WorldWideScience

Sample records for rhode island professor

  1. Rhode Island unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard Lardaro

    2010-01-01

    How can a state like Rhode Island have such a high unemployment rate? This question has been asked often over the past year, especially since at one point, Rhode Island found itself with the dubious distinction of having the highest unemployment rate in the United States. Following that extreme, Rhode Island seemed to settle into a niche where its rank was third nationally.

  2. Lodging Update: Providence, Rhode Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragel Roginsky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Each quarter, Pinnacle Advisory Group prepares an analysis of the New England lodging industry, which provides a regional summary and then focuses in depth on a particular market. These reviews look at recent and proposed supply changes, factors affecting demand and growth rates, and the effects of interactions between such supply and demand trends. In this issue, the authors spotlight the lodging market in Providence, Rhode Island.

  3. Updating Rhode Island's strategic highway safety plan (SHSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes the peer exchange sponsored by the Rhode Island : Department of Transportation (RIDOT) that focused on Rhode Islands SHSP : update. : Rhode Islands goals for the peer exchange included learning from other States : expe...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Transportation Data for

    Science.gov (United States)

    stations in Rhode Island with alternative fuels Fuel Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 3 3 More Rhode Island Videos on YouTube Video thumbnail for Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Rhode Island Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Rhode Island July 14, 2017 https://www.youtube.com/embed

  5. Rhode Island Hurricane Evacuation Study Technical Data Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... The purpose of the study is to provide the Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency and Rhode Island coastal communities with realistic data quantifying the major factors involved in hurricane...

  6. Rhode Island Flood Plain Management Services; Bench & Reference Mark Catalogue Portsmouth, Newport and Warwick, Rhode Island

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hatfield, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    This study, which developed a catalog of bench and reference marks for several communities in Rhode Island, was conducted by the Long Range Planning Branch, Planning Directorate, New England Division, U.S...

  7. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Rhode Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Rhode Island single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  8. The timber resources of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland H. Ferguson; John R. McGuire; John R. McGuire

    1957-01-01

    This is a report on the first comprehensive survey ever made of the timber resources of Rhode Island. It shows, for the years 1952 and 1953, the area and condition of the forest land, the volume and quality of standing timber, the rates of timber growth and mortality, and the extent of timber cutting for forest products. The survey was made by the Forest Service as...

  9. One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-11-01

    Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

  10. 77 FR 43514 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ...-AA01 Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, and adding an offshore anchorage in Rhode Island Sound south of Brenton Point... rulemaking (NPRM) entitled ``Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI,'' in the...

  11. Rhode Island ITS/CVO business plan : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Rhode Island Intelligent Transportation Systems/Commercial Vehicle Operations (ITS/CVO) Institutional Issues Study completed July 1996, substantiated the need for enhanced efficiency and safety in commercial transportation systems and regulation....

  12. Leaking Underground Tanks in Rhode Island; LUSTs12

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This dataset shows the location of storage tanks and associated piping used for petroleum and certain hazardous substances that have experienced leaks as determined...

  13. The Clinical Research Landscape in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, George; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2017-01-06

    To present an overview of clinical research activity and the state of medical research funding in Rhode Island. We utilized clinicaltrials.gov registry to profile clinical studies between 2011 to 2016. NIH RePORT and other federal databases were used to extract information on levels of federal funding. Previously published hospital financial reports were reviewed for data on hospital-specific total external research funding. During 2011-2016, 1651 clinical studies were registered in clinicaltrials.gov. Nearly a third of all clinical studies were in oncology (21%) and cardiovascular diseases (10%). Alzheimer's dementia, breast cancer, HIV, and hepatitis C accounted for nearly 17% of all clinical trials. Seventy-five percent (75%) of clinical trials in RI were conducted in hospitals affiliated with Lifespan or Care New England. Financial support for clinical trials largely came from industry (60%) with 23% being supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The rest are funded by nonprofit organizations, charitable foundations, educational institutions, and unlisted concerns. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-01.asp].

  14. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Rhode Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Rhode Island. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Rhode Island.

  15. 76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ...-AA01 Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Rhode Island Sound south of Brenton Point, Rhode Island, for use by vessels waiting to enter... Sound that under current informal practice is routinely used by mariners as an anchorage while waiting...

  16. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Rhode Island. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  17. Semen bacterial flora of Rhode Island Breeder cocks in Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The semen used in this study was collected from 77 Rhode Island Breeder cocks reared in battery cages under intensive management from a private farm in Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria using the back massage procedure, 27 of the 77 semen samples (35.1%) contained bacterial isolates. None of the samples grew fungi.

  18. Influence of insemination time on fertility of Rhodes island white ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of insemination time on fertility of Rhodes island white chicken (Gallus domestica) raised in northern guinea savannah zone of Nigeria. D Zahraddeen, ISR Butswat, KM Bello, AA Washik. Abstract. No Abstract. International Journal of Tropical Agriculture and Food Systems Vol. 1 (4) 2007: pp. 378-383. Full Text:.

  19. 77 FR 68797 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Hurricane Sandy beginning on October 26, 2012, and continuing, are of sufficient severity and magnitude to... emergency. The following areas of the State of Rhode Island have been designated as adversely affected by...; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and Households In Presidentially Declared Disaster...

  20. 76 FR 60850 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Hurricane Irene beginning on August 26, 2011, and continuing, are of sufficient severity and magnitude to... State of Rhode Island have been designated as adversely affected by this declared emergency: Providence..., Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing...

  1. Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage Equality in Rhode Island

    OpenAIRE

    Kastanis, Angeliki; Badgett, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Extending marriage rights to same-sex couples in Rhode Island would bring an estimated $7 million to the state and local economy, including $5.5 million in additional wedding spending and $1.5 million in tourism expenditures made by out-of-town guests. Based on Rhode Island’s rates of 7 percent sales tax and 6 percent hotel and lodging tax, $530,000 in tax revenue will be generated for the state in the first three years same-sex couples may marry. The boost in travel spending will generate ap...

  2. Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS). Rhode Island Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    ft from the center line of Ashaway, Beaver, Blackstone , Chepechet, Clear, Falls, Flat, Hunt, Moshassuck., Moosup, Narrow, Pawcatuck, Pascoag...municipal recycling regulations, the Rhode Island Battery Deposit and Control Regulations, or oil subject to the hard-to- dispose-of tax . " Recyclable...designed to backfire into the feed hopper. avoid backfire into the feed hopper (RIDEM Verify that the feed hopper is designed to allow removal of refuse

  3. 76 FR 52656 - Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14211-000] Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On June 10, 2011, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...

  4. RI State Profile. Rhode Island: New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Rhode Island's New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP), a comprehensive test. Its purpose is to measure each student's overall proficiency for graduation in the six core academic areas. In 2008, the Board of Regents in Rhode Island established new regulations for high school diplomas. Beginning with the…

  5. Children's mental health and family functioning in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Hanna K; Viner-Brown, Samara I; Garcia, Jorge

    2007-02-01

    Our objectives were to (a) estimate the prevalence of children's mental health problems, (b) assess family functioning, and (c) investigate the relationship between children's mental health and family functioning in Rhode Island. From the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health, Rhode Island data for children 6 to 17 years of age were used for the analyses (N = 1326). Two aspects of family functioning measures, parental stress and parental involvement, were constructed and were examined by children's mental health problems, as well as other child and family characteristics (child's age, gender, race/ethnicity, special needs, parent's education, income, employment, family structure, number of children, and mother's general and mental health). Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression were used to investigate the relationship. Among Rhode Island children, nearly 1 (19.0%) in 5 had mental health problems, 1 (15.6%) in 6 lived with a highly stressed parent, and one third (32.7%) had parents with low involvement. Bivariate analyses showed that high parental stress and low parental involvement were higher among parents of children with mental health problems than parents of children without those problems (33.2% vs 11.0% and 41.0% vs 30.3%, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression, parents of children with mental health problems had nearly 4 times the odds of high stress compared with parents of children without those problems. When children's mental health problems were severe, the odds of high parental stress were elevated. However, children's mental health was not associated with parental involvement. Children's mental health was strongly associated with parental stress, but it was not associated with parental involvement. The findings indicate that when examining the mental health issues of children, parental mental health and stress must be considered.

  6. Scientific information in support of water resource management of the Big River area, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David S.; Masterson, John P.; Robinson, Keith W.; Crawley, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    The Rhode Island Water Resources Board (RIWRB) is concerned that the demand for water may exceed the available public water supply in central and southern Rhode Island. Although water is often assumed to be plentiful in Rhode Island because of abundant rainfall, an adequate supply of water is not always available everywhere in the state during dry periods. Concerns that water demand may exceed supply are greatest during the summer, when lower water levels and increased drought potential combine with seasonal increases in peak water demand (Rhode Island Water Resources Board, 2012). High summer water demands are due to increases in outdoor water use, such as lawn watering and agricultural irrigation, and to increased summer population in coastal areas. Water-supply concerns are particularly acute in central and southern Rhode Island, where groundwater is the primary source of drinking water.

  7. Meeting changing conditoins at the Rhode Island Medical Center cogeneration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galamaga, D.P.; Bowen, P.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Rhode Island Department of Mental Health, Retardation and Hospitals is one state department in Rhode Island whose basic function is to provide services to seriously disabled individuals throughout the state. Savings in operating expenses from the Rhode Island Medical Center Central Power Plant have accruded to provide operating funds for the major programs. Operating under a Director who reports to the Governor of Rhode Island, the Department has three major divisions, approximately 2500 employees, and a budget of 200 million dollars. Its operations extend throughout the state and the major focus for hospital or institutional levels of care reside in three major locations, the Dr. U.E. Zambarano Memorial Hospital in northern Rhode Island, the Dr. Joseph Ladd Center in southern Rhode Island, and the Rhode Island Medical Center in the middle of the state. Besides these institution-based operations, the Department sponsors a wide range of rehabilitative programming in the community other through direct operations of facilities such as group homes or through contracts with private non-profit providers of service

  8. The Montessori Experiment in Rhode Island (1913-1940): Tracing Theory to Implementation over 25 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights archived documents pertaining to a 25-year experimental classroom implemented by Clara Craig, then supervisor of training at the Rhode Island Normal School. Craig is notable as she was the only participant in the first International Montessori Training Course in Rome, Italy, in 1913, to gain approval from the Rhode Island…

  9. Combined multibeam and bathymetry data from Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound: a regional perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Danforth, William W.; Blankenship, Mark R.; Clos, Andrew R.; Glomb, Kimberly A.; Lewit, Peter G.; Nadeau, Megan A.; Wood, Douglas A.; Parker, Castleton E.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research and management communities because of this area's ecological, recreational, and commercial importance. Geologically interpreted digital terrain models from individual surveys provide important benthic environmental information, yet many applications of this information require a geographically broader perspective. For example, individual surveys are of limited use for the planning and construction of cross-sound infrastructure, such as cables and pipelines, or for the testing of regional circulation models. To address this need, we integrated 14 contiguous multibeam bathymetric datasets that were produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during charting operations into one digital terrain model that covers much of Block Island Sound and extends eastward across Rhode Island Sound. The new dataset, which covers over 1244 square kilometers, is adjusted to mean lower low water, gridded to 4-meter resolution, and provided in Universal Transverse Mercator Zone 19, North American Datum of 1983 and geographic World Geodetic Survey of 1984 projections. This resolution is adequate for sea-floor feature and process interpretation but is small enough to be queried and manipulated with standard Geographic Information System programs and to allow for future growth. Natural features visible in the data include boulder lag deposits of winnowed Pleistocene strata, sand-wave fields, and scour depressions that reflect the strength of oscillating tidal currents and scour by storm-induced waves. Bedform asymmetry allows interpretations of net sediment transport. Anthropogenic features visible in the data include shipwrecks and dredged channels. Together the merged data reveal a larger, more continuous perspective of bathymetric topography than previously available, providing a fundamental framework for

  10. Fiscal Year 1988 program report: Rhode Island Water Resources Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, C.P.C.

    1989-07-01

    The State of Rhode Island is active in water resources planning, development, and management activities which include legislation, upgrading of wastewater treatment facilities, upgrading and implementing pretreatment programs, protecting watersheds and aquifers throughout the state. Current and anticipated state water problems are contamination and clean up of aquifers to protect the valuable groundwater resources; protection of watersheds by controlling non-point source pollution; development of pretreatment technologies; and deterioring groundwater quality from landfill leachate or drainage from septic tank leaching field. Seven projects were included covering the following subjects: (1) Radon and its nuclei parents in bedrocks; (2) Model for natural flushing of aquifer; (3) Microbial treatment of heavy metals; (4) Vegetative uptake of nitrate; (5) Microbial process in vegetative buffer strips; (6) Leachate characterization in landfills; and (7) Electrochemical treatment of heavy metals and cyanide

  11. Environmental management of mosquito-borne viruses in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gettman, Alan; Becker, Elisabeth; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) are both primarily bird viruses, which can be transmitted by several mosquito species. Differences in larval habitats, flight, and biting patterns of the primary vector species result in substantial differences in epidemiology, with WNV more common, primarily occurring in urban areas, and EEEV relatively rare, typically occurring near swamp habitats. The complex transmission ecology of these viruses complicates prediction of disease outbreaks. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) and Department of Health (DoH) provide prevention assistance to towns and maintain a mosquito surveillance program to identify potential disease risk. Responses to potential outbreaks follow a protocol based on surveillance results, assessment of human risk, and technical consultation.

  12. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New...

  13. Promoting Independence in Rhode Island: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Rhode Island demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  14. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector arcs in...

  15. Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island

  16. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and terrestrial invertebrate species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York,...

  17. 2012 USACE Post Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Rhode Island and Massachusetts Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) represents 354.272 square miles of coastline for Rhode Island...

  18. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, and dolphins in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York/New Jersey...

  19. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INVERTPT (Invertebrate Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare terrestrial invertebrates in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector...

  20. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Rhode Island based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Rhode Island census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  1. Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island.

  2. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for nesting birds in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points in this...

  3. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HABPT (Habitat and Plant Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare terrestrial plants in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points...

  4. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small mammal species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector polygons in...

  5. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seal haul-out sites in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points in...

  6. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Rhode Island,...

  7. The Myth of the Citizen Soldier: Rhode Island Provincial Soldiers in the French and Indian War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    14 Revolution, is an excellent account of social, economic, and political factors in colonial America that influenced the concept of the citizen ...THE MYTH OF THE CITIZEN -SOLDIER: RHODE ISLAND PROVINCIAL SOLDIERS IN THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR A thesis presented to the...From - To) AUG 2015 – JUN 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Myth of the Citizen Soldier: Rhode Island Provincial Soldiers in the French and Indian War

  8. 76 FR 51383 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Rhode Island and Massachusetts recognizes the benefits of collaborating in the evaluation and potential... appropriate; (3) A preliminary schedule of proposed activities, including those leading to commercial...

  9. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Rhode Island, elevation data are critical for flood risk management, natural resources conservation, coastal zone management, sea level rise and subsidence, agriculture and precision farming, and other business uses. Today, high-quality light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the sources for creating elevation models and other elevation datasets. Federal, State, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data, on a national basis, that are (on average) 30 years old and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data. The new 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative (Snyder, 2012a,b), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  10. Tourism development and impacts: lessons from the Island of Rhodes, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Pappas, Nikolaos; Tsartas, Paris

    2009-01-01

    During the post Second World War period, the island of Rhodes experienced significant changes at several levels of its economy, society, and environment, associated directly or indirectly with rapid tourism development. The tourism impacts are profound on both locals and visitors. The purpose of this paper is to examine the key informants’ perceptions in Rhodes toward tourism impacts. Moreover it correlates the respondents’ perceptions with the previous studies’ outcomes in the region. Finall...

  11. CTD data from Rhode Island Sound collected from R/V Hope Hudner in 2009-2010 in support of Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan (NODC Accession 0109929)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists of 173 CTD casts in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds obtained during 4 surveys. The surveys were performed during 22-24 September 2009, 7-8...

  12. How do we reduce plasma transfusion in Rhode Island?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Christian P; Tavares, Maria F; Sweeney, Joseph D

    2017-08-01

    Plasma transfusions are given to patients with coagulopathy, either prophylactically, before an invasive procedure; or therapeutically, in the presence of active bleeding; and as an exchange fluid in therapeutic plasma exchange for disorders such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is consensus that many prophylactic plasma transfusions are non-efficacious, and the misdiagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura results in unnecessary therapeutic plasma exchange. Beginning in 2001, programs to reduce plasma transfusion in the three major teaching hospitals in Rhode Island were initiated. The programs evolved through the establishment of guidelines, education for key prescribers of plasma, screening of plasma prescriptions, and engagement of individual prescribing physicians for out-of-guidelines prescriptions with modification or cancellation. Establishment of an in-house ADAMTS13 (ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1, motif 13) assay in 2013 was used to prevent therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with non-thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura microangiopathy. Transfusion service data were gathered at the hospital level regarding blood component use, hospital data for discharges, inpatient mortality, and mean case-mix index, and, at the state level, for units of plasma shipped from the community blood center to in-state hospitals. Between 2006 and 2016, a reduction in plasma use from 11,805 to 2677 units (a 77% decrease) was observed in the three hospitals and was mirrored in the state as a whole. This decline was not associated with any increase in red blood cell transfusion. Inpatient mortality either declined or was unchanged. An active program focused on education and interdiction can achieve a large decrease in plasma transfusions without evidence of patient harm. © 2017 AABB.

  13. "Into Your Hands His Life and Liberty...." A Collection of Significant Cases from the Rhode Island Courts. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Donald E.; Mattson, John O., Ed.

    Six cases from Rhode Island court history are presented in this document. The cases, dating from the time of Roger Williams to the 1970s, examine religious freedom, personal freedom, treason, robbery, murder, and drug possession. Each case is summarized and questions are supplied to help students understand crime and punishment in Rhode Island. A…

  14. Rhode Island crystalline repository project: Technical progress report, 1984-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A Nuclear Waste Fund established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provided financial support to the State of Rhode Island for its participation in the high-level radioactive waste repository siting program. In 1984, the Office of the Governor set up a multidisciplinary Project Review Team consisting of staff from three State agencies and the University of Rhode Island. Members of the Review Team attended several meetings throughout the reporting period to voice their concerns about siting directly to the US Department of Energy (DOE). Written comments were also submitted on draft plans and reports. Many of Rhode Island's recommendations in these comments were later adopted. In May, 1986, Secretary of Energy John Herrington announced the suspension of the crystalline repository siting program. The remainder of the year was spent monitoring litigation challenging that decision and pending legislation. Administrative phase-down of the program was essentially complete by the close of the calendar year

  15. Measuring the Influences That Affect Technological Literacy in Rhode Island High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study sampled the current state of technological literacy in Rhode Island high schools using a new instrument, the Technological Literacy Assessment, which was developed for this study. Gender inequalities in technological literacy were discovered, and possible causes and solutions are presented. This study suggests possible next steps for…

  16. Investing in Low-Wage Workers: Lessons from Family Child Care in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Anne; Seavey, Dorie

    2006-01-01

    While child care is one of the fastest growing occupations in the country, most employment in this field is precarious and low-wage. Investing in Low-Wage Workers profiles the Day Care Justice Co-op, a group of largely Latina and African American women living and working in some of Rhode Island's poorest communities. Determined to improve family…

  17. School District Regionalization in Rhode Island: Relationship with Spending and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In Rhode Island, unless costs for education are controlled, taxpayers could face increased property taxes, increased sales tax on goods and services, and tax increases to existing fees to raise revenue (NEEP, 2010). Reducing the number of school districts was cited as the number two solution by the New England Economic Partnership in 2010 to…

  18. Estimated medical cost savings in Rhode Island by implementation of a primary seat belt law

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    This report examines 2006 hospital discharge data reporting cases where the external cause of injury to a vehicle occupant was a motor vehicle crash to predict the estimated savings to Rhode Island if a primary seat belt law is implemented. The savin...

  19. Video Review: Better Places: The Hmong of Rhode Island a Generation Later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Youyee Vang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a review of Better Places: a documentary that follows up with Hmong families who were originally part of a film produced in the early 1980s about the resettlement experiences of Hmong refugees in Providence, Rhode Island.

  20. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  1. How Will Teachers Fare in Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan? Public Pension Project Brief 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Butrica, Barbara A.; Haaga, Owen; Southgate, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid retirement plans that combine defined benefit pensions with 401(k) type, defined contribution accounts can play important roles in the reform of public-sector pensions. Summarizing results from our longer report ["How Will Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan Affect Teachers? A Report of the Public Pension Project" (2014)], this…

  2. Rhode Island Pension Reform: Implications and Opportunities for Education. Education Sector Policy Briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot-Hatfield, Jennie; Monahan, Amy; Rosenberg, Sarah; Tucker, Bill

    2011-01-01

    On August 24, 2010, the state of Rhode Island received some outstanding news. Its yearlong, bipartisan effort to develop new policies to spur educational improvement was about to pay off. The state, along with eight others and the District of Columbia, was named a winner of the U.S. Department of Education's Race to the Top grant competition. The…

  3. The Rhode Island "Washington": Meaning Making in Social Studies through Art History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The Rhode Island State House in Providence is an imposing structure. It is also an architecturally significant one. Built of white Georgia marble between 1895 and 1904, it has one of only four self-supporting marble covered domes found in the world. It was placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Looking around, one encounters…

  4. Consumer Behavior and Greenhouse Gas Emissions at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-31

    Of the 16,000 students at the University of Rhode Island, about 55% percent commute to campus. Between students, staff and faculty there could be up to 11,000 commuters at the University, most of which drive alone. A high volume of single-occupancy v...

  5. Perceptions of electronic health record implementation: a statewide survey of physicians in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Matthew C; Baier, Rosa R; Gardner, Rebekah L

    2014-10-01

    Although electronic health record use improves healthcare delivery, adoption into clinical practice is incomplete. We sought to identify the extent of adoption in Rhode Island and the characteristics of physicians and electronic health records associated with positive experience. We performed a cross-sectional study of data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Health for the Health Information Technology Survey 2009 to 2013. Survey questions included provider and practice demographics, health record information, and Likert-type scaled questions regarding how electronic health record use affected clinical practice. The survey response rate ranged from 50% to 65%, with 62% in 2013. Increasing numbers of physicians in Rhode Island use an electronic health record. In 2013, 81% of physicians used one, and adoption varied by clinical subspecialty. Most providers think that electronic health record use improves billing and quality improvement but has not improved job satisfaction. Physicians with longer and more sophisticated electronic health record use report positive effects of introduction on all aspects of practice examined (P electronic health record introduction (P electronic health record vendors most frequently used in Rhode Island, 5 were associated with improved job satisfaction. We report the largest statewide study of electronic health record adoption to date. We found increasing physician use in Rhode Island, and the extent of adoption varies by subspecialty. Although older physicians are less likely to be positive about electronic health record adoption, longer and more sophisticated use are associated with more positive opinions, suggesting acceptance will grow over time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Special Point Features for the State of Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence, and Washington Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  7. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Special Line Features for the State of Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence, and Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  8. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Soil Polygons for the State of Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence, and Washington Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — 2013 VERSION 6 Spatial: This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative...

  9. Legislative Districts, Rhode Island Senate Districts; risen07; State legislature district boundaries for the RI State Senate as determined in 2002 and revised in 2004 as designated in Rhode Island General Law 17-11. Corrected for renumbering of districts 9,12,24,and 32 in 2007, Published in 2007, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Legislative Districts dataset current as of 2007. Rhode Island Senate Districts; risen07; State legislature district boundaries for the RI State Senate as determined...

  10. "It's been a long road to acceptance": midwives in Rhode Island, 1970-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Simone M

    2014-01-01

    A resurgence of midwifery came to Rhode Island in the 1970s. Midwives acted as modern health care professionals to conserve a traditional woman-centered birth, but the battle was long and arduous, from Dr. Ellen Stone attempting to eliminate midwives in the state in 1912 to doctors using the death of 2 home birth infants in the 1980s to undermine the growing presence of professional nurse-midwives in the state. Midwives prevailed when the state legislature passed measures in 1988 and 1990 increasing the power and authority of midwives, and when a federal grant in 1993 allowed the University of Rhode Island to open the first training program for nurse-midwives in the state.

  11. A Precipitation-Runoff Model for the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2007-01-01

    A Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model of the Blackstone River Basin was developed and calibrated to study the effects of changing land- and water-use patterns on water resources. The 474.5 mi2 Blackstone River Basin in southeastern Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is experiencing rapid population and commercial growth throughout much of its area. This growth and the corresponding changes in land-use patterns are increasing stress on water resources and raising concerns about the future availability of water to meet residential and commercial needs. Increased withdrawals and wastewater-return flows also could adversely affect aquatic habitat, water quality, and the recreational value of the streams in the basin. The Blackstone River Basin was represented by 19 hydrologic response units (HRUs): 17 types of pervious areas (PERLNDs) established from combinations of surficial geology, land-use categories, and the distribution of public water and public sewer systems, and two types of impervious areas (IMPLNDs). Wetlands were combined with open water and simulated as stream reaches that receive runoff from surrounding pervious and impervious areas. This approach was taken to achieve greater flexibility in calibrating evapotranspiration losses from wetlands during the growing season. The basin was segmented into 50 reaches (RCHRES) to represent junctions at tributaries, major lakes and reservoirs, and drainage areas to streamflow-gaging stations. Climatological, streamflow, water-withdrawal, and wastewater-return data were collected during the study to develop the HSPF model. Climatological data collected at Worcester Regional Airport in Worcester, Massachusetts and T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, were used for model calibration. A total of 15 streamflow-gaging stations were used in the calibration. Streamflow was measured at eight continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations that are part of the U.S. Geological

  12. Analysis of Human Trafficking Cases in Rhode Island, 2009-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith Skodmin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an analysis of law enforcement identified cases of human trafficking in Rhode Island from 2009 to 2013. Information was collected from police and court records, prosecutors’ press releases, and reports in the media. During this period, there was one case of forced labor of a domestic worker and six cases of domestic sex trafficking. Many of the characteristics of the Rhode Island cases were consistent with other human trafficking cases in the United States. Discussions of key findings include (a outcomes of a criminal case using a new human trafficking statute on fraud in foreign contracting and a civil suit, (b how online prostitution ads are used to market victims to sex buyers using ethnicity of the victims and age and social standing of the sex buyers, and (c how mothers of victims are involved in locating their daughters and making reports to the police that initiated investigations.

  13. 75 FR 57188 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... implementation of the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) requirements in 40 CFR part 268 because Rhode Island has..., April 24, 2006 (other than LDR requirements): Rules 2.2 C, 2.2 C.4, 2.2 F, 2.2 G, 2.2 I, 2.2 J, 7.0 B.82...)), but Safe Food and Fertilizer disagrees with the EPA determinations and states that the ``use of...

  14. Contribution of chronic petroleum inputs to Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Vleet, E S; Quin, J G

    1978-05-01

    Sediment cores from Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound have been analyzed for petroleum hydrocarbons and compared with a relatively unpolluted sediment core from the Gulf of Maine. The sediments were analyzed for unbound hydrocarbons, hydrocarbons bound or closely associated with humic substances, and residual hydrocarbons bound or closely associated with the clay mineral or kerogen matrix. Results indicated that in general 90-100% of the hydrocarbons were in the unbound form and could be easily extracted with organic solvents. The petroleum hydrocarbons decreased with depth at all stations. Biogenic hydrocarbons (nC/sub 25/, nC/sub 27/, nC/sub 29/, and nC/sub 31/) made up an increasingly greater percentage of the total with increasing depth. The hydrocarbons in the Narragansett Bay sediments and near surface Rhode Island Sound sediments strongly resembled the hydrocarbons previously reported for the Providence River and upper Narragansett Bay. These petroleum-like hydrocarbons were shown to be largely introduced to the river and bay through chronic inputs from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. These hydrocarbons then undergo sedimentation throughout the entire bay and into Rhode Island Sound. Preliminary calculations indicate that over 0.2 million t (tonne) of petroleum hydrocarbons may be transported to the marine environment annually from municipal treatment plants. Most of these hydrocarbons appear to accumulate in estuarine and coastal sediments.

  15. NOAA Digital Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography and Ancillary Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and...

  16. REWSET: A prototype seismic and tsunami early warning system in Rhodes island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Gerasimos; Argyris, Ilias; Aggelou, Savvas; Karastathis, Vasilis

    2014-05-01

    Tsunami warning in near-field conditions is a critical issue in the Mediterranean Sea since the most important tsunami sources are situated within tsunami wave travel times starting from about five minutes. The project NEARTOWARN (2012-2013) supported by the EU-DG ECHO contributed substantially to the development of new tools for the near-field tsunami early warning in the Mediterranean. One of the main achievements is the development of a local warning system in the test-site of Rhodes island (Rhodes Early Warning System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis - REWSET). The system is composed by three main subsystems: (1) a network of eight seismic early warning devices installed in four different localities of the island, one in the civil protection, another in the Fire Brigade and another two in municipality buildings; (2) two radar-type (ultrasonic) tide-gauges installed in the eastern coastal zine of the island which was selected since research on the historical earthquake and tsunami activity has indicated that the most important, near-field tsunami sources are situated offshore to the east of Rhodes; (3) a crisis Geographic Management System (GMS), which is a web-based and GIS-based application incorporating a variety of thematic maps and other information types. The seismic early warning devices activate by strong (magnitude around 6 or more) earthquakes occurring at distances up to about 100 km from Rhodes, thus providing immediate mobilization of the civil protection. The tide-gauges transmit sea level data, while during the crisis the GMS supports decisions to be made by civil protection. In the near future it is planned the REWSET system to be integrated with national and international systems. REWSET is a prototype which certainly could be developed in other coastal areas of the Mediterranean and beyond.

  17. Availability of ground water in the Blackstone River area Rhode Island and Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Herbert E.; Dickerman, David C.

    1974-01-01

    The Blackstone River study area covers 83 square miles of northern Rhode Island and 5 square miles of adjacent Massachusetts (fig. 1). It includes parts of the Blackstone, Moshassuck, and Tenmile River basins, and a coastal area that drains to the brackish Seekonk and Providence Rivers. In Rhode Island, all or parts of the suburban towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, North Smithfield, and Smithfield and all or parts of the cities of Central Falls, East Povidence, Pawtucket, Providence, and Woonsocket are within the study area. Also included are parts of the towns Attleboro and North Attleborough in Massachusetts. In 1970, total population was about 240,000, which was equivalent to about one-fourth of the total population of Rhode Island. Fresh water usage in 1970 by public-supply systems and self-supplied industry was about 33 mgd (million gallons per day), which was equal to 22 percent of total fresh water use in Rhode Island for all purposes except generation of electric power (fig. 2). Anticipated increases in population and per capita water requirements are likely to cause the demand for water to more than double within the next 50 years. A significant part of this demand can be met from wells that tap the principal streams. This aquifer yielded an average of 10 mgd in 1970 and is capable of sustaining a much higher yield. The primary objectives of the study were to determine and map the saturated thickness and transmissivity of the stratified-drift aquifer and to assess the potential sustained yield of those parts of the aquifer favorable for large-scale development of water. A secondary objective was to describe ground-water quality and to evaluate the impact of induced infiltration of polluted stream water on the quality of native ground water. This report is based on analysis of drillers' records of more than 700 wells and borings which include 462 lithologic logs; 35 specific-capacity determinations; 12 aquifer tests, including detailed tests at two sites to

  18. Retrospective analysis of heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island based on old and new herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Sofia M; Murray, David W; Whitfeld, Timothy J S

    2017-01-01

    Herbarium specimens may provide a record of past environmental conditions, including heavy metal pollution. To explore this potential, we compared concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc in historical and new collections from four sites in Rhode Island, USA. We compared historical specimens (1846 to 1916) to congener specimens collected in 2015 at three former industrial sites in Providence, Rhode Island, and one nonindustrial site on Block Island. Leaf material was prepared by UltraWAVE SRC Microwave Digestion, and heavy metal concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Heavy metal concentrations in the historical and new specimens were measurable for all elements tested, and levels of copper and zinc were comparable in the historical and 2015 collections. By contrast, the concentration of lead declined at all sites over time. Significant variability in heavy metal concentration was observed between taxa, reflecting their varied potential for elemental accumulation. It seems clear that herbarium specimens can be used to evaluate past levels of pollution and assess local environmental changes. With careful sampling effort, these specimens can be a valuable part of environmental science research. Broadening the possible applications for herbarium collections in this way increases their relevance in an era of reduced funding for collections-based research.

  19. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012, 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average.

  20. The brave new world of GEC evaluation: the experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these efforts, and the modifications to assessment that ensued in response to the increased accountability requirements. The evaluation focused on RIGEC's series of continuing education, day-long workshops for health and social service professionals, the completion of all seven of which leads to a Certificate in Interdisciplinary Practice in Geriatrics.

  1. Chronic interstitial lung disease in nylon flocking industry workers--Rhode Island, 1992-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-26

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) occurs infrequently; some cases are attributed to sarcoidosis, pulmonary hemorrhage syndromes, connective tissue diseases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, drugs, radiation, and mineral dusts (e.g., silica or asbestos). However, most cases of ILD are of uncertain classification or etiology. This report describes preliminary findings of the investigation in Rhode Island of an outbreak of ILD among workers involved in the manufacture of finely cut nylon (flock) and flocked fabric (used for upholstery, clothing, and automobiles); the findings provide evidence of a newly recognized occupational illness.

  2. Surveillance of Travel-Related Mosquito-borne Illness in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alang, Neha; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Mermel, Leonard A; Mileno, Maria D

    2016-07-01

    Malaria and Dengue are some of the common infections occurring in persons traveling to countries endemic for these infections. Chinkungunya virus infection is another illness that can occur in people who have travelled to areas endemic for chikungunya virus infection. Herein we report cases of malaria, dengue, and chikungunya in Newport Hospital, The Miriam Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login].

  3. APPARENT DIGESTIBILITY OF RHODE ISLAND RED HEN DIETS CONTAINING Leucaena leucocephala AND Moringa oleifera LEAF MEALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abouelezz Fouad Mohammed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study consisted of two trials aimed to evaluate the dietary digestibility by Rhode Island Red (RIR hens' fed on different levels of Leucaena leucocephala (LLM or Moringa oleifera (MOLM. In each experiment, thirty six Rhode Island Red hens at 36 weeks of age were randomly divided into four groups each of nine birds which were allocated in individual cages. The four groups were corresponded to four dietary treatments containing 0 (control, 5, 10 and 15 % of LLM (Exp 1 or MOLM (Exp 2. All groups received smashed diets containing similar metabolizable energy and crude protein (16% CP and 2900 kcal ME/kg diet, as fed basis. The hens were fed the experimental diets for six weeks and during the last four days, feed intake was individually recorded every day and excreta was totally collected twice daily and weighed individually. Considerable amounts of CP were found in LLM (23.61% DM and MOLM (19.76% DM. The dietary treatments had no significant effect on the intake of dry matter (DM, organic matter (OM, gross energy (GE, crude protein (CP or neutral detergent fiber (NDF in both experiments, while the acid detergent fibers (ADF consumption increased linearly (P

  4. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  5. Profiles of medicinal cannabis patients attending compassion centers in rhode island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Nickolas; Topletz, Ariel; Frater, Susan; Yates, Gail; Lally, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Little is understood regarding medicinal marijuana dispensary users. We sought to characterize socio-demographics and reasons for medicinal marijuana use among medical cannabis dispensary patients in Rhode Island. Participants (n=200) were recruited from one of two Compassion Centers in Rhode Island and asked to participate in a short survey, which included assessment of pain interference using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). The majority of participants were male (73%), Caucasian (80%), college educated (68%), and had health insurance (89%). The most common reason for medicinal marijuana use was determined to be chronic pain management. Participants were more likely to have BPI pain interference scores of > 5 if they were older (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.04-1.78) or reported using cannabis as a substitute for prescription medications (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.23-4.95), and were less likely to have interference scores of >5 if they had higher income levels (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.40-0.70) or reported having ever received treatment for an alcohol use disorder. One-fifth of participants had a history of a drug or alcohol use disorder. Most participants report that medicinal cannabis improves their pain symptomology, and are interested in alternative treatment options to opioid-based treatment regimens.

  6. Attitudinal Factors and Personal Characteristics Influence Support for Shellfish Aquaculture in Rhode Island (US) Coastal Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Tracey M; Jin, Di

    2018-05-01

    This study explores public interests associated with shellfish aquaculture development in coastal waters of Rhode Island (US). Specifically, we examine (1) the levels of public support for (or opposition to) shellfish aquaculture development and (2) factors driving the levels of support, using survey data and ordinal logistic regressions. Results of the analysis identify several key attitudinal factors affecting individual's support for shellfish aquaculture in Rhode Island (RI). The level of support is positively associated with attitudes related to shellfish aquaculture's benefits to the local economy and its role as a nutritional food option, and negatively influenced by attitudes related to aquaculture farms' effects on aesthetic quality and their interference with other uses. Findings highlight that support for (or opposition to) aquaculture in RI is driven more by attitudes associated with social impacts than by those associated with environmental impacts. The level of support is also affected by personal characteristics related to an individual's participation in recreational activities. For instance, bicycle riders tend to be supportive of shellfish aquaculture while respondents who participate in sailing and birding are less supportive. By identifying the broader public's interests in shellfish aquaculture, findings from this study and others like it can be used to address public concerns, incorporate public perceptions and attitudes into permitting decisions, and develop outreach targeted at specific stakeholder groups.

  7. Water-quality trends in the Scituate reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, 1983-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2015-01-01

    The Scituate Reservoir is the primary source of drinking water for more than 60 percent of the population of Rhode Island. Water-quality and streamflow data collected at 37 surface-water monitoring stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, from October 2001 through September 2012, water years (WYs) 2002-12, were analyzed to determine water-quality conditions and constituent loads in the drainage area. Trends in water quality, including physical properties and concentrations of constituents, were investigated for the same period and for a longer period from October 1982 through September 2012 (WYs 1983-2012). Water samples were collected and analyzed by the Providence Water Supply Board, the agency that manages the Scituate Reservoir. Streamflow data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. Median values and other summary statistics for pH, color, turbidity, alkalinity, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and orthophosphate were calculated for WYs 2003-12 for all 37 monitoring stations. Instantaneous loads and yields (loads per unit area) of total coliform bacteria and E. coli, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, and orthophosphate were calculated for all sampling dates during WYs 2003-12 for 23 monitoring stations with streamflow data. Values of physical properties and concentrations of constituents were compared with State and Federal water-quality standards and guidelines and were related to streamflow, land-use characteristics, varying classes of timber operations, and impervious surface areas.

  8. Adolescent suicide and health risk behaviors: Rhode Island's 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongwen; Perry, Donald K; Hesser, Jana E

    2010-05-01

    Suicide is the third-leading cause of death among high school students in the U.S. This study examined the relationships among indicators of depressed mood, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and demographics and risk behaviors in Rhode Island high school students. Data from Rhode Island's 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey were utilized for this study. The statewide sample contained 2210 randomly selected public high school students. Data were analyzed in 2008 to model for each of five depressed mood/suicide indicators using multivariable logistic regression. By examining depressed mood and suicide indicators through a multivariable approach, the strongest predictors were identified, for multiple as well as specific suicide indicators. These predictors included being female, having low grades, speaking a language other than English at home, being lesbian/gay/bisexual/unsure of sexual orientation, not going to school as a result of feeling unsafe, having been a victim of forced sexual intercourse, being a current cigarette smoker, and having a self-perception of being overweight. The strength of associations between three factors (immigrant status, feeling unsafe, and having forced sex) and suicide indicators adds new information about potential predictors of suicidal behavior in adolescents. 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The interactive systems framework applied to the strategic prevention framework: the Rhode Island experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Paul; Friend, Karen B; Buka, Stephen; Egan, Crystelle; Barovier, Linda; Amodei, Brenda

    2012-12-01

    The Interactive Systems Framework for Dissemination and Implementation (ISF) was introduced as a heuristic systems level model to help bridge the gap between research and practice (Wandersman et al., in Am J Commun Psychol 41:171-181, 2008). This model describes three interacting systems with distinct functions that (1) distill knowledge to develop innovations; (2) provide supportive training and technical assistance for dissemination to; (3) a prevention delivery system responsible for implementation in the field. The Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) is a major prevention innovation launched by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The SPF offers a structured, sequential, data-driven approach that explicitly targets environmental conditions in the community and aims for change in substance use and problems at the population level. This paper describes how the ISF was applied to the challenges of implementing the SPF in 14 Rhode Island communities, with a focus on the development of a new Training and Technical Assistance Resources Center to support SPF efforts. More specifically, we (1) describe each of the three ISF interacting systems as they evolved in Rhode Island; (2) articulate the lines of communication between the three systems; and (3) examine selected evaluation data to understand relationships between training and technical assistance and SPF implementation and outcomes.

  10. Occurrence of the lessepsian species Portunus pelagicus (Crustacea and Apogon pharaonis (Pisces in the marine area of Rhodes Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. CORSINI-FOKA

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Red Sea species are colonizing the eastern Mediterranean Sea via the Suez Canal, mainly following the Anatolian coasts and spreading westwards. Portunus pelagicus is one of the most common Red Sea swimming crabs, first recorded in the Levantine Basin in 1898. Four specimens of P. pelagicus were collected in different marine areas of Rhodes Island from 1991 to 2000, while three specimens of the lessepsian fish Apogon pharaonis, first recorded in the Mediterranean in 1947, were caught during 2002 in the NW coast of Rhodes. The sub-tropical character of the marine area around Rhodes seems to facilitate the propagation of lessepsian species. These migrants have reached the island at different velocity and degree of establishment of their populations. The occurrence of the blue swimmer crab P. pelagicus and of the bullseye cardinal fish A. pharaonis increases the number of the decapod Crustacea and fish species of Red Sea origin observed in Greek waters.

  11. The Forests of Southern New England, 2007: A report on the forest resources of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Charles J. Barnett; Susan J. Crocker; Grant M. Domke; Dale Gormanson; William N. Hill; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya Lister; Christopher Martin; Patrick D. Miles; Randall Morin; W. Keith Moser; Mark D. Nelson; Barbara O' Connell; Bruce Payton; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Rachel Riemann; Christopher W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the fifth forest inventory of the forests of Southern New England, defined as Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and analysis program. Information on forest attributes, ownership, land use change, carbon, timber products, forest health, and statistics and quality...

  12. Particle-bound metal transport after removal of a small dam in the Pawtuxet River, Rhode Island, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pawtuxet River in Rhode Island, USA, has a long history of industrial activity and pollutant discharges. Metal contamination of the river sediments is well documented and historically exceeded toxicity thresholds for a variety of organisms. The Pawtuxet River dam, a low-head ...

  13. New Orleans on His Mind: A Rhode Island Choral Director Brings Katrina Victims Music--And Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2009-01-01

    Westerly, Rhode Island, is a long way from New Orleans. But the physical distance has not stopped David DeAngelis, choral director at Westerly High School, from providing his students with one heck of a lesson: The opportunity to truly connect with others through music. Under DeAngelis' direction, Westerly's various vocal ensembles have held…

  14. How Will Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan Affect Teachers? A Report of the Public Pension Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Butrica, Barbara A.; Haaga, Owen; Southgate, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 Rhode Island replaced the stand-alone defined benefit pension plan it provided to state employees with a hybrid plan that reduced the defined benefit component and added a 401(k)-type, defined contribution component. Although controversial, the new hybrid plan will boost retirement incomes for most of the states public school teachers. Our…

  15. Evaluation of the impact of the 2012 Rhode Island health care worker influenza vaccination regulations: implementation process and vaccination coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna; Lindley, Megan C; Dube, Donna; Kalayil, Elizabeth J; Paiva, Kristi A; Raymond, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    In October 2012, the Rhode Island Department of Health (HEALTH) amended its health care worker (HCW) vaccination regulations to require all HCWs to receive annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask during direct patient contact when influenza is widespread. Unvaccinated HCWs failing to wear a mask are subject to a fine and disciplinary action. To describe the implementation of the 2012 Rhode Island HCW influenza vaccination regulations and examine their impact on vaccination coverage. Two data sources were used: (1) a survey of all health care facilities subject to the HCW regulations and (2) HCW influenza vaccination coverage data reported to HEALTH by health care facilities. Descriptive statistics and paired t tests were performed using SAS Release 9.2. For the 2012-2013 influenza season, 271 inpatient and outpatient health care facilities in Rhode Island were subject to the HCW regulations. Increase in HCW influenza vaccination coverage. Of the 271 facilities, 117 facilities completed the survey (43.2%) and 160 facilities reported vaccination data to HEALTH (59.0%). Between the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 influenza seasons, the proportion of facilities having a masking policy, as required by the revised regulations, increased from 9.4% to 94.0% (P employee HCWs in Rhode Island increased from 69.7% in the 2011-2012 influenza season to 87.2% in the 2012-2013 season. Rhode Island's experience demonstrates that statewide HCW influenza vaccination requirements incorporating mask wearing and moderate penalties for noncompliance can be effective in improving influenza vaccination coverage among HCWs.

  16. Hydrogeologic data for the Big River-Mishnock River stream-aquifer system, central Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogeology, ground-water development alternatives, and water quality in the BigMishnock stream-aquifer system in central Rhode Island are being investigated as part of a long-term cooperative program between the Rhode Island Water Resources Board and the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate the ground-water resources throughout Rhode Island. The study area includes the Big River drainage basin and that portion of the Mishnock River drainage basin upstream from the Mishnock River at State Route 3. This report presents geologic data and hydrologic and water-quality data for ground and surface water. Ground-water data were collected from July 1996 through September 1998 from a network of observation wells consisting of existing wells and wells installed for this study, which provided a broad distribution of data-collection sites throughout the study area. Streambed piezometers were used to obtain differences in head data between surface-water levels and ground-water levels to help evaluate stream-aquifer interactions throughout the study area. The types of data presented include monthly ground-water levels, average daily ground-water withdrawals, drawdown data from aquifer tests, and water-quality data. Historical water-level data from other wells within the study area also are presented in this report. Surface-water data were obtained from a network consisting of surface-water impoundments, such as ponds and reservoirs, existing and newly established partial-record stream-discharge sites, and synoptic surface-water-quality sites. Water levels were collected monthly from the surface-water impoundments. Stream-discharge measurements were made at partial-record sites to provide measurements of inflow, outflow, and internal flow throughout the study area. Specific conductance was measured monthly at partial-record sites during the study, and also during the fall and spring of 1997 and 1998 at 41 synoptic sites throughout the study area. General geologic data, such as

  17. Rhode Island crystalline repository siting project: Technical progress report, Calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild, B.

    1987-01-01

    A Nuclear Waste Fund established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides financial support to affected states to participate in the high-level radioactive waste repository siting program of the US Department of Energy. In Rhode Island, that function was performed by a multidisciplinary Project Review Team consisting of staff from three State agencies. Members of the Review Team attended several meetings in 1986 to discuss mutual concerns with Federal, State and Tribal officials. Comments were developed on DOE's Draft Area Recommendation Report. Members of the Review Team also testified at a public hearing in Providence on the Draft ARR, and developed and distributed a public information booklet. In May, Secretary of Energy John Herrington announced the suspension of the crystalline repository siting program. The remainder of the year was spent monitoring litigation challenging that decision and pending legislation. Administrative phase-down of the program was essentially complete by the close of the calendar year

  18. Technical progress report: Rhode Island crystalline repository project, calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    A Nuclear Waste Fund established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides financial support to affected states to participate in the high-level radioactive waste repository siting program of the US Department of Energy. In Rhode Island, that function is performed by a multidisciplinary Project Review Team consisting of staff from three State agencies. Members of the Review Team attended several meetings in 1985 to voice their concerns directly to DOE. Written comments were also submitted on draft plans and reports. Among the issues raised were inconsistencies in the geologic and environmental data used to screen potential repository sites, the role of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) in the repository program, and regulations regarding the transportation and storage of nuclear waste. The Review Team also began work on a public information booklet describing the repository program in nontechnical terms. That booklet will be distributed widely upon completion

  19. Siting high-level nuclear waste repositories: A progress report for Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frohlich, R.K.; Vild, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    In this booklet, we will not try to argue the pros and cons of nuclear power or weapons production. We will focus instead on the issue of nuclear waste disposal. With the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, the US Congress and the President charged federal and state regulators with the responsibility of settling that issue by the end of this century - with extensive public involvement. This booklet, now in its second printing, is designed to explain the nature of ''high-level'' nuclear waste, the essential criteria for its safe and permanent disposal, and Rhode Island's participation in the federal repository program. It has been funded from a USDOE grant derived from a utility-financed Nuclear Waste Fund established under the NWPA. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Magnitude of flood flows for selected annual exceedance probabilities in Rhode Island through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Ahearn, Elizabeth A.; Levin, Sara B.

    2012-01-01

    Heavy persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe widespread flooding in Rhode Island that set or nearly set record flows and water levels at many long-term streamgages in the State. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, conducted a study to update estimates of flood magnitudes at streamgages and regional equations for estimating flood flows at ungaged locations. This report provides information needed for flood plain management, transportation infrastructure design, flood insurance studies, and other purposes that can help minimize future flood damages and risks. The magnitudes of floods were determined from the annual peak flows at 43 streamgages in Rhode Island (20 sites), Connecticut (14 sites), and Massachusetts (9 sites) using the standard Bulletin 17B log-Pearson type III method and a modification of this method called the expected moments algorithm (EMA) for 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) floods. Annual-peak flows were analyzed for the period of record through the 2010 water year; however, records were extended at 23 streamgages using the maintenance of variance extension (MOVE) procedure to best represent the longest period possible for determining the generalized skew and flood magnitudes. Generalized least square regression equations were developed from the flood quantiles computed at 41 streamgages (2 streamgages in Rhode Island with reported flood quantiles were not used in the regional regression because of regulation or redundancy) and their respective basin characteristics to estimate magnitude of floods at ungaged sites. Of 55 basin characteristics evaluated as potential explanatory variables, 3 were statistically significant—drainage area, stream density, and basin storage. The pseudo-coefficient of determination (pseudo-R2) indicates these three explanatory variables explain 95 to 96 percent of the variance

  1. On the wind power rejection in the islands of Crete and Rhodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsaprakakis, Dimitris Al.; Papadakis, Nikos; Christakis, Dimitris G.; Zervos, Arthouros

    2007-01-01

    Crete and Rhodes represent the two biggest isolated power systems in Greece. The energy production in both islands is based on thermal power plants. The annual wind energy rejection percentage is calculated for Crete and Rhodes in this paper. The rejected wind energy is defined as the electric energy produced by the wind turbines and not absorbed by the utility network, mainly due to power production system's stability and dynamic security reasons. A parametric calculation of the annual wind energy rejection percentage, in terms of the installed wind power, the power demand and the maximum allowed wind power instant penetration percentage, is accomplished. The methodology takes into account (i) the wind power penetration probability, restricted by the thermal generators technical minima and the maximum allowed wind power instant penetration percentage over the instant power demand; and (ii) the wind power production probability, derived by the islands' wind potential. The present paper indicates that isolated power systems which are based on thermal power plants have a limited wind power installation capacity - in order to achieve and maintain an adequate level of system stability. For a maximum wind power instant penetration percentage of 30% of the power demand, in order to ensure an annual wind energy rejection percentage less than 10%, the total installed wind power should not exceed the 40% of the mean annual power demand. The results of this paper are applicable to medium and great size isolated power systems, with particular features: (i) the power production is based on thermal power plants; (ii) the power demand exhibits intensive seasonal variations and is uncorrelated to the wind data; (iii) the mean annual power demand is greater than 10MW; and (iv) a high wind potential, presenting mean annual wind velocity values greater than 7.5ms-1, is recorded. (Author)

  2. Increase in Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Fentanyl-Rhode Island, January 2012-March 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Melissa C; Sumner, Steven A; Spelke, M Bridget; Bohm, Michele K; Sugerman, David E; Stanley, Christina

    2018-03-01

    This study identified sociodemographic, substance use, and multiple opioid prescriber and dispenser risk factors among drug overdose decedents in Rhode Island, in response to an increase in overdose deaths (ODs) involving fentanyl. This cross-sectional investigation comprised all ODs reviewed by Rhode Island's Office of the State Medical Examiners (OSME) during January 2012 to March 2014. Data for 536 decedents were abstracted from OSME's charts, death certificates, toxicology reports, and Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) databases. Decedents whose cause of death involved illicit fentanyl (N = 69) were compared with decedents whose causes of death did not involve fentanyl (other drug decedents; N = 467). Illicit-fentanyl decedents were younger than other drug decedents (P = 0.005). While more other-drug decedents than illicit fentanyl decedents had postmortem toxicological evidence of consuming heroin (31.9% vs 19.8%, P < 0.001) and various pharmaceutical substances (P = 0.002-0.027), third party reports indicated more recent heroin use among illicit fentanyl decedents (62.3% vs 45.6%, P = 0.002). Approximately 35% of decedents filled an opioid prescription within 90 days of death; of these, one-third had a mean daily dosage greater than 100 morphine milligram equivalents (MME/day). Most decedents' opioid prescriptions were filled at one to two dispensers (83.9%) and written by one to two prescribers (75.8%). Notably, 29.2% of illicit fentanyl and 10.5% of other drug decedents filled prescriptions for buprenorphine, which is used to treat opioid use disorders. Illicit-fentanyl deaths frequently involved other illicit drugs (e.g., cocaine, heroin). The proportion of all decedents acquiring greater than 100 MME/day prescription dosages written and/or filled by few prescribers and dispensers is concerning. To protect patients, prescribers and dispensers should review PMP records and substance abuse history prior to providing opioids.

  3. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  4. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL) of the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), University of Rhode Island is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  5. Strategies for Success of Women Faculty in Science: The ADVANCE Program at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishner, K.; Silver, B.; Boudreaux-Bartels, F.; Harlow, L.; Knickle, H.; Mederer, H.; Peckham, J.; Roheim, C.; Trubatch, J.; Webster, K.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF-funded ADVANCE program seeks to increase the recruitment and retention of women faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines as part of a national goal of creating a broad-based scientific workforce able to effectively address societal demands. The University of Rhode Island, a recipient of an Institutional Transformation ADVANCE grant in 2003, has begun a campus-wide initiative. The 5 goals are (1) to increase the numbers of women STEM faculty, (2) to provide faculty development opportunities, (3) to improve networks of professional and social support, (4) to assess the academic work environment for all faculty, and (5) to implement long-term changes throughout the university that promote a supportive work environment for women STEM faculty. Accomplishments during the first year include (1) hiring several ADVANCE Assistant Professors, (2) developing workshops on critical skills for junior faculty (grant writing, negotiations, mentoring), (3) initiating a series of lunch meetings where pertinent topical and work-family issues are discussed informally, (4) awarding small Incentive grants for research and other projects that enhance the careers of women STEM faculty, (5) developing and modifying university policies on family leave and dual career couple recruitment, (6) developing and implementing quantitative and qualitative assessment tools for baseline and ongoing campus-wide work climate surveys within the context of a theoretical model for change, and (7) offering directed self-study workshops for entire departments using a trained facilitator. The ADVANCE Assistant Professor position, unique to URI's program, allows a new hire to spend the first 2-3 years developing a research program without teaching obligations. ADVANCE pays their salary during this time, at which point they transition to a regular faculty position. During this first of five years of NSF funding, the ADVANCE program has been met with campus wide

  6. A High-Resolution Reconstruction of Late-Holocene Relative Sea Level in Rhode Island, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, R. B.; Engelhart, S. E.; Kemp, A.; Cahill, N.; Halavik, B. T.; Corbett, D. R.; Brain, M.; Hill, T. D.

    2017-12-01

    Studies on the US Atlantic and Gulf coasts have utilized salt-marsh peats and the macro- and microfossils preserved within them to reconstruct high-resolution records of relative sea level (RSL). We followed this approach to investigate spatial and temporal RSL variability in southern New England, USA, by reconstructing 3,300 years of RSL change in lower Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. After reconnaisance of lower Narragansett Bay salt marshes, we recovered a 3.4m core at Fox Hill Marsh on Conanicut Island. We enumerated foraminiferal assemblages at 3cm intervals throughout the length of the core and we assessed trends in δ13C at 5 cm resolution. We developed a composite chronology (average resolution of ±50 years for a 1 cm slice) using 30 AMS radiocarbon dates and historical chronological markers of known age (137Cs, heavy metals, Pb isotopes, pollen). We assessed core compaction (mechanical compression) by collecting compaction-free basal-peat samples and using a published decompaction model. We employed fossil foraminifera and bulk sediment δ13C to estimate paleomarsh elevation using a Bayesian transfer function trained by a previously-published regional modern foraminiferal dataset. We combined the proxy RSL reconstruction and local tide-gauge measurements from Newport, Rhode Island (1931 CE to present) and estimated past rates of RSL change using an Errors-in-Variables Integrated Gaussian Process (EIV-IGP) model. Both basal peats and the decompaction model suggest that our RSL record is not significantly compacted. RSL rose from -3.9 m at 1250 BCE reaching -0.4 m at 1850 CE (1 mm/yr). We removed a Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) contribution of 0.9 mm/yr based on a local GPS site to facilitate comparison to regional records. The detrended sea-level reconstruction shows multiple departures from stable sea level (0 mm/yr) over the last 3,300 years and agrees with prior reconstructions from the US Atlantic coast showing evidence for sea-level changes that

  7. Rhode Island hurricanes and tropical storms: A fifty-six year summary 1936-1991. Technical memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    The paper was compiled to provide a general overview of all tropical cyclone activity near Rhode Island since 1936. The year of 1936 is arbitrary, chosen mainly to include a 'not so well known' system prior to the well documented Great New England Hurricane of 1938. Thirty-one such storms have affected the state in the past 56 years, either making landfall along the coast of southern New England, or passing close enough over the offshore waters to spread tropical storm or hurricane force conditions into the area. The intensities of these systems have ranged from weak, disorganized tropical storms to full fledged major hurricanes. The one feature common to almost all of the storms was a rapid acceleration toward Rhode Island, which greatly reduced the time to prepare and evacuate

  8. Pawtuxet River, Warwick, Rhode Island. Local Flood Damage Reduction Study. Detailed Project Report for Water Resources Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Warwich (Belmont Park) Rhode Island. Cover Title Reads: Flood Damage Reduction IS. KEY WORDS (Ce൘.. asm towvee aide of mogoseem aid 1~110j IV MeMAw...cost of the premium paid by policy holders. The actual premium is less than the actuarial rate by the amount of the subsidy which represents one facet...coverage limits, therefore it was not necessary to calculate additional coverage premiums based on actuarial rates. The annual average subsidized

  9. Numerical simulation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Big River Management Area, central Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.

    2013-01-01

    The Rhode Island Water Resources Board is considering use of groundwater resources from the Big River Management Area in central Rhode Island because increasing water demands in Rhode Island may exceed the capacity of current sources. Previous water-resources investigations in this glacially derived, valley-fill aquifer system have focused primarily on the effects of potential groundwater-pumping scenarios on streamflow depletion; however, the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands have not been assessed, and such assessments are a requirement of the State’s permitting process to develop a water supply in this area. A need for an assessment of the potential effects of pumping on wetlands in the Big River Management Area led to a cooperative agreement in 2008 between the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Rhode Island. This partnership was formed with the goal of developing methods for characterizing wetland vegetation, soil type, and hydrologic conditions, and monitoring and modeling water levels for pre- and post-water-supply development to assess potential effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands. This report describes the hydrogeology of the area and the numerical simulations that were used to analyze the interaction between groundwater and surface water in response to simulated groundwater withdrawals. The results of this analysis suggest that, given the hydrogeologic conditions in the Big River Management Area, a standard 5-day aquifer test may not be sufficient to determine the effects of pumping on water levels in nearby wetlands. Model simulations showed water levels beneath Reynolds Swamp declined by about 0.1 foot after 5 days of continuous pumping, but continued to decline by an additional 4 to 6 feet as pumping times were increased from a 5-day simulation period to a simulation period representative of long-term average monthly conditions. This continued decline in water levels with

  10. The effect of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island property sales price

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Susan Shim

    This dissertation uses the hedonic pricing model to study the impact of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island house sales prices. The first two manuscripts are on lake water quality and use RI house sales transactions from 1988--2012. The third studies wind turbines using RI house sales transactions from 2000--2013. The first study shows that good lake water quality increases lakefront property price premium. It also shows that environmental amenities, such as forests, substitute for lake amenity as the property's distance from the lake increases. The second lake water quality study incorporates time variables to examine how environmental amenity values change over time. The results show that property price premium associated with good lake water quality does not change as it is constant in proportion to housing prices with short term economic fluctuations. The third study shows that wind turbines have a negative and significant impact on housing prices. However, this is highly location specific and varies with neighborhood demographics. All three studies have policy implications which are discussed in detail in the manuscripts below.

  11. Assessing Thermally Stressful Events in a Rhode Island Coldwater Fish Habitat Using the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Chambers

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly important to recognize historical water quality trends so that the future impacts of climate change may be better understood. Climate studies have suggested that inland stream temperatures and average streamflow will increase over the next century in New England, thereby putting aquatic species sustained by coldwater habitats at risk. In this study we evaluated two different approaches for modeling historical streamflow and stream temperature in a Rhode Island, USA, watershed with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, using (i original SWAT and (ii SWAT plus a hydroclimatological model component that considers both hydrological inputs and air temperature. Based on daily calibration results with six years of measured streamflow and four years of stream temperature data, we examined occurrences of stressful conditions for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis using the hydroclimatological model. SWAT with the hydroclimatological component improved modestly during calibration (NSE of 0.93, R2 of 0.95 compared to the original SWAT (NSE of 0.83, R2 of 0.93. Between 1980–2009, the number of stressful events, a moment in time where high or low flows occur simultaneously with stream temperatures exceeding 21 °C, increased by 55% and average streamflow increased by 60%. This study supports using the hydroclimatological SWAT component and provides an example method for assessing stressful conditions in southern New England’s coldwater habitats.

  12. Conversion, core redesign and upgrade of the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMeglio, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more Uranium-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with the fact that the conversion should be accomplished without serious degradation of reactor characteristics and capability, has resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during the course of its 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor are neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents an opportunity during the conversion to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper will present the preliminary conclusions of both aspects. (Author)

  13. Fiscal Year 1987 program report: Rhode Island Water Resource Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, P.C.

    1988-07-01

    The 1987 program objective was to conduct studies and research of value to the New England region as well as to assist in the solution of problems in the State of Rhode Island. Current and anticipated state and regional-water problems are contamination of surface and groundwater by natural radioactivity such as radon, by chemicals from industrial and agricultural activities, septic tank and leach field, improperly managed landfills and the lack of public awareness and public participation in water-quality protection and management. It was found in the 1987 program that an epithermal neutron-activation analysis was best suitable for measuring uranium and thorium of which radon is the decayed product. Lower U and Th were found in calc-alkalic and mafic volcanic rocks while higher concentrations were found in the alkalic and peraluminous rocks. A computer model using finite-element method to simulate fluid flows through fractured porous media was developed for predicting the extent of ground-water contamination in the State

  14. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Rhode Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Rhode Island. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  15. Sea-floor morphology and sedimentary environments in southern Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Nardi, Matthew J.; Andring, Matthew A.

    2015-09-09

    Multibeam echosounder data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration along with sediment samples and still and video photography of the sea floor collected by the U.S. Geological Survey were used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in southern Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, as part of a long-term effort to map the sea floor along the northeastern coast of the United States. Sea-floor features include rocky areas and scour depressions in high-energy environments characterized by erosion or nondeposition, and sand waves and megaripples in environments characterized by coarse-grained bedload transport. Two shipwrecks are also located in the study area. Much of the sea floor is relatively featureless within the resolution of the multibeam data; sedimentary environments in these areas are characterized by processes associated with sorting and reworking. This report releases bathymetric data from the multibeam echosounder, grain-size analyses of sediment samples, and photographs of the sea floor and interpretations of the sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. It provides base maps that can be used for resource management and studies of topics such as benthic ecology, contaminant inventories, and sediment transport.

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Providence Quadrangle, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zollinger, R.C.; Blauvelt, R.P.; Chew, R.T. III.

    1982-09-01

    The Providence Quadrangle, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Criteria for this evaluation were developed by the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Environments were recognized after literature research, surface and subsurface geologic reconnaissance, and examination of known uranium occurrences and aeroradioactivity anomalies. Environments favorable for authigenic uranium deposits were found in the Quincy and Cowesett Granites. An environment favorable for contact-metasomatic deposits is in and around the borders of the Narragansett Pier Granite where it intrudes the Pennsylvanian sediments of the Narragansett Basin. An environment favorable for authigenic deposits in metamorphic rocks is in a migmatite on the eastern edge of the Scituate Granite Gneiss batholith. Environments favorable for contact-metasomatic deposits occur at the contacts between many of the granitic rocks and metamorphic rocks of the Blackstone Series. Results of this study also indicate environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the rocks of the Narragansett Basin. Environments unfavorable for uranium deposits in the quadrangle include all granites not classified as favorable and the metamorphic rocks of eastern Connecticut. Glacial deposits and Cretaceous-Tertiary sediments remain unevaluated

  17. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-one. Rhode Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Rhode Island governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  18. Willingness of Rhode Island Dentists to Provide Limited Preventive Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Catherine Tuyet Mai; Shield, Renee R; Giddon, Donald B

    2016-07-01

    In response to the shortage of primary care physicians and the need for greater intercollaboration among health professionals, dentists with sufficient medical and surgical training are an untapped resource to provide limited preventive primary care (LPPC), such as chairside screening for chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to determine attitudes of Rhode Island dentists toward becoming more involved in the overall health of their patients. Using a 5-point scale (1 being highest), a pretested survey was administered to 92 respondent RI dentists who were asked to indicate their willingness to become more involved in patients' overall health, and undergo additional training to provide LPPC. Their moderate level of willingness was offset by great concern for liability, with older dentists being significantly more willing to assume these additional responsibilities than younger dentists (pstomiatrist was still dentist first, but with no significant difference between the mean ranks of dentist and oral physician.[Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login].

  19. Libraries, The locations and contact information for academic, private and public libraries in Rhode Island. The intention of this dataset was to provide an overview of data. Additional information pertinent to the state is also available from the RI Department of, Published in 2007, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Libraries dataset current as of 2007. The locations and contact information for academic, private and public libraries in Rhode Island. The intention of this dataset...

  20. Professor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    DEBAT: Danske bistandskroner skal øge den interregionale handel i Afrika - det skaber vækst i Afrika og indirekte handel med danske virksomheder, mener Henrik Hansen, professor ved Økonomisk Institut på KU.......DEBAT: Danske bistandskroner skal øge den interregionale handel i Afrika - det skaber vækst i Afrika og indirekte handel med danske virksomheder, mener Henrik Hansen, professor ved Økonomisk Institut på KU....

  1. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: REPTILES (Reptile and Amphibian Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for threatened/endangered sea turtles, diamondback terrapins, and rare reptiles/amphibians in coastal Rhode...

  2. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HABITATS (Habitat and Plant Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for eelgrass, macroalgae, submerged aquatic vegetation, and rare terrestrial plants in coastal Rhode...

  3. Food acquisition methods and correlates of food insecurity in adults on probation in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kimberly R; Tang, Alice M; Stopka, Thomas J; Beckwith, Curt G; Must, Aviva

    2018-01-01

    Individuals under community corrections supervision may be at increased risk for food insecurity because they face challenges similar to other marginalized populations, such as people experiencing housing instability or substance users. The prevalence of food insecurity and its correlates have not been studied in the community corrections population. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 2016, surveying 304 probationers in Rhode Island to estimate the prevalence of food insecurity, identify food acquisition methods, and determine characteristics of groups most at-risk for food insecurity. We used chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to assess differences in sociodemographics and eating and food acquisition patterns, GIS to examine geospatial differences, and ordinal logistic regression to identify independent correlates across the four levels of food security. Nearly three-quarters (70.4%) of the participants experienced food insecurity, with almost half (48.0%) having very low food security. This is substantially higher than the general population within the state of Rhode Island, which reported a prevalence of 12.8% food insecurity with 6.1% very low food security in 2016. Participants with very low food security most often acquired lunch foods from convenience stores (and less likely from grocery stores) compared to the other three levels of food security. Participants did not differ significantly with regards to places for food acquisition related to breakfast or dinner meals based upon food security status. In adjusted models, being homeless (AOR 2.34, 95% CI: 1.31, 4.18) and depressed (AOR 3.12, 95% CI: 1.98, 4.91) were independently associated with a greater odds of being in a food insecure group. Compared to having help with meals none of the time, participants who reported having meal help all of the time (AOR 0.28, 95% CI: 0.12, 0.64), most of the time (AOR 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.61), and some of the time (AOR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.98) had a lower odds of

  4. Food acquisition methods and correlates of food insecurity in adults on probation in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopka, Thomas J.; Beckwith, Curt G.

    2018-01-01

    Background Individuals under community corrections supervision may be at increased risk for food insecurity because they face challenges similar to other marginalized populations, such as people experiencing housing instability or substance users. The prevalence of food insecurity and its correlates have not been studied in the community corrections population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 2016, surveying 304 probationers in Rhode Island to estimate the prevalence of food insecurity, identify food acquisition methods, and determine characteristics of groups most at-risk for food insecurity. We used chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests to assess differences in sociodemographics and eating and food acquisition patterns, GIS to examine geospatial differences, and ordinal logistic regression to identify independent correlates across the four levels of food security. Results Nearly three-quarters (70.4%) of the participants experienced food insecurity, with almost half (48.0%) having very low food security. This is substantially higher than the general population within the state of Rhode Island, which reported a prevalence of 12.8% food insecurity with 6.1% very low food security in 2016. Participants with very low food security most often acquired lunch foods from convenience stores (and less likely from grocery stores) compared to the other three levels of food security. Participants did not differ significantly with regards to places for food acquisition related to breakfast or dinner meals based upon food security status. In adjusted models, being homeless (AOR 2.34, 95% CI: 1.31, 4.18) and depressed (AOR 3.12, 95% CI: 1.98, 4.91) were independently associated with a greater odds of being in a food insecure group. Compared to having help with meals none of the time, participants who reported having meal help all of the time (AOR 0.28, 95% CI: 0.12, 0.64), most of the time (AOR 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.61), and some of the time (AOR 0.54, 95% CI: 0

  5. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Neuhauser, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  6. An Initial evaluation of law enforcement overdose training in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Cory D; Zaller, Nickolas; Macmadu, Alexandria; Green, Traci C

    2016-05-01

    To assess initial change in knowledge, self-efficacy, and anticipated behaviors among Rhode Island law enforcement officers on drug overdose response and prevention. Law enforcement officers (N=316) voluntarily completed a pre-post evaluation immediately before and after taking part in overdose prevention and response trainings. Assessment items included measures of knowledge (Brief Overdose Recognition and Response Assessment (BORRA)), self-efficacy, attitudes toward drugs and overdose prevention, awareness of the Good Samaritan Law, and open-ended items pertaining to overdose knowledge and response behaviors. Non-parametric tests measured within-group and between-group differences. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests evaluated changes in BORRA scores and self-efficacy items. McNemar's tests assessed changes regarding the Good Samaritan law and open-ended items. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests measured post-training change in attitudes. Law enforcement officers demonstrated statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy (identifying signs of opioid overdose, naloxone indication, counseling witnesses in overdose prevention, and referring witnesses for more information), overdose identification knowledge (BORRA mean increased from 7.00 to 10.39), naloxone administration knowledge (BORRA mean increased from 10.15 to 12.59), Good Samaritan Law awareness (17.9% increase after training), and anticipated behaviors in response to future observed overdose (65.7% changed from passive to active response post training). Harm reduction programs can provide law enforcement officers with the knowledge and skills necessary to intervene and reduce overdose mortality. Given the statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy, attitudinal changes, and Good Samaritan law awareness, law enforcement officers are more prepared to actively interact with drug users during a drug-involved emergency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

  8. Retrospective analysis of heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island based on old and new herbarium specimens1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Sofia M.; Murray, David W.; Whitfeld, Timothy J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Herbarium specimens may provide a record of past environmental conditions, including heavy metal pollution. To explore this potential, we compared concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc in historical and new collections from four sites in Rhode Island, USA. Methods: We compared historical specimens (1846 to 1916) to congener specimens collected in 2015 at three former industrial sites in Providence, Rhode Island, and one nonindustrial site on Block Island. Leaf material was prepared by UltraWAVE SRC Microwave Digestion, and heavy metal concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy. Results: Heavy metal concentrations in the historical and new specimens were measurable for all elements tested, and levels of copper and zinc were comparable in the historical and 2015 collections. By contrast, the concentration of lead declined at all sites over time. Significant variability in heavy metal concentration was observed between taxa, reflecting their varied potential for elemental accumulation. Discussion: It seems clear that herbarium specimens can be used to evaluate past levels of pollution and assess local environmental changes. With careful sampling effort, these specimens can be a valuable part of environmental science research. Broadening the possible applications for herbarium collections in this way increases their relevance in an era of reduced funding for collections-based research. PMID:28090410

  9. Ground water input to coastal salt ponds of southern Rhode Island estimated using 226Ra as a tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M K; Moran, S B

    2001-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclide 226Ra (t1/2 = 1600 years) was used as a tracer to determine ground water input to Point Judith, Potter, Green Hill and Ninigret ponds in southern Rhode Island. Measurements of 226Ra activity were made in samples collected from salt ponds, pore waters, sediments, and local ground water wells during June-August, 1997. These results were combined with a simple box model to derive ground water input fluxes of 0.1-0.3 cm3 cm-2 d-1 (2-5 x 10(7) L d-1), which are comparable to previous estimates of ground water input to these ponds.

  10. Sea-floor geology in northwestern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Woods, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data, collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a 69-square-kilometer area of northwestern Block Island Sound, are used with sediment samples, and still and video photography of the sea floor, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at 43 stations within this area, to interpret the sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. Features on the sea floor include boulders, sand waves, scour depressions, modern marine sediments, and trawl marks. Boulders, which are often several meters wide, are found in patches in the shallower depths and tend to be overgrown with sessile flora and fauna. They are lag deposits of winnowed glacial drift, and reflect high-energy environments characterized by processes associated with erosion and nondeposition. Sand waves and megaripples tend to have crests that either trend parallel to shore with 20- to 50-meter (m) wavelengths or trend perpendicular to shore with several-hundred-meter wavelengths. The sand waves reflect sediment transport directions perpendicular to shore by waves, and parallel to shore by tidal or wind-driven currents, respectively. Scour depressions, which are about 0.5 m lower than the surrounding sea floor, have floors of gravel and coarser sand than bounding modern marine sediments. These scour depressions, which are conspicuous in the sidescan-sonar data because of their more highly reflective coarser sediment floors, are likely formed by storm-generated, seaward-flowing currents and maintained by the turbulence in bottom currents caused by their coarse sediments. Areas of the sea floor with modern marine sediments tend to be relatively flat to current-rippled and sandy.

  11. Native Bee Diversity and Pollen Foraging Specificity in Cultivated Highbush Blueberry (Ericaceae: Vaccinium corymbosum) in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Zachary; Ginsberg, Howard S; Alm, Steven R

    2016-12-01

    We identified 41 species of native bees from a total of 1,083 specimens collected at cultivated highbush blueberry plantings throughout Rhode Island in 2014 and 2015. Andrena spp., Bombus spp., and Xylocopa virginica (L.) were collected most often. Bombus griseocollis (DeGeer), B. impatiens Cresson, B. bimaculatus Cresson, B. perplexus Cresson, and Andrena vicina Smith collected the largest mean numbers of blueberry pollen tetrads. The largest mean percent blueberry pollen loads were carried by the miner bees Andrena bradleyi Viereck (91%), A. carolina Viereck (90%), and Colletes validus Cresson (87%). The largest mean total pollen grain loads were carried by B. griseocollis (549,844), B. impatiens (389,558), X. virginica (233,500), and B. bimaculatus (193,132). Xylocopa virginica was the fourth and fifth most commonly collected bee species in 2014 and 2015, respectively. They exhibit nectar robbing and females carried relatively low blueberry pollen loads (mean 33%). Overall, we found 10 species of bees to be the primary pollinators of blueberries in Rhode Island. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Nutrient, suspended sediment, and trace element loads in the Blackstone River Basin in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 2007 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Waldron, Marcus C.; DeSimone, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients, suspended sediment, and trace element loads in the Blackstone River and selected tributaries were estimated from composite water-quality samples in order to better understand the distribution and sources of these constituents in the river basin. The flow-proportional composite water-quality samples were collected during sequential 2-week periods at six stations along the river’s main stem, at three stations on tributaries, and at four wastewater treatment plants in the Massachusetts segment of the basin from June 2007 to September 2009. Samples were collected at an additional station on the Blackstone River near the mouth in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, from September 2008 to September 2009. The flow-proportional composite samples were used to estimate average daily loads during the sampling periods; annual loads for water years 2008 and 2009 also were estimated for the monitoring station on the Blackstone River near the Massachusetts-Rhode Island border. The effects of hydrologic conditions and net attenuation of nitrogen were investigated for loads in the Massachusetts segment of the basin. Sediment resuspension and contaminant loading dynamics were evaluated in two Blackstone River impoundments, the former Rockdale Pond (a breached impoundment) and Rice City Pond.

  13. Long-Term Ground-Water Levels and Transmissivity in the Blackstone River Basin, Northern Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Jack R.; Church, Peter E.; Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water provides about 7.7 million gallons per day, or 28 percent of total water use in the Rhode Island part of the Blackstone River Basin. Primary aquifers in the basin are stratified glacial deposits, composed mostly of sand and gravel along valley bottoms. The ground-water and surface-water system in the Blackstone River Basin is under stress due to population growth, out-of-basin water transfers, industrialization, and changing land-use patterns. Streamflow periodically drops below the Aquatic Base Flow standard, and ground-water withdrawals add to stress on aquatic habitat during low-flow periods. Existing hydrogeologic data were reviewed to examine historical water-level trends and to generate contour maps of water-table altitudes and transmissivity of the sand and gravel aquifer in the Blackstone River Basin in Rhode Island. On the basis of data from four long-term observation wells, water levels appear to have risen slightly in the study area during the past 55 years. Analysis of available data indicates that increased rainfall during the same period is a likely contributor to the water-level rise. Spatial patterns of transmissivity are shown over larger areas and have been refined on the basis of more detailed data coverage as compared to previous mapping studies.

  14. Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Smith, Thor E.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models of Pawcatuck River (26.9 miles) and Wood River (11.6 miles) were updated from the most recent approved U.S. Department of Homeland Security-Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) for specified flows and boundary conditions. The hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) using steady-state simulations and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood, which is the AEP determined for the 2010 flood in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers. The simulated WSEs were compared to high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 39 HWMs along the Pawcatuck River and 11 HWMs along the Wood River. The 2010 peak flow generally was larger than the 0.2-percent AEP flow, which, in part, resulted in the FIS and updated model WSEs to be lower than the 2010 HWMs. The 2010 HWMs for the Pawcatuck River averaged about 1.6 feet (ft) higher than the 0.2-percent AEP WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The 2010 HWMs for the Wood River averaged about 1.3 ft higher than the WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to observed 2010 HWMs provides a measure of the hydraulic model performance, which indicates the updated models better represent flooding at other AEPs than the existing FIS models.

  15. LIDAR Products, State of Rhode Island: LIDAR for the North East – ARRA and LiDAR for the North East Part II; LiDAR was collected in the Winter and Spring 2011 at a 1 meter or better nominal post spacing (1m GSD) for approximately 1,074 square miles of Rhode Island, whi, Published in 2012, 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — LIDAR Products dataset current as of 2012. State of Rhode Island: LIDAR for the North East – ARRA and LiDAR for the North East Part II; LiDAR was collected in the...

  16. 33 CFR 165.121 - Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: High... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION... Guard District § 165.121 Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode...

  17. Cryptorchestia ruffoi sp. n. from the island of Rhodes (Greece, revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Davolos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new Cryptorchestia species, Cryptorchestia ruffoi Latella & Vonk, sp. n. from the island of Rhodes in south-eastern Greece, can be distinguished on the basis of morphological and phylogenetic data. Morphological analysis and DNA sequencing of mitochondrial and nuclear protein-coding genes indicated that this species is related to C. cavimana (Cyprus and C. garbinii (Mediterranean regions, with a recent northward expansion. Results supported a genetic separation between the Cryptorchestia species of the east Mediterranean regions and those of the northeast Atlantic volcanic islands examined in this study (C. canariensis, C. gomeri, C. guancha, and C. stocki from the Canary islands, C. monticola from Madeira, and C. chevreuxi from the Azores. The Mediterranean and Atlantic Cryptorchestia species appear to be also morphologically distinct. Cryptorchestia ruffoi sp. n., C. cavimana, C. garbinii, and C. kosswigi (Turkish coast clearly have a small lobe on the male gnathopod 1 merus. This character was the main diagnostic difference between Cryptorchestia (sensu Lowry, 2013 and Orchestia. However, among the six northeast Atlantic island Cryptorchestia species only C. stocki has a small lobe on the merus of gnathopod 1. Reduction or loss of the lobe in the Atlantic Island species cannot be ruled out; however, molecular phylogenetic analysis leads us to presume that this lobe independently evolved between the east Mediterranean Cryptorchestia species and C. stocki from Gran Canaria.

  18. Forty Years of Excellence and Beyond. Proceedings of the Annual North East Association for Institutional Research (NEAIR) Conference (40th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 9-12, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Tiffany, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The NEAIR 2013 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Newport, Rhode Island, conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Aspiring to the Role of "Data Badass:" Some Thoughts on the Political Context of IR (Mark Freeman); (2) Data-Driven Internal Benchmarks and Successful Learning Outcomes (Mamta Saxena…

  19. Exposure to fentanyl-contaminated heroin and overdose risk among illicit opioid users in Rhode Island: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jennifer J; Marshall, Brandon D L; Rich, Josiah D; Green, Traci C

    2017-08-01

    Illicit fentanyl use has become wide spread in the US, causing high rates of overdose deaths among people who use drugs. This study describes patterns and perceptions of fentanyl exposure among opioid users in Rhode Island. A mixed methods study was conducted via questionnaire with a convenience sample of 149 individuals using illicit opioids or misusing prescription opioids in Rhode Island between January and November 2016. Of these, 121 knew of fentanyl and reported known or suspected exposure to fentanyl in the past year. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the first 47 participants. Study participants were predominantly male (64%) and white (61%). Demographic variables were similar across sample strata. Heroin was the most frequently reported drug of choice (72%). Self-reported exposure to illicit fentanyl in the past year was common (50.4%, n=61). In multivariate models, regular (at least weekly) heroin use was independently associated with known or suspected fentanyl exposure in the past year (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR)=4.07, 95% CI: 1.24-13.3, p=0.020). In interviews, users described fentanyl as unpleasant, potentially deadly, and to be avoided. Participants reporting fentanyl exposure routinely experienced or encountered non-fatal overdose. Heroin users reported limited ability to identify fentanyl in their drugs. Harm reduction strategies used to protect themselves from fentanyl exposure and overdose, included test hits, seeking prescription opioids in lieu of heroin, and seeking treatment with combination buprenorphine/naloxone. Participants were often unsuccessful in accessing structured treatment programs. Among illicit opioid users in Rhode Island, known or suspected fentanyl exposure is common, yet demand for fentanyl is low. Fentanyl-contaminated drugs are generating user interest in effective risk mitigation strategies, including treatment. Responses to the fentanyl epidemic should be informed by the perceptions and experiences of

  20. Availability of ground water in the lower Pawcatuck River basin, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Joseph B.; Johnston, Herbert E.; Malmberg, Glenn T.

    1974-01-01

    The lower Pawcatuck River basin in southwestern Rhode Island is an area of about 169 square miles underlain by crystalline bedrock over which lies a relatively thin mantle of glacial till and stratified drift. Stratified drift, consisting dominantly of sand and gravel, occurs in irregularly shaped linear deposits that are generally less than a mile wide and less than 125 feet thick; these deposits are found along the Pawcatuck River, its tributaries, and abandoned preglacial channels. Deposits of stratified sand and gravel constitute the principal aquifer in the lower Pawcatuck basin and the only one capable of sustaining yields of 100 gallons per minute or more to individual wells. Water available for development in this aquifer consists of water in storage--potential ground-water runoff to streams--plus infiltration that can be induced from streams. Minimum annual ground-water runoff from the sand and gravel aquifer is calculated to be at least 1.17 cubic feet per second per square mile, or 0.76 million gallons per day per square mile. Potential recharge by induced infiltration is estimated to range from about 250 to 600 gallons per day per linear foot of streambed for the principal streams. In most areas, induced infiltration from streams constitutes the major source of water potentially available for development by wells. Because subsurface hydraulic connection in the sand and gravel aquifer is poor in several places, the deposits are conveniently divisible into several ground-water reservoirs. The potential yield from five of the most promising ground-water reservoirs is evaluated by means of mathematical models. Results indicate that continuous withdrawals ranging from 1.3 to 10.3 million gallons per day, and totaling 31 million gallons per day, are obtainable from these reservoirs. Larger yields may be recovered by different well placement, spacing, construction and development, pumping practice, and so forth. Withdrawals at the rates indicated will reduce

  1. Perceptions of breast and cervical cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Roberta E; Risica, Patricia Markham

    2004-01-01

    This study explored perceptions of cancer, risk, and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in Rhode Island. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of 147 adults. Perceived risks for breast cancer were predominantly associated with carelessness about health care, trauma to the breast, and breastfeeding. Cervical cancer risks were mostly attributed to carelessness about health care and sexual behaviors. A strong sense of fatalism and embarrassment coexisted with positive beliefs about check-ups and screening. Participants cited confianza (trust, confidence) in their doctor, and their doctor's provision of information and explanations, as important factors in decreasing embarrassment and increasing their likelihood of getting screened. While familiarity with mammography and Pap testing was great among participants, many did not practice sustained, regular screening, and held misconceptions about tests and screening guidelines. Respondents' perceptions of having sufficient information often did not correspond to their having the accurate information necessary to promote informed screening decisions.

  2. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the UNC Recovery Systems Facility, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluitt, C.M.

    1981-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Recovery Systems Facility located near Wood River Junction, Rhode Island. At the time of the survey (August 1979) materials were being processed at the facility. Gamma ray data were collected over a 3.28 km 2 area centered on the facility by flying north-south lines spaced 60 m apart. Processed data indicated that detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with those expected from normal background emitters, except directly over the UNC Facility. Average exposure rates 1 m above the ground, as calculated from the aerial data, are presented in the form of an isopleth map. No ground sample data were taken at the time of the aerial survey

  3. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York-New Jersey Metropolitan Area - Volume 1, Geographic Information Systems data and Volume 2, Maps in Portable Document Format (NODC Accession 0014792)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York - New Jersey Metropolitan Area from 1999 to...

  4. Areas contributing recharge to production wells and effects of climate change on the groundwater system in the Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesz, Paul J.; Stone, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins in southern Rhode Island are an important water resource for public and domestic supply, irrigation, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rhode Island Department of Health, began a study in 2012 as part of an effort to protect the source of water to six large-capacity production wells that supply drinking water and to increase understanding of how climate change might affect the water resources in the basins. Soil-water-balance and groundwater-flow models were developed to delineate the areas contributing recharge to the wells and to quantify the hydrologic response to climate change. Surficial deposits of glacial origin ranging from a few feet to more than 200 feet thick overlie bedrock in the 24.4-square mile study area. These deposits comprise a complex and productive aquifer system.

  5. Violence Against Women: Injuries and Deaths in Rhode Island Yongwen Jiang, PhD; Deborah Debare, MMHS; Lynne-Marie Shea, BA; Samara Viner-Brown, MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongwen; DeBare, Deborah; Shea, Lynne-Marie; Viner-Brown, Samara

    2017-12-01

    Violence against women is a public health issue. Monitoring assault-related injury and homicide death among women is imperative for understanding this public health issue. We used data from the 2014 Rhode Island emergency department (ED), hospital discharge (HD), and 2004-2014 Rhode Island violent death reporting system (RIVDRS) to provide a broad picture for violence against women injuries and deaths in Rhode Island. ED visit and HD data show that the majority of female assault injuries occurred among women aged 25-44, resided in the core cities, and had public insurance. RIVDRS data showed that over half of the homicides among women were aged 25-64; nearly two in five were non-Hispanic black or Hispanic. Precipitating circumstances include intimate partner violence, a preceding argument or a conflict, and precipitated by another crime. Evidence-informed interventions need to target high-risk populations and urban areas to effectively reduce violence against women. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-12.asp].

  6. 78 FR 54621 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Island 02905. The purpose of the orientation meeting is to inform the newly appointed Committee members... information may contact the Eastern Regional Office at 202-376-7533. Persons needing accessibility services...

  7. Sedimentation and paleoecology of Pliocene lagoonal-shallow marine deposits on the island of Rhodes (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the depositional and paleontological characteristics of a section of the Pliocene Kritika Formation on the island of Rhodos is presented. The environmental significance of sedimentary structures, the paleoecology of benthonic Foraminifera, and the sequentional

  8. Comparative study of growth performance, meat quality and haematological parameters of Fayoumi, Rhode Island Red and their reciprocal crossbred chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abida Parveen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2001 unsexed day-old-chicks of each Fayoumi, Rhode Island Red (RIR, RIR × Fayoumi (RIFI and Fayoumi × RIR (FIRI were obtained from hatchery of Poultry Research Institute, Rawalpindi. The birds were maintained on deep litter system for a period of 20 weeks. The results revealed that the average day old weight was highest in RIR and FIRI, intermediate in RIFI and lowest in Fayoumi chickens. The RIR breed consumed more feed and gained maximum (P0.05 difference among pure and crossbred chickens. There was non-significant (P>0.05 difference in haematological values among all chickens. The total erythrocyte number, haemoglobin and packed cell volume increased with the advancement of age. However, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular haemoglobin values decreased gradually with the advancement of age. It may be concluded that crossbred chickens gained better body weight than Fayoumi and moderate than RIR chickens with lower mortality. The crossbred chickens of FIRI showed better performance in all traits than crossbred chickens of RIFI.

  9. Radioactive ground-water contamination from an enriched-uranium cold scrap recovery operation, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B.J.; Kipp, K.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid wastes from a uranium-bearing cold scrap recovery plant at an industrial site in Wood River Junction, Rhode Island were discharged to the environment through evaporation ponds from 1966 to 1980. Leakage from the polyethylene- and polyvinylchloride-lined ponds resulted in a plume of contaminated ground water that extends from the ponds northwestward to the Pawcatuck River through a highly permeable sand and gravel aquifer of glacial origin. Contaminants include: strontium 90, technetium 99, boron, nitrate and potassium. Water quality data from more than 100 observation wells indicate that the plume of contamination is approximately 700 meters long, 100 meters wide, and is confined to the upper 25 meters of saturated thickness where sediments consist of medium to coarse sand and gravel. No contamination has been detected in fine sands and silts underlying the coarser materials. Piezometric-head and water-quality data from wells screened at multiple depths on both sides of the river indicate that contaminants discharge both to the river and to a swampy area at the west edge of the river. Dilution precludes detection of contaminants once they have entered the river, which has an average flow of 5 cubic meters per second

  10. Long-term monitoring of growth in the Eastern Elliptio, Elliptio complanata (Bivalvia: Unionidae), in Rhode Island: A transplant experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, D.H.; Newton, T.J.; Green, L.

    2007-01-01

    The lengths of marked specimens of the freshwater mussel, Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata [Lightfoot 1786]), were monitored annually in 3 lakes in Rhode Island, USA, from 1991 to 2005. Mussels growing in Worden Pond showed a change in mean shell length of only 4.3 mm over 14 y, whereas mussel growth in 2 nearby lakes was 3 to 8x greater than growth in Worden Pond over the same time period. L???, the length at which shell growth stops, was significantly different (p < 0.001) among lakes and ranged from 60.5 to 87.4 mm. Transplant experiments revealed that mussels moved to Worden Pond stopped growing, whereas mussels moved from Worden Pond to the 2 other lakes grew at rates similar to the rates observed for resident mussels in the 2 lakes. Standard water-quality measures did not explain the observed growth cessation and lower condition indices of mussels in Worden Pond. Our growth data are consistent with food limitation. The consistent slow growth of E. complanata in Worden Pond, without high mortality, and its ability to increase growth when placed in environments more favorable than Worden Pond, suggests both growth plasticity and longevity in these animals. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  11. Semen quality parameters, their inter-relationship and post-washing sperm attributes of Rhode Island Red roosters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Richard Churchil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present experiments were conducted (a to evaluate the semen attributes of older Rhode Island Red (RIR roosters and the inter-trait relationships, (b to test sperm washing and storage duration suitable for gene transfer experiments. Materials and Methods: The semen characteristics of older RIR roosters were studied, and Pearson correlation analysis was done to demonstrate the inter-trait relationships. Progressive motility and percent live sperms were tested at different post-washing intervals to identify suitable sperm processing conditions for gene transfer experiments. Results: The volume, appearance score, initial motility, sperm count and percent live and abnormal spermatozoa were 0.38 ml, 3.58, 80.34%, 4.03 × 109 sperms/ml, 83.18% and 4.52% respectively. Positive correlation was observed among appearance score, motility, live sperm and sperm count. Semen volume is negatively correlated with all the other characters except live sperms, whereas, percent abnormal sperms negatively associated with all the other traits. Significant (p<0.05 decrease in terms of motility and live sperm was recorded at 60 min post-washing. Conclusion: The semen attributes of RIR roosters compares well with the other breeds of chicken. The appearance score can be used to assess fertility where microscopic evaluation facilities are limited. The sperm washing protocol tested in the experiment is suitable for gene transfer experiments.

  12. Trends in nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder reflect changing nitrogen inputs to Rhode Island, USA estuarine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruell, Richard J; Taplin, Bryan K; Miller, Kenneth M

    2017-05-15

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (δ 15 N) in juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, were used to examine changes in nitrogen inputs to several Rhode Island, USA estuarine systems. Fish were collected over two three-year periods with a ten-year interval between sampling periods (2002-2004 and 2012-2014). During that interval numerous changes to nutrient management practices were initiated in the watersheds of these estuarine systems including the upgrade of several major wastewater treatment facilities that discharge to Narragansett Bay, which significantly reduced nitrogen inputs. Following these reductions, the δ 15 N values of flounder in several of the systems decreased as expected; however, isotope ratios in fish from upper Narragansett Bay significantly increased. We believe that low δ 15 N values measured in 2002-2004 were related to concentration-dependent fractionation at this location. Increased δ 15 N values measured between 2012 and 2014 may indicate reduced fractionation or that changes in wastewater treatment processes altered the nitrogen isotopic ratios of the effluents. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2015-01-01

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2013 (October 1, 2012, through September 30, 2013) for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB) in the cooperative study. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages are equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2013 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2013.

  14. Results from a Community-Wide Pilot Program to Standardize COPD Education for Patients Across Healthcare Settings in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelland, Kimberly; Youssef, Rouba; Calandra, Kathleen; Cellar, Jennifer; Thiesen, Jennifer; Gardner, Rebekah

    2017-07-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with significant morbidity, decreased quality of life, and burdensome hospital admissions. Therefore, patients with COPD interact with clinicians in a number of healthcare settings. A coalition of healthcare practitioners in Rhode Island, in partnership with the local Quality Improvement Organization, designed and implemented a standardized, COPD education program for use across multiple healthcare settings. More than 60 organizations participated, producing 140 Master Trainers, who trained 634 staff members at their facilities from October 2015 through June 2016. Master Trainers were satisfied with the training, and we observed significant increases in knowledge scores post-training among all participants, which remained significant when stratified by setting. These results demonstrate that implementation of a community-based program to disseminate patient-centered, standardized COPD education in multiple healthcare settings is feasible. We hope this program will ultimately improve patient outcomes and serve as the foundation for expanding standardized education for other chronic conditions. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-07.asp].

  15. Population genetic analyses are consistent with the introduction of Ceramium secundatum (Ceramiaceae, Rhodophyta) to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Meghann R; Saunders, Gary W

    2015-11-01

    During ongoing DNA barcode (COI-5P) surveys of the macroalgal flora along the northwest Atlantic coast, we discovered a population of Ceramium secundatum in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA. This species is regarded as common and widespread in the northeast Atlantic, ranging from Norway to Morocco, but until now has not been reported from the western Atlantic. Several lines of evidence suggest that C. secundatum may be introduced to Narragansett Bay: (1) despite extensive collecting, specimens have only been obtained from a limited geographic range in the northwest Atlantic; (2) three other nonindigenous seaweed species are reportedly introduced in this region, which is thought to be a consequence of shipping; and (3) this species is introduced to South Africa and New Zealand. To investigate this suspected introduction, we applied population genetic analyses (using the cox2-3 spacer) to compare the Narragansett Bay C. secundatum population to native populations in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. Collectively, analyses of biogeographical and molecular data indicate that C. secundatum is likely introduced to Narragansett Bay. The implications of this discovery are discussed.

  16. Integrated use of surface geophysical methods for site characterization — A case study in North Kingstown, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole D.; Lane, John W.; Brandon, William C.; Williams, Christine A.P.; White, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    A suite of complementary, non‐invasive surface geophysical methods was used to assess their utility for site characterization in a pilot investigation at a former defense site in North Kingstown, Rhode Island. The methods included frequency‐domain electromagnetics (FDEM), ground‐penetrating radar (GPR), electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and multi‐channel analysis of surface‐wave (MASW) seismic. The results of each method were compared to each other and to drive‐point data from the site. FDEM was used as a reconnaissance method to assess buried utilities and anthropogenic structures; to identify near‐surface changes in water chemistry related to conductive leachate from road‐salt storage; and to investigate a resistive signature possibly caused by groundwater discharge. Shallow anomalies observed in the GPR and ERT data were caused by near‐surface infrastructure and were consistent with anomalies observed in the FDEM data. Several parabolic reflectors were observed in the upper part of the GPR profiles, and a fairly continuous reflector that was interpreted as bedrock could be traced across the lower part of the profiles. MASW seismic data showed a sharp break in shear wave velocity at depth, which was interpreted as the overburden/bedrock interface. The MASW profile indicates the presence of a trough in the bedrock surface in the same location where the ERT data indicate lateral variations in resistivity. Depths to bedrock interpreted from the ERT, MASW, and GPR profiles were similar and consistent with the depths of refusal identified in the direct‐push wells. The interpretations of data collected using the individual methods yielded non‐unique solutions with considerable uncertainty. Integrated interpretation of the electrical, electromagnetic, and seismic geophysical profiles produced a more consistent and unique estimation of depth to bedrock that is consistent with ground‐truth data at the site. This test case shows that using

  17. Competing priorities that rival health in adults on probation in Rhode Island: substance use recovery, employment, housing, and food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kimberly R; Must, Aviva; Tang, Alice M; Beckwith, Curt G; Stopka, Thomas J

    2018-02-27

    Individuals on probation experience economic disadvantage because their criminal records often prohibit gainful employment, which compromises their ability to access the basic components of wellbeing. Unemployment and underemployment have been studied as distinct phenomenon but no research has examined multiple determinants of health in aggregate or explored how these individuals prioritize each of these factors. This study identified and ranked competing priorities in adults on probation and qualitatively explored how these priorities impact health. We conducted in-depth interviews in 2016 with 22 adults on probation in Rhode Island to determine priority rankings of basic needs. We used Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory and the literature to guide the priorities we pre-selected for probationers to rank. Within a thematic analysis framework, we used a modified ranking approach to identify the priorities chosen by participants and explored themes related to the top four ranked priorities. We found that probationers ranked substance use recovery, employment, housing, and food intake as the top four priorities. Probationers in recovery reported sobriety as the most important issue, a necessary basis to be able to address other aspects of life. Participants also articulated the interrelatedness of difficulties in securing employment, food, and housing; these represent stressors for themselves and their families, which negatively impact health. Participants ranked healthcare last and many reported underinsurance as an issue to accessing care. Adults on probation are often faced with limited economic potential and support systems that consistently place them in high-risk environments with increased risk for recidivism. These findings emphasize the need for policies that address the barriers to securing gainful employment and safe housing. Interventions that reflect probationer priorities are necessary to begin to mitigate the health disparities in this population.

  18. Performance differences of Rhode Island Red, Bashang Long-tail Chicken, and their reciprocal crossbreds under natural cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shanshan; Yang, Xukai; Gao, Yahui; Jiao, Wenjie; Li, Xinghua; Li, Yajie; Ning, Zhonghua

    2017-10-01

    The Bashang Long-tail chicken (BS), an indigenous Chinese breed, is considered cold tolerant. We selected BS, the Rhode Island Red (RIR), and their reciprocal crossbreds for the present study. The objectives were: i) to validate whether BS is cold tolerant and whether egg production and cold tolerance of crossbreds could be improved; and ii) to determine the physiological characteristics that underlie cold tolerance and favorable egg production performance in cold environments. A total of 916 chickens were reared in warm and natural cold environments (daily mean ambient temperature varied from 7.4°C to 26.5°C in the warm environment and from -17.5°C to 27.0°C in the cold environment). To investigate their adaptability to the cold environment, the egg production performance and body weight were monitored and compared between breeds and environments. The cloacal temperature and serum biochemical parameters were monitored to reveal the physiological characteristics underlie cold tolerance and favorable egg production performance in the cold environment. The warm environment experiment showed that RIR had the highest egg production performance, and that the reciprocal crossbreds had a higher egg production performance than BS. While in the cold environment RIR had the lowest egg production performance, and the reciprocal crossbreds had a higher egg production performance than BS. In the cold environment BS and reciprocal crossbreds had higher triiodothyronine, tetraiodothyronine levels than RIR. At 35 and 39 wk of age, when the ambient temperature was extremely low (varied from -20°C to 0°C), serum glucose, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol of BS and crossbreds were higher than RIR. Bashang Long-tail chicken has a favorable cold tolerance ability. Crossbreeding with RIR and BS is an effective way to develop cold tolerant chickens with improved egg production performance.

  19. Geomorphic Identification and Verification of Recent Sedimentation Patterns in the Woonasquatucket River, North Providence, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    1954 52.0 465 Diane 8/19/1955 Tropical Storm 29 1965 35.4 438 1963-1967 (Statewide) Alma 6/14/1966 Extratropical 30 1996 42.4 438 10/20/1996...1960 9/12/1960 Extratropical Tropical Storm Hurricane (Cat 2) 34 1990 48.1 402 Bob 8/19/1991 Hurricane (Cat 2) 35 1964 29.2 401 1963-1967...Island to use the Scotch loom, a reproduction of a power loom used in Europe , and was also the first mill in the United States to produce worsteds

  20. More Rhode Island Adults Have Dental Coverage After the Medicaid Expansion: Did More Adults Receive Dental Services? Did More Dentists Provide Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Oh, Junhie

    2017-10-02

    Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion since 2014, 68,000 more adults under age 65 years were enrolled in Rhode Island Medicaid as of December 2015, a 78% increase from 2013 enrollment. This report assesses changes in dental utilization associated with this expansion. Medicaid enrollment and dental claims for calendar years 2012-2015 were extracted from the RI Medicaid Management Information System. Among adults aged 18-64 years, annual numbers and percentages of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental service were summarized. Additionally, dental service claims were assessed by provider type (private practice or health center). Although 15,000 more adults utilized dental services by the end of 2015, the annual percentage of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental services decreased over the reporting periods, compared to pre-ACA years (2012-13: 39%, 2014: 35%, 2015: 32%). From 2012 to 2015, dental patient increases in community health centers were larger than in private dental offices (78% vs. 34%). Contrary to the Medicaid population increase, the number of dentists that submitted Medicaid claims decreased, particularly among dentists in private dental offices; the percentage of RI private dentists who provided any dental service to adult Medicaid enrollees decreased from 29% in 2012 to 21% in 2015. Implementation of Medicaid expansion has played a critical role in increasing the number of Rhode Islanders with dental coverage, particularly among low-income adults under age 65. However, policymakers must address the persistent and worsening shortage of dental providers that accept Medicaid to provide a more accessible source of oral healthcare for all Rhode Islanders. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-10.asp].

  1. Macrophthalmus graeffei A. Milne Edwards, 1873 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Macrophthalmidae: a new Indo-Pacific guest off Rhodes Island (SE Aegean Sea, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. PANCUCCI-PAPADOPOULOU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new alien crab, the macrophthalmid Macrophthalmus graeffei, is reported from the eastern coastline of Rhodes Island. The species, of Indo-West Pacific origin, is known from muddy sediments up to about 80 m depth. In the Mediterranean, its presence has been observed along Levantine coasts as well as along the Turkish coast of the Aegean Sea.Macrophthalmus graeffei increases to twelve the number of alien brachyurans present in the Hellenic SE Aegean Sea, ten of them having Indo-Pacific origin.

  2. EFFECTS OF FEEDING Moringa stenopetala LEAF MEAL ON NUTRIENT INTAKE AND GROWTH PERFORMANCE OF RHODE ISLAND RED CHICKS UNDER TROPICAL CLIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aberra Melesse

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Moringa stenopetala leaf meal (MSLM on nutrient intake and weight gain (WG were evaluated. Forty unsexed Rhode Island Red chicks were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. The control diet (T1 (MSLM 0%, the experimental diets contained MSML at a rate of 2% (T2, 4% (T3, and 6% (T4 of the diets (as fed basis to replace 3%, 5.9% and 8.8% of the crude protein (CP of the control diet. Daily feed, dry matter and CP intake of the chicks fed MSLM diets were higher (p

  3. Online Hookup Sites for Meeting Sexual Partners Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Rhode Island, 2013: A Call for Public Health Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philip A; Towey, Caitlin; Poceta, Joanna; Rose, Jennifer; Bertrand, Thomas; Kantor, Rami; Harvey, Julia; Santamaria, E Karina; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Nunn, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Frequent use of websites and mobile telephone applications (apps) by men who have sex with men (MSM) to meet sexual partners, commonly referred to as "hookup" sites, make them ideal platforms for HIV prevention messaging. This Rhode Island case study demonstrated widespread use of hookup sites among MSM recently diagnosed with HIV. We present the advertising prices and corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs of the top five sites used by newly diagnosed HIV-positive MSM to meet sexual partners: Grindr, Adam4Adam, Manhunt, Scruff, and Craigslist. Craigslist offered universal free advertising. Scruff offered free online advertising to selected nonprofit organizations. Grindr and Manhunt offered reduced, but widely varying, pricing for nonprofit advertisers. More than half (60%, 26/43) of newly diagnosed MSM reported meeting sexual partners online in the 12 months prior to their diagnosis. Opportunities for public health agencies to promote HIV-related health messaging on these sites were limited. Partnering with hookup sites to reach high-risk MSM for HIV prevention and treatment messaging is an important public health opportunity for reducing disease transmission risks in Rhode Island and across the United States.

  4. Rhodes University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  5. Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in selected river reaches in the Pawtuxet River Basin, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Olson, Scott A.; Flynn, Robert H.; Strauch, Kellan R.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this event, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 56 river miles in the Pawtuxet River Basin to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) at specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled included the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Dry Brook, Meshanticut Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, Quidneck Brook, and two unnamed tributaries referred to as South Branch Pawtuxet River Tributary A1 and Tributary A2. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 using steady-state simulations. Updates to the models included incorporation of new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were assessed using high-water marks (HWMs) obtained in a related study following the March– April 2010 flood and the simulated water levels at the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP), which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the basin. HWMs were obtained at 110 sites along the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, and Quidneck Brook. Differences between the 2010 HWM elevations and the simulated 0.2-percent AEP WSEs from flood insurance studies (FISs) and the updated models developed in this study varied with most differences attributed to the magnitude of the 0.2-percent AEP flows. WSEs from the updated models generally are in closer agreement with the observed 2010 HWMs than with the FIS WSEs. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to

  6. Analysis of trends of water quality and streamflow in the Blackstone, Branch, Pawtuxet, and Pawcatuck Rivers, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 1979 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie, Jennifer G.; Mullaney, John R.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2017-02-21

    Trends in long-term water-quality and streamflow data from six water-quality-monitoring stations within three major river basins in Massachusetts and Rhode Island that flow into Narragansett Bay and Little Narragansett Bay were evaluated for water years 1979–2015. In this study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, water-quality and streamflow data were evaluated with a Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season smoothing method, which removes the effects of year-to-year variation in water-quality conditions due to variations in streamflow (discharge). Trends in annual mean, annual median, annual maximum, and annual 7-day minimum flows at four continuous streamgages were evaluated by using a time-series smoothing method for water years 1979–2015.Water quality at all monitoring stations changed over the study period. Decreasing trends in flow-normalized nutrient concentrations and loads were observed during the period at most monitoring stations for total nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate, and total phosphorus. Average flow-normalized loads for water years 1979–2015 decreased in the Blackstone River by up to 46 percent in total nitrogen, 17 percent in nitrite plus nitrate, and 69 percent in total phosphorus. The other rivers also had decreasing flow-normalized trends in nutrient concentrations and loads, except for the Pawtuxet River, which had an increasing trend in nitrite plus nitrate. Increasing trends in flow-normalized chloride concentrations and loads were observed during the study period at all of the rivers, with increases of more than 200 percent in the Blackstone River.Small increasing trends in annual mean daily streamflow were observed in 3 of the 4 rivers, with increases of 1.2 to 11 percent; however, the trends were not significant. All 4 rivers had decreases in streamflow for

  7. Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2006). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2006 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2006. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 42 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2006. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.60 to 26 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,600,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,500,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2006; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 15,000 to 100,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 22,000 to 180,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 24.6 milligrams per liter

  8. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2003 (October 1, 2002, to September 30, 2003). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2003 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2003. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 31 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2003. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.44 to 20 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,200,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,900,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2003; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 10,000 to 61,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 100,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 21.3 milligrams per liter

  9. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2004 (October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2004 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2004. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 27 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2004. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.42 to 19 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,100,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,700,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2004; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 12,000 to 61,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 17,000 to 100,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 24.8 milligrams per liter

  10. Streamflow, water quality and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2016-05-03

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2014 (October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014) for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Providence Water Supply Board in the cooperative study. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages are equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the Providence Water Supply Board and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the U.S. Geological Survey during WY 2014 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the Providence Water Supply Board are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2014.The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey) contributed a mean streamflow of 23 cubic feet per second to the reservoir during WY 2014. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.35 to about 14 cubic feet per second. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,200,000 kilograms of sodium and 2,100,000 kilograms of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2014; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 7,700 to 45,000 kilograms per year per

  11. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2012 (October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2012 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the PWSB were summarized by using values of central tendency and used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2012. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 26 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2012. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.40 to about 17 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,100,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,900,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2012; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 8,700 to 51,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 14,000 to 87,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected

  12. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2013-01-01

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2011 (October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2011 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2011. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 37 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2011. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.5 to about 21 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,600,000 kg (kilograms) of sodium and 2,600,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2011; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 9,800 to 53,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 90,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were

  13. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, water year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2018-05-11

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2015 (October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2015) for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Providence Water Supply Board. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages are equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 36 sampling stations by the Providence Water Supply Board and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the U.S. Geological Survey during WY 2015 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the Providence Water Supply Board are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2015.The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey) contributed a mean streamflow of 25 cubic feet per second to the reservoir during WY 2015. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.38 to about 14 cubic feet per second. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,500,000 kilograms of sodium and 2,400,000 kilograms of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2015; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 8,000 to 54,000 kilograms per square mile and from 12,000 to 91

  14. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the UNC Recovery Systems Facility, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island. Date of survey: August 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the UNC Recovery Systems facility located near Wood River Junction, Rhode Island. At the time of the survey (August 1979) materials were being processed at the facility. Gamma ray data were collected over a 3.63 km 2 area centered on the facility by flying north-south lines spaced 60 m apart. Processed data indicated that detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with those expected from normal background emitters, except at certain locations described in this report. Average exposure rates 1 m above the ground, as calculated from the aerial data, are presented in the form of an isopleth map. No ground sample data were taken at the time of the aerial survey

  15. Enhancing resiliency for elderly populations : Shelter-in-place planning and training at facilities serving elderly populations through the Rhode Island Senior Resiliency Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard; Mozzer, Michael; Albanese, Joseph; Paturas, James; Gold, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Elderly populations are disproportionately affected by disasters. In part, this is true because for many older adults, special assistance is needed to mitigate the consequences of disasters on their health and wellbeing. In addition, many older adults may reside in diverse living complexes such as long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities and independent-living senior housing complexes. Planning for each type of facility is different and the unique features of these facilities must be considered to develop readiness to deal with disasters. Based on this, the Rhode Island Department of Health established the Senior Resiliency Project to bolster the level of resiliency for the types of living facilities housing older adults. The project involves performing onsite assessments of energy resources, developing site-specific sheltering-inplace and energy resiliency plans, and educating and training facility employees and residents on these plans and steps they can take to be better prepared. Based on the feasibility of conducting these activities within a variety of facilities housing older adults, the project is segmented into three phases. This paper describes survey findings, outcomes of interventions, challenges and recommendations for bridging gaps observed in phases 1 and 2 of the project.

  16. Quantitative PCR assay to determine prevalence and intensity of MSX (Haplosporidium nelsoni) in North Carolina and Rhode Island oysters Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Ami E; Ford, Susan E; Gauthier, Julie D; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2012-12-27

    The continuing challenges to the management of both wild and cultured eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica populations resulting from protozoan parasites has stimulated interest in the development of molecular assays for their detection and quantification. For Haplosporidium nelsoni, the causative agent of multinucleated sphere unknown (MSX) disease, diagnostic evaluations depend extensively on traditional but laborious histological approaches and more recently on rapid and sensitive (but not quantitative) end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Here, we describe the development and application of a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for H. nelsoni using an Applied Biosystems TaqMan® assay designed with minor groove binder (MGB) probes. The assay was highly sensitive, detecting as few as 20 copies of cloned target DNA. Histologically evaluated parasite density was significantly correlated with the quantification cycle (Cq), regardless of whether quantification was categorical (r2 = 0.696, p < 0.0001) or quantitative (r2 = 0.797, p < 0.0001). Application in field studies conducted in North Carolina, USA (7 locations), revealed widespread occurrence of the parasite with moderate to high intensities noted in some locations. In Rhode Island, USA, application of the assay on oysters from 2 locations resulted in no positives.

  17. Assessment of Damage and Adaptation Strategies for Structures and Infrastructure from Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise for a Coastal Community in Rhode Island, United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Small

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of inundation, erosion, and wave damage for a coastal community in Rhode Island, USA. A methodology called the Coastal Environmental Risk Index (CERI was used that incorporates levels of inundation including sea level rise, wave heights using STWAVE, and detailed information about individual structures from an E911 database. This information was input into damage functions developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers following Hurricane Sandy. Damage from erosion was evaluated separately from local published erosion rates. Using CERI, two different adaptation strategies were evaluated that included a combination of dune restoration, protective berms, and a tide gate. A total of 151 out of 708 structures were estimated to be protected from inundation and wave action by the combined measures. More importantly, the use of CERI allowed for the assessment of the impact of different adaptation strategies on both individual structures and an entire community in a Geographical Information Systems (GIS environment. This tool shows promise for use by coastal managers to assess damage and mitigate risk to coastal communities.

  18. Alternations in Cholesterol and Fatty Acids Composition in Egg Yolk of Rhode Island Red x Fyoumi Hens Fed with Hemp Seeds (Cannabis sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaib Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of hemp seed (HS supplementation on egg yolk cholesterol and fatty acid composition in laying hens. Sixty hens (Rhode Island Red x Fyoumi were evenly distributed into four groups (three replicates per group at the peak production (34 weeks. HS was included into the ration at the level of 0.0 (HS-0, 15 (HS-15, 20 (HS-20, and 25% (HS-25 and continued the supplementation for consecutively three weeks. At the end of the experiment, three eggs per replicate were randomly collected and analyzed for egg yolk fatty acids and cholesterol profile. The statistical analysis of the result revealed that supplementation of HS-25 significantly (P<0.05 decreased egg yolk total cholesterol, myristic (C14:0, palmitic (C16:0, and stearic (C18:0. Similarly, total as well as individual monounsaturated fatty acids decreased significantly (P<0.05 while total and individual polyunsaturated fatty acids increased significantly in the HS-25. In addition, total omega-3 and omega-6 increased significantly in the HS-25 group. From the present result, we concluded that addition of HS at the rate of 25% to the diet of laying hens augmented the cholesterol and fatty acids profile in egg yolk.

  19. A Review of 20 Years of Research on Overdiagnosis and Underdiagnosis in the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-02-01

    The Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project represents an integration of research methodology into a community-based outpatient practice affiliated with an academic medical centre. The MIDAS project is the largest clinical epidemiological study using semi-structured interviews to assess a wide range of psychiatric disorders in a general clinical outpatient practice. In an early report from the MIDAS project, we found that across diagnostic categories clinicians using unstandardized, unstructured clinical interviews underrecognized diagnostic comorbidity, compared with the results of semi-structured interviews. Moreover, we found that the patients often wanted treatment for symptoms of disorders that were diagnosed as comorbid, rather than principal, conditions. This highlighted the importance, from the patient's perspective, of conducting thorough diagnostic interviews to diagnose disorders that are not related to the patient's chief complaint because patients often desire treatment for these additional diagnoses. While several of the initial papers from the MIDAS project identified problems with the detection of comorbid disorders in clinical practice, regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorder we observed the emergence of an opposite phenomenon-clinician overdiagnosis. The results from the MIDAS project, along with other studies of diagnosis in routine clinical practice, have brought to the forefront the problem with diagnosis in routine clinical practice. An important question is what do these findings suggest about the community standard of care in making psychiatric diagnoses, and whether and how the standard of care should be changed? The implications are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Experiences of three states implementing the Medicaid health home model to address opioid use disorder-Case studies in Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Wishner, Jane B; Allen, Eva H; Lallemand, Nicole; Epstein, Marni; Spillman, Brenda C

    2017-12-01

    The United States is facing an unprecedented opioid epidemic. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) included several provisions designed to increase care coordination in state Medicaid programs and improve outcomes for those with chronic conditions, including substance use disorders. Three states-Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont - adopted the ACA's optional Medicaid health home model for individuals with opioid use disorder. The model coordinates opioid use disorder treatment that features opioid agonist therapy provided at opioid treatment programs (OTPs) and Office-based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with medical and behavioral health care and other services, including those addressing social determinants of health. This study examines state approaches to opioid health homes (OHH) and uses a retrospective analysis to identify facilitators and barriers to the program's implementation from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders. We conducted 28 semi-structured discussions with 70 discussants across the three states, including representatives from state agencies, OHH providers (OTPs and OBOTs), Medicaid health plans, and provider associations. Discussions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo. In addition, we reviewed state health home applications, policies, regulatory guidance, reporting, and other available OHH materials. We adapted the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) model as a guiding framework to examine the collected data, helping us to identify key factors affecting each stage of the OHH implementation. Overall, discussants reported that the OHH model was implemented successfully and was responsible for substantial improvements in patient care. Contextual factors at both the state level (e.g., legislation, funding, state leadership, program design) and provider level (OHH provider characteristics, leadership, adaptability) affected each stage of implementation of the OHH model. States took a variety of approaches in

  1. Water-quality assessment of the New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island : environmental settings and implications for water quality and aquatic biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Nielsen, Martha G.; Robinson, Keith W.; Coles, James F.

    1999-01-01

    The New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island constitute one of 59 study units selected for water-quality assessment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. England Coastal Basins study unit encompasses the fresh surface waters and ground waters in a 23,000 square-mile area that drains to the Atlantic Ocean. Major basins include those of the Kennebec, Androscoggin, Saco, Merrimack, Charles, Blackstone, Taunton, and Pawcatuck Rivers. Defining the environmental setting of the study unit is the first step in designing and conducting a multi-disciplinary regional water-quality assessment. The report describes the natural and human factors that affect water quality in the basins and includes descriptions of the physiography, climate, geology, soils, surface- and ground-water hydrology, land use, and the aquatic ecosystem. Although surface-water quality has greatly improved over the past 30 years as a result of improved wastewater treatment at municipal and industrial wastewater facilities, a number of water-quality problems remain. Industrial and municipal wastewater discharges, combined sewer overflows, hydrologic modifications from dams and water diversions, and runoff from urban land use are the major causes of water-quality degradation in 1998. The most frequently detected contaminants in ground water in the study area are volatile organic compounds, petroleum-related products, nitrates, and chloride and sodium. Sources of these contaminants include leaking storage tanks, accidental spills, landfills, road salting, and septic systems and lagoons. Elevated concentrations of mercury are found in fish tissue from streams and lakes throughout the study area.

  2. Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island’s largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2005). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2005 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2005. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 30 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2005. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.42 to 19 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,300,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,000,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2005; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 13,000 to 77,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 19,000 to 130,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 25.3 milligrams per

  3. Simulated and observed 2010 flood-water elevations in selected river reaches in the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding and set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 33 river miles in Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins from the most recent approved Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) from specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled include the main stem of the Moshassuck River and its main tributary, the West River, and three tributaries to the West River—Upper Canada Brook, Lincoln Downs Brook, and East Branch West River; and the main stem of the Woonasquatucket River. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high-resolution land-surface elevation data, and flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate steady-state WSEs at the 1- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flows, which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the Moshassuck River Basin and the Woonasquatucket River, respectively. The simulated WSEs were compared to the high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in these basins in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 18 HWMs along the Moshassuck River and 45 HWMs along the Woonasquatucket River. Differences between the 2010 HWMs and the simulated 2- and 1-percent AEP WSEs from the FISs and the updated models developed in this study varied along the reach. Most differences could be attributed to the magnitude of the 2- and 1-percent AEP flows used in the FIS and updated model flows. Overall, the updated model and the FIS WSEs were not appreciably different when compared to the observed 2010 HWMs along the

  4. Re-designing an Earth Sciences outreach program for Rhode Island public elementary schools to address new curricular standards and logistical realities in the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, N.; Vachula, R. S.; Pascuzzo, A.; Prilipko Huber, O.

    2017-12-01

    In contrast to middle and high school students, elementary school students in Rhode Island (RI) have no access to dedicated science teachers, resulting in uneven quality and scope of science teaching across the state. In an attempt to improve science education in local public elementary schools, the Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (DEEPS) at Brown University initiated a student-driven science-teaching program that was supported by a NSF K-12 grant from 2007 to 2014. The program led to the development of an extensive in-house lesson plan database and supported student-led outreach and teaching in several elementary and middle school classrooms. After funding was terminated, the program continued on a volunteer basis, providing year-round science teaching for several second-grade classrooms. During the 2016-2017 academic year, New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were introduced in RI public schools, and it became apparent that our outreach efforts required adaptation to be more efficient and relevant for both elementary school students and teachers. To meet these new needs, DEEPS, in collaboration with the Providence Public School District, created an intensive summer re-design program involving both graduate and undergraduate students. Three multi-lesson units were developed in collaboration with volunteer public school teachers to specifically address NGSS goals for earth science teaching in 2nd, 3rd and 4th grades. In the 2017-2018 academic year DEEPS students will co-teach the science lessons with the public school teachers in two local elementary schools. At the end of the next academic year all lesson plans and activities will be made publically available through a newly designed DEEPS outreach website. We herein detail our efforts to create and implement new educational modules with the goals of: (1) empowering teachers to instruct science, (2) engaging students and fostering lasting STEM interest and competency, (3) optimizing

  5. Evaluating prediction uncertainty of areas contributing recharge to well fields of multiple water suppliers in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt River Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesz, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Three river basins in central Rhode Island-the Hunt River, the Annaquatucket River, and the Pettaquamscutt River-contain 15 production wells clustered in 4 pumping centers from which drinking water is withdrawn. These high-capacity production wells, operated by three water suppliers, are screened in coarse-grained deposits of glacial origin. The risk of contaminating water withdrawn by these well centers may be reduced if the areas contributing recharge to the well centers are delineated and these areas protected from land uses that may affect the water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rhode Island Department of Health, began an investigation in 2009 to improve the understanding of groundwater flow and delineate areas contributing recharge to the well centers as part of an effort to protect the source of water to these well centers. A groundwater-flow model was calibrated by inverse modeling using nonlinear regression to obtain the optimal set of parameter values, which provide a single, best representation of the area contributing recharge to a well center. Summary statistics from the calibrated model were used to evaluate the uncertainty associated with the predicted areas contributing recharge to the well centers. This uncertainty analysis was done so that the contributing areas to the well centers would not be underestimated, thereby leaving the well centers inadequately protected. The analysis led to contributing areas expressed as a probability distribution (probabilistic contributing areas) that differ from a single or deterministic contributing area. Groundwater flow was simulated in the surficial deposits and the underlying bedrock in the 47-square-mile study area. Observations (165 groundwater levels and 7 base flows) provided sufficient information to estimate parameters representing recharge and horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the glacial deposits and hydraulic conductance of streambeds. The calibrated value for recharge

  6. Simulation of the Effects of Water Withdrawals, Wastewater Return Flows, and Land-Use Change on Streamflow in the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Streamflow in many parts of the Blackstone River Basin in south-central Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is altered by water-supply withdrawals, wastewater-return flows, and land-use change associated with a growing population. Simulations from a previously developed and calibrated Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model for the basin were used to evaluate the effects of water withdrawals, wastewater-return flows, and land-use change on streamflow. Most of the simulations were done for recent (1996?2001) conditions and potential buildout conditions in the future when all available land is developed to provide a long-range assessment of the effects of possible future human activities on water resources in the basin. The effects of land-use change were evaluated by comparing the results of long-term (1960?2004) simulations with (1) undeveloped land use, (2) 1995?1999 land use, and (3) potential buildout land use at selected sites across the basin. Flow-duration curves for these land-use scenarios were similar, indicating that land-use change, as represented in the HSPF model, had little effect on flow in the major tributary streams and rivers in the basin. However, land-use change?particularly increased effective impervious area?could potentially have greater effects on the hydrology, water quality, and aquatic habitat of the smaller streams in the basin. The effects of water withdrawals and wastewater-return flows were evaluated by comparing the results of long-term simulations with (1) no withdrawals and return flows, (2) actual (measured) 1996?2001 withdrawals and wastewater-return flows, and (3) potential withdrawals and wastewater-return flows at buildout. Overall, the results indicated that water use had a much larger effect on streamflow than did land use, and that the location and magnitude of wastewater-return flows were important for lessening the effects of withdrawals on streamflow in the Blackstone River Basin

  7. Development and psychometric validation of the 'Parent Perspective University of Rhode Island Change Assessment-Short' (PURICA-S) Questionnaire for the application in parents of children with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junne, Florian; Ziser, Katrin; Mander, Johannes; Martus, Peter; Denzer, Christian; Reinehr, Thomas; Wabitsch, Martin; Wiegand, Susanna; Renner, Tobias; Giel, Katrin E; Teufel, Martin; Zipfel, Stephan; Ehehalt, Stefan

    2016-11-17

    High prevalence rates of childhood obesity urgently call for improved effectiveness of intervention programmes for affected children and their families. One promising attempt can be seen in tailoring interventions according to the motivational stages of parents as 'agents of change' for their children. Evidence from other behavioural contexts (eg, addiction) clearly shows the superiority of motivational-stage dependent tailored (behavioural) interventions. For the time-efficient assessment of motivational stages of change, this study aims to develop and psychometrically validate a 'Parent Perspective Version' of the existing University of Rhode Island Change Assessment-Short, an instrument assessing the motivational stages based on the theoretical fundamentals of the Transtheoretical Model of Psychotherapy. In a multistep Delphi procedure, involving experts from the study context, the original items of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment-Short Questionnaire will be transformed from the 'self-perspective' ('I am having a problem') to the parent perspective ('my child is having a problem'). Following item adaptation, the new version of the questionnaire will be psychometrically validated in a cohort of N=300 parents with overweight or obese children. Parents will be recruited within a multicentre and multisite approach involving private paediatric practices, specialised outpatient clinics as well as inpatient and rehabilitation sites. Analyses will include confirmatory factor analyses, internal consistencies (reliability) as well as convergent and criterion validity. Convergent validity will be analysed using subscales of the HAKEMP-90 Questionnaire, an instrument which has been shown to differentiate between 'state' and 'action' orientation of individuals. This study has been granted ethics committee approval by the University of Tuebingen (number 644/2014BO2). The results of this study will be released to the participating study centres and will be

  8. Developing a wintering waterfowl community baseline for environmental monitoring of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island [version 3; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty J. Kreakie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, the Atlantic Ecology Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development began an annual winter waterfowl survey of Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay. Herein, we explore the survey data gathered from 2004 to 2011 in order to establish a benchmark understanding of our waterfowl communities and to establish a statistical framework for future environmental monitoring. The abundance and diversity of wintering waterfowl were relatively stable during the initial years of this survey, except in 2010 when there was a large spike in abundance and a reciprocal fall in diversity. There was no significant change in ranked abundance of most waterfowl species, with only Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola and Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucllatus showing a slight yet significant upward trend during the course of our survey period. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS was used to examine the community structure of wintering waterfowl. The results of the NMDS indicate that there is a spatial structure to the waterfowl communities of Narragansett Bay and this structure has remained relatively stable since the survey began. Our NMDS analysis helps to solidify what is known anecdotally about the bay’s waterfowl ecology, and provides a formalized benchmark for long-term monitoring of Narragansett Bay’s waterfowl communities. Birds, including waterfowl, are preferred bioindicators and we propose using our multivariate approach to monitor the future health of the bay. While this research focuses on a specific area of New England, these methods can be easily applied to novel areas of concern and provide a straightforward nonparametric approach to community-level monitoring. The methods provide a statistic test to examine potential drivers of community turnover and well-suited visualization tools.

  9. 77 FR 30551 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... transmission grid on the Rhode Island mainland to Block Island. Deepwater Wind proposes to connect an onshore... Island LLC (Deepwater Wind) Transmission System (BITS) proposal submitted to the Bureau of Ocean Energy... electrical power from Deepwater Wind's proposed 30 megawatt (MW) offshore wind energy project located in...

  10. 美國羅德島州公立學校教育體系的源起與H. Barnard的教育作為(1800-1849) The Origin of Public School System of Rhode Island and the Accomplishments of H. Barnard (1800-1849

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    彭煥勝 Huan-Sheng Peng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available 本文以美國羅德島州為例,觀察其特殊的歷史文化背景對公立學校體系發展的影響,探討美國首次以州公款每年定期補助各地方公立學校教育發展之《免費學校法》(1800 年)的源起、挫敗經過。1828 年《學校法》再度頒布,奠定州議會教育經費補助地方公立學校教育發展之制度。1843 年州政府延攬H. Barnard主持羅德島州的公共教育事務,經過Barnard 的努力,開創羅德島首次強迫各地方徵收教育稅,以及解除各鎮自行徵收教育稅上限的規定,在州的教育補助經費、校舍建築與設備、教師素質與成長團體、教育視導制度等方面,皆有顯著的成效,建立起羅德島州的公立學校教育體系。 Taking the public school system of Rhode Island as an example, this research examines the influence of Rhode Island’s unique history and culture on the development of its public school system. It also examines the origin and setback of Free School Law in 1800, which first enacted periodical subsidies of every local public school. The School Act of 1828 was finally implemented, so that state assembly could found public schools. H. Barnard became the Commissioner of Public Schools in 1843. Under his administration, Rhode Island first mandated local governments to levy a tax on education and removed the upper limits of educational taxes collected by every town. In addition to funds, school buildings and facilities, the quality of teachers and their associating, and the educational supervision system had also developed and made a great deal of progress. The contribution of Barnard to the establishment of Rhode Island’s public school system has been marked ever since.

  11. 2015 State Geodatabase for Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  12. Point Judith, Rhode Island, Breakwater Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    output stations. Beach zones considered included the sandy beach to the west side of the HoR, which had significant dune features and was fronting...time dependency for crest height and wave parameters is assumed, hc = total damaged crest height of structure from toe , Lp is the local wave length...computed using linear wave theory and Tp, h is the toe depth, hc’ = total undamaged crest height of structure from toe , At = area of structure enclosed

  13. Level III Ecoregions of Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  14. PLANT INVASIONS IN RHODE ISLAND RIPARIAN ZONES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vegetation in riparian zones provides valuable wildlife habitat while enhancing instream habitat and water quality. Forest fragmentation, sunlit edges, and nutrient additions from adjacent development may be sources of stress on riparian zones. Landscape plants may include no...

  15. Level IV Ecoregions of Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  16. 2006 FEMA Lidar: Rhode Island Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. By positioning laser range finding with the use of 1...

  17. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may.... [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in the Atlantic Ocean and.... Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in the Atlantic Ocean from the...

  18. Nutrient and metal loads estimated by using discrete, automated, and continuous water-quality monitoring techniques for the Blackstone River at the Massachusetts-Rhode Island State line, water years 2013–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Jason R.; Granato, Gregory E.; Smith, Kirk P.

    2018-01-10

    Flow-proportional composite water samples were collected in water years 2013 and 2014 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, from the Blackstone River at Millville, Massachusetts (U.S. Geological Survey station 01111230), about 0.5 mile from the border with Rhode Island. Samples were collected in order to better understand the dynamics of selected nutrient and metal constituents, assist with planning, guide activities to meet water-quality goals, and provide real-time water-quality information to the public. An automated system collected the samples at 14-day intervals to determine total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, to provide accurate monthly nutrient concentration data, and to calculate monthly load estimates. Concentrations of dissolved trace metals and total aluminum were determined from 4-day composite water samples that were collected twice monthly by the automated system. Results from 4-day composites provide stakeholders with information to evaluate trace metals on the basis of chronic 4-day exposure criteria for aquatic life, and the potential to use the biotic ligand model to evaluate copper concentrations. Nutrient, trace metal, suspended sediment, dissolved organic carbon, and chlorophyll a concentrations were determined from discrete samples collected at the Millville station and from across the stream transect at the upstream railroad bridge, and these concentrations served as a means to evaluate the representativeness of the Millville point location.Analytical results from samples collected with the automated flow-proportional sampling system provided the means to calculate monthly and annual loading data. Total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads in water year (WY) 2013 were about 447,000 and 36,000 kilograms (kg), respectively. In WY 2014, annual loads of total nitrogen and total phosphorus were about 342,000 and 21,000 kg, respectively. Total nitrogen

  19. Access to Dental Care for Children in Rhode Island. Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Linda; Fontes, Janice; Ross, Maureen; Lawrence, Robin; Andrews, John; Kernan, Sharon; Leddy, Tricia; O'Bara, Joan; Young, John

    Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home, and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who are low income or uninsured. Noting that dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common preventable chronic childhood disease, this Kids Count issue brief considers the extent to…

  20. H10628: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound Corridor, Rhode Island, 1995-09-11

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  1. NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Connecticut and Long Island, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ Contract No....

  2. Diagenesis of arc-derived sandstones of Cretaceous formations in the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, Canada(MEMORIAL VOLUME TO THE LATE PROFESSOR TERUHIKO SAMESHIMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Yagishita, Koji

    1994-01-01

    Diagenesis of sediments derived from a magmatic arc provenance may greatly differ from that of sediments derived from an intracratonic- or foreland-type provenance. Sediments from the magmatic arc are compositionally immature and rich in volcanic and sedimentary rock fragments. Sandstone samples of mid- to Upper Cretaceous formations in the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, Canada, contain either large amounts of pseudomatrix or authigenic cements. An inverse relationship between the...

  3. Autonomia profissional dos professores

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Teresa P.; Veiga, Feliciano

    2007-01-01

    Este estudo pretendeu analisar as representações dos professores acerca da sua autonomia em contexto escolar, com recurso a uma amostra de 203 professores de ambos os sexos, pertencentes a escolas dos distritos de Lisboa, Setúbal, Leiria e Aveiro. Utilizou-se a Escala de Autonomia Profissional dos Professores (EAPP).

  4. Happy Birthday Professor Telegdi

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Professor Telegdi, pictured with Luciano Maiani and Alexander Skrinsky, receiving the medal of foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences in June 2000. Professor Valentine Telegdi celebrated his 80th birthday on Friday, 11th January. A brilliant American physicist of Hungarian origin, Professor Telegdi was a professor at the University of Chicago, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ) and the California Institute of Technology and took part in many CERN experiments, of which NA10 and L3 were the most recent. He served as Chairman of CERN's Scientific Policy Committee from 1981 to 1983. A member of numerous scientific academies, he shared the prestigious Wolf Prize with Maurice Goldhaber in 1991 in recognition of their separate seminal contributions to nuclear and particle physics, particularly those concerning weak interactions involving leptons.

  5. Coastal Barrier Resource Areas, Barrier Islands and Spits; s44gbb89; Barrier Beaches as defined by RI CRMC were barrier beaches as defined by RI CRMC were identified on quad maps and manually digitized from tablets, Published in 1989, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Coastal Barrier Resource Areas dataset current as of 1989. Barrier Islands and Spits; s44gbb89; Barrier Beaches as defined by RI CRMC were barrier beaches as defined...

  6. Rhode Island Hurricane Evacuation Study Technical Data Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    ... evacuation decision-making. To accomplish this, the study provides information on the extent and severity of potential flooding from hurricanes, the associated vulnerable population, capacities of existing public shelters...

  7. 78 FR 4967 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... 11/ 14/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through 10/31/2012. Effective..., Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major...

  8. Rhode Island 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2010. The data types...

  9. EFFECTS OF PHOTOSTIMULATION ON SEMEN PRODUCTION IN RHODE ISLAND ROOSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA LADOSI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In mammals the length of daylight has an oscillatory influence on semen production. It is known that in mammalian males highest semen output occurs mainly in spring and fall. It is possible that there is the same pattern in rooster semen production despite the anatomic differences regarding the testis location and, obviously local temperature. Considering these facts the present trial was set up in order to reveal effects of prolonged daylight – photo stimulation – on semen production in young roosters. All young roosters in the trial were divided in 3 groups, according to the age when photo stimulating schedule started. Photo stimulation was performed by moving young roosters from an 8h/day light to 14h / day light. Attempts of collecting semen up to the age of 20 weeks have failed showing relationship between body general development and semen output. Under prolonged light semen parameters as volume, motility and concentration changed from one week to the other. However, light is not the single factor inducing sexual maturity of the genital tract, but it could be used in young roosters in order to stimulate feed intake and thus overall body growth and development.

  10. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, NEWPORT COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  11. 78 FR 23278 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq. (the ``Stafford... magnitude to warrant a major disaster declaration under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency... Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and Households in...

  12. 77 FR 69648 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq. (the ``Stafford... magnitude to warrant a major disaster declaration under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency... Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  13. Rhode Island 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2005. The data types...

  14. Rhode Island 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2007. The data types...

  15. COASTAL STUDY, KENT COUNTY,RHODE ISLAND USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  16. COASTAL STUDY, BRISTOL COUNTY,RHODE ISLAND USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  17. 77 FR 67857 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    .... Effective Date: 11/03/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 01/02/2013. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan... that provide essential services of governmental nature may file disaster loan applications at the....125 Non-Profit Organizations Without Credit Available 3.000 Elsewhere For Economic Injury: Non-Profit...

  18. University of Rhode Island Regional Earth Systems Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, Lewis [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Cornillon, P. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The primary objective of this program was to establish the URI Regional Earth System Center (“Center”) that would enhance overall societal wellbeing (health, financial, environmental) by utilizing the best scientific information and technology to achieve optimal policy decisions with maximum stakeholder commitment for energy development, coastal environmental management, water resources protection and human health protection, while accelerating regional economic growth. The Center was to serve to integrate existing URI institutional strengths in energy, coastal environmental management, water resources, and human wellbeing. This integrated research, educational and public/private sector outreach Center was to focus on local, state and regional resources. The centerpiece activity of the Center was in the development and implementation of integrated assessment models (IAMs) that both ‘downscaled’ global observations and interpolated/extrapolated regional observations for analyzing the complexity of interactions among humans and the natural climate system to further our understanding and, ultimately, to predict the future state of our regional earth system. The Center was to begin by first ‘downscaling’ existing global earth systems management tools for studying the causes of local, state and regional climate change and potential social and environmental consequences, with a focus on the regional resources identified above. The Center would ultimately need to address the full feedbacks inherent in the nonlinear earth systems by quantifying the “upscaled” impacts of those regional changes on the global earth system. Through an interacting suite of computer simulations that are informed by observations from the nation’s evolving climate observatories, the Center activities integrates climate science, technology, economics, and social policy into forecasts that will inform solutions to pressing issues in regional climate change science, ‘green economy’ investment and climate policy. These project objectives were designed as part of a 5-year program, which would have constituted the initial phase for the establishment of the Center. Almost immediately (i.e. before receiving even the first year of funding) we were informed that we would not be receiving any funding beyond the initial phase; one year. This seriously impacted our ability to deliver on our objectives and, with that, a re-scoping of the Center priorities was designed to fit the 1-year constraints on funding. It was decided that, given the Center’s emphasis on building IAMs, the best way to proceed was to first focus on one particularly important component of the IAM – a natural sciences model that would be useful for research and forecasting of the circualation/ecology/biogeochemistry of RI’s coastal waters. We have succeeded on that necessarily more limited objective, as we will describe below.

  19. H01938: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. Professor Michael Levitt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma-Louise Davies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Professor Michael Levitt (Stanford University, USA won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems—computational tools which can calculate the course of chemical reactions. Professor Levitt was born in Pretoria, South Africa; he came to the UK on a summer vacation aged 16, where he decided to stay and study for his A‑levels. His interest in the physics of living systems drove him to study biophysics at King’s College London, before securing a PhD position at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. In the interim year between his degree and beginning his PhD, Professor Levitt worked at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, where he met his future wife. They married later that year and moved to Cambridge, where their three children were born. After completing his PhD, he spent time working in Israel, Cambridge, the Salk Institute and Stanford (both California. Since 1986, he has split his time between Israel and California. Outside of science, he is a keen hiker and he is well-known to have attended the eclectic ‘Burning Man’ Festival in California.[1] Professor Levitt visited the University of Warwick to speak at the Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference in March 2015. In this interview, Dr Gemma-Louise Davies, an Institute of Advanced Study Global Research Fellow, spoke to Professor Levitt about the importance of Interdisciplinarity in his field, role models in Academia, and his plans for the future. Image: Professor Michael Levitt (left with Dr Scott Habershon (right, organiser of the 2015 Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference during his visit to the University of Warwick in March 2015. [1] ‘Burning Man’ is a unique annual festival dedicated to community, art, music, self-expression and self-reliance. Tens of thousands of people flock to this temporary metropolis built in the Californian desert.

  1. Professor Torben Larsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    En samling af væsentlige artikler, og diskussion, om stormflod skrevet af professor Torben Larsen, Aalborg Universitet. Torben Larsen diskuterer i artiklerne et forslag om at lukke Thyborøn Kanal for at mindske risikoen for stormflod og oversvømmelse langs Limfjordens byer.......En samling af væsentlige artikler, og diskussion, om stormflod skrevet af professor Torben Larsen, Aalborg Universitet. Torben Larsen diskuterer i artiklerne et forslag om at lukke Thyborøn Kanal for at mindske risikoen for stormflod og oversvømmelse langs Limfjordens byer....

  2. H11321: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Buzzard Bay and Rhode Island Sound, Rhode Island, 2004-07-07

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  3. H11920: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound and Approaches, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, 2008-08-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. H11922: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound and Approaches, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, 2008-08-22

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  5. H11320: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Buzzard Bay and Rhode Island Sound, Rhode Island, 2004-06-23

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  6. Professor Tiina Tasmuth Helsingis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Tervisekasvatuse õppetooli professor Tiina Tasmuth osales 11.-14. juunini Helsingis toimunud rahvusvahelise konverentsi "2nd Psycho-Social Impacts of Breast Cancer" töös ning esines ettekandega teemal "Chronic post-treatment symptoms in patients with breast cancer" : [täistekst

  7. Professor Kalkman retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1991-01-01

    On 13 December 1990 Prof. Dr. Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman retired from the positions of Professor of Plant Systematics and Scientific Director of the Rijksherbarium/ Hortus Botanicus by presenting his valedictory lecture to the academic community of Leiden University and the assembled Dutch Botanical

  8. Professor Wolfgang Panofsky

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Professor Wolfgang panofsky, who died on September 24 aged 88, was a particle physicists and director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC) in California; with Jack Steinberger, he was the first to isolate the neutral pi meson, one of the subatomic particles which had been predicted by theoretical scientists to account for the strng force which binds the nuclei of atoms." (1 page)

  9. Professor og DMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Eigil

    2010-01-01

    Det er koldt, og det har det været længe. Sammen med sneen har det en selvforstærkende effekt på vintervejret, forklarer professor og meteorolog. Kulde: - Det er koldt, fordi vinden kommer fra et sted, hvor det er koldt. Det er den enkle forklaring på, at Danmark og store dele af Europa lige nu...... oplever meget lave temperaturer - og for Danmarks vedkommende en usædvanlig lang periode med vintervejr. Forklaringen kommer fra professor Eigil Kaas fra Niels Bohr Instituttet ved Københavns Universitet. Han forklarer til jp.dk, at vintervejret dog er betinget af den mere eller mindre tilfældige måde...

  10. Professor Alex Callinicos

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Saqer

    2016-01-01

    Professor Alex Callinicos is a renowned social theorist and scholar of international political economy. He conducts research on Marx and Marxism, European social and political theory, contemporary political philosophy, critical theory, historiography, and international political economy. His work provides invaluable insights on issues of race and racism, social justice, the Third Way, imperialism, austerity, and EU politics, among many other fascinating contemporary issues. Alex studied Philo...

  11. Professor Stewart's incredible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of - real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative - along with several you might have thought you couldn't think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart's guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes,

  12. Professor Alex Callinicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saqer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Professor Alex Callinicos is a renowned social theorist and scholar of international political economy. He conducts research on Marx and Marxism, European social and political theory, contemporary political philosophy, critical theory, historiography, and international political economy. His work provides invaluable insights on issues of race and racism, social justice, the Third Way, imperialism, austerity, and EU politics, among many other fascinating contemporary issues. Alex studied Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Balliol College, Oxford, and Philosophy of Science at the London School of Economics before writing a DPhil on Marx's Capital, also at Balliol. He was a Junior Research Fellow in Contemporary Social Thought at St Peter's College, Oxford from 1979 to 1981, after which he taught social and political theory at the Department of Politics at the University of York until 2005, when he moved to King's College London. Alex is currently the Professor of European Studies at King's and editor of International Socialism. Alex has been an active contributor to the development of the movement for another globalization, participating in the World Social Forum and an animator of the European Social Forum. Among his best known books are The Revolutionary Ideas of Karl Marx (1983, Against Postmodernism (1990, Social Theory (1999, An Anti-Capitalist Manifesto (2003, The Resources of Critique (2006, Imperialism and Global Political Economy (2009. His most recent book is entitled Deciphering Capital: Marx’s Capital and its Destiny (2014.

  13. Numerical simulation of the 2002 Northern Rhodes Slide (Greece) and evaluation of the generated tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniboni, Filippo; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Small landslides are very common along the submarine margins, due to steep slopes and continuous material deposition that increment mass instability and supply collapse occurrences, even without earthquake triggering. This kind of events can have relevant consequences when occurring close to the coast, because they are characterized by sudden change of velocity and relevant speed achievement, reflecting into high tsunamigenic potential. This is the case for example of the slide of Rhodes Island (Greece), named Northern Rhodes Slide (NRS), where unusual 3-4 m waves were registered on 24 March 2002, provoking some damage in the coastal stretch of the city of Rhodes (Papadopoulos et al., 2007). The event was not associated with earthquake occurrence, and eyewitnesses supported the hypothesis of a non-seismic source for the tsunami, placed 1 km offshore. Subsequent marine geophysical surveys (Sakellariou et al., 2002) evidenced the presence of several detachment niches at about 300-400 m depth along the northern steep slope, one of which can be considered responsible of the observed tsunami, fitting with the previously mentioned supposition. In this work, that is carried out in the frame of the European funded project NearToWarn, we evaluated the tsunami effects due to the NRS by means of numerical modelling: after having reconstructed the sliding body basing on morphological assumptions (obtaining an esteemed volume of 33 million m3), we simulated the sliding motion through the in-house built code UBO-BLOCK1, adopting a Lagrangian approach and splitting the sliding mass into a "chain" of interacting blocks. This provides the complete dynamics of the landslide, including the shape changes that relevantly influence the tsunami generation. After the application of an intermediate code, accounting for the slide impulse filtering through the water depth, the tsunami propagation in the sea around the island of Rhodes and up to near coasts of Turkey was simulated via the

  14. Weak convergence approach to the theory of large deviations approach to the theory of large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    PAUL DUPUIS is a professor in the Division of Applied Mathematics at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. RICHARD S. ELLIS is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

  15. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  16. Wanted: More Squares Among Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William H.

    1969-01-01

    Professors who see the world and life in a context of sincerely held religious beliefs should be given the same tolerance and understanding which atheists and agnostics used to demand for themselves. (AD)

  17. The College Professor's Professional Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Walter S.; Rubin, Harvey W.

    1977-01-01

    The growing number of professional liability suits against professors warrants a close examination of the need for and provisions of available insurance coverage. The evolution of tort liability, the question of negligence, and the professional liability policy are discussed. (LBH)

  18. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  19. H12009: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Block Island Sound, Rhode Island, 2009-05-19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. Student Evaluations of College Professors: Are Female and Male Professors Rated Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basow, Susan A.; Silberg, Nancy T.

    1987-01-01

    Over 1,000 undergraduates evaluated 16 male and female professors in terms of teaching effectiveness and sex-typed characteristics. Male students gave female professors significantly poorer ratings than male professors on the six teaching evaluation measures. Female students evaluated female professors less favorably than male professors on three…

  1. The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

  2. Teaching Ethos of Reference Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Marcel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses the teaching ethos of professors who are recognized for their good practice as trainers. The aim of our study is to analyze the influences of such professors’ professional constitution, as well as the explicit and/or tacit teaching knowledge they mobilize in their teaching practices. Based on Shulman, Gauthier, Tardif and Polanyi, we conducted interviews with three professors described by their students as reference. They were also observed in their classes, in the context of an undergraduate program in pedagogy at a public university. Data show similarities between the practices of the investigated professors, as well as a consistent description of their didactics, which is marked by intellective, moral, emotional and behavioral features.

  3. Professors of the New Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Profiles four professors who epitomize the increasing influence of academe on new technology-driven Internet business: a start-up maven, Steven Kaplan; a social psychologist, Michael Ray; a cyberlawyer, David Post; and an e-commerce expert, Andrew B. Whinston. (DB)

  4. ICT Use by Journalism Professors in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Elias Said

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses how journalism professors at Colombian universities use information and communications technologies (ICT) in their teaching. Survey data was obtained during the first trimester of 2009 from 63 professors in journalism departments and from a total of 865 professors who are affiliated with journalism departments at 29…

  5. City of Rhodes: residents' attitudes toward tourism impacts and development

    OpenAIRE

    Pappas, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important issues of research in tourism is the exploration of residents' attitudes in local communities, since viable and sustainable tourism development can only be successful when it serves the actual needs and demands of the destination’s population, and any tourism evolution is directly dependant on locals’ acceptance and support. The purpose of this paper is to examine the host population perceptions in the city of Rhodes toward economic, social, and environmental tourism...

  6. Professor dr hab. Maria Lisiewska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Stasińska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biography and scientific achievements of Professor Maria Lisiewska. She earned master’s degree and Ph.D. in natural sciences from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań. After earning her doctoral degree, she stayed at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań and conducted her thrilling research on mycology and taught until now. Prof. Maria Lisiewska is an author of many books, articles, and other scholarly reports.

  7. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  8. Island biogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittaker, Robert James; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Matthews, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Islands provide classic model biological systems. We review how growing appreciation of geoenvironmental dynamics of marine islands has led to advances in island biogeographic theory accommodating both evolutionary and ecological phenomena. Recognition of distinct island geodynamics permits gener...

  9. Feeding Dairy Cows to Increase Performance on Rhodes Grass Ley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irungu, K.R.G.; Mbugua, P.N.

    1999-01-01

    Majority of dairy farmers in Kenya produce milk from cows fed on roughage. The cow performance follows seasonal variability in quality and quantity of roughage. The objective of the current study was to increase cow performance and maintain productivity of a rhodes grass (chloris gayana) ley. Twenty-four Freisian cows in their second to third lactation were strip grazed on fertilized irrigated Rhodes grass at a stocking rate of 0.034 ha per cow. Four dietary groups of six cows were allocated to one of our diets. one group got no dairy meal while the other three groups were supplemented at a 1kg of dairy meal per 10, 5 and 2.5 kg of 4% fat corrected milk dairy. this amount to 0, 386, 750 and 1542 kg dairy meal (89.4%, DM, 93.7 OM, 16.8, CP and CF) during the lactation. during the 43 - week lactation, records on pasture nutrient yield, nutrient intake, milk yield, liveweight, reproduction and subsequent calf birth weight were collected. The Rhodes grass ley produced 20.7 (ranging from 16.7 to 28.7) t of dry matter (DM) per hectare and cows harvested 16.0 (12.0 to 24.0) t during the 43 weeks.The Rhodes grass contained 32.1, 87.7, 10.8, and 32.3% DM, organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP) and crude fiber (CF) respectively. Mean stubble of 4.7 (3.9 to 6.0) t DM per hectare was left at pasture. Feeding dairy meals significantly increased (P 0.05) affect batter fat content (3.78 to 3.96%). It maintained (P > 0.05) cow liveweight and increased (P < 0.05) calf birth weight from 32.7 to 37.2 kg. Feeding dairy meal did not affect oestrus cycling. Extreme supplementation, 1542 kg dairy meal, decreased (P < 0.05) fertility. Insemination per conception and calving interval increased (P < 0.05) from 1.5 to 3.5 and 522 days. The findings in the current study show that pasture yield can be increased by over 590% dry matter from 3.5 t obtained from natural pasture containing Kikuyu and Star grasses. The Rhodes grass yield can be increased to 232% of national average yield of 1300

  10. Attitudes towards bilingualism : the case of two Greek islands

    OpenAIRE

    Kostoulas-Makrakis, Nelly; Karantzola, Eleni; Athanassiadis, Elias

    2006-01-01

    Bilingualism, and more recently plurilingualism, is attracting considerable attention due to the increasing influx of people with different ethnolinguistic background to Western societies as well as the fact that we live in a globalised world. This study presents the results of a large-scale survey administered to 1,727 students enrolled in Greek schools in the islands of Rhodes and Symi during the scholastic year 2002-2003. Using an adapted version of Baker’s questionnaire ...

  11. Professor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    DEBAT: Land og by hænger uløseligt sammen - både i forhold til fødevareproduktion og -distribuering – men også i forhold til vores fælles natur. Når vi bor i byerne, er vi tæt forbundet og afhængige af de tjenester, som landbruget bidrager med – fødevarer, sikring af rent grundvand, bioenergi, re...

  12. professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Isabel Rodrigues Magalhães

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of classroom practices focused on scientific literacy as animportant outcome of schooling forces the re-thinking of science teacher’sformation. In this sense, this paper reports a study which involved theconception, development, implement and evaluation of an in-service program(IP focused on the Science — Technology — Society (STS education alongwith critical thinking (CT [STS/CT]. From the obtained results it was concludedthat the in-service program contributed for the teachers to (reconstructconceptions about Science, Technology and Society, to (reconstructknowledge related to the STS orientation and critical thinking and to promotetheir pre-disposition to implement STS/CTdidactic and pedagogic practices

  13. Many Rhodes: Travelling Scholarships and Imperial Citizenship in the British Academic World, 1880-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Tamson

    2011-01-01

    Since its Foundation in 1901, the Rhodes Scholarships scheme has been held up as the archetype of a programme designed to foster imperial citizens. However, though impressive in scale, Cecil Rhodes's foundation was not the first to bring colonial students to Britain. Over the course of the previous half-century, governments, universities and…

  14. Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: 143rd Tactical Airlift Group, Rhode Island Air National Guard, Quonset State Airport, North Kingstown, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    portions of the master plan and preliminary engineering for a new international airport for Lisbon, Portugal , estimated to cost $250 million. Self... sinES awtuc, SiC,9 @, Sta. 0.4.. Loc.’ el v t tim w . made weet of 66 water to. dril Sl thr0 g concrete.~ oa~~ 4.80 L0051 1.450, a. Di caes"J @tknwe...8217:par-i SI17. lilt)*~ fir, Sai~d. irav nir 1 ,l 111.-li 1s -w-i-l, a 6-Inch lent, Of coals ,- t. tint SANUI. li1tle Silt l(ll) GFIAPNhf SISCCULI/ O REMAR

  15. 'Supermentoring' of assistant professors' teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Ole

    Aarhus University offers a mandatory pedagogical training program for assistant professors, required in order to obtain tenure at a Danish university. At Business and Social Sciences, this program is supplemented by voluntary observation and (first of all formative) supervision of the assistant...... professors’ teaching practice. This offer is given is (i) because many young university teachers face problems putting pedagogical theory into practice – even though the program mentioned is practice-oriented, and (ii) because many of them (partly due to (i)) lack self-confidence as to teaching...

  16. Entrevista com professor Bertrand Badie

    OpenAIRE

    Mere Marques Aveiro, Thais

    2015-01-01

    Bertrand Badie é cientista político, professor na Sciences Po, Paris, pesquisador do CERI (Centro de Estudos e Pesquisas Internacionais), codiretor da coleção L’etat du monde, publicada anualmente desde 2010 e coeditor da Enciclopédia Internacional de Ciência Política. Entre 2002 e 2005, foi Diretor do Centro de Estudos Internacionais sobre a paz e resoluções de conflitos. Por dez anos (1994 –2003), foi Diretor das publicações da Sciences Po.Desde 2000, ministra o Curso Espaço Mundial que, a ...

  17. Interview with Professor Mark Wilcox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Mark Wilcox speaks to Georgia Patey, Commissioning Editor: Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist and Head of Microbiology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals (Leeds, UK), the Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds (Leeds, UK), and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile and the Head of the UK C. difficile Reference Laboratory for Public Health England (PHE). He was the Director of Infection Prevention (4 years), Infection Control Doctor (8 years) and Clinical Director of Pathology (6 years) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He is Chair of PHE's Rapid Review Panel (reviews utility of infection prevention and control products for National Health Service), Deputy Chair of the UK Department of Health's Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Committee and a member of PHE's HCAI/AR Programme Board. He is a member of UK/European/US working groups on C. difficile infection. He has provided clinical advice as part of the FDA/EMA submissions for the approval of multiple novel antimicrobial agents. He heads a healthcare-associated infection research team at University of Leeds, comprising approximately 30 doctors, scientists and nurses; projects include multiple aspects of C. difficile infection, diagnostics, antimicrobial resistance and the clinical development of new antimicrobial agents. He has authored more than 400 publications, and is the coeditor of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (5th/6th/7th Editions, 15 December 2007).

  18. Native and alien ichthyofauna in coastal fishery of Rhodes (eastern Mediterranean (2002-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Corsini-Foka

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhodes Island (southeastern Aegean is located in a geographically crucial region subjected to biological invasions. Among the 108 alien species recorded, 30 are fish, all of Indo-Pacific/Red Sea origin introduced via Suez through Lessepsian migration (Corsini-Foka et al., 2015; Corsini-Foka and Kondylatos, In press; Kondylatos and Corsini-Foka, In press. In this oligotrophic area, fishery production is limited, due to the paucity of species of commercial interest and their low abundance, while adapted infrastructures for fish landing and marketing are absent. Coastal fishery has dominated during the last twenty years (ELSTAT, 2015. Within 2002-2010, the Hydrobiological Station of Rhodes conducted experimental boat seining surveys, using exclusively a professional 12m fishing boat, at 5-30 m depth, in the Gulf of Trianda (sandy mud, Posidonia meadows. The 94 carried out hauls (7-18 hauls/year, produced a total fish biomass of approximately 4400 Kg, recording 97 fish (86 native, 11 alien and 4 cephalopod species (3 native, 1 alien. Fish species ranged from 32 to 63/year, whereas aliens ranged from 5 to 8 species. Almost steadily present since 2002, were earlier colonizers such as Apogonichthyoides pharaonis, Siganus rivulatus, Siganus luridus, Stephanolepis diaspros and more recent ones as Pteragogus trispilus, Sphyraena chrysotaenia and Fistularia commersonii, while Lagocephalus sceleratus, firstly recorded in 2005, occurred regularly since 2007; the presence of Lagocephalus suezensis, Sphyraena flavicauda and Upeneus pori was scattered since their first records in 2004-2005. Alien fish commercially important are the Siganids, S. chrysotaenia and surprisingly F. commersonii. In terms of biomass per haul, alien fish ranged from 0 to 18.5 Kg, native from 1.5 to 182 Kg. Catches were dominated by Centracanthidae (Spicara spp. and Sparidae (Boops boops, sometimes by other native such as Oblada melanura, Diplodus spp., Chromis Chromis and others. The

  19. Professor Gender, Age, and "Hotness" in Influencing College Students' Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Boswell, Stefanie S.; McCaleb, Kayla; Robertson, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    A sample of 230 undergraduate psychology students rated their expectations of a bogus professor (who was randomly designated a man or woman and "hot" versus "not hot") based on ratings and comments found on RateMyProfessors.com. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis: dedication,…

  20. Observations on Professor Hayek's Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig von Mises

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This memorandum was written at the request of Henry Hazlitt to provide Mises’s comments on and concerns about F.A. Hayek’s initial proposals for what became the Mont Pèlerin Society. Mises stresses that those who favor liberty and freedom and oppose totalitarianism must also oppose interventionism. The memo argues that those who fought and lost against the rising tide of totalitarianism at the turn of the 20th Century lost their battles because they settled for middle-of-the-road policies that conceded considerable ground to the socialists. The weak point in Professor Hayek’s plan is that it relies upon the cooperation of many men who are today’s middle-of-the-roaders. As interventionists, they may not be the hoped-for intellectual pioneers to inspire people to build a freer world.

  1. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  2. The Professors behind the MOOC Hype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolowich, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. Nearly half of the professors felt their online courses were as rigorous academically as the versions they taught in the classroom. The survey, conducted by "The…

  3. Professor Nukem - et eksperiment med oplevelsesbaseret forskningsformidling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Thorhauge, Anne Mette

    2007-01-01

    Professor Nukem er resultatet af et forskningsprojekt om oplevelsesbaseret forskningsformidling der har form som et computerspil med tilhørende website, hvor brugeren interaktivt kan engagere sig i forskning omkring sociale og kulturelle aspekter ved computerspil. Professor Nukem kan spilles på...

  4. Professor Kodi Husimi promoted accelerator projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of my article is to describe how deeply Professor Husimi devoted himself to promote large accelerator projects in Japan, as the establishment of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Photon Factory and TRISTAN, in which I myself was deeply involved. In addition, some topics related that I was a student of Professor Husimi are also reported. (author)

  5. The Reluctant Professor: Implications for University Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1973-01-01

    Stating the belief that most analyses of the university fail to deal realistically with the role of the professor, the author's purpose is to show why it is difficult and possible undesirable to involve professors deeply in issues of university government. (Author/JB)

  6. Remembering for tomorrow: Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mustafa Abdalla M

    2013-01-01

    This is a highlight of the obituary ceremony in tribute to Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb (1910 - 1973), organized by the Medical Students Association of the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Khartoum (U of K). Professor Haseeb has been the first Sudanese Professor and first Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. He was an outstanding humane teacher, mentor and researcher, and was awarded the international Dr. Shousha Foundation Prize and Medal by the WHO. He was also an active citizen in public life and became Mayor of Omdurman City. The obituary ceremony reflected the feelings of the medical community and included speeches by Professor Abdalla El Tayeb, President of U of K; the Dean, Faculty of Medicine; the Late Professor Haseeb's colleagues and students, His family representative, and an elegy poem.

  7. PROFESSORES: IMAGENS DO FUTURO PRESENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitê Alves Bezerra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ao observar a comunidade portuguesa que busca compreender a historicidade das formas e dos processos de escolarização por meio do estabelecimento de intenso diálogo com outras comunidades, é impossível não dar destaque à figura de António Manuel Seixas Nóvoa. Nascido em Lisboa no ano de 1954, aos 18 anos inicia o curso de Ciências da Educação na Universidade de Lisboa. Após lecionar em importantes universidades tais como Paris V, Oxford e Columbia University, atualmente acumula as posições de reitor da Universidade de Lisboa e professor catedrático da Faculdade de Psicologia e de Ciências da Educação na Instituição. Nóvoa tem se destacado à frente de debates internacionais a respeito da história da educação e educação comparada.

  8. Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This easterly looking view shows the seven major volcanic islands of the Canary Island chain (28.0N, 16.5W) and offers a unique view of the islands that have become a frequent vacation spot for Europeans. The northwest coastline of Africa, (Morocco and Western Sahara), is visible in the background. Frequently, these islands create an impact on local weather (cloud formations) and ocean currents (island wakes) as seen in this photo.

  9. In Conversation with: Professor Liz Thomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nelson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Editors Karen Nelson, John Clarke and Sally Kift interview Professor Liz Thomas,  Director of the Widening Participation Research Centre at Edge Hill University.  She is also Lead Adviser Retention and Success at the Higher Education Academy, England.   Professor Thomas was one of the keynote speakers at the 15th International First Year in Higher Education Conference held in Brisbane, Australia from the 26th – 29th of June, 2012.  Professor Thomas joined the Journal Editors at the conclusion of the main conference program to explore some of the key themes raised in her address.  

  10. Turning university professors into competent learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefanova, Eliza; Ilieva, Miroslava; Nikolova, Nikolina; Stefanov, Krassen

    2008-01-01

    Stefanova, E., Ilieva, M., Nikolova, N, & Stefanov, K. (2008). Turning university professors into competent learners. In H. W. Sligte & R. Koper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th TENCompetence Open Workshop. Empowering Learners for Lifelong Competence Development: pedagogical, organisational and

  11. Lifelong learning: Science professors need leadership training

    OpenAIRE

    Leiserson, Charles E.; McVinney, Chuck

    2015-01-01

    Education does not stop. Professors must update and develop their technical skills throughout their careers. But as they progress, few take the time — or are offered the opportunity — to become educated in how to be an effective leader.

  12. Professor dr hab. Anna Maria Bujakiewicz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kujawa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biography and scientific achievements of Professor Anna Bujakiewicz. After receiving her master’s degree and doctorate in biology and mycology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Professor Bujakiewicz continued her exciting research and teaching on mycology at her Alma Mater Posnaniensis for more than 50 years. Her publications in this field include many books, articles, and other scholarly reports.

  13. 75 FR 43478 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ...: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental.... Mail: Robin Biscaia, RCRA Waste Management Section, Office of Site Remediation and Restoration (OSRR 07... Delivery or Courier: Deliver your comments to: Robin Biscaia, RCRA Waste Management Section, Office of Site...

  14. Knowledge about Anabolic Steroids of Rhode Island Adolescents: Implications for Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, June

    Although anabolic steroids are associated with short term behavior and long term health problems, few schools address this issue. Adolescents were surveyed to determine their general knowledge of anabolic steroids, attitudes related to fair play, and interest in limiting anabolic steroid use. Data from 322 boys and 331 girls in grades 7-12 were…

  15. Imprint of the Past: Ecological History of Greenwich Bay, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because environmental problems are often caused by an accumulation of impacts over several decades or even centuries, it is necessary to look at the environmental history of an area to understand what happened, and why, before solutions can be devised. This case study of Greenwic...

  16. Temporal and spatial behavior of pharmaceuticals in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The behavior and fate of pharmaceutical ingredients in coastal marine ecosystems are not well understood. To address this, the spatial and temporal distribution of 15 high-volume pharmaceuticals were measured over a 1-yr period in Narragansett Bay (RI, USA) to elucidate factors a...

  17. Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  18. The Environmental Assessment and Management (TEAM) Guide; Rhode Island Supplement, Revised March 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    insulating varnish or enamel is applied onto the surface of a wire for use in electrical machinery 6. coil coating -- the application of a coating to any...methyl siloxanes 24. the perfluorocarbon compounds which fall into these classes: a. cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated alkanes b...cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated ethers with no unsaturations c. cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated tertiary

  19. SHALLOW HABITATS IN TWO RHODE ISLAND SYSTEMS: II. PATTERNS OF SIZE, STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL GROUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are examining habitats in small estuarine coves that may be important for the development of ecological indicators of integrity. We sampled nekton in Coggeshall Cove (shallow estuarine cove) in summer 1999 and 2000 and Ninigret Pond (coastal lagoon) in summer 2000. Coggeshall ...

  20. Emerging dragonfly diversity at small Rhode Island (U.S.A.) wetlands along an urbanization gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliberti Lubertazzi, Maria A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.

    2010-01-01

    Natal habitat use by dragonflies was assessed on an urban to rural land-use gradient at a set of 21 wetlands, during two emergence seasons (2004, 2005). The wetlands were characterized for urbanization level by using the first factor from a principal components analysis combining chloride concentration in the wetland and percent forest in the surrounding buffer zone. Measurements of species diversity and its components (species richness and evenness) were analyzed and compared along the urbanization gradient, as were distributions of individual species. Dragonfly diversity, species richness, and evenness did not change along the urbanization gradient, so urban wetlands served as natal habitat for numerous dragonfly species. However, several individual species displayed strong relationships to the degree of urbanization, and most were more commonly found at urban sites and at sites with fish. In contrast, relatively rare species were generally found at the rural end of the gradient. These results suggest that urban wetlands can play important roles as dragonfly habitat and in dragonfly conservation efforts, but that conservation of rural wetlands is also important for some dragonfly species.

  1. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, pelagic birds, passerine birds, gulls and...

  2. Centredale Manor Superfund Site in Rhode Island included on EPA List of Targeted for Immediate Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released the list of Superfund sites that Administrator Pruitt has targeted for immediate and intense attention. The Centredale Manor Restoration Project superfund site is one of the 21 sites on the list.

  3. H11988: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Providence, Rhode Island, 2009-08-13

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. Pediatric refugees in Rhode Island: increases in BMI percentile, overweight, and obesity following resettlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heney, Jessica H; Dimock, Camia C; Friedman, Jennifer F; Lewis, Carol

    2014-01-05

    To evaluate BMI change among pediatric refugees resettling in Providence, RI. Retrospective chart review of pediatric refugees from the initial evaluation to year 3 post-resettlement at Hasbro Children's Hospital. Primary outcome of interest was within person change in BMI percentile at each time point. From 2007-2012, 181 children visited the clinic. Initial prevalence of overweight and obesity was 14.1% and 3.2% versus 22.8% and 12.6% at year 3. From visit 1 and years 1-3, there was a positive mean within person change in BMI percentile of 12.9% (95% CI 6.3-19.6%s), 16.6% (95% CI 11.2-21.9%), and 14.4% (95% CI 9.1-19.7%). The prevalence of overweight and obesity increased from 17.3% at initial intake to 35.4% at 3 years post-resettlement to surpass that of American children (31.7-31.8% for 2007-2012). Refugee children have additional risk factors for obesity; multidisciplinary interventions must be designed to address nutrition at each visit.

  5. Marine Ecological Risk Assessment at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Ag mercury Hg arsenic As monobutyltin* MBT dibutyltin* DBT tributyltin * TBT Analyses performed by NOSC. See text for preparation and analysis...coprostanol (COPROS), benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), total parent PAHs (PSUM), and tributyltin ( TBT ). These particular analytes were chosen because of their known...in intertidal and subtidal sediments. Because TBT degrades fairly rapidly to less toxic DBT and MBT (Seligman et al., 1989), the relative quantities

  6. Geomorphic Identification and Verification of Recent Sedimentation Patterns in the Woonasquatucket River, North Providence, Rhode Island

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corcoran, Maureen K

    2007-01-01

    The Woonasquatucket River in North Providence, RI, is a postglacial river flowing approximately 18 miles from its headwaters in North Smithfield, RI, to Providence, RI, where it joins the Moshassuck...

  7. The Decline of the Autopsy in Rhode Island and Nationwide: Past Trends and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Alex; Anthony, Douglas

    2016-10-04

    The autopsy has long been a fundamental aspect of medical practice and research. However, in the last 50 years, the proportion of deaths for which an autopsy is performed has decreased dramatically. Here we examine some of the reasons for the decline of the autopsy, as well as several interventions that have been proposed to revive it. We also present autopsy utilization data from the Lifespan system, which mirrors nationwide trends. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-10.asp].

  8. 78 FR 51043 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... Determination of Sales History AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule revises the determination of sales history provisions currently prescribed under the cranberry... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 929 [Doc. No. AMS-FV-12-0042...

  9. 78 FR 28149 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Determination of Sales History AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... Cranberry Marketing Committee (Committee). This change would modify sales history calculations so that they... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 929 [Doc. No. AMS-FV-12-0042...

  10. A Rhode Island High School-University Partnership: Urban Students' Perceptions of College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly one third of U.S. students will fail to graduate from high school this year and another one-third will graduate without the skills needed to be successful after high school. These statistics are even more alarming for minority and low income students, with fewer than 10% of low income minority students going on to earn bachelors' degrees…

  11. 75 FR 5900 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... process and to encourage more diverse candidates on the Committee. The independent grower members and... independent growers on the Cranberry Marketing Committee (Committee). The order regulates the handling of... locally by the Committee. This rule would revise the nomination and balloting procedures for independent...

  12. 75 FR 18394 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... process and to encourage more diverse candidates on the Committee. The independent grower members and...: This rule revises the nomination and balloting procedures for independent growers on the Cranberry... the nomination and balloting procedures for independent growers to allow them to participate in the...

  13. Effects of Tide Stage on the Use of Salt Marshes by Wading Birds in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine how tide stage affects wading bird abundance, behavior, and foraging in three Narragansett Bay salt marshes (RI), we conducted surveys at 10-min intervals—across the full tidal range—during six days at each marsh in July/September of 2006. The wading bird community ...

  14. 76 FR 16322 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ...; telephone: (301) 734-5243, Fax: (301) 734-5275; or e-mail at: [email protected] or Kenneth.Johnson... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 929 [Docket No. AMS-FV-11-0011... Referendum AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Referendum order. SUMMARY: This document...

  15. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, KENT COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND (ALL JURISDICTIONS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  16. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for bridges, state borders, airports, aquaculture sites, beaches, boat ramps, commercial fishing sites, Coast Guard,...

  17. Coenzyme Q10 and soyphosphatidylcholine in EK extender on preservation of Rhode Island Red poultry semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Nath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of EK extender alone or incorporation with CoenzymeQ10 (CoQ10 and/or soyphosphatidylcholine (SPC in poultry semen and their effects on seminal traits during temporal storage at 4⁰C for different time intervals (12 h, 24 h, and 36 h. Heterospermic pooled semen samples diluted (1:4 with EK, EK + SPC, EK+ CoQ10 and EK + SPC + CoQ10 extenders separately, preserved and different spermiogram were assessed. Various seminal traits within the same extender differ significantly (p<0.05 among different groups and with different time intervals of storage. CoQ10 and SPC in the EK extender exhibited favorable synergistic effect on sperm quality and were able to protect the male gametes against cold-stress up to 36h at 4⁰C. In this study, we concluded that incorporation of SPC and CoQ10 together in EK extender possess novel potentiality to maintain seminal quality during liquid storage of poultry semen at 4⁰C and for their safe transportation and further use for Artificial Reproductive technologies (ARTs.

  18. Hydrodynamic Modeling for Channel and Shoreline Stabilization at Rhodes Point, Smith Island, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    γβ), and 1,−sξ is the Iribarren parameter based on the first negative moment wave period: , , tan s s m φξ H L   1 1 0 (3-17) with ,, m m...capabilities of CMS-Wave: A coastal wave model for inlets and navigation projects. In Proceedings, Symposium to Honor Dr. Nicholas Kraus. Journal of Coastal

  19. 78 FR 63383 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island: Prevention of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ...; Final Rule.'' 75 FR 82536 (Dec. 30, 2010). A. GHG-Related Actions EPA has recently undertaken a series... appropriate circuit by December 23, 2013. Filing a petition for reconsideration by the Administrator of this... comment in response to the parallel notice of proposed rulemaking for this action published in the...

  20. 77 FR 14691 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    .... Specifically, the requirement does not apply to cold cleaning machines: (1) Used in ``special and extreme... products; 2. Requirements for charcoal lighter materials, aerosol adhesives and floor wax strippers; 3...). This APC regulation applies to anyone that solicits the use of or applies asphalt for road paving...

  1. 2011 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic Lidar: Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is a combination of 3 separate FEMA collections (Blackstone, Charles-Quincy and Narragansett) with similar specifications. See the Ground Control...

  2. H08394: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Mount Hope Bay, Rhode Island, 1963-06-07

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2081 - EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... liquids marketing and storage 2/22/77 5/07/81 46 FR 25446 (c)(12) 7/05/79 5/07/81 46 FR 25446 (c)(12) 4/22.../31/90 55 FR 35625 (c)(36) RACT determination for Tillotson-Pearson under 15.5. 4/24/90 9/6/90 55 FR...

  4. COMPARISON OF GENKENSIA DEMISSA (DILLWYN) POPULATIONS IN RHODE ISLAND FRINGE MARSHES WITH VARYING NITROGEN LOADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased residential development in coastal watersheds has led to increases in anthropogenic nitrogen inputs into estuaries. Sessile bivalves are good candidate organisms to examine animal condition in nutrient-enriched areas because they contribute significantly to energy flow...

  5. Understanding the "How" of Quality Improvement: Lessons from the Rhode Island Program Quality Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, Elizabeth; Smith, Charles; Wong, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, afterschool and youth development programming has moved from providing childcare for working parents to being an integral component of the learning day, supporting the academic, social, and emotional development of young people. An important part of that transition has been a growing emphasis on improving program quality.…

  6. Quantifying contributions to light attenuation in estuaries and coastal embayments: Application to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Narragansett Bay, light attenuation by total suspended sediments (TSS), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and phytoplankton chlorophyll-a (chl-a) pigment is 129, 97, and 70%, respectively, of that by pure seawater. Spatial distribution of light attenuation indicates hig...

  7. Adaptive Management of Urban Ecosystem Restoration: Learning From Restoration Managers in Rhode Island, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban aquatic restoration can be difficult to accomplish because of complications like industrial pollutants, population density, infrastructure, and expense; however, unique opportunities in urban settings, including the potential to provide benefits to many diverse people, can ...

  8. 77 FR 37653 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Centers for Arizona, Maryland and Rhode Island...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... committed local partners and demonstrated experience of the leadership team in manufacturing, outreach and.../FR-2008-02-11/pdf/E8-2482.pdf . Employer/Taxpayer Identification Number (EIN/TIN), Dun and Bradstreet...

  9. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2010, 2010 state, Rhode Island, 2010 Census Block State-based

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  10. 75 FR 51832 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... concerning Federal funds provided under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency... Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to... Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050, Presidentially Declared...

  11. 75 FR 51836 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... concerning Federal funds provided under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency... Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and Households in Presidentially Declared Disaster Areas; 97.049, Presidentially Declared Disaster Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for...

  12. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INDEX (Index Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the boundaries of the U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000 topographic maps and other map and digital data boundaries...

  13. F00270: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Rhode Island, 1984-09-27

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  14. 75 FR 43409 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ...--Statistical Methods for Evaluating Ground-Water Monitoring Data from Hazardous Waste Facilities, 53 FR 39720... Refining Primary and Secondary Oil/Water/Solids Separation Sludge Listings, 56 FR 21955, May 13, 1991: Rule... handle hazardous sludges as hazardous wastes when they leave the zero discharge unit. Whether this...

  15. Diagnosis of potential stressors adversely affecting benthic invertebrate communities in Greenwich Bay, Rhode Island, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwich Bay is an urbanized embayment of Narragansett Bay potentially impacted by multiple stressors. The present study identified the important stressors affecting Greenwich Bay benthic fauna. First, existing data and information were used to confirm that the waterbody was imp...

  16. 2014 NOAA Post-Sandy Topobathymetric Lidar: Void DEMs Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These lidar data were collected by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Geodetic Survey Remote Sensing Division using a Riegl VQ820G system. The...

  17. 2010 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic Lidar: Coastal Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. H10788: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Point Judith, Rhode Island, 1997-11-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  19. 77 FR 20330 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... instructions for submitting comments. Email: david.b.olson@usace.army.mil . Include the docket number COE- 2012.... Olson), 441 G Street NW., Washington, DC 20314-1000. Hand Delivery/Courier: Due to security requirements...: Mr. David Olson, Headquarters, Operations and Regulatory Community of Practice, Washington, DC at 202...

  20. 77 FR 11798 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ...., sulfates, nitrates, organic carbon, elemental carbon, and soil dust), which also impair visibility by... Quality Model: The EPA's Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.5.1 is a photochemical...

  1. H11310: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, 2004-07-29

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  2. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains management area data for National Estuarine Research Reserves, wildlife refuges, wildlife management areas, state/regional parks, state...

  3. Providence 10 x 20 NTMS area, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Providence 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 318 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 180 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include: water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Ci, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from 1.2 to 61.7 ppM with an average of 4.5 ppM. A group of high uranium concentrations was found in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. These sites also had high concentrations of thorium and rare-earth elements that indicate the presence of a sand with a high proportion of heavy minerals

  4. A MASS BALANCE OF SURFACE WATER GENOTOXICITY IN PROVIDENCE RIVER (RHODE ISLAND USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White and Rasmussen (Mutation Res. 410:223-236) used a mass balance approach to demonstrate that over 85% of the total genotoxic loading to the St. Lawrence River at Montreal is non-industrial. To validate the mass balance approach and investigate the sources of genotoxins in sur...

  5. H08396: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Mount Hope Bay, Rhode Island, 1957-10-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  6. Accounting Professor Qualification in Digital Age: A Perception Study on Brazilian Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendruscolo, Maria Ivanice; Behar, Patrícia Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    This papers aims at analyzing the perception of Accounting professors about the necessary qualifications in Accounting undergraduate courses. The contribution of this study is to theoretically discuss the education of Accounting professors, with empirical data, because Accounting teaching requires specific competencies in the digital area. The…

  7. Satisfaction among accounting professors in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Sousa Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of satisfaction among accounting professors in Brazil throughout their careers. The research is classified as descriptive and used a quantitative approach to data analysis. 641 valid responses were obtained from professors from all regions of Brazil. The results show that a feeling of satisfaction prevails among accounting course professors, as most of them “like the profession” and, in general, "are satisfied with it”. It was found that levels of satisfaction are higher among individuals with more experience, in that in their first years in the job (one to three years, professors have lower satisfaction rates; the highest levels of satisfaction are found in the final stage (over 35 years. The main factor that influences satisfaction is personal fulfillment (teaching work and relationship with students. It was also possible to identify that positive feelings about teaching predominate (67.3% compared to negative ones (32.7%. These results show the need for greater attention to be paid in the early years of the career in order to avoid a "reality clash". They also show the need for other studies to investigate how the phases in the life cycle of accounting professors are characterized.

  8. Dr. Rudolph Binion: professor, mentor, psychohistorian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaluta, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    As the title of my paper indicates, Dr. Rudolph Binion was my professor, mentor, and a leading psychohistorian. My paper in memoriam to Rudolph Binion is intended as both a retrospective and an introspective account of my relationship with him, as he had a pivotal influence on me when he was my professor at Columbia University. His help and influence continued after I left graduate school. In my paper I also deal with the enormous stresses of navigating through graduate school, for those students whose goal was to earn the Ph.D. degree. Some examinations were dreaded, For Example The "Examination in Subjects," popularly called the "Oral Exam." The "incubation" period was long indeed, frequently averaging nearly ten years, and it was an ordeal, as the rate of attrition was very high. There is then also the question of "ego strength" and that of "transference" toward the professor. Graduate school is indeed a long and strenuous challenge. I took a seminar in modern French history, a requirement for the Master's degree with Professor Binion, which was consequential for me, as he taught me to be objective in writing history. Professor Binion was a demanding and outstanding teacher.

  9. The housekeeper and the professor a novel

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    He is a brilliant math Professor with a peculiar problem—ever since a traumatic head injury, he has lived with only eighty minutes of short-term memory. She is an astute young Housekeeper—with a ten-year-old son—who is hired to care for the Professor. And every morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are introduced to each other anew, a strange and beautiful relationship blossoms between them. Though he cannot hold memories for long (his brain is like a tape that begins to erase itself every eighty minutes), the Professor's mind is still alive with elegant equations from the past. And the numbers, in all of their articulate order, reveal a sheltering and poetic world to both the Housekeeper and her young son. The Professor is capable of discovering connections between the simplest of quantities—like the Housekeeper's shoe size—and the universe at large, drawing their lives ever closer and more profoundly together, even as his memory slips away. Yoko Ogawa's The Housekeeper and the Professo...

  10. ENSAIO: HOMENAGEM AO PROFESSOR REINIER ROZESTRATEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. R. Tupinambá

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma homenagem póstuma ao Professor Doutor Reinier Rozestraten. O texto apresenta, suscintamente, o percurso acadêmico do nomeado professor, em especial a sua passagem pela Psicologia do Trânsito. Paralelamente discorre sobre sua principal obra na área, que, de certo modo introduz o discurso psicológico sobre o comportamento de trânsito em perspectiva nacional, juntamente com sua preocupação em imprimir um caráter científico ao tema e introduzi-lo no contexto da academia e na sociedade em perspectivas teórica e prática. A obra escolhida é considerada um marco para o estabelecimento teórico da disciplina da psicologia do trânsito no Brasil. A homenagem foi originalmente escrita por ocasião dos cinco anos de falecimento do professor Reinier.

  11. The Rhodes Scholarship in the Current Era of Student Activism: What Do We Consider "Prestigious" and Who Benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary student activism has revealed deep feelings of alienation on college campuses, prompting strong reactions to current and historical racial injustice, including the history of Cecil Rhodes. Can advisors promote restorative justice by encouraging reflection upon privileges afforded to Rhodes scholars and their responsibility to address…

  12. Illustrated & Dissected: Professor Richard Sawdon Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This Alternative Gallery feature introduces the photographic artist Professor Richard Sawdon Smith. Professor Sawdon Smith's work stems around a fascination with representations of anatomy that have been fuelled by his experience as a hospital patient. The work has allowed him to explore ideas through the use of medical illustrations which include early anatomical drawings, personal medical photography and facial modelling. The work highlights how such imagery can be used in the context of a patient seeking understanding and acceptance of ill health and disease using the body as a canvas on which to translate the experience.

  13. Kai Adolf Jensen, professor i almindelig patologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2016-01-01

    for the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine production and supervised many young scientists’ doctoral theses on the aspects of tuberculosis. He became internationally recognized, and he revealed an important scientific fraud in the laboratory of the Austrian professor Ernst Löwenstein (1878-1950), who claimed that he...... could detect M. tuberculosis in blood cultures as a cause of a multitude of diseases. He was a pioneer in eradication of bovine tuberculosis in Denmark which became the first country in the world where this happened. Kai Adolf Jensen held the position as professor of general pathology from 1940 to 1965...

  14. Professor Stewart's casebook of mathematical mysteries

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Like its wildly popular predecessors Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities and Hoard of Mathematical Treasures, Professor Stewart's brand-new book is a miscellany of over 150 mathematical curios and conundrums, packed with trademark humour and numerous illustrations. In addition to the fascinating formulae and thrilling theorems familiar to Professor Stewart's fans, the Casebook follows the adventures of the not-so-great detective Hemlock Soames and his sidekick Dr John Watsup (immortalised in the phrase 'Watsup, Doc?'). By a remarkable coincidence they live at 222B Baker Street, just a

  15. Professor: Danmarkskanon skal give plads til mangfoldighed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2016-01-01

    DEBAT: Danmark har igennem størstedelen af sin historie været et flerkulturelt land. Vi kan derfor ikke diskutere danske værdier til en Danmarkskanon uden at kaste et blik på globale strømninger og vores mangfoldige fortid, skriver Garbi Schmidt, professor ved RUC......DEBAT: Danmark har igennem størstedelen af sin historie været et flerkulturelt land. Vi kan derfor ikke diskutere danske værdier til en Danmarkskanon uden at kaste et blik på globale strømninger og vores mangfoldige fortid, skriver Garbi Schmidt, professor ved RUC...

  16. Incorporating Open/Free GIS and GPS Software in Power Transmission Line Routine Work: The Case of Crete and Rhodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pylarinos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Geographical Information System (GIS and Global Positioning System (GPS software are widely gaining attention in power system planning and operation. Although commercial systems are increasingly being incorporated in power systems applications, they are yet to be fully incorporated in the routine work of utilities (and especially in the work of crews, due to several reasons such as cost, portability, connectivity, performance/speed, infrastructure etc. This paper focuses on incorporating certain open/free GIS and GPS software in routine transmission line work. The case study is the 150kV transmission systems of the Greek islands of Crete and Rhodes which show increased complexity due to certain localized factors such as Greek legislation, the diverse terrain/routes, the segmented design due to the network’s growth over the years (regarding both voltage levels and routes and the use of different Coordinate Reference Systems (or Geodetic Systems from the Greek state. The main goals of this work was to incorporate open/free software that provided limitless online access points, offline navigation and a user friendly design that wouldn’t require any additional training, programming etc. The basic scheme described in this paper can be followed to provide similar results in other applications.

  17. Final Comments from Professors George and Beane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, James; George, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    Concludes this journal focus section on curriculum integration with transcripts of questions asked by conference attendees and answers by Professors Beane and George. Areas addressed included experience levels with children and teachers, studies that point to the failure of curriculum integration, and how teachers can continue curriculum…

  18. Professor Jacques Cortes prantsuse keele lektoraadis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Juuni alguses külastas filoloogiateaduskonna romaani-germaani filoloogia osakonda Roueni ülikooli professor Jacques Cortes (Prantsusmaa). Ta korraldas 4. õa üliõpilastele prantsuse keele intensiivkursuse ja võttis vastu eksami ning kohtus prantsuse keele lektoraadi õppejõududega : [täistekst

  19. Russel Nye: The Professor in Public Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungiville, Maurice

    1995-01-01

    A discussion of the influence of Russel Nye, a college English professor at Michigan State University and journalist, focuses on the values that shaped his teaching, scholarship, and writing and his defense of democratic values, especially in education. It is concluded that Nye's experience suggests that public service can be a source of personal…

  20. Interview met professor Joan Wallach Scott

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Greetje; Tijhoff, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Joan Scott, professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Avanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (USA), was the keynote speaker at the conference 'Uitsluitend emancipatie' in de Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam in October 2012. An interview on gender, history, feminism and her book

  1. String theorist takes over as Lucasian Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    String theorist Michael Green will be the next Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Green, 63, will succeed Stephen Hawking, who held the chair from 1980 before retiring last month at the age of 67 and taking up a distinguished research chair at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada (see above).

  2. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  3. CFA or CFP: A Guide for Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    The CFA Institute and the CFP Board of Standards provide professional certifications in the field of finance. In this paper, I provide my experience with the CFA and CFP programs in order to give other professors some insight into the process of attaining the designations. I hope to provide answers to some of the questions that other faculty…

  4. Reflections of a Latino Associate Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2018-01-01

    The following reflection essay is about my experiences as a Latino Associate Professor who focuses on criminology, youth violence, juvenile justice, and the associated disparities with race, ethnicity, and immigration. I reflect about the "race and justice" job market, pursuing and establishing a Latina/o Criminology working group, often…

  5. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  6. Marshall Islands

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2015-01-01

    This note aims to build understanding of the existing disaster risk financing and insurance (DRFI) tools in use in The Marshall Islands and to identify gaps where potential engagement could further develop financial resilience. The likelihood that a hazardous event will have a significant impact on the Marshall Islands has risen with the increasing levels of population and assets in the urban ...

  7. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  8. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These regulations govern Exchange Visitor Program participants in the categories of professor and research scholar, except...

  9. Variables That Can Affect Student Ratings of Their Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Attribution theory was applied to help predict the results of an experiment that examined the effects of three independent variables on students' ratings of their professors. The dependent variables were students' perceptions of whether the professor caused the students' grades and student satisfaction with their professor. The results suggest…

  10. E-Mail from Professor Enhances Student Motivation and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, professors use the first day of class to build rapport. However, current technology allows professors to contact students prior to the first day of class. This study assessed how the receipt of a welcoming e-mail from a female professor 1 week before the first day of class affected student motivation and attitudes toward the…

  11. Social and Intel lectual Trends at Rhodes in the Early Sixties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    canberry

    When I arrived at Rhodes in 1962, the only graduates I had ever met were doctors .... expect me to fail at university, were aston ished at the end of my first year to find .... Irving was a socialist and a deter mined one, but his best friend was fellow.

  12. Collection and analysis of remotely sensed data from the Rhode River Estuary Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. W.; Williamson, F. S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The remote sensing study to survey the Rhode River watershed for spray irrigation with secondarily treated sewage is reported. The standardization of Autumn coloration changes with Munsell color chips is described along with the mapping of old field vegetation for the spray irrigation project. The interpretation and verification of salt marsh vegetation by remote sensing of the water shed is discussed.

  13. Circumstantial Evidence of Possible Hot Spot Activity Outside Rhodes, Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Miliaresis, George

    2014-01-01

    Zouzias Dimitrios, St Seymour Karen, Miliaresis George, Vamvoukakis Costas (2008). Circumstantial Evidence of Possible Hot Spot Activity Outside Rhodes, Eastern Mediterranean Sea. 3rd International Conference on the Geology of the Tethys (8-11 January, 2008, South Valley University - Aswan). [Abstract in Program

  14. [Professor WU Zhongchao's experience of penetration needling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yu

    2016-08-12

    Professor WU Zhongchao has unique application of penetration needling in clinical treatment. Professor WU applies penetration needling along meridians, and the methods of penetration needling include self-meridian penetration, exterior-interior meridian penetration, identical-name meridian penetration, different meridian penetration. The meridian differentiation is performed according to different TCM syndromes, locations and natures of diseases and acupoint nature, so as to make a comprehensive assessment. The qi movement during acupuncture is focused. In addition, attention is paid on anatomy and long-needle penetration; the sequence and direction of acupuncture is essential, and the reinforcing and reducing methods have great originality, presented with holding, waiting, pressing and vibrating. Based on classical acupoint, the acupoint of penetration needling is flexible, forming unique combination of acupoints.

  15. Professor Andrzej Nespiak (1921-1981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Majewski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biography of a professor of the Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Botany of the Medical Academy in Wrocław, who was formerly an investigator of the Agricultural Academy in Wrocław. He worked on mycorhiza, the participation of Macromycetes in forest communities and the use of fungi for synthesis of some organic compounds, he was also the author of the Polish flora of the genus Cortinarius (1975,1981 and Inocybe (manuscript.

  16. Professor Andrzej Nespiak (1921-1981)

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Majewski

    2014-01-01

    The biography of a professor of the Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Botany of the Medical Academy in Wrocław, who was formerly an investigator of the Agricultural Academy in Wrocław. He worked on mycorhiza, the participation of Macromycetes in forest communities and the use of fungi for synthesis of some organic compounds, he was also the author of the Polish flora of the genus Cortinarius (1975,1981) and Inocybe (manuscript).

  17. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  18. 31 July 2014 - Professor M. Kastner

    CERN Multimedia

    Egli, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    MIT Faculty Member Donner Professor of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology United States of America, Prof. M. Kastner visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Beams Department M. Solfaroli Camillocci, LHC superconducting magnet assembly hall visit with L. Rossi and R. Principe, LHC Computing Grid Project presentation and computer centre visit with I. Bird and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  19. Work process of nursing professors 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Giordano, Denisse; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the work process of nursing professors. Method: descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, developed with a focus on critical epidemiology, carried out at a School of Nursing in Chile. The research subjects consist of 17 nursing professors, with whom individual semi-structured interviews were carried out and nine participated in a focus group. The Ethics Committee approved this study. Results: 88.2% were female, mean age of 42 years, 47% were married, 94% were Chilean, average length of service in the institution of 2.8 years, and 23.5% had a master’s degree. Regarding the work process, the students were the work object, the tools used were the knowledge and the experience as a nurse, and the work environment was considered good. Regarding the form of work organization, 76% have a 44-hour workweek, the wage was considered inadequate and the workload was higher than foreseen in the contract. The dialectic of the nursing work process is evidenced, demonstrating the contradiction between the low wages and labor overload and the narratives reporting a good work environment, personal fulfillment and transcendence that goes far beyond work. Conclusions: the work process allows describing the work components of the nursing professors, which are consistent with the results of the literature and show the dialectic of the nursing work process. PMID:29211193

  20. Professor Witold Nowicki - a greatly spirited pathologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, A; Szepietowska, A; Sulkowski, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a complete overview of the scientific, professional and social activity of a great Polish pathologist, Witold Nowicki (1878-1941), from mainly Polish-written, original sources with a major impact on mostly his own publications. The biographical commemoration of this eminent professor is not only due to the fact that he provided a profound microscopic characterization of pneumatosis cystoides in 1909 and 1924. Nowicki greatly influenced the development of anatomical pathology in Poland, having authored over 82 publications, with special reference to tuberculosis, lung cancer, sarcomatous carcinomas, scleroma and others. However, the first of all his merits for the readership of Polish pathologists was his textbook titled Anatomical Pathology, which was a basic pathology manual in pre-war Poland. Witold Nowicki - as the head of the academic pathological anatomy department and former dean of the medical faculty - was shot with other professors by Nazi Germans in the Wuleckie hills in Lvov during World War Two. Professor Nowicki was described as being "small in size but great in spirit" by one of his associates, and remains an outstanding example of a meticulous pathologist, a patient tutor and a great social activist to follow.

  1. O professor_: de quem estamos falando mesmo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Fabiane Konowaluk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto procura abordar a temática relacionada à auto-imagem do professor, constatada através de uma enquete e da construção de um website que subsidiou o tensionamento com o real. Segundo Arroyo (2000, p. 124, “carregamos a função que exercemos, que somos e a imagem de professor(a que internalizamos”. Dessa forma, o tema em estudo segue, ainda hoje, sendo altamente significativo, pois não podemos esquecer os momentos históricos, políticos e sociais vivenciados pelos professores, buscando justamente explicações sobre como as questões de auto-imagem, o fazer e suas competências, suas possibilidades e limites e outros tantos fatores que estão a alterar seu comportamento. Arroyo (2000, p. 124 assinala que a auto-imagem docente é apreendida em múltiplos espaços e tempos, em múltiplas vivências, como resultado das condições psicológicas e sociais que afetam sua docência

  2. Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  3. Redox Pioneer: Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Dolph L

    2016-07-01

    Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer, because he has published an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times and 29 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Gladyshev is world renowned for his characterization of the human selenoproteome encoded by 25 genes, identification of the majority of known selenoprotein genes in the three domains of life, and discoveries related to thiol oxidoreductases and mechanisms of redox control. Gladyshev's first faculty position was in the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Nebraska. There, he was a Charles Bessey Professor and Director of the Redox Biology Center. He then moved to the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Redox Medicine. His discoveries in redox biology relate to selenoenzymes, such as methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxin reductases, and various thiol oxidoreductases. He is responsible for the genome-wide identification of catalytic redox-active cysteines and for advancing our understanding of the general use of cysteines by proteins. In addition, Gladyshev has characterized hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling and regulation of protein function by methionine-R-sulfoxidation. He has also made important contributions in the areas of aging and lifespan control and pioneered applications of comparative genomics in redox biology, selenium biology, and aging. Gladyshev's discoveries have had a profound impact on redox biology and the role of redox control in health and disease. He is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 1-9.

  4. O fracasso escolar no discurso do professor

    OpenAIRE

    Piccirilli, Manoela de Souza Silva

    2014-01-01

    O fracasso escolar tem sido repetidamente abordado em pesquisas de diversas naturezas que buscam diferentes razões para sua ocorrência. Essa dissertação não pretende elaborar mais uma suposição do que venha a ser o fracasso escolar, mas analisar os sentidos deste no discurso de alguns professores de educação básica. Trata-se de um estudo qualitativo realizado sob a ótica da teoria-metodológica da Análise de Discurso de linha francesa a partir de Michel Pêcheux. O procedimento ...

  5. An Interview with Professor Roy Caldwell

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhary, Kuntal; Bhat, Prashant; Rosen, Jared; Naughton, Ida; Wang, Jingyan

    2013-01-01

    Envision the underwater world: vibrant coral, swaying seaweed, and lively creatures abound. However, the postcards and National Geographic covers that try to capture the beauty of this picturesque habitat can only represent it at one moment in time -- in reality, the landscape is hardly static, since many of its animals are capable of body modifications to change their shape and color. To understand the coloration and color vision of sea creatures, UC Berkeley Professor Roy L. Caldwell resear...

  6. In Memoriam: Professor Jan M. Hoem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Vaupel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jan Hoem died on Saturday in Stockholm after a long illness. Jan became Director of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR in 1999; he and I jointly led the Institute for almost eight years. During this period he served as Editor of Demographic Research; he took on this responsibility shortly after the journal was launched and built the journal into a respected online source of cutting-edge analysis. Jan was a superb colleague, with very good judgment, a delightful sense of humor, and deep devotion to research quality. A pioneer of event history analysis, he understood the subtleties of the subject better than anyone else. Jan was born and educated in Norway and worked in Oslo before becoming Professor in Copenhagen and then Professor in Stockholm, where he established SUDA, a leading demographic research initiative. His dedication to high-quality, statistically sophisticated population research at SUDA and MPIDR as well as in the journal Demographic Research substantially advanced the discipline of demography. Jan was a warm and generous teacher, a loyal colleague, and a caring friend whom many people will long remember with gratitude and respect. James W. Vaupel Publisher, Demographic Research

  7. Interview: Interview with Professor Malcolm Rowland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Malcolm

    2010-03-01

    Malcolm Rowland is Professor Emeritus and former Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and a member and former director (1996-2000), of the Centre for Applied Pharmacokinetic Research, University of Manchester. He holds the positions of Adjunct Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco; Member, Governing Board, EU Network of Excellence in Biosimulation; Founder member of NDA Partners; academic advisor to a Pharmaceutical initiative in prediction of human pharmacokinetics and Scientific Advisor to the EU Microdose AMS Partnership Program. He was President of the EU Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences (1996-2000); Vice-President of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (2001-2009) and a Board Member of the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs, 2004-2008). He received his degree in Pharmacy and PhD at the University of London and was on faculty (School of Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco [1967-1975]) before taking up a professorship at Manchester. His main research interest is physiologically based pharmacokinetics and its application to drug discovery, development and use. He is author of over 300 scientific articles and co-author, with TN Tozer, of the textbooks Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics: Concepts and Applications and Introduction to Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics. He was editor of the Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics (formerly Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics, 1973-2007) and, since 1977, has organized regular residential workshops in pharmacokinetics.

  8. Professor de Hevesy traces radioisotope history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    Professor George de Hevesy, who was a pioneer in the field of radioactive tracers, prepared this paper for the IAEA symposium on Radiochemical Methods of Analysis, held at Salzburg in October 1964. Professor de Hevesy was born in Budapest in 1885. He studied in Budapest, Berlin and Freiburg, and spent some years at Zurich when Einstein was there. In 1911 he went to Manchester to work with Rutherford and there witnessed some of the greatest discoveries in the history of physics. At the end of 1912 he visited the Vienna Institute for Radium Research, where he worked with Paneth, and in 1913 applied the method of labelled lead for the first time. After the first world war, he worked at the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen; since 1943, his chief activities have been in Sweden. In 1923, with Coster, he discovered the element hafnium. He made notable discoveries on the mobility of ions, and isotope separation, and his work on radioisotope tracers, which has had important biological applications, won him the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1943

  9. A ATUAÇÃO DE PROFESSORES DE ENSINO SUPERIOR: INVESTIGANDO DOIS PROFESSORES BEM AVALIADOS PELOS ESTUDANTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Quadros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, higher education teacher training has received more didactic-pedagogical attention. Despite numerous criticisms to professors' work, some practices present differentials that make them a reference to students, even among university professors with undergraduate and graduate degrees in their specific areas of knowledge. To analyze the classes of such professors who become a reference to students, we selected two higher education professors of chemistry and videotaped their classes seeking to identify the teaching strategies that they use. After analysis, we shared the results with the subjects and complemented them with a semi-structured interview. We found out that these professors perform based on counter-models of professors who they had had in their undergraduate courses and developed strategies aiming to minimize for their students the difficulties they themselves had experienced.

  10. Class renormalization: islands around islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiss, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    An orbit of 'class' is one that rotates about a periodic orbit of one lower class with definite frequency. This contrasts to the 'level' of a periodic orbit which is the number of elements in its continued fraction expansion. Level renormalization is conventionally used to study the structure of quasi-periodic orbits. The scaling structure of periodic orbits encircling other periodic orbits in area preserving maps is discussed here. Fixed points corresponding to the accumulation of p/q bifurcations are found and scaling exponents determined. Fixed points for q > 2 correspond to self-similar islands around islands. Frequencies of the island boundary circles at the fixed points are obtained. Importance of this scaling for the motion of particles in stochastic regions is emphasized. (author)

  11. Professor Gender, Age, and “Hotness” in Influencing College Students’ Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Sohr-Preston

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate psychology students rated expectations of a bogus professor (randomly designated a man or woman and hot versus not hot based on an online rating and sample comments as found on RateMyProfessors.com (RMP. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis (PCA: dedication, attractiveness, enhancement, fairness, and clarity. Participants rated current psychology professors on the same qualities. Current professors were divided based on gender (man or woman, age (under 35 or 35 and older, and attractiveness (at or below the median or above the median. Using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA, students expected hot professors to be more attractive but lower in clarity. They rated current professors as lowest in clarity when a man and 35 or older. Current professors were rated significantly lower in dedication, enhancement, fairness, and clarity when rated at or below the median on attractiveness. Results, with previous research, suggest numerous factors, largely out of professors’ control, influencing how students interpret and create professor ratings. Caution is therefore warranted in using online ratings to select courses or make hiring and promotion decisions. 

  12. Paediatric Virology as a new educational initiative: An interview with Nobelist Professor of Virology Harald zur Hausen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Born in Gelsenkirchen-Buer in Germany on March 11th, 1936, Professor Harald zur Hausen, Emeritus Professor of Virology at the University of Freiburg and 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes cervical cancer, believes that good knowledge of virological methods and diagnostic possibilities are an asset for all young paediatricians. Professor zur Hausen considers that the creation of an educational platform on Paediatric Virology is definitely very beneficial for young paediatricians, as this will greatly enhance their knowledge in the field of Virology. He very actively advocates the vaccination of boys for the eradication of HPV infection and emphasises that male HPV vaccination should be included into the current vaccination programmes. He would have certainly considered Dr George N. Papanicolaou (Kyme, Island of Euboea, Greece, 1883 - Miami, Florida, USA, 1962) as an excellent candidate for the Nobel Prize, stating that the contribution of Dr Papanicolaou did not find sufficient recognition in the past. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens, Greece, on October 7th, 2017, Professor zur Hausen will give his plenary lecture on 'Paediatric Virology and Oncology: Virus persistence and the important first years of life'.

  13. Professor Howard Mason and oxygen activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterman, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Our understanding of the classification, function, mechanism, and structure of the enzymes which incorporate atoms of oxygen from atmospheric molecular oxygen during catalysis is based on the thoughtful and technically challenging experiments of two giants in the field of Biochemistry, Howard Mason and Osamu Hayaishi. This volume celebrates the 50th anniversary of the discovery and characterization of these 'oxygenase' enzymes and provides a broad view of how far this area of research has advanced. Professor Hayaishi describes herein his perspective on the background and major discoveries which led to the development of this field. Regrettably Howard Mason passed away at age 88 in 2003. I am indeed fortunate to have been a Ph.D. student with Howard and to have the opportunity to briefly review his role in the development of this field for this special commemorative issue of BBRC

  14. Institutional Support for the Virtual Professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom JONES

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Academics who hold positions at single-mode, distance education institutions are presently being hampered by an adherence to a long-standing set of protocols (specific office location, face-to-face meetings that were put in place when the conventional post-secondary was the norm. With the advent of a powerful merging of personal computers and the internet, a shift from those protocols to one of support for the virtual professor is in the offing, to the benefit of both the professoriate and the student. A key factor in this shift is the degree and quality of institutional support that will allow these changes to take place. This paper focuses on a number of the key factors that will have to be addressed if this new type of distance education academic is to function effectively.

  15. Interview with Professor Dr. Daniel Spreng

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, C.; Kilchmann, A.

    2004-01-01

    This interview with Professor Dr. Daniel Spreng of the Center for Energy Policy and Economics (CEPE) in Zuerich, Switzerland, deals with questions concerning research in the area of energy economics. In particular, the situation in Switzerland, where mains-connected sources of energy such as electricity and gas play an important role in energy supply, is looked at in the light of market liberalisation. Various approaches to the liberalisation of gas and electricity systems are discussed and the costs of liberalised supply systems are compared with those of the present monopolistic situation. Also, energy reserves and the use of the gas distribution system in a future hydrogen-based energy supply scenario are looked at. Projects currently being worked on at the CEPE are reviewed

  16. The Limited Role of Journalism Professors in Direct Media Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Abraham Z.

    This paper discusses reasons why few journalism professors are personally confronting the news media with criticism or praise. One of the primary reasons for this is that journalism professors may fear retribution or keep inbred ties with the media or be following academic tradition. A survey was conducted in Spring 1975 for this report. The…

  17. Student and Professor Gender Effects in Introductory Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M. Ryan; Johnson, Marianne F.; Kuennen, Eric W.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have yielded highly mixed results as to differences in male and female student performance in statistics courses; the role that professors play in these differences is even less clear. In this paper, we consider the impact of professor and student gender on student performance in an introductory business statistics course taught by…

  18. Professor om kystsikring: Ingen universelle løsninger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    DEBAT: Der findes ikke universalløsninger mod stigende risiko for stormfloder, men løsninger skal findes, skriver Karsten Arnbjerg-Nielsen, professor ved DTU.......DEBAT: Der findes ikke universalløsninger mod stigende risiko for stormfloder, men løsninger skal findes, skriver Karsten Arnbjerg-Nielsen, professor ved DTU....

  19. Effects of Social Support on Professors' Work Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Christin; Chung-Yan, Greg A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how various types of workplace social support from different support sources interact with occupational stressors to predict the psychological well-being of university professors. Design/method/approach: A total of 99 full-time professors participated via an online or paper questionnaire. Findings:…

  20. The benefits of being economics professor A (rather than Z)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Praag, C.M.; van Praag, B.M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Alphabetical name ordering on multi-authored academic papers, which is the convention in economics and various other disciplines, is to the advantage of people whose last name initials are placed early in the alphabet. Professor A, who has been a first author more often than Professor Z, will have

  1. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    In issue 1-2003, Anette Kolmos and Lone Krogh reported on the two-semester study course " University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (DK)". Now, in part 2, they are adressing guidelines for supervison and advising of assistant professors in the university teacher education...

  2. Do Professors Have Customer-Based Brand Equity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Jillapalli, Regina

    2014-01-01

    This research endeavors to understand whether certain professors have customer-based brand equity (CBBE) in the minds of students. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to conceptualize, develop, and empirically test a model of customer-based professor brand equity. Survey data gathered from 465 undergraduate business students were used to…

  3. University Curriculum Project--Professors Reflect on Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Beatrice C.

    This paper describes the reflections of the university professors in eight colleges at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who were pioneers in integrating assistive technology and related content into their courses and who continue to provide leadership in curricular change. Professors from the colleges of fine and performing arts, business,…

  4. Engaging Undergraduates in Feminist Classrooms: An Exploration of Professors' Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Leland G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the results of a feminist action research project that sought to ascertain professors' best practices for engaging undergraduates in feminist classrooms. In semi-structured interviews, professors recommended assigning readings from a variety of positionalities; creating a safe space for class discussion; relying on data to…

  5. What I Wish My Professors Had Told Me

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    What do you wish your undergraduate professors told you before you ever set foot in a classroom? Jennifer Collins, one such professor who prepares pre-service teachers, has a list of six "truths" she shares with her students. In this article, Collins outlines those pieces of advice, which include understanding your larger purpose,…

  6. Mental Health Assessment in Professors' Training in Two Chilean Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carlos J.; Quintana, Ingrid M.; Rodriguez, Felipe F.

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the evaluation of professors of pedagogy and directors programs, about the importance of mental health in vocational training, and factors that might influence this valuation. The methodology includes participation of 17 academicians (professors and belonging to the managerial staff) of two universities in southern Chile. A…

  7. Academic Labor Markets and Assistant Professors' Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Lowell L.

    2012-01-01

    Using data for 638 assistant professors who joined graduate sociology departments between 1975 and 1992, I examine the claim that when the labor market for new doctorates is weak, assistant professors experience less favorable employment outcomes than when that labor market is strong. Surprisingly, I find that those hired during the weak…

  8. In commemoration of professor V.P. Karpov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semyonova L.S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is about professor Karpov V.P., a prominent scientist, first rector of Yekaterinoslav Medical Academy. Biography of a great investigator, his main achievements in the area of histology, biology, theory and history of medicine was studied. Professor Karpov V.P. always combined his great scientific, organizational and research work with social activity. Monographs of professor Karpov V.P. and conferences organized by him were of great importance in the solution of such new problems as theary of microscope and cell amitosis. Professor Karpov is a founder of a large school of histology. Thanks to his active participation and personal guidance, in 1917 department of histology was founded in Yekaterinoslav Medical Institute. The author of the article has analyzed Hippocrates` works translated into Russian by professor Karpov V.P. and pointed out their significance for modern medical science and practice.

  9. Professor I I Glass A Tribute and Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Igra, Ozer

    2013-01-01

    The book provides personal memories along with description of scientific works written by ex-graduate students and research associates of the late Professor Glass. The described research work covers a wide range of shock wave phenomena, resulting from seeds planted by Professor Glass. Professor Glass was born in Poland in 1918. He immigrated together with his parents to Canada at the age of 12 and received all his professional education at the University of Toronto, Canada. He became a world recognized expert in shock wave phenomena, and during his 45 years of active research he supervised more than 125 master and doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows and visiting research associates. In this book seven of his past students/research-associates describe their personal memories of Professor Glass and present some of their investigations in shock wave phenomena which sprung from their past work with Professor Glass. Specifically, these investigations include underwater shock waves, shock/bubble interaction, m...

  10. OBITUARY: Professor Jan Evetts in memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Glowacki, Bartek

    2005-11-01

    It is with great sadness that we report the death of Jan Evetts, who lost his second battle with cancer on 18 August 2005. In 1988 he was appointed Founding Editor of this journal where his leadership created the foundation upon which its success rests today. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials, and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the scientific community is incalculable, as is attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' embryonic superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for applications in magnets. Competing theories for the critical current density at that time were fine filaments or `Mendelssohn Sponge' versus the pinning of Abrikosov quantized vortices. The results of the group's work, to which Jan made a major contribution, came down heavily in favour of the latter theory. Jan's outstanding characteristic was his

  11. Impacto vocal de professores Teachers' vocal impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ricarte

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar o impacto vocal nas atividades diárias em professores do ensino médio. Correlacionar os achado da auto-percepção do problema vocal com os aspectos: efeitos no trabalho, na comunicação diária, na comunicação social e na sua emoção. MÉTODOS: a amostra foi constituída por 107 professores, sendo 86 com queixa e 21 sem queixa, selecionados em escolas da rede particular de ensino de Maceió-AL. Cada professor respondeu individualmente o protocolo Perfil Participação em Atividades Vocais na presença da pesquisadora, assinalando suas respostas em uma escala visual que varia de 0 a 10. O protocolo é composto por 28 questões com a presença integrada em cinco aspectos englobados para avaliar a qualidade de vida e o resultado de tratamentos vocais. O protocolo oferece, ainda, dois escores adicionais: pontuação de limitação nas atividades (PLA e de restrição de participação (PRP. RESULTADOS: na comparação dos grupos com e sem queixa vocal foram verificados que todos os resultados foram estatisticamente significantes (pPURPOSE: to analyze the vocal impact in the daily activities on high-school teachers. Correlate the finding of the auto-perception on the vocal problem with the following aspects: effects in the work, daily communication, social communication and, its emotion METHODS: the sample consisted of 107 teachers, 86 with and 21 with no complaint, selected from private teaching schools in Maceió-AL. Each teacher answered individually the Protocol for Voice Activity Participation Profile in the presence of the researcher, noting their responses on a visual scale ranging from 0 to 10. The protocol is composed of 28 questions with the presence integrated in five aspects to evaluate the quality of life and the result of vocal treatments. The protocol offers, still, two additional scores: punctuation of limitation in the activities (PLA and restriction of participation (PRP. RESULTS: comparing the groups with

  12. Professor Wind i Deadline om Spitzenkandidaten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    Professor og centerleder, Marlene Wind, var fredag den 23. februar 2018 i DR2 Deadline for at snakke om proceduren bag udvælgelsen af en ny formand for Europa Kommissionen. Professer Wind forklarede blandt andet, hvordan Europa Parlamentet, siden Lisabon Traktaten i 2009, har fortolket en del af...... traktaten til, at det skal være det vindende parti ved EP-valget, som vælger Kommissionsformanden. Dette er kendt som Spitzenkandidaten-proceduren. Wind pointerede, at særligt tyskerne har den holdning til EU, at den primære legitimitet ligger hos Europa parlamentet, da det er det eneste direkte folkevalgte...... organ i EU. Wind påpegede, at statsoverhovederne har været meget skeptiske eller direkte imod proceduren, men at der er en stigende holdning til, at proceduren kan være med til at sikre borgerinddragelse i EU. Til dette sagde Wind; "Hvis man skal engangere borgerne ved det her valg, hvor stort set ingen...

  13. Memories of Professor Sugimoto and isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Usual magnetic isotope-separators select the particles with the same Z/A value which may include different nuclides. Identification of the isotope with the same Z/A value but different Z or A value is an universal requirement for nuclear physics experiments. If one knows, together with the A/Z value, the dE/dx or the range of the isotope in some energy absorber, which are the function of Z 2 /A, its nuclide can be specified. This idea can be realized by arranging proper energy-absorber at the focal point of magnetic analyzer. The author proposes another novel method in which two dipole-magnets are excited with some difference, and an energy absorber corresponding to that energy difference is situated between two magnets. It can also be devised so that the dispersion at the final focal-point depends only on the emission angle of the isotope at production. Professor Sugimoto recognized the significance of this scheme and proposed to employ it in the experiment at BEVATRON. The unbalanced two dipole-magnets method is employed at RIKEN and RCNP, Osaka University. The author's creative idea originated in Sugimoto Laboratory at Osaka University. (author)

  14. Editorial: A dedication to Professor Jan Evetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Harald; Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Barber, Zoe; Somekh, Rob; Glowacki, Bartek

    2006-03-01

    A few days before the beginning of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity we learned that Professor Jan Evetts, a pioneer of superconductor research, a brilliant scientist, a wonderful person and a great personal friend, had passed away. We therefore decided to dedicate the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity to the memory of Jan Evetts. The following citation is based on material provided by his former supervisor (D Dew-Hughes) and his closest co-workers in Cambridge. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan Evetts passed away after losing his second battle with cancer on 24th August 2005. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the superconductivity community is incalculable, as attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He entered the college in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for

  15. Special issue dedicated to Professor Johann M. Schepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon P De Bruin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available It is a great pleasure for me to have been associated with this special issue of the SA Journal of Industrial Psychology dedicated to Professor Johann M. Schepers. The purpose of the special issue is to honour Professor Schepers for his contributions to the development of Psychology and Industrial Psychology as empirical fields of study in South Africa. The contributors have worked with Professor Schepers as students or colleagues and share his academic interests. The articles reflect his areas of interest and employ analytic techniques taught and championed by him. We are grateful to Professor Schepers for his cooperation throughout this project. Thanks are due to all the contributors and referees.

  16. Professor Anne Khademian named National Academy of Public Administration Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2009-01-01

    Anne Khademian, professor with Virginia Tech's Center for Public Administration and Policy, School of Public and International Affairs, at the Alexandria, Va., campus has been elected a National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) Fellow.

  17. Afetividade entre professor e aluno no processo ensino-aprendizagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Simone Galdino Schaefer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo analisar as relações de afetividade entre professor e aluno no processo ensino-aprendizagem. Utiliza de metodologia com abordagem qualitativa, observação participante, e entrevistas semi-estruturadas. O lócus da pesquisa foi a Escola Municipal de Educação Básica Lizamara Aparecida Oliva de Almeida em Sinop, entre Fevereiro e Maio de 2014. Enquanto sujeitos, contou-se com professores e alunos do 3º ano do Ensino Fundamental. Dos resultados parciais, verificou-se que mesmo que a afetividade e a aprendizagem sejam reconhecidas teoricamente por Henri Wallon como elos fundamentais para o processo ensino-aprendizagem, ainda não é bem compreendido pelos sujeitos professores. Palavras-chave: psicologia educacional; afetividade; professores e alunos. 

  18. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The article describes a course for assistant professors within the University Teacher Education at Aalborg University. The course focus is to develop knowledge, skills and methods from within the didactic, pedagogical, and learning theory-based fields....

  19. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... not exceeding two years at any university, college, school, or other educational institution situated...

  20. Redox Pioneer: Professor Stuart A. Lipton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Professor Stuart A. Lipton Stuart A. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D. is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because of his publication of four articles that have been cited more than 1000 times, and 96 reports which have been cited more than 100 times. In the redox field, Dr. Lipton is best known for his work on the regulation by S-nitrosylation of the NMDA-subtype of neuronal glutamate receptor, which provided early evidence for in situ regulation of protein activity by S-nitrosylation and a prototypic model of allosteric control by this post-translational modification. Over the past several years, Lipton's group has pioneered the discovery of aberrant protein nitrosylation that may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). In particular, the phenotypic effects of rare genetic mutations may be understood to be enhanced or mimicked by nitrosative (and oxidative) modifications of cysteines and thereby help explain common sporadic forms of disease. Thus, Lipton has contributed in a major way to the understanding that nitrosative stress may result from modifications of specific proteins and may operate in conjunction with genetic mutation to create disease phenotype. Lipton (collaborating with Jonathan S. Stamler) has also employed the concept of targeted S-nitrosylation to produce novel neuroprotective drugs that act at allosteric sites in the NMDA receptor. Lipton has won a number of awards, including the Ernst Jung Prize in Medicine, and is an elected fellow of the AAAS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 757–764. PMID:23815466

  1. Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place and Contractor. Part 13 (New London, Ohio - Westerly, Rhode Island), FY1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    C .4uO > NMX jInI n-4 r- -4 >0a0 0a 0 X 11 M -4 it 000C000 00 000C>-4 0. on n0000 - -1 4D to "c0200 00O c > : Q 10 1(0 -4 I1 r- -q a)on Coo -4 r𔃼m00...o004 inn = In0 N -a 1 a (-4 gao LCao Wo LA4 0*v 0 Z2o0o000 ix N N. " 0 I (a0-4 N t I0) C.0C -JOC) Woo 4 -444 q0 0 1- Nr EU a (04 N aJO WOO 0.4 woo

  2. H10350: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, New York and Rhode Island, 1990-08-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  3. F00241: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Conn, Ma., New York and Rhode Island, 1984-06-16

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. Time of travel and dispersion of a dye plume in the Blackstone River, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Gene W.; Breault, Robert F.; Waite, Andrew M.; Hartman, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    To obtain copies of this report, please contact: Director, Division of Watershed Management, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 8 New Bond St., Worcester, MA 01608, (508) 792–7650

  5. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation and Ecology: Examples from Varved Sediments of the Pettaquamscutt River Estuary, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estuaries and lakes are undergoing anthropogenic alterations as development and industry intensify in the modern world. Assessing the ecological health of such water bodies is difficult because accurate accounts of pre-anthropogenic estuarine/lacustrine conditions do not exist. ...

  6. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation and Ecology: Examples from Varved Sediments of the Pettaquanscutt River Estuary, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estuaries and lakes are undergoing anthropogenic alterations as development and industry intensify in the modern world. Assessing the ecological health of such water bodies is difficult because accurate accounts of pre-anthropogenic estuarine/lacustrine conditions do not exist. S...

  7. The Rhode Island Life Saving Score (RILSS)--a proposed life-saving definition for EMS and emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kenneth A; Sullivan, Francis M

    2013-12-03

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Emergency Medicine staff are often described as life-saving providers, but there is no generally accepted objective definition of a life saved by these providers. Therefore, a proposed definition is described. Development of this definition began with conceptual rules, followed by a survey of physician EMS medical directors, and then by the development of a tool to implement the definition, and measure its validity and reliability through a review of 100 critical care transport EMS patient charts.

  8. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Boston Weather Forecast Office (BOX WFO) - Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to create an online mapping viewer...

  9. Internet-Based Methods to Construct a Stakeholder Network for the Sustainability of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background\\Questions\\Methods Conservation coalitions, where numerous organizations collaborate for the augmented environmental protection of a critical habitat, have been shown to reduce redundancy and increase effectiveness. In order to initiate an effective conservation coalit...

  10. Barriers, Opportunities, and Strategies for Urban Ecosystem Restoration: Lessons Learned from Restoration Managers in Rhode Island, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban ecosystem restoration can be especially difficult to accomplish because of complications like industrial pollutants, population density, infrastructure, and expense, however, the unique opportunities in urban settings, including the potential to provide benefits to many peo...

  11. MORS/ITEA Mini-Symposium Emphasizing the E in T and E Held in Newport, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    developers at that time. There was, however, no concrete idea as to Testing was akin to a final exam in college what an evaluation should be. One of... ltams Anlysis Activity US Army Civilian AM17: AMXSY-CA Abereen Proving Grouon MD 21005-6429 (301) 278-6429 100 Oppenheimer, David A. SRA Corporation

  12. Proceedings of the Gulf Stream Workshop Held at West Greenwich, Rhode Island on 23-26 April 1985,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    from the cooler (blue-to- green ) slope water to the warmer (yellow-to-red) waters of the Gulf Stream and Sargasso Sea. Further use. of satellite...baroclinic instability. In fact, Hogg (1985) has shown that these motions closely resemble those predicted by the Gill, Green and Simmons (1974...experiment in which observations in .., e form of 4x instead of Ay were provtied c"velocity" instea of "svrearmfunctaon"). The behavor of the error

  13. 2016 Cartographic Boundary File, 2010 Urban Areas (UA) within 2010 County and Equivalent for Rhode Island, 1:500,000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2016 cartographic boundary KMLs are simplified representations of selected geographic areas from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically...

  14. Tenarife Island, Canary Island Archipelago, Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Tenarife Island is one of the most volcanically active of the Canary Island archipelago, Atlantic Ocean, just off the NW coast of Africa, (28.5N, 16.5W). The old central caldera, nearly filled in by successive volcanic activity culminating in two stratocones. From those two peaks, a line of smaller cinder cones extend to the point of the island. Extensive gullies dissect the west side of the island and some forests still remain on the east side.

  15. Ellen Gleditsch: Professor, radiochemist and mentor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykknes, Annette

    2005-06-01

    This dissertation deals with Ellen Gleditsch and some important aspects of her career, as professor, radiochemist and mentor. As Professor Gleditsch supervised students, gave lectures, disseminated science, did research and administrative work; together with many others she participated in the shaping of a research university which developed during her career. She also experienced the daily life in an institute in which there was competition for both resources and positions, included the professorship she was finally granted after many set-backs. The Radiochemist Ellen Gleditsch worked and researched at Marie Curie's laboratory in Paris, and later at Bertram Boltwood's laboratory in New Haven and Stefan Meyer's Institute for Radium Research in Vienna, furthermore she planned and made efforts to establish a similar laboratory in Oslo. During her time in Paris and U.S.A. Gleditsch participated in important debates in the early period of radioactivity, including those on the determination of the radium-uranium ratio and the half-life of radium. In Norway she devoted her time to atomic weight determinations, age determinations, and radiogeological investigations. Research was all important part of Gleditsch's life and career. Gleditsch was also a Mentor in many respects; in tile international radioactivity community, as one of the first female academics and radiochcmists in Norway, for her many students, and this role seems also to have been hers within her family. In Paris she looked after students from all over the world to help alleviate their home sickness, at the University of Oslo she was known as the scientific mother to many; mentoring was among Gleditsch's main qualities. The story of Ellen Gleditsch opens for several perspectives that are discussed. 3 papers are included. In paper 1, ''Ellen Gleditsch: Pioneer Woman in Radiochemistry'', the story is about the young chemist Ellen Gleditsch, who arrived in Paris in 1907 and started cooperating with Marie Curie

  16. Seniorforsker Ole Hertel udnævnt til adjungeret professor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Christian

    2009-01-01

    Sektionsleder og seniorforsker Ole Hertel, Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser (DMU) ved Aarhus Universitet, er udnævnt til adjungeret professor ved Institut for Miljø, Samfund og Rumlig Forandring på Roskilde Universitet.......Sektionsleder og seniorforsker Ole Hertel, Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser (DMU) ved Aarhus Universitet, er udnævnt til adjungeret professor ved Institut for Miljø, Samfund og Rumlig Forandring på Roskilde Universitet....

  17. DISCOURSE SPACE OF THE LINGUOCULTURAL CHARACTER TYPE PROFESSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Sinelnikova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article offers an analysis of the linguocultural character type professor taking into consideration both traditional set of signs and those transformations that indicate accumulation of evolutionary changes. The methodological base for the systematic description were the achievements of such areas of scientific knowledge as personology, linguopersonology and discourseology. The linguocultural character type (LCCT is a generalised image of persons, whose behaviour and value orientations influence culture, language and show social originality of the society. The peculiarity of the studied linguocultural character type is in its interrelation with the linguocultural character types intellectual and teacher as well as in the fact of the traditional connection with the concept elite. The exposure of such kind of multidimensional relations allowed to focus attention on the qualities of the LCCT professor that ensure its relative self-sufficiency. The sign of elitism and belonging to the intellectuals of the LCCT professor is asserted by the high social status recognised by the society, which is based on professionalism and compliance with moral principles. The axiological generality of the LCCT professor and teacher is ensured by the peculiarities of the modern pedagogical discourse with its typical image settings. One of the main features of the image of a professor is its belonging to the elite language person. The transformational processes in the contents of the LCCT professor are connected with the globalisation: including the international dimension in the evaluation of the professional activity, complication of the language environment, marketisation of the university sphere.

  18. Forecasting the Student-Professor Matches That Result in Unusually Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jennifer; Lakey, Brian; Lucas, Jessica L.; LaCross, Ryan; Plotkowski, Andrea R.; Winegard, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Two important influences on students' evaluations of teaching are relationship and professor effects. Relationship effects reflect unique matches between students and professors such that some professors are unusually effective for some students, but not for others. Professor effects reflect inter-rater agreement that some professors…

  19. "They Are Weighted with Authority": Fat Female Professors in Academic and Popular Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisanick, Christina

    2007-01-01

    The images of fat professors encountered in popular culture are few in number and negative in depiction. In this article, the author discusses on how will the professorial body affect the way in which students perceive the professor's teaching abilities. The author concludes that bias against fat professors, professors of color, and other…

  20. First chelonian eggs and carapace fragments from the Pliocene of Rhodes, Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller-Töwe, Inken J.; Kjeldahl-Vallon, Tina A.; Milàn, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Well-preserved fossil eggs and eggshell fragments from the Pliocene Apolakkia Formation of Rhodes (Greece) are described. The eggs were found in-situ in a clutch. They are sub-spherical with lengths of 53-60 mm and widths of about 40 mm. All eggs are diagenetically compressed and their original...... diameters are estimated at 45-50 mm. The eggshells are 0.3-0.5 mm thick, partly recrystallized, but widely still aragonitic. They consist of needle-like crystals that form individual shell units. A few pores are preserved between these shell units. This shell-structure allows assignment to chelonian eggs...... in the oofamily Testudoolithidae and the oogenus Testudolithus. The external morphology, microstructure and mineralogical composition of the eggshells show close resemblance to eggs of the extant tortoise Geochelone elephantopus. Together with a small association of turtle carapace fragments from the same...

  1. The I Professor Formation in the Wallonian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranha, Ana Lúcia Batista; Mrech, Leny Magalhaes; Zacharias, Adriana Pereira Gonçalves; Figueredo, Luana Prado; Mendonça, Catarina Terumi Abe; Fernandes, Maria de Fátima Prado

    2015-12-01

    Objectives Analyze how teachers perceive the construction of their I Professor from the perspective of Wallon and learn about their everyday experiences in school in the condition of being self and other. Method Qualitative, with 13 participants from the Bachelor of Nursing Program. Data collection was carried out in 2013 using interviews that were subjected to thematic analysis. Results Three categories emerged: Construction of the I Professor; living daily life supported by oneself and the other; and the components for constructing the I Professor, highlighting consciousness and valuing of oneself and the other. Conclusion The teachers traveled a path that allowed them to recognize themselves in different movements of the internalization of the I.

  2. [The essence of Professor Wu Lian-Zhong's acupuncture manipulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Yi; Wu, Lian-Zhong

    2014-05-01

    The painless needle insertion technique, summarized by Professor WU Lian-zhong during his decades of acupuncture clinical practice is introduced in this article, which is characterized as soft, flexible, fast, plucking and activating antipathogenic qi. The Sancai (three layers) lifting and thrusting manipulation technique is adopted by Professor WU for getting the qi sensation. And features of 10 kinds of needling sensation such as soreness, numbness, heaviness, distension, pain, cold, hot, radiation, jumping and contracture are summarized. Finger force, amplitude, speed and time length are also taken as the basis of reinforcing and reducing manipulations. Moreover, examples are also given to explain the needling technique on some specific points which further embodies Professor WU's unique experiences and understandings on acupuncture.

  3. ATLANTIC and beyond: an interview with Professor Azfar Zaman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Azfar; Wu, Wing

    2015-01-01

    Professor Azfar Zaman speaks to Wing Wu, Commissioning Editor: Professor Azfar Zaman is a Consultant Interventional Cardiologist at Freeman Hospital and Professor of Cardiology at Newcastle University. Following graduation at Leeds Medical School, he completed postgraduate training in cardiology at regional centres in Leeds, London and Cardiff. Prior to his appointment in Newcastle upon Tyne, he was a Fulbright Scholar and British Heart Foundation International Fellow at Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, USA. He is the Clinical Lead for Coronary Intervention and Director of the Cardiac Catheter Laboratories. In 2012, he was appointed Specialty Group Lead for Cardiovascular Research and has an interest in clinical research, with a particular interest in atherothrombosis in diabetes and clinical trials.

  4. Gender and teamwork: an analysis of professors' perspectives and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddoes, Kacey; Panther, Grace

    2018-05-01

    Teamwork is increasingly seen as an important component of engineering education programmes. Yet, prior research has shown that there are numerous ways in which teamwork is gendered, and can lead to negative experiences for women students. This article presents the first interview findings on professors' perspectives on gender and teamwork. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 39 engineering professors to determine what and how they thought about gender in engineering and engineering education. For this article, the parts of the interviews about teamwork are analysed. We conclude that professors need tools to help them facilitate gender-inclusive teamwork, and those tools must address the beliefs that they already hold about teamwork. The findings raise questions about the adoption of evidence-based instructional practices and suggest current teamwork practices may exacerbate gender inequalities in engineering.

  5. [Professor Kazimierz Jaegermann--forensic pathologist--scientist--thinker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiłowski, Władysław

    2009-01-01

    Professor Kazimierz Jaegermann, a founder of the theory of medico-legal opinionating, passed away 20 years ago. Numerous specialists in forensic medicine and an ever increasing number of lawyers substantiate the importance and value of the creative thought and the entire research work of Professor Jaegermann that have been an inspiration of progress in forensic medicine and in the science of applied law. His unique ability to perform a scientific synthesis leading to recognizing forensic medicine as an applied bridging knowledge points to the eminently creative role played by Professor Jaegermann in development of forensic medicine. There is an urgent need to recall his research activities and to publish a complete collection of his articles and publications. With this idea in mind, I present below an article based on the text published in No. 1 of the Zeszyty Naukowe Katedry Medycyny Sadowej Slaskiej Akademii Medycznej in 1995.

  6. Faculty Agency in Applying for Promotion to Professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Gardner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: In the United States, faculty who wish to pursue promotion to the rank of professor do so without clear guidance or structure. Even the timing of such a process is nebulous. As such, an individual engages in agentic action to pursue the rank. Background: This study examined the experiences of faculty members who chose to pursue the application process to be promoted to professor but were rejected or dissuaded. Methodology: Utilizing a case study of one institutional setting, we conducted 10 in-depth qualitative interviews. Contribution: Very little is known about the process of promotion to full professor in the U.S. and even less empirical research exists. This study advances knowledge of the process and the experiences of those undertaking it. Findings: We learned that cues from the social context greatly influenced these faculty members’ sense of agency.

  7. [Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD, students at Budapest and Prague Faculties of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlík, M; Derzsiová, K

    2010-11-01

    Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD were contemporaries, both born in 1899, one in Zvolen, the other in Dombovar, at the time of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Prof. Por attended the Faculty of Medicine in Budapest from 1918 to 1920, and Prof. Klopstock studied at the same place between 1917 and 1919. From 1920 until graduation on 6th February 1926, Prof. Por continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague. Prof. Klopstock had to interrupt his studies in Budapest due to pulmonary tuberculosis; he received treatment at Tatranske Matliare where he befriended Franz Kafka. Later, upon Kafka's encouragement, he changed institutions and continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, where he graduated the first great go. It is very likely that, during their studies in Budapest and Prague, both professors met repeatedly, even though their life paths later separated. Following his graduation, Prof. Por practiced as an internist in Prague, later in Slovakia, and from 1945 in Kosice. In 1961, he was awarded the title of university professor of internal medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, where he practiced until his death in 1980. Prof. Klopstock continued his studies in Kiel and Berlin. After his graduation in 1933, he practiced in Berlin as a surgeon and in 1938 left for USA. In 1962, he was awarded the title of university professor of pulmonary surgery in NewYork, where he died in 1972.

  8. Researching Pacific island livelihoods:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund Christensen, Andreas; Mertz, Ole

    2010-01-01

    on contemporary theories of nissology and conceptual analytical frameworks for island research. Through a review of selected case-study-based island literature on changing livelihoods coming out of the South Pacific, we wish to illustrate and discuss advantages of finding common grounds for small island studies....... The focus is on two dimensions of island livelihood, migration and natural resource management, both of which are significant contributors in making island livelihoods and shaping Pacific seascapes. We argue that there is still a substantial lack of studies targeting small island dynamics that are empirical...

  9. Ecological characteristics of the invasive pufferfish Lagocephalus sceleratus (Gmelin, 1789 in the eastern Mediterranean Sea – a case study from Rhodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KALOGIROU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ecological and societal impact of the invasive pufferfish Lagocephalus sceleratus on coastal habitats of an area of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (Rhodes Island was investigated. Seasonal quantitative samplings in two common coastal habitats were used to investigate habitat use of different life-stages. Sandy areas were found to be highly important for the early life stages of L. sceleratus. In contrast, Posidonia oceanica habitats were mainly preferred by larger (> 29 cm reproductive adults, not exceeding 64 cm. Lagocephalus sceleratus was found to feed on invertebrates and fish while size classification revealed a tendency for a diet shift with increased size. During early life stages, L. sceleratus inhabits sandy bottoms where it feeds on various invertebrates. The predominant molluscan species found in the diet of larger (> 20 cm L. sceleratus individuals were the economically important Sepia officinalis and Octopus vulgaris. The size at which 50% of individuals reach maturity was estimated to 19 cm. With increased size, habitat shift to seagrass meadows most possibly occurs to meet both the increased demand in prey availability and requirement of appropriate spawning ground. Condition factor of L. sceleratus showed significantly higher values during summer than all other seasons and this was attributed to spawning season and increase in feeding. Societal impacts were alarming due to increased public attention concerning its lethal effects (presence of tetrodotoxin, if consumed. Its high abundance in the coastal fish communities of the studied area combined with ecological and societal impacts, clearly classify L. sceleratus a pest for fisheries and potential threat for biodiversity.

  10. Aspectos gerais da formação de professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson do Carmo Inforsato

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo, ancorado em estudos recentes e antigos, mostra o afastamento dos cursos de formação de professores em relação aos elementos que compõem a prática profissional docente. Favorável a uma aproximação efetiva com o contexto das práticas de sala de aula, o autor defende a idéia de uma formação de professores atrelada aos problemas e necessidades da prática docente no ensino formal de 1º e 2º graus.

  11. [Effective acupoints for bulbar paralysis by professor GAO Weibin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lianru; Zheng, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Professor GAO Weibin academically advocates, based on basic theory of TCM and theories of different schools, modern science technology should be used for the methods and principles of acupuncture and Chinese medicine for neuropathy, so as to explore and summarize the rules, characteristics and advantages of TCM for nervous system disease, especially bulbar paralysis. During the treatment of bulbar paralysis, professor GAO creatively proposes the effective acupuncture points such as Gongxue, Tunyan-1, Tunyan-2, Fayin, Tiyan and Zhifanliu from the aspects of neuroanatomy, and analyzes their anatomical structure and action mechanism.

  12. A formação do professor de biologia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlichting, Maria Cristina Rodrigues Maranhão

    1997-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciencias da Educação O estudo evidencia o tratamento dicotômico mantido na estrutura curricular dos cursos de formação do professor de biologia considerando ser essa prática responsável pelos preconceitos que levam à desvalorização da prática pedagógica. O estudo parte da análise da estrutura curricular e aprofunda-se com entrevistas que buscam levantar o posicionamento dos professores dos cursos de Ciências Biológi...

  13. Forecasting the student–professor matches that result in unusually effective teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jennifer; Lakey, Brian; Lucas, Jessica L; LaCross, Ryan; R Plotkowski, Andrea; Winegard, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background Two important influences on students' evaluations of teaching are relationship and professor effects. Relationship effects reflect unique matches between students and professors such that some professors are unusually effective for some students, but not for others. Professor effects reflect inter-rater agreement that some professors are more effective than others, on average across students. Aims We attempted to forecast students' evaluations of live lectures from brief, video-recorded teaching trailers. Sample Participants were 145 college students (74% female) enrolled in introductory psychology courses at a public university in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Methods Students viewed trailers early in the semester and attended live lectures months later. Because subgroups of students viewed the same professors, statistical analyses could isolate professor and relationship effects. Results Evaluations were influenced strongly by relationship and professor effects, and students' evaluations of live lectures could be forecasted from students' evaluations of teaching trailers. That is, we could forecast the individual students who would respond unusually well to a specific professor (relationship effects). We could also forecast which professors elicited better evaluations in live lectures, on average across students (professor effects). Professors who elicited unusually good evaluations in some students also elicited better memory for lectures in those students. Conclusions It appears possible to forecast relationship and professor effects on teaching evaluations by presenting brief teaching trailers to students. Thus, it might be possible to develop online recommender systems to help match students and professors so that unusually effective teaching emerges. PMID:24953773

  14. Perda da voz em professores e não professores Voice loss in teachers and non-teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Park

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a percepção de professores e não-professores sobre as implicações de uma eventual perda de voz. MÉTODOS: Participaram 205 indivíduos sendo 105 professores e 100 não professores entre 23 a 65 anos, 106 mulheres e 99 homens. Foi aplicado um questionário contendo quatro perguntas referentes a uma eventual perda de visão, audição, voz e deambulação e o grau de impacto inferido (de 0 a 4. RESULTADOS: Para o grupo de professores, não enxergar gerou o maior impacto negativo (média de 3,8, seguido por não andar (média de 3,7, não ter voz (média de 3,7 e não ouvir (média de 3,6. Para o grupo de não-professores, não enxergar também gerou o maior impacto negativo (média de 3,4, seguido por não andar (média de 3,0; não ouvir (média de 2,2 e não ter voz (média de 2,0. Em relação ao maior impacto de uma eventual perda da voz, professores indicaram prejuízos no trabalho, relacionamento social e atividades rotineiras e, no grupo de não professores, nas atividades rotineiras, trabalho, relacionamento social e manifestações das emoções. CONCLUSÕES: Os professores valorizam sua voz de modo diverso dos não-professores e ambos os grupos avaliam a perda da voz como algo que não acarreta consequências negativas. Apesar de o professor perceber mais o impacto de um eventual problema de voz do que o não-professor, os sentimentos em relação à perda da voz foram muito semelhantes nos dois grupos.PURPOSE: To investigate teachers' and non-teachers' perception regarding the implications of an eventual loss of voice. METHODS: Participated in the study 205 individuals (106 women and 99 men, 105 teachers and 100 non-teachers, with ages varying from 23 to 65 years old. The participants were asked to answer a questionnaire with four questions regarding an eventual loss of vision, hearing, voice and deambulation, and the inferred impact degree (from 0 to 4. RESULTS: For the teachers group, not being able to see

  15. Collection and analysis of remotely sensed data from the Rhode River Estuary Watershed. [ecological parameters of Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    NASA chose the watershed of Rhode River, a small sub-estuary of the Bay, as a representative test area for intensive studies of remote sensing, the results of which could be extrapolated to other estuarine watersheds around the Bay. A broad program of ecological research was already underway within the watershed, conducted by the Smithsonian Institution's Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies (CBCES) and cooperating universities. This research program offered a unique opportunity to explore potential applications for remote sensing techniques. This led to a joint NASA-CBCES project with two basic objectives: to evaluate remote sensing data for the interpretation of ecological parameters, and to provide essential data for ongoing research at the CBCES. A third objective, dependent upon realization of the first two, was to extrapolate photointerpretive expertise gained at the Rhode River watershed to other portions of the Chesapeake Bay.

  16. A Group Interview about Publishing with Professor Jack Zipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Louise Parfitt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The conversation piece is the product of a group interview with Professor Jack Zipes and provides useful insights about publishing for early career researchers across disciplines. Based on his wider experiences as academic and writer, Professor Zipes answered questions from PhD researchers about: writing books, monographs and edited collections; turning a PhD thesis into a monograph; choosing and approaching publishers; and the advantages of editing books and translations. It presents some general advice for writing and publishing aimed at postgraduate students. Professor Zipes is an Emeritus Professor at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, United States, a world expert on fairy tales and storytelling highlighting the social and historical dimensions of them. Zipes has forty years of experience publishing academic and mass-market books, editing anthologies, and translating work from French, German and Italian. His best known books are Breaking the Magic Spell (1979, Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion (1983, The Irresistible Fairy Tale: The Cultural and Social History of a Genre (2012, and The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm (2014.

  17. "Dear Professor: This Is What I Want You to Know."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Brooke

    1986-01-01

    Describes high school students' letters written to help their teacher interpret youth culture to college professors at an upcoming seminar. Essays reflected four themes: (1) a search for family, (2) identity problems and loneliness, (3) living with rapid change, and (4) fear of failure, especially in college. (2 references) (MLH)

  18. Kant as a Professor: Some Lessons for Today's Intellectuals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thoughts of every great philosopher is measured and represented by the history of his social background. It is indeed, more appropriate particularly in the case of a great philosopher like Immanuel Kant to single out for special recognition the outstanding characteristics of his early life on his career as a professor of ...

  19. The rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky: Vortex theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Wood, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of two articles with the main, and largely self-explanatory, title "Rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky". This article considers rotors with finite number of blades and is subtitled "Vortex theories". The first article with subtitle "Momentum theories", assessed the starring...

  20. The Education of an English Professor: The Biographical Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Valencia, Heriberto; Enríquez, Jakeline Amparo Villota; Ramos Acosta, Lizeth

    2018-01-01

    This article is the result of a qualitative research following the characteristics of hermeneutical research aims to understand the training process of the English university professor, taking into account factors that affect and surround the social, economic, and cultural environment; in which the experience and the story of life, shape the…

  1. Professor: A motorized field-based phenotyping cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    An easy-to-customize, low-cost, low disturbance, motorized proximal sensing cart for field-based high-throughput phenotyping is described. General dimensions, motor specifications, and a remote operation application are given. The cart, named Professor, supports mounting multiple proximal sensors an...

  2. Professor Age and Gender Affect Student Perceptions and Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Shauna W.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2015-01-01

    Student evaluations provide rich information about teaching performance, but a number of factors beyond teacher effectiveness influence student evaluations. In this study we examined the effects of professor gender and perceived age on ratings of effectiveness and rapport as well as academic performance. We also asked students to rate professor…

  3. Professor Rastislav Dzúrik: the Man and the Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzsiová, Katarina; Mydlík, Miroslav

    2016-02-01

    Rastislav Dzrik, finished his medical study at the Medical School of Comenius University in Bratislava in 1953. After graduation he began to work at the Institute of chemistry and biochemistry of the Medical School and in 1957 he continued working at the IIIrd Internal Clinic of this faculty, which became later the base of "Internal School of Professor T. R. Niederland" with biochemical focusing. In the year 1967 ProfessorDzrik in cooperation with ProfessorJan Brod founded the Nephrological Section of the Slovak Internal Society and then the postgraduate scientific-research activity in nephrology began. The main topics of his scientific activity, in which he received many priority results, were: Isolation and characteristic of inhibitor of glucose utilisation and of inhibitor of renal gluconeogenesis; Effect of "middle molecular substances, especially in the development of renal insufficiency; Isolation and identification of hippurate and pseudouridine. His publishing activity was manifested in more than 500 scientific papers, several monographs and many chapters in various textbooks and manuals of internal medicine and clinical biochemistry, and more than 1,000 citations. The most important success of Professor Dzrik was the textbook "Nephrology which was published in 2004 and he was its main editor. Rastislav Dzriks impact on the field of Nephrology in Slovakia was manifold. It included his complex work of clinical nephrology, his pedagogical activities, and last but not least his excellent organizing abilities.

  4. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness on Distance Learning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jeanny; Tomasi, Stella D.

    2015-01-01

    Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students' perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive…

  5. Professor Oberth and Dr. von Braun at ARS Banquet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun holds the coveted Hermarn Oberth award presented to him by Professor Oberth during the banquet hosted by the Alabama Section of the American Rocket Society (ARS), on October 19, 1961. The Oberth award was given for outstanding technical contributions to the field of astronautics or for the promotion and advancement of astronautical sciences.

  6. The benefits of being economics professor A (and not Z)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Praag, C.M.; van Praag, B.M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Alphabetic name ordering on multi-authored academic papers, which is the convention in the economics discipline and various other disciplines, is to the advantage of people whose last name initials are placed early in the alphabet. As it turns out, Professor A, who has been a first author more often

  7. Professor Lisa Aranson on JA Green (a pioonier artist photographer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jonathan Adagogo Green's photographic and artistic contributions working in his countryside, the Niger Delta of Nigeria is reviewed by Professor Lisa Aranson. Aranson in a public lecture presentation on the stand-point of art history thinks of J.A. Green as having operated in two worlds of which he is said to have initiated in ...

  8. Teaching the College "Nones": Christian Privilege and the Religion Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riswold, Caryn D.

    2015-01-01

    Working with undergraduate students invites teachers into relationship and conversation with young people at a time when they are emerging as adults and forming their identities. Faith is one area of identity formation often attended to by scholars, college professors, and their institutions. But within that, little attention has been paid to…

  9. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  10. Burnout Syndrome and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Padilla, Arlington Antonio; Escorcia Bonivento, Carla Vanessa; Perez Suarez, Blinis Sat

    2017-01-01

    The presence of the Burnout syndrome in professors may be regarded as a deterioration of their mental health with negative impacts on their job performance. It is known that teachers develop different activities in the areas of teaching, outreach and research. This study aims to analyze the relationship between the Burnout syndrome and…

  11. Dilemmas of a Newly Recruited Academic Qualified Professor: A Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the situation of a newly recruited academic professor who volunteered to teach a course on Research Methods to first-term MBA students in a practitioner-oriented case method Business School. Research Methods is a unique course due to its relevance not only in business but also across all graduate programs. Instructional and…

  12. "Women in Science" with Professor Jocelyn Bell Burnell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prof. Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell is currently a visiting Professor at the. University of Oxford UK and a Fellow of Mansfield College. In a career spanning over four decades, she has made outstanding contributions to Astronomy and the public understanding of Science. As a Ph.D student in Cambridge. University she was ...

  13. Why Don't All Professors Use Computers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, David Eli

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the adoption of computer technology at universities and examines reasons why some professors don't use computers. Topics discussed include computer applications, including artificial intelligence, social science research, statistical analysis, and cooperative research; appropriateness of the technology for the task; the Computer Aptitude…

  14. The Professor as Intern: Approaches to Teaching Advertising Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamber, Linda

    Drawing upon the experiences of a participant in the Visiting Professor Program sponsored by the Advertising Education Foundation of the American Advertising Federation and the American Academy of Advertising, this paper discusses the advantages such programs can have for both the host company and the participant. The first section of the paper…

  15. Ten Things Every Professor Should Know about Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kenneth; Dunlap, Joanna; Stevens, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ten key assessment practices for advancing student learning that all professors should be familiar with and strategically incorporate in their classrooms and programs. Each practice or concept is explained with examples and guidance for putting it into practice. The ten are: learning outcomes, performance assessments,…

  16. Virginia Tech Wildlife Professor Helping To Save Florida Panther

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    With few Florida panthers now in existence, Mike Vaughan, Virginia Tech professor of wildlife and sciences in the College of Natural Resources, has been appointed to serve on the Florida Panther Scientific Review Team (SRT). Vaughan and other SRT members have made several trips to Naples, Fla., to interview state and federal biologists directly involved with the recovery of the Florida panther.

  17. How Not to Lose Face on Facebook, for Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    For years college administrators have warned students to watch their step in online social realms, noting that sharing too much could hurt them later on if future employees saw their drunken party pictures or boorish writings. Now that professors and administrators are catching Facebook fever, they should heed their own advice. The author…

  18. Tribute to the legend Mr. Veterinary Public Health, Professor James ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The author was also destined during his Sabbatical Leave to have an interactive interview session with Prof James Steele after attending the 20th Annual James Steele lecture/ 99th birthday Dinner of Professor James Steele 4th and 6th April 2012 at the Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, USA. The interview ...

  19. "Friending" Professors, Parents and Bosses: A Facebook Connection Conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Katherine A.; Peluchette, Joy V.

    2011-01-01

    The ever-growing popularity of Facebook has led some educators to ponder what role social networking might have in education. The authors examined student reactions to friend requests from people outside their regular network of friends including professors, parents, and employers. We found students have the most positive reactions to friend…

  20. Humor and the Emeritus Professor: An Interview with Gene Roth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a compilation of several conversations with Dr. Gene Roth, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University. Dr. Roth is past President of the Academy of Human Resource Development, and although he is well known for his efforts in bringing humor into the field of HRD, he is not the same Gene Roth that played…

  1. Understanding the Motivation and Transformation of White Culturally Responsive Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, China; Alfred, Mary

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation for White professors in higher education to become culturally inclusive in their teaching practices and the transformational experiences that created this motivation and shaped their development. The findings revealed personal convictions that centred on moral obligations towards teaching was…

  2. Häbi, professor, teil on Gefilus kapis / Eve Kruuse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kruuse, Eve,d1959-

    2008-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli professor Marika Mikelsaar võitis läinud kuul koos kolleegidega (Tiiu Kullisaar, Epp Songisepp, Hedi Annuk ja Mihkel Zilmer) Soulis ülemaailmse naisleiutajate konkursil ME-3 bakteri avastamise ja probiootikuks arendamise eest kuldmedali

  3. The Life of the Mind: A Tribute to Three Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kaoru

    2000-01-01

    This speech by a distinguished scholar in educational psychology recounts, with appreciation, his educational experiences under three distinguished professors: Toshio Maki, his undergraduate thesis supervisor in Japan; E. Paul Torrance, the prominent educational psychologist; and C. Gilbert Wrenn, his doctoral advisor. (DB)

  4. University Professors and Teaching Ethics: Conceptualizations and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kathy Lund; Beggs, Jeri Mullins

    2006-01-01

    After the spectacular ethical breaches in corporate America emerged, business school professors were singled out as having been negligent in teaching ethical standards. This exploratory study asked business school faculty about teaching ethics, including conceptualizations of ethics in a teaching context and opinions of the extent to which…

  5. Florida Tech professor gets three-year grant

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Dr. Marc Baarmand, Florida Tech associate professor of physics, has received a three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Division of High Energy Physics, to conduct research with the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment" (1/3 page).

  6. Diomede Islands, Bering Straight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Diomede Islands consisting of the western island Big Diomede (also known as Imaqliq, Nunarbuk or Ratmanov Island), and the eastern island Little Diomede (also known as Krusenstern Island or Inaliq), are two rocky islands located in the middle of the Bering Strait between Russia and Alaska. The islands are separated by an international border and the International Date Line which is approximately 1.5 km from each island; you can look from Alaska into tomorrow in Russia. At the closest land approach between the United States, which controls Little Diomede, and Russia, which controls Big Diomede, they are 3 km apart. Little Diomede Island constitutes the Alaskan City of Diomede, while Big Diomede Island is Russia's easternmost point. The first European to reach the islands was the Russian explorer Semyon Dezhnev in 1648. The text of the 1867 treaty finalizing the sale of Alaska uses the islands to designate the border between the two nations. The image was acquired July 8, 2000, covers an area of 13.5 x 10.8 km, and is located at 65.8 degrees north latitude, 169 degrees west longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Tales of island tails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de Alma V.; Oost, Albert P.; Veeneklaas, Roos M.; Lammerts, Evert Jan; Duin, van Willem E.; Wesenbeeck, van Bregje K.

    2016-01-01

    The Frisian islands (Southern North Sea) have extensive island tails, i.e. the entire downdrift side of an island consisting of salt marshes, dunes, beaches and beach plains, and green beaches. Currently, large parts of these tails are ageing and losing dynamics, partly due to human influence.

  8. Communications and Informational Technologies: professional preparation of the Informatics professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Robaina Valdés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of the society it is sign by the development of the techniques and the science that has challenges the educational system in the formation of the new generation. The Cuban Educational politics had defined the social mission to each subsystem of education, in the particular case of the professional polytechnic education, belongs to the professors of Informatics, the accomplish of this mission, develop an important role in the educational use of the communication and informational technologies that requires and an adequate professional preparation. The aim of this article is to based form the theoretical and methodological point, the process of the professional preparation of the professors of informatics in the technical schools while they apply the communication and informational technologies, the theorical bases offered the historical past and tendencies of the professional preparation while they apply the communication and information technologies, the educative use of information technologies in the pedagogical process and the theoretical support in this process, using revision methods bibliography and systematizing . We may say that the research work concludes that the preparation of the professors had passed for different stages that had point to the need of the formation of professor to give answers to the introduction of the informatics subject at school, using different ways, the postgraduate updates and all the variety of ways to upgrade the professors will use. Form the educative point of view a part from the study as a subject must be use as an intermediate in the pedagogical process, also, to determine the characteristic that distinguish the professional preparation process.

  9. Broadband Wireline Provider Service Summary; BBRI_wirelineSum12

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This dataset represents the availability of broadband Internet access in Rhode Island via all wireline technologies assessed by Broadband Rhode Island. Broadband...

  10. Broadband Wireline Provider Service: Other Copper Wireline; BBRI_otherCopper12

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This dataset represents the availability of wireline broadband Internet access in Rhode Island via "Other Copper Wireline" technology. In Rhode Island, this category...

  11. Refletindo sobre a relação professor-aluno em um grupo de professores do Esino Fundamental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio dos Santos Andrade

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A partir das concepções de Donald Schön sobre a formação do professor como prático reflexivo, os princípios de trabalho com pequenos grupos, baseados nas concepções de J. L Moreno, foram utilizados com o objetivo de facilitar o processo de reflexão sobre suas práticas de sala de aula, com seis professores do Ensino Fundamental. Foram realizados nove encontros de 90 a 120 minutos de duração. Nas discussões, os casos dos alunos mais problemáticos quanto ao seu comportamento foram trazidos pelos professores e analisados pelo grupo a luz das concepções da Pragmática da Comunicação Humana. Como resultado destas discussões, os professores foram levados a considerar os aspectos mais latentes, e portanto significantes, de suas relações com os alunos. Estas reflexões conduziram a uma "resignificação" das mesmas, com efeitos surpreendentes sobre os comportamentos dos alunos.

  12. Maury Nussbaum reappointed as Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Maury Nussbaum, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been reappointed as the Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  13. Brian M. Kleiner receives Ralph H. Bogle Professor Fellowship in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Brian M. Kleiner, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been named the Ralph H. Bogle Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  14. Yue Joseph Wang named Grant A. Dove Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Yue Joseph Wang, professor of electrical and computer engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been named the Grant A. Dove Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  15. In lieu of an autobiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestin, J.

    1993-07-01

    The author recalls some of the issues related to his professional work, first at the Politechnika in Warsaw and at the Polish University College in London and subsequently during his tenure as a professor of engineering at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

  16. Higher Education Institutional Affiliation and Satisfaction among Feminist Professors: Is There an Advantage to Women's Colleges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Rachel; Kmeic, Julie; Worell, Judith; Crosby, Faye

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether feminist professors of psychology at women's colleges derived more job satisfaction than feminist professors at coed colleges. Surveys and interviews indicated that feminist professors were generally satisfied with their pedagogical situations and generally dedicated to and successful at teaching. Institutional affiliation…

  17. The Roles of a University Professor in a Teacher Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Chin; Hung, Hsiu-Ting; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The opportunities in which university professors collaborate with the practicing school teachers in a teacher study group are few. This study investigated how a university professor facilitated a collaborative teacher study group to enhance teachers' professional growth. Five primary school teachers and a university professor collaborated on…

  18. University Student Expectations of Confidentiality When Disclosing Information to Their Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gregory E.; Dalton, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore university students' expectations of confidentiality when they make disclosures to their university professors. A secondary purpose was to consider if students have a higher expectation of confidentiality when talking with Psychology professors versus professors in other disciplines. Students were asked to…

  19. The Effects of Professors' Race and Gender on Student Evaluations and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basow, Susan A.; Codos, Stephanie; Martin, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effects of professor gender, professor race, and student gender on student ratings of teaching effectiveness and amount learned. After watching a three-minute engineering lecture presented by a computer-animated professor who varied by gender and race (African American, White), female and male undergraduates…

  20. Describing the Cognitive Level of Professor Discourse and Student Cognition in College of Agriculture Class Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, John C.; Whittington, M. Susie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the cognitive level of professor discourse and student cognition during selected college of agriculture class sessions. Twenty-one undergraduate class sessions were videotaped in 12 professors' courses. Results were interpreted to show that professors' discourse was mostly (62%) at the knowledge and…

  1. PREFACE: Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsuya

    2011-08-01

    This issue includes a special section on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in memory of the late Professor Kunio Kuwahara, who passed away on 15 September 2008, at the age of 66. In this special section, five articles are included that are based on the lectures and discussions at `The 7th International Nobeyama Workshop on CFD: To the Memory of Professor Kuwahara' held in Tokyo on 23 and 24 September 2009. Professor Kuwahara started his research in fluid dynamics under Professor Imai at the University of Tokyo. His first paper was published in 1969 with the title 'Steady Viscous Flow within Circular Boundary', with Professor Imai. In this paper, he combined theoretical and numerical methods in fluid dynamics. Since that time, he made significant and seminal contributions to computational fluid dynamics. He undertook pioneering numerical studies on the vortex method in 1970s. From then to the early nineties, he developed numerical analyses on a variety of three-dimensional unsteady phenomena of incompressible and compressible fluid flows and/or complex fluid flows using his own supercomputers with academic and industrial co-workers and members of his private research institute, ICFD in Tokyo. In addition, a number of senior and young researchers of fluid mechanics around the world were invited to ICFD and the Nobeyama workshops, which were held near his villa, and they intensively discussed new frontier problems of fluid physics and fluid engineering at Professor Kuwahara's kind hospitality. At the memorial Nobeyama workshop held in 2009, 24 overseas speakers presented their papers, including the talks of Dr J P Boris (Naval Research Laboratory), Dr E S Oran (Naval Research Laboratory), Professor Z J Wang (Iowa State University), Dr M Meinke (RWTH Aachen), Professor K Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor U Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor F Hussain (University of Houston), Professor M Farge (École Normale Superieure), Professor J Y Yong (National

  2. Paradise Islands? Island States and Environmental Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverker C. Jagers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Island states have been shown to outperform continental states on a number of large-scale coordination-related outcomes, such as levels of democracy and institutional quality. The argument developed and tested in this article contends that the same kind of logic may apply to islands’ environmental performance, too. However, the empirical analysis shows mixed results. Among the 105 environmental outcomes that we analyzed, being an island only has a positive impact on 20 of them. For example, island states tend to outcompete continental states with respect to several indicators related to water quality but not in aspects related to biodiversity, protected areas, or environmental regulations. In addition, the causal factors previously suggested to make islands outperform continental states in terms of coordination have weak explanatory power in predicting islands’ environmental performance. We conclude the paper by discussing how these interesting findings can be further explored.

  3. Economic losses to buildings due to tsunami impact: the case of Rhodes city, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Ioanna; Novikova, Tatyana; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos

    2017-04-01

    The expected economic losses to buildings due to the tsunami impact is of particular importance for the tsunami risk management. However, only few efforts can be found in this direction. In this study we approached this issue selecting the city of Rhodes Isl., Greece, as a test-site. The methodological steps followed include (a) selection of worst case scenario in the study area based on the tsunami history of the area which includes several powerful events, e.g. 142 AD, 1303, 1481, 1609, 1741, (b) numerical simulation of the tsunami and determination of the inundation zone, (c) application of the DAMASCHE empirical tool, produced by the SCHEMA EU-FP6 project, for the calculation of the damage level expected at each one of the buildings as a function of the water depth in the inundation area, (d) calculation of the buildings that would need reparation after partial damage and of those that would need reconstruction after total destruction, (e) calculation of the cost implied for both reparation and reconstruction. The several data sets which are needed for the execution of these steps, are susceptible to uncertainties and, therefore, the final results are quite sensitive to changes of the data sets. Alternative costs were calculated by taking into account the several uncertainties involved. This research is a contribution to the EU-FP7 tsunami research project ASTARTE (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe), grant agreement no: 603839, 2013-10-30.

  4. The Inevitable Universe---Parker-Rhodes' peculiar mixture of ontology and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1989-12-01

    When asked to give a lecture on Parker-Rhodes' physics, I was somewhat non-plused. I almost replied ''What physics?'' --- a point of view that Frederick expresses himself more than once in the book he was working on when he died. But that would be unjust. Whatever his view, I assert that the discovery of the Combinational Hierarchy is one of the most important ''discoveries'' --- or whatever you want to call it --- in physics made in this century. His calculation of the proton-electron mass ratio is also a fantastic result that we are still trying to come to grips with. And his insight into early cosmology --- what he called a ''cold big bang'' --- which appeared in an early version of the Theory of Indistinguishables, also had merit. His early universe is a lot closer to my own views now than I realized when I first encountered it. We will mention other insights as I go along. But his views are so different from those of anyone I know or knew, that I have decided to let him speak for himself by reading passages from his manuscript The Inevitable Universe, or TIU, which was still unpublished at the time of his death, and add a few comments on them

  5. The Inevitable Universe---Parker-Rhodes' peculiar mixture of ontology and physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1989-12-01

    When asked to give a lecture on Parker-Rhodes' physics, I was somewhat non-plused. I almost replied What physics '' --- a point of view that Frederick expresses himself more than once in the book he was working on when he died. But that would be unjust. Whatever his view, I assert that the discovery of the Combinational Hierarchy is one of the most important discoveries'' --- or whatever you want to call it --- in physics made in this century. His calculation of the proton-electron mass ratio is also a fantastic result that we are still trying to come to grips with. And his insight into early cosmology --- what he called a cold big bang'' --- which appeared in an early version of the Theory of Indistinguishables, also had merit. His early universe is a lot closer to my own views now than I realized when I first encountered it. We will mention other insights as I go along. But his views are so different from those of anyone I know or knew, that I have decided to let him speak for himself by reading passages from his manuscript The Inevitable Universe, or TIU, which was still unpublished at the time of his death, and add a few comments on them.

  6. Biography of Professor Cornel Tiberiu Opriş. Professional maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Alexandru; Rotaru, Horatiu

    2017-01-01

    Professor Cornel Tiberiu Opris was the founder and Chair of the Clinic and University Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Cluj, after the Education Reform of 1948. The article illustrates how the founder of these institutions led a valiant struggle for obtaining and arranging a location for the newly established Faculty of Dentistry, within the Institute of Medicine and Pharmacy. Professor Cornel Tiberiu Opriş established himself as the most prodigious researcher at the Faculty for over a quarter-century, until his retirement, introducing his original conception in the therapeutic and surgical field. He created in Cluj-Napoca a specialist medical school by imposing national prestige for the institution that he led.

  7. [Professor SONG Nanchang's experience for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Pan, Hao; Xu, Hanbin

    2015-06-01

    Professor SONG Nanchang's clinical experience and characteristics for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis are introduced. In clinical treatment, professor SONG has adopted staging treatment strategy, and performed acupuncture stimulation with different levels. He attaches great importance to the acupoint selection on distal limbs. For the treatment on the face, he takes temperature as necessity; he inherits from famous Chinese doctor ZONG Ruilin's acupuncture technique of slow-twisting and gentle-pressing. Meanwhile, he excels in combination, of different therapies, using acupuncture, moxibustion, electroacupuncture, auricular point sticking, Chinese herbal medicine, etc. according to individual condition and disease stages. He also emphasizes on psychological counseling and daily life care to achieve rehabilitation within the shortest time.

  8. [Professor GAO Yuchun's experience of acupuncture for headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Linhua; Xing, Xiao; Xue, Weihua; Wang, Yanjun; Xu, Cejun; Xuc, Jun; Gao, Yuchun; Kang, Suobin

    2015-12-01

    As one of the important founders of GAO's acupuncture academic school in YanZhao area, Professor GAO Yuchun 's experience of acupuncture for headache is summarized in this paper. In the opinion of Professor GAO, the treatment of headache should focus on eliminating evil and relieving pain, and the syndrome differentiation should be based on meridian differentiation, especially on three yang meridians of foot as well as liver meridian and kidney meridian. In the acupoint prescription, attention should be placed on strengthening the spleen and stomach. The midnight-midday ebb flow acupuncture is advocated. The combination between acupuncture order and movement of qi is emphasized. In the manipulation, the role of pressing hand, the stimulation during reinforcing and reducing methods, and needle-retention time are important. The breathing reinforcing and reducing method of acupuncture are also advocated.

  9. [Learning experience of acupuncture technique from professor ZHANG Jin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hongsheng; Zhang, Jin

    2017-08-12

    As a famous acupuncturist in the world, professor ZHANG Jin believes the key of acupuncture technique is the use of force, and the understanding of the "concentrating the force into needle body" is essential to understand the essence of acupuncture technique. With deep study of Huangdi Neijing ( The Inner Canon of Huangdi ) and Zhenjiu Dacheng ( Compendium of Acupuncture and Moxibustion ), the author further learned professor ZHANG Jin 's theory and operation specification of "concentrating force into needle body, so the force arriving before and together with needle". The whole-body force should be subtly focused on the tip of needle, and gentle force at tip of needle could get significant reinforcing and reducing effect. In addition, proper timing at tip of needle could start reinforcing and reducing effect, lead qi to disease location, and achieve superior clinical efficacy.

  10. [Professor ZHAO Jiping's meridian diagnosis and treatment for primary dysmenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cheng; Zhang, Chang; Zhang, Jiajia; Wang, Jun

    2016-03-01

    For the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea, professor ZHAO Jiping focuses on meridian diagnosis and inspection, and uses pressing methods to locate the response points along the meridian, including acupoints and aishi points. During the stage of attack, it is essential to press along the spleen meridian, mainly Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Diji (SP 8) and Yinlingquan (SP 9); during the stage of remission, it is essential to press along the bladder meridian and stomach meridian, mainly Ganshu (BL 18), Pishu (BL 20), Weishu (BL 21), Shenshu (BL 23) and Zusanli (ST 36). The differences between deficiency syndrome and excess syndrome lead to the different feelings of doctors and patients. Combined with the results of meridian diagnosis and inspection, the aim of treatment can be achieved by different acupuncture methods. Professor ZHAO pays attention to the treatment of accompanied symptoms and timing of treatment, since the relief of accompanied syndromes and selection of timing are keys to relieving patient's pain.

  11. [Summary of professor YANG Jun's experience for intractable facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Li, Zaiyuan; Ge, Tingqiu; Zhang, Man; Yuan, Aihong; Yang, Jun

    2017-06-12

    Professor YANG Jun 's experience of diagnosis and treatment for intractable facial paralysis is introduced. Professor YANG focuses on the thinking model that combines TCM, western medicine and acupuncture, and adopts the differentiation system that combines disease differentiation, syndrome differentiation and meridian differentiation; he adopts the treatment integrates etiological treatment, overall regulation, symptomatic treatment as well as acupuncture, moxibustion, medication and flash cupping. The acupoints of yangming meridians are mostly selected, and acupoints of governor vessel such as Dazhui (GV 14) and Jinsuo (GV 8) are highly valued. The multiple-needles shallow-penetration-insertion twirling lifting and thrusting technique are mostly adopted to achieve slow and mild acupuncture sensation; in addition, the facial muscles are pulled up with mechanics action. The intensive stimulation with electroacupuncture is recommended at Qianzheng (Extra), Yifeng (TE 17) and Yangbai (GB 14), which is given two or three treatments per week.

  12. Qualidade do sono entre professores e fatores associados

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Andrade Pereira Meier

    2016-01-01

    O sono desempenha função notável na prevenção de doenças, manutenção e recuperação da saúde física e mental. Como processo reparador, sofre influências de fatores determinantes e condicionantes, que o tornam complexo e multifacetado. As condições adversas de trabalho enfrentadas por professores podem prejudicar sua qualidade de vida e, consequentemente, seu padrão de sono. Este estudo objetivou analisar a qualidade do sono e fatores associados em professores da educação básica. Trata-se de um...

  13. An Outstanding Career: Professor Emeritus Iacob Cătoiu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Oprică

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the duration of his commissions of Deputy Dean (1981-1989 and, respectively, Dean (1992-2003, and also by the manner of approaching the managerial problems and his scientific extension, Professor Iacob Cătoiu left and indelible trace on the evolution of the former Department of Commerce in the Bucharest University of Economic Studies (ASE – now the Department of Business and Tourism. He is author or co-author of an important number of books (57 and articles (105 and book presentations. Thus, after he made the personal acquaintance with Philip Kotler, the guru of international marketing, in 1997, Professor Iacob Cătoiu wrote the Forward to the Romanian version of Philip Kotler's volume Managementul marketingului (Marketing Management a fundamental book in its field. (Nicolae Lupu

  14. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EATING HABITS IN UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Luiz Rodrigues Munaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, university professors engage in academic tasks often stressful and sedentary behaviors, making the practice of physical activity and healthier eating habits. The aim of this study was to review the literature Brazilian studies on physical activity and eating habits of university professors .The search was conducted between March and May 2013, in electronic databases. For the delimitation of the study, was used as descriptors: Physical Activity, University Teachers and Eating Habits. At the end of the article selection process, remaining 06 studies that have been described and discussed in the text. And all of a descriptive nature, with small samples with some robust and consistent methodology. The selected studies, regardless of their qualities, point to the need of this population to engage in more physical activity and healthy eating habits programs

  15. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EATING HABITS IN UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Luiz Rodrigues Munaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, university professors engage in academic tasks often stressful and sedentary behaviors, making the practice of physical activity and healthier eating habits. The aim of this study was to review the literature Brazilian studies on physical activity and eating habits of university professors .The search was conducted between March and May 2013, in electronic databases. For the delimitation of the study, was used as descriptors: Physical Activity, University Teachers and Eating Habits. At the end of the article selection process, remaining 06 studies that have been described and discussed in the text. And all of a descriptive nature, with small samples with some robust and consistent methodology. The selected studies, regardless of their qualities, point to the need of this population to engage in more physical activity and healthy eating habits programs.

  16. The university professor: integration between the personal and professional dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Javier BERMÚDEZ-APONTE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this article, the authors explain how the teaching role is affected by certain social and cultural changes, like the knowledge society emergence, the universities orientation towards marketing, the constant demand and pressure exerted on teachers to publish, the loss of the ethical sense in the academic activity and the disparity of tasks that are being assigned to the university professors. In view of the above, a comprehensive model, compound by two concepts –personal and professional– of a university professor is proposed; in fact, this model incorporates and summarises different contributions regarding this theme. Finally, this article aims to defend the need to understand the teaching role as a vocation, in the broadest sense of the word, a vocation carries the inclination to pursue an aim: the education of those students that teachers have in charge.

  17. The University Professor View from the Communitarian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Del Valle López

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The task of the university professor is a mission and not simply a profession and that is why higher education should be impregnated with values. Nowadays education is articulated into three areas: the State, the Market and the Volunteering, but no one of these three sectors by themselves has covered the needs of all the citizens, there have always been losers, therefore the conjunction of the three sectors became necessary. Communitarianism promotes an ethical-social pact that favors the progress of society without nullifying the individual dimension. It believes that the university is the space where a communitarian consciousness should be promoted to generate a social capital by means of education and it is a privilege place to substantiate the moral identity of the person beginning with the commitment of the professor with the university student.

  18. Professor Peter Higgs: "My Life as a Boson"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Professor Peter Higgs played a key role in the development of the Standard Model, our current theory of fundamental physics. The search for the Higgs Boson is the centrepiece of the LHC programme at CERN, and the existence of this famously elusive particle is likely to be confirmed or refuted with data currently being collected, using apparatus partly designed at Bristol. Professor Higgs will introduce the ideas of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and discuss how these developed from their application in condensed matter through the earlier work of Yoichiro Nambu and Jeffrey Goldstone, to the work of Robert Brout, Francois Englert and himself in 1964. The subsequent application of these ideas to electroweak theory will be discussed briefly.

  19. YouTube Professors: Scholars as Online Video Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at the rising popularity of professors as the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites is making it possible for classrooms to be opened up and making teaching--which once took place behind closed doors--a more public art. Web video has generated a new form of…

  20. YouTube Professors Scholars as Online Video Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how professors are becoming the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites end up opening the classroom and making teaching--which once took place behind closed doors--a more public art. Web videos open a new form of public intellectualism to scholars looking to…