane are explained in the unified picture. We also argue the relation between the p-soup proposal and the conformal field theory calculations of the D1–D5(-P) black holes in superstring theory.

  7. The new powder diffractometer D1B of the Institut Laue Langevin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente Orench, I.; Clergeau, J. F.; Martínez, S.; Olmos, M.; Fabelo, O.; Campo, J.

    2014-11-01

    D1B is a medium resolution high flux powder diffractometer located at the Institut Laue Langevin, ILL. D1B a suitable instrument for studying a large variety of polycrystalline materials. D1B runs since 1998 as a CRG (collaborating research group) instrument, being exploited by the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France) and CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Spain). In 2008 the Spanish CRG started an updating program which included a new detector and a radial oscillating collimator (ROC). The detector, which has a sensitive height of 100mm, covers an angular range of 128°. Its 1280 gold wires provide a neutron detection point every 0.1°. The ROC is made of 198 gadolinium- based absorbing collimation blades, regular placed every 0.67°. Here the present characteristics of D1B are reviewed and the different experimental performances will be presented.

  8. A Role for D1 Dopamine Receptors in Striatal Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Friend, Danielle M.; Keefe, Kristen A

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure results in long-term damage to the dopamine system in both human METH abusers and animal models. One factor that has been heavily implicated in this METH-induced damage to the dopaminergic system is the activation of D1 Dopamine (DA) receptors. However, a significant caveat to the studies investigating the role of the receptor in such toxicity is that genetic and pharmacological manipulations of the D1 DA receptor also mitigate METH-induced hyperthermia. Import...

  9. Aberrant D1 and D3 dopamine receptor transregulation in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chunyu; Wang, Dan; Asico, Laureano D; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S; Hopfer, Ulrich; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure by inhibition of sodium transport in renal proximal tubules (RPTs) and relaxation of vascular smooth muscles. Because dopamine receptors can regulate and interact with each other, we studied the interaction of D(1) and D(3) receptors in immortalized RPT cells and mesenteric arteries from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), and in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). In WKY rats, the D(1)-like agonist, fenoldopam, increased D(3) receptor protein in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=4.5x10(-9) M, t(1/2)=15.8 hours). In SHRs, fenoldopam (10(-5) M) actually decreased the expression of D(3) receptors. D(1) and D(3) receptor co-immunoprecipitation was increased by fenoldopam (10(-7) M/24 h) in WKY rats but not in SHRs. The effects of fenoldopam in CASMCs were similar as those in WKY RPT cells (ie, fenoldopam increased D(1) and D(3) receptor proteins). Both D(3) (PD128907, Emax=80%+/-6%, pED(50)=5+/-0.1) and D(1)-like receptor (fenoldopam, Emax=81%+/-8%, pED(50)=5+/-0.2, n=12) agonists relaxed mesenteric arterial rings. Co-stimulation of D(1) and D(3) receptors led to additive vasorelaxation in WKY rats, but not in SHRs. D(1) and D(3) receptors interact differently in WKY and SHRs. Altered interactions between D(1) and D(3) receptors may play a role in the pathogenesis of genetic hypertension, including human hypertension, because these receptors also interact in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

  10. Adaptive evolution of the Streptococcus pyogenes regulatory aldolase LacD.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Zachary; Caparon, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In the human-pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, the tagatose bisphosphate aldolase LacD.1 likely originated through a gene duplication event and was adapted to a role as a metabolic sensor for regulation of virulence gene transcription. Although LacD.1 retains enzymatic activity, its ancestral metabolic function resides in the LacD.2 aldolase, which is required for the catabolism of galactose. In this study, we compared these paralogous proteins to identify characteristics correlated with divergence and novel function. Surprisingly, despite the fact that these proteins have identical active sites and 82% similarity in amino acid sequence, LacD.1 was less efficient at cleaving both fructose and tagatose bisphosphates. Analysis of kinetic properties revealed that LacD.1's adaptation was associated with a decrease in k(cat) and an increase in K(m). Construction and analysis of enzyme chimeras indicated that non-active-site residues previously associated with the variable activities of human aldolase isoenzymes modulated LacD.1's affinity for substrate. Mutant LacD.1 proteins engineered to have LacD.2-like levels of enzymatic efficiency lost the ability to function as regulators, suggesting that an alteration in efficiency was required for adaptation. In competition under growth conditions that mimic a deep-tissue environment, LacD.1 conferred a significant gain in fitness that was associated with its regulatory activity. Taken together, these data suggest that LacD.1's adaptation represents a form of neofunctionalization in which duplication facilitated the gain of regulatory function important for growth in tissue and pathogenesis.

  11. Expression of Cyclin D1 and P16 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Biswajit; Raphael, Vandana; Khonglah, Yookarin; GiriLynrah, Kyrshanlang

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the lethal cancers with a high incidence rate in Asia. Many genes including cyclin D1 and p16 play important role in its carcinogenesis. We aimed to analyze the expressions of cyclin D1 and p16 with the various clinicopathological characteristics of ESCC. METHODS We examined 30 biopsy samples of ESCC for cyclin D1 and p16 protein expressions using immunohistochemistry. Immunointensity was classified as no immunostaining (-), weakly immunostaining (+), weak immunostaining (++) and strongly positive immunostaining (+++). RESULTS Out of the 30 cases, positive expression of cyclin D1 was detected in 26 cases (86.7%). The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (88.2%), lymph node metastasis (87.5%), and tumors which were poorly differentiated (92.9%) were higher in cyclin D1 positive tumors than in the cyclin D1 negative tumors. However no significant association was found between cyclin D1 expression and the different clinicopathological parameters.There were 22 cases of ESCC (73.3 %) which showed negativity for p16. The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (82.4%) and poorly differentiated tumors (92.9%) were higher in the p16 negative tumors than in the p16 positive tumors. There was significant association between the histological grade and p16 expression (p=0.012). However, there were no significant association with regard to site, size and lymph node status of the tumors and p16 expression. CONCLUSION The study shows that alterations of cyclin D1 and p16 play an important role in ESCC. Loss of p16 expression was associated with poor differentiation.

  12. Thermodynamics of $(d+1)$-dimensional NUT-charged AdS Spacetimes

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, R.; Fatibene, L.; Mann, R. B.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the thermodynamic properties of $(d+1)$-dimensional spacetimes with NUT charges. Such spacetimes are asymptotically locally anti de Sitter (or flat), with non-trivial topology in their spatial sections, and can have fixed point sets of the Euclidean time symmetry that are either $(d-1)$-dimensional (called "bolts") or of lower dimensionality (pure "NUTs"). We compute the free energy, conserved mass, and entropy for 4, 6, 8 and 10 dimensions for each, using both Noether charge meth...

  13. Identification of human dopamine D1-like receptor agonist using a cell-based functional assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan JIANG; Ke-qing OU-YANG; Shao-xi CAI; Ying-he HU; Zhi-liang XU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To establish a cell-based assay to screen human dopamine D1 and D5 receptor agonists against compounds from a natural product compound library.Methods: Synthetic responsive elements 6×cAMP response elements (CRE) and a mini promoter containing a TATA box were inserted into the pGL3 basic vector to generate the reporter gene construct pCRE/TA/Luci. CHO cells were co-transfected with the reporter gene construct and human D1 or D5 receptor cDNA in mammalian expression vectors. Stable cell lines were established for agonist screening. A natural product compound library from over 300 herbs has been established. The extracts from these herbs were used for human D1 and D5 receptor agonist screenings. Results: A number of extracts were identified that activated both D1 and D5 receptors. One of the herb extracts, SBG492, demonstrated distinct pharmacological characteristics with human D1 and D5 receptors.The EC50 values of SBG492 were 342.7 μg/mL for the D1 receptor and 31.7 μg/mL for the D5 receptor. Conclusion: We have established a cell-based assay for high-throughput drug screening to identify D 1-like receptor agonists from natural products. Several extracts that can active D1-like receptors were discovered.These compounds could be useful tools for studies on the functions of these receptors in the brain and could potentially be developed into therapeutic drugs for the treatment of central nervous system diseases.

  14. Expressions of cyclin D1 and p27kip1 in carcinogenesis of stomach mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qunqing Liu; Guiying Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between the expressions of cyclin D1 and p27kipl in the canceration course of the stomach.Methods: The immunohistochemical staining technique (SP method) was used to detect the expressions of cyclin D1, p27kip1 in chronic superficial gastritis (CSG), chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), dysplasia (DYS), gastric carcinoma (GCA) biopsy specimens.Results: The positive cyclin D1 expression rates increased with the progressing from CAG→IM→DYS→GCA respectively, and those in IM, DYS and GCA were different from those in CSG, P<0.05, while DYS group was indifferent from GCA group, P>0.05.The positive p27k'pl expression rates decreased with the mucosa progressing from CAG→IM→DYS→GCA.There was a negative correlation between the expression cyclin D1 and p27kip1 (y=-0.53, P=0.000).Conclusion: Expression rates of cyclin D1 in the canceration course of the stomach mucosa trend were increased and those of p27kip1 were decreased; the abnormal expressions of them were found in the early term of the canceration course of the stomach mucosa, and the inverse expression suggests there may be a negative feedback regulatory loop between cyclin D1 and p27kip1.

  15. Expression of cyclin D1 and p16 in psoriasis before and after phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou EL-Ela, M; Nagui, N; Mahgoub, D; El-Eishi, N; Fawzy, M; El-Tawdy, A; Abdel Hay, R; Rashed, L

    2010-10-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PV) is characterized by keratinocyte hyperproliferation. Altered expression of cell-cycle regulatory genes involved in the cyclin D1 ⁄ p16 INK4-pRb pathway may contribute to this epidermal hyperproliferation. To assess the expression of cyclin D1 and p16 in psoriasis, and to evaluate the effect of phototherapy on their expression. The study population comprised 25 patients with PV and 10 healthy controls. Patients were treated with 24 sessions of either narrowband ultraviolet (UV) B or psoralen UVA. Skin biopsies were taken from the affected skin of each patient before and after treatment, and from the healthy controls, to examine cyclin D1 and p16 expression. Before phototherapy, the mean value of cyclin D1 concentration in patients was significantly greater than that in controls and the mean value of p16 concentration in patients was significantly lower than that in controls. Following treatment, we detected a significant decrease in cyclin D1 and a significant increase in p16. Cyclin D1 upregulation and p16 downregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Normalization of the levels of both parameters may be a mechanism by which phototherapy induces remission in psoriasis.

  16. Stage-specific requirement for cyclin D1 in glial progenitor cells of the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobs, Lionel; Baranek, Constanze; Nestel, Sigrun; Kulik, Akos; Kapfhammer, Josef; Nitsch, Cordula; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2014-05-01

    Despite the vast abundance of glial progenitor cells in the mouse brain parenchyma, little is known about the molecular mechanisms driving their proliferation in the adult. Here we unravel a critical role of the G1 cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in controlling cell division of glial cells in the cortical grey matter. We detect cyclin D1 expression in Olig2-immunopositive (Olig2+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, as well as in Iba1+ microglia and S100β+ astrocytes in cortices of 3-month-old mice. Analysis of cyclin D1-deficient mice reveals a cell and stage-specific molecular control of cell cycle progression in the various glial lineages. While proliferation of fast dividing Olig2+ cells at early postnatal stages becomes gradually dependent on cyclin D1, this particular G1 regulator is strictly required for the slow divisions of Olig2+/NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors in the adult cerebral cortex. Further, we find that the population of mature oligodendrocytes is markedly reduced in the absence of cyclin D1, leading to a significant decrease in the number of myelinated axons in both the prefrontal cortex and the corpus callosum of 8-month-old mutant mice. In contrast, the pool of Iba1+ cells is diminished already at postnatal day 3 in the absence of cyclin D1, while the number of S100β+ astrocytes remains unchanged in the mutant.

  17. Cyclin D1 Expression and Its Correlation with Histopathological Differentiation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Saawarn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cyclin D1 regulates the G1 to S transition of cell cycle. Its deregulation or overexpression may lead to disturbance in the normal cell cycle control and tumour formation. Overexpression of cyclin D1 has been reported in various tumors of diverse histogenesis. This case control retrospective study was carried out to study the immunohistochemical reactivity and expression of cyclin D1 and its association with site, clinical staging, and histopathological differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Methods. Forty formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of biopsy specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma were immunohistochemically evaluated for expression of cyclin D1. Results. Cyclin D1 expression was seen in 45% cases of OSCC. It did not correlate with site and clinical staging. Highest expression was seen in well-differentiated, followed by moderately differentiated, and poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, with a statistically significant correlation. Conclusion. Cyclin D1 expression significantly increases with increase in differentiation.

  18. A new approach for treatment of hypertension: modifying D1 dopamine receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chunyu; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2006-10-01

    Essential hypertension is a major factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure and kidney failure. Dopamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension by regulating epithelial sodium transport and vasodilatation directly or indirectly with other hormones and humoral factors, such as reactive oxygen species and the renin-angiotensin system. Dopamine receptors are classified into five subtypes based on their structure and pharmacology. Among those dopamine receptor subtypes, D(1) receptor is the most important one, during conditions of moderate sodium intake, more than 50% of renal sodium excretion is regulated by D(1)-like receptors. Decreased renal dopamine production and/or impaired D(1) receptor function have been reported in hypertension. Disruption of D(1) receptor results in hypertension. In this paper, we review the mechanisms by which hypertension develops when D(1) receptor function is perturbed. We also discuss possible new approaches developing anti-hypertensive medicine by increasing renal dopamine production, enhancing D(1) receptor function, or modifying its interactions with other blood pressure-regulating systems.

  19. (-)-Stepholodine induced enhancement of cardiac muscle contractions mediated by D1 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shu-yuan; LIU Zheng; HU Hui-sheng; SHI Zhen; CHEN Long

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of (-)-Stepholidine (SPD) on enhancing D1 receptor mediated contraction of cardiac muscle in isolated rat heart and to examine whether SPD has a direct effect on the heart dopamine D1 receptors. SPD an active ingredient of the Chinese herb Stephania intermedia, binds to dopamine D1 and D2 like receptors. Biochemical, electrophysiological and behavioural experiments have provided strong evidence that SPD is both a D(1/5) agonist and a D(2/4) antagonist, which could indicate unique antipsychotic properties. Methods Normal adult rat working hearts were isolated by Langendorff technique. Results SPD significantly increased the cardiac muscle contraction in a dose-dependent manner. The selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1 μM) blocked the SPD induced heart contraction, however, neither the β-receptor antagonist propranolol (1 μM) nor the α1-receptor antagonist prazosin (1 μM) had any effect on blocking SPD induced heart contractions. Moreover, the L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nimodipine (1 μM) completely blocked the effect of SPD on cardiac muscle contraction. Conclusions SPD show the effect on enhancing contraction of isolated rat heart through activating L-type Ca2+ channel mediated by heart D1 receptors.

  20. NeuroD1: developmental expression and regulated genes in the rodent pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Estela M; Bailey, Michael J; Rath, Martin F; Shi, Qiong; Morin, Fabrice; Coon, Steven L; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C

    2007-08-01

    NeuroD1/BETA2, a member of the bHLH transcription factor family, is known to influence the fate of specific neuronal, endocrine and retinal cells. We report here that NeuroD1 mRNA is highly abundant in the developing and adult rat pineal gland. Pineal expression begins in the 17-day embryo at which time it is also detectable in other brain regions. Expression in the pineal gland increases during the embryonic period and is maintained thereafter at levels equivalent to those found in the cerebellum and retina. In contrast, NeuroD1 mRNA decreases markedly in non-cerebellar brain regions during development. Pineal NeuroD1 levels are similar during the day and night, and do not appear to be influenced by sympathetic neural input. Gene expression analysis of the pineal glands from neonatal NeuroD1 knockout mice identifies 127 transcripts that are down-regulated (>twofold, p twofold, p < 0.05). According to quantitative RT-PCR, the most dramatically down-regulated gene is kinesin family member 5C ( approximately 100-fold) and the most dramatically up-regulated gene is glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 ( approximately fourfold). Other impacted transcripts encode proteins involved in differentiation, development, signal transduction and trafficking. These findings represent the first step toward elucidating the role of NeuroD1 in the rodent pinealocyte.

  1. Haplotype variation of Green Revolution gene Rht-D1 during wheat domestication and improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chihong Zhang; Lifeng Gao; Jiaqiang Sun; Jizeng Jia; Zhenglong Ren

    2014-01-01

    Green Revolution made a substantial contribution to wheat yields worldwide in the 1960s and 1970s. It is of great importance to analyze the haplotype variation of Rht-D1, the Green Revolution gene, during wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) domestication and breeding to understand its evolution and function in wheat breeding history. In this study, the Rht-D1 and its flanking regions were sequenced and single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected based on a panel of 45 accessions of Aegilops tauschi , 51 accessions of landraces and 80 accessions of commercial varieties. Genetic diversity in the wild accessions was much higher than that in the varieties and higher than that reported previously. Seven haplotypes (Hapl I to Hapl VII) of Rht-D1 were identified and their evolutionary relationships were proposed. In addition to the wel-known Green Revolution al ele Rht-D1b, Hapl VII (an al ele Rht-D1k) was identified in early breeding varieties, which reduced plant height by 16%. The results suggested that Rht-D1k had been used in breeding before the Green Revolution and made a great contribution to wheat production worldwide. Based on the breeding history and molecular evidence, we proposed that the wheat Green Revolution in China and International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) occurred independently.

  2. Expression and significance of cyclin D1, p27kipl protein in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁键群; 许敬尧; 张静; 何启才; 祝佳; 盛彩霞

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between expression of cell cycle-related protein cyclin D1, p27kipl and the pathogenesis of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and the value of prediction of prognosis. Methods: Cyclin D1 and p27kipl protein were detected by immunohistochemical En Vision method in 43 BACs. Results: The positivity of cyclin D1 in BAC was 65.1% (28/43), which was significantly higher than that in normal pulmonary tissue (0/13), P0.05), while cyclin D1 expression was found to be negatively correlated with tumor size (P0.05), but was negatively correlated with stromal fibrosis, lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (P<0.05); and positively associated with postoperative survival period (P<0.01). The survival rate of p27kipl positive group was significantly higher than that of p27kipl negative group (P<0.01). No statistically significant correlation was found between cyclin D1 and p27kipl expression. Conclusions: Increased cyclin D1 expression and decreased p27kipl expression are related to the pathogenesis of BAC; decreased p27kipl expression is associated with metastasis progression; immunodetection ofp27kipl is useful for assessment of prognosis.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a thermotolerant ene reductase from Geobacillus sp. 30 and its heterologous expression in Rhodococcus opacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Honda, Kohsuke; Wada, Mayumi; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2014-07-01

    Rhodococcus opacus B-4 cells are adhesive to and even dispersible in water-immiscible hydrocarbons owing to their highly lipophilic nature. In this study, we focused on the high operational stability of thermophilic enzymes and applied them to a biocatalytic conversion in an organic reaction medium using R. opacus B-4 as a lipophilic capsule of enzymes to deliver them into the organic medium. A novel thermo- and organic-solvent-tolerant ene reductase, which can catalyze the enantioselective reduction of ketoisophorone to (6R)-levodione, was isolated from Geobacillus sp. 30, and the gene encoding the enzyme was heterologously expressed in R. opacus B-4. Another thermophilic enzyme which catalyzes NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol was identified from the gene-expression library of Thermus thermophilus and the gene was coexpressed in R. opacus B-4 for cofactor regeneration. While the recombinant cells were not viable in the mixture due to high reaction temperature, 634 mM of (6R)-levodione could be produced with an enantiopurity of 89.2 % ee by directly mixing the wet cells of the recombinant R. opacus with a mixture of ketoisophorone and cyclohexanol at 50 °C. The conversion rate observed with the heat-killed recombinant cells was considerably higher than that obtained with a cell-free enzyme solution, demonstrating that the accessibility between the substrates and enzymes could be improved by employing R. opacus cells as a lipophilic enzyme capsule. These results imply that a combination of thermophilic enzymes and lipophilic cells can be a promising approach for the biocatalytic production of water-insoluble chemicals.

  4. Biodegradation of 4-nitrotoluene with biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2: metabolic pathway, cell surface properties and toxicological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Debasree; Hazra, Chinmay; Dandi, Navin; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-11-01

    A novel 4-nitrotoluene-degrading bacterial strain was isolated from pesticides contaminated effluent-sediment and identified as Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2 based on morphological and biochemical properties and 16S rDNA sequencing. The strain NT2 degraded 4-NT (400 mg l(-1)) with rapid growth at the end of 120 h, reduced surface tension of the media from 71 to 29 mN m(-1) and produced glycolipidic biosurfactants (45 mg l(-1)). The biosurfactant was purified and characterized as trehalose lipids. The biosurfactant was stable in high salinity (10 % w/v NaCl), elevated temperatures (120 °C for 15 min) and a wide pH range (2.0-10.0). The noticeable changes during biodegradation were decreased hydrophobicity; an increase in degree of fatty acid saturation, saturated/unsaturated ratio and cyclopropane fatty acid. Biodegradation of 4-NT was accompanied by the accumulation of ammonium (NH4 (+)) and negligible amount of nitrite ion (NO2 (-)). Product stoichiometry showed a carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mass balance of 37 and 35 %, respectively. Biodegradation of 4-NT proceeded by oxidation at the methyl group to form 4-nitrobenzoate, followed by reduction and hydrolytic deamination yielding protocatechuate, which was metabolized through β-ketoadipate pathway. In vitro and in vivo acute toxicity assays in adult rat (Rattus norvegicus) showed sequential detoxification and the order of toxicity was 4-NT >4-nitrobenzyl alcohol >4-nitrobenzaldehyde >4-nitrobenzoate > protocatechuate. Taken together, the strain NT2 could be used as a potential bioaugmentation candidate for the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

  5. Identification and characterization of another 4-nitrophenol degradation gene cluster, nps, in Rhodococcus sp. strain PN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Nishimura, Munehiro; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Negoro, Seiji

    2011-06-01

    4-Nitrophenol (4-NP) is a toxic compound formed in soil by the hydrolysis of organophosphorous pesticides, such as parathion. We previously reported the presence of the 4-NP degradation gene cluster (nphRA1A2) in Rhodococcus sp. strain PN1, which encodes a two-component 4-NP hydroxylase system that oxidizes 4-NP into 4-nitrocatechol. In the current study, another gene cluster (npsC and npsRA2A1B) encoding a similar 4-NP hydroxylase system was cloned from strain PN1. The enzymes from this 4-NP hydroxylase system (NpsA1 and NpsA2) were purified as histidine-tagged (His-) proteins and then characterized. His-NpsA2 showed NADH/FAD oxidoreductase activity, and His-NpsA1 showed 4-NP oxidizing activity in the presence of His-NpsA2. In the 4-NP oxidation using the reconstituted enzyme system (His-NpsA1 and His-NpsA2), hydroquinone (35% of 4-NP disappeared) and hydroxyquinol (59% of 4-NP disappeared) were detected in the presence of ascorbic acid as a reducing reagent, suggesting that, without the reducing reagent, 4-NP was converted into their oxidized forms, 1,4-benzoquinone and 2-hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone. In addition, in the cell extract of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing npsB, a typical spectral change showing conversion of hydroxyquinol into maleylacetate was observed. These results indicate that this nps gene cluster, in addition to the nph gene cluster, is also involved in 4-NP degradation in strain PN1.

  6. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  7. Distribution of a Nocardia brasiliensis Catalase Gene Fragment in Members of the Genera Nocardia, Gordona, and Rhodococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Johnson, Wendy M.; Welsh, Oliverio; Resendiz-Uresti, Francisco L.; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.

    1999-01-01

    An immunodominant protein from Nocardia brasiliensis, P61, was subjected to amino-terminal and internal sequence analysis. Three sequences of 22, 17, and 38 residues, respectively, were obtained and compared with the protein database from GenBank by using the BLAST system. The sequences showed homology to some eukaryotic catalases and to a bromoperoxidase-catalase from Streptomyces violaceus. Its identity as a catalase was confirmed by analysis of its enzymatic activity on H2O2 and by a double-staining method on a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and ferricyanide; the result showed only catalase activity, but no peroxidase. By using one of the internal amino acid sequences and a consensus catalase motif (VGNNTP), we were able to design a PCR assay that generated a 500-bp PCR product. The amplicon was analyzed, and the nucleotide sequence was compared to the GenBank database with the observation of high homology to other bacterial and eukaryotic catalases. A PCR assay based on this target sequence was performed with primers NB10 and NB11 to confirm the presence of the NB10-NB11 gene fragment in several N. brasiliensis strains isolated from mycetoma. The same assay was used to determine whether there were homologous sequences in several type strains from the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Gordona, and Streptomyces. All of the N. brasiliensis strains presented a positive result but only some of the actinomycetes species tested were positive in the PCR assay. In order to confirm these findings, genomic DNA was subjected to Southern blot analysis. A 1.7-kbp band was observed in the N. brasiliensis strains, and bands of different molecular weight were observed in cross-reacting actinomycetes. Sequence analysis of the amplicons of selected actinomycetes showed high homology in this catalase fragment, thus demonstrating that this protein is highly conserved in this group of bacteria. PMID:10325357

  8. Atividade de nanoformulações de Melaleuca alternifolia e terpinen-4-ol em isolados de Rhodococcus equi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagave

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi é o agente etiológico da rodococose equina, importante doença respiratória de potros. Especialmente na última década, a emergência de cepas resistentes aos antimicrobianos empregados no tratamento da rodococose tem sido relatada. Nesse sentido, há a necessidade de estudos envolvendo terapias alternativas e novas tecnologias, incluindo o uso de plantas medicinais e nanotecnologia. Neste trabalho utilizou-se Melaleuca alternifolia nas seguintes formulações: óleo livre, nanocápsula, nanoemulsão e a combinação de óleo livre com nanocápsula e com nanoemulsão, além do seu composto majoritário, terpinen-4-ol, a fim de verificar a atividade antimicrobiana frente a isolados de R. equi de diferentes origens. Utilizou-se o método de microdiluição em caldo na determinação das concentrações inibitória mínima (CIM e bactericida mínima (CBM das diferentes formulações frente aos isolados (n=24. Verificou-se baixo potencial para atividade antibacteriana de M. alternifolia na formulação de óleo livre. Todavia, essa atividade foi potencializada quando se incorporou o óleo essencial às nanoformulações. O composto terpinen-4-ol demonstrou potencial atividade antibacteriana quando incorporado ao óleo essencial e quando utilizado isoladamente. Verificou-se que tanto M. alternifolia quanto terpinen-4-ol testados possuem atividade antimicrobiana contra isolados de R. equi, sugerindo seu emprego em estudos avaliando seu potencial para o tratamento da rodococose.

  9. Rhodococcus equi's extreme resistance to hydrogen peroxide is mainly conferred by one of its four catalase genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Bidaud

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is one of the most widespread causes of disease in foals aged from 1 to 6 months. R. equi possesses antioxidant defense mechanisms to protect it from reactive oxygen metabolites such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 generated during the respiratory burst of phagocytic cells. These defense mechanisms include enzymes such as catalase, which detoxify hydrogen peroxide. Recently, an analysis of the R. equi 103 genome sequence revealed the presence of four potential catalase genes. We first constructed ΔkatA-, ΔkatB-, ΔkatC-and ΔkatD-deficient mutants to study the ability of R. equi to survive exposure to H(2O(2in vitro and within mouse peritoneal macrophages. Results showed that ΔkatA and, to a lesser extent ΔkatC, were affected by 80 mM H(2O(2. Moreover, katA deletion seems to significantly affect the ability of R. equi to survive within murine macrophages. We finally investigated the expression of the four catalases in response to H(2O(2 assays with a real time PCR technique. Results showed that katA is overexpressed 367.9 times (± 122.6 in response to exposure to 50 mM of H(2O(2 added in the stationary phase, and 3.11 times (± 0.59 when treatment was administered in the exponential phase. In untreated bacteria, katB, katC and katD were overexpressed from 4.3 to 17.5 times in the stationary compared to the exponential phase. Taken together, our results show that KatA is the major catalase involved in the extreme H(2O(2 resistance capability of R. equi.

  10. Increasing awareness of Rhodococcus equi pulmonary infection in the immunocompetent adult: a rare infection with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Samantha; Lewis, Christopher; Nisbet, Mitzi

    2013-12-13

    The aim of this case report and review is to increase awareness of this uncommon infection with Rhodococcus equi (R. equi), in immunocompetent adults. R. equi is a soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacillus that frequently causes infection in grazing livestock. Human infection is rare and mostly limited to the immunocompromised hosts. We present a case of pneumonia caused by R. equi infection in a 55-year-old male builder who presented with cough, dyspnoea and night sweats, initially suspected to have pulmonary tuberculosis. Following biopsy of the mediastinal lymph nodes, R. equi was cultured, which is usually not a contaminant. Despite extensive investigations a host immune defect was not identified. The patient recovered after three months of combination antibiotic treatment, initially with intravenous vancomycin and meropenem followed by oral clarithromycin and rifampicin. To further clarify this rare disease we did a literature review that identified 26 adult patients with R. equi infection, without an identified host immunosuppressive condition. In this cohort, the median age at presentation was 53 years and infection holds a strong male predominance 19 (73%). An environmental exposure (e.g. farming, horse breeder) was found in 13 (50%). Ten (38%) of these patients had pulmonary infection. All deaths 3 (12%) occurred in the patients had pulmonary infection. R.equi is an infection that is difficult to diagnose and carries a high mortality if prompt treatment is not established. It is important to realise the potential for this disease to be misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis or community acquired pneumonia. Clinical suspicion is important especially if an environmental exposure is suspected.

  11. Structural characterisation of the virulence-associated protein VapG from the horse pathogen Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoko, Tebekeme; Blagova, Elena V; Whittingham, Jean L; Dover, Lynn G; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2015-08-31

    Virulence and host range in Rhodococcus equi depends on the variable pathogenicity island of their virulence plasmids. Notable gene products are a family of small secreted virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) that are critical to intramacrophagic proliferation. Equine-adapted strains, which cause severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals, produce a cell-associated VapA that is necessary for virulence, alongside five other secreted homologues. In the absence of biochemical insight, attention has turned to the structures of these proteins to develop a functional hypothesis. Recent studies have described crystal structures for VapD and a truncate of the VapA orthologue of porcine-adapted strains, VapB. Here, we crystallised the full-length VapG and determined its structure by molecular replacement. Electron density corresponding to the N-terminal domain was not visible suggesting that it is disordered. The protein core adopted a compact elliptical, anti-parallel β-barrel fold with β1-β2-β3-β8-β5-β6-β7-β4 topology decorated by a single peripheral α-helix unique to this family. The high glycine content of the protein allows close packing of secondary structural elements. Topologically, the surface has no indentations that indicate a nexus for molecular interactions. The distribution of polar and apolar groups on the surface of VapG is markedly uneven. One-third of the surface is dominated by exposed apolar side-chains, with no ionisable and only four polar side-chains exposed, giving rise to an expansive flat hydrophobic surface. Other surface regions are more polar, especially on or near the α-helix and a belt around the centre of the β-barrel. Possible functional significance of these recent structures is discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Age-related changes following in vitro stimulation with Rhodococcus equi of peripheral blood leukocytes from neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachroo, Priyanka; Ivanov, Ivan; Seabury, Ashley G; Liu, Mei; Chowdhary, Bhanu P; Cohen, Noah D

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular bacterium primarily known as an equine pathogen that infects young foals causing a pyogranulomatuous pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms mediating the immune response of foals to R. equi are not fully elucidated. Hence, global genomic high-throughput tools like gene expression microarrays might identify age-related gene expression signatures and molecular pathways that contribute to the immune mechanisms underlying the inherent susceptibility of foals to disease caused by R. equi. The objectives of this study were 2-fold: 1) to compare the expression profiles at specific ages of blood leukocytes from foals stimulated with virulent R. equi with those of unstimulated leukocytes; and, 2) to characterize the age-related changes in the gene expression profile associated with blood leukocytes in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi. Peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained from 6 foals within 24 hours (h) of birth (day 1) and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after birth. The samples were split, such that half were stimulated with live virulent R. equi, and the other half served as unstimulated control. RNA was extracted and the generated cDNA was labeled with fluorescent dyes for microarray hybridizations using an equine microarray. Our findings suggest that there is age-related differential expression of genes involved in host immune response and immunity. We found induction of genes critical for host immunity against pathogens (MHC class II) only at the later time-points (compared to birth). While it appears that foals up to 8-weeks of age are able to initiate a protective inflammatory response against the bacteria, relatively decreased expression of various other immune-related genes points toward inherent diminished immune responses closer to birth. These genes and pathways may contribute to disease susceptibility in foals if infected early in life, and might thus be targeted for developing preventative or therapeutic strategies.

  13. Effects of age and macrophage lineage on intracellular survival and cytokine induction after infection with Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Sturgill, Tracy L

    2014-07-15

    Rhodococcus equi, a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, causes life-threatening pneumonia in foals and in people with underlying immune deficiencies. As a basis for this study, we hypothesized that macrophage lineage and age would affect intracellular survival of R. equi and cytokine induction after infection. Monocyte-derived and bronchoalveolar macrophages from 10 adult horses and from 10 foals (sampled at 1-3 days, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 5 months of age) were infected ex vivo with virulent R. equi. Intracellular R. equi were quantified and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 p40, IL-18, IFN-γ, and TNF-α was measured. Intracellular replication of R. equi was significantly (Pequi was significantly (P=0.002) higher in 3-month-old foals than in 3-day old foals, 2-week-old foals, 1-month-old foals, and adult horses. Expression of IL-4 mRNA was significantly higher in monocyte-derived macrophages whereas expression of IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-α was significantly higher in bronchoalveolar macrophages. Induction of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and IL-8 mRNA in bronchoalveolar macrophages of 1-3-day old foals was significantly higher than in older foals or adult horses. Preferential intracellular survival of R. equi in bronchoalveolar macrophages of juvenile horses may play a role in the pulmonary tropism of the pathogen and in the window of age susceptibility to infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Brief tale of a bacteraemia by Rhodococcus equi with concomitant lung mass: what came first, the chicken or the egg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prassede Salutari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Rhodococcus equi is an uncommon Gram positive, variably acid-fast agent of infections, that appear as hard to treat mostly owing to the establishment of intracellular niches. Also, the lack of criteria to interpret susceptibility testing may lead to under-reporting or overestimation of resistance expression. Finally, the knowledge about this pathogen’s clinical impact may be affected by wrong characterization at a genus and species level provided by phenotype-based assays.

    We present the case of a bacteraemia with a concomitant lung mass in a lymphoma patient, that further highlights the emergence of rhodococcal diseases as a matter for concern in the field of infectious diseases and haematology.

     

  15. Age-related changes following in vitro stimulation with Rhodococcus equi of peripheral blood leukocytes from neonatal foals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kachroo

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular bacterium primarily known as an equine pathogen that infects young foals causing a pyogranulomatuous pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms mediating the immune response of foals to R. equi are not fully elucidated. Hence, global genomic high-throughput tools like gene expression microarrays might identify age-related gene expression signatures and molecular pathways that contribute to the immune mechanisms underlying the inherent susceptibility of foals to disease caused by R. equi. The objectives of this study were 2-fold: 1 to compare the expression profiles at specific ages of blood leukocytes from foals stimulated with virulent R. equi with those of unstimulated leukocytes; and, 2 to characterize the age-related changes in the gene expression profile associated with blood leukocytes in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi. Peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained from 6 foals within 24 hours (h of birth (day 1 and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after birth. The samples were split, such that half were stimulated with live virulent R. equi, and the other half served as unstimulated control. RNA was extracted and the generated cDNA was labeled with fluorescent dyes for microarray hybridizations using an equine microarray. Our findings suggest that there is age-related differential expression of genes involved in host immune response and immunity. We found induction of genes critical for host immunity against pathogens (MHC class II only at the later time-points (compared to birth. While it appears that foals up to 8-weeks of age are able to initiate a protective inflammatory response against the bacteria, relatively decreased expression of various other immune-related genes points toward inherent diminished immune responses closer to birth. These genes and pathways may contribute to disease susceptibility in foals if infected early in life, and might thus be targeted for developing preventative or therapeutic

  16. The atf2 gene is involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis and accumulation in the oleaginous Rhodococcus opacus PD630.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Martín A; Arabolaza, Ana; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Gramajo, Hugo; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2013-03-01

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630 is an oleaginous bacterium able to accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAG) in different carbon sources. The last reaction for TAG biosynthesis is catalyzed by the bifunctional wax ester synthase/acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) enzymes encoded by atf genes. R. opacus PD630 possesses at least 17 putative atf homologous genes in its genome, but only atf1 and atf2 exhibited a significant DGAT activity when expressed in E. coli, as revealed in a previous study. The contribution of atf1 gene to TAG accumulation by strain PD630 has been demonstrated previously, although additional Atfs may also contribute to lipid accumulation, since the atf1-disrupted mutant is still able to produce significant amounts of TAG (Alvarez et al., Microbiology 154:2327-2335, 2008). In this study, we investigated the in vivo role of atf2 gene in TAG accumulation by R. opacus PD630 by using different genetic strategies. The atf2-disrupted mutant exhibited a decrease in TAG accumulation (up to 25-30 %, w/w) and an approximately tenfold increase in glycogen formation in comparison with the wild-type strain. Surprisingly, in contrast to single mutants, a double mutant generated by the disruption of atf1 and atf2 genes only showed a very low effect in TAG and in glycogen accumulation under lipid storage conditions. Overexpression of atf1 and atf2 genes in strain PD630 promoted an increase of approximately 10 % (w/w) in TAG accumulation, while heterologous expression of atf2 gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis caused an increase in TAG accumulation during cultivation in nitrogen-rich media. This study demonstrated that, in addition to atf1 gene, atf2 is actively involved in TAG accumulation by the oleaginous R. opacus PD630.

  17. Cyclin D1 fine-tunes the neurogenic output of embryonic retinal progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yoon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintaining the correct balance of proliferation versus differentiation in retinal progenitor cells (RPCs is essential for proper development of the retina. The cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 is expressed in RPCs, and mice with a targeted null allele at the cyclin D1 locus (Ccnd1-/- have microphthalmia and hypocellular retinas, the latter phenotype attributed to reduced RPC proliferation and increased photoreceptor cell death during the postnatal period. How cyclin D1 influences RPC behavior, especially during the embryonic period, is unclear. Results In this study, we show that embryonic RPCs lacking cyclin D1 progress through the cell cycle at a slower rate and exit the cell cycle at a faster rate. Consistent with enhanced cell cycle exit, the relative proportions of cell types born in the embryonic period, such as retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptor cells, are increased. Unexpectedly, cyclin D1 deficiency decreases the proportions of other early born retinal neurons, namely horizontal cells and specific amacrine cell types. We also found that the laminar positioning of horizontal cells and other cell types is altered in the absence of cyclin D1. Genetically replacing cyclin D1 with cyclin D2 is not efficient at correcting the phenotypes due to the cyclin D1 deficiency, which suggests the D-cyclins are not fully redundant. Replacement with cyclin E or inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 restores the balance of RPCs and retinal cell types to more normal distributions, which suggests that regulation of the retinoblastoma pathway is an important function for cyclin D1 during embryonic retinal development. Conclusion Our findings show that cyclin D1 has important roles in RPC cell cycle regulation and retinal histogenesis. The reduction in the RPC population due to a longer cell cycle time and to an enhanced rate of cell cycle exit are likely to be the primary factors driving retinal hypocellularity

  18. Resolvin D1 primes the resolution process initiated by calorie restriction in obesity-induced steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Bibiana; Titos, Esther; Morán-Salvador, Eva; López-Vicario, Cristina; García-Alonso, Verónica; González-Périz, Ana; Arroyo, Vicente; Clària, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Insulin resistance and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), characterized by hepatic steatosis combined with inflammation, are major sequelae of obesity. Currently, lifestyle modification (i.e., weight loss) is the first-line therapy for NASH. However, weight loss resolves steatosis but not inflammation. In this study, we tested the ability of resolvin D1 (RvD1), an anti-inflammatory and proresolving molecule, to promote the resolution initiated by calorie restriction in obese mice with NASH. Calorie restriction reduced adipose and liver weight (-56 and -13%, respectively; P<0.001), serum leptin and resistin levels, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. In addition to these, mice receiving RvD1 during the dietary intervention showed increased adiponectin expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and reduced liver macrophage infiltration (-15%, P<0.01). Moreover, RvD1 skewed macrophages from an M1- to an M2-like anti-inflammatory phenotype, induced a specific hepatic miRNA signature (i.e., miR-219-5p and miR-199a-5p), and reduced inflammatory adipokine mRNA and protein expression and macrophage innate immune response. In precision-cut liver slices (PCLSs), which override the influence of circulating factors, RvD1 attenuated hypoxia-induced mRNA and protein expression of COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and CCR7. Of note, RvD1 anti-inflammatory actions were absent in macrophage-depleted PCLSs. In summary, RvD1 acts as a facilitator of the hepatic resolution process by reducing the inflammatory component of obesity-induced NASH.

  19. Resolvin D1 Dampens Pulmonary Inflammation and Promotes Clearance of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croasdell, Amanda; Lacy, Shannon H; Thatcher, Thomas H; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2016-03-15

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, and exacerbations in patients with underlying inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In mice, NTHi is rapidly cleared, but a strong inflammatory response persists, underscoring the concept that NTHi induces dysregulation of normal inflammatory responses and causes a failure to resolve. Lipid-derived specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) play a critical role in the active resolution of inflammation by both suppressing proinflammatory actions and promoting resolution pathways. Importantly, SPMs lack the immunosuppressive properties of classical anti-inflammatory therapies. On the basis of these characteristics, we hypothesized that aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) would dampen NTHi-induced inflammation while still enhancing bacterial clearance. C57BL/6 mice were treated with AT-RvD1 and infected with live NTHi. AT-RvD1-treated mice had lower total cell counts and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and had earlier influx of macrophages. In addition, AT-RvD1-treated mice showed changes in temporal regulation of inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, with decreased KC at 6 h and decreased IL-6, TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 expression at 24 h post infection. Despite reduced inflammation, AT-RvD1-treated mice had reduced NTHi bacterial load, mediated by enhanced clearance by macrophages and a skewing toward an M2 phenotype. Finally, AT-RvD1 protected NTHi-infected mice from weight loss, hypothermia, hypoxemia, and respiratory compromise. This research highlights the beneficial role of SPMs in pulmonary bacterial infections and provides the groundwork for further investigation into SPMs as alternatives to immunosuppressive therapies like steroids.

  20. Expression and significance of cyclin D1, p27kip1 protein in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁键群; 许敬尧; 张静; 何启才; 祝佳; 盛彩霞

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between expression of cell cycle-related protein cyclin D1, p27kipl and the pathogenesis of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and the value of prediction of prognosis. Methods: Cyclin D 1 and p27kip 1 protein were detected by immunohistochemical En Vision method in 43 BACs. Results: The positivity of cyclin D 1 in BAC was 65.1% (28/43), which was significantly higher than that in normal pulmonary tissue (0/13), P<0.01. No statistically significant association was found between cyclin D1 expression data and sex, age, tobacco-use history, histologic subtype (mucinous vs nonmucinous), stromal fibrosis, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage or postoperative survival period (P>0.05), while cyclin D1 expression was found to be negatively correlated with tumor size (P<0.05). The positivity of p27kipl in BACs was 51.2% (22/43), significantly lower than that in normal pulmonary tissue (12/13), P<0.01. p27kipl expression level was not associated with sex, age, tobacco-use history, tumor size or histologic subtype (P>0.05), but was negatively correlated with stromal fibrosis, lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (P<0.05); and positively associated with postoperative survival period (P<0.01). The survival rate of p27kipl positive group was significantly higher than that of p27kipl negative group (P<0.01). No statistically significant correlation was found between cyclin D 1 and p27kipl expression. Conclusions: Increased cyclin D1 expression and decreased p27kip 1 expression are related to the pathogenesis of BAC;decreased p27kipl expression is associated with metastasis progression; immunodetection ofp27kip 1 is useful for assessment of prognosis.

  1. [Destruction of aromatic hydrocarbons by the Rhodococcus wratislaviensis KT112-7 strain isolated from waste products of a salt-mining factory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, D O; Korsakova, E S; Demakov, V A; Plotnikova, E G

    2013-01-01

    The destruction of aromatic hydrocarbons by the Rhodococcus wratislaviensis KT112-7 strain isolated from technogenic mineral waste products of the BKRU1 Uralkalii factory has been investigated (city of Berezniki, Perm krai). The R. wratislaviensis KT112-7 was shown to utilize increased concentrations of ophthalic (o-PA) (8 g/L) and benzoic (BA) (3.4 g/L) acids. The strain grows with o-FA, BA, and biphenyl at a NaCl content of up to 50, 90, and 75 g/L in the culture medium, respectively. Based on an analysis of the metabolic profile and nucleotide sequences of the bphA1, benA, and phtB genes, the KT112-7 strain was established to decompose o-PA via the formation of 3,4-dihydroxyphthalic and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acids. The decomposition of biphenyl is carried out via the formation of BA and then at low concentrations of NaCl (up to 50 g/L) via the formation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid followed by its oxidation; at high concentrations of NaCl (over 60 g/L), via the direct oxidation of benzoic acid with the production of catechol. These data indicate that the Rhodococcus wratislaviensis KT112-7 destructor strain is a promising strain for the development of new biotechnologies directed at the utilization (transformation) of aromatic compounds, including under the conditions of increased mineralization.

  2. Effects of resolvin D1 on cell survival and cytokine expression of human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Mohamed; Shibani, Nouf-Al; Labban, Nawaf; Batarseh, Ghada; Song, Fengyu; Ruby, John; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-12-01

    Tissue breakdown in periodontitis is initiated by bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and is caused largely by host responses. Resolvins protect the host against acute inflammation by blocking the migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to initiate resolution. The effects of resolvins on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) are unknown. This study examines the effects of resolvin D1 on HGF survival and cytokine expression when treated with or without P. gingivalis supernatant. Cytotoxicity of resolvin D1 on HGFs with or without a toxic level of P. gingivalis supernatant was measured with lactate dehydrogenase assays. Cytokine arrays were performed on HGF-conditioned media treated with or without resolvin D1 and with or without P. gingivalis supernatant. Resolvin D1 had no cytotoxic effects on HGFs at concentrations between 1 and 1,000 nM (all P > 0.05). Resolvin D1 (1,000 nM) significantly inhibited the toxic effects of 13.5% (v/v) P. gingivalis supernatant on HGFs (P = 0.002). Resolvin D1 significantly reduced the expression of interleukin (IL)-6 (P = 0.010) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (P = 0.04) in untreated fibroblasts. P. gingivalis (10%) supernatant significantly increased the expression levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF), granulocyte CSF, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO), IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, MCP-2, MCP-3, and monokine induced by γ-interferon. Resolvin D1 significantly reduced the expression of GRO (P = 0.04), marginally reduced the levels of MCP-1 (P = 0.10), and marginally increased the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (P = 0.07) from HGFs treated with P. gingivalis supernatant. Resolvin D1 altered the cytotoxicity of P. gingivalis supernatant on HGFs. Resolvin D1 significantly reduced GRO, marginally reduced MCP-1, and marginally increased TGF-β1 from P. gingivalis-treated HGFs, which could alter the ability of P. gingivalis to induce inflammation.

  3. Cloning, expression, and functional analysis of human dopamine D1 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-chun SUN; Lei JIN; Yan CAO; Li-zhen WANG; Fan MENG; Xing-zu ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To construct an HEK293 cell line stably expressing human dopamine D1 receptor (D1R). Methods: cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR using total RNA from human embryo brain tissue as the template. The PCR products were subcloned into the plasmid pcDNA3 and cloned into the plasmid pcDNA3.1. The cloned D1R cDNA was sequenced and stably expressed in HEK293 cells. Expression of D1R in HEK293 cells was monitored by the [3H]SCH23390 binding assay. The function of D1R was studied by the cAMP accumulation assay, CRE-SEAP reporter gene activity assay, and intracellular calcium assay. Results: An HEK293 cell line stably expressing human D1R was obtained. A saturation radioligand binding experiment with [3H]SCH23390 demonstrated that the Kd and Bmax values were 1.5±0.2 nmol/L and 2.94±0.15 nmol/g of protein, respectively. In the[3H]SCH23390 competition assay, D1R agonist SKF38393 displaced[3H]SCH23390 with an IC50 value of 2.0 (1.5-2.8) μmol/L. SKF38393 increased the intracellular cAMP level and CRE-SEAP activity through D1R expressed in HEK293 cells in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.25(0.12-0.53) μmol/L and 0.39 (0.27-0.57) μmol/L at 6 h/0.59 (0.22-1.58) μmol/L at 12 h, respectively. SKF38393 also increased the intracellular calcium level in a concentration-dependent manner with EC50 value of 27 (8.6-70) nmol/L.Conclusion: An HEK293 cell line stably expressing human D1R was obtained successfuly. The study also demonstrated that the CRE-SEAP activity assay could be substituted for the cAMP accumulation assay for measuring increase in cAMP levels. Thus, both intracellular calcium measurements and the CRE-SEAP activity assay are suitable for high-throughput screening in drug research.

  4. Immunohistochemical comparison of cyclin D1 and P16 in odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Seyed Mohammad; Poursadeghi, Hamid; Aminzadeh, Atousa

    2013-03-01

    The different growth mechanism and biologic behavior of the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) compared to other odontogenic cysts might be related to the proliferating capacity of its epithelium. In this study, the aim was to evaluate and compare the distribution and staining intensity of P16 and cyclin D1 in OKC and unicystic ameloblastoma (UA). In this descriptive analytic study, hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides of OKCs and UAs available from the archives of the oral pathology laboratory of the Esfahan School of Dentistry were examined. Twenty-five noninflamed solitary odontogenic keratocysts and 25 unicystic ameloblastomas (of either type) were selected and stained immunohistochemically. Distribution and staining intensity score (SID score) for P16- and cyclin D1-positive cells was calculated in both groups. Results were analyzed statistically with Wilcoxon, Friedman, and Mann-Whitney tests; P P16-positive cells was observed in the basal and suprabasal layers of keratocysts (P > 0.05) and central portions of UAs (P > 0.05). Expression of Cyclin D1 was higher in UAs compared to keratocyts (P P16 did not show a significant difference between the two study groups (P > 0.05). Cyclin D1 did show a higher staining intensity in UAs compared to the keratocysts, although the expression of P16 was similar in the studied groups. The invasive growth of OKC might be related to the state of expression of cyclin D1 and P16 in the epithelium of this cyst.

  5. EXPRESSION OF P16 AND CYCLIN D1 IN THE COURSE OF CARCINOGENESIS OF THE STOMACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-long; XU Feng; LI Yan-jie

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine p16 and cyclin D1 expression in the specimen of gastric carcinoma, atypic hyperplasia, atrophic gastritis, superficial gastritis and normal gastric mucosa. Methods: Using immunohistochemical method (ABC), the samples of 58 adenocarcinomas, 22 atypic hyperplasias, 28 atrophic gastritis,27 superficial gastritis and 15 gastric epitheliums were analyzed. Results: Positive immunostaining rate for p16 protein was the highest in normal gastric mucosa and decreased with the lesions progressing from superficial gastritis to atrophic gastritis to atypital hyperplasia and to adenocarcinoma (85%, 78.6%, 31.8%,48.3% respectively); Positive immunostaining of cyclin D1 can observed in atrophic gastritis. With the lesions progressing from atrophic gastritis to atypical hyperplasia to adenocarcinoma, its expression rate increased (17.9%, 36.4%, 53.4% respectively), and there was a significant difference between adenocarcinoma and atrophic gastritis group (P<0.05). An interesting observation was that inverse expression between p16and cyclin D1, was shown in most of gastric cancer detected. Conclusion: It is indicated that p16 and cyclin D1 play an important role in the gastric carcinogenesis, the inverse expression between p16 and cyclin D1 suggested that there is a suppression trend in them.

  6. SO(d,1)-invariant Yang-Baxter operators and the dS/CFT correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Hollands, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model for the dS/CFT correspondence. The model is constructed in terms of a "Yang-Baxter operator" $R$ for unitary representations of the deSitter group $SO(d,1)$. This $R$-operator is shown to satisfy the Yang-Baxter equation, unitarity, as well as certain analyticity relations, including in particular a crossing symmetry. With the aid of this operator we construct: a) A chiral (light-ray) conformal quantum field theory whose internal degrees of freedom transform under the given unitary representation of $SO(d,1)$. By analogy with the $O(N)$ non-linear sigma model, this chiral CFT can be viewed as propagating in a deSitter spacetime. b) A (non-unitary) Euclidean conformal quantum field theory on ${\\mathbb R}^{d-1}$, where $SO(d,1)$ now acts by conformal transformations in (Euclidean) spacetime. These two theories can be viewed as dual to each other if we interpret ${\\mathbb R}^{d-1}$ as conformal infinity of deSitter spacetime. Our constructions use semi-local generator fields defined in terms o...

  7. Dopamine D1 receptor-agonist interactions: A mutagenesis and homology modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Scot; Guilmette, Edward; Salafia, Michelle; Gray, David

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates intracellular signaling via agonist activation. Although the number of solved GPCR X-ray structures has been steadily increasing, still no structure of the D1 receptor exists. We have used site-directed mutagenesis of 12 orthosteric vicinity residues of possible importance to G protein-coupled activation to examine the function of prototypical orthosteric D1 agonists and partial agonists. We find that residues from four different regions of the D1 receptor make significant contributions to agonist function. All compounds studied, which are catechol-amines, are found to interact with the previously identified residues: the conserved D103(3.32), as well as the trans-membrane V serine residues. Additional key interactions are found for trans-membrane VI residues F288(6.51), F289(6.52) and N292(6.55), as well as the extra-cellular loop residue L190(ECL2). Molecular dynamics simulations of a D1 homology model have been used to help put the ligand-residue interactions into context. Finally, we considered the rescaling of fold-shift data as a method to account for the change in the size of the mutated side-chain and found that this rescaling helps to relate the calculated ligand-residue energies with observed experimental fold-shifts.

  8. THE OVEREXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF CYCLIN D1 AND P53 IN CERVICAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the significance of overexpresson of eyclin D1 and P53 protein in cervical squamous cell carcinomas.Methods:Fifty cases of invasive cervical squamous cell carcinomas and 10 Cases of normal cervical squamous epithelia were investigated with immunihistochemical technique.Results:The overexpressioin of cyclin D1 and P53 in invasive cervical carcinomas was 70% and 50%,respectively,There was no overexpression of them in the control group.The overexpression of cyclin D1 in grade Ⅱand Ⅲ was much higher than that in grade I(P<0.05),The overexpresson of cyclin D1 in stage Ⅲof cervical carcinoma was significantly higher than that in stage Ⅱ(P<0.05).The overexpression of P53 in grade -Ⅱand gradeⅢ of cervical carcinoma was remarkably higher than that in grade I(P<0.05),Conclusion:The action point of both cyclin D1 and P53 may be at G1/S transtition.The overexpression of them was associated with development and progression of cervical carcinoma probably in different mechanisms and different pathways.

  9. THE OVEREXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF CYCLIN D1 AND P53 IN CERVICAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓丽; 王梅; 李明众; 宋天保; 任娟; 尚菊战

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of ov erexpresson of cyclin D1 and P53 protein in cervical squamous cell carcinomas.Methods Fifty cases of in vasive cervical squamous cell carcinomas and 10 cases of normal cervical squamou s epithelia were investigated with immunihistochemical technique. Results The overexpression of cyclin D1 and P53 in invasive cer vical carcinomas was 70% and 50 %, respectively. There was no overexpression of them in the control group. The o verexpression of cyclin D1 in grade Ⅱ and Ⅲ was much higher than that in grad eⅠ(P<0.05). The overexpresson of cyclin D1 in stage Ⅲ of cervical carcinom a was significantly higher than that in stage Ⅱ (P<0.05). The overexpress ion of P53 in grade Ⅱ and grade Ⅲ of cervical carcinoma was remarkably higher than that in grade Ⅰ (P<0.05).Conclusion The action point of both cyclin D1 and P53 may be at G1/S transition. The overexpression of them was associated with development and progression of cervical carcinoma probably in different mechanisms and differen t pathways.

  10. EXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF CYCLIN D1 IN HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨连君; 司晓辉

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the expression and significance of cell cycle protein cyclin D1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: The expression of cyclin D1 protein in 29 cases of HCC tissues was detected by immunohistochemical ABC method, and the relationship between its positive rate and pathological grades of HCC tissues was analyzed. Results: The positive rate of cyclin D1 in HCC tissues was 58.6%(17 in 29 cases), whereas only 18.2% (2 cases of 11 cases) in the non-tumor liver tissues immediately adjacent to HCC tissues (LAH). There was significant difference between grade II and LAH tissues (P<0.05), and between grade I and grade III on the positive rate of cyclin D1 (P<0.05), respectively. Conclusion: Cyclin D1 may be regarded as an oncogenic marker during the genesis and development of HCC, and its role in the transforming process from G1 phase to S phase of HCC cells needs further studies.

  11. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Highly Enantiopure 1,4-Benzodioxane-2-carboxylic Acid and Amide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; WANG De-Xian; ZHENG Qi-Yu; WANG Mei-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Catalyzed by Rhodococcus erythropolis A J270, a nitrile hydratase and amidase containing microbial whole-cell catalyst, at 10 ℃ and with the use of methanol as a co-solvent, nitrile and amide biotransformations produce 2S-1,4-benzodioxane-2-carboxamide and 2R-1,4-benzodioxane-2-carboxylic acid in high yields with excellent enantioselectivity.

  12. ADP competes with FAD binding in putrescine oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hellemond, Erik W.; Mazon, Hortense; Heck, Albert J.; van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2008-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540 (PuORh) is a soluble homodimeric flavoprotein of 100 kDa, which catalyzes the oxidative deamination of putrescine and some other aliphatic amines. The initial characterization of PuORh uncovered an intriguing feature: the enzyme appeared t

  13. Casimir interaction between spheres in $\\boldsymbol{(D+1)}$-dimensional Minkowski spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Teo, L P

    2014-01-01

    We consider the Casimir interaction between two spheres in $(D+1)$-dimensional Minkowski spacetime due to the vacuum fluctuations of scalar fields. We consider combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The TGTG formula of the Casimir interaction energy is derived. The computations of the T matrices of the two spheres are straightforward. To compute the two G matrices, known as translation matrices, which relate the hyper-spherical waves in two spherical coordinate frames differ by a translation, we generalize the operator approach employed in [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. \\textbf{36}, 1078 (1988)]. The result is expressed in terms of an integral over Gegenbauer polynomials. Using our expression for the Casimir interaction energy, we derive the large separation and small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energy. In the large separation regime, we find that the Casimir interaction energy is of order $L^{-2D+3}$, $L^{-2D+1}$ and $L^{-2D-1}$ respectively for Dirichlet-Di...

  14. Cyclin D1 in ASM Cells from Asthmatics Is Insensitive to Corticosteroid Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jodi C; Seidel, Petra; Schlosser, Tobias; Ramsay, Emma E; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplasia of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a feature of the remodelled airway in asthmatics. We examined the antiproliferative effectiveness of the corticosteroid dexamethasone on expression of the key regulator of G(1) cell cycle progression-cyclin D1-in ASM cells from nonasthmatics and asthmatics stimulated with the mitogen platelet-derived growth factor BB. While cyclin D1 mRNA and protein expression were repressed in cells from nonasthmatics in contrast, cyclin D1 expression in asthmatics was resistant to inhibition by dexamethasone. This was independent of a repressive effect on glucocorticoid receptor translocation. Our results corroborate evidence demonstrating that corticosteroids inhibit mitogen-induced proliferation only in ASM cells from subjects without asthma and suggest that there are corticosteroid-insensitive proliferative pathways in asthmatics.

  15. Export of cytochrome P450 105D1 to the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderbhai, M A; Ugochukwu, C C; Kelly, S L; Lamb, D C

    2001-05-01

    CYP105D1, a cytochrome P450 from Streptomyces griseus, was appended at its amino terminus to the secretory signal of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase and placed under the transcriptional control of the native phoA promoter. Heterologous expression in E. coli phosphate-limited medium resulted in abundant synthesis of recombinant CYP105D1 that was translocated across the bacterial inner membrane and processed to yield authentic, heme-incorporated P450 within the periplasmic space. Cell extract and whole-cell activity studies showed that the periplasmically located CYP105D1 competently catalyzed NADH-dependent oxidation of the xenobiotic compounds benzo[a]pyrene and erythromycin, further revealing the presence in the E. coli periplasm of endogenous functional redox partners. This system offers substantial advantages for the application of P450 enzymes to whole-cell biotransformation strategies, where the ability of cells to take up substrates or discard products may be limited.

  16. DAMAGE MECHANISM ANALYSIS OF 2D 1 × 1 BRAIDED COMPOSITES UNDER UNIDIRECTIONAL TENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张超; 许希武; 陈康

    2013-01-01

    Coupling with the periodical displacement boundary condition ,a representative volume element (RVE) model is established to simulate the progressive damage behavior of 2D 1 × 1 braided composites under unidirection-al tension by using the nonlinear finite element method .Tsai-Wu failure criterion with various damage modes and Mises criterion are considered for predicting damage initiation and progression of yarns and matrix .The anisotropic damage model for yarns and the isotropic damage model for matrix are used to simulate the microscopic damage propagation of 2D 1 × 1 braided composites .Murakami′s damage tensor is adopted to characterize each damage mode .In the simulation process ,the damage mechanisms are revealed and the tensile strength of 2D 1 × 1 braided composites is predicted from the calculated average stress-average strain curve . Numerical results show good agreement with experimental data ,thus the proposed simulation method is verified for damage mechanism analysis of 2D braided composites .

  17. The Deuteron Spin-dependent Structure Function $g^{d}_1$ and its First Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Becker, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Demchenko, D.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Horn, I.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ivanchin, I.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, D.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kubart, J.; Kuhn, R.; Kukhtin, V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Masek, L.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Matthia, D.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rondio, E.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, I.A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schroeder, W.; Seeharsch, D.; Seimetz, M.; Setter, D.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Trippel, S.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhao, J.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the deuteron spin-dependent structure function g^d_1 based on the data collected by the COMPASS experiment at CERN during the years 2002-2004. The data provide an accurate evaluation for \\Gamma^d_1, the first moment of g^d_1(x), and for the matrix element of the singlet axial current, a_0. The results of QCD fits in the next to leading order (NLO) on all g1 deep inelastic scattering data are also presented. They provide two solutions with the gluon spin distribution function \\Delta_G positive or negative, which describe the data equally well. In both cases, at Q^2 = 3(GeV/c)^2 the first moment of \\Delta G is found to be of the order of 0:2 - 0:3 in absolute value.

  18. Intronic SH2D1A mutation with impaired SAP expression and agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recher, Mike; Fried, Ari J; Massaad, Michel J; Kim, Hye Young; Rizzini, Michela; Frugoni, Francesco; Walter, Jolan E; Mathew, Divij; Eibel, Hermann; Hess, Christoph; Giliani, Silvia; Umetsu, Dale T; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Geha, Raif S

    2013-02-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease is a primary immunodeficiency syndrome associated with the inability to control Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), lymphoma, and hypogammaglobulinemia. XLP is caused by mutations in the SH2D1A gene, which encodes the SLAM-associated protein (SAP), or in the BIRC4 gene, which encodes the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Here we report a patient with recurrent respiratory tract infections and early onset agammaglobulinemia who carried a unique disease-causing intronic loss-of-function mutation in SH2D1A. The intronic mutation affected SH2D1A gene transcription but not mRNA splicing, and led to markedly reduced level of SAP protein. Despite undetectable serum immunoglobulins, the patient's B cells replicated and differentiated into antibody producing cells normally in vitro.

  19. Shutdown dose rate assessment with the Advanced D1S method: Development, applications and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villari, R., E-mail: rosaria.villari@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Moro, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Petrizzi, L. [European Commission, DG Research and Innovation K5, CDMA 00/030, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Podda, S. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Serikov, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: Development of Advanced-D1S for shutdown dose rate calculations; Recent applications of the tool to tokamaks; Summary of the results of benchmarking with measurements and R2S calculations; Limitations and further development. Abstract: The present paper addresses the recent developments and applications of Advanced-D1S to the calculations of shutdown dose rate in tokamak devices. Results of benchmarking with measurements and Rigorous 2-Step (R2S) calculations are summarized and discussed as well as limitations and further developments. The outcomes confirm the essential role of the Advanced-D1S methodology and the evidence for its complementary use with the R2Smesh approach for the reliable assessment of shutdown dose rates and related statistical uncertainties in present and future fusion devices.

  20. Evolutionary dynamics of HBV-D1 genotype epidemic in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccozzi, Massimo; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Equestre, Michele; Cella, Eleonora; Ebranati, Erika; Gabanelli, Elena; Villano, Umbertina; Bruni, Roberto; Yalcinkaya, Tulay; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Zehender, Gianguglielmo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), is the leading cause of liver diseases infecting an estimated 240 million persons worldwide. The HBV prevalence rates are variables between different countries, with an high level of endemicity in the south-eastern part of Europe. Seven main HBV-D subgenotypes have been described until now (D1-D7). Turkey, seems to have played an important role in the penetration of HBV-D1 in the Mediterranean area. The importance of Turkey in the European epidemiology of HBV is also suggested by the observation that the highest spread of HBV infection in the Continent are reported in Turkey with Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania and some southern regions of Italy. In this paper the molecular epidemiology and the epidemiological history of HBV-D in Turkey was studied, by characterizing 34 new Turkish isolates and performing a phylogeographic reconstruction. By using a phylodynamic and phylogeographic Bayesian approach, the analysis suggested that HBV-D1 originated in Turkey about in the early 1940s. The large prevalence of D1 in comparison to the other subgenotypes in Turkey confirms the importance of this Country as epidemiological reservoir of HBV-D1 dispersion. The phylogeny suggests that after each initial introduction of the virus in a specific population, separate transmission clusters have been evolving along independent phylogenetic lineages. Better characterization and continuous monitoring of such groups are going to be crucial to understand in detail the epidemiology of HBV-D1 subgenotype in Turkey and to assess the efficacy of prevention, vaccination and therapy in controlling the epidemic.

  1. UGT74D1 is a novel auxin glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Hui Jin

    Full Text Available Auxin is one type of phytohormones that plays important roles in nearly all aspects of plant growth and developmental processes. The glycosylation of auxins is considered to be an essential mechanism to control the level of active auxins. Thus, the identification of auxin glycosyltransferases is of great significance for further understanding the auxin regulation. In this study, we biochemically screened the group L of Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase superfamily for enzymatic activity toward auxins. UGT74D1 was identified to be a novel auxin glycosyltransferase. Through HPLC and LC-MS analysis of reaction products in vitro by testing eight substrates including auxins and other compounds, we found that UGT74D1 had a strong glucosylating activity toward indole-3-butyric acid [IBA], indole-3-propionic acid [IPA], indole-3-acetic acid [IAA] and naphthaleneacetic acid [NAA], catalyzing them to form corresponding glucose esters. Biochemical characterization showed that this enzyme had a maximum activity in HEPES buffer at pH 6.0 and 37°C. In addition, the enzymatic activity analysis of crude protein and the IBA metabolite analysis from transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing UGT74D1 gene were also carried out. Experimental results indicated that over-production of the UGT74D1 in plants indeed led to increased level of the glucose conjugate of IBA. Moreover, UGT74D1 overexpression lines displayed curling leaf phenotype, suggesting a physiological role of UGT74D1 in affecting the activity of auxins. Our current data provide a new target gene for further genetic studies to understand the auxin regulation by glycosylation in plants.

  2. Cat (Fel d 1) and dog (Can f 1) allergen levels in cars, dwellings and schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesler, A; Ścigała, G; Łudzeń-Izbińska, B

    Pets are an important source of indoor allergens. The aim of the study was to compare cat and dog allergen levels in cars, schools and homes. The study was carried out in 17 cars, 14 classrooms and 19 dwellings located in the highly industrialized and urbanized region of Poland. Dust and air samples were analyzed for Fel d 1 and Can f 1 using a double monoclonal ELISA assay. The highest amounts of cat and dog allergens (Fel d 1: 1169 μg/g; Can f 1: 277 μg/g) were found in dwellings with pets. Allergen concentrations were correlated with the number of animals kept at home. Although concentrations on automobile seats were lower, Fel d 1 levels exceeded 8 μg/g in 23.5 % of cars and high levels of Can f 1 (>10 μg/g) were found in 17.6 % of cars. The study revealed that cars of pet owners may be reservoirs of cat and dog allergens even when animals are not transported in them. In schools, concentrations of pet allergens did not reach high levels, but the moderate levels of Fel d 1 (≥1-8 μg/g) and Can f 1 (≥2-10 μg/g) were detected in 42.9 and 7.1 % of the investigated classrooms. Concentrations of cat and dog allergen in schools were higher than in homes without pets. While airborne Fel d 1 and Can f 1 levels were found low, residential allergen concentrations in settled dust and air were correlated. The study results suggest that classrooms and cars of pet owners may be important sites of exposure to cat and dog allergens, though the highest concentrations of Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are found in homes of pet owners.

  3. Helical reactor design FFHR-d1 and c1 for steady-state DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, A., E-mail: sagara.akio@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Tamura, H.; Tanaka, T.; Yanagi, N.; Miyazawa, J.; Goto, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Yagi, J.; Watanabe, T.; Takayama, S.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •More than 10 years’ operation is feasible using the inboard WC shield, where the total TBR is 1.18 with 90% 6Li. •The divertor targets can be efficiently shielded, expanding the range of material choice (e.g., Cu alloys). •Flinabe blanket mixed with metal powder is proposed to increase hydrogen solubility and thermal efficiency. •Helical coils by connecting segments of 100 kA-class YBCO high-temperature superconductors is proposed. •A multi-path strategy on FFHR-d1 is introduced with sub-ignition options for “before demo, compact and component-test”. -- Abstract: NIFS launched the Fusion Engineering Research Project (FERP) in preparation for DEMO by starting the redesign of the LHD-type helical reactor FFHR-d1. In the first round, the main parameters were selected. The second round is preparing detailed three-dimensional (3D) design of the superconducting magnet support structures, and 3D neutronics analyses, where the diverter targets can be efficiently shielded from fast neutrons. A new Flinabe blanket mixed with metal powder was proposed. Fabrication of helical coils by connecting half-helical-pitch segments of 100 kA-class YBCO high-temperature superconductors is proposed as a promising method. Also in progress is improvement of the first round of the core plasma design, ignition start-up analyses, and fueling scenario. As a consequence, a multi-path strategy on FFHR-d1 has been introduced with versions of -d1A, -d1B, and -d1C, where design flexibility is expanded to include subignition with options FFHR-c1 for “before demo, compact, and component-test.”.

  4. SVR-D1.2: A Prediction Model for Population Occurrence of Paddy Stem Borer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichuan Gu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyse the SVR-based prediction method for selecting the optimal model framework based on kernel matrix. Moreover, SVR-D1.2 is proposed with the help of the kernel matrix’s symmetry and positive definition and kernel alignment. Test results show that there exactly exists the non-line relation between the insect population occurrence and the meteorological factors and the new prediction model, SVR-D1.2, improved prediction accuracy compared with other methods.

  5. Using the D1D5 CFT to Understand Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Avery, Steven

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, we review work presented in arXiv:0906.2015, arXiv:0907.1663, arXiv:1002.3132, arXiv:1003.2746, and arXiv:1007.2202 on the D1D5 system. We begin with some motivational material for black holes in string theory. In Chapter 2, we review the D1D5 system, including the gravity and CFT descriptions. In Chapter 3, we show how to perturbatively relax the decoupling limit in a general AdS-CFT setting. This allows one to compute the emission out of the AdS/CFT into the asymptotic...

  6. Investigating the Role of Cyclin D1 in the Promotion of Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    20mM Tris, 40mM MgCl2, 2.5mM EGTA). Beads containing SCFFbx4 complexes 6 were then mixed with Sf9 -produced purified cyclin D1 substrate, ATP...ubiquitylation reactions with Sf9 -purified cyclin D1/CDK4 as substrate, in the presence of E1, E2, 1 ubiquitin, and ATP. 2 3 Figure 6. Fbx4 loss drives cell...kinase/methyltrans- ferase reactions with purified recombinant PRMT5/MEP50 pro- duced in Sf9 cells. PRMT5-dependent methyltransferase activity was

  7. Elevated dopamine D1 receptor availability in striatum of Göttingen minipigs after electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landau, Anne M.; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Audrain, Héléne

    2017-01-01

    established a novel model of brain stimulation in Göttingen minipigs based on the protocol of ECT applied in humans. With positron emission tomography (PET), we determined a measure of dopaminergic neurotransmission with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist [11C]SCH23390. Seven minipigs were anesthetized......, binding returned towards baseline at 8-10 days. Increased binding was observed in inverse proportion to baseline binding rates. Increased binding to dopamine D1 receptors suggests facilitation of dopaminergic neurotransmission, which may contribute to the therapeutic effects of ECT. Importantly...

  8. Green Synthesis of D-1,2,4-Butanetriol from D-Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-31

    increasingly valuable as the biorefinery industry continues to make progress in the isolation of xylose from hemi-cellulose. The other, two-step process ...alcohol dehydrogenase, adhP capable of producing an upward of 35 g/L of D-1,2,4-butanetriol from D-xylose. However the process also generates byproducts...eliminate the need of using xylose as a carbon source, a new two-step approach to D-1,2,4-butanetriol synthesis from glucose has been developed. The process

  9. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Sun, Shiqin [College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University-Daqing, Daqing, Heilongjiang 163319 (China); Chen, Xiangmei, E-mail: xm_chen6176@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Fengmin [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The expression of Fbx4 was significantly lower in HCC tissues. • Novel splicing variants of Fbx4 were identified. • These novel variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cells. • The novel Fbx4 isoforms could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. • These isoforms showed less capability for cyclin D1 binding and degradation. - Abstract: Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168–245nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant

  10. Adolescent Maturation of Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Function and Interactions in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Jennifer B.; Leslie, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period characterized by heightened vulnerability to illicit drug use and the onset of neuropsychiatric disorders. These clinical phenomena likely share common neurobiological substrates, as mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems actively mature during this period. Whereas prior studies have examined age-dependent changes in dopamine receptor binding, there have been fewer functional analyses. The aim of the present study was therefore to determine whether the functional consequences of D1 and D2-like activation are age-dependent. Adolescent and adult rats were given direct D1 and D2 agonists, alone and in combination. Locomotor and stereotypic behaviors were measured, and brains were collected for analysis of mRNA expression for the immediate early genes (IEGs), cfos and arc. Adolescents showed enhanced D2-like receptor control of locomotor and repetitive behaviors, which transitioned to dominant D1-like mechanisms in adulthood. When low doses of agonists were co-administered, adults showed supra-additive behavioral responses to D1/D2 combinations, whereas adolescents did not, which may suggest age differences in D1/D2 synergy. D1/D2-stimulated IEG expression was particularly prominent in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). Given the BNST’s function as an integrator of corticostriatal, hippocampal, and stress-related circuitry, and the importance of neural network dynamics in producing behavior, an exploratory functional network analysis of regional IEG expression was performed. This data-driven analysis demonstrated similar developmental trajectories as those described in humans and suggested that dopaminergic drugs alter forebrain coordinated gene expression age dependently. D1/D2 recruitment of stress nuclei into functional networks was associated with low behavioral output in adolescents. Network analysis presents a novel tool to assess pharmacological action, and highlights critical developmental changes in functional

  11. EXPRESSION OF p16, CYCLIN D1 AND RB PROTEIN IN GASTRIC CARCINOMA AND PREMALIGNANT LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪林; 赵志泉; 季国忠; 范志宁; 金宁; 刘政; 张平; 程铁华

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of p16, cyclin D1 and Rb protein in gastric carcinoma and premalignant lesions including dysplastic gastric mucosa and intestinal metaplasia gastric mucosa. Methods: Using SP immunohistochemical methods, the expression of pl6, cyclin D1 and Rb proteins was detected in 10 specimens of normal gastric mucosa, 15 specimens of dysplastic gastric mucosa, 15 specimens of intestinal metaplasia gastric mucosa, 30 specimens of gastric carcinoma. The clinical characteristics of the 30 patients with gastric carcinoma were analysed to explore the relationship between the parameter detected and biological action of gastric cancer. Results: Expression of p16 protein was detected in 90% of normal gastric mucosa, 86.67% of dysplastic gastric mucosa, 86.67% of intestinal metaplasia gastric mucosa, 36.67% of gastric carcinoma. The positive rate of p16 protein expression in gastric carcinoma is significantly lower than that in normal gastric mucosa and gastric premalignant lesions mucosa (P<0.01). Expression of cyclin D1 protein was detected in 10% of normal gastric mucosa, 20% of dysplastic gastric mucosa, 20% of intestinal metaplasia gastric mucosa, 53.33% of gastric carcinoma. The positive rate of cyclin D1, protein expression in gastric carcinoma is significantly higher than that in normal gastric mucosa and gastric premalignant lesions mucosa (P<0.05). Expression of Rb protein was detected in 90% of normal gastric mucosa, 80% of dysplastic gastric mucosa, 80% of intestinal metaplasia gastric mucosa, 50% of gastric carcinoma. The positive rate of Rb protein expression in gastric carcinoma is significantly lower than that in normal gastric mucosa (P<0.05). The expression of p16, cyclin D1 gene were associated with the degree of differentiation of gastric carcinoma, lymphnodes metastasis and distant metastasis. Conclusion: p16, Cyclin D1 and Rb gene play important role in gastric carcinoma genesis. The expression of p16, cyclin D1 and Rb gene

  12. 松下发布3D相机DMC-3D1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    近日。松下发布了双镜头4x光学变焦便携数码相机LumixDMC-3D1。3D1搭载1200万像素“高感光度CMOS”传感器,VenusEngine影像处理引擎,支持拍摄2D及3D照片。拥有3.5英寸的触摸屏。连拍速度8fPs。双镜头可以独立进行对焦与变焦。

  13. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Nr1d1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Nr1d1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nr1d1 All cell types SRX997755,SRX12817...758,SRX994726,SRX100297,SRX1304810,SRX1304809 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Nr1d1.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Nr1d1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Nr1d1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nr1d1 All cell types SRX997762,SRX10946...4810,SRX997755,SRX994726,SRX1304809,SRX997756 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Nr1d1.AllCell.bed ...

  15. 26 CFR 1.691(d)-1 - Amounts received by surviving annuitant under joint and survivor annuity contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... joint and survivor annuity contract. 1.691(d)-1 Section 1.691(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Decedents § 1.691(d)-1 Amounts received by surviving annuitant under joint and survivor annuity contract. (a... and survivor annuity contract (to the extent indicated in paragraph (b) of this section) are...

  16. Oscillation of Branching Ratios Between the D (2 s )+D (1 s ) and the D (2 p )+D (1 s ) Channels in Direct Photodissociation of D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Meng, Qingnan; Mo, Yuxiang

    2017-08-01

    The direct photodissociation of D2 at excitation energies above 14.76 eV occurs via two channels, D (2 s )+D (1 s ) and D (2 p )+D (1 s ) . The branching ratios between the two have been measured from the dissociation threshold to 3200 cm-1 above it, and it is found that they show cosine oscillations as a function of the fragment wave vector magnitudes. The oscillation is due to an interference effect and can be simulated using the phase difference between the wave functions of the two channels, analogous to Young's double-slit experiment. By fitting the measured branching ratios, we have determined the depths and widths of the effective spherical potential wells related to the two channels, which are in agreement with the effective depths and widths of the ab initio interaction potentials. The results of this Letter illustrate the importance of the relative phase between the fragments in controlling the branching ratios of the photodissociation channels.

  17. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van der Geize

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551, ipdB (rv3552, fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP. Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  18. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van der Geize

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551, ipdB (rv3552, fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP. Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  19. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geize, R; Grommen, A W F; Hessels, G I; Jacobs, A A C; Dijkhuizen, L

    2011-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551), ipdB (rv3552), fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid)-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP). Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  20. Variación de la composición de ácidos grasos de membrana celular de Rhodococcus rodochrous GNP-OHP-38r en respuesta a la temperatura y salinidad Variation in the composition of Rhodococcus rodochrous GNP-OHP-38r cell membrane fatty acids in response to temperature and salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.N. Pucci

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Los integrantes del género Rhodococcus son habitantes frecuentes y abundantes de áreas contaminadas con hidrocarburos y resisten la creciente salinidad que se presenta en la Patagonia central. Este género tiene buena capacidad de eliminar contaminantes hidrocarburos que constituyen el mayor contaminante de la región. En el presente trabajo se estudió la respuesta en la composición de sus ácidos grasos de una cepa aislada de un sistema de landfarming, ante la acción combinada de diferentes temperaturas y concentraciones salinas. La estrategia de la cepa Rhodococcus rodochrous GNP-OHP-38r frente al incremento de temperatura, es el aumento del porcentaje de los ácidos grasos saturados totales (n:0; ácidos grasos ramificados en el carbono terminal con grupos oxidrilo en posición 2 (n:0 iso 2 OH y saturados con grupo metilo en carbono 10 (n:0 10 metil, a expensas de la disminución del porcentaje de los n:1 cis.The members of the genus Rhodococcus are frequent and abundant inhabitants of polluted areas with hydrocarbons and they resist the salinity present in the central Patagonia. This genus has good capacity to eliminate pollution produced by hydrocarbons that constitutes the biggest pollutant agent in the region. The present work studies the answer in the composition of its fatty acids under the combined action of the temperature and saline concentration of an isolated stump of a landfarming system. The strategy of Rhodococcus rodochrous strain GNP-OHP-38r in front of the thermal-osmotic stress is the increase of the percentage of the total saturated fatty acids (n:0; fatty acids branched in the terminal carbon with hidroxyl group in position 2 (n:0 iso 2 OH and saturated with group methyl in carbon 10 (n:0 10 metil when the temperature is increased. These acids increase while the percentage of n:1 cis decrease.