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Sample records for revision operation rate

  1. IMPACT OF A REVISED {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al REACTION RATE ON THE OPERATION OF THE Mg-Al CYCLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Imbriani, G.; DiLeva, A.; Limata, B. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Strieder, F. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Bemmerer, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400 (Germany); Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Lemut, A. [Universita di Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Formicola, A.; Gustavino, C.; Junker, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Gervino, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Torino and INFN Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Guglielmetti, A., E-mail: straniero@oa-teramo.inaf.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano (Italy); and others

    2013-02-15

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H-burning regions. In particular, low-energy nuclear resonances in the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al reaction affect the production of radioactive {sup 26}Al{sup gs} as well as the resulting Mg/Al abundance ratio. Reliable estimations of these quantities require precise measurements of the strengths of low-energy resonances. Based on a new experimental study performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics, we provide revised rates of the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup gs} and the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} reactions with corresponding uncertainties. In the temperature range 50-150 MK, the new recommended rate of {sup 26}Al {sup m} production is up to five times higher than previously assumed. In addition, at T = 100 MK, the revised total reaction rate is a factor of two higher. Note that this is the range of temperature at which the Mg-Al cycle operates in a H-burning zone. The effects of this revision are discussed. Due to the significantly larger {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} rate, the estimated production of {sup 26}Al{sup gs} in H-burning regions is less efficient than previously obtained. As a result, the new rates should imply a smaller contribution from Wolf-Rayet stars to the galactic {sup 26}Al budget. Similarly, we show that the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) extra-mixing scenario does not appear able to explain the most extreme values of {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, i.e., >10{sup -2}, found in some O-rich presolar grains. Finally, the substantial increase of the total reaction rate makes the hypothesis of self-pollution by massive AGBs a more robust explanation for the Mg-Al anticorrelation observed in globular-cluster stars.

  2. FFTF operations procedures preparation guide. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Guide is intended to provide guidelines for the initial preparation of FFTF Operating Procedures. The Procedures Preparation Guide was developed from the plan presented and approved in the FFTF Reactor Plant Procedures Plan, PC-1, Revision 3

  3. Outcome, revision rate and indication for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J V; Polk, A; Sorensen, A K

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated patient-reported outcomes, the rate of revision and the indications for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty of the shoulder in patients with osteoarthritis. All patients with osteoarthritis who underwent primary resurfacing hemiarthroplasty and reported...... to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR), between January 2006 and December 2010 were included. There were 772 patients (837 arthroplasties) in the study. The Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder (WOOS) index was used to evaluate patient-reported outcome 12 months (10 to 14) post......-operatively. The rates of revision were calculated from the revisions reported to the DSR up to December 2011 and by checking deaths with the Danish National Register of Persons. A complete questionnaire was returned by 688 patients (82.2%). The mean WOOS was 67 (0 to 100). A total of 63 hemiarthroplasties (7...

  4. Operations program plan: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This document, the Operations Program Plan (OPP), has been developed as the seven-year master plan for operation of WIPP. The OPP was authorized by the Albuquerque Field Office of the Department of Energy (DOE-AL) and that organization's WIPP Project Office (DOE-WPO) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The OPP is the directive from the DOE-WPO Project Manager as to how the WIPP is to be managed, operated, and administered. As the top tier management document for WIPP, the OPP establishes organizational responsibilities and an organizational structure for the Waste Isolation Division (WID) of Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The OPP sets policy and tone for conducting WIPP operations; it requires and specifically authorizes implementing documents (e.g., manuals). It has also proven instrumental in the budgeting and planning process, most particularly in expediting the preparation of specific budgets and detailed schedules for each of the numerous work packages. The OPP is also used to communicate information about WIPP operations

  5. Laparoscopic revision of failed antireflux operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, F M; Bloomston, M; Zervos, E; Muench, J; Albrink, M H; Murr, M; Rosemurgy, A S

    2001-01-01

    A small number of patients fail fundoplication and require reoperation. Laparoscopic techniques have been applied to reoperative fundoplications. We reviewed our experience with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication. Reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication was undertaken in 28 patients, 19 F and 9 M, of mean age 56 years +/- 12. Previous antireflux procedures included 19 open and 12 laparoscopic antireflux operations. Symptoms were heartburn (90%), dysphagia (35%), and atypical symptoms (30%%). The mean interval from antireflux procedure to revision was 13 months +/- 4.2. The mean DeMeester score was 78+/-32 (normal 14.7). Eighteen patients (64%) had hiatal breakdown, 17 (60%) had wrap failure, 2 (7%) had slipped Nissen, 3 (11%) had paraesophageal hernias, and 1 (3%) had an excessively tight wrap. Twenty-five revisions were completed laparoscopically, while 3 patients required conversion to the open technique. Complications occurred in 9 of 17 (53%) patients failing previous open fundoplications and in 4 of 12 patients (33%) failing previous laparoscopic fundoplications and included 15 gastrotomies and 1 esophagotomy, all repaired laparoscopically, 3 postoperative gastric leaks, and 4 pneumothoraces requiring tube thoracostomy. No deaths occurred. Median length of stay was 5 days (range 2-90 days). At a mean follow-up of 20 months +/- 17, 2 patients (7%) have failed revision of their fundoplications, with the rest of the patients being essentially asymptomatic (93%). The results achieved with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication are similar to those of primary laparoscopic fundoplications. Laparoscopic reoperations, particularly of primary open fundoplication, can be technically challenging and fraught with complications. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Revised estimates for ozone reduction by shuttle operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Previous calculations by five different modeling groups of the effect of space shuttle operations on the ozone layer yielded an estimate of 0.2 percent ozone reduction for the Northern Hemisphere at 60 launches per year. Since these calculations were made, the accepted rate constant for the reaction between hydroperoxyl and nitric oxide to yield hydroxyl and nitrogen dioxide, HO2 + NO yields OH + NO2, was revised upward by more than an order of magnitude, with a resultant increase in the predicted ozone reduction for chlorofluoromethanes by a factor of approximately 2. New calculations of the shuttle effect were made with use of the new rate constant data, again by five different modeling groups. The new value of the shuttle effect on the ozone layer was found to be 0.25 percent. The increase resulting from the revised rate constant is considerably less for space shuttle operations than for chlorofluoromethane production, because the new rate constant also increases the calculated rate of downward transport of shuttle exhaust products out of the stratosphere.

  7. Electric rate operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, D.

    1993-01-01

    The share of nuclear power in EDF production implies multiple rate structures. How are these rates determined. What are the new applications of electricity, and in particular those that make use of the especially low summer prices for electricity. These are topics of interest to the man in the street (witness EDF's recent 'red-white-blue' rates). This prompted the 'Nuclear Power in the Financial, Energy and Economic situation' department of France's nuclear power company to organize a conference bringing together an expert on rates - M.P. Bernard, head of the rate fixing service at the EDF's headquarters - and representatives from suppliers of equipment taking advantage of the various EDF rate options

  8. Operational electricity transmission rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roggen, M.

    1997-01-01

    In a liberalized electricity market both the consumers and the producers of electricity must pay for the use of the power transmission network. Thus, the net manager has unlimited options to realize efficiency improvements. A neutral and transparent management of the power grid is necessary to avoid disturbance of the market. KEMA Consulting translated abstract ideas and strategic advices to operational concepts in its report 'A framework for the determination of tariffs of the transport in the Dutch electricity sector'

  9. Operator licensing examination standards for power reactors. Interim revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    These examination standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the processes associated with initial and requalification examinations. The standards also ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations for all applicants. These standards are for guidance purposes and are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations (i.e., 10 CFR Part 55), and they are subject to revision or other changes in internal operator licensing policy. This interim revision permits facility licensees to prepare their initial operator licensing examinations on a voluntary basis pending an amendment to 10 CFR Part 55 that will require facility participation. The NRC intends to solicit comments on this revision during the rulemaking process and to issue a final Revision 8 in conjunction with the final rule

  10. Revision Hip Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review of Diagnoses, Operative Findings, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Harris, Joshua D; Erickson, Brandon J; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Nho, Shane J

    2015-07-01

    To determine indications for, operative findings of, and outcomes of revision hip arthroscopy. A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed based on PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Therapeutic clinical outcome studies reporting the indications for, operative findings of, and outcomes of revision hip arthroscopy were eligible for inclusion. All study-, patient-, and hip-specific data were extracted and analyzed. The Modified Coleman Methodology Score was used to assess study quality. Five studies were included (348 revision hip arthroscopies; 333 patients; mean age, 31.4 ± 4.2 years; 60% female patients). All 5 studies were either Level III or IV evidence. The surgeon performing revision hip arthroscopy was the same as the primary hip surgeon in only 25% of cases. The mean time between primary and revision hip arthroscopy was 27.8 ± 7.0 months (range, 2 to 193 months). Residual femoroacetabular impingement was the most common indication for and operative finding of revision hip arthroscopy (81% of cases). The most commonly reported revision procedures were femoral osteochondroplasty (24%) and acetabuloplasty (18%). The modified Harris Hip Score was used in all 5 analyzed studies, with significant (P arthroscopy, subsequent reported operations were hip arthroplasty in 11 patients and re-revision hip arthroscopy in 8 patients (5% total reoperation rate). Revision hip arthroscopy is most commonly performed for residual femoroacetabular impingement, with statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements shown in multiple patient-reported clinical outcome scores at short-term follow-up. The reoperation rate after revision hip arthroscopy is 5% within 2 years, including further arthroscopy or conversion to hip arthroplasty. Level IV, systematic review of Level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. W-087 Operational test report. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks. The equipment to be tested includes the following: a. Leak detection system operation and controls. b. Electrical interlocks.- C. Transfer pump oper ation. d. Vacuum breaker system interlocks.

  12. Methods for implementing revisions to emergency operating procedures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.B.; Bell, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    In response to the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published the TMI Action Plan. The TMI Action Plan Item I.C.1 called for the upgrading of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) at nuclear power plants. The program developed from this Action Plan item has resulted in utility efforts to: (1) revise EOPs; (2) train personnel in the use of the EOPs; and (3) implement the revised EOPs. The NRC supported the study presented in this report to identify factors which influence the effectiveness of training and implementation of revised EOPs. The NRC's major concern was the possible effects of negative transfer of training. The report includes a summary of existing methods for implementing revisions to procedures based on interviews of plant personnel, a review of the training literature applicable to the effect of previously learned procedures on the learning of and performance with revised procedures (i.e., negative transfer) and recommendations of methods and schedules for implementing revised EOPs. While the study found that the concern over negative transfer of training was not as great as anticipated, several recommendations were made. These include: (1) overtraining of operators to reduce the effect of observed negative transfer; and (2) implementation of the revised EOPs as soon as possible after training to minimize the time operators must rely upon the old EOPs after having been trained on the revised EOPs. The results of the study should be useful both to the utilities and the NRC in the development and review of EOP implementation programs

  13. Operational waste volume projection. Revision 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of July 1994

  14. Operating and Assurance Program Plan. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The LBL Operating and Assurance Program (OAP) is a management system and a set of requirements designed to maintain the level of performance necessary to achieve LBL`s programmatic and administrative objectives effectively and safely through the application of quality assurance and related conduct of operations and maintenance management principles. Implement an LBL management philosophy that supports and encourages continual improvement in performance and quality at the Laboratory. Provide an integrated approach to compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and DOE orders. The OAP is intended to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance. The Program also contains management system elements of DOE Orders 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities; 5480.25, Safety of Accelerator Facilities; and 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, and is meant to integrate these elements into the overall LBL approach to Laboratory management. The requirements of this program apply to LBL employees and organizations, and to contractors and facility users as managed by their LBL sponsors. They are also applicable to external vendors and suppliers as specified in procurement documents and contracts.

  15. Overview of FRMAC Operations. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) operations is to describe the FRMAC response to a major radiological emergency and to describe the subsequent response activities which provide radiological monitoring and assessment outside the immediate boundaries of the radiological emergency site. In the event of a major radiological emergency, Federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the State(s) and a designed Lead Federal Agency (LFA) that all Federal radiological assistance is fully supporting their efforts to protect the public and will provide monitoring and assessment results for their immediate use in decision making. The Federal agencies do not relinquish their statutory responsibilities. However, the mandated Federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities

  16. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  17. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience.

  18. Polarized proton Target-III operators manual, revision A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.; Rynes, P.

    1976-04-01

    A revision is given of a manual containing standard operating procedures for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of a polarized proton target. The discussion includes the target cryostat, the 3 He and 4 He pumping systems, remote monitors and controls, the microwave system, the magnet and power supply, the computerized polarization monitor, the 4 He liquifier and gas recovery system, and miscellaneous auxiliary equipment

  19. A comparison of revision and rerupture rates of ACL reconstruction between autografts and allografts in the skeletally immature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ian R; Chen, Jason; Love, Rebecca; Davis, Brent R; Maletis, Gregory B; Funahashi, Tadashi T

    2016-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions (ACLRs) in skeletally immature patients are increasing. The purpose of this study is to describe the demographics, graft usage, revision, and re-operation rates in skeletally immature ACLRs in the Kaiser Permanente healthcare system. Skeletally immature patients (type; bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft, hamstring autograft, and any type of allograft. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and race were evaluated as confounders. Cox proportional hazard models stratified by surgeon were used to analyse the risk of revision and re-operation. A total of 534 primary ACLR cases were evaluated with a mean follow-up of 2.9 years. The majority were hamstring autografts (n = 388, 72.7%), male (n = 339, 63.9%), and White (n = 232, 43.4%). Median age was 14.9 years, and median BMI was 21.9 kg/m(2). There were 44 (8.2%) aseptic revisions and 48 (9.0%) same-knee re-operations. The incidence rate for revision was BPTB autograft 5.5%, hamstring autograft 7.5%, and allograft 13.2%. After adjusting for confounders and surgeon clustering effect, the risk of aseptic revision and revision between allograft and hamstring autograft did not reach statistical significance. Graft selection differs in skeletally immature patients with a preponderance of surgeries being performed with hamstring tendon autografts. High revision rates were identified for all graft types used, though differences in revision rates across different graft types did not reach statistical significance. Surgeons should be aware of high rates of revision in this skeletally immature young population, although type of graft used did not appear to make a difference. III.

  20. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  1. What Is the Rerevision Rate After Revising a Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty? Analysis From the AOANJRR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Min-Leong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Graves, Stephen; de Steiger, Richard

    2015-11-01

    More than 15,000 primary hip resurfacing arthroplasties have been recorded by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) with 884 primary procedures requiring revision for reasons other than infection, a cumulative percent revision rate at 12 years of 11%. However, few studies have reported the survivorship of these revision procedures. (1) What is the cumulative percent rerevision rate for revision procedures for failed hip resurfacings? (2) Is there a difference in rerevision rate among different types of revision or bearing surfaces? The AOANJRR collects data on all primary and revision hip joint arthroplasties performed in Australia and after verification against health department data, checking of unmatched procedures, and subsequent retrieval of unreported procedures is able to obtain an almost complete data set relating to hip arthroplasty in Australia. Revision procedures are linked to the known primary hip arthroplasty. There were 15,360 primary resurfacing hip arthroplasties recorded of which 884 had undergone revision and this was the cohort available to study. The types of revisions were acetabular only, femoral only, or revision of both acetabular and femoral components. With the exception of the acetabular-only revisions, all revisions converted hip resurfacing arthroplasties to conventional (stemmed) total hip arthroplasties (THAs). All initial revisions for infection were excluded. The survivorship of the different types of revisions and that of the different bearing surfaces used were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using Cox proportional hazard models. Cumulative percent revision was calculated by determining the complement of the Kaplan-Meier survivorship function at that time multiplied by 100. Of the 884 revisions recorded, 102 underwent further revision, a cumulative percent rerevision at 10 years of 26% (95% confidence interval, 19.6-33.5). There was no difference in the rate of

  2. Rate of shunt revision as a function of age in patients with shunted hydrocephalus due to myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupepe, Esther B; Hopson, Betsy; Johnston, James M; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Jerry Oakes, W; Blount, Jeffrey P; Rocque, Brandon G

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE It is generally accepted that cerebrospinal fluid shunts fail most frequently in the first years of life. The purpose of this study was to describe the risk of shunt failure for a given patient age in a well-defined cohort with shunted hydrocephalus due to myelomeningocele (MMC). METHODS The authors analyzed data from their institutional spina bifida research database including all patients with MMC and shunted hydrocephalus. For the entire population, the number of shunt revisions in each year of life was determined. Then the number of patients at risk for shunt revision during each year of life was calculated, thus enabling them to calculate the rate of shunt revision per patient in each year of life. In this way, the timing of all shunt revision operations for the entire clinic population and the likelihood of having a shunt revision during each year of life were calculated. RESULTS A total of 655 patients were enrolled in the spina bifida research database, 519 of whom had a diagnosis of MMC and whose mean age was 17.48 ± 11.7 years (median 16 years, range 0-63 years). Four hundred seventeen patients had had a CSF shunt for the treatment of hydrocephalus and thus are included in this analysis. There were 94 shunt revisions in the 1st year of life, which represents a rate of 0.23 revisions per patient in that year. The rate of shunt revision per patient-year initially decreased as age increased, except for an increase in revision frequency in the early teen years. Shunt revisions continued to occur as late as 43 years of age. CONCLUSIONS These data substantiate the idea that shunt revision surgeries in patients with MMC are most common in the 1st year of life and decrease thereafter, except for an increase in the early teen years. A persistent risk of shunt failure was observed well into adult life. These findings underscore the importance of routine follow-up of all MMC patients with shunted hydrocephalus and will aid in counseling patients and

  3. Revising the IDEA Student Ratings of Instruction System 2002-2011 Data. IDEA Technical Report No. 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Stephen L.; Li, Dan; Brown, Ron; Guo, Meixi; Sullivan, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the processes undertaken to revise the IDEA Student Ratings of Instruction (SRI) system. The previous revision occurred in 1999, as described in IDEA Technical Report No. 11, "Revising the IDEA System for Obtaining Student Ratings of Instructors and Courses" (Hoyt, Chen, Pallett, & Gross, 1999). The procedures…

  4. Gunner's Mate G 3 and 2; Rate Training Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The rate training manual has been prepared for men of the regular Navy and of the Naval Reserve for the purpose of advancement to increase knowledge in the various aspects of the Gunner's Mate rating (G 3 and 2). Chapters 1 through 14 deal with the following topics: the requirements of the Gunner's Mate G Rating, explosives and pyrotechnics,…

  5. Structured Head and Neck CT Angiography Reporting Reduces Resident Revision Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tucker F; Brinjikji, Waleed; Doolittle, Derrick A; Nagelschneider, Alex A; Welch, Brian T; Kotsenas, Amy L

    2018-04-12

    This resident-driven quality improvement project was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of structured reporting to reduce revision rates for afterhours reports dictated by residents. The first part of the study assessed baseline revision rates for head and neck CT angiography (CTA) examinations dictated by residents during afterhours call. A structured report was subsequently created based on templates on the RSNA informatics reporting website and critical findings that should be assessed for on all CTA examinations. The template was made available to residents through the speech recognition software for all head and neck CTA examinations for a duration of 2 months. Report revision rates were then compared with and without use of the structured template. The structured template was found to reduce revision rates by approximately 50% with 10/41 unstructured reports revised and 2/17 structured reports revised. We believe that structured reporting can help reduce reporting errors, particularly in term of typographical errors, train residents to evaluate complex examinations in a systematic fashion, and assist them in recalling critical findings on these examinations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 2016 National Census of Ferry Operators (Revised 03/18)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The 2016 NCFO dataset is comprised of the responses of all operators who completed the 2016 Census, reporting 2015 calendar year ferry operations. The NCFO Flat File...

  7. 78 FR 59981 - Proposed Revision to Physical Security-Standard Design Certification and Operating Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Design Certification and Operating Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Standard... Design Certification and Operating Reactors.'' The NRC seeks comments on the proposed revised section of... subject): Federal Rulemaking Web site: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC-2013...

  8. Operability test procedure for 244-U DCRT. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    This OPT will insure the operability of various systems and their general equipment, used in the operation of the 244-U DCRT. Systems that will be tested include the following: Leak Detection Systems; Heat Trace System; Vessel Temperature Measurement System; Dip Tube Water System; Weight Factor and Specific Gravity System; Instrument Air System; Vessel Liquid Level System; Vessel Liquid Transfer System; and Exhauster Differential Pressure Indicating Controller System. The tests will cover checks on equipment operation and electrical interlocks, but will not cover checks on associated annunciator alarms which are covered in a separate OTP

  9. Selective application of revised source terms to operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hyun; Song, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Young Wook; Ko, Hyun Seok; Kang, Chang Sun

    2001-01-01

    More than 30 years later since 1962 when TID-14844 was promulgated, there has been big change of the US NRC's regulatory position in using accident source terms for radiological assessment following a design basis accident (DBA). To replace the instantaneous source terms of TID-14844, the time-dependent source terms of NUREG-1465 was published in 1995. In the meantime, the radiological acceptance criteria for reactor site evaluation in 10 CFR Part 100 were also revised. In particular, the concept of total effective dose equivalent has been incorporated in accordance with the radiation protection standards set forth in revised 10 CFR Part 20. Subsequently, the publication of Regulatory Guide 1.183 and the revision of Standard Review Plan 15.0.1 followed in 2000, which provided the licensee of operating nuclear power reactor with the acceptable guidance of applying the revised source term. The guidance allowed the holder of an operating license issued prior to January 10, 1997 to voluntarily revise the accident source terms used in the radiological consequence analyses of DBA. Regarding to its type of application, there suggested full and selective applications, Whether it is full or selective, based upon the scope and nature of associated plant modifications being proposed, the actual application of the revised source terms to an operating plant is expected to give a large impact on its facility design basis. Considering scope and cost of the analyses required for licensing, selective application is seemed to be more appealing to an licensee of the operating plant rather than full application. In this paper, hence, the selective application methodology is reviewed and is actally applied to the assessment of offsite radiological consequence following a LOCA at Ulchin Unit 3 and 4, in order to identify and analyze the potential impacts due to application of revised source terms and to assess the considerations taken in each application prior to its actual

  10. Application of the polystyrene model made by 3-D printing rapid prototyping technology for operation planning in revision lumbar discectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Xie, Yang; Chen, Ziqiang; Wang, Chuanfeng; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of 3-D rapid prototyping technology in revision lumbar discectomy. 3-D rapid prototyping technology has not been reported in the treatment of revision lumbar discectomy. Patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation who were preparing to undergo revision lumbar discectomy from a single center between January 2011 and 2013 were included in this analysis. Patients were divided into two groups. In group A, 3-D printing technology was used to create subject-specific lumbar vertebral models in the preoperative planning process. Group B underwent lumbar revision as usual. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were compared between groups included operation time, perioperative blood loss, postoperative complications, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japan Orthopaedics Association (JOA) scores, and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for back pain and leg pain. A total of 37 patients were included in this study (Group A = 15, Group B = 22). Group A had a significantly shorter operation time (106.53 ± 11.91 vs. 131.92 ± 10.81 min, P < 0.001) and significantly less blood loss (341.67 ± 49.45 vs. 466.77 ± 71.46 ml, P < 0.001). There was no difference between groups for complication rate. There were also no differences between groups for any clinical metric. Using the 3-D printing technology before revision lumbar discectomy may reduce the operation time and the perioperative blood loss. There does not appear to be a benefit to using the technology with respect to clinical outcomes. Future prospective studies are needed to further elucidate the efficacy of this emerging technology.

  11. Vascular access for hemodialysis. Patency rates and results of revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palder, S B; Kirkman, R L; Whittemore, A D; Hakim, R M; Lazarus, J M; Tilney, N L

    1985-08-01

    Over a 4-year interval, 324 arteriovenous conduits were created in 256 patients with end-stage renal disease as access for chronic hemodialysis. These included 154 Cimino fistulae, 163 polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts, and seven miscellaneous grafts. Satisfactory patency rates were demonstrated for as long as 4 years for both Cimino fistulae and PTFE grafts by life-table analysis. Failures of Cimino fistulae usually occurred early in the postoperative period, secondary to attempts to use inadequate veins. Thrombosis caused the majority of PTFE graft failures and was generally the result of venous stenosis. Correction of such venous stenosis is mandatory to restore graft patency and can result in prolonged graft survival.

  12. LANDSAT-D ground segment operations plan, revision A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B.

    1982-01-01

    The basic concept for the utilization of LANDSAT ground processing resources is described. Only the steady state activities that support normal ground processing are addressed. This ground segment operations plan covers all processing of the multispectral scanner and the processing of thematic mapper through data acquisition and payload correction data generation for the LANDSAT 4 mission. The capabilities embedded in the hardware and software elements are presented from an operations viewpoint. The personnel assignments associated with each functional process and the mechanisms available for controlling the overall data flow are identified.

  13. Operations and Maintenance Manual, Atmospheric Contaminant Sensor, Revision B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The sensor is a mass spectrometer system which continuously monitors the atmospheric constituents of hydrogen, water vapor, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, and monitors the Freons on a demand sampling basis. The manual provides a system description, operational procedures, and maintenance and troubleshooting instructions. Circuit diagrams…

  14. Heart rate never lies: interventional cardiologist and Braude's quote revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stéphane; Stauffer, Jean-Christophe; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Graf, Denis; Puricel, Serban; Frobert, Aurélien; Muller, Olivier; Togni, Mario; Arroyo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Interventional cardiologists may be immune to stress, allowing them to perform complex percutaneous interventions under pressure. To assess heart rate (HR) variations as a surrogate marker of stress of interventional cardiologists during percutaneous cardiac procedures and in every-day life. This is a single-centre observational study including a total of six male interventional cardiologists performing coronary interventions and pacemaker implantations. Participants were asked to record their HR with the Apple Watch Device during procedures, every-day life and control activities such as outpatient consultations, sport, marital conflicts and sexual intercourse. Average daily HR was 88±17 bpm. During work days, HR increased significantly during procedures (90±17 bpm) compared with days outside the cathlab (87±17 bpm, p=0.02). The average HR was higher during a regular week working (88±16 bpm) compared with weekends off (84±18 bpm, p=0.002). Complex cardiac procedures were associated with higher HR up to 122 bpm. Peak HR were higher during physical exertion. Of note, participants complained of hypersexuality and mania after night shifts. Work and especially percutaneous cardiac procedures increase HR independently of physical exertion suggesting that interventional cardiologists experience mental stress and emotions.

  15. Polarized proton target-III. Operations manual, revision B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.; Rynes, P.

    1978-01-01

    The manual presented contains certain standard operating procedures for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of PPT-III. In total, these systems comprise the following major divisions: (1) the target cryostat; (2) the 4 He pumping system; (3) the 3 He pumping system; (4) the remote monitors and controls; (5) the microwave system; (6) the magnet and power supply; (7) the computerized polarization monitor; (8) the 4 He liquefier and gas recovery system; and (9) miscellaneous auxiliary equipment

  16. Dredging: An Annotated Bibliography on Operations, Equipment, and Processes. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    aggregate mining. 0006 APGAR , W. J. and BASCO, D. R. 1973 (Oct). "An Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Flow Field Surrounding a Suction Pipe...modes. Sub-systems designed in way that in case of emergency they can operate independently, or, if necessary, can be over- ruled by manual control...0442 VANONI, V. A. (Editor). 1975. Sedimentation Engineering, Manuals and Reports on Engineering Practice No. 54, ASCE, New York. Contents: Nature of

  17. Environmental dosimetry for normal operations at SRP. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marter, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiological effect of environmental releases from SRP during normal operations has been assessed annually since 1972 with a dosimetry model developed by SRL in 1971 to 1972, as implemented in the MREM code for atmospheric releases and RIVDOSE code for liquid releases. Starting in 1978, SRL started using environmental models and dose commitment factors developed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for all other environmental dose calculations. The NRC models are more flexible than the older SRL models, use more up-to-date methodologies, cover more exposure pathways, and permit more detailed analysis of effects of normal operations. It is recommended that the NRC models, as implemented in the computer codes X0QD0Q and GASPAR for atmospheric releases and LADTAP for liquid releases, and NRC dose commitment factors be used as the standard method at SRP for assessing offsite dose from normal operations in Health Protection Department annual environmental monitoring reports, and in National Environmental Policy Act documents and Safety Analysis Reports for SRP facilities. 23 references, 3 figures, 9 tables

  18. Early postoperative fluoroquinolone use is associated with an increased revision rate after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Young, Chris; Werner, Brian C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use following arthroscopic primary rotator cuff repair with failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. An insurance database was queried for patients undergoing rotator cuff repair from 2007 to 2015. These patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months postoperatively (divided into 0-2, 2-4, and 4-6 months), (2) a matched negative control cohort of patients not prescribed fluoroquinolones, and (3) a matched positive control cohort of patients prescribed fluoroquinolones between 6 and 18 months following rotator cuff repair. Rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair were compared within 2 years. A total of 1292 patients were prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months after rotator cuff repair, including 442 within 2 months, 433 within 2 to 4 months, and 417 within 4 to 6 months, and were compared to 5225 matched negative controls and 1597 matched positive controls. The rate of revision rotator cuff repair was significantly higher in patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 2 months (6.1 %) compared to matched negative (2.2 %, P = 0.0009) and positive controls (2.4 %, P = 0.0026). There were no significant differences in the rate of revision rotator cuff repair when fluoroquinolones were prescribed >2 months after rotator cuff repair. Early use of fluoroquinolones following rotator cuff repair was independently associated with significantly increased rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. This is the first clinical study examining the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use with failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. III.

  19. Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 (1) was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 (2). The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring (3,4,5) including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. Neutron spectra and dose rates from selected locations at the LLNL were measured with a high resolution spectroscopic neutron dose rate system (ROSPEC) as well as with a standard neutron rem meter (a.k.a., a remball). The spectra obtained at these locations compare well with the spectra from the Radiation Calibration Laboratory's (RCL) bare californium source that is currently used to calibrate neutron dose rate instruments. The measurements obtained from the high resolution neutron spectrometer and dose meter ROSPEC and the NRD dose meter compare within the range of ±25%. When the new radiation weighting factors are adopted with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835, the measured dose rates will increase by up to 22%. The

  20. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Delirium Rating Scale Revised-98 (DRS-R98).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Trzepacz, Paula T; Franco, Jose G; Meagher, David J; Lee, Yanghyun; Kim, Jeong-Lan; Furlanetto, Leticia M; Negreiros, Daniel; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chen, Chun-Hsin; Kean, Jacob; Leonard, Maeve

    2015-01-01

    Principal components analysis applied to the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 contributes to understanding the delirium construct. Using a multisite pooled international delirium database, the authors applied confirmatory factor analysis to Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 scores from 859 adult patients evaluated by delirium experts (delirium, N=516; nondelirium, N=343). Confirmatory factor analysis found all diagnostic features and core symptoms (cognitive, language, thought process, sleep-wake cycle, motor retardation), except motor agitation, loaded onto factor 1. Motor agitation loaded onto factor 2 with noncore symptoms (delusions, affective lability, and perceptual disturbances). Factor 1 loading supports delirium as a single construct, but when accompanied by psychosis, motor agitation's role may not be solely as a circadian activity indicator.

  1. Three or more preoperative injections is the most significant risk factor for revision surgery after operative treatment of lateral epicondylitis: an analysis of 3863 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degen, Ryan M; Cancienne, Jourdan M; Camp, Christopher L; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S; Werner, Brian C

    2017-04-01

    This study was conducted to identify the rate of failure of operative treatment of lateral epicondylitis, defined as progression to ipsilateral revision surgery, and associated patient-specific risk factors for failure. A national database was used to identify patients undergoing surgical treatment of lateral epicondylitis from 2005 to 2012. Patients undergoing concomitant procedures were excluded. Patients who then required subsequent ipsilateral extensor carpi radialis brevis débridement or release within 2 years were identified using similar methods. A multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate patient-related risk factors for revision surgery. In addition, the number of preoperative injections (1, 2, or ≥3) in the ipsilateral elbow was identified and included in the regression analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each risk factor. Of 3863 patients who underwent operative treatment of lateral epicondylitis, 58 (1.5%) required ipsilateral revision surgery. Risk factors for revision surgery included age lateral epicondylitis in the studied population is low (1.5%). Risk factors for revision surgery include younger age, male gender, morbid obesity, tobacco use, and inflammatory arthritis. The most significant risk factor for revision surgery is having ≥3 ipsilateral preoperative injections. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Operation of high rate microstrip gas chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Bouclier, Roger; Capéans-Garrido, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Manzin, G; Million, Gilbert; Hoch, M; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1996-01-01

    We describe recent measurements carried out in well controlled and reproducible conditions to help understanding the factors affecting the short and long term behaviour of Microstrip Gas Chambers. Special care has been taken concerning the gas purity and choice of materials used in the system and for the detectors construction. Detectors built on glasses with surface resistivity in the range $10^{13}-10^{15} \\Omega/\\Box$ have shown satisfactory performance as they do not show charging-up process at high rate and stand the large doses required for the future high luminosity experiments (~10 mC·cm-1·yr-1). Concerning the lifetime measurements, it has been observed that chambers manufactured on high-resistivity glass are far more susceptible of suffering ageing than detectors made on low resistivity, electron-conducting supports, independently of the metal used for the artwork (chromium or gold) at least in clean gas conditions. The successfully operation in the laboratory of detectors manufactured on diamond-...

  3. A revised mineral nutrient supplement increases biomass and growth rate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropat, Janette; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Casero, David; Ent, Petr; Castruita, Madeli; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Malasarn, Davin

    2011-06-01

    Interest in exploiting algae as a biofuel source and the role of inorganic nutrient deficiency in inducing triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation in cells necessitates a strategy to efficiently formulate species-specific culture media that can easily be manipulated. Using the reference organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we tested the hypothesis that modeling trace element supplements after the cellular ionome would result in optimized cell growth. We determined the trace metal content of several commonly used Chlamydomonas strains in various culture conditions and developed a revised trace element solution to parallel these measurements. Comparison of cells growing in the revised supplement versus a traditional trace element solution revealed faster growth rates and higher maximum cell densities with the revised recipe. RNA-seq analysis of cultures growing in the traditional versus revised medium suggest that the variation in transcriptomes was smaller than that found between different wild-type strains grown in traditional Hutner's supplement. Visual observation did not reveal defects in cell motility or mating efficiency in the new supplement. Ni²⁺-inducible expression from the CYC6 promoter remained a useful tool, albeit with an increased requirement for Ni²⁺ because of the introduction of an EDTA buffer system in the revised medium. Other advantages include more facile preparation of trace element stock solutions, a reduction in total chemical use, a more consistent batch-to-batch formulation and long-term stability (tested up to 5 years). Under the new growth regime, we analyzed cells growing under different macro- and micronutrient deficiencies. TAG accumulation in N deficiency is comparable in the new medium. Fe and Zn deficiency also induced TAG accumulation, as suggested by Nile Red staining. This approach can be used to efficiently optimize culture conditions for other algal species to improve growth and to assay cell physiology. © 2011 The Authors

  4. Development of the methodology for application of revised source term to operating nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, M.S.; Kang, P.; Kang, C.S.; Moon, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Considering the current trend in applying the revised source term proposed by NUREG-1465 to the nuclear power plants in the U.S., it is expected that the revised source term will be applied to the Korean operating nuclear power plants in the near future, even though the exact time can not be estimated. To meet the future technical demands, it is necessary to prepare the technical system including the related regulatory requirements in advance. In this research, therefore, it is intended to develop the methodology to apply the revised source term to operating nuclear power plants in Korea. Several principles were established to develop the application methodologies. First, it is not necessary to modify the existing regulations about source term (i.e., any back-fitting to operating nuclear plants is not necessary). Second, if the pertinent margin of safety is guaranteed, the revised source term suggested by NUREG-1465 may be useful to full application. Finally, a part of revised source term could be selected to application based on the technical feasibility. As the results of this research, several methodologies to apply the revised source term to the Korean operating nuclear power plants have been developed, which include: 1) the selective (or limited) application to use only some of all the characteristics of the revised source term, such as release timing of fission products and chemical form of radio-iodine and 2) the full application to use all the characteristics of the revised source term. The developed methodologies are actually applied to Ulchin 9 and 4 units and their application feasibilities are reviewed. The results of this research are used as either a manual in establishing the plan and the procedure for applying the revised source term to the domestic nuclear plant from the utility's viewpoint; or a technical basis of revising the related regulations from the regulatory body's viewpoint. The application of revised source term to operating nuclear

  5. Korean Version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98: Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jian; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Hwi-Jung; Shin, Im Hee; Kim, Jeong-Lan; Trzepacz, Paula T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of the present study were 1) to standardize the validity and reliability of the Korean version of Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R98-K) and 2) to establish the optimum cut-off value, sensitivity, and specificity for discriminating delirium from other non-delirious psychiatric conditions. Methods Using DSM-IV criteria, 157 subjects (69 delirium, 29 dementia, 32 schizophrenia, and 27 other psychiatric patients) were enrolled. Subjects were evaluated using DRS-R98-K, DRS-K, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE-K), and Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) scale. Results DRS-R98-K total and severity scores showed high correlations with DRS-K. They were significantly different across all groups (p=0.000). However, neither MMSE-K nor CGI-S distinguished delirium from dementia. All DRS-R98-K diagnostic items (#14-16) and items #1 and 2 significantly discriminated delirium from dementia. Cronbach's alpha coefficient revealed high internal consistency for DRS-R98-K total (r=0.91) and severity (r=0.89) scales. Interrater reliability (ICC between 0.96 and 1) was very high. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under the curve of DRS-R98-K total score was 0.948 between the delirium group and all other groups and 0.873 between the delirium and dementia groups. The best cut-off scores in DRS-R98-K total score were 18.5 and 19.5 between the delirium and the other three groups and 20.5 between the delirium and dementia groups. Conclusion We demonstrated that DRS-R98-K is a valid and reliable instrument for assessing delirium severity and diagnosis and discriminating delirium from dementia and other psychiatric disorders in Korean patients. PMID:21519534

  6. 77 FR 45599 - CED Rock Springs, Inc.; Supplemental Notice That Revised Market-Based Rate Tariff Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. ER02-2546-000; ER02-2546-001] CED Rock Springs, Inc.; Supplemental Notice That Revised Market- Based Rate Tariff Filing...-referenced proceeding of CED Rock Springs, Inc.'s tariff revision filing, noting that such filing includes a...

  7. Conceptual design report for a remotely operated cask handling system. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yount, J.A.; Berger, J.D.

    1984-09-01

    Recent advances in remote handling utilizing commercial robotics are conceptually applied to lowering operator cumulative radiation exposure and increasing throughput during cask handling operations in nuclear shipping and receiving facilities. Revision 1 incorporates functional criteria for facility equipment, equipment technical outline specifications, and interface control drawings to assist Architect Engineers in the application of remote handling to waste shipping and receiving facilities. The document has also been updated to show some of the equipment used in proof-of-principle testing during fiscal year 1984. 10 references, 50 figures, 1 table

  8. Frontal sinus revision rate after nasal polyposis surgery including frontal recess clearance and middle turbinectomy: A long-term analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkhatar, Hakim; Khettab, Idir; Sultanik, Philippe; Laccourreye, Ollivier; Bonfils, Pierre

    2018-08-01

    To determine the frontal sinus revision rate after nasal polyposis (NP) surgery including frontal recess clearance (FRC) and middle turbinectomy (MT), to search for predictive factors and to analyse surgical management. Longitudinal analysis of 153 patients who consecutively underwent bilateral sphenoethmoidectomy with FRC and MT for NP with a minimum follow-up of 7 years. Decision of revision surgery was made in case of medically refractory chronic frontal sinusitis or frontal mucocele. Univariate and multivariate analysis incorporating clinical and radiological variables were performed. The frontal sinus revision rate was 6.5% (10/153). The mean time between the initial procedure and revision surgery was 3 years, 10 months. Osteitis around the frontal sinus outflow tract (FSOT) was associated with a higher risk of frontal sinus revision surgery (p=0.01). Asthma and aspirin intolerance did not increase the risk, as well as frontal sinus ostium diameter or residual frontoethmoid cells. Among revised patients, 60% required multiple procedures and 70% required frontal sinus ostium enlargement. Our long-term study reports that NP surgery including FRC and MT is associated with a low frontal sinus revision rate (6.5%). Patients developing osteitis around the FSOT have a higher risk of frontal sinus revision surgery. As mucosal damage can lead to osteitis, FSOT mucosa should be preserved during initial NP surgery. However, as multiple procedures are common among NP patients requiring frontal sinus revision, frontal sinus ostium enlargement should be considered during first revision in the hope of reducing the need of further revisions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner's Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section

  10. High proximal migration in cemented acetabular revisions operated with bone impaction grafting; 47 revision cups followed with RSA for 17 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaddes, Maziar; Herberts, Peter; Malchau, Henrik; Johanson, Per-Erik; Kärrholm, Johan

    2017-05-12

    Bone impaction grafting is a biologically and mechanically appealing option in acetabular revision surgery, allowing restitution of the bone stock and restoration of the biomechanics. We analysed differences in proximal migration of the revision acetabular components when bone impaction grafting is used together with a cemented or an uncemented cup. 43 patients (47 hips), revised due to acetabular loosening and judged to have less than 50% host bone-implant contact were included. The hips were randomised to either an uncemented (n = 20) or a cemented (n = 27) revision cup. Radiostereometry and radiography was performed postoperatively, at 3 and 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 13 and 17 years postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1, 2 and 5 years postoperatively and thereafter at the same interval as in the radiographic follow-up. There were no differences in the base line demographic data between the 2 groups. At the last follow-up (17 years) 14 hips (10 cemented, 4 uncemented) had been re-revised due to loosening. 3 additional cups (1 uncemented and 2 cemented) were radiographically loose. There was a higher early proximal migration in the cemented cups. Cups operated on with cement showed a higher early migration measured with RSA and also a higher number of late revisions. The reason for this is not known, but factors such as inclusion of cases with severe bone defects, use of smaller bone chips and issues related to the impaction technique might have had various degrees of influence.

  11. Final Approval of California Air Plan Revision; Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District; VOCs From Motor Vehicle Assembly Coating Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is taking final action to approve a revision to the Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD) portion of the California SIP concerning the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from motor vehicle assembly coating operations.

  12. The revised program for measurements in intense operation mode according to AVV-IMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieringer, J.; Wirth, E.; Buehling, A.; Mueller-Neumann, M.; Haase, G.; Heinrich, T.; Steinkopff, T.; Wiezorek, C.

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring program for measurements in intense operation mode has been revised recently by a working group at the Federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (BMU). The major issues of the revision are reported in this contribution. Measurements in intense operation must be appropriate for fast assessment of the radiological situation, for estimating the dose to the population and for decisions on countermeasures to minimize the dose. In order to meet these requirements the structure of the measurement program in intense operation mode was divided into three phases when different exposition paths are relevant: before and during dispersion of radioactive material, immediately after dispersion of radioactive material has ended and a late phase when contamination values have decreased in different environmental media. For each of these phases a special measurement program was defined that is tailored to achieve the above mentioned objectives. Minimum detectable activity concentrations were introduced similar to the measurement program in routine operation mode. They follow the intervention levels in the catalogue of countermeasures and maximum permitted values given by the European Union (EU) for food and animal feed. The minimum detectable activity concentrations were defined such that the detection of 1/10 of the intervention levels for countermeasures is ensured. (orig.)

  13. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  14. Evaluation of the revised electrolytic reduction reactor from a remote operability aspect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Yoon, K. H.; Kim, K. H. (and others)

    2008-01-15

    This report presents an evaluation of the remote operability of the revised electrolytic reduction (ER) reactor installed in the ACP at KAERI. All operations have to be implemented in a fully remote manner since the ACPF is a hotcell for handling highly radioactive materials such as spent nuclear fuels. In particular, the ER process is a key process of the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) and it needs a lot of other auxiliary equipment to perform it. Also, since the ER equipment is too big and complicated, and contrarily the ACPF is not big enough, and one common rail is allotted for a bridge transported servo manipulator, an in-cell crane and a gate crane, a remote handling of the ER reactor is accompanied by a difficulty for a remote operation. For an easy understanding, short overview of the ER process, the remote handling equipment, the structural configuration of the ACPF and the detail drawings of the ER equipment are presented. Through 4 month-remote operational tests, detailed operational procedures are presented along with pictures. The remote handling equipment and tools required in each operation are addressed in detail. Also, the procedure to implement each remote operation, and a task difficulty are evaluated from a remote operability aspect. All the remote tasks are distinguished according to whether a remote operation can be performed or not. Finally, partial improvement or an idea to solve the suggested problems is presented. This report will assist in modifying or scaling up the ER reactor.

  15. Low interest rates - do they revise household saving motives in the Euro area?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kochaniak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the impact of decreasing MFI interest rates on household deposits and saving goals in 12 Monetary Union member countries in the years 2009-2015. It analyses tendencies in household deposits (overnight, with agreed maturity and redeemable at notice, and attempts to link them with certain household saving motives (target, retirement and precautionary. The paper identifies those deposit categories which appeared as sensitive to declining interest rates and indicates the Eurozone countries whose populations are expected to revise their savings plans. Precise implications are drawn for target saving motives of households in Austria, Cyprus and Malta. However, in the case of two other motives, the analysis does not conclude on the impact of decreasing MFI interest rates.

  16. The unsuspected prosthetic joint infection : incidence and consequences of positive intra-operative cultures in presumed aseptic knee and hip revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A M E; Bénard, M; Meis, J F; van Hellemondt, G; Goosen, J H M

    2017-11-01

    Positive cultures are not uncommon in cases of revision total knee and hip arthroplasty (TKA and THA) for presumed aseptic causes. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of positive intra-operative cultures in presumed aseptic revision of TKA and THA, and to determine whether the presence of intra-operative positive cultures results in inferior survival in such cases. A retrospective cohort study was assembled with 679 patients undergoing revision knee (340 cases) or hip arthroplasty (339 cases) for presumed aseptic causes. For all patients three or more separate intra-operative cultures were obtained. Patients were diagnosed with a previously unsuspected prosthetic joint infection (PJI) if two or more cultures were positive with the same organism. Records were reviewed for demographic details, pre-operative laboratory results and culture results. The primary outcome measure was infection-free implant survival at two years. The incidence of unsuspected PJI was 27 out of 340 (7.9%) in TKA and 41 out of 339 (12.1%) in THA. Following revision TKA, the rate of infection-free implant survival in patients with an unsuspected PJI was 88% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 60 to 97) at two years compared with 98% (95% CI 94 to 99) in patients without PJI (p = 0.001). After THA, the rate of survival was similar in those with unsuspected PJI (92% (95% CI 73 to 98) at two years) and those without (94% (95% CI 89 to 97), p = 0.31). Following revision of TKA and THA for aseptic diagnoses, around 10% of cases were found to have positive cultures. In the knee, such cases had inferior infection-free survival at two years compared with those with negative cultures; there was no difference between the groups following THA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1482-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  17. Upgraded safety analysis document including operations policies, operational safety limits and policy changes. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.

    1996-03-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source Safety Analysis Reports (1), (2), (3), BNL reports number-sign 51584, number-sign 52205 and number-sign 52205 (addendum) describe the basic Environmental Safety and Health issues associated with the department's operations. They include the operating envelope for the Storage Rings and also the rest of the facility. These documents contain the operational limits as perceived prior or during construction of the facility, much of which still are appropriate for current operations. However, as the machine has matured, the experimental program has grown in size, requiring more supervision in that area. Also, machine studies have either verified or modified knowledge of beam loss modes and/or radiation loss patterns around the facility. This document is written to allow for these changes in procedure or standards resulting from their current mode of operation and shall be used in conjunction with the above reports. These changes have been reviewed by NSLS and BNL ES and H committee and approved by BNL management

  18. Operative strategy based in low rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia S, D.M.; Torres A, C.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the possibility of the reactor operation of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant (CNLV) with a low flow, compared with the Cycle 10 that it was called Cycle 10 similar for this work. The main objective is to analyze the advantages or disadvantages that are obtained when going down the flow from the reactor to an interval that varies, from 81% to 106%, being a flow window but big of the one that it was used that is from 93.1% to 100.8%. It is found that making this type of changes, a favorable response is obtained, without any possibility of fault of the reactor. (Author)

  19. PSA-based evaluation and rating of operational events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Cobo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discusses the PSA-based evaluation and rating of operational events, including the following: historical background, procedures for event evaluation using PSA, use of PSA for event rating, current activities

  20. Trochanteric entry femoral nails yield better femoral version and lower revision rates-A large cohort multivariate regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Richard S; Gage, Mark J; Galos, David K; Donegan, Derek J; Liporace, Frank A

    2017-06-01

    Intramedullary nailing (IMN) has become the standard of care for the treatment of most femoral shaft fractures. Different IMN options include trochanteric and piriformis entry as well as retrograde nails, which may result in varying degrees of femoral rotation. The objective of this study was to analyze postoperative femoral version between three types of nails and to delineate any significant differences in femoral version (DFV) and revision rates. Over a 10-year period, 417 patients underwent IMN of a diaphyseal femur fracture (AO/OTA 32A-C). Of these patients, 316 met inclusion criteria and obtained postoperative computed tomography (CT) scanograms to calculate femoral version and were thus included in the study. In this study, our main outcome measure was the difference in femoral version (DFV) between the uninjured limb and the injured limb. The effect of the following variables on DFV and revision rates were determined via univariate, multivariate, and ordinal regression analyses: gender, age, BMI, ethnicity, mechanism of injury, operative side, open fracture, and table type/position. Statistical significance was set at pregression analysis revealed that a lower BMI was significantly associated with a lower DFV (p=0.006). Controlling for possible covariables, multivariate analysis yielded a significantly lower DFV for trochanteric entry nails than piriformis or retrograde nails (7.9±6.10 vs. 9.5±7.4 vs. 9.4±7.8°, pregression analysis. However, this is not to state that the other nail types exhibited abnormal DFV. Translation to the clinical impact of a few degrees of DFV is also unknown. Future studies to more in-depth study the intricacies of femoral version may lead to improved technology in addition to potentially improved clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of intraoperative difficulties and management of operative complications in revision anterior exposure of the lumbar spine: a report of 25 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Delblond, William; Poignard, Alexandre; Allain, Jérôme

    2013-04-01

    After a first anterior approach to the lumbar spine, formation of adhesions of soft tissues to the spine increases the surgical difficulties and potential for iatrogenic injury during the revision exposure. The objective of this study was to identify the intraoperative difficulties and postoperative complications associated with revision anterior lumbar spine procedures in a single institution. This is a retrospective review of 25 consecutive anterior revision lumbar surgeries in 22 patients (7 men and 15 women) operated on between 1998 and 2011. Patients with trauma or malignancies were excluded. The mean age of the patients at the time of revision surgery was 56 years (range 20-80 years). The complications were analyzed depending on the operative level and the time between the index surgery and the revision. Six major complications (five intraoperatively and one postoperatively) occurred in five patients (20 %): three vein lacerations (12 %) and two ureteral injuries (8 %), despite the presence of a double-J ureteral stent. The three vein damages were repaired or ligated by a vascular surgeon. One of the two ureteral injuries led to a secondary nephrectomy after end-to-end anastomosis failure; the other necessitated secondary laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Anterior revision of the lumbar spine is technically challenging and is associated with a high rate of vascular or urologic complications. Therefore, the potential complications of the procedure must be weighted against its benefits. When iterative anterior lumbar approach is mandatory, exposure should be performed by an access surgeon in specialized centers that have ready access to vascular and urologic surgeons.

  2. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of als Functional Rating Scale-Revised in Portuguese language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Keyte; Pereira, Cecília; Pavan, Karina; Valério, Berenice Cataldo Oliveira

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is the cross-cultural, as well as to validate in Portuguese language the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale - Revised (ALSFRS-R). We performed a prospective study of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinically defined. The scale, after obtaining the final version in Portuguese, was administered in 22 individuals and three weeks after re-applied. There were no significant differences between the application and reapplication of the scale (p=0.069). The linear regression and internal consistency measured by Pearson correlation and alpha Conbrach were significant with r=0.975 e alpha=0.934. The reliability test-retest demonstrated by intraclass correlation coefficient was strong with ICC=0.975. Therefore, this version proved to be applicable, reliable and easy to be conducted in clinical practice and research.

  3. Functional outcome, revision rates and mortality after primary total hip replacement--a national comparison of nine prosthesis brands in England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pennington

    Full Text Available The number of prosthesis brands used for hip replacement has increased rapidly, but there is little evidence on their effectiveness. We compared patient-reported outcomes, revision rates, and mortality for the three most frequently used brands within each prosthesis type: cemented (Exeter V40 Contemporary, Exeter V40 Duration and Exeter V40 Elite Plus Ogee, cementless (Corail Pinnacle, Accolade Trident, and Taperloc Exceed, and hybrid (Exeter V40 Trilogy, Exeter V40 Trilogy, and CPT Trilogy.We used three national databases of patients who had hip replacements between 2008 and 2011 in the English NHS to compare functional outcome (Oxford Hip Score (OHS ranging from 0 (worst to 48 (best in 43,524 patients at six months. We analysed revisions and mortality in 187,201 patients. We used multiple regression to adjust for pre-operative differences. Prosthesis type had an impact on post-operative OHS and revision rates (both p<0.001. Patients with hybrid prostheses had the best functional outcome (mean OHS 39.4, 95%CI 39.1 to 39.7 and those with cemented prostheses the worst (37.7, 37.3 to 38.1. Patients with cemented prostheses had the lowest reported 5-year revision rates (1.3%, 1.2% to 1.4% and those with cementless prostheses the highest (2.2%, 2.1% to 2.4%. Differences in mortality according to prosthesis type were small and not significant (p = 0.06. Functional outcome varied according to brand among cemented (p = 0.05, with Exeter V40 Duration having the best and cementless prostheses (p = 0.01, with Corail Pinnacle having the best. Revision rates varied according to brand among hybrids (p = 0.05, with Exeter V40 Trident having the lowest.Functional outcomes were better with cementless cups and revision rates were lower with cemented stems, which underlies the good overall performance of hybrids. The hybrid Exeter V40 Trident seemed to produce the best overall results. This brand should be considered as a benchmark in randomised trials.

  4. Comparing Cultural Differences in Two Quality Measures in Chinese Kindergartens: The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised and the Kindergarten Quality Rating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bi Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the degrees of congruence between two early childhood evaluation systems on various quality concepts: the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) and Zhejiang's Kindergarten Quality Rating System (KQRS). Analysis of variance and post hoc least significant difference tests were employed to show the extent to…

  5. Low revision rate after total hip arthroplasty in patients with pediatric hip diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engesæter, Lars B; Engesæter, Ingvild Ø; Fenstad, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background The results of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) after pediatric hip diseases such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), or Perthes' disease have been reported to be inferior to the results after primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA.......9%) were operated due to pediatric hip diseases (3.1% for Denmark, 8.8% for Norway, and 1.9% for Sweden) and 288,435 THAs (77.8%) were operated due to OA. Unadjusted 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival of THAs after pediatric hip diseases (94.7% survival) was inferior to that after OA (96.6% survival......). Consequently, an increased risk of revision for hips with a previous pediatric hip disease was seen (risk ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3-1.5). However, after adjustment for differences in sex and age of the patients, and in fixation of the prostheses, no difference in survival was found (93.6% after pediatric hip...

  6. The impact of electrocautery method on post-operative bleeding complications after non-newborn circumcision and revision circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, Niall J; Nelson, Caleb P; Cendron, Marc; Turner, Shaunna; Borer, Joseph G

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated post-operative bleeding complications in non-newborns following use of monopolar versus bipolar electrocautery for circumcision or revision circumcision. We retrospectively reviewed sequentially performed cases of circumcision and revision circumcision performed by nine pediatric urologists at our institution from 2005 to 2010. In order to incorporate both the monopolar and bipolar electrocautery experience for a single surgeon employing bipolar technique, sequential cases from 2002 to 2010 were reviewed. Variables assessed included age, procedure, method of electrocautery, skin approximation and dressing, and bleeding complications. 1810 patients that underwent either circumcision or revision circumcision were reviewed. Complete data was available for 1617 patients. Age at operation was a mean 3.7 ± 4.9 yrs and median 1.5 yrs. Return for bleeding complication for all surgeons, was 2/336 (0.6%) for bipolar and 28/1281 (2.2%) for monopolar (p = 0.0545). For the single surgeon using bipolar technique, returns were 2/336 (0.6%) for bipolar and 5/309 (1.6%) for monopolar (p = 0.2133). Returns per procedure type were 1/200 (0.5%) bipolar and 24/844 (2.8%) monopolar for primary circumcision (p = 0.0513), and 1/136 (0.7%) bipolar and 4/437 (0.9%) monopolar (p = 0.84) for revision. Four of 1617 (0.2%) patients returned to the operating room [4/1281 (0.3%) monopolar (p = 0.31)]. There was no difference in return to the operating room for circumcision versus revision. Return for bleeding complications after circumcision and revision circumcision occurred more frequently after monopolar electrocautery compared to bipolar. However, there was no significant difference between the two electrocautery methods. Either form of electrocautery appears to be effective for this common pediatric urologic procedure. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Delirium subtype identification and the validation of the Delirium Rating Scale--Revised-98 (Dutch version) in hospitalized elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Casteelen, Gerty; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; van der Mast, Roos C.; Levi, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delirium is the most common acute neuropsychiatric disorder in hospitalized elderly. The Dutch version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98) appears to be a reliable method to classify delirium. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the

  8. 78 FR 20423 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Revisions to Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Enforcement (BSEE); Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule will revise and add several new... 63610). That rule established a new Subpart S in 30 CFR part 250, requiring all OCS operators to have a... to developing and implementing stop work authority (SWA) and ultimate work authority (UWA), requiring...

  9. 75 FR 3639 - Revisions to Rules Authorizing the Operation of Low Power Auxiliary Stations in the 698-806 MHz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    .... 10-24; DA 10-92] Revisions to Rules Authorizing the Operation of Low Power Auxiliary Stations in the... Auxiliary Stations, Including Wireless Microphones, and the Digital Television Transition AGENCY: Federal... language that must be used in the consumer disclosure that is required by Section 15.216 of Appendix B in...

  10. Perioperative Serum Lipid Status and Statin Use Affect the Revision Surgery Rate After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Werner, Brian C

    2017-11-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated that hyperlipidemia is associated with poor tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair; however, these findings have not been substantiated in human studies. To examine any association between hyperlipidemia and the failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair requiring revision surgery and to investigate whether the use of statin lipid-lowering agents had any influence on observed associations. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From a national insurance database, patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with perioperative lipid levels (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein [LDL], and triglycerides) recorded were reviewed. For each lipid test, patients were stratified into normal, moderate, and high groups based on published standards. For the total cholesterol and LDL cohorts, a subgroup analysis of patients stratified by statin use was performed. The primary outcome measure was ipsilateral revision rotator cuff surgery, including revision repair or debridement. A logistic regression analysis controlling for patient demographics and comorbidities was utilized for comparison. There were 30,638 patients included in the study. The rate of revision rotator cuff surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.40; P = .022) and high total cholesterol levels (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.10-1.55; P = .006) compared with patients with normal total cholesterol levels perioperatively. Within each of these groups, patients without statin use had significantly higher rates of revision surgery, while those with statin prescriptions did not. The absolute risk reduction for statin use ranged from 0.24% to 1.87% when stratified by the total cholesterol level, yielding a number needed to treat from 54 to 408 patients. The rate of revision surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10-1.41; P = .001) and high LDL levels (OR, 1.46; 95

  11. Test plan for determining breathing rates in single shell tanks using tracer gases. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This test plan specifies the requirements and conditions for the injection of tracer gas (Helium (He)) into single shell tanks to determine breathing rates using periodic sampling. The eight tanks which have been selected at the time this Test Plan was developed are A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, U-103 (U-103 is counted twice, once during the winter months and once during the summer), and U-105. Other tanks to be sampled will be assigned by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at a later date in the study process as resources allow, the document shall be revised as required. The sampling of headspace for each of these tanks shall be performed using available risers or the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinet as available. The tank farm vapor cognizant engineer shall assign the injection and sample testing point for each tank and document the point in the field work package. SUMMA TMI canisters, equipped in-line with dual particulate air filters and two silica gel sorbent traps will be used to collect the gas samples. The purpose of dual particulate air filters is to ensure no radioactive particulates are transferred to the SUMMA TMI canisters. The silica gel sorbent traps will effectively eliminate any tritiated water vapor that may be present in the sample gas stream. PNNL shall supply the tracer gases injection system and shall perform the analysis on the headspace samples. TWRS Characterization project shall inject the tracer gas and perform the sampling. Refer to Engineering Task Plan HNF-SD-TWR-ETP-002 for a detailed description of the responsibilities for this task

  12. Prolonged operative time increases infection rate in tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Matthew; Wright, Adam; Gruen, Gary; Siska, Peter; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Tarkin, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau present a treatment challenge and are susceptible to both prolonged operative times and high postoperative infection rates. For those fractures treated with open plating, we sought to identify the relationship between surgical site infection and prolonged operative time as well as to identify other surgical risk factors. We performed a retrospective controlled analysis of 309 consecutive unicondylar and bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated with open plate osteosynthesis at our institution's level I trauma centre during a recent 5-year period. We recorded operative times, injury characteristics, surgical treatment, and need for operative debridement due to infection. Operative times of infected cases were compared to uncomplicated surgical cases. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for postoperative infection. Mean operative time in the infection group was 2.8h vs. 2.2h in the non-infected group (p=0.005). 15 fractures (4.9%) underwent four compartment fasciotomies as part of their treatment, with a significantly higher infection rate than those not undergoing fasciotomy (26.7% vs. 6.8%, p=0.01). Open fracture grade was also significantly related to infection rate (closed fractures: 5.3%, grade 1: 14.3%, grade 2: 40%, grade 3: 50%, pinfection rates (13.9% vs. 8.7%, p=0.36). Multivariable logistic regression analysis of the entire study group identified longer operative times (OR 1.78, p=0.013) and open fractures (OR 7.02, psite infection. Operative times approaching 3h and open fractures are related to an increased overall risk for surgical site infection after open plating of the tibial plateau. Dual incision approaches with bicolumnar plating do not appear to expose the patient to increased risk compared to single incision approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-operative diagnosis - effect on repeat-operation rates in the UK breast screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, M.G.; Cheung, S.; Kearins, O.; Lawrence, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-operative diagnosis rates in the UK breast screening programme have improved dramatically from 48.8% in 1994/95 (only nine units achieved the then minimum standard of 70%) to 94% in 2005/06 (only seven units failed to achieve the target of 90%). Preoperative and operative history of all 120,550 women diagnosed with screen-detected breast cancer in the UK between April 1994 and March 2006 was derived from different national databases. In 2005/06, 2,790 (17.8%) of the 15,688 women having surgery needed two or more operations. In 2001/02 (non-operative diagnosis rate 87%), the re-operation rate was 23.8% (2,377 of 9,969). Extrapolation backwards to 1994/95 (non-operative diagnosis rate 48.8%) suggests a re-operation rate of 62%. Analysis over the 4 years from April 2002 (n=34,198) demonstrates that 4,089 (12%) women with a correct non-operative diagnosis of invasive disease required additional surgery compared to 1,166 (48%) of women who were under-staged (diagnosed as non-invasive based on core biopsy, but actually suffering from invasive disease). Failure to achieve a non-operative diagnosis of invasive disease (n=1,542) or non-invasive disease (n=2,247) resulted in re-operation rates of 65 and 43% respectively. Given the impact of not having a diagnosis pre-operatively, or of under-staging invasive carcinoma, it seems timely to introduce more sophisticated standards. (orig.)

  14. Recurrens Rates and Affecting Factors in Patients Operated for Endometrioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt Eftal Taner

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate reurrens rates and affecting factors in patients operated for endometrioma.\tMATERIAL-METHOD: The cases operated for over cyst diagnosis and pathologically endometrioma diagnosis between the years 2000-2004 has been reviewed retrospectively. Cases’s age, cyst diameter, endometriosis stage and operation procedure have been recorded and the cases that have recurrence and factors affecting recurrence are evaluated.\tRESULTS: Results: 51 of 137 (37.3% cases with endometrioma that have average age of 29.1 in course of operation ± 5.4 had left side, 37 of 137(27% had right side and 49 of 137 (35.7% had bilateral endometrioma. Average diameter of endometriomas was 5.1 ±1.9 cm (1-1.5 cm. After average 3.3±1.8 years from first operation time in 42 cases(30.6% had recurrence. in the left over recurrence rate was signifciantly high (10.8% to 41.2% than right over. For recurrence rate There were no significiant diference between the 102 cases that had laparoscopy and 35 cases that had laparotomy according to cyst diameter, case ages and type of operation.\tWhen the cases were reviewed according to endometriozis staging, There were significiantly high recurrence rate at stage III (28.9% and stage IV(46.0%. With respect to the operation type, patients that had one-sided ooferektomi,relapse is not seen. Patients that had fenestration and ablation as operation, relapse rate is 52.9% significiantly higher than patients that had kistektomi (26.9%.Despite decrease in preoperative complaints (dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, chronic pelvic pain in early postoperative period, they recurred in late postoperative period. 47(56% of 84 patients who have fertility desire gave live birth unfortunately 12(14.3% of them.\tCONCLUSION: Recurrence rates were signifiantly higher in cases with lift sided endometrioma, advanced stafe of endometriosis and in patient udergone fenestration and ablation for treatment.

  15. Improvement of rate of operation of LWRs, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makiura, Ryutaro

    1978-01-01

    In the first part, the growing importance of improving the rate of operation of nuclear power plants is expressed in view of the big unit capacity of the present plants. The following parts of this report are devoted to the description of various measures for improving the reliability and the rate of operation of BWR plants from the standpoint of plant makers. The first subject is the early solution of ''singular troubles'', for example, the channel wear due to the oscillation of LPRM strings. The second subject is ''ordinary troubles'' such as valve leak and malfunction, deterioration of various parts, and vibration of pipes. The improvement of load factor is discussed in the third part in connection with the present efforts to abolish the PCIOMR operation and to employ the fine motion of control rod-driving mechanism. The final subject concerns with the efforts for shortening the time required for regular inspection. Review of inspection items and shortening of their required time, reduction of radiation exposure automated and remote-controlled operation, and intensive training of operators are the main subjects discussed here. (Aoki, K.)

  16. Complexity rating of abnormal events and operator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeivind Braarud, Per

    1998-01-01

    The complexity of the work situation during abnormal situations is a major topic in a discussion of safety aspects of Nuclear Power plants. An understanding of complexity and its impact on operator performance in abnormal situations is important. One way to enhance understanding is to look at the dimensions that constitute complexity for NPP operators, and how those dimensions can be measured. A further step is to study how dimensions of complexity of the event are related to performance of operators. One aspect of complexity is the operator 's subjective experience of given difficulties of the event. Another related aspect of complexity is subject matter experts ratings of the complexity of the event. A definition and a measure of this part of complexity are being investigated at the OECD Halden Reactor Project in Norway. This paper focus on the results from a study of simulated scenarios carried out in the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory, which is a full scope PWR simulator. Six crews of two licensed operators each performed in 16 scenarios (simulated events). Before the experiment subject matter experts rated the complexity of the scenarios, using a Complexity Profiling Questionnaire. The Complexity Profiling Questionnaire contains eight previously identified dimensions associated with complexity. After completing the scenarios the operators received a questionnaire containing 39 questions about perceived complexity. This questionnaire was used for development of a measure of subjective complexity. The results from the study indicated that Process experts' rating of scenario complexity, using the Complexity Profiling Questionnaire, were able to predict crew performance quite well. The results further indicated that a measure of subjective complexity could be developed that was related to crew performance. Subjective complexity was found to be related to subjective work load. (author)

  17. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Chinese Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-03-15

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  18. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [es

  19. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  20. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  1. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [fr

  2. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [ru

  3. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  4. Wavelet and receiver operating characteristic analysis of heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffery, G.; Griffith, T. M.; Naka, K.; Frennaux, M. P.; Matthai, C. C.

    2002-02-01

    Multiresolution wavelet analysis has been used to study the heart rate variability in two classes of patients with different pathological conditions. The scale dependent measure of Thurner et al. was found to be statistically significant in discriminating patients suffering from hypercardiomyopathy from a control set of normal subjects. We have performed Receiver Operating Characteristc (ROC) analysis and found the ROC area to be a useful measure by which to label the significance of the discrimination, as well as to describe the severity of heart dysfunction.

  5. Motor operated valve testing and the 'rate of loading' phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses valve design features which affect the ability to predict motor operated valve (MOV) performance and reviews factors which should be considered when selecting switch settings to limit stem loads. Considerable attention is given to the rate of loading phenomenon which affects the relationship between valve stem thrust and actuator spring pack deflection. Equations are developed, and testing is discussed which permit the construction of an MOV dynamic model. Factors which must be considered when maintaining switch settings correct throughout the life of the plant are discussed. And switch setting acceptance criteria for use with baseline Static and Design Basis testing are suggested

  6. Revision of failed hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty rapidly relieves pain and improves function in the early post operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muirhead-Allwood Sarah K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We reviewed the results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent revision of a hip resurfacing prosthesis to a total hip replacement. Revisions were performed for recurrent pain and effusion, infection and proximal femoral fractures. Both components were revised in 20 cases. There were 12 male and 13 female patients with average time to revision of 34.4 and 26.4 months respectively. The mean follow up period was 12.7 months (3 to 31. All patients reported relief of pain and excellent satisfaction scores. Two patients experienced stiffness up to three months post operatively. Pre operative Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were 39.1, 36.4 and 52.2 respectively. Mean post operative scores at last follow up were 17.4, 89.8 and 6.1 respectively (p

  7. Rating of intra-operative neuro-monitoring results in operative correction of the spinal deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Skripnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the work was filing the electrophysiological phenomena observed in the process of intra-operative neuromonitoring followed by development of the results’ scale of intra-operative neuro-physiological testing of the pyramidal tract. Materials and мethods. The selection for evaluation included data of 147 protocols of intra-operative neuromonitoring in 135 patients (53 males, 82 females, aged from 1 y. 5 m. to 52 years (14,1±0,7 years with spinal deformities of different etiology who underwent instrumentation spinal correction followed by fixation of thoracic / thoracolumbar spine segments using various variants of internal systems of trans-pedicular fixation. Intra-operative neuro-monitoring was performed using system «ISIS IOM» (Inomed Medizintechnik GmbH, Germany. The changes of motor evoked potentials were evaluated according to this scale. Results. Five types of pyramidal system reaction to operative invasion were revealed. According to neurophysiological criteria three grades of the risk of neurological disorders development during operative spinal deformity correction and, correspondingly, three levels of anxiety for the surgeon were defined. Conclusion. Intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring is the effective highly technological instrument to prevent neurological disorders in the spinal deformity. Offered rating scale of the risk of neurological complications gives the possibility to highlight three levels of anxiety during operative invasion.

  8. Cotrel-dubousset instrumentation for the correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Long-term results with an unexpected high revision rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Franz J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years, the CD instrumentation has been regarded as the standard device for the surgical correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Nevertheless, scientific long-term results on this procedure are rare. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective follow-up study of patients treated for AIS with CD instrumentation and spondylodesis. Methods A total of 40 patients with AIS underwent CD instrumentation in our department within 3 years and between 1990 and 1992. For the retrospective analysis, first all the patient documents were reviewed, and pre-/postoperative X-ray images as well as those at the latest follow-up were analysed. Furthermore, it was attempted to conduct a clinical survey using the SRS-24 questionnaire, which was sent to the patients after a preceding announcement on the phone. Results Radiologically, the frontal main curvature was improved from a preoperative angle of 69.2° to a postoperative angle of 35.4°, and the secondary curvature was improved from a preoperative angle of 42.6° to a postoperative angle of 20.5°. The latest radiological follow-up at average 57.4 months post surgery showed an average loss of correction of 9.6° (main curvature and 4.6° (secondary curvature, respectively. Within the first 30 days post surgery, 3 out of 40 patients (7.5% received early operative revision for the dislocation of hooks or rods. At an average of 45.7 months (range 11 to 142 months, 19 out of 40 patients (47.5%; including 2 patients with early revision received late operative revisions: The reasons were late infection (10 out of 40 patients; 25% with the development of fistulae (7 cases or putrid secretion (3 cases, which was resolved with the complete removal of instrumentation after all. The average time until revision was 35.5 months (range 14 to 56 months after CD instrumentation. Furthermore, complete implant removal was necessary in 8 out of 40 patients (20% for late operate site

  9. Development of the Self-Esteem Rating Scale for Children (Revised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Lian-Hwang

    1987-01-01

    Developed a teacher's rating scale of self-esteem for children. Participants were 231 school children in grades K-7. Used sociometric measures, popularity ranking by teachers, and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory to estimate validity. The Self-Esteem Rating Scale for Children (SERSC) included 12 behavioral characteristics rated most…

  10. Administration Booklet: Teachers' Rating Questionnaire (Grade 2). Revised Form 1974. Paper No. 125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E.N.; Wyman, W.C.

    Specific criteria for the rating of each questionnaire item are stated in detail. The teacher is asked, after reading the questions carefully, to assign each second grade student a rating for every question. This rating should be based on a personal knowledge of the student. The booklet is divided into three sections with section 1 focusing on…

  11. Application of revised procedure on determining large excess reactivity of operating reactor. Fuel addition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2002-01-01

    The fuel addition method or the neutron absorption substitution method have been used for determination of large excess multiplication factor of large sized reactors. It has been pointed out, however, that all the experimental methods are possibly not free from the substantially large systematic error up to 20%, when the value of the excess multiplication factor exceeds about 15%Δk. Then, a basic idea of a revised procedure was proposed to cope with the problem, which converts the increase of multiplication factor in an actual core to that in a virtual core by calculation, because its value is in principle defined not for the former but the latter core. This paper proves that the revised procedure is able to be applicable for large sized research and test reactors through the theoretical analyses on the measurements undertaken at the JMTRC and JMTR cores. The values of excess multiplication factor are accurately determined utilizing the whole core calculation by the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. (author)

  12. 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility operational test specification. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met. The technical requirements for operational testing of the 200 Area TEDF are defined by the test requirements presented in Appendix A. These test requirements demonstrate the following: pump station No.1 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; pump station No. 2 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; water is transported through the collection and transfer lines to the disposal ponds with no detectable leakage; the disposal ponds accept flow from the transfer lines with all support equipment operating as designed; and the control systems operate and status the 200 Area TEDF including monitoring of appropriate generator discharge parameters

  13. Network Operations Support Plan for the Spot 2 mission (revision 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbitzky, Victor

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this Network Operations Support Plan (NOSP) is to indicate operational procedures and ground equipment configurations for the SPOT 2 mission. The provisions in this document take precedence over procedures or configurations in other documents.

  14. Space Operations Center system analysis. Volume 3, book 2: SOC system definition report, revision A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Operations Center (SOC) orbital space station program operations are described. A work breakdown structure for the general purpose support equipment, construction and transportation support, and resupply and logistics support systems is given. The basis for the design of each element is presented, and a mass estimate for each element supplied. The SOC build-up operation, construction, flight support, and satellite servicing operations are described. Detailed programmatics and cost analysis are presented.

  15. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants. Volume 1. A Field Study Training Program. Third Edition. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The purpose of this wastewater treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified wastewater treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  16. Water Treatment Plant Operation Volume 2. A Field Study Training Program. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  17. Tradevman 1 & C. Naval Education and Training Command. Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Education and Training Command, Washington, DC.

    Designed as a self-study text for enlisted personnel of the Navy and Naval Reserve, this rate training manual presents information that is directly related to the professional standards for advancement to Petty Officer Third Class and Petty Officer Second Class in the Tradevman (TD) rating. (Tradevmen install, repair, modify, and maintain…

  18. Re-admissions, re-operations and length of stay in hospital after aseptic revision knee replacement in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, M.; Jørgensen, C. C.; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2014-01-01

    of hospital stay was four days (interquartile range: 3 to 5), with a 90 days re-admission rate of 9.9%, re-operation rate of 3.5% and mortality rate of 0.2%. The age ranges of 51 to 55 years (p = 0.018), 76 to 80 years (p re-admission...

  19. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  20. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory

  1. Stratification of surgical site infection by operative factors and comparison of infection rates after hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Warren, David K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether operative factors are associated with risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially insured enrollees aged 6 months-64 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, fourth edition, codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2010. SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by diagnosis codes. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were analyzed. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] vs 0.34% [57/16,524], P=.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] vs 2.03% [14/691], P=.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] vs 0.44% [247/55,720], Poperative factors may facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities.

  2. Do Rerevision Rates Differ After First-time Revision of Primary THA With a Cemented and Cementless Femoral Component?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Kirill; Pedersen, Alma B; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    ) and 2 years (range, 0-16 years), respectively. Survival of first revision THA, with second revision of the femur as outcome, was evaluated using hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) adjusting for potential confounding. All patient- and surgery-related data are collected from Danish...... for the most likely confounding factors. Our data suggest that increased use of cementless fixation in primary THA may lead to inferior survivorship of first revision THA. Level III, therapeutic study....... the results of future revision procedures; however, this has not been documented. The purpose of this study was to compare (1) the risk for rerevision of first revision THA; (2) the patterns of femoral bone loss at the time of first revision of primary THA; (3) the reasons for first revision of primary THA...

  3. Navigation and Alignment Aids Concept of Operations and Supplemental Design Information. Revision A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Cryan, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    The IDSS Navigation and Alignment Aids Concept of Operations and Supplemental Design Information document provides supplemental information to the IDSS IDD. The guide provides insight into the navigation and alignment aids design, and how those aids can be utilized by incoming vehicles for proximity operations and docking. The navigation aids are paramount to successful docking.

  4. 78 FR 46255 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear... nuclear power plant. Compliance with the provisions of the rule is required by June 20, 2014. This... environmental effect of renewing the operating license of a nuclear power plant. This document is necessary to...

  5. Two-stage revision of septic knee prosthesis with articulating knee spacers yields better infection eradication rate than one-stage or two-stage revision with static spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanò, C L; Gala, L; Logoluso, N; Romanò, D; Drago, L

    2012-12-01

    The best method for treating chronic periprosthetic knee infection remains controversial. Randomized, comparative studies on treatment modalities are lacking. This systematic review of the literature compares the infection eradication rate after two-stage versus one-stage revision and static versus articulating spacers in two-stage procedures. We reviewed full-text papers and those with an abstract in English published from 1966 through 2011 that reported the success rate of infection eradication after one-stage or two-stage revision with two different types of spacers. In all, 6 original articles reporting the results after one-stage knee exchange arthoplasty (n = 204) and 38 papers reporting on two-stage revision (n = 1,421) were reviewed. The average success rate in the eradication of infection was 89.8% after a two-stage revision and 81.9% after a one-stage procedure at a mean follow-up of 44.7 and 40.7 months, respectively. The average infection eradication rate after a two-stage procedure was slightly, although significantly, higher when an articulating spacer rather than a static spacer was used (91.2 versus 87%). The methodological limitations of this study and the heterogeneous material in the studies reviewed notwithstanding, this systematic review shows that, on average, a two-stage procedure is associated with a higher rate of eradication of infection than one-stage revision for septic knee prosthesis and that articulating spacers are associated with a lower recurrence of infection than static spacers at a comparable mean duration of follow-up. IV.

  6. Developing a model of competence in the operating theatre: psychometric validation of the perceived perioperative competence scale-revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Polit, Denise F; Hamlin, Lois; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of the Revised Perioperative Competence Scale (PPCS-R). There is a lack of a psychometrically tested sound self-assessment tools to measure nurses' perceived competence in the operating room. Content validity was established by a panel of international experts and the original 98-item scale was pilot tested with 345 nurses in Queensland, Australia. Following the removal of several items, a national sample that included all 3209 nurses who were members of the Australian College of Operating Room Nurses was surveyed using the 94-item version. Psychometric testing assessed content validity using exploratory factor analysis, internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, and construct validity using the "known groups" technique. During item reduction, several preliminary factor analyses were performed on two random halves of the sample (n=550). Usable data for psychometric assessment were obtained from 1122 nurses. The original 94-item scale was reduced to 40 items. The final factor analysis using the entire sample resulted in a 40 item six-factor solution. Cronbach's alpha for the 40-item scale was .96. Construct validation demonstrated significant differences (pperceived competence scores relative to years of operating room experience and receipt of specialty education. On the basis of these results, the psychometric properties of the PPCS-R were considered encouraging. Further testing of the tool in different samples of operating room nurses is necessary to enable cross-cultural comparisons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 105-KE Basin isolation barrier leak rate test analytical development. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides an analytical development in support of the proposed leak rate test of the 105-KE Basin. The analytical basis upon which the K-basin leak test results will be used to determine the basin leakage rates is developed in this report. The leakage of the K-Basin isolation barriers under postulated accident conditions will be determined from the test results. There are two fundamental flow regimes that may exist in the postulated K-Basin leakage: viscous laminar and turbulent flow. An analytical development is presented for each flow regime. The basic geometry and nomenclature of the postulated leak paths are denoted

  8. 78 FR 65601 - Revised Filing Deadlines Following Resumption of Normal Commission Operations; 2014 Modification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... High-Cost Loop Support Formula; Modernizing the E- Rate Program for Schools and Libraries; Reassessment of Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields Limits and Policies AGENCY: Federal... reply comments are due by November 19, 2013. Modernizing the E-Rate Program for Schools and Libraries...

  9. Rate of revisions or conversion after bariatric surgery over 10 years in the state of New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Nie, Lizhou; Blackstone, Robin; Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Pryor, Aurora

    2018-04-01

    A primary measure of the success of a procedure is the whether or not additional surgery may be necessary. Multi-institutional studies regarding the need for reoperation after bariatric surgery are scarce. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the rate of revisions/conversions (RC) after 3 common bariatric procedures over 10 years in the state of New York. University Hospital, involving a large database in New York State. The Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database was used to identify all patients undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG), and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) between 2004 and 2010. Patients were followed for RC to other bariatric procedures for at least 4 years (up to 2014). Multivariable cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for additional surgery after each common bariatric procedure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to check the factors associated with having ≥2 follow-up procedures. There were 40,994 bariatric procedures with 16,444 LAGB, 22,769 RYGB, and 1781 SG. Rate of RC was 26.0% for LAGB, 9.8% for SG, and 4.9% for RYGB. Multiple RC ( = />2) were more common for LAGB (5.7% for LAGB, .5% for RYGB, and .2% for LSG). Band revision/replacements required further procedures compared with patients who underwent conversion to RYGB/SG (939 compared with 48 procedures). Majority of RC were not performed at initial institution (68.2% of LAGB patients, 75.9% for RYGB, 63.7% of SG). Risk factors for multiple procedures included surgery type, as LAGB was more likely to have multiple RC. Reoperation was common for LAGB, but less common for RYGB (4.9%) and SG (9.8%). RC rate are almost twice after SG than after RYGB. LAGB had the highest rate (5.7%) of multiple reoperations. Conversion was the procedure of choice after a failed LAGB. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Impact of use of Double Set-up on Infection Rates in Revision Total Knee Replacement and Limb Salvage Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Waterman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective analysis was performed to determine the impact of utilizing a double set-up procedure on reducing infection rates revision total knee and limb salvage procedures in patients with known joint infection.  Eighteen cases fit selection criteria.  The recurrence rate of infection was 5.5% which is less than reported recent literature review.   This suggests the use of a double set-up in combination with other infection reducing protocols may help further reduce recurrent infection.  Keywords: double set-up, infection, revision total knee arthroplasty, limb-salvage

  11. Gender, renal function, and outcomes on the liver transplant waiting list: assessment of revised MELD including estimated glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Robert P; Shaheen, Abdel Aziz M; Aspinall, Alexander I; Quinn, Robert R; Burak, Kelly W

    2011-03-01

    The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) allocation system for liver transplantation (LT) may present a disadvantage for women by including serum creatinine, which is typically lower in females. Our objectives were to investigate gender disparities in outcomes among LT candidates and to assess a revised MELD, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), for predicting waiting list mortality. Adults registered for LT between 2002 and 2007 were identified using the UNOS database. We compared components of MELD, MDRD-derived eGFR, and the 3-month probability of LT and death between genders. Discrimination of MELD, MELDNa, and revised models including eGFR for mortality were compared using c-statistics. A total of 40,393 patients (36% female) met the inclusion criteria; 9% died and 24% underwent LT within 3 months of listing. Compared with men, women had lower median serum creatinine (0.9 vs. 1.0 mg/dl), eGFR (72 vs. 83 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), and mean MELD (16.5 vs. 17.2; all p discrimination for 3-month mortality (c-statistics: MELD 0.896, MELD-eGFR 0.894, MELDNa 0.911, MELDNa-eGFR 0.905). Women are disadvantaged under MELD potentially due to its inclusion of creatinine. However, since including eGFR in MELD does not improve mortality prediction, alternative refinements are necessary. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium Facility's evaluation basis fire operational accident. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumburgh, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous programmatic activities involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of improved and/or unique fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed in July 1994 to address operational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environmental. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EBF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility

  13. RCRA facility investigation report for the 200-PO-1 operable unit. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) report is prepared in support of the RFI/corrective measures study process for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report summarizes existing information on this operable unit presented in the 200 East and PUREX Aggregate Area Management Study Reports, contaminant specific studies, available modeling data, and groundwater monitoring data summary reports. Existing contaminant data are screened against current regulatory limits to determine contaminants of potential concern (COPC). Each identified COPC is evaluated using well-specific and plume trend analyses

  14. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-NR-2 Operable Unit. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This qualitative risk assessment provides information about the 100- NR-2 Groundwater Operable Unit of the Hanford reservation. Topics discussed in this report are: data evaluation; human health risk assessment overview; ecological evaluations; summary of uncertainty; results of both the ecological and human health evaluations; toxicity assessment; risk characterization; and a summary of contaminants of potential concern

  15. 78 FR 37281 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... factors: (1) License renewal will involve nuclear power plants for which the environmental impacts of...) Changes in the environment around nuclear power plants are gradual and predictable. The 1996 GEIS improved... environmental impacts that may occur from renewing commercial nuclear power plant operating licenses; (2...

  16. [Design of Oxygen Saturation, Heart Rate, Respiration Rate Detection System Based on Smartphone of Android Operating System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingshan; Zeng, Bixin

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we designed an oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate monitoring system based on smartphone of android operating system, physiological signal acquired by MSP430 microcontroller and transmitted by Bluetooth module.

  17. Self-inserted foreign body and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: evaluated by the Conners' Parent Rating Scales-Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Kemal; Özcan, Özlem; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal; Durukan, Kübra

    2013-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and self-inserted foreign bodies (SIFBs) in children by the Conners' Parent Rating Scales-Revised (CPRS-R). Forty-five children (31 males and 14 females) with self-inserted foreign body of ear/nose and 37 healthy children (22 males and 15 females) included into the study. They were all between 3 and 9 years old. The parents filled the socio-demographic information form including age, gender, demographic data, previous medical history of the child and features of the family; and completed the Conners' Parent Rating Scales-Revised (CPRS-R) questionnaire. In the SIFB group (study), 55.6% of the children were not attending to the school, 31.1% of them were attending to the primary school and 13.3% of them were the pre-school student. These rates were 37.8%, 32.4% and 29.7%, respectively, in the control group. The all CPRS-R subscale values (CG/I, H, ADHD-I, CGI-DI, DSMIV SS-I, DSM-IV SS-HI and DSM-IV SS-T) were significantly higher in the study group than the control group. There was no significant correlation between gender of the children and CPRS-R subscales. Children with lower school success, and having previous psychiatric problems were related to higher CPRS-R values in all subscales. In older children, hyperactivity scores were lower; and in younger children and the children, not going to the school, hyperactivity scores were higher. CPRS-R scores decreased as the child grown. It was concluded that children with ADHD were more likely to have conditions that might damage himself/herself such as self-inserted foreign body or trauma than normal children. To avoid this condition, these families should closely observe the child; and the child should be provided to participate in activities such as group games and activities that contribute to the development of the child. Warning the children properly and close follow-up of the young children are required to prevent this

  18. Revising rates of asymptomatic Zika virus infection based on sentinel surveillance data from French Overseas Territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Subissi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available French Polynesia and the French Territories of the Americas (FTAs have experienced outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV infection. These territories used similar sentinel syndromic surveillance to follow the epidemics. However, the surveillance system only takes into account consulting patients diagnosed with ZIKV disease, while non-consulting cases, as well as asymptomatic cases, are not taken into account. In the French territories under study, the ratio of consulting to non-consulting patients was found to likely be as low as 1/3 to 1/4, and rough estimates of the ZIKV asymptomatic infections indicated a lower rate than previously reported (i.e., not more than half. Keywords: Zika virus, Sentinel surveillance, Asymptomatic infections, Pacific islands, Caribbean region, Vector-borne infections

  19. Revision rates for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty – a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ras Sørensen, Sofie-amalie L.; Jørgensen, Henrik L.; Sporing, Sune L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare revision rates of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing (HRS) and MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA), as well as the primary causes for revisions. Methods The PubMed database was queried for potentially relevant articles addressing MoMTHA and MoMHRS, a total of 51 articles were....... The odds ratio was 1.25 (1.03:1.53) 95% CI (p = 0.03) (MoMHRS vs. MoMTHA). The studies of hip prostheses were separated into 2 categories of short- and long-term (more or less than 5 years). Short-term revision rate for MoMTHA was 4.5% after 4.8 years, and for MoMHRS 4.0% after 4.2 years. The odds ratio...

  20. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan's purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner

  1. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-10

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

  2. Duane Arnold Energy Center. Semiannual operation report (revision 1), July--December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The start-up testing program was in progress, but net electrical power generated was 1,320,654 MWH. The unit was critical for 3620.2 hours and the generator was on line for 3389.7 hours. Information is presented concerning operations, power generation, shutdowns, maintenance, changes, tests, experiments, primary coolant chemistry, and occupational personnel radiation exposure. Radioactive effluent, radiological monitoring, nonradiological monitoring, and environmental monitoring are described. (U.S.)

  3. Hazard and operability study of the multi-function Waste Tank Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) East site will be constructed on the west side of the 200E area and the MWTF West site will be constructed in the SW quadrant of the 200W site in the Hanford Area. This is a description of facility hazards that site personnel or the general public could potentially be exposed to during operation. A list of preliminary Design Basis Accidents was developed

  4. Site-specific waste management instruction for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit drilling. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, J.T.

    1996-08-01

    This site-specific waste management instruction provides guidance for the management of waste generated as a result of groundwater well installations in the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit (OU). The well installations are necessary to implement the Remedial Action (RA) option (pump-and-treat using ion exchange) to prevent discharge of hexavalent chromium at levels above those considered protective of aquatic life in the Columbia River and riverbed sediments

  5. Interest rate and commercial banks' lending operations in Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was found that Monetary Policy Rate (MPR) and inflation rate exert a positive and significant impact on banks' loans for the period. For the deregulation era, the result showed that MPR and the exchange rate had significant impact on banks' loans and advances. While the former exerted a negative impact, the later had a ...

  6. Concerning partial revision of regulations on installation, operation, etc., of nuclear reactor, etc., for test and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    To enforce the rules relating to nuclear material protection at nuclear power facilities as covered by the Nuclear Reactor Control Law, which was revised in May last year, orders should be issued by the Prime Minister's Office (or Ministry of International Trade and Industry) to specify the following matters: (1) measures to be carried out by the operators of nuclear facilities to ensure the protection of specially designated nuclear fuel materials, (2) procedures for the application for permission as covered by nuclear material protection rules, and (3) requirements for managers in charge of nuclear material protection. The new regulations should cover the following: (1) rules relating to the business of refining of nuclear fuels, and raw materials for nuclear substances, (2) rules relating to the business of processing of nuclear fuels, (3) rules relating to the installation, operation, etc., of nuclear reactor, etc., for test and research, (4) rules relating to the business of reprocessing of spent fules, (5) rules relating to the business of management of nuclear fuels or waste contaminated with nuclear fuels, and (6) rules relating to the application of nuclear fuels. (N.K)

  7. Proposed plan for interim remedial measures at the 100-KR-1 Operable Unit. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This proposed plan identifies the preferred alternative for interim remedial measures for remedial action of radioactive liquid waste disposal sites that include contaminated soils and structures at the 100-KR-1 Operable Unit, located at the Hanford Site. It also summarizes other remedial alternatives evaluated for interim remedial measures in this Operable Unit. The intent of interim remedial measures is to speed up actions to address contaminated areas that pose potential threats to human health and the environment. This proposed plan is being issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the lead regulatory agency; the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the support regulatory agency; and the US Department of Energy (DOE), the responsible agency. The EPA, Ecology, and the DOE are issuing this proposed plan as part of their public participation responsibilities under Section 117(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly known as the ''Superfund Law.'' This proposed plan is intended to be a fact sheet for public review which briefly describes the remedial alternatives analyzed, identifies a preferred alternative, and summarizes the information relied upon to recommend the preferred alternative

  8. The Swedish Version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale: Revised (RAADS-R). A Validation Study of a Rating Scale for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lisa M. J.; Naswall, Katharina; Manouilenko, Irina; Nylander, Lena; Edgar, Johan; Ritvo, Riva Ariella; Ritvo, Edward; Bejerot, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of diagnostic instruments for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R), an 80-item self-rating scale designed to assist clinicians diagnosing ASD in adults. It was administered to 75…

  9. The design and implementation of an operational model evaluation system. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, K.T.

    1995-06-01

    The complete evaluation of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model typically includes a study of the model`s operational performance. Such a study very often attempts to compare the model`s calculations of an atmospheric pollutant`s temporal and spatial distribution with field experiment measurements. However, these comparisons tend to use data from a small number of experiments and are very often limited to producing the commonly quoted statistics based on the differences between model calculations and the experimental measurements (fractional bias, fractional scatter, etc.). This paper presents initial efforts to develop a model evaluation system geared for both the objective statistical analysis and the subjective visualization of the interrelationships between a model`s calculations and the appropriate field measurement data.

  10. Risk-based decision analysis for the 200-BP-5 groundwater operable unit. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaramonte, G.R.

    1996-02-01

    This document presents data from a risk analysis that was performed on three groundwater contaminant plumes within the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. Hypothetical exposure scenarios were assessed based on current and future plume conditions. For current conditions, a hypothetical industrial groundwater scenarios were assumed. The industrial ingestion scenario, which is derived from HSRAM, was not used for drinking water and should not be implied by this risk analysis that the DOE is advocating use of this groundwater for direct human ingestion. Risk was calculated at each monitoring well using the observed radionuclide concentrations in groundwater from that well. The calculated values represent total radiological incremental lifetime cancer risk. Computer models were used to show the analytical flow and transport of contaminants of concern

  11. NRC/FEMA operational response procedures for response to a commercial nuclear reactor accident. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    Procedures have been developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which provide the response teams of both agencies with the steps to be taken in responding to an emergency at a commercial nuclear power plant. The emphasis of these procedures is mainly on the interface between NRC and FEMA at their respective Headquarters and Regional Offices and at the various sites at which such an emergency could occur. Detailed procedures are presented that cover for both agencies, notification schemes and manner of activation, organizations at Headquarters and the site, interface procedures, coordination of onsite and offsite operations, the role of the Senior FEMA Official, and the cooperative efforts of each agency's public information staff

  12. Relatively High Complication and Revision Rates of the Mayo® Metaphysical Conservative Femoral Stem in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Tal Frenkel; Warshevski, Yaniv; Gold, Aviram; Shasha, Nadav; Snir, Nimrod; Chechik, Ofir; Dolkart, Oleg; Eilig, Dynai; Herman, Amir; Rath, Ehud; Kramer, Moti; Drexler, Michael

    2018-05-08

    The Mayo metaphysical conservative femoral stem (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana) is a wedge-shaped implant designed to transfer loads proximally, reduce femoral destruction, and enable the preservation of bone stock in the proximal femur. Thus, it is a potentially preferred prosthesis for active, non-elderly patients who may require additional future surgeries. This retrospective case study analyzed the outcomes of consecutive patients who underwent total hip replacements with this stem between May 2001 and February 2013. All patients underwent clinical assessment, radiological evaluation for the presence and development of radiolucent lines, and functional assessment (numerical analog scale, Harris hip score, and Short Form-12 questionnaire). Ninety-five hips (79 patients) were available for analysis. The patients' mean age was 43 years (range, 18-64 years), and the mean follow-up was 97 months (range, 26.9-166 months). The postoperative clinical assessments and functional assessments revealed significant improvements. Sixteen patients (20.3%) had 18 orthopedic complications, the most common of which were an intraoperative femoral fracture and implant dislocation requiring revision surgeries in 10 hips (10.5%). Radiological analysis revealed evidence of femoral remodeling in 64 (67.4%) implants, spot welds (neocortex) in 35 (36.8%), and osteolysis in 3 (3.2%). These results suggest that the conservative hip femoral implant has an unacceptable complication rate for non-elderly patients. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Changes in safety climate and teamwork in the operating room after implementation of a revised WHO checklist: a prospective interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erestam, Sofia; Haglind, Eva; Bock, David; Andersson, Annette Erichsen; Angenete, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Inter-professional teamwork in the operating room is important for patient safety. The World Health Organization (WHO) checklist was introduced to improve intraoperative teamwork. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety climate in a Swedish operating room setting before and after an intervention, using a revised version of the WHO checklist to improve teamwork. This study is a single center prospective interventional study. Participants were personnel working in operating room teams including surgeons, anesthesiologists, scrub nurses, nurse anaesthetists and nurse assistants. The study started with pre-interventional observations of the WHO checklist use followed by education on safety climate, the WHO checklist, and non-technical skills in the operating room. Thereafter a revised version of the WHO checklist was introduced. Post-interventional observations regarding the performance of the WHO checklist were carried out. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire was used to assess safety climate at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline we discovered a need for improved teamwork and communication. The participants considered teamwork to be important for patient safety, but had different perceptions of good teamwork between professions. The intervention, a revised version of the WHO checklist, did not affect teamwork climate. Adherence to the revision of the checklist was insufficient, dominated by a lack of structure. There was no significant change in teamwork climate by use of the revised WHO checklist, which may be due to insufficient implementation, as a lack of adherence to the WHO checklist was detected. We found deficiencies in teamwork and communication. Further studies exploring how to improve safety climate are needed. NCT02329691.

  14. Trickle Bed Reactor Operation under Forced Liquid Feed Rate Modulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanika, Jiří; Jiřičný, Vladimír; Karnetová, P.; Kolena, J.; Lederer, J.; Skála, D.; Staněk, Vladimír; Tukač, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2007), s. 192-198 ISSN 1451-9372 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : trickle -bed reactor * period * feed rate Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  15. Hydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Fiachra T

    2010-03-01

    Partial-thickness scalds are the most common pediatric burn injury, and primary management consists of wound dressings to optimize the environment for reepithelialization. Operative intervention is reserved for burns that fail to heal using conservative methods. Worldwide, paraffin-based gauze (Jelonet) is the most common burn dressing; but literature suggests that it adheres to wounds and requires more frequent dressing change that may traumatize newly epithelialized surfaces. Hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM) provide an occlusive moist environment to optimize healing and are associated with less frequent dressing changes.

  16. The multiple sclerosis rating scale, revised (MSRS-R: Development, refinement, and psychometric validation using an online community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wicks Paul

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developing the PatientsLikeMe online platform for patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS, we required a patient-reported assessment of functional status that was easy to complete and identified disability in domains other than walking. Existing measures of functional status were inadequate, clinician-reported, focused on walking, and burdensome to complete. In response, we developed the Multiple Sclerosis Rating Scale (MSRS. Methods We adapted a clinician-rated measure, the Guy’s Neurological Disability Scale, to a self-report scale and deployed it to an online community. As part of our validation process we reviewed discussions between patients, conducted patient cognitive debriefing, and made minor improvements to form a revised scale (MSRS-R before deploying a cross-sectional survey to patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS on the PatientsLikeMe platform. The survey included MSRS-R and comparator measures: MSIS-29, PDDS, NARCOMS Performance Scales, PRIMUS, and MSWS-12. Results In total, 816 RRMS patients responded (19% response rate. The MSRS-R exhibited high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = .86. The MSRS-R walking item was highly correlated with alternative walking measures (PDDS, ρ = .84; MSWS-12, ρ = .83; NARCOMS mobility question, ρ = .86. MSRS-R correlated well with comparison instruments and differentiated between known groups by PDDS disease stage and relapse burden in the past two years. Factor analysis suggested a single factor accounting for 51.5% of variance. Conclusions The MSRS-R is a concise measure of MS-related functional disability, and may have advantages for disease measurement over longer and more burdensome instruments that are restricted to a smaller number of domains or measure quality of life. Studies are underway describing the use of the instrument in contexts outside our online platform such as clinical practice or trials. The MSRS-R is released for use under

  17. Prediction of the time-dependent failure rate for normally operating components taking into account the operational history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrbanic, I.; Simic, Z.; Sljivac, D.

    2008-01-01

    The prediction of the time-dependent failure rate has been studied, taking into account the operational history of a component used in applications such as system modeling in a probabilistic safety analysis in order to evaluate the impact of equipment aging and maintenance strategies on the risk measures considered. We have selected a time-dependent model for the failure rate which is based on the Weibull distribution and the principles of proportional age reduction by equipment overhauls. Estimation of the parameters that determine the failure rate is considered, including the definition of the operational history model and likelihood function for the Bayesian analysis of parameters for normally operating repairable components. The operational history is provided as a time axis with defined times of overhauls and failures. An example for demonstration is described with prediction of the future behavior for seven different operational histories. (orig.)

  18. OPERABILITY RATE OF DISTAL GASTRIC CANCER AND THE EFFECT OF GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION IN THE OPERABILITY RATE AND POSTOPERATIVE OUTCOME- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh T. R

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stomach cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. 1 Except in countries where screening for stomach cancer is prevalent, most of the distal stomach tumours are diagnosed at advanced stage. Gastric outlet obstruction is usually believed to be a sign of locally-advanced disease. Complete surgical removal of the disease (R0 is the only potentially curative treatment for resectable gastric cancer. The aim of the study is to finda The operability rate of gastric cancer in our institution and the incidence of Gastric Outlet Obstruction (GOO in patients undergoing gastrectomy for distal gastric cancer. b To compare the postoperative outcome in patients with gastric outlet obstruction and those without gastric outlet obstruction. c To see if the histology of the tumour has any role in the development of GOO. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study. The study includes patients who were admitted with carcinoma stomach and underwent operative or nonoperative treatment in our institution during 2013 to 2015. RESULTS Overall operability rate was 45.8%. Operable patients in the GOO group were 47%. Operability in the no outlet obstruction group were 45%. Data shows a slightly increased predilection for GOO in diffuse and mixed type of tumours (statistically not significant. Intestinal tumours had significant rate of anaemia compared to diffuse tumours (p <0.005. Overall mortality was 6.7%. Mortality is higher in the GOO group (8.8%. CONCLUSION (a. Operability rate of distal gastric cancer in our institution is 45.8%. (b. Incidence of gastric outlet obstruction in patients undergoing gastrectomy is 38.2%. (c. Presence of gastric outlet obstruction does not influence operability rate (47% vs. 45%. (d. Morbidity and mortality after distal radical gastrectomy is comparable in both groups. (e. Both intestinal and diffuse histology have equal incidence of GOO. (f. Chronic blood loss and incidence of anaemia is more in

  19. 42 CFR 412.62 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... determines national adjusted DRG prospective payment rates for operating costs, for each inpatient hospital... DRG prospective payment rates for inpatient operating costs for such discharges in each region, for... classifications. (1) For purposes of paragraph (e) of this section, the following definitions apply: (i) The term...

  20. Analysis of gross error rates in operation of commercial nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joos, D.W.; Sabri, Z.A.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Experience in operation of US commercial nuclear power plants is reviewed over a 25-month period. The reports accumulated in that period on events of human error and component failure are examined to evaluate gross operator error rates. The impact of such errors on plant operation and safety is examined through the use of proper taxonomies of error, tasks and failures. Four categories of human errors are considered; namely, operator, maintenance, installation and administrative. The computed error rates are used to examine appropriate operator models for evaluation of operator reliability. Human error rates are found to be significant to a varying degree in both BWR and PWR. This emphasizes the import of considering human factors in safety and reliability analysis of nuclear systems. The results also indicate that human errors, and especially operator errors, do indeed follow the exponential reliability model. (Auth.)

  1. Effect of ventilation rate on air cleanliness and energy consumption in operation rooms at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Tseng; Liang, Ching-Chieh; Chien, Tsung-Yi; Wu, Feng-Jen; Fan, Kuang-Chung; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2018-02-27

    The interrelationships between ventilation rate, indoor air quality, and energy consumption in operation rooms at rest are yet to be understood. We investigate the effect of ventilation rate on indoor air quality indices and energy consumption in ORs at rest. The study investigates the air temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of carbon dioxide, particulate matter (PM), and airborne bacteria at different ventilation rates in operation rooms at rest of a medical center. The energy consumption and cost analysis of the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system in the operation rooms at rest were also evaluated for all ventilation rates. No air-conditioned operation rooms had very highest PM and airborne bacterial concentrations in the operation areas. The bacterial concentration in the operation areas with 6-30 air changes per hour (ACH) was below the suggested level set by the United Kingdom (UK) for an empty operation room. A 70% of reduction in annual energy cost by reducing the ventilation rate from 30 to 6 ACH was found in the operation rooms at rest. Maintenance of operation rooms at ventilation rate of 6 ACH could save considerable amounts of energy and achieve the goal of air cleanliness.

  2. Plastic surgeons' self-reported operative infection rates at a Canadian academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wendy Ky; Kaur, Manraj Nirmal; Thoma, Achilleas

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection rates are of great interest to patients, surgeons, hospitals and third-party payers. While previous studies have reported hospital-acquired infection rates that are nonspecific to all surgical services, there remain no overall reported infection rates focusing specifically on plastic surgery in the literature. To estimate the reported surgical site infection rate in plastic surgery procedures over a 10-year period at an academic hospital in Canada. A review was conducted on reported plastic surgery surgical site infection rates from 2003 to 2013, based on procedures performed in the main operating room. For comparison, prospective infection surveillance data over an eight-year period (2005 to 2013) for nonplastic surgery procedures were reviewed to estimate the overall operative surgical site infection rates. A total of 12,183 plastic surgery operations were performed from 2003 to 2013, with 96 surgical site infections reported, corresponding to a net operative infection rate of 0.79%. There was a 0.49% surgeon-reported infection rate for implant-based procedures. For non-plastic surgery procedures, surgical site infection rates ranged from 0.04% for cataract surgery to 13.36% for high-risk abdominal hysterectomies. The plastic surgery infection rate at the study institution was found to be site infection rates. However, these results do not report patterns of infection rates germane to procedures, season, age groups or sex. To provide more in-depth knowledge of this topic, multicentre studies should be conducted.

  3. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    rehabilitation programme, between 2002 and 2004. Re-operation rate was assessed 6 months postoperatively. Surgeons were grouped as unsupervised junior registrars versus experienced surgeons operating or supervising. Fractures were stratified as technically undemanding or demanding. RESULTS: Unsupervised junior......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... registrars operated on 23% (137/600) of all and 15% (56/365) of technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. The latter had a higher re-operation rate within 6 months, compared with the rate when more experienced surgeons were present. In logistic regression analysis combining age, gender, American...

  4. Lower rates of symptom recurrence and surgical revision after primary compared with secondary endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to aqueductal stenosis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Eric W; Goodwin, C Rory; Jusué-Torres, Ignacio; Elder, Benjamin D; Hoffberger, Jamie; Lu, Jennifer; Blitz, Ari M; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is the treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus; however, the success of ETV in patients who have previously undergone shunt placement remains unclear. The present study analyzed 103 adult patients with aqueductal stenosis who underwent ETV for obstructive hydrocephalus and evaluated the effect of previous shunt placement on post-ETV outcomes. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of 151 consecutive patients who were treated between 2007 and 2013 with ETV for hydrocephalus. One hundred three (68.2%) patients with aqueductal stenosis causing obstructive hydrocephalus were included in the analysis. Postoperative ETV patency and aqueductal and cisternal flow were assessed by high-resolution, gradient-echo MRI. Post-ETV Mini-Mental State Examination, Timed Up and Go, and Tinetti scores were compared with preoperative values. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed comparing the post-ETV outcomes in patients who underwent a primary (no previous shunt) ETV (n = 64) versus secondary (previous shunt) ETV (n = 39). RESULTS The majority of patients showed significant improvement in symptoms after ETV; however, no significant differences were seen in any of the quantitative tests performed during follow-up. Symptom recurrence occurred in 29 (28.2%) patients after ETV, after a median of 3.0 (interquartile range 0.8-8.0) months post-ETV failure. Twenty-seven (26.2%) patients required surgical revision after their initial ETV. Patients who received a secondary ETV had higher rates of symptom recurrence (p = 0.003) and surgical revision (p = 0.003), particularly in regard to additional shunt placement/revision post-ETV (p = 0.005). These differences remained significant after multivariate analysis for both symptom recurrence (p = 0.030) and surgical revision (p = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS Patients with obstructive hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis exhibit symptomatic improvement after ETV, with a

  5. High mid-term revision rate after treatment of large, full-thickness cartilage lesions and OA in the patellofemoral joint using a large inlay resurfacing prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jens Ole

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The HemiCAP-Wave® implant for the patellofemoral resurfacing treatment of large cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis (OA) was introduced in 2009. The outcome of a prospective cohort study of 18 patients with large trochlea lesions or isolated OA treated with the HemiCAP-Wave® implant...... pain but high mid-term revision rate after patellofemoral inlay resurfacing using the HemiCAP-Wave® implant. Patellofemoral resurfacing implantation treatment with a large inlay prosthesis can offer temporary treatment for large isolated patellofemoral cartilage lesions or OA in younger patients...

  6. Expanded Operational Temperature Range for Space Rated Li-Ion Batteries, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quallion's Phase II proposal calls for expanding the nominal operation range of its space rated lithium ion cells, while maintaining their long life capabilities. To...

  7. Expanded Operational Temperature Range for Space Rated Li-Ion Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quallion's response to this solicitation calls for expanding the nominal operation range of its space rated lithium ion cells, while maintaining their long life...

  8. High revision rate but good healing capacity of atypical femoral fractures. A comparison with common shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilcher, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Healing of complete, atypical femoral fractures is thought to be impaired, but the evidence is weak and appears to be based on the delayed healing observed in patients with incomplete atypical fractures. Time until fracture healing is difficult to assess, therefore we compared the reoperation rates between women with complete atypical femoral fractures and common femoral shaft fractures. We searched the orthopaedic surgical registry in Östergötland County for patients with subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures (ICD-10 diagnosis codes S72.2, S72.3 and M84.3F) between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2013. Out of 895 patients with surgically treated femoral shaft fractures, 511 were women 50 years of age or older. Among these we identified 24 women with atypical femoral shaft fractures, and 71 with common shaft fractures. Reoperations were performed in 6 and 5 patients, respectively, odds ratio 4.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 16.1). However, 5 reoperations in the atypical fracture group could not be ascribed to poor healing. In 3 patients the reoperation was due to a new fracture proximal to a standard intramedullary nail. In 2 patients the distal locking screws were removed due to callus formation that was deemed incomplete 5 months post-operatively. The one patient with poor healing showed faint callus formation at 5 months when the fracture was dynamised and callus remained sparse at 11 months. Among patients with common shaft fractures, 2 reoperations were performed to remove loose screws, 2 because of peri-implant fractures and 1 reoperation due to infection. Reoperation rates in patients with complete atypical femoral fractures are higher than in patients with common shaft fractures. The main reason for failure was peri-implant fragility fractures which might be prevented with the use of cephalomedullary nails at the index surgery. Fracture healing however, seems generally good. A watchful waiting approach is advocated in patients with fractures that appear to

  9. Library Automation Alternatives in 1996 and User Satisfaction Ratings of Library Users by Operating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibbarelli, Pamela

    1996-01-01

    Examines library automation product introductions and conversions to new operating systems. Compares user satisfaction ratings of the following library software packages: DOS/Windows, UNIX, Macintosh, and DEC VAX/VMS. Software is rated according to documentation, service/support, training, product reliability, product capabilities, ease of use,…

  10. ATLAS trigger operations: Monitoring with “Xmon” rate prediction system

    CERN Document Server

    Aukerman, Andrew Todd; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present the operations and online monitoring with the “Xmon” rate prediction system for the trigger system at the ATLAS Experiment. A two-level trigger system reduces the LHC’s bunch-crossing rate, 40 MHz at design capacity, to an average recording rate of about 1 kHz, while maintaining a high efficiency of selecting events of interest. The Xmon system uses the luminosity value to predict trigger rates that are, in turn, compared with incoming rates. The predictions rely on past runs to parameterize the luminosity dependency of the event rate for a trigger algorithm. Some examples are given to illustrate the performance of the tool during recent operations.

  11. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  12. Dose rate evaluation of workers on the operation floor in Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kaoru; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Shirai, Keisuke; Matsuoka, Ippei; Mukaida, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    At Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, installation of a fuel handling machine is planned to support the removal of spent fuel. The dose rates at the workplace were calculated based on the source distribution measured using a collimator in order to confirm that the dose rates on the operation floor were within a manageable range. It was confirmed that the accuracy of the source distribution was C/M = 1.0-2.4. These dose rates were then used to plan the work on the operation floor.

  13. Investigation of component failure rates for pulsed versus steady state tokamak operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents component failure rate data sources applicable to magnetic fusion systems, and defines multiplicative factors to adjust these data for specific use on magnetic fusion experiment designs. The multipliers address both long pulse and steady state tokamak operation. Thermal fatigue and radiation damage are among the leading reasons for large multiplier values in pulsed operation applications. Field failure rate values for graphite protective tiles are presented, and beryllium tile failure rates in laboratory testing are also given. All of these data can be used for reliability studies, safety analyses, design tradeoff studies, and risk assessments

  14. Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luff, R.; Zaehringer, M.; Harms, W.; Bleher, M.; Prommer, B.; Stoehlker, U.

    2014-01-01

    The German Federal Office for Radiation Protection operates a network of about 1800 gamma dose rate stations as a part of the national emergency preparedness plan. Each of the six network centres is capable of operating the network alone. Most of the used hardware and software have been developed in-house under open-source license. Short development cycles and close cooperation between developers and users ensure robustness, transparency and fast maintenance procedures, thus avoiding unnecessary complex solutions. This also reduces the overall costs of the network operation. An easy-to-expand web interface has been developed to make the complete system available to other interested network operators in order to increase cooperation between different countries. The interface is also regularly in use for education during scholarships of trainees supported, e.g. by the 'international Atomic Energy Agency' to operate a local area dose rate monitoring test network. (authors)

  15. Operation and maintenance manual for the temporary septic holding tank at the 100-D remedial action support facility. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelty, G.G.

    1996-10-01

    This manual was prepared to provide detailed information for the operation and maintenance of the sanitary wastewater holding system at the 100-D Remedial Action Support Facility located in the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site. This document describes operations, including the type and frequency of required maintenance, and system failure response procedures

  16. Operation and maintenance manual for the temporary septic holding tank at the 100-D remedial action support facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelty, G.G.

    1996-09-01

    This manual provides detailed information for the operation and maintenance of the sanitary wastewater holding system at the 100-D Remedial Action Support Facility located in the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit of the Hanford Site. This document describes operations, including the type and frequency of required maintenance, and system failure response procedures

  17. Description of the rates, trends and surgical burden associated with revision for prosthetic joint infection following primary and revision knee replacements in England and Wales: an analysis of the National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenguerrand, Erik; Whitehouse, Michael R; Beswick, Andrew D; Toms, Andrew D; Porter, Martyn L; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-07-10

    To describe the prevalence rates of revision surgery for the treatment of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) for patients undergoing knee replacement, their time trends, the cumulative incidence function of revision for PJI and estimate the burden of PJI at health service level. We analysed revision knee replacements performed due to a diagnosis of PJI and the linked index procedures recorded in the National Joint Registry from 2003 to 2014 for England and Wales. The cohort analysed consisted of 679 010 index primary knee replacements, 33 920 index revision knee replacements and 8247 revision total knee replacements performed due to a diagnosis of PJI. The prevalence rates, their time trends investigated by time from index surgery to revision for PJI, cumulative incidence functions and the burden of PJI (total procedures) were calculated. Overall linear trends were investigated with log-linear regression. The incidence of revision total knee replacement due to PJI at 2 years was 3.2/1000 following primary and 14.4/1000 following revision knee replacement, respectively. The prevalence of revision due to PJI in the 3 months following primary knee replacement has risen by 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.2 to 5.3) from 2005 to 2013 and 7.5-fold (95% CI 1.0 to 56.1) following revision knee replacement. Over 1000 procedures per year are performed as a consequence of knee PJI, an increase of 2.8 from 2005 to 2013. Overall, 75% of revisions were two-stage with an increase in use of single-stage from 7.9% in 2005 to 18.8% in 2014. Although the risk of revision due to PJI following knee replacement is low, it is rising, and coupled with the established and further predicted increased incidence of both primary and revision knee replacements, this represents an increasing and substantial treatment burden for orthopaedic service delivery in England and Wales. This has implications for future service design and the funding of individual and specialist centres. © Article author

  18. Risk factors for total hip arthroplasty aseptic revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatod, Monti; Cafri, Guy; Namba, Robert S; Inacio, Maria C S; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient, operative, implant, surgeon, and hospital factors associated with aseptic revision after primary THA in patients registered in a large US Total Joint Replacement Registry. A total of 35,960 THAs registered from 4/2001-12/2010 were evaluated. The 8-year survival rate was 96.7% (95% CI 96.4%-97.0%). Females had a higher risk of aseptic revision than males. Hispanic and Asian patients had a lower risk of revision than white patients. Ceramic-on-ceramic, ceramic-on-conventional polyethylene, and metal-on-conventional polyethylene bearing surfaces had a higher risk of revision than metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene. Body mass index, health status, diabetes, diagnosis, fixation, approach, bilateral procedures, head size, surgeon fellowship training, surgeon and hospital volume were not revision risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of the growth rate for joint fast breeder reactor and light water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Borg, C.R.; Ott, K.O.

    1977-07-01

    An investigation of fuel consumption and breeding characteristics of FBR-LWR joint operation is presented. The FBR operates in a closed cycle with joint-reprocessing of core and blanket material. The LWR-portion that runs on FBR plutonium operates in an open cycle. The growth rate of the system is defined based upon the fact that the discharge from the system will make up a fraction of an identical system; the system growth rate is found to have an almost linear dependence on the fraction of the LWR fed by plutonium from the FBR. The LWR growth rate, which is negative, is a constant and represents the fraction of the fuel burnt in the LWR-fraction that runs on FBR plutonium per year

  20. Terry Turbopump Expanded Operating Band Full-Scale Component and Basic Science Detailed Test Plan-Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solom, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Ross, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.

    2017-08-01

    This document details the milestone approach to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) efforts. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  1. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should...

  2. High-rate operant behavior in two mouse strains: a response-bout analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua E; Pesek, Erin F; Newland, M Christopher

    2009-06-01

    Operant behavior sometimes occurs in bouts characterized by an initiation rate, within-bout response rate, and bout length. The generality of this structure was tested using high-rate nose-poking in mice. Reinforcement of short interresponse times produced high response rates while a random-interval schedule held reinforcement rates constant. BALB/c mice produced bouts that were more frequent, longer, and contained a higher within-bout rate of responding (nine nose-pokes/s) than did the C57BL/6 mice (five nose-pokes/s). Adding a running wheel decreased total nose-pokes and bout length, and increased bout-initiation rate. Free-feeding reduced nose-poking by decreasing bout-initiation rate. Photoperiod reversal decreased bout-initiation rate but not total nose-poke rate. Despite strain differences in bout structure, both strains responded similarly to the interventions. The three bout measures were correlated with overall rate but not with each other. Log-survival analyses provided independent descriptors of the structure of high-rate responding in these two strains.

  3. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, DODGE COUNTY, WISCONSIN (AND INCORPORATED AREAS) - Fox Lake Physical Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk;...

  4. Effect of pre operative heart rate on post spinal hypotension in obsteric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Zahoor, M.U.; Zaid, A.Y.; Buland, K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the association between of preoperative heart rate and post spinal hypotension in women undergoing cesarean section, Two hundred patients undergoing caesarean were included in the study selected on non probability convenience sampling technique, The patients were divided into two groups depending upon their pre operative heart rate. Spinal anesthesia was administered and number of patients developing hypotension was noted. Among 200 patients, who were included in the study; 112 were placed in group A and 88 were placed in group B depending on mean heart rate of 90 beats per minute or less or 91 beats per minute or more respectively. In group A 14 (11.86%) patients developed hypotension where as in group B 28 (31,82%) patients developed hypotension. Pre operative heart rate is significantly associated with post spinal hypotension in obstetric patients undergoing cesarean section. (author)

  5. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the theoretical background and findings of an empirical study of revision policies, using Denmark as a case in point. After an overview of important definitions, types and parameters, the paper explains the methods and data gathered from a questionnaire survey and an interview...... survey. Results clearly show that most translation companies regard both unilingual and comparative revisions as essential components of professional quality assurance. Data indicate that revision is rarely fully comparative, as the preferred procedure seems to be a unilingual revision followed by a more...... or less comparative rereading. Though questionnaire data seem to indicate that translation companies use linguistic correctness and presentation as the only revision parameters, interview data reveal that textual and communicative aspects are also considered. Generally speaking, revision is not carried...

  6. Two-stage revision of infected hip arthroplasty using a shortened post-operative course of antibiotics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Paul B

    2009-04-01

    We present a series of 30 consecutive patients with 31 infected total hip arthroplasties treated by a single surgeon over a 4-year period in whom a shortened post-operative course of antimicrobial chemotherapy was used.

  7. Operation and Thermal Modeling of the ISIS H– Source from 50 to 2 Hz Repetition Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, H; Lettry, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN’s Linac4 accelerator H− ion source, currently under construction, will operate at a 2 Hz repetition rate, with pulse length of 0.5 ms and a beam current of 80 mA. Its reliability must exceed 99 % with a mandatory 3 month uninterrupted operation period. A Penning ion source is successfully operated at ISIS; at 50 Hz repetition rate it reliably provides 55 mA H− pulses of 0.25 ms duration over 1 month. The discharge plasma ignition is very sensitive to the temperatures of the discharge region, especially of its cathode. The investigation by modeling and measurement of operation parameters suitable for arc ignition and H− production at 2 Hz is of paramount importance and must be understood prior to the implementation of discharge ion sources in the Linac4 accelerator. In its original configuration, the ISIS H− source delivers beam only if the repetition rate is above 12.5 Hz, this paper describes the implementation of a temperature control of the discharge region aiming at lower repetition rate op...

  8. The petroleum explorationist's guide to contracts used in oil and gas operations, new revised 2nd edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosburg, L.G. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This book includes many materials on contracts involving natural gas (including take-or-pay litigation, regulation gas balancing, purchase and sale); drilling contracts, division orders and acquisition contracts; a new taxation section and the 1988 ASPL Model Form Operating Agreement. Also includes: Side-byside comparison of the 1982-1989 model forms; COPAS accounting procedure, support and farmount agreements, Area of Mutual Interest provisions, seismic options, structuring considerations, AAPL model from operating agreement, and much more exclamation point

  9. Rate-based congestion control in networks with smart links, revision. B.S. Thesis - May 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heybey, Andrew Tyrrell

    1990-01-01

    The author uses a network simulator to explore rate-based congestion control in networks with smart links that can feed back information to tell senders to adjust their transmission rates. This method differs in a very important way from congestion control in which a congested network component just drops packets - the most commonly used method. It is clearly advantageous for the links in the network to communicate with the end users about the network capacity, rather than the users unilaterally picking a transmission rate. The components in the middle of the network, not the end users, have information about the capacity and traffic in the network. The author experiments with three different algorithms for calculating the control rate to feed back to the users. All of the algorithms exhibit problems in the form of large queues when simulated with a configuration modeling the dynamics of a packet-voice system. However, the problems are not with the algorithms themselves, but with the fact that feedback takes time. If the network steady-state utilization is low enough that it can absorb transients in the traffic through it, then the large queues disappear. If the users are modified to start sending slowly, to allow the network to adapt to a new flow without causing congestion, a greater portion of the network's bandwidth can be used.

  10. Failure rate modeling using fault tree analysis and Bayesian network: DEMO pulsed operation turbine study case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongiovanni, Danilo Nicola, E-mail: danilo.dongiovanni@enea.it [ENEA, Nuclear Fusion and Safety Technologies Department, via Enrico Fermi 45, Frascati 00040 (Italy); Iesmantas, Tomas [LEI, Breslaujos str. 3 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability) assessment of secondary heat transfer loop for a DEMO nuclear fusion plant. • Definition of a fault tree for a nuclear steam turbine operated in pulsed mode. • Turbine failure rate models update by mean of a Bayesian network reflecting the fault tree analysis in the considered scenario. • Sensitivity analysis on system availability performance. - Abstract: Availability will play an important role in the Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO) success from an economic and safety perspective. Availability performance is commonly assessed by Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability (RAMI) analysis, strongly relying on the accurate definition of system components failure modes (FM) and failure rates (FR). Little component experience is available in fusion application, therefore requiring the adaptation of literature FR to fusion plant operating conditions, which may differ in several aspects. As a possible solution to this problem, a new methodology to extrapolate/estimate components failure rate under different operating conditions is presented. The DEMO Balance of Plant nuclear steam turbine component operated in pulse mode is considered as study case. The methodology moves from the definition of a fault tree taking into account failure modes possibly enhanced by pulsed operation. The fault tree is then translated into a Bayesian network. A statistical model for the turbine system failure rate in terms of subcomponents’ FR is hence obtained, allowing for sensitivity analyses on the structured mixture of literature and unknown FR data for which plausible value intervals are investigated to assess their impact on the whole turbine system FR. Finally, the impact of resulting turbine system FR on plant availability is assessed exploiting a Reliability Block Diagram (RBD) model for a typical secondary cooling system implementing a Rankine cycle. Mean inherent availability

  11. Failure rate modeling using fault tree analysis and Bayesian network: DEMO pulsed operation turbine study case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongiovanni, Danilo Nicola; Iesmantas, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability) assessment of secondary heat transfer loop for a DEMO nuclear fusion plant. • Definition of a fault tree for a nuclear steam turbine operated in pulsed mode. • Turbine failure rate models update by mean of a Bayesian network reflecting the fault tree analysis in the considered scenario. • Sensitivity analysis on system availability performance. - Abstract: Availability will play an important role in the Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO) success from an economic and safety perspective. Availability performance is commonly assessed by Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability (RAMI) analysis, strongly relying on the accurate definition of system components failure modes (FM) and failure rates (FR). Little component experience is available in fusion application, therefore requiring the adaptation of literature FR to fusion plant operating conditions, which may differ in several aspects. As a possible solution to this problem, a new methodology to extrapolate/estimate components failure rate under different operating conditions is presented. The DEMO Balance of Plant nuclear steam turbine component operated in pulse mode is considered as study case. The methodology moves from the definition of a fault tree taking into account failure modes possibly enhanced by pulsed operation. The fault tree is then translated into a Bayesian network. A statistical model for the turbine system failure rate in terms of subcomponents’ FR is hence obtained, allowing for sensitivity analyses on the structured mixture of literature and unknown FR data for which plausible value intervals are investigated to assess their impact on the whole turbine system FR. Finally, the impact of resulting turbine system FR on plant availability is assessed exploiting a Reliability Block Diagram (RBD) model for a typical secondary cooling system implementing a Rankine cycle. Mean inherent availability

  12. Process Management and Exception Handling in Multiprocessor Operating Systems Using Object-Oriented Design Techniques. Revised Sep. 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Vincent; Johnston, Gary; Campbell, Roy

    1988-01-01

    The programming of the interrupt handling mechanisms, process switching primitives, scheduling mechanism, and synchronization primitives of an operating system for a multiprocessor require both efficient code in order to support the needs of high- performance or real-time applications and careful organization to facilitate maintenance. Although many advantages have been claimed for object-oriented class hierarchical languages and their corresponding design methodologies, the application of these techniques to the design of the primitives within an operating system has not been widely demonstrated. To investigate the role of class hierarchical design in systems programming, the authors have constructed the Choices multiprocessor operating system architecture the C++ programming language. During the implementation, it was found that many operating system design concerns can be represented advantageously using a class hierarchical approach, including: the separation of mechanism and policy; the organization of an operating system into layers, each of which represents an abstract machine; and the notions of process and exception management. In this paper, we discuss an implementation of the low-level primitives of this system and outline the strategy by which we developed our solution.

  13. Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.

  14. Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice

  15. Approach and plan for cleanup actions in the 100-FR-2 operable unit of the Hanford Site, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    A new administrative approach is being used to reach a cleanup decision for the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit. The unit, located at the 100-F Area, contains solid waste sites and is one of the remaining operable units scheduled for characterization and cleanup in the 100 Area. This Focus Package (1) describes the new approach and activities needed to reach a decision on cleanup actions for the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit and (2) invites public participation into the planning process. The previous approach included the production of a Work Plan, a Limited Field Investigation Report, a Qualitative Risk Assessment, a Focused Feasibility Study, and a Proposed Plan, all culminating in an interim action Record of Decision. Information gathered to date on other operable units allows the analgous site approach to be used on the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, and therefore, a reduction in documentation preparation. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Department of Energy (Tri-Party Agreement) believe that the new approach will save time and funding. In the new approach, the Work Plan has been condensed into this 12 page Focus Package. The Focus Package includes a summary of 100-F Area information, a list of waste sites in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, a summary of proposed work, and a schedule. The new approach will also combine the Limited Field Investigation and Qualitative Risk Assessment reports into the Focused Feasibility Study. The Focused Feasibility Study will analyze methods and costs to clean up waste sites. Consolidating the documents should reduce the time to complete the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process by 16 months, compared to the previous approach

  16. Engineering evaluation/conceptual plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit interim remedial measure. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents an engineering evaluation and conceptual plan for an interim remedial measure (IRM) to address a uranium and technetium-99 groundwater plume in the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This report provides information regarding the need for an IRM and its potentially achievable objectives and goals. The report also evaluates alternatives to contain elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99 and to obtain information necessary to develop final remedial actions for the operable unit

  17. 76 FR 56683 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Revisions to Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... implementation of SEMS programs, and establishing requirements for reporting unsafe working conditions. In... be under investigation, the event further illustrates the importance of ensuring safe operations on... safer and with appropriate protections for workers and the environment. BOEMRE may consider further...

  18. 75 FR 3622 - Revisions to Rules Authorizing the Operation of Low Power Auxiliary Stations in the 698-806 MHz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... translators, and Class A stations are continuing to operate in the 700 MHz Band after the transition. The..., marketing, and packaging materials, including online materials, related to such devices. The labeling must... display (including online display) any low power auxiliary stations, including wireless microphones, that...

  19. 75 FR 3682 - Revisions to Rules Authorizing the Operation of Low Power Auxiliary Stations in the 698-806 MHz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... seeks comment on the adoption in its rules marketing and labeling requirements, including possible... microphones operating simultaneously, and only one or two vacant TV channels may be required for such users... ``white spaces'' proceeding are designed to ensure that there will be one or more TV channels available...

  20. Analysis of the influence of operating conditions on fouling rates in fired heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Fuentes, A.; Picón-Núñez, M.; Polley, G.T.; Méndez-Díaz, S.

    2014-01-01

    Fouling due to chemical reaction in preheat trains for the processing of crude oil plays a key role in the operation and maintenance costs and on greenhouse emissions to atmosphere in crude processing plants. A preheat train consists of a set of heat transfer units that provide the crude oil stream the required amount of thermal energy to reach its target temperature either by heat recovery or by direct firing. Fired heaters supply external high temperature heating through the burning of fuel which result in complex heat transfer processes due to the large temperature and pressure changes and vaporization that takes place inside the unit. In this work, a thermo-hydraulic analysis of the performance of fired heaters is carried out through the application of commercial software to solve the mathematical models using finite difference methods; the analysis is applied to the crude side of a vertical fired heater in order to evaluate the impact of process conditions such as throughput and crude inlet temperature (CIT) on the fouling that take place at the early stages of operation. Using a fouling rate model based on thermo-hydraulic parameters, fouling rates are predicted assuming steady state operation and clean conditions. Although variations in process conditions are known to influence fouling rates, little work has been done on the subject. In this work excess air and steam injection are studied as a means to mitigate fouling. Results show that throughput reduction brings about a marked increase in the fouling rates. A decrease in CIT affects only the convection zone and it is found that this effect is negligible. In terms of excess air, it is found that although it affects negatively the heater efficiency it can be used to balance heat transfer between the convection and radiation zone in a way that fouling rates are reduced; however this strategy should be considered right from the design stage. Finally it is observed that steam injection is an effective method

  1. Operators and scales: diagnostic and rating issues in psychiatric PET research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagren, H.

    1992-01-01

    In psychiatric research that for various reasons has to restrict itself to a limited number of subjects, such as studies involving expensive positron emission tomography techniques, issues concerning the parsimonious description of patients gain in importance. The number of descriptive variables must be optimally small. This paper offers a conceptual back-ground for the choice of operators in operational diagnostic systems designed to delimit pathological types, and of rating scales designed to measure syndromal severity in a dimensional way. A practical suggestion in five tenets for the organization of clinical research of this kind is presented. (author)

  2. EPRI PWR primary water chemistry guidelines revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElrath, Joel; Fruzzetti, Keith

    2014-01-01

    EPRI periodically updates the PWR Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines as new information becomes available and as required by NEI 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues). The last revision of the PWR water chemistry guidelines identified an optimum primary water chemistry program based on then-current understanding of research and field information. This new revision provides further details with regard to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), fuel integrity, and shutdown dose rates. A committee of industry experts, including utility specialists, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) and fuel vendor representatives, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) representatives, consultants, and EPRI staff collaborated in reviewing the available data on primary water chemistry, reactor water coolant system materials issues, fuel integrity and performance issues, and radiation dose rate issues. From the data, the committee updated the water chemistry guidelines that all PWR nuclear plants should adopt. The committee revised guidance with regard to optimization to reflect industry experience gained since the publication of Revision 6. Among the changes, the technical information regarding the impact of zinc injection on PWSCC initiation and dose rate reduction has been updated to reflect the current level of knowledge within the industry. Similarly, industry experience with elevated lithium concentrations with regard to fuel performance and radiation dose rates has been updated to reflect data collected to date. Recognizing that each nuclear plant owner has a unique set of design, operating, and corporate concerns, the guidelines committee has retained a method for plant-specific optimization. Revision 7 of the Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines provides guidance for PWR primary systems of all manufacture and design. The guidelines continue to emphasize plant

  3. Anthropogenic seismicity rates and operational parameters at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Emily E; Lajoie, Lia J

    2013-08-02

    Geothermal power is a growing energy source; however, efforts to increase production are tempered by concern over induced earthquakes. Although increased seismicity commonly accompanies geothermal production, induced earthquake rate cannot currently be forecast on the basis of fluid injection volumes or any other operational parameters. We show that at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the total volume of fluid extracted or injected tracks the long-term evolution of seismicity. After correcting for the aftershock rate, the net fluid volume (extracted-injected) provides the best correlation with seismicity in recent years. We model the background earthquake rate with a linear combination of injection and net production rates that allows us to track the secular development of the field as the number of earthquakes per fluid volume injected decreases over time.

  4. Backup power working group best practices handbook for maintenance and operation of engine generators, Volume 1. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Padgett, A.B.; Burrows, K.P.; Fairchild, P.N.; Lam, T.; Janes, J.

    1997-01-01

    This handbook is divided into the four chapters. Chapter one covers the design, procurement, storage, handling and testing of diesel fuel oil to be used in DOE backup power supplies. Chapter two discusses the selection of automatic transfer switches to be used in DOE backup power supplies. Chapter three is about low voltage open frame air circuit breaker operation, testing, and maintenance for DOE backup power supplies. And chapter four covers installation, design, and maintenance of engine cooling water and jacket water systems

  5. Numerical Study of Operating Pressure Effect on Carbon Nanotube Growth Rate and Length Uniformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zahed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD is one of the most popular methods for producing Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs. The growth rate of CNTs based on CVD technique is investigated by using a numerical model based on finite volume method. Inlet gas mixture, including xylene as carbon source and mixture of argon and hydrogen as carrier gas enters into a horizontal CVD reactor at atmospheric pressure. In this article the operating pressure variations are studied as the effective parameter on CNT growth rate and length uniformity.

  6. High rate operation of micro-strip gas chambers on diamond-coated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Bouclier, Roger; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Temmel, T; Cooke, R A; Donnel, S; Sastri, S A; Sonderer, N

    1996-01-01

    Very high rate operation of micro­strip gas chambers can be achieved using slightly conducting substrates. We describe preliminary measurements realized with detectors manufactured on boro-silicate glass coated, before the photo-lithographic processing, with a diamond layer having a surface resistivity of around 1014 ‡/o. Stable medium-term operation, and a rate capability largely exceeding the one obtained with identical plates manufactured on uncoated glass are demonstrated. If these results are confirmed by long-term measurements the diamond coating technology appears very attractive since it allows, with a moderate cost overhead, to use thin, commercially available glass with the required surface quality for the large-scale production of gas micro-strip detectors.

  7. A streamer tube detector for operation at high rates in the CPLEAR experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennet, J.M.; Carroll, M.; Cawley, E.L.; Dodgson, M.; Fry, J.R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Harrison, P.; Harrison, P.F.; Haselden, A.R.; Hayman, P.J.; King, D.; Maley, P.D.; Sacks, L.E.; Sanders, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The design and instrumentation of a streamer tube detector for operation in the high rate environment of the CPLEAR experiment at CERN is described. A study of gas mixtures for use in the streamer tube is discussed. The final mixture of 46% argon, 50% isobutane, 4% methylal and 0.01% freon produces an axial resolution of 1.5 cm with an efficiency of 98% per layer. (orig.)

  8. Revision of Booster to Storage Ring Transport Line Design and Injection Scheme for Top-Up Operation at NSRRC

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Min-Huey; Chen, Jenny; Chen June Rong; Hsu, Kuo-Tung; Kuo, Chin-Cheng; Luo, Gwo-Huei

    2005-01-01

    In order to help the operation of constant current, the optics of booster to storage ring transport line (BTS) design is reinvestigated. The initial twiss parameters are derived by measurement. The optics of the transport line is readjusted according to the measured initial beam parameters. The design of pulse width of the injection kicker is also changed from 1.2μsecond to 2.0μsecond. The injection scheme is reviewed and the effects of the kicker error on both injected beam and stored beam are investigated and shown in this report.

  9. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Revision of final safety analysis report. Activity: 5.1.3-Task-08. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.; Elias, D.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this mission included providing assistance for the revision of the FSAR including: national practices, administrative procedures, required staffing level, other resources, planning, scheduling, content, and organization of the revision. Activities included several days of lectures regarding worldwide practices including the United States and Commonwealth Edison Company (ComEd), interaction with Chinese counterparts re. their FSAR and Technical Specification revision and two visits to the Qin Shan NPP

  10. No impact of repeated extinction exposures on operant responding maintained by different reinforcer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, John Y H; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2017-05-01

    Greater rates of intermittent reinforcement in the presence of discriminative stimuli generally produce greater resistance to extinction, consistent with predictions of behavioral momentum theory. Other studies reveal more rapid extinction with higher rates of reinforcers - the partial reinforcement extinction effect. Further, repeated extinction often produces more rapid decreases in operant responding due to learning a discrimination between training and extinction contingencies. The present study examined extinction repeatedly with training with different rates of intermittent reinforcement in a multiple schedule. We assessed whether repeated extinction would reverse the pattern of greater resistance to extinction with greater reinforcer rates. Counter to this prediction, resistance to extinction was consistently greater across twelve assessments of training followed by six successive sessions of extinction. Moreover, patterns of responding during extinction resembled those observed during satiation tests, which should not alter discrimination processes with repeated testing. These findings join others suggesting operant responding in extinction can be durable across repeated tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This technical memorandum presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. This document provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. They are used during project scooping (Data Quality Objectives development), in screening level risk assessments to support early action or No Further Investigation decisions, and in the baselines risk assessment where they are employed in the selection of chemicals of potential concern. The primary objective of this document is to standardize these values and eliminate any duplication of effort by providing PRGs to all contractors involved in risk activities. In addition, by managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the ER Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values

  12. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  13. Sampling and analysis plan for remediation of Operable Unit 100-IU-3 waste site 600-104. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This sampling and analysis plan presents the rationale and strategy for the sampling and analysis activities to support remediation of 100-IU-3 Operable Unit waste site 600-104. The purpose of the proposed sampling and analysis activities is to demonstrate that time-critical remediation of the waste site for soil containing 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid salts and esters (2,4-D) and dioxin/furan isomers at concentrations that exceed cleanup levels has been effective. This shall be accomplished by sampling various locations of the waste site before and after remediation, analyzing the samples, and comparing the results to action levels set by the Washington State Department of Ecology

  14. Data validation summary report for the 100-BC-5 Operable Unit Round 9 Groundwater Sampling. Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, A.T.

    1996-03-01

    The information provided in this validation summary report includes chemical analyses of samples from 100-BC-5 Operable Unit Round 9 Groundwater sampling data. Data from this sampling event and their related quality assurance (QA) samples were reviewed and validated in accordance with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) guidelines at the requested level. Sample analyses included metals, general chemistry, and radiochemistry. Sixty metals samples were analyzed by Quanterra Environmental Services (QES) and Lockheed Analytical Services (LAS). The metals samples were validated using WHC protocols specified in Data Validation Procedures for Chemical Analyses. All qualifiers assigned to the metals data were based on this guidance. The Table 1.1 lists the metals sample delivery group (SDG) that were validated for this sampling event

  15. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This technical memorandum presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. This document provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. They are used during project scooping (Data Quality Objectives development), in screening level risk assessments to support early action or No Further Investigation decisions, and in the baselines risk assessment where they are employed in the selection of chemicals of potential concern. The primary objective of this document is to standardize these values and eliminate any duplication of effort by providing PRGs to all contractors involved in risk activities. In addition, by managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the ER Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values.

  16. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J. T.

    2014-10-01

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H E and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  17. Analysis of failed rotator cuff repair – Retrospective survey of revisions after open rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Schupfner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotator cuff defects are frequently occurring shoulder pathologies associated with pain and movement impairment. Aims The aim of the study was to analyse the pathologies that lead to operative revisions after primary open rotator cuff repair. Methods In 216 patients who underwent primary rotator cuff repair and later required operative revision between 1996 to 2005, pathologies found intraoperatively during the primary operation and during revision surgery were collected, analysed and compared. Results The average age at the time of revision surgery was 54.3 years. The right shoulder (61.6 per cent was more often affected than the left, males (63.4 per cent more often than females. At primary operation – apart from rotator cuff repair – there were the following surgical procedures performed: 190 acromioplasty, 86 Acromiclavicular joint resections, 68 tenodesis, 40 adhesiolysis and 1 tenotomy. If an ACJ-resection had been performed in the primary operation, ACJ-problems were rare in revision surgery (p<0.01. Primary gleno-humeral adhesions were associated with a significant rise in re-tearing rate (p=0.049. Primary absence of adhesions went along with a significant lower rate of adhesions found at revision (p=0.018. Primary performed acromioplasty had no influence on re-tearing rate (p=0.408 or on the rate of subacromial impingement at revision surgery (p=0.709. Conclusion To avoid operative revision after rotator cuff repair relevant copathologies of the shoulder have to be identified before or during operation and treated accordingly. Therefore, even during open rotator cuff repair, the surgeon should initially start with arthroscopy of the shoulder joint and subacromial space to recognise co-pathologies.

  18. Operational and Strategic Implementation of Dynamic Line Rating for Optimized Wind Energy Generation Integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentle, Jake Paul

    2016-01-01

    One primary goal of rendering today's transmission grid 'smarter' is to optimize and better manage its power transfer capacity in real time. Power transfer capacity is affected by three main elements: stability, voltage limits, and thermal ratings. All three are critical, but thermal ratings represent the greatest opportunity to quickly, reliably and economically utilize the grid's true capacity. With the 'Smarter Grid', new solutions have been sought to give operators a better grasp on real time conditions, allowing them to manage and extend the usefulness of existing transmission infrastructure in a safe and reliable manner. The objective of the INL Wind Program is to provide industry a Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) solution that is state of the art as measured by cost, accuracy and dependability, to enable human operators to make informed decisions and take appropriate actions without human or system overloading and impacting the reliability of the grid. In addition to mitigating transmission line congestion to better integrate wind, DLR also offers the opportunity to improve the grid with optimized utilization of transmission lines to relieve congestion in general. As wind-generated energy has become a bigger part of the nation's energy portfolio, researchers have learned that wind not only turns turbine blades to generate electricity, but can cool transmission lines and increase transfer capabilities significantly, sometimes up to 60 percent. INL's DLR development supports EERE and The Wind Energy Technology Office's goals by informing system planners and grid operators of available transmission capacity, beyond typical Static Line Ratings (SLR). SLRs are based on a fixed set of conservative environmental conditions to establish a limit on the amount of current lines can safely carry without overheating. Using commercially available weather monitors mounted on industry informed custom brackets developed by INL in combination with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD

  19. Flight Test Guide (Part 61 Revised): Instrument Pilot: Helicopter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The guide provides an outline of the skills required to pass the flight test for an Instrument Pilot Helicopter Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. General procedures for flight tests are described and the following pilot operations outlined: maneuvering by reference to instruments, IFR navigation, instrument…

  20. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  1. Revision of the recommended international general standard for irradiated foods and of the recommended international code of practice for the operation of radiation facilities used for the treatment of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    In view of the findings and statements of the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food, convened in Geneva from 27 October to 3 November 1980, a Consultation Group, convened in Geneva from 1 to 3 July 1981 suggested the revision of the Recommended International General Standard for Irradiated Foods and of the Recommended International Code of Practice for the Operation of Radiation Facilities. The proposed changes are given and justified and the revised wording of the documents presented

  2. Item response theory analysis of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised in the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Elizabeth D; Staniewska, Dorota; Coyne, Karin S; Boyer, Stacey; White, Leigh Ann; Zach, Neta; Cedarbaum, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to examine dimensionality and item-level performance of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) across time using classical and modern test theory approaches. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were conducted using data from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Pooled Resources Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database with complete ALSFRS-R data (n = 888) at three time-points (Time 0, Time 1 (6-months), Time 2 (1-year)). Results demonstrated that in this population of 888 patients, mean age was 54.6 years, 64.4% were male, and 93.7% were Caucasian. The CFA supported a 4* individual-domain structure (bulbar, gross motor, fine motor, and respiratory domains). IRT analysis within each domain revealed misfitting items and overlapping item response category thresholds at all time-points, particularly in the gross motor and respiratory domain items. Results indicate that many of the items of the ALSFRS-R may sub-optimally distinguish among varying levels of disability assessed by each domain, particularly in patients with less severe disability. Measure performance improved across time as patient disability severity increased. In conclusion, modifications to select ALSFRS-R items may improve the instrument's specificity to disability level and sensitivity to treatment effects.

  3. Defining freight rates as a contribution to the successful operation of container shipping companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Oblak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of the world market and the flexibility of containerization to adjust to the constant changes in supply and demand of the international goods market, has led to a continuous increase in the portion of the container transport within the international maritime cargo transport. By the increase of the container transport level, the impact and importance of container freight rates have been growing, the variability of which directly reflects on the world economy. The aim of this paper is to analyze the efficiency of actual methods in establishing the container freight rates according to the problems which appear in the container shipping operation and refer to large differences in the weights of the actual transported cargo and the declared cargo in containers. The consequence of is lower freight rates and higher costs of the vessels exploitation, concerning the increase of the bunker oil consumption. The conducted research is based on actual data that have been collected and analyzed from particular container vessel liner services within period of 90 days and casting off from 16 container ports. The proposed measures could increase the level of usability of the transporting ships capacities and enable a more accurate and correct account of sea freight rates. The results of the research have shown that by increasing the control of accuracy of the cargo weight in containers and by improving the model of accounting, the freight rates can increase the incomes of shipping companies maintaining the same level of container traffic, which can have a direct influence on the efficiency of their successful operation.

  4. LOW ENDOPHTHALMITIS RATES AFTER INTRAVITREAL ANTI-VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR INJECTIONS IN AN OPERATION ROOM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, Florentina J; Brynskov, Troels; Munk, Marion R

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the rate of presumed endophthalmitis (EO) after intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections in three European hospitals performed in an operation room (OR) under sterile conditions. METHODS: A retrospective multicenter study between 2003 and 2016...... at three European sites, City Hospital Triemli Zurich, Switzerland (CHT), Zealand University Hospital Roskilde, Denmark (ZUH) and University Clinic Bern, Switzerland (UCB). Intravitreal injection (IVI) database of each department was reviewed. All anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections were...... performed using a standardized sterile technique in an operation room. Injection protocols were similar between the three sites. No preinjection antibiotics were given. Postoperative antibiotics varied among sites. RESULTS: A total of 134,701 intravitreal injections were performed at the 3 sites between...

  5. Preliminary estimation of the dose rates of the operation room of the RPR radioisotope cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.C.S.; Silva, J.J.G.; Pina, J.L.S. de; Fajardo, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    During the preliminary studies, about the installations layout of a radioisotope production reactor, the possibility of construction of a radioisotope cell at the reactor building has been investigated. The decisions about that construction has considered mainly the level of the radiation dose over the cell operator. The dose rate has been calculated based on: neutron flux and gamma radiation from fission products and activation materials inside the reactor; volatile fission products such as noble gases and iodides; tritium form ternary fission. The objective was calculate the radiation dose over the cell operator during a journey of 8 hours of work per day. For those calculations some data have been obtained from the Angra-3 reactor. (author)

  6. "Diamond" over-coated Microstrip Gas Chambers for high rate operation

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Bouclier, Roger; Capéans-Garrido, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Hoch, M; Manzin, G; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1997-01-01

    We describe the recent developments on the diamond-like carbon (DLC) over-coated Microstrip Gas Chambers made on drawn glass substrates. MSGC surface coating with thin DLC layer of stable and controlled resistivity was proposed to overcome the limitation of detector operation due to surface charging-up under avalanches. This brings also advantages for the detector manufacturing technology. The thin layer, deposited on top of a manufactured MSGC (over-coating), demonstrates excellent mechanical properties and very good stability. We report on recent measurements with DLC over-coated MSGCs of various surface resistivities (ranging from 1013W/r to 1016W/r) on D-263 and AF45 glass substrates. Over-coated MSGCs exhibit good rate capability for the resistivity of the surface around 1015W/r. Stable operation up to 50 mC/cm of accumulated charge from avalanches has been demonstrated.

  7. Operation logic and functionality of automatic dose rate and image quality control of conventional fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2009-01-01

    New generation of fluoroscopic imaging systems is equipped with spectral shaping filters complemented with sophisticated automatic dose rate and image quality control logic called ''fluoroscopy curve'' or ''trajectory''. Such fluoroscopy curves were implemented first on cardiovascular angiographic imaging systems and are now available on conventional fluoroscopy equipment. This study aims to investigate the control logic operations under the fluoroscopy mode and acquisition mode (equivalent to the legacy spot filming) of a conventional fluoroscopy system typically installed for upper-lower gastrointestinal examinations, interventional endoscopy laboratories, gastrointestinal laboratory, and pain clinics.

  8. Operation logic and functionality of automatic dose rate and image quality control of conventional fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    New generation of fluoroscopic imaging systems is equipped with spectral shaping filters complemented with sophisticated automatic dose rate and image quality control logic called ''fluoroscopy curve'' or ''trajectory''. Such fluoroscopy curves were implemented first on cardiovascular angiographic imaging systems and are now available on conventional fluoroscopy equipment. This study aims to investigate the control logic operations under the fluoroscopy mode and acquisition mode (equivalent to the legacy spot filming) of a conventional fluoroscopy system typically installed for upper-lower gastrointestinal examinations, interventional endoscopy laboratories, gastrointestinal laboratory, and pain clinics.

  9. Prediction of critical flow rates through power-operated relief valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahian, D.; Singh, A.

    1983-01-01

    Existing single-phase and two-phase critical flow models are used to predict the flow rates through the power-operated relief valves tested in the EPRI Safety and Relief Valve test program. For liquid upstream conditions, Homogeneous Equilibrium Model, Moody, Henry-Fauske and Burnell two-phase critical flow models are used for comparison with data. Under steam upstream conditions, the flow rates are predicted either by the single-phase isentropic equations or the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model, depending on the thermodynamic condition of the fluid at the choking plane. The results of the comparisons are used to specify discharge coefficients for different valves under steam and liquid upstream conditions and evaluate the existing approximate critical flow relations for a wide range of subcooled water and steam conditions

  10. Pre-operative antiseptic shower and bath policy decreases the rate of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical site infections in patients undergoing joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Kristin; Statz, Catherine; Glover, James; Banton, Kaysie; Beilman, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following joint arthroplasty increases length of stay, hospital cost, and leads to patient and healthcare provider dissatisfaction. Due to the presence of non-biologic implants (the prosthetic joint) in these procedures, infection is often devastating and treatment of the infection is more difficult. For this reason, prevention of SSI is of crucial importance in this population. Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nares of approximately 30-40% of the population, is the most common pathogen causing SSI, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rate. A pre-operative shower or bath with an antiseptic is an inexpensive and effective method of removal of these transient skin pathogens prior to the procedure and may be used to decrease SSI. We hypothesize that a preoperative antiseptic shower or bath will decrease the rate of SSI. A retrospective review was performed at two affiliated hospitals within the same system, one with a hospital-wide policy enforcing pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath and the other with no policy, with cases included from January 2010 to June 2012. International Classification of Disease-Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and chart review were used to identify patients undergoing joint arthroplasty and to identify those with SSI. Two thousand three-hundred forty-nine arthroplasties were performed at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, a tertiary-care hospital with a pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath policy in place. An additional 1,693 procedures were performed at Fairview Ridges Hospital, a community hospital with no pre-operative policy. There was no difference in the rate of SSI between the two hospitals (1.96% vs. 1.95%; p=1.0). However, the rate of SSI caused by S. aureus was significantly decreased by pre-operative antiseptic shower/bath (17% vs. 61%; p=0.03), as was the rate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections (2% vs. 24% p=0.002). A pre-operative

  11. Post-operative high dose rate brachytherapy in patients with low to intermediate risk endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearcey, R.G.; Petereit, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the outcome using different dose/fractionation schedules in high dose rate (HDR) post-operative vaginal vault radiotherapy in patients with low to intermediate risk endometrial cancer. The world literature was reviewed and thirteen series were analyzed representing 1800 cases. A total of 12 vaginal vault recurrences were identified representing an overall vaginal control rate of 99.3%. A wide range of dose fractionation schedules and techniques have been reported. In order to analyze a dose response relationship for tumor control and complications, the biologically effective doses to the tumor and late responding tissues were calculated using the linear quadratic model. A threshold was identified for complications, but not vaginal control. While dose fractionation schedules that delivered a biologically effective dose to the late responding tissues in excess of 100 Gy 3 (LQED = 60 Gy) predicted for late complications, dose fractionation schedules that delivered a modest dose to the vaginal surface (50 Gy 10 or LQED = 30 Gy) appeared tumoricidal with vaginal control rates of at least 98%. By using convenient, modest dose fractionation schedules, HDR vaginal vault - brachytherapy yields very high local control and extremely low morbidity rates. (author)

  12. Mortality and recurrence rate after pressure ulcer operation for elderly long-term bedridden patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Masamitsu; Tada, Hideyuki; Mashiba, Kumi; Yurugi, Satoshi; Iioka, Hiroshi; Niitsuma, Katsunori; Yasuda, Yukiko

    2005-06-01

    We operated on 16 sacral pressure ulcers in elderly and long-term residential patients who were immobile as a result of cerebral vascular disease. The mean age of patients was 76 years. Eight ulcers were treated with local fascial flaps and 8 by simple closure. The follow-up period was from 1 to 4 years. Recurrence and mortality rates were examined retrospectively. In the 16 patients, recurrence occurred in 37.5%, and 43.8% died without recurrence. The recurrence rate was 37.5% for local fascial flaps and 37.5% for simple closure. Overall mortality was 68.8% in the follow-up period. Because postoperative death was common, we should not only focus on reducing local pressure but also pay attention to any underlying disease. Because of this high mortality rate, the least invasive procedure possible should be used. Because the recurrence rate of simple closure was the same as for local fascial flaps, simple closure should be considered as a reconstructive method.

  13. 77 FR 55817 - Panther Creek Power Operating, LLC; Supplemental Notice that Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER12-2570-000] Panther Creek Power Operating, LLC; Supplemental Notice that Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for... Panther Creek Power Operating, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an accompanying...

  14. Two-dimensional optoelectronic interconnect-processor and its operational bit error rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Jiang; Gollsneider, Brian; Chang, Wayne H.; Carhart, Gary W.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Simonis, George J.; Shoop, Barry L.

    2004-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) multi-channel 8x8 optical interconnect and processor system were designed and developed using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) driven 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays and the photodetector (PD) arrays with corresponding wavelengths. We performed operation and bit-error-rate (BER) analysis on this free-space integrated 8x8 VCSEL optical interconnects driven by silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) circuits. Pseudo-random bit stream (PRBS) data sequence was used in operation of the interconnects. Eye diagrams were measured from individual channels and analyzed using a digital oscilloscope at data rates from 155 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s. Using a statistical model of Gaussian distribution for the random noise in the transmission, we developed a method to compute the BER instantaneously with the digital eye-diagrams. Direct measurements on this interconnects were also taken on a standard BER tester for verification. We found that the results of two methods were in the same order and within 50% accuracy. The integrated interconnects were investigated in an optoelectronic processing architecture of digital halftoning image processor. Error diffusion networks implemented by the inherently parallel nature of photonics promise to provide high quality digital halftoned images.

  15. Operational and Strategic Implementation of Dynamic Line Rating for Optimized Wind Energy Generation Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentle, Jake Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    One primary goal of rendering today’s transmission grid “smarter” is to optimize and better manage its power transfer capacity in real time. Power transfer capacity is affected by three main elements: stability, voltage limits, and thermal ratings. All three are critical, but thermal ratings represent the greatest opportunity to quickly, reliably and economically utilize the grid’s true capacity. With the “Smarter Grid”, new solutions have been sought to give operators a better grasp on real time conditions, allowing them to manage and extend the usefulness of existing transmission infrastructure in a safe and reliable manner. The objective of the INL Wind Program is to provide industry a Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) solution that is state of the art as measured by cost, accuracy and dependability, to enable human operators to make informed decisions and take appropriate actions without human or system overloading and impacting the reliability of the grid. In addition to mitigating transmission line congestion to better integrate wind, DLR also offers the opportunity to improve the grid with optimized utilization of transmission lines to relieve congestion in general. As wind-generated energy has become a bigger part of the nation’s energy portfolio, researchers have learned that wind not only turns turbine blades to generate electricity, but can cool transmission lines and increase transfer capabilities significantly, sometimes up to 60 percent. INL’s DLR development supports EERE and The Wind Energy Technology Office’s goals by informing system planners and grid operators of available transmission capacity, beyond typical Static Line Ratings (SLR). SLRs are based on a fixed set of conservative environmental conditions to establish a limit on the amount of current lines can safely carry without overheating. Using commercially available weather monitors mounted on industry informed custom brackets developed by INL in combination with Computational

  16. The relationship between the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale and its revised form and child outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Brunsek

    Full Text Available The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS and its revised version (ECERS-R were designed as global measures of quality that assess structural and process aspects of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC programs. Despite frequent use of the ECERS/ECERS-R in research and applied settings, associations between it and child outcomes have not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this research was to evaluate the association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and children's wellbeing. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were completed up to July 3, 2015. Eligible studies provided a statistical link between the ECERS/ECERS-R and child outcomes for preschool-aged children in ECEC programs. Of the 823 studies selected for full review, 73 were included in the systematic review and 16 were meta-analyzed. The combined sample across all eligible studies consisted of 33, 318 preschool-aged children. Qualitative systematic review results revealed that ECERS/ECERS-R total scores were more generally associated with positive outcomes than subscales or factors. Seventeen separate meta-analyses were conducted to assess the strength of association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and measures that assessed children's language, math and social-emotional outcomes. Meta-analyses revealed a small number of weak effects (in the expected direction between the ECERS/ECERS-R total score and children's language and positive behavior outcomes. The Language-Reasoning subscale was weakly related to a language outcome. The enormous heterogeneity in how studies operationalized the ECERS/ECERS-R, the outcomes measured and statistics reported limited our ability to meta-analyze many studies. Greater consistency in study methodology is needed in this area of research. Despite these methodological challenges, the ECERS/ECERS-R does appear to capture aspects of quality that are important for children

  17. Symptom profile as assessed on delirium rating scale-revised-98 of delirium in respiratory intensive care unit: A study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the phenomenology of delirium in patients admitted in a Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU. Methods: Consecutive patients admitted to RICU were screened for delirium using Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS, Confusion Assessment Method for ICU (CAM-ICU assessment tool and those found positive for delirium were evaluated by a psychiatrist to confirm the diagnosis. Those with a diagnosis of delirium as per the psychiatrist were evaluated on Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98 to study phenomenology. Results: All the 75 patients fulfilled the criteria of “acute onset of symptoms” and “presence of an underlying physical disorder” as per the DRS-R-98. Commonly seen symptoms of delirium included disturbances in attention (100%, thought process abnormality (100%, fluctuation in symptoms (97.33% disturbance in, sleep-wake cycle, language disturbance (94.7%, disorientation (81.33%, and short-term memory impairments (73.33%. No patient had delusions and very few (5.3% reported perceptual disturbances. According to RASS subtyping, hypoactive delirium was the most common subtype (n = 34; 45.33%, followed by hyperactive subtype (n = 28; 37.33% and a few patients had mixed subtype of delirium (n = 13; 17.33%. Factor structure of DRS-R-98 symptoms yielded 3 factors (Factor-1: cognitive factor; Factor-2: motoric factor; Factor-3; thought, language, and fluctuation factor. Conclusion: The phenomenology of delirium in ICU patients is similar to non-ICU patients, but hypoactive delirium is the most common subtype.

  18. The relationship between the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale and its revised form and child outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsek, Ashley; Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; McMullen, Evelyn; Fletcher, Brooke; Shah, Prakesh S

    2017-01-01

    The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS) and its revised version (ECERS-R) were designed as global measures of quality that assess structural and process aspects of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs. Despite frequent use of the ECERS/ECERS-R in research and applied settings, associations between it and child outcomes have not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this research was to evaluate the association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and children's wellbeing. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were completed up to July 3, 2015. Eligible studies provided a statistical link between the ECERS/ECERS-R and child outcomes for preschool-aged children in ECEC programs. Of the 823 studies selected for full review, 73 were included in the systematic review and 16 were meta-analyzed. The combined sample across all eligible studies consisted of 33, 318 preschool-aged children. Qualitative systematic review results revealed that ECERS/ECERS-R total scores were more generally associated with positive outcomes than subscales or factors. Seventeen separate meta-analyses were conducted to assess the strength of association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and measures that assessed children's language, math and social-emotional outcomes. Meta-analyses revealed a small number of weak effects (in the expected direction) between the ECERS/ECERS-R total score and children's language and positive behavior outcomes. The Language-Reasoning subscale was weakly related to a language outcome. The enormous heterogeneity in how studies operationalized the ECERS/ECERS-R, the outcomes measured and statistics reported limited our ability to meta-analyze many studies. Greater consistency in study methodology is needed in this area of research. Despite these methodological challenges, the ECERS/ECERS-R does appear to capture aspects of quality that are important for children's wellbeing

  19. Failure rate evaluation for different components operating in sodium, based on operating experience of the RAPSODIE and the PHENIX reactors and the test loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisseau, J.; Dorey, J.; Hedin, F.; Le Floch, C.

    1982-01-01

    The failure rates of the following components, valves operating in sodium, mechanical and electromagnetic pumps, and heat exchangers including intermediate heat exchangers, cold traps, steam generators, are evaluated by analysing the main incidents which occurred on these components. Therefore, this paper contains an evaluation of the operating experience of components working in sodium and of the reliability of these components

  20. Effect of clearcutting operations on the survival rate of a small mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín A H Escobar

    Full Text Available Clearcutting is a common timber harvesting technique that represents a significant and abrupt change in habitat conditions for wildlife living in industrial forests. Most research on this type of impact has focused on comparing populations or communities in mature forests/plantations and the resulting clearcut stands. However, this approach does not separate the effect of changes in habitat attributes from direct mortality produced by the intensive use of heavy machinery required for cutting down trees and dragging them to a road. Because knowing the fate of individuals after a disturbance is important for modelling landscape-scale population dynamics in industrial forests, we conducted a study in South-Central Chile to understand the short-term response to clearcutting operations of the long-haired Akodont (Abrothrix longipillis, a forest specialist mouse. Between 2009 and 2013 we radiotracked a total of 51 adult male Akodonts, before, during and after the clearcutting of the pine plantations in which they lived. A minimum of 52.4% of the individuals died as a direct cause of the timbering operations, being crushed by vehicles or logs during logging operations. Our observations suggest that, instead of fleeing the area, the response of long-haired Akodonts to the approaching machinery is to hide under the forest litter or in burrows, which exposes them to a serious risk of death. The real mortality rate associated to clearcutting may be higher than that estimated by us because of some methodological biases (i.e. individuals with crushed radiotransmitters not recorded and the fact that additional mortality sources may affect the population in the weeks following logging operations (e.g., higher exposure to predation, effects of site preparation for the new plantation, etc.

  1. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-02-01

    In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties.

  2. Rate of generation of tritium during the operation of Tsuruga Power Station Unit No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funamoto, Hisao; Yoshinari, Masaharu; Fukuda, Masayuki; Makino, Shinichi; Watari, Tuneo

    1994-01-01

    Total amount of 3 H activity in primary coolant due to the operation of Tsuruga Power Station Unit No. 2 was estimated. The 3 H inventory was measured for samples from the spent fuel pool, primary coolant and miscellaneous tanks. From the result of the measurement and the data of environmental release of 3 H, the rate of generation of 3 H in the reactor was found to be 25 TBq/GWa. Since Tsuruga Power Station Unit No. 2 is a PWR type reactor, we presume that most of the 3 H in primary coolant is formed by 10 B(n, 2α) 3 H reaction. It is necessary to release about 23 TBq/GWa of 3 H to maintain the station inventory at the present level. (author)

  3. High-power 355 nm ultraviolet lasers operating at ultrahigh repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H; Liu, Q; Yan, P; Gong, M

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a novel 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser operating at ultrahigh repetition rate from 300 kHz to 1 MHz. The hybrid fiber-MOPA–bulk amplifiers based IR source exhibits a high average power of 105 W with near-diffraction-limited beam quality, narrow linewidth and high polarization extinction ratio. Two-cascaded LBO crystals are employed for high efficiency frequency tripling, and a maximum 43.7 W of average UV power is achieved at 400 kHz, corresponding to a conversion efficiency as high as 41.6%. The pulse duration of the UV pulse can be tuned from 5 to 10 ns with good pulse peak stability (better than 2.2% (RMS)). (letter)

  4. Response Load Extrapolation for Wind Turbines during Operation Based on Average Conditional Exceedance Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Naess, Arvid; Saha, Nilanjan

    2011-01-01

    to cases where the Gumbel distribution is the appropriate asymptotic extreme value distribution. However, two extra parameters are introduced by which a more general and flexible class of extreme value distributions is obtained with the Gumbel distribution as a subclass. The general method is implemented...... within a hierarchical model where the variables that influence the loading are divided into ergodic variables and time-invariant non-ergodic variables. The presented method for statistical response load extrapolation was compared with the existing methods based on peak extrapolation for the blade out......The paper explores a recently developed method for statistical response load (load effect) extrapolation for application to extreme response of wind turbines during operation. The extrapolation method is based on average conditional exceedance rates and is in the present implementation restricted...

  5. High-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy for local advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.B.; Mychalczak, B.; Enker, W.; Anderson, L.; Cohen, A.E.; Minsky, B.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to improve the local control for advanced and recurrent cancers of the rectum, we have integrated high-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) into the treatment program. Between 11/92 and 10/95, 47 patients (pts) were treated. There were 26 males and 21 females whose ages ranged from 30-80 (median = 62) years. There were 19 pts with primary unresectable rectal cancer, and 28 pts who were treated for recurrent rectal cancer. Histology was adenocarcinoma - 45 pts, squamous cancer - 2 pts. The range of follow-up is 1-34 months (median = 14 months). The majority of primary unresectable pts received pre-operative radiation therapy (4500-5040 cGy) with chemotherapy (5-FU with Leucovorin) 4-6 weeks later, they underwent resection + HDR-IORT (1200 cGy). For the 28 pts with recurrent cancer, the majority received surgery and HDR-IORT alone because they had received prior RT. For the pts with primary unresectable disease, actuarial 2-year local control was 77%, actuarial distant metastasis-free survival was 71%, disease free survival was 66%, and overall survival was 84%. For those pts with recurrent disease, actuarial 2-year local control rate was 65%, distant metastasis-free survival was 65%, disease free survival was 47%, and overall survival was 61%. Complications occurred in 36%. There were no cases where the anatomical distribution of disease, or technical limitations prevented the adequate delivery of HDR-IORT. We conclude that this technique was most versatile, and enabled all appropriate pts to receive IORT. The preliminary data in terms of local control are encouraging, even for the poor prognostic sub-group of pts with recurrent cancer

  6. Complication Rates and Short-Term Outcomes After Operative Hammertoe Correction in Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Claire Mackenzie; Boden, Stephanie Ann; Boden, Allison Lee; Maidman, Samuel David; Cutler, Anya; Mignemi, Danielle; Bariteau, Jason

    2018-02-01

    Hammertoe deformities are the most common lesser toe deformity. To date, no studies have looked at outcomes of operative management in the geriatric population, which may be at greater risk for complications or functional compromise because of comorbidities. Data on 58 patients undergoing operative correction of hammertoe deformities were prospectively collected. Clinical outcomes were assessed using preoperative and postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores with a minimum of 6-month follow-up. Patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of age at the time of surgery: younger than 65 and 65 and older. Complication rates and mean VAS and SF-36 improvement were compared. Forty-seven patients met inclusion criteria (7 men, 40 women), with 26 patients (37 toes) in the younger cohort and 21 patients (39 toes) in the older cohort. Overall, patients demonstrated significant improvement from baseline to 6 and 12 months postoperatively in VAS ( P < .001 and P < .001) and SF-36 ( P < .001 and P < .001) scores. Mean improvement in VAS and SF-36 scores was not significantly different between the groups at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Complications occurred in 13.5% and 10.3% of patients in the younger and older cohorts, respectively. Outcomes of operative correction of hammertoe deformities in older patients were similar to outcomes in younger patients after greater than 6 months of follow-up. Overall improvement in VAS and SF-36 was statistically significant for both cohorts. There was no associated increase in complications for older patients. Level, III comparative series.

  7. Heart rate calculation from ensemble brain wave using wavelet and Teager-Kaiser energy operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Jayaraman; Adithya, V

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal artifacts are caused by various factors, such as, Electro-oculogram (EOG), Electromyogram (EMG), Electrocardiogram (ECG), movement artifact and line interference. The relatively high electrical energy cardiac activity causes EEG artifacts. In EEG signal processing the general approach is to remove the ECG signal. In this paper, we introduce an automated method to extract the ECG signal from EEG using wavelet and Teager-Kaiser energy operator for R-peak enhancement and detection. From the detected R-peaks the heart rate (HR) is calculated for clinical diagnosis. To check the efficiency of our method, we compare the HR calculated from ECG signal recorded in synchronous with EEG. The proposed method yields a mean error of 1.4% for the heart rate and 1.7% for mean R-R interval. The result illustrates that, proposed method can be used for ECG extraction from single channel EEG and used in clinical diagnosis like estimation for stress analysis, fatigue, and sleep stages classification studies as a multi-model system. In addition, this method eliminates the dependence of additional synchronous ECG in extraction of ECG from EEG signal process.

  8. Automation-aided Task Loads Index based on the Automation Rate Reflecting the Effects on Human Operators in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungmin; Seong, Poonghyun; Kim, Jonghyun

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers have found that a high automation rate does not guarantee high performance. Therefore, to reflect the effects of automation on human performance, a new estimation method of the automation rate that considers the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs) was suggested. These suggested measures express how much automation support human operators but it cannot express the change of human operators' workload, whether the human operators' workload is increased or decreased. Before considering automation rates, whether the adopted automation is good or bad might be estimated in advance. In this study, to estimate the appropriateness of automation according to the change of the human operators' task loads, automation-aided task loads index is suggested based on the concept of the suggested automation rate. To insure plant safety and efficiency on behalf of human operators, various automation systems have been installed in NPPs, and many works which were previously conducted by human operators can now be supported by computer-based operator aids. According to the characteristics of the automation types, the estimation method of the system automation and the cognitive automation rate were suggested. The proposed estimation method concentrates on the effects of introducing automation, so it directly express how much the automated system support human operators. Based on the suggested automation rates, the way to estimate how much the automated system can affect the human operators' cognitive task load is suggested in this study. When there is no automation, the calculated index is 1, and it means there is no change of human operators' task load

  9. Automation-aided Task Loads Index based on the Automation Rate Reflecting the Effects on Human Operators in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seungmin; Seong, Poonghyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jonghyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Many researchers have found that a high automation rate does not guarantee high performance. Therefore, to reflect the effects of automation on human performance, a new estimation method of the automation rate that considers the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs) was suggested. These suggested measures express how much automation support human operators but it cannot express the change of human operators' workload, whether the human operators' workload is increased or decreased. Before considering automation rates, whether the adopted automation is good or bad might be estimated in advance. In this study, to estimate the appropriateness of automation according to the change of the human operators' task loads, automation-aided task loads index is suggested based on the concept of the suggested automation rate. To insure plant safety and efficiency on behalf of human operators, various automation systems have been installed in NPPs, and many works which were previously conducted by human operators can now be supported by computer-based operator aids. According to the characteristics of the automation types, the estimation method of the system automation and the cognitive automation rate were suggested. The proposed estimation method concentrates on the effects of introducing automation, so it directly express how much the automated system support human operators. Based on the suggested automation rates, the way to estimate how much the automated system can affect the human operators' cognitive task load is suggested in this study. When there is no automation, the calculated index is 1, and it means there is no change of human operators' task load.

  10. Pre-operational proof and leakage rate testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This Standard provides the requirements for pre-operational proof tests and leakage rate tests of concrete containment structures of a containment system designed as Class Containment components. 1 fig

  11. Laboratory determination of normal operating flow rates with enlarged outlet fittings -- BDF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, E.D.

    1960-02-02

    Experiments have been conducted in the Hydraulics Laboratory, at the request of IPD`s Mechanical Development-A Operation, to determine the energy losses of various enlarged outlet fitting combinations. These experiments were conducted an steady state runs and allow the determination of the normal operating point (flow rate) of a reactor process channel under selected conditions of front header pressure and fuel charge. No attempt is made to make a mechanical or economic evaluation of the particular fitting combinations, although observations were noted which might bear on this evaluation. It is very important for the reader to bear in mind that changing outlet fittings will definitely affect the reactor tube power limits and outlet vater temperature limits. The size of the outlet fittings largely determines the present outlet temperature limits of the old reactors. The flow characteristics of these present fittings cause some degree of pressurization to suppress boiling on the fuel charge and also cause dual Panellit trip protection for certain flow changes and for power surges. Enlargement of the outlet fittings may actually reduce the allowable outlet coolant temperature limits. Since these effects cannot be determined on the apparatus used in these experiments, a complete discussion of this point is not included in this report. However, the seriousness of these effects should be known and carefully analyzed before a final selection of enlarged outlet fittings in made. This report will be one of a series. New reports in the series will be issued as data are obtained for other such outlet fitting combinations or for new concepts of outlet fitting assemblies such as the new nozzle being developed by C. E. Trantz for use on F-reactor stuck gunbarrel tubes.

  12. Convergence rates and finite-dimensional approximations for nonlinear ill-posed problems involving monotone operators in Banach spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Buong.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate convergence rates for an operator version of Tikhonov regularization constructed by dual mapping for nonlinear ill-posed problems involving monotone operators in real reflective Banach spaces. The obtained results are considered in combination with finite-dimensional approximations for the space. An example is considered for illustration. (author). 15 refs

  13. Performance-based improvement of the leakage rate test program for the reactor containment of HTTR. Adoption of revised test programs containing 'Type A, Type B and Type C tests'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masaaki; Emori, Koichi; Sekita, Kenji; Furusawa, Takayuki; Hayakawa, Masato; Kozawa, Takayuki; Aono, Tetsuya; Kuroha, Misao; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Kimishima, Satoru

    2008-10-01

    The reactor containment of HTTR is periodically tested to confirm leak-tight integrity by conducting overall integrated leakage rate tests, so-called 'Type A tests,' in accordance with a standard testing method provided in Japan Electric Association Code (JEAC) 4203. 'Type A test' is identified as a basic one for measuring whole leakage rates for reactor containments, it takes, however, much of cost and time of preparation, implementation and restoration of itself. Therefore, in order to upgrade the maintenance technology of HTTR, the containment leakage rate test program for HTTR was revised by adopting efficient and economical alternatives including Type B and Type C tests' which intend to measure leakage rates for containment penetrations and isolation valves, respectively. In JEAC4203-2004, following requirements are specified for adopting an alternative program: upward trend of the overall integrated leakage rate due to aging affection should not be recognized; performance criterion for combined leakage rate, that is a summation of local leakage rates evaluated by Type B and Type C tests and converted to whole leakage rates, should be established; the criterion of the combined leakage rate should be satisfied as well as of the overall integrated leakage rate; correlation between the overall integrated and combined leakage rates should be recognized. Considering the historical performances, policies of conforming to the forgoing requirements and of carrying out the revised test program were developed, which were accepted by the regulatory agency. This report presents an outline of the leakage rate tests for the reactor containment of HTTR, identifies practical issues of conventional Type A tests, and describes the conforming and implementing policies mentioned above. (author)

  14. The ROC Toolbox: A toolbox for analyzing receiver-operating characteristics derived from confidence ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, Joshua D; Barrett, Frederick S; Harlow, Iain M; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2017-08-01

    Signal-detection theory, and the analysis of receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs), has played a critical role in the development of theories of episodic memory and perception. The purpose of the current paper is to present the ROC Toolbox. This toolbox is a set of functions written in the Matlab programming language that can be used to fit various common signal detection models to ROC data obtained from confidence rating experiments. The goals for developing the ROC Toolbox were to create a tool (1) that is easy to use and easy for researchers to implement with their own data, (2) that can flexibly define models based on varying study parameters, such as the number of response options (e.g., confidence ratings) and experimental conditions, and (3) that provides optimal routines (e.g., Maximum Likelihood estimation) to obtain parameter estimates and numerous goodness-of-fit measures.The ROC toolbox allows for various different confidence scales and currently includes the models commonly used in recognition memory and perception: (1) the unequal variance signal detection (UVSD) model, (2) the dual process signal detection (DPSD) model, and (3) the mixture signal detection (MSD) model. For each model fit to a given data set the ROC toolbox plots summary information about the best fitting model parameters and various goodness-of-fit measures. Here, we present an overview of the ROC Toolbox, illustrate how it can be used to input and analyse real data, and finish with a brief discussion on features that can be added to the toolbox.

  15. Effects on stereotypy and other challenging behavior of matching rates of instruction to free-operant rates of responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jesse W; Van Laarhoven, Toni; Repp, Alan C

    2002-01-01

    Research has shown that when individuals are in situations that do not occasion one form of motoric responding, they will engage in another so that the overall level of motoric responding is homeostatic. The purpose of this study was to test whether students would substitute task-related behaviors for stereotypic or other challenging behaviors when the opportunity for active responding did or did not match the level of motoric responding in a free-operant baseline. Four students with mental retardation participated. Results showed that they did substitute behaviors, with stereotypic and other challenging behaviors occurring 1.5-14 times as much in the Non-matched condition for the four students. Further analysis showed considerably more of these behaviors in passive than in active tasks (by a factor up to 21 times as much). Results were discussed in terms of homeostasis, functional assessment, and opportunities to improve educational behaviors.

  16. Retrospective analysis of dose delivery in intra-operative high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, M.; Avadhani, J.S.; Malhotra, H.K.; Cunningham, B.; Tripp, P.; Jaggernauth, W.; Podgorsak, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Background. This study was performed to quantify the inaccuracy in clinical dose delivery due to the incomplete scatter conditions inherent in intra-operative high dose rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy. Methods. Treatment plans of 10 patients previously treated in our facility, which had irregular shapes of treated areas, were used. Treatment geometries reflecting each clinical case were simulated using a phantom assembly with no added build-up on top of the applicator. The treatment planning geometry (full scatter surrounding the applicator) was subsequently simulated for each case by adding bolus on top of the applicator. Results. For geometries representing the clinical IOHDR incomplete scatter environment, measured doses at the 5 mm and 10 mm prescription depths were lower than the corresponding prescribed doses by about 7.7% and 11.1%, respectively. Also, for the two prescription methods, an analysis of the measured dose distributions and their corresponding treatment plans showed average decreases of 1.2 mm and 2.2 mm in depth of prescription dose, respectively. Conclusions. Dosimetric calculations with the assumption of an infinite scatter environment around the applicator and target volume have shown to result in dose delivery errors that significantly decrease the prescription depth for IOHDR treatment.(author)

  17. Theoretical determination of spectrum-exposure rate conversion operator of HPGe detector and its application to the measurement of environmental gamma-ray exposure rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ch.M.; Choi, B.I.; Kwak, S.S.; Ji, P.K.; Kim, T.W.; Park, Y.W.; Yoon, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    A conversion operator between spectrum and exposure rate, using a portable HPGe detector for environmental radiation monitoring, was determined theoretically under the assumption of uniform distribution of radiation source on the ground surface. The measurement results were compared with those of a pressurized ionization chamber. The results obtained with the HPGe detector were slightly lower. The method can be easily applied to any gamma ray detector to obtain a spectrum - exposure-rate conversion factor for computing the exposure rate of environmental gamma radiation. (N.T.) 15 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. Introductory Business Textbook Revision Cycles: Are They Getting Shorter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Brian; Brunswick, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The rate of textbook revision cycles is examined in light of the recent trend towards more rapid revisions (and adoptions of textbooks). The authors conduct background research to better understand the context for textbook revision cycles and the environmental forces that have been influencing what appears to be more rapid textbook revisions. A…

  19. High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder Operations for Optimal Payload and Science Telemetry Management Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Michael T.; McElyea, Richard M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All International Space Station (ISS) Ku-band telemetry transmits through the High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (HCOR). The HCOR provides the recording and playback capability for all payload, science, and International Partner data streams transmitting through NASA's Ku-band antenna system. The HCOR is a solid-state memory recorder that provides recording capability to record all eight ISS high-rate data during ISS Loss-of-Signal periods. NASA payloads in the Destiny module are prime users of the HCOR; however, NASDA and ESA will also utilize the HCOR for data capture and playback of their high data rate links from the Kibo and Columbus modules. Marshall Space Flight Center's Payload Operations Integration Center manages the HCOR for nominal functions, including system configurations and playback operations. The purpose of this paper is to present the nominal operations plan for the HCOR and the plans for handling contingency operations affecting payload operations. In addition, the paper will address HCOR operation limitations and the expected effects on payload operations. The HCOR is manifested for ISS delivery on flight 9A with the HCOR backup manifested on flight 11A. The HCOR replaces the Medium-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (MCOR), which has supported payloads since flight 5A.1.

  20. Determination of total flow rate and flow rate of every operating branch in commissioning of heavy water loop for ARR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yan

    1997-01-01

    The heavy water loop (i,e, RCS) for ARR-2 in Algeria is a complex loop. Flow regulating means are not provided by the design in order to operate the reactor safely and simplify operating processes. How to determine precisely the orifice diameters of resistance parts for the loop is a key point for decreasing deviation between practical and design flow rates. Commissioning tests shall ensure that under every one of combined operating modes for the pumps, total coolant flow rate is about the same (the number of pumps operating in parallel is the same) and is consistent with design requirement, as well as the distribution of coolant flow rate to every branch is uniform. The flow Determination is divided into two steps. First and foremost, corresponding resistance part at each pump outlet is determined in commissioning test of shorted heavy water loop with light water, so that the problem about uniform distribution of the flow rate to each branch is solved, Secondly, resistance part at the reactor inlet is determined in commissioning test of heavy water loop connected with the vessel, so that the problem about that total heavy water flow rate is within optimal range is solved. According to practical requirements of the project, a computer program of hydraulic calculation and analysis for heavy water loop has been developed, and hydraulic characteristics test for a part of loop has been conducted in order to correct calculation error. By means of program calculation combining with tests in site, orifice diameters of 9 resistance parts has been determined rapidly and precisely and requirements of design and operation has been met adequately

  1. Rates of secondary hyperparathyroidism after bypass operation for super-morbid obesity: An overlooked phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael G; Ward, Marc A; Applewhite, Megan K; Wong, Harry; Prachand, Vivek; Angelos, Peter; Kaplan, Edwin L; Grogan, Raymon H

    2017-03-01

    With over 110,000 bariatric operations performed in the United States annually, it is important to understand the biochemical abnormalities causing endocrine dysfunction associated with these procedures. Here we compare 2 malabsorptive procedures, duodenal switch and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, to determine the role malabsorption plays in secondary hyperparathyroidism in this population. Data from all super-obese patients undergoing duodenal switch or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between August 2002 and October 2005 were prospectively collected. Postoperatively, all patients received 1,200 mg of calcium citrate and 1,000 IU vitamin D3 per American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery guidelines. Beginning in 2007, duodenal switch patients were instructed to add daily vitamin D3 10,000 IU. Statistical analyses included Student t test, multivariate, and univariate logistic regression. Of 283 patients with a body mass index ≥50, 170 (60.1%) underwent duodenal switch, while 113 (39.9%) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Of 132 (46.6%) patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, 101 (59.4%) had undergone duodenal switch and 31 (27.4%) had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Symptoms were more common in the duodenal switch group (33 patients [19.4%]) than Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (11 patients [9.7%]). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that the extent of bypass and duration of follow-up were the only 2 independent predictive risk factors for developing secondary hyperparathyroidism. Although vitamin D levels improved with increased vitamin D3 supplementation in 2007, rates of secondary hyperparathyroidism increased. Despite routine postoperative calcium and vitamin D3 supplementation, secondary hyperparathyroidism is common after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and duodenal switch. The degree of iatrogenic malabsorption correlates with the incidence of secondary hyperparathyroidism. These rates suggest current supplementation guidelines are not sufficient in

  2. Post operative high dose rate intravaginal irradiation in endometrial cancer: a safe and effective outpatient treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Peter; Gibbons, Susan; Vicini, Frank; Weiner, Sheldon; Dmuchowski, Carl; Mele, Beth; Brabbins, Donald; Jennings, John; Gustafson, Gary; Martinez, Alvaro

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our experience with out patient high dose rate (HDR) intravaginal irradiation given post-operatively in endometrial cancer to assess local control, survival, and toxicity when used alone or in combination with external beam irradiation. Methods and Materials: From (12(88)) to (12(92)), 78 patients underwent TAH/BSO and received post-operative HDR intravaginal irradiation for endometrial cancer. Pathologic stage distribution was IB/IC: 56%, II: 22%, III: 22%. Adjuvant therapy was given in one of three schemes: HDR vaginal radiation alone (6 weekly fractions of 500 cGy prescribed 5 mm from the applicator surface treating the upper 4 cm of the vagina), pelvic irradiation with vaginal HDR (500 cGy x 4 weekly fractions) or whole abdomen/pelvic irradiation (WAPI) with vaginal HDR treatment (500 cGy x 3 weekly fractions). Prior to the first HDR vaginal treatment, a simulation with placement of vaginal apex metallic markers was performed to assure proper positioning of the intravaginal cylinders. Pelvic midline blocking was designed from the HDR intravaginal simulation films. The 55 patients who underwent combined external beam irradiation/brachytherapy received a median dose to the pelvis of 5040 cGy (range 25.2-51.6 Gy), and a median total vaginal dose of 5060 cGy (range 30.0-57.6 Gy). Results: Median follow-up is 37 months (range 6-73 months). Local control (vaginally) is 98.7%. The one vaginal failure was in the distal vagina, outside the treatment volume. All other failures (4) were distant with the vagina controlled [3 intra-abdominal and one bone/intra-abdominal]. For stages I and II, the disease free survival is 92.8%. For stage III the disease free survival is 86.5%. Median overall time to failure is 14.3 months (range 8.5-18.6 months). In terms of acute toxicity, no grade 3-4 acute toxicity of the vagina or bladder was seen. However, 9% acute GI toxicity was encountered. Chronic grade 1-2 toxicities included: vaginal 21.8% (foreshortening and

  3. Measurement of peak impact loads differ between accelerometers - Effects of system operating range and sampling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Christina; Giangregorio, Lora M; Gibbs, Jenna C; Levine, Iris C; Tung, James; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-06-14

    A wide variety of accelerometer systems, with differing sensor characteristics, are used to detect impact loading during physical activities. The study examined the effects of system characteristics on measured peak impact loading during a variety of activities by comparing outputs from three separate accelerometer systems, and by assessing the influence of simulated reductions in operating range and sampling rate. Twelve healthy young adults performed seven tasks (vertical jump, box drop, heel drop, and bilateral single leg and lateral jumps) while simultaneously wearing three tri-axial accelerometers including a criterion standard laboratory-grade unit (Endevco 7267A) and two systems primarily used for activity-monitoring (ActiGraph GT3X+, GCDC X6-2mini). Peak acceleration (gmax) was compared across accelerometers, and errors resulting from down-sampling (from 640 to 100Hz) and range-limiting (to ±6g) the criterion standard output were characterized. The Actigraph activity-monitoring accelerometer underestimated gmax by an average of 30.2%; underestimation by the X6-2mini was not significant. Underestimation error was greater for tasks with greater impact magnitudes. gmax was underestimated when the criterion standard signal was down-sampled (by an average of 11%), range limited (by 11%), and by combined down-sampling and range-limiting (by 18%). These effects explained 89% of the variance in gmax error for the Actigraph system. This study illustrates that both the type and intensity of activity should be considered when selecting an accelerometer for characterizing impact events. In addition, caution may be warranted when comparing impact magnitudes from studies that use different accelerometers, and when comparing accelerometer outputs to osteogenic impact thresholds proposed in literature. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Revision Total Hip Arthoplasty: Factors Associated with Re-Revision Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Khatod, M; Cafri, G; Inacio, MCS; Schepps, AL; Paxton, EW; Bini, SA

    2015-01-01

    The survivorship of implants after revision total hip arthroplasty and risk factors associated with re-revision are not well defined. We evaluated the re-revision rate with use of the institutional total joint replacement registry. The purpose of this study was to determine patient, implant, and surgeon factors associated with re-revision total hip arthroplasty.A retrospective cohort study was conducted. The total joint replacement registry was used to identify patients who had undergone revi...

  5. Optimizing the data acquisition rate for a remotely controllable structural monitoring system with parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Wenjuan; Guo, Aihuang; Liu, Yang; Azmi, Asrul Izam; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel technique that optimizes the real-time remote monitoring and control of dispersed civil infrastructures. The monitoring system is based on fiber Bragg gating (FBG) sensors, and transfers data via Ethernet. This technique combines parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling to increase the data acquisition rate in remote controllable structural monitoring systems. The compact parallel operation mode is highly efficient at achieving the highest possible data acquisition rate for the FBG sensor based local data acquisition system. Self-adaptive sampling is introduced to continuously coordinate local acquisition and remote control for data acquisition rate optimization. Key issues which impact the operation of the whole system, such as the real-time data acquisition rate, data processing capability, and buffer usage, are investigated. The results show that, by introducing parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling, the data acquisition rate can be increased by several times without affecting the system operating performance on both local data acquisition and remote process control

  6. The Epidemiology of Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Adults from Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Timothy; Wasserstein, David; Dwyer, Tim; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Marks, Paul H.; Bach, Bernard R.; Townley, John; Mahomed, Nizar; Chahal, Jaskarndip

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The morbidity associated with revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the rate of and risk factors for re-revision, re-operation, and re-admission following revision ACLR in the general population. Methods: All patients who underwent first revision ACLR in Ontario, Canada from January 2004 to December 2010 were identified and followed to December 2012. Exclusions included age (<16 years), previous osteotomy, or multi-ligament knee reconstruction. The main outcome was re-revision ACLR. Secondary outcomes included re-operation [irrigation and debridement (I&D), meniscectomy, manipulation under anesthesia (MUA), contralateral ACLR, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA)], and re-admission within 90 days of surgery. Survival to re-revision was determined using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) approach. A Cox proportional hazards model or logistic regression were used to determine the influence of patient factors (age, sex, neighborhood income quintile, and comorbidity), surgical factors (graft choice, concurrent meniscal procedure, and fixation method), and provider factors (surgeon volume, surgeon years in practice, and hospital status) on outcomes. A post-hoc analysis was performed to determine the influence of the aforementioned factors on overall post-operative infection risk, including both operative and non-operative cases. Results: Overall, 827 patients were included (median age: 30 years; 58.8% males). Single stage revisions comprised 92.9% of cases, and a meniscal procedure (repair or debridement) was performed in 45.3% of cases. The re-revision rate at a mean follow-up of 4.8±2.2 years was 4.4%, and the five-year survival rate was 95.4% (Figure 1). The rates of I&D, meniscectomy, contralateral ACLR, and re-admission were 0.8%, 3.1%, 3.4%, and 4.1%, respectively. MUA and TKA were rare. Young age significantly increased contralateral ACLR risk (risk decreased by 5.1% with each year

  7. Patient-reported Outcomes and Revision Rates at a Mean Follow-up of 10 Years After Lumbar Total Disc Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Line A.; Tendal Paulsen, Rune; Carreon, Leah

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: Prospective observational cohort study. OBJECTIVE.: To determine the long-term clinical results and prosthesis survival in patients treated with lumbar total disc replacement (TDR). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Fusion has become the current standard surgical treatment for lumbar...... and statistically significant worse outcome scores at last follow-up compared to patients who had no revision. Thirty patients (52.6%) would choose the same treatment again if they were faced with the same problem. CONCLUSION.: This study demonstrated significant improvement in long-term clinical outcomes, similar...

  8. A self-adaptive toll rate algorithm for high occupancy toll (HOT) lane operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Dramatically increasing travel demands and insufficient traffic facility supplies have resulted in severe : traffic congestion. High Occupancy Toll (HOT) lane operations have been proposed as one of the most : applicable and cost-effective countermea...

  9. Possibility of increasing the average rate of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by operating in the self-oscillating regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumakov, G A; Slinko, M G

    1979-05-01

    The possibility of increasing the average rate of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by operating in the self-oscillating regime was demonstrated by analyzing a kinetic model of hydrogen interaction with oxygen over a metallic catalyst. Within a certain interval of partial pressures of oxygen, the average reaction rate over a period of oscillation may be over five times that of the steady-state reaction.

  10. Circumcision revision in male children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Ghazo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine indications for circumcision revision and to identify the specialty of the person who performed unsatisfactory primary circumcision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors reviewed medical records of 52 cases that underwent circumcision revision over a 6-year period (1998 to 2004. Sleeve surgical technique was used for revision in patients with redundant foreskin or concealed penis, penoplasty for partial or complete degloving of the penis and meatotomy for external meatal stenosis. The mean age of children was 32 months (range 6 months to 9 years. RESULTS: Most of unsatisfactory primary circumcisions (86.7% were performed by laymen. All patients who underwent circumcision revision had good to excellent cosmetic results. CONCLUSION: Primary circumcision performed by laymen carry a high complication rate and serious complications may occur. A period of training and direct supervision by physicians is required before allowing laymen to perform circumcision independently.

  11. Examination of the optimal operation of building scale combined heat and power systems under disparate climate and GHG emissions rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.; Modi, V.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CHP attributable reductions, not viable by electric generation alone, are defined. • Simplified operating strategy heuristics are optimal under specific circumstances. • Phosphoric acid fuel cells yield the largest reductions except in the extremes. • Changes in baseline emissions affect the optimal system capacity and operating hours. - Abstract: This work aims to elucidate notions concerning the ideal operation and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions benefits of combined heat and power (CHP) systems by investigating how various metrics change as a function of the GHG emissions from the underlying electricity source, building use type and climate. Additionally, a new term entitled “CHP Attributable” reductions is introduced to quantify the benefits from the simultaneous use of thermal and electric energy, removing benefits achieved solely from fuel switching and generating electricity more efficiently. The GHG emission benefits from implementing internal combustion engine, microturbines, and phosphoric acid (PA) fuel cell based CHP systems were evaluated through an optimization approach considering energy demands of prototypical hospital, office, and residential buildings in varied climates. To explore the effect of electric GHG emissions rates, the ideal operation of the CHP systems was evaluated under three scenarios: “High” GHG emissions rates, “Low” GHG emissions rates, and “Current” GHG emissions rate for a specific location. The analysis finds that PA fuel cells achieve the highest GHG emission reductions in most cases considered, though there are exceptions. Common heuristics, such as electric load following and thermal load following, are the optimal operating strategy under specific conditions. The optimal CHP capacity and operating hours both vary as a function of building type, climate and GHG emissions rates from grid electricity. GHG emissions reductions can be as high as 49% considering a PA fuel cell for a

  12. THE AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT RATE IN CIVIL AVIATION DURING AIR TRANSPORT OPERATIONS AT THE AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Запорожець

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aircraft accident dates in civil aviation Ukraine and in republics of participants Agreement werecollected. The aircraft accident rate per 1 million flights was defined for civil aviation Ukraine and republicsof participants Agreement. Dynamics of aircraft accident rate was represented for civil aviation Ukraine.This dynamics was done for civil aviation of republics of participants Agreement and worldwide.

  13. A population based study of variations in operation rates for breast cancer, of comorbidity and prognosis at diagnosis: failure to operate for early breast cancer in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, T; Evans, T; Lagord, C; Monypenny, I; Kearins, O; Lawrence, G

    2014-10-01

    Older women are less likely to have surgery for operable breast cancer. This population-based study examines operation rates by age and identifies groups which present with early or late disease. 37 000 cancer registrations for 2007 were combined with Hospital Episode Statistics comorbidity data for England. Operation rates were examined by age, ethnicity, deprivation, comorbidity, screen-detection, tumour size, grade and nodal status. Early and late presentation were correlated with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) groups and tumour size. The proportion of women not having surgery increased from 7-10% at ages 35-69 to 82% from age 90. From age 70, the proportion not having surgery rose by an average of 3.1% per year of age. Women with a Charlson Comorbidity Index score of ≥1 (which increased with age), with tumours >50 mm or who were node positive, were less likely to have surgery. Although women aged 70-79 were more likely to have larger tumours, their tumours were also more likely to have an excellent or good NPI (p ethnic groups (p ethnic groups presented with more advanced tumours. Older women had larger tumours which were otherwise of good prognosis, and this would not account for the failure to operate which may in part be related to comorbidity in this age group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating... determined using the methodology set forth in §§ 412.73(c)(15) and 412.73(c)(16). (f) DRG adjustment. The...

  15. 42 CFR 412.75 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs based on a Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.75 Determination of the... methodology set forth in §§ 412.73(c)(15) and 412.73(c)(16). (e) DRG adjustment. The applicable hospital...

  16. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating... update factor is determined using the methodology set forth in § 412.73(c)(12) through (c)(16). (f) DRG...

  17. Gamma dose rate estimation and operation management suggestions for decommissioning the reactor pressure vessel of HTR-PM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Fang; Hong Li; Jianzhu Cao; Wenqian Li; Feng Xie; Jiejuan Tong [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua, University, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-01

    China is now designing and constructing a high temperature gas cooled reactor-pebble bed module (HTR-PM). In order to investigate the future decommissioning approach and evaluate possible radiation dose, gamma dose rate near the reactor pressure vessel was calculated for different cooling durations using QAD-CGA program. The source term of this calculation was provided by KORIGEN program. Based on the calculated results, the spatial distribution and temporal changes of gamma dose rate near reactor pressure vessel was systematically analyzed. A suggestion on planning decommissioning operation of reactor pressure vessel of HTRPM was given based on calculated dose rate and the Chinese Standard GB18871-2002. (authors)

  18. The effects of operational conditions on the respiration rate of Tubificidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juqing Lou

    Full Text Available Tubificidae is often used in the wastewater treatment systems to minimize the sludge production because it can be fed on the activated sludge. The process conditions have effect on the growth, reproduction, and sludge reduction efficiency of Tubificidae. The effects of the water quality, density of worms, pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO concentration on the respiration rate of Tubificidae were investigated to determine the optimal conditions for the growth and metabolism of the worms and reveal the mechanisms involving the efficient sludge reduction in terms of these conditions. It was observed that the respiration rate was highest in the water discharged from an ecosystem that included symbiotic Tubificidae and microbes and was lowest in distilled water. Considering density of the worms, the highest rate was 81.72±5.12 mg O2/g(dry weight·h·L with 0.25 g (wet weight of worms in 1 L test flask. The maximum Tubificidae respiration rate was observed at a pH of 8.0±0.05, a rate that was more than twice as high as those observed at other pH values. The respiration rate increased in the temperature range of ∼8°C-22°C, whereas the rate declined in the temperature range of ∼22°C-30°C. The respiration rate of Tubificidae was very high for DO range of ∼3.5-4.5 mg/L, and the rates were relatively low for out of this DO range. The results of this study revealed the process conditions which influenced the growth, and reproduction of Tubificidae and sludge reduction at a microscopic level, which could be a theoretical basis for the cultivation and application of Tubificidae in wastewater treatment plants.

  19. Effects of a Capital Investment and a Discount Rate on the Optimal Operational Duration of an HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the effects of a capital investment and a discount rate on the optimal operational duration of an HLW repository. According to the previous researches of the KRS(Korea Reference System) for an HLW repository, the amounts of 7,068,200 C$K and 2,636.2 MEUR are necessary to construct and operate surface and underground facilities. Since these huge costs can be a burden to some national economies, a study for a cost optimization should be performed. So we aim to drive the dominant cost driver for an optimal operational duration. A longer operational duration may be needed to dispose of more spent fuels continuously from a nuclear power plant, or to attain a retrievability of an HLW repository at a depth of 500 m below the ground level in a stable plutonic rock body. In this sense, an extended operational duration for an HLW repository affects the overall disposal costs of a repository. In this paper, only the influence of a capital investment and a discount rate was estimated from the view of optimized economics. Because these effects must be significant factors to minimize the overall disposal costs based on minimizing the sum of operational costs and capital investments

  20. Relationship of Employee Attitudes and Supervisor-Controller Ratio to En Route Operational Error Rates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broach, Dana

    2002-01-01

    ...; Rodgers, Mogford, Mogford, 1998). In this study, the relationship of organizational factors to en route OE rates was investigated, based on an adaptation of the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS; Shappell & Wiegmann 2000...

  1. What Are We Waiting For Customer Wait Time, Fill Rate, And Marine Corps Equipment Operational Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    directed the use of Customer Wait Time (CWT) as a measure of supply chain performance (Department of Defense [DOD], 2000). CWT is defined as “the total...time elapsed between issuance of a customer order and satisfaction of the order” (United States Marine Corps [USMC], 2014, pp. 2–29). In theory...rate is a widely used metric for setting inventory levels and is also a useful measure of customer satisfaction . In general, high fill-rates can be

  2. Post-operative high dose rate vaginal apex brachytherapy in stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumbs, A.A.; Turner, B.C.; Knisely, J.P.S.; Kacinski, B.M.; Roberts, K.B.; Peschel, R.E.; Haffty, B.G.; Rutherford, T.J.; Edraki, B.; Schwartz, P.E.; Wilson, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Patients with Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma have traditionally been treated with total abdominal hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and radiation. The reported incidence of local recurrence in surgically treated patients with FIGO Stage IA or IB endometrial adenocarcinoma is 4-10% at 2 years. Combined surgery and radiation has resulted in a reduction of recurrence to 2-6%. We report the presentation, actuarial survival, actuarial rate of local failure, salvage rate, and complications for patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy following surgery. Materials and Methods: Between 1985 and 1994 a total of 286 patients with FIGO Stage I endometrioid uterine adenocarcinoma were treated with HDR Ir-192 vaginal apex brachytherapy alone to a total dose of 21 Gy in 3 fractions at 0.5 cm from the vaginal mucosa. The pathologic stage by treatment group was IA: 31%, IB: 68%, and IC: 1%. The histologic grade of the patient's tumors was grade 1: 69%, 2: 29%, and 3: 2% of patients. The median time from surgery to radiation was 34 days (range 14-66 days). The median follow-up for 286 patients with Stage IA (92 patients), IB (190 patients), and IC (4 patients) was respectively, 37, 35 and 40 months (2 patients lost to follow-up prior to 6 months). Results: Patients presented with vaginal bleeding (94%) or abnormal pap smear (6%) at a median age for Stage IA and IB, of 54 and 63 years, respectively (range 32-88). The 5-year overall actuarial survival rate was 94.5%. The 5-year actuarial survival rate by histologic grade was 97.5% and 91.5% for FIGO grade 1 and 2, respectively (p=.011). The 5-year actuarial survival rate by depth of myometrial invasion was 99.0% and 92.5% for Stage IA and IB, respectively (p=.029). Median overall time to failure is 19.5 months (range 10-36 months). The 5-year actuarial rate of local failure was 4.5%. The overall failure rate in our study group was 2.8% (8 patients), local failure only 1

  3. 7 CFR 1430.208 - Payment rate and dairy operation payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the months that the Boston Class I milk price under the applicable milk marketing order is equal to or... the feed components of the estimated price of 16 percent Mixed Dairy Feed per pound noted on page 33... be made to dairy operations when the Boston Class I milk price under the applicable Federal milk...

  4. Design and operating experience with electric systems for high rate liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, T.F.; Hibbard, M.C.; Nelson, C.A. Jr.; Thompson, P.A.; Makdisi, Y.; Lipton, R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of experiments have been instrumented by an ADC scheme utilizing an integrated amplifier, a packaged delay line, the difference of two samples taken Before and After the signal exits the delay, and a multiplexer to a single ADC for a system. Design features, operating peculiarities, and experience to date are discussed

  5. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HVAC SYSTEM OPERATION, AIR EXCHANGE RATE, AND INDOOR-OUTDOOR PARTICULATE MATTER RATIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of duty cycle , the fraction of time the heating and cooling (HVAC) system was operating, were made in each participant's home during the spring season of the RTP Particulate Matter Panel Study. A miniature temperature sensor/data logger combination placed on the ...

  6. The rate of acquisition of formal operational schemata in adolescence: A secondary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Shulamith G.; Shemesh, Michal

    A theoretical model of cognitive development is applied to the study of the acquisition of formal operational schemata by adolescents. The model predicts that the proportion of adolescents who have not yet acquired the ability to perform a a specific Piagetian-like task is an exponentially decreasing function of age. The model has been used to analyze the data of two large-scale studies performed in the United States and in Israel. The functional dependence upon age was found to be the same in both countries for tasks which are used to assess the following formal operations: proportional reasoning, probabilistic reasoning, correlations, and combinatorial analysis. Different functional dependence was found for tasks assessing conservation, control of variables, and prepositional logic. These results give support to the unity hypothesis of cognitive development, that is, the hypothesis that the various schemata of formal thought appear simultaneously.

  7. FINANCIAL AND LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE FOREIGN EXCHANGE RATES ON BANK EXTERNAL TRADING OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Papazov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term "currency" has different meanings but is usually defined as any means of payment that is not in local currency units. The ratio between the foreign currency and local currency units results into exchange rate. When arranging payment transactions abroad, local entities - natural and legal persons must exchange their national currency in advance for the currency of the country in which they are due or in another currency commonly accepted as an international payment. Under this regime, the national currency is quoted in relation to another currency, that is exchange rate.

  8. High Re-Operation Rates Using Conserve Metal-On-Metal Total Hip Articulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, S L; Jakobsen, Thomas; Christoffersen, Hardy

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Metal-on-metal hip articulations have been intensely debated after reports of adverse reactions and high failure rates. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the implant of a metal-on.metal total hip articulation (MOM THA) from a single manufacture in a two-center st......INTRODUCTION: Metal-on-metal hip articulations have been intensely debated after reports of adverse reactions and high failure rates. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the implant of a metal-on.metal total hip articulation (MOM THA) from a single manufacture in a two...

  9. Efficient quantum repeater with respect to both entanglement-concentration rate and complexity of local operations and classical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhaofeng; Guan, Ji; Li, Lvzhou

    2018-01-01

    Quantum entanglement is an indispensable resource for many significant quantum information processing tasks. However, in practice, it is difficult to distribute quantum entanglement over a long distance, due to the absorption and noise in quantum channels. A solution to this challenge is a quantum repeater, which can extend the distance of entanglement distribution. In this scheme, the time consumption of classical communication and local operations takes an important place with respect to time efficiency. Motivated by this observation, we consider a basic quantum repeater scheme that focuses on not only the optimal rate of entanglement concentration but also the complexity of local operations and classical communication. First, we consider the case where two different two-qubit pure states are initially distributed in the scenario. We construct a protocol with the optimal entanglement-concentration rate and less consumption of local operations and classical communication. We also find a criterion for the projective measurements to achieve the optimal probability of creating a maximally entangled state between the two ends. Second, we consider the case in which two general pure states are prepared and general measurements are allowed. We get an upper bound on the probability for a successful measurement operation to produce a maximally entangled state without any further local operations.

  10. Uroflowmetric changes, success rate and complications following Tension-free Vaginal Tape Obturator (TVT-O) operation in obese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Reham; El-Faissal, Yahia M; Hashem, Ahmed T; Gad Allah, Sherine H

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of Tension-free Vaginal Tape Obturator (TVT-O) operation in the treatment of urodynamic stress incontinence (USI) in obese females, with respect to uroflowmetric changes, success rate and postoperative complications. This prospective observational study included 26 patients with USI at the Obstetrics & Gynecology department-Cairo University hospital during the year 2015. The participants had body mass index (BMI)≥30. Patients underwent TVT-O operation. Follow up of the patients was performed by cough test and uroflowmetry after one week, one month, three months and six months. Postoperative complications such as groin pain, sense of incomplete emptying, need to strain to complete micturition and urinary tract infection were recorded. Comparisons between groups were done using Chi square, Phi-Cramer test for categorical variables. The mean age for the subjects was 43.58±9.01years. The mean BMI was 33.4±2.1. The success rate of TVT-O operation was 21 out of 26 patients (≈81%). Normal maximum flow rate was in 88% of patients at week one and was normal in 100% of patients at months three and six (p=0.101 & 0.101). Postoperative groin pain was the main complaint during the first week after operation and decreased significantly from week one to the 1st month postoperative (84.62% & 65.38%, P=0.041). TVT-O operation showed a high success rate in treatment of USI in obese patients without affecting the voiding function of the bladder as proven by the uroflowmetry. The main postoperative complaint was the groin pain which significantly improved after one month. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of operating parameters and rate of uranium bioleaching from a low-grade ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, A.; Roosta-Azad, R.; Safdari, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the bioleaching of a low-grade uranium ore containing 480 ppm uranium has been reported. The studies involved extraction of uranium using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans derived from the uranium mine samples. The maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) and doubling time (t d ) were obtained 0.08 h -1 and 8.66 h, respectively. Parameters such as Fe 2+ concentration, particle size, temperature and pH were optimized. The effect of pulp density (PD) was also studied. Maximum uranium bio-dissolution of 100 ± 5 % was achieved under the conditions of pH 2.0, 5 % PD and 35 deg C in 48 h with the particles of d 80 = 100 μm. The optimum concentration of supplementary Fe 2+ was dependent to the PD. This value was 0 and 10 g of FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O/l at the PD of 5 and 15 %, respectively. The effects of time, pH and PD on the bioleaching process were studied using central composite design. New rate equation was improved for the uranium leaching rate. The rate of leaching is controlled with the concentrations of ferric and ferrous ions in solution. This study shows that uranium bioleaching may be an important process for the Saghand U mine at Yazd (Iran). (author)

  12. 76 FR 80866 - Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carriers Negotiated Rate Arrangements; Tariff Filing Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ...: Notice of Inquiry. SUMMARY: The Federal Maritime Commission is issuing this Notice of Inquiry seeking... surcharges, and are required to make their rules tariffs available to shippers free of charge; (2) NRA rates... in response to the Notice of Inquiry that contain confidential information, the confidential copy of...

  13. Examination of Factors that Influence the Operation Income and Expenditure Balance Difference Rate of 20 Educational Foundation Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hisato; Yano, Kouya; Nagasawa, Kaoko; Katou, Satoka; Yokota, Kuninobu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the factors that influence the operation income and expenditure balance ratio of school corporations running university hospitals by multiple regression analysis. 1. We conducted cluster analysis of the financial ratio and classified the school corporations into those running colleges and universities.2. We conducted multiple regression analysis using the operation income and expenditure balance ratio of the colleges as the variables and the Diagnosis Procedure Combination data as the explaining variables.3. The predictive expression was used for multiple regression analysis. 1. The school corporations were divided into those running universities (7), colleges (20) and others. The medical income ratio and the debt ratio were high and the student payment ratio was low in the colleges.2. The numbers of emergency care hospitalizations, operations, radiation therapies, and ambulance conveyances, and the complexity index had a positive influence on the operation income and expenditure balance ratio. On the other hand, the number of general anesthesia procedures, the cover rate index, and the emergency care index had a negative influence.3. The predictive expression was as follows.Operation income and expenditure balance ratio = 0.027 × number of emergency care hospitalizations + 0.005 × number of operations + 0.019 × number of radiation therapies + 0.007 × number of ambulance conveyances - 0.003 × number of general anesthesia procedures + 648.344 × complexity index - 5877.210 × cover rate index - 2746.415 × emergency care index - 38.647Conclusion: In colleges, the number of emergency care hospitalizations, the number of operations, the number of radiation therapies, and the number of ambulance conveyances and the complexity index were factors for gaining ordinary profit.

  14. Status of the ALICE TPC upgrade for high-rate operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasik, Piotr [TU Muenchen, Physik Department E12, Excellence Cluster ' ' Universe' ' , D-85748, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device for tracking and charged particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2018/2019, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate of about 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 100 above the present readout rate of the TPC. This will result in a significant improvement on the sensitivity of rare probes that are considered key observables to characterise the hot and dense QCD matter created in such collisions. In order to make full use of this luminosity, a major upgrade of the TPC is required. It is foreseen to replace the existing MWPC-based readout chambers by Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors to overcome the rate limitations imposed by the present gated readout scheme. An extensive R and D program has been launched to reach the challenging requirements of the upcoming upgrade of the detector. In this presentation the most recent results are discussed concerning ion backflow suppression, gain stability, energy and dE/dx resolution and stability against discharges. The status of the upgrade of the online calibration and data reduction system, which includes advanced techniques for online corrections of space-charge distortions, as well as the development of a new readout electronics are reported.

  15. Comparison of the effect of paper and computerized procedures on operator error rate and speed of performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converse, S.A.; Perez, P.B.; Meyer, S.; Crabtree, W.

    1994-01-01

    The Computerized Procedures Manual (COPMA-II) is an advanced procedure manual that can be used to select and execute procedures, to monitor the state of plant parameters, and to help operators track their progress through plant procedures. COPMA-II was evaluated in a study that compared the speed and accuracy of operators' performance when they performed with COPMA-II and traditional paper procedures. Sixteen licensed reactor operators worked in teams of two to operate the Scales Pressurized Water Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University. Each team performed one change of power with each type of procedure to simulate performance under normal operating conditions. Teams then performed one accident scenario with COPMA-II and one with paper procedures. Error rates, performance times, and subjective estimates of workload were collected, and were evaluated for each combination of procedure type and scenario type. For the change of power task, accuracy and response time were not different for COPMA-II and paper procedures. Operators did initiate responses to both accident scenarios fastest with paper procedures. However, procedure type did not moderate response completion time for either accident scenario. For accuracy, performance with paper procedures resulted in twice as many errors as did performance with COPMA-II. Subjective measures of mental workload for the accident scenarios were not affected by procedure type

  16. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields; Revision didactica del sistema de magnitudes operativas ICRU para la evaluacion de la dosis equivalente en campos externos de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H{sub E} and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  17. New and revised standards for coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  18. Outcomes of revision external dacryocystorhinostomy and nasal intubation by bicanalicular silicone tubing under endonasal endoscopic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Seyhmus; Kürşat Cingü, Abdullah; Sahin, Alparslan; Gün, Ramazan; Kiniş, Vefa; Caça, Ihsan

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term treatment outcomes in patients who underwent revision of external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) and nasal intubation by bicanalicular silicone tubing (BSTI) under endonasal endoscopic guidance. Data from 28 patients with recurrent dacryocystitis were retrospectively reviewed. Revision external DCR and bicanalicular nasal intubation by silicone tubing under endonasal endoscopic guidance was performed in 28 eyes of 28 patients. The patients were evaluated with respect to the reason of recurrence, time to recurrence, time to revision, duration of follow-up and surgical success. Endoscopic endonasal examination detected an osteotomy-side obstruction by the excessive granulation tissue in 24 patients (86%), nasal septal deviation in three patients (10%) and nasal polyp in one patient (4%). Recurrence occurred after a mean duration of 5.3±3.7 months following the first operation. The mean time between the first DCR operation and the revision DCR was 11.5 ± 9.3 months. After a mean follow-up of 14.9±7.8 months, the rate of anatomic success alone was 85% (24/28); the rate of subjective success was 78% (22/28). Revision external DCR and bicanalicular nasal intubation by silicone tubing under endonasal endoscopic guidance can be recommended in patients with recurrent dacryocystitis as a surgical approach that achieves satisfactory objective and subjective success rates.

  19. Operational measurements of stack flow rates in a nuclear power plant with ultrasonic anemometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, E.; Kirtzel, H.-J.; Ebenhoech, E.

    2003-01-01

    The calculation of the impact of radio nuclides within the surroundings of nuclear power stations requires quantitative measurements of the stack emission. As a standard method, propeller anemometers have been installed inside the stack, but due to the wear and tear of the moving parts in such conventional sensors the servicing and maintenance are costly and may cause restrictions in the operation of the stack. As an alternative to propeller anemometers ultrasonic sensors have been applied which employ no moving parts and are almost free of maintenance. Furthermore, any shifts in internal calibration parameters can be identified by the sensor electronics with on-line plausibility checks. The tests have proven that ultrasonic systems are able to measure adequately and reliably the flow inside the stack. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of economic and technical efficiency of diesel engines operation on the basis of volume combustion rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. О. Берестовой

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a new approach to evaluation of complex efficiency of diesel engines. Traditionally, cylinder’s capacity, rotation frequency, average efficient pressure inside cylinder, piston’s stroke, average piston’s velocity, fuel specific consumption and other indices are used as generalizing criteria, characterizing diesel engine’s efficiency, but they do not reflect interrelation between engine’s complex efficiency and a set of economic, mass-dimensional, operational and ecological efficiency. The approach applied in the article makes it possible to reveal the existing and modify the existing methods of solving the problem of improving diesel engine’s efficiency with due regard to interrelation of the parameters, characterizing efficiency of their operation. Statistic analyses were carried out, on the basis of which an assumption regarding the existence of interrelation between specific fuel consumption and the analyzed engine’s parameters was made. Processing of statistical data for various analyzed functions of diesel engines helped offer a function, illustrating the link between volume combustion rate, piston’s area and nominal theoretical specific fuel consumption. Interrelation between volume combustion rate, nominal parameters of diesel operation and efficiency indices, obtained by processing statistical data of more than 500 models of diesels of different series was evaluated, the main feature of it being a mathematical trend. The analysis of the obtained function makes it possible to establish an interrelation between economic efficiency of a diesel, its main index being specific fuel consumption and volume combustion rate and design peculiarities

  1. Multi-Output Power Converter, Operated from a Regulated Input Bus, for the Sireus Rate Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrecilla Marcos Compadre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a DC to DC converter designed to meet the power supply requirements of the SiREUS Coarse Rate Sensor (CRS which is a 3-axis MEMS Rate Sensor (MRS that uses a resonating ring gyro and will be used in different ESA missions. The converter supplies +5V, −5V, 3.3V, 1.8V and 40V and it has been designed and prototyped by Clyde Space Ltd with the EQM and FM units being manufactured by Selex ES. The first model was designed for a 28V un-regulated bus and the second model presented here has been designed for a 50V regulated bus. PWM voltage regulation was not used because of the noise requirements and the regulated input bus allowed an unregulated power stage approach. There are also stringent volume and interface constraints, which also affected the design. For such reasons, a fixed dutycycle, quasi-resonant single-ended topology with output linear regulators has been implemented; having the advantages of providing low switching losses, low radiated and conducted noise and no over-voltage failure mode. This paper highlights the techniques used to satisfy stringent noise and protection requirements of the load.

  2. Revised licensee event report system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Poore, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Licensee Event Reports (LERs) provide the basis for evaluating and assessing operating experience information from nuclear power plants. The reporting requirements for submitting LERs to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have been revised. Effective Jan. 1, 1984, all events were to be submitted in accordance with 10 CFR 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Report NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System-Description of System and Guidelines for Reporting, describes the guidelines on reportability of events. This article summarizes the reporting requirements as presented in NUREG-1022, high-lights differences in data reported between the revised and previous LER systems, and presents results from a preliminary assessment of LERs submitted under the revised LER reporting system

  3. High rate partial-state-of-charge operation of VRLA batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Patrick T.

    The world market for 12 V SLI batteries currently stands at around US$ 12 billion. The lack of a serious challenge from other battery types has allowed lead-acid products to serve this market exclusively, with minimal demand for product improvement through research and development, and a sharp competition has, over time, cut sales prices to commodity levels. The electrochemical storage of energy in automobiles now faces the possibility of a major change, in the form of the proposed 36/42 V electrical systems for vehicles that remain primarily powered by internal combustion engines, and of the hybrid electric vehicle. The duty cycle for these two applications sees the battery held at a partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) for most of its life and required to supply, and to accept, charge at unprecedented rates. The remarkable advances achieved with VRLA battery technology for electric vehicles during the past 8-10 years will be of only passing value in overcoming the challenges posed by high rate PSoC service in 36/42 V and HEV duty. This is because the failure modes seen in PSoC are quite different from those faced in EV (deep cycle) use. The replacement of the 12 V SLI will not take place rapidly. However, if the applications which take its place are to be satisfied by a lead-acid product (probably VRLA), rather than by a battery of a different chemistry, a program of development as successful as that mounted for deep cycle duty will be required. The present phase of the Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC) R&D program has begun to shed light on those aspects of the function of a VRLA battery which currently limit its life in high rate PSoC duty. The program is also pursuing the several technologies which show promise of overcoming those limits, including multiple tab plate design, mass transport facilitation and minor component (both beneficial and detrimental impurity) management. This paper presents a brief review of the changes which are taking place in

  4. Calculation code revised MIXSET for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonda, Kozo; Oka, Koichiro; Fukuda, Shoji.

    1979-02-01

    Revised MIXSET is a FORTRAN IV calculation code developed to simulate steady and transient behaviors of the Purex extraction process and calculate the optimum operating condition of the process. Revised MIXSET includes all the functions of MIXSET code as shown below. a) Maximum chemical system of eight components can be handled with or without mutual dependence of the distribution of components. b) The flowrate and concentration of feed can be renewed successively at any state, transient or steady, for searching optimum operating conditions. c) Optimum inputs of feed concentrations and flowrates can be calculated to satisfy both of specification and recovery rate of a product. d) Radioactive decay reactions can be handled on each component. Besides these functions, the following chemical reactions concerned in Purex process are newly-included in Revised MIXSET code and the quantitative changes of components such as H + , U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), NH 2 OH, N 2 H 4 can be simulated. 1st Gr. (i) reduction of Pu(IV); U 4+ + 2Pu 4+ + 2H 2 O → UO 2 2+ + 2Pu 3+ + 4H + . (ii) oxidation of Pu(III); 2Pu 3+ + 3H + + NO 3 - → 2Pu 4+ + HNO 2 + H 2 O. (iii) oxidation of U(IV); U 4+ + NO 3 - + H 2 O → UO 2 2+ + H + + HNO 2 2U 4+ + O 2 + 2H 2 O → 2UO 2 2+ + 4H + . (iv) decomposition of HNO 2 ; HNO 2 + N 2 H 5 + → HN 3 + 2H 2 O + H + . (author)

  5. Radiographic failure and rates of re-operation after acromioclavicular joint reconstruction: a comparison of surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, H T; Hsu, L; Sodl, J; Arianjam, A; Yian, E H

    2016-04-01

    To compare radiographic failure and re-operation rates of anatomical coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstructional techniques with non-anatomical techniques after chronic high grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries. We reviewed chronic AC joint reconstructions within a region-wide healthcare system to identify surgical technique, complications, radiographic failure and re-operations. Procedures fell into four categories: (1) modified Weaver-Dunn, (2) allograft fixed through coracoid and clavicular tunnels, (3) allograft loop coracoclavicular fixation, and (4) combined allograft loop and synthetic cortical button fixation. Among 167 patients (mean age 38.1 years, (standard deviation (sd) 14.7) treated at least a four week interval after injury, 154 had post-operative radiographs available for analysis. Radiographic failure occurred in 33/154 cases (21.4%), with the lowest rate in Technique 4 (2/42 4.8%, p = 0.001). Half the failures occurred by six weeks, and the Kaplan-Meier survivorship at 24 months was 94.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 79.6 to 98.6) for Technique 4 and 69.9% (95% CI 59.4 to 78.3) for the other techniques when combined. In multivariable survival analysis, Technique 4 had better survival than other techniques (Hazard Ratio 0.162, 95% CI 0.039 to 0.068, p = 0.013). Among 155 patients with a minimum of six months post-operative insurance coverage, re-operation occurred in 9.7% (15 patients). However, in multivariable logistic regression, Technique 4 did not reach a statistically significant lower risk for re-operation (odds ratio 0.254, 95% CI 0.05 to 1.3, p = 0.11). In this retrospective series, anatomical CC ligament reconstruction using combined synthetic cortical button and allograft loop fixation had the lowest rate of radiographic failure. Anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using combined synthetic cortical button and allograft loop fixation had the lowest rate of radiographic failure. ©2016 The British Editorial

  6. Operative correction of judoists’ training loads on the base of on-line monitoring of heart beats rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Qiang Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: ensure increase of effectiveness of training process’s control by means of operative correction of training loads of different qualification judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate indicators. Material: the research was conducted on the base of Brest SCJSOR № 1. Judo wrestlers of different sport qualification (age 17-19 years old, n=15 participated in the research. Monitoring of judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate was carried out with the help of system “Polar”. Results: we have found factorial structure of functional fitness in every profile of sportsmen. Model characteristics of judo wrestlers were supplemented with the most important sides of functional fitness. Analysis of indicators of restoration effectiveness indicators (REI in both groups of judo wrestlers showed high level of organism’s responsiveness to training load of special and power orientation in comparison with speed power load. We have worked out algorithm of operative correction of training loads by indicators of heart beats rate in training process, depending on orientation and intensity of loads’ physiological influence on judo wrestler. Conclusions: Telemetric on-line monitoring of sportsman’s heart beats rate and calculation of REI permit to objectively assess effectiveness of training’s construction and of micro-cycle in total and detect in due time the trend to development of over-loading and failure of adaptation.

  7. Operative correction of judoists’ training loads on the base of on-line monitoring of heart beats rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: ensure increase of effectiveness of training process’s control by means of operative correction of training loads of different qualification judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate indicators. Material: the research was conducted on the base of Brest SCJSOR № 1. Judo wrestlers of different sport qualification (age 17-19 years old, n=15 participated in the research. Monitoring of judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate was carried out with the help of system “Polar”. Results: we have found factorial structure of functional fitness in every profile of sportsmen. Model characteristics of judo wrestlers were supplemented with the most important sides of functional fitness. Analysis of indicators of restoration effectiveness indicators (REI in both groups of judo wrestlers showed high level of organism’s responsiveness to training load of special and power orientation in comparison with speed power load. We have worked out algorithm of operative correction of training loads by indicators of heart beats rate in training process, depending on orientation and intensity of loads’ physiological influence on judo wrestler. Conclusions: Telemetric on-line monitoring of sportsman’s heart beats rate and calculation of REI permit to objectively assess effectiveness of training’s construction and of micro-cycle in total and detect in due time the trend to development of over-loading and failure of adaptation.

  8. Injury Rates on New and Old Technology Oil and Gas Rigs Operated by the Largest United States Onshore Drilling Contractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackley, David J.; Retzer, Kyla D.; Hubler, Warren G.; Hill, Ryan D.; Laney, A. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Occupational fatality rates among oil and gas extraction industry and specifically among drilling contractor workers are high compared to the U.S. all-industry average. There is scant literature focused on non-fatal injuries among drilling contractors, some of which have introduced engineering controls to improve rig efficiency and reduce injury risk. Methods We compared injury rates on new and old technology rigs operated by the largest U.S. drilling contractor during 2003–2012, stratifying by job type and grouping outcomes by injury severity and body part affected. Results Six hundred seventy-one injuries were recorded over 77.4 million person-hours. The rate on new rigs was 66% of that on old rigs. Roughnecks had lower injury rates on new rigs, largely through reduced limb injury rates. New rigs had lower rates in each non-fatal injury severity category. Conclusions For this company, new technology rigs appear to provide a safer environment for roughnecks. Future studies could include data from additional companies. PMID:25164118

  9. Injury rates on new and old technology oil and gas rigs operated by the largest United States onshore drilling contractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackley, David J; Retzer, Kyla D; Hubler, Warren G; Hill, Ryan D; Laney, A Scott

    2014-10-01

    Occupational fatality rates among oil and gas extraction industry and specifically among drilling contractor workers are high compared to the U.S. all-industry average. There is scant literature focused on non-fatal injuries among drilling contractors, some of which have introduced engineering controls to improve rig efficiency and reduce injury risk. We compared injury rates on new and old technology rigs operated by the largest U.S. drilling contractor during 2003-2012, stratifying by job type and grouping outcomes by injury severity and body part affected. Six hundred seventy-one injuries were recorded over 77.4 million person-hours. The rate on new rigs was 66% of that on old rigs. Roughnecks had lower injury rates on new rigs, largely through reduced limb injury rates. New rigs had lower rates in each non-fatal injury severity category. For this company, new technology rigs appear to provide a safer environment for roughnecks. Future studies could include data from additional companies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pre-title I safety evaluation for the retrieval operations of transuranic waste drums in the Solid Waste Disposal Facility. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, M.S.

    1992-08-01

    Phase I of the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Facility Line Item Project includes the retrieval and safe storage of the pad drums that are stored on TRU pads 2-6 in the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF). Drums containing TRU waste were placed on these pads as early as 1974. The pads, once filled, were mounded with soil. The retrieval activities will include the excavation of the soil, retrieval of the pad drums, placing the drums in overpacks (if necessary) and venting and purging the retrieved drums. Once the drums have been vented and purged, they will be transported to other pads within the SWDF or in a designated area until they are eventually treated as necessary for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. This safety evaluation provides a bounding assessment of the radiological risk involved with the drum retrieval activities to the maximally exposed offsite individual and the co-located worker. The results of the analysis indicate that the risk to the maximally exposed offsite individual and the co-located worker using maximum frequencies and maximum consequences are within the acceptance criteria defined in WSRC Procedural Manual 9Q. The purpose of this evaluation is to demonstrate the incremental risk from the SWDF due to the retrieval activities for use as design input only. As design information becomes available, this evaluation can be revised to satisfy the safety analysis requirements of DOE Orders 4700 and 5480.23

  11. Case-mix analysis and variation in rates of non-surgical treatment of older women with operable breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J; Richards, P; Ward, S; Francis, M; Lawrence, G; Collins, K; Reed, M; Wyld, L

    2015-08-01

    Non-surgical management of older women with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive operable breast cancer is common in the UK, with up to 40 per cent of women aged over 70 years receiving primary endocrine therapy. Although this may be appropriate for frailer patients, for some it may result in treatment failure, contributing to the poor outcomes seen in this age group. Wide variation in the rates of non-operative management of breast cancer in older women exists across the UK. Case mix may explain some of this variation in practice. Data from two UK regional cancer registries were analysed to determine whether variation in treatment observed between 2002 and 2010 at hospital and clinician level persisted after adjustment for case mix. Expected case mix-adjusted surgery rates were derived by logistic regression using the variables age, proxy Charlson co-morbidity score, deprivation quintile, method of cancer detection, tumour size, stage, grade and node status. Data on 17,129 women aged 70 years or more with ER-positive operable breast cancer were analysed. There was considerable variation in rates of surgery at both hospital and clinician level. Despite adjusting for case mix, this variation persisted at hospital level, although not at clinician level. This study demonstrates variation in selection criteria for older women for operative treatment of early breast cancer, indicating that some older women may be undertreated or overtreated, and may partly explain the inferior disease outcomes in this age group. It emphasizes the urgent need for evidence-based guidelines for treatment selection criteria in older women with breast cancer. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Pregnancy and recurrence rates in infertile patients operated for ovarian endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luţuc, Monica Holicov; Nemescu, D; Onofriescu, Alina; Târnovanu, Mihaela; Moscalu, Mihaela; Onofriescu, M

    2015-01-01

    The study deals with the preoperative ultrasound diagnosis of ovarian endometriosis, postoperative ultrasound reassessment, laparoscopic surgical resolution of ovarian endometriosis, estimation of recurrence risk 12 months after surgery by ultrasound, reappearance of clinical symptoms (such as pain) or second-look laparoscopy, and pregnancy rate 2 years after surgery. 140 patients with en- dometriosis and infertility admitted to the Iasi "Cuza-Vodă" Clinical Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology between the years 2009-2011 were included in the study. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1-59 cases that refused in vitro fertilization procedures, did not afford in vitro fertilization (IVF) or had minimal endometriosis and young ages and thus a possibility of delaying treatment, and group 2--62 cases which underwent IVF procedures immediately after surgery. No significant differences in the chance of becoming pregnant were found between the two groups (χ2 = 2.06, p = 0.0891, 95% CI); in group 1, 11.86% pregnancies were obtained while in group 2 the pregnancy rate was 11.29%. Based on the nonparametric method of analysis of contingency tables we could estimate the odds of becoming pregnant in the study groups, obtaining an odds ratio (OR = 1.16, CI: 1.04-2.23, 95% CI). This result indicated that in group 1 the odds of becoming pregnant was not significantly higher, and the estimation was made for a confidence interval of 95%. The study had in view the assessment of pregnancies obtained in the study groups and the time interval (number of weeks) from the time of intervention until the occurrence of pregnancy. The Kaplan-Meier analysis enabled the assessment of the mean value and the median value of the number of weeks until becoming pregnant, and these values did not show significant differences (χ2 = 1.55, p = 0.212, 95% CI). For endometriosis associated with infertility, hormonal suppression does not improve fertility, and therefore surgery followed by

  13. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  14. Logistics Modeling of Emplacement Rate and Duration of Operations for Generic Geologic Repository Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-11-01

    This study identified potential geologic repository concepts for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and (2) evaluated the achievable repository waste emplacement rate and the time required to complete the disposal for these concepts. Total repository capacity is assumed to be approximately 140,000 MT of spent fuel. The results of this study provide an important input for the rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) disposal cost analysis. The disposal concepts cover three major categories of host geologic media: crystalline or hard rock, salt, and argillaceous rock. Four waste package sizes are considered: 4PWR/9BWR; 12PWR/21BWR; 21PWR/44BWR, and dual purpose canisters (DPCs). The DPC concepts assume that the existing canisters will be sealed into disposal overpacks for direct disposal. Each concept assumes one of the following emplacement power limits for either emplacement or repository closure: 1.7 kW; 2.2 kW; 5.5 kW; 10 kW; 11.5 kW, and 18 kW.

  15. Logistics Modeling of Emplacement Rate and Duration of Operations for Generic Geologic Repository Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-01-01

    This study identified potential geologic repository concepts for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and (2) evaluated the achievable repository waste emplacement rate and the time required to complete the disposal for these concepts. Total repository capacity is assumed to be approximately 140,000 MT of spent fuel. The results of this study provide an important input for the rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) disposal cost analysis. The disposal concepts cover three major categories of host geologic media: crystalline or hard rock, salt, and argillaceous rock. Four waste package sizes are considered: 4PWR/9BWR; 12PWR/21BWR; 21PWR/44BWR, and dual purpose canisters (DPCs). The DPC concepts assume that the existing canisters will be sealed into disposal overpacks for direct disposal. Each concept assumes one of the following emplacement power limits for either emplacement or repository closure: 1.7 kW; 2.2 kW; 5.5 kW; 10 kW; 11.5 kW, and 18 kW.

  16. Overseas Contingency Operations: OMB and DOD Should Revise the Criteria for Determining Eligible Costs and Identify the Costs Likely to Endure Long Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    the theater of operations; Within the theater, the incremental costs above the funding programmed in the base budget to: • support commanders in the...billion in funding for OCO. While DOD’s OCO budget request has included amounts for contingency operations primarily in Iraq and Afghanistan, more...the extent to which OMB’s 2010 criteria address the activities included in DOD’s OCO budget request; and (2) whether DOD has developed and

  17. Reanalysis of Rate Data for the Reaction CH3 + CH3 → C2H6 Using Revised Cross Sections and a Linearized Second-Order Master Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, M A; Green, N J B; Shannon, R J; Pilling, M J; Seakins, P W; Western, C M; Robertson, S H

    2015-07-16

    Rate coefficients for the CH3 + CH3 reaction, over the temperature range 300-900 K, have been corrected for errors in the absorption coefficients used in the original publication ( Slagle et al., J. Phys. Chem. 1988 , 92 , 2455 - 2462 ). These corrections necessitated the development of a detailed model of the B̃(2)A1' (3s)-X̃(2)A2″ transition in CH3 and its validation against both low temperature and high temperature experimental absorption cross sections. A master equation (ME) model was developed, using a local linearization of the second-order decay, which allows the use of standard matrix diagonalization methods for the determination of the rate coefficients for CH3 + CH3. The ME model utilized inverse Laplace transformation to link the microcanonical rate constants for dissociation of C2H6 to the limiting high pressure rate coefficient for association, k∞(T); it was used to fit the experimental rate coefficients using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to minimize χ(2) calculated from the differences between experimental and calculated rate coefficients. Parameters for both k∞(T) and for energy transfer ⟨ΔE⟩down(T) were varied and optimized in the fitting procedure. A wide range of experimental data were fitted, covering the temperature range 300-2000 K. A high pressure limit of k∞(T) = 5.76 × 10(-11)(T/298 K)(-0.34) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained, which agrees well with the best available theoretical expression.

  18. Acquisition and analysis of throughput rates for an operational department-wide PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Taira, Ricky K.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III; Huang, H. K.

    1992-07-01

    The accurate prediction of image throughput is a critical issue in planning for and acquisition of any successful Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). Bottlenecks or design flaws can render an expensive PACS implementation useless. This manuscript presents a method for accurately predicting and measuring image throughput of a PACS design. To create the simulation model of the planned or implemented PACS, it must first be decomposed into principal tasks. We have decomposed the entire PACS image management chain into eight subsystems. These subsystems include network transfers over three different networks (Ethernet, FDDI and UltraNet) and five software programs and/or queues: (1) transfer of image data from the imaging modality computer to the image acquisition/reformatting computer; (2) reformatting the image data into a standard image format; (3) transferring the image data from the acquisition/reformatting computer to the image archive computer; (4) updating a relational database management system over the network; (5) image processing-- rotation and optimal gray-scale lookup table calculation; (6) request that the image be archived; (7) image transfer from the image archive computer to a designated image display workstation; and (8) update the local database on the image display station, separate the image header from the image data and store the image data on a parallel disk array. Through development of an event logging facility and implementation of a network management package we have acquired throughput data for each subsystem in the PACS chain. In addition, from our PACS relational database management system, we have distilled the traffic generation patterns (temporal, file size and destination) of our imaging modality devices. This data has been input into a simulation modeling package (Block Oriented Network Simulator-- BONeS) to estimate the characteristics of the modeled PACS, e.g., the throughput rates and delay time. This simulation

  19. Impact of Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Screening Trials and Revised PSA Screening Guidelines on Rates of Prostate Biopsy and Postbiopsy Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Boris; Van Houten, Holly K; Herrin, Jeph; Moreira, Daniel M; Kim, Simon P; Shah, Nilay D; Karnes, R Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and postbiopsy complications represent important risks of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening. Although landmark randomized trials and updated guidelines have challenged routine PSA screening, it is unclear whether these publications have affected rates of biopsy or postbiopsy complications. To evaluate whether publication of the 2008 and 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations, the 2009 European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, or the 2013 American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines was associated with changes in rates of biopsy or postbiopsy complications, and to identify predictors of postbiopsy complications. This quasiexperimental study used administrative claims of 5279315 commercially insured US men aged ≥40 yr from 2005 to 2014, of whom 104584 underwent biopsy. Publications on PSA screening. Interrupted time-series analysis was used to evaluate the association of publications with rates of biopsy and 30-d complications. Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of complications. From 2005 to 2014, biopsy rates fell 33% from 64.1 to 42.8 per 100000 person-months, with immediate reductions following the 2008 USPSTF recommendations (-10.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], -17.1 to -3.0; pprostate-specific antigen screening; however, the relative morbidity of biopsy continues to increase. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of the Optimized Automation Rate considering Effects of Automation on Human Operators in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Seong, Poong Hyun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Man Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Automation refers to the use of a device or a system to perform a function previously performed by a human operator. It is introduced to reduce the human errors and to enhance the performance in various industrial fields, including the nuclear industry. However, these positive effects are not always achieved in complex systems such as nuclear power plants (NPPs). An excessive introduction of automation can generate new roles for human operators and change activities in unexpected ways. As more automation systems are accepted, the ability of human operators to detect automation failures and resume manual control is diminished. This disadvantage of automation is called the Out-of-the- Loop (OOTL) problem. We should consider the positive and negative effects of automation at the same time to determine the appropriate level of the introduction of automation. Thus, in this paper, we suggest an estimation method to consider the positive and negative effects of automation at the same time to determine the appropriate introduction of automation. This concept is limited in that it does not consider the effects of automation on human operators. Thus, a new estimation method for automation rate was suggested to overcome this problem

  1. Performance of a GM tube based environmental dose rate monitor operating in the Time-To-Count mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zickefoose, J.; Kulkarni, T.; Martinson, T.; Phillips, K.; Voelker, M. [Canberra Industries Inc. (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The events at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in the aftermath of a natural disaster underline the importance of a large array of networked environmental monitors to cover areas around nuclear power plants. These monitors should meet a few basic criteria: have a uniform response over a wide range of gamma energies, have a uniform response over a wide range of incident angles, and have a large dynamic range. Many of these criteria are met if the probe is qualified to the international standard IEC 60532 (Radiation protection instrumentation - Installed dose rate meters, warning assemblies and monitors - X and gamma radiation of energy between 50 keV and 7 MeV), which specifically deals with energy response, angle of incidence, dynamic range, response time, and a number of environmental characteristics. EcoGamma is a dual GM tube environmental gamma radiation monitor designed specifically to meet the requirements of IEC 60532 and operate in the most extreme conditions. EcoGamma utilizes two energy compensated GM tubes operating with a Time-To-Count (TTC) collection algorithm. The TTC algorithm extends the lifetime and range of a GM tube significantly and allows the dual GM tube probe to achieve linearity over approximately 10 decades of gamma dose rate (from the Sv/hr range to 100 Sv/hr). In the TTC mode of operation, the GM tube is not maintained in a biased condition continuously. This is different from a traditional counting system where the GM tube is held at a constant bias continuously and the total number of strikes that the tube registers are counted. The traditional approach allows for good sensitivity, but does not lend itself to a long lifetime of the tube and is susceptible to linearity issues at high count rates. TTC on the other hand only biases the tube for short periods of time and in effect measures the time between events, which is statistically representative of the total strike rate. Since the tube is not continually biased, the life of the tube

  2. Performance of a GM tube based environmental dose rate monitor operating in the Time-To-Count mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zickefoose, J.; Kulkarni, T.; Martinson, T.; Phillips, K.; Voelker, M.

    2015-01-01

    The events at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in the aftermath of a natural disaster underline the importance of a large array of networked environmental monitors to cover areas around nuclear power plants. These monitors should meet a few basic criteria: have a uniform response over a wide range of gamma energies, have a uniform response over a wide range of incident angles, and have a large dynamic range. Many of these criteria are met if the probe is qualified to the international standard IEC 60532 (Radiation protection instrumentation - Installed dose rate meters, warning assemblies and monitors - X and gamma radiation of energy between 50 keV and 7 MeV), which specifically deals with energy response, angle of incidence, dynamic range, response time, and a number of environmental characteristics. EcoGamma is a dual GM tube environmental gamma radiation monitor designed specifically to meet the requirements of IEC 60532 and operate in the most extreme conditions. EcoGamma utilizes two energy compensated GM tubes operating with a Time-To-Count (TTC) collection algorithm. The TTC algorithm extends the lifetime and range of a GM tube significantly and allows the dual GM tube probe to achieve linearity over approximately 10 decades of gamma dose rate (from the Sv/hr range to 100 Sv/hr). In the TTC mode of operation, the GM tube is not maintained in a biased condition continuously. This is different from a traditional counting system where the GM tube is held at a constant bias continuously and the total number of strikes that the tube registers are counted. The traditional approach allows for good sensitivity, but does not lend itself to a long lifetime of the tube and is susceptible to linearity issues at high count rates. TTC on the other hand only biases the tube for short periods of time and in effect measures the time between events, which is statistically representative of the total strike rate. Since the tube is not continually biased, the life of the tube

  3. Conversion total hip arthroplasty: Primary or revision total hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Baghoolizadeh, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an increasingly common procedure among elderly individuals. Although conversion THA is currently bundled in a diagnosis related group (DRG) with primary THA, there is a lack of literature supporting this classification and it has yet to be identified whether conversion THA better resembles primary or revision THA. This editorial analyzed the intraoperative and postoperative factors and functional outcomes following conversion THA, primary THA, and revision THA to understand whether the characteristics of conversion THA resemble one procedure or the other, or are possibly somewhere in between. The analysis revealed that conversion THA requires more resources both intraoperatively and postoperatively than primary THA. Furthermore, patients undergoing conversion THA present with poorer functional outcomes in the long run. Patients undergoing conversion THA better resemble revision THA patients than primary THA patients. As such, patients undergoing conversion THA should not be likened to patients undergoing primary THA when determining risk stratification and reimbursement rates. Conversion THA procedures should be planned accordingly with proper anticipation of the greater needs both in the operating room, and for in-patient and follow-up care. We suggest that conversion THA be reclassified in the same DRG with revision THA as opposed to primary THA as a step towards better allocation of healthcare resources for conversion hip arthroplasties. PMID:26601055

  4. Does formal education and training of staff reduce the operation rate for fractures of the distal radius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle; Murphy, Lynn; Gallagher, Brendan; Eames, Niall

    2013-12-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are one of the most common extremity fractures, and operation rates are increasing. Staff within our unit felt that formal teaching, particularly of new medical staff, with regards to fracture reduction and appropriate cast application could result in a reduction in operation rates. Retrospective data was extracted from FORD (Fracture Outcome and Research Database), including: number of fractures, number of fractures undergoing ORIF, fracture configuration, patient demographics, and mechanism of injury. All patients undergoing ORIF had their radiographs assessed by two separate reviewers. Information regarding adequate fracture reduction, adequate cast application (using Gap Index), and appropriate plaster cast moulding was recorded. Formal teaching was then given to the next group of medical staff rotating through the unit, and the same data was collected prospectively for that six-month period. Exclusion criteria included bilateral injuries, and polytrauma patients. A total of 1623 distal radial fractures were treated in our unit over the 12-month period, with 71 undergoing ORIF in the first 6 months and 39 in the second 6 months, this was statistically significant (p = 0.0009). Our study found that formal teaching and education significantly reduced the operation rate for distal radial fractures. This effect was most significant for extra-articular, dorsally angulated fractures of the distal radius. Our study proves that just 1 h of basic training at the beginning of an attachment can have significant benefits to both the unit and, more importantly, the patients. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Loosening After Acetabular Revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Weiss, Stefan; Klotz, Matthias C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The best method of revision acetabular arthroplasty remains unclear. Consequently, we reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision acetabular arthroplasty using revision rings (1541 cases; mean follow-up (FU) 5.7 years) and Trabecular Metal, or TM, implants (1959 cases; mean FU 3.7 years...

  6. High rate lithium-thionyl chloride battery development for undersea weapon propulsion applications. Revised. Final report 1 Sep 77-30 Jun 78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, W.C.; Walk, C.R.

    1978-08-23

    This report describes the experimental results obtained in the development of a high rate lithium, thionyl chloride battery system. Initially, cell optimization studies were conducted with so-called neutral electrolyte, i.e., thionyl chloride containing equimolar quantities of LiCl and AlCl/sup 3/. This report is divided into four sections, Section I - Cell Performance in Neutral Electrolyte, Section II - Cell Performance in Acid Electrolyte, Section III - Discussions of Battery Characteristics and Section IV - Active Battery Considerations.

  7. Operational specification and forecasting advances for Dst, LEO thermospheric densities, and aviation radiation dose and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the magnetosphere, thermosphere, and even troposphere are key regions that are affected. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed and is producing innovative space weather applications. Key operational systems for providing timely information about the effects of space weather on these domains are SET’s Magnetosphere Alert and Prediction System (MAPS), LEO Alert and Prediction System (LAPS), and Automated Radiation Measurements for Aviation Safety (ARMAS) system. MAPS provides a forecast Dst index out to 6 days through the data-driven, redundant data stream Anemomilos algorithm. Anemomilos uses observational proxies for the magnitude, location, and velocity of solar ejecta events. This forecast index is used by satellite operations to characterize upcoming geomagnetic storms, for example. In addition, an ENLIL/Rice Dst prediction out to several days has also been developed and will be described. LAPS is the SET fully redundant operational system providing recent history, current epoch, and forecast solar and geomagnetic indices for use in operational versions of the JB2008 thermospheric density model. The thermospheric densities produced by that system, driven by the LAPS data, are forecast to 72-hours to provide the global mass densities for satellite operators. ARMAS is a project that has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on aircraft to capture the real-time radiation environment due to Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The dose and dose-rates are captured on aircraft, downlinked in real-time via the Iridium satellites, processed on the ground, incorporated into the most recent NAIRAS global radiation climatology data runs, and made available to end users via the web and

  8. Real-world fuel use and gaseous emission rates for flex fuel vehicles operated on E85 versus gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavarrafiee, Maryam; Frey, H Christopher

    2018-03-01

    Flex fuel vehicles (FFVs) typically operate on gasoline or E85, an 85%/15% volume blend of ethanol and gasoline. Differences in FFV fuel use and tailpipe emission rates are quantified for E85 versus gasoline based on real-world measurements of five FFVs with a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS), supplemented chassis dynamometer data, and estimates from the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model. Because of inter-vehicle variability, an individual FFV may have higher nitrogen oxide (NO x ) or carbon monoxide (CO) emission rates on E85 versus gasoline, even though average rates are lower. Based on PEMS data, the comparison of tailpipe emission rates for E85 versus gasoline is sensitive to vehicle-specific power (VSP). For example, although CO emission rates are lower for all VSP modes, they are proportionally lowest at higher VSP. Driving cycles with high power demand are more advantageous with respect to CO emissions, but less advantageous for NO x . Chassis dynamometer data are available for 121 FFVs at 50,000 useful life miles. Based on the dynamometer data, the average difference in tailpipe emissions for E85 versus gasoline is -23% for NO x , -30% for CO, and no significant difference for hydrocarbons (HC). To account for both the fuel cycle and tailpipe emissions from the vehicle, a life cycle inventory was conducted. Although tailpipe NO x emissions are lower for E85 versus gasoline for FFVs and thus benefit areas where the vehicles operate, the life cycle NO x emissions are higher because the NO x emissions generated during fuel production are higher. The fuel production emissions take place typically in rural areas. Although there are not significant differences in the total HC emissions, there are differences in HC speciation. The net effect of lower tailpipe NO x emissions and differences in HC speciation on ozone formation should be further evaluated. Reported comparisons of flex fuel vehicle (FFV) tailpipe emission rates for E85 versus

  9. Predictive analysis of the radiation exposure for the primary cooling system of the rated power operation of MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Miyahara, Shinya; Hasegawa, Masanori; Maegawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive corrosion products (CP) are main source of personal radiation exposure during maintenance without fuel-failure accident in the Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) plants. In order to establish the techniques of radiation dose estimation for personnel, program system 'DORE' has been developed. The DORE system is constructed by PSYCHE code and QAD code system. The density of each deposited CP of primary coolant system in MONJU was estimated by using the PSYCHE. Moreover, the QAD-CGGP2R code is applied to dose rate calculations for the primary coolant system in MONJU. The dose rate around primary piping system was visualized using AVS software. The predicted values were estimated to be saturated at 2-3 mSv/h in twenty years after the start of operation, and the dose rate reaches 4 mSv/h in domains near the IHX and the cold-leg piping. It has been assumed that the main radiation source is 54 Mn in the IHX, primary pump and cold-leg piping region. On the other hand, it was indicated that the contribution to dose rate of the 60 Co accounted for approximately 23% in the hot-leg piping region. (author)

  10. International Analysis of Age-Specific Mortality Rates From Mesothelioma on the Basis of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Boffetta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Past analyses of mortality data from mesothelioma relied on unspecific codes, such as pleural neoplasms. We calculated temporal trends in age-specific mortality rates in Canada, the United States, Japan, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, the United Kingdom, and Australia on the basis of the 10th version of the International Classification of Diseases, which includes a specific code for mesothelioma. Older age groups showed an increase (in the United States, a weaker decrease during the study period, whereas in young age groups, there was a decrease (in Poland, a weaker increase, starting, however, from low rates. Results were consistent between men and women and between pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma, although a smaller number of events in women and for peritoneal mesothelioma resulted in less precise results. The results show the heterogeneous effect of the reduction of asbestos exposure on different age groups; decreasing mortality in young people reflects reduced exposure opportunity, and increasing mortality in the elderly shows the long-term effect of early exposures.

  11. Revision of the design model for a cryogenic falling liquid film helium separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Bartlit, J.R.; Sherman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    The present paper reports revision of the design model previously developed by the authors for the cryogenic falling liquid film helium separator. The revised design procedure is composed of three steps : 1) calculation of distributions of phase flow rates, temperature and phase compositions within the refrigerated section and the packed section ; 2) calculation of more detailed distributions of these variables within the refrigerated section ; and 3) estimation of column dimensions and determination of operating conditions. It is assumed that the vacant refrigerated section has two theoretical stages for hydrogen isotope separation. The mixture within the refrigerated section is considered in step 2) as two component system of He-HD. (author)

  12. Safety assessment for the proposed pilot-scale treatability tests for the 200-UP-1 and 200-ZP-1 groundwater operable units. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This safety assessment provides an analysis of the proposed pilot-scale treatability test activities to be and conducted within the 200 Area groundwater operable units on the Hanford Site. The 200-UP-1 and 200-ZP-1 operable units are located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. These tests will evaluate an ion exchange (IX) water purification treatment system and granular activated carbon (GAC). A detailed engineering analysis of (GAC) adsorption for remediation of groundwater contamination. A detailed engineering analysis of the IX treatment system. The principal source of information for this assessment, states that the performance objective of the treatment systems is to remove 90% of the uranium and technetium-99 ( 99 Tc) from the extracted groundwater at the 200-UP-1 site. The performance objective for 200-ZP-1 is to remove 90% of the carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), chloroform, and trichloroethylene (TCE) from the extracted groundwater

  13. American National Standard administrative controls and quality assurance for the operational phase of nuclear power plants, revision of N18.7-1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard provides requirements and recommendations for an administrative controls and quality assurance program necessary to provide assurance that operational phase activities at nuclear power plants are carried out without undue risk to the health and safety of the public. The requirements of this Standard apply to all activities affecting the safety-related functions of nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components. It is not intended to apply to test mobile and experimental reactors nor reactors not subject to U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing. However, applicable sections of this Standard should be used as they apply to related activities. Activities included are: design changes, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, inspecting, testing, operating, maintaining, repairing, refueling and modifying

  14. Revising the security organisation at Forsmark NPP - A case study from the point of view of the operator and the regulatory and supervisory authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeden, B.; Strandberg, L.; Isaksson, S.

    2001-01-01

    Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant consists of three reactor-units. Each unit has separate shift crews and separate control rooms for operation of the plant. During 1996, Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB (FKA) decided to change the organisation of Security at the site in Forsmark, Sweden. Reasons for changing the Organisation Experiences pointed out that it was necessary to have a Security supervisor present at site 24 hours per day. Experiences were basically gained from occasions when malfunctions in the technical security systems occurred. Another experience was that the procedures describing counter measures to different malfunctions in the technical security systems, did not meet the same high requirements, that would be expected in comparison with the Standard Operational and Emergency Operational Procedures, which are used for operation of the Nuclear Power Plant. It was decided to integrate the Security guards in the shift crew, one guard for each reactor unit and shift. Some of the regular Field Operators in the shift-crews for operating the plant were educated to competent Security Guards. The Shift Supervisor on each reactor unit became in charge for one Security Guard. One of the units also became in charge of the Security Central and the Security Guard operating the technical security systems. During incidents the supervisor from the fire brigade takes the responsibility for the security. He also has additionally two Security Guards at disposal from the fire brigade. In case of a major incident, this arrangement let the Shift Supervisors proceed taking the necessary counter measures concerning the process in the power plant. The attitude to new duties among the regular Field Operators educated to Security Guards were not positive, this problem affected also the attitude among the Shift supervisors. It was difficult to bring the different reactor units to work in the same direction and at the same time, generally speaking. The procedures and standards at each unit

  15. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  16. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA ampersand Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects ampersand Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC's scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule

  17. Revised version of quality guidelines for presurgical epilepsy evaluation and surgical epilepsy therapy issued by the Austrian, German, and Swiss working group on presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Felix; Bast, Thomas; Czech, Thomas; Feucht, Martha; Hans, Volkmar H; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Noachtar, Soheyl; Oltmanns, Frank; Polster, Tilman; Seeck, Margitta; Trinka, Eugen; Wagner, Kathrin; Strzelczyk, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The definition of minimal standards remains pivotal as a basis for a high standard of care and as a basis for staff allocation or reimbursement. Only limited publications are available regarding the required staffing or methodologic expertise in epilepsy centers. The executive board of the working group (WG) on presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy treatment published the first guidelines in 2000 for Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. In 2014, revised guidelines were published and the WG decided to publish an unaltered English translation in this report. Because epilepsy surgery is an elective procedure, quality standards are particularly high. As detailed in the first edition of these guidelines, quality control relates to seven different domains: (1) establishing centers with a sufficient number of sufficiently and specifically trained personnel, (2) minimum technical standards and equipment, (3) continuous medical education of employees, (4) surveillance by trained personnel during video electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring (VEM), (5) systematic acquisition of clinical and outcome data, (6) the minimum number of preoperative evaluations and epilepsy surgery procedures, and (7) the cooperation of epilepsy centers. These standards required the certification of the different professions involved and minimum numbers of procedures. In the subsequent decade, quite a number of colleagues were certified by the trinational WG; therefore, the executive board of the WG decided in 2013 to make these standards obligatory. This revised version is particularly relevant given that the German procedure classification explicitly refers to the guidelines of the WG with regard to noninvasive/invasive preoperative video-EEG monitoring and invasive intraoperative diagnostics in epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Successful operation of continuous reactors at short retention times results in high-density, fast-rate Dehalococcoides dechlorinating cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Anca G; Fajardo-Williams, Devyn; Popat, Sudeep C; Torres, César I; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of Dehalococcoides mccartyi reducing perchloroethene and trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene was a key landmark for bioremediation applications at contaminated sites. D. mccartyi-containing cultures are typically grown in batch-fed reactors. On the other hand, continuous cultivation of these microorganisms has been described only at long hydraulic retention times (HRTs). We report the cultivation of a representative D. mccartyi-containing culture in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) at a short, 3-d HRT, using TCE as the electron acceptor. We successfully operated 3-d HRT CSTRs for up to 120 days and observed sustained dechlorination of TCE at influent concentrations of 1 and 2 mM TCE to ≥ 97 % ethene, coupled to the production of 10(12) D. mccartyi cells Lculture (-1). These outcomes were possible in part by using a medium with low bicarbonate concentrations (5 mM) to minimize the excessive proliferation of microorganisms that use bicarbonate as an electron acceptor and compete with D. mccartyi for H2. The maximum conversion rates for the CSTR-produced culture were 0.13 ± 0.016, 0.06 ± 0.018, and 0.02 ± 0.007 mmol Cl(-) Lculture (-1) h(-1), respectively, for TCE, cis-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride. The CSTR operation described here provides the fastest laboratory cultivation rate of high-cell density Dehalococcoides cultures reported in the literature to date. This cultivation method provides a fundamental scientific platform for potential future operations of such a system at larger scales.

  19. Pulsed-dose-rate peri-operative brachytherapy as an interstitial boost in organ-sparing treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Serkies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate peri-operative multicatheter interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT with an intra-operative catheter placement to boost the tumor excision site in breast cancer patients treated conservatively. Material and methods: Between May 2002 and October 2008, 96 consecutive T1-3N0-2M0 breast cancer patients underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT including peri-operative PDR-BT boost, followed by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. The BT dose of 15 Gy (1 Gy/pulse/h was given on the following day after surgery. Results: No increased bleeding or delayed wound healing related to the implants were observed. The only side effects included one case of temporary peri-operative breast infection and 3 cases of fat necrosis, both early and late. In 11 patients (11.4%, subsequent WBRT was omitted owing to the final pathology findings. These included eight patients who underwent mastectomy due to multiple adverse prognostic pathological features, one case of lobular carcinoma in situ, and two cases with no malignant tumor. With a median follow-up of 12 years (range: 7-14 years, among 85 patients who completed BCT, there was one ipsilateral breast tumor and one locoregional nodal recurrence. Six patients developed distant metastases and one was diagnosed with angiosarcoma within irradiated breast. The actuarial 5- and 10-year disease free survival was 90% (95% CI: 84-96% and 87% (95% CI: 80-94%, respectively, for the patients with invasive breast cancer, and 91% (95% CI: 84-97% and 89% (95% CI: 82-96%, respectively, for patients who completed BCT. Good cosmetic outcome by self-assessment was achieved in 58 out of 64 (91% evaluable patients. Conclusions : Peri-operative PDR-BT boost with intra-operative tube placement followed by EBRT is feasible and devoid of considerable toxicity, and provides excellent long-term local control. However, this strategy necessitates careful patient selection and histological confirmation

  20. The nuclear liability conventions revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    2004-01-01

    The signature on 12 February 2004 of the Protocols amending respectively the 1960 Paris Convention and the 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention was the second step of the process of modernisation of the international nuclear liability regime after the adoption in September 1997 of a Protocol revising the 1963 Vienna Convention and of a new Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage. The common objective of the new instruments is to provide more funds to compensate a larger number of potential victims in respect of a broader range of damage. Another goal of the revision exercise was to maintain the compatibility between the Paris and Vienna based systems, a commitment enshrined in the 1988 Joint Protocol, as well as to ascertain that Paris/Brussels countries could also become a Party to the Convention on Supplementary Compensation. However, while generally consistent vis a vis the Joint Protocol, the provisions of the Paris and Vienna Conventions, as revised, differ on some significant aspects. Another remaining issue is whether the improved international nuclear liability regime will succeed in attracting in the future a larger number of countries, particularly outside Europe, and will so become truly universal. Therefore, the need for international co-operation to address these issues, to facilitate the adoption of new implementing legislation and to ensure that this special regime keeps abreast of economic and technological developments, is in no way diminished after the revision of the Conventions.(author)

  1. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations. Building 221-H, B-Line, Scrap Recovery Facility (Supplement 2A): Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-07-01

    The now HB-Line is located an top of the 221-H Building on the fifth and sixth levels and is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The new HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, Neptunium Facility, and Plutonium Oxide Facility. The Scrap Recovery Facility is designed to routinely generate nitrate solutions of {sup 235}U{sup 239}Pu and Pu-238 fromscrap for purification by anion exchange or by solvent extraction in the canyon. The now facility incorporates improvements in: (1) engineered controls for nuclear criticality, (2) cabinet integrity and engineered barriers to contain contamination and minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

  2. Does different duration of non-operative immobilization have an effect on the redislocation rate of primary patellar dislocation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaewkongnok, Bo; Bøvling, Anders; Milandt, Nikolaj

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immobilization devices such as plaster splints, casts and braces have been used for first time patellar dislocation (FTPD) in order to prevent redislocation. This study evaluates different non-operative immobilization regimes upon rates of redislocation. METHODS: A retrospective cohort...... study with a study population of 1366 in which 601 subjects under 30years with FTPD were included from three hospitals. Exclusion criteria were osteochondral fracture, ligament injury and subluxation. Subjects were divided into five groups; unknown/none, two weeks of brace, two weeks of brace followed...... by bandage, four weeks of brace and six weeks of brace with increasing of range of motion. Radiographs were evaluated for trochlear dysplasia (TD), patella alta, trochlear depth and growth zone. Crude analysis and logistic regression adjusted for radiographic assessments, age, gender and rehabilitation...

  3. Study of optimal operation management by a monitoring system for corrosion and heat-transfer rate of condensate pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Katsmi; Kominami, Hirohiko; Atsumi, Tetsuro; Nagata, Koji (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Sumitomo Light Metal Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-09-26

    In order to optimize the anticorrosion and antifouling management of aluminum brass condensate pipes, the monitoring system was developed, which could control a corrosion resistance and heat transfer rate during operation. Since a polarization resistance could be used as an index for anticorrosion control, while a heat transmission coefficient or cleanliness factor for heat transfer control, a polarization resistance meter and fouling meter were made as prototype detectors. Fundamental test of a model condenser (simulated by-pass pipe) was performed using a processing system combined with the meters, and monitored data and analytical data of the test were arranged. System performance was ascertained to be preferable by the verification test on a real condenser, however, more compact system was required for practical use because of restriction in by-pass pipe installation. In addition to the monitoring function, a control function for sponge ball cleaning and iron ion injection was also added to keep the specified index value. 13 figs,. 1 tab.

  4. Heart rate variability at limiting stationarity: evidence of neuro-cardiac control mechanisms operating at ultra-low frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A C; Groves, D; Eleuteri, A; Mesum, P; Patterson, D; Taggart, P

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the linkage of exogenously stimulated emotional stress with the neurogenic regulation of heart rate operating at very low frequencies. The objectives were three-fold: to consider the present evidence that such a linkage exists as a primary phenomenon; to compare the potential of a frequency-domain method and a time-domain method in revealing this phenomenon by characterizing heart rate variability (HRV) at frequencies of [0.0005…0.4] Hz and to design, implement and report a physiological experiment in which alternating periods of exposure to bland and high valence visual stimuli might reveal this phenomenon. A methodical challenge was to optimize the length of exposure to the stimulus such that subjects did not have time to habituate to stimuli, whilst acquiring sufficient data (heart beats) such that the ultra-low frequency (ULF) components of HRV could be described. With exposure times set to approximately 5 min, during which time the strength of the stimulus and the corresponding evoked response were considered stationary, the lowest HRV frequency component that could be characterized was 0.003 Hz. In trials with parametrically defined test data, the time-domain method based on the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck Gaussian process (OU-GP) was shown to be better than the frequency-domain method in describing the ULF components of the HRV. In an experimental cohort of 16 subjects, analysis using the OU-GP revealed evidence of cardiac regulatory mechanisms influenced by emotional valence operating in the bandwidth (ULF*) [0.002…0.01] Hz. (paper)

  5. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide...... basis. Patients and methods - 105 partial revisions (100 patients) and 215 potential 2-stage revision procedures (205 patients) performed due to infection from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 were identified from the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register (DKR). Failure was defined as surgically related death...

  6. Incremental artificial bee colony with local search to economic dispatch problem with ramp rate limits and prohibited operating zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özyön, Serdar; Aydin, Doğan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Prohibited operating zone economic dispatch problem has been solved by IABC-LS. ► The losses used in the solution of the problem have been computed by B-loss matrix. ► IABC-LS method has been applied to three test systems in literature. ► The values obtained by IABC and IABC-LS are better than the results in literature. - Abstract: In this study, prohibited operating zone economic power dispatch problem which considers ramp rate limit, has been solved by incremental artificial bee colony algorithm (IABC) and incremental artificial bee colony algorithm with local search (IABC-LS) methods. The transmission line losses used in the solution of the problem have been computed by B-loss matrix. IABC, IABC-LS methods have been applied to three different test systems in literature which consist of 6, 15 and 40 generators. The attained optimum solution values have been compared with the optimum results in literature and have been discussed.

  7. Bringing High-Rate, CO2-Based Microbial Electrosynthesis Closer to Practical Implementation through Improved Electrode Design and Operating Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdin, Ludovic; Freguia, Stefano; Flexer, Victoria; Keller, Jurg

    2016-02-16

    The enhancement of microbial electrosynthesis (MES) of acetate from CO2 to performance levels that could potentially support practical implementations of the technology must go through the optimization of key design and operating conditions. We report that higher proton availability drastically increases the acetate production rate, with pH 5.2 found to be optimal, which will likely suppress methanogenic activity without inhibitor addition. Applied cathode potential as low as -1.1 V versus SHE still achieved 99% of electron recovery in the form of acetate at a current density of around -200 A m(-2). These current densities are leading to an exceptional acetate production rate of up to 1330 g m(-2) day(-1) at pH 6.7. Using highly open macroporous reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes with macropore sizes of about 0.6 mm in diameter was found to be optimal for achieving a good balance between total surface area available for biofilm formation and effective mass transfer between the bulk liquid and the electrode and biofilm surface. Furthermore, we also successfully demonstrated the use of a synthetic biogas mixture as carbon dioxide source, yielding similarly high MES performance as pure CO2. This would allow this process to be used effectively for both biogas quality improvement and conversion of the available CO2 to acetate.

  8. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C

  9. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  10. Descriptor revision belief change through direct choice

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical examination of how the choice of what to believe is represented in the standard model of belief change. In particular the use of possible worlds and infinite remainders as objects of choice is critically examined. Descriptors are introduced as a versatile tool for expressing the success conditions of belief change, addressing both local and global descriptor revision. The book presents dynamic descriptors such as Ramsey descriptors that convey how an agent’s beliefs tend to be changed in response to different inputs. It also explores sentential revision and demonstrates how local and global operations of revision by a sentence can be derived as a special case of descriptor revision. Lastly, the book examines revocation, a generalization of contraction in which a specified sentence is removed in a process that may possibly also involve the addition of some new information to the belief set.

  11. Bibliocable. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    This selective, annotated bibliography is a revision of the original published in 1972 (ED 071 402). Some 104 books, articles, and reports included here deal with access, applications, franchising, regulation, technology, and other aspects of cable television. The listings are of two types in each category. First are revisions of the original…

  12. Single-stage revision for fungal peri-prosthetic joint infection: a single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, T O; Kendoff, D; Kamath, A F; Jonen, V; Rueger, J M; Frommelt, L; Gebauer, M; Gehrke, T

    2014-04-01

    Fungal peri-prosthetic infections of the knee and hip are rare but likely to result in devastating complications. In this study we evaluated the results of their management using a single-stage exchange technique. Between 2001 and 2011, 14 patients (ten hips, four knees) were treated for a peri-prosthetic fungal infection. One patient was excluded because revision surgery was not possible owing to a large acetabular defect. One patient developed a further infection two months post-operatively and was excluded from the analysis. Two patients died of unrelated causes. After a mean of seven years (3 to 11) a total of ten patients were available for follow-up. One patient, undergoing revision replacement of the hip, had a post-operative dislocation. Another patient, undergoing revision replacement of the knee, developed a wound infection and required revision 29 months post-operatively following a peri-prosthetic femoral fracture. The mean Harris hip score increased to 74 points (63 to 84; p prosthetic infection is feasible, with an acceptable rate of a satisfactory outcome.

  13. Pyrosequencing as a tool for the detection of Phytophthora species: error rate and risk of false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettraino, A M; Bonants, P; Tomassini, A; Bruni, N; Vannini, A

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of pyrosequencing for the description of Phytophthora communities in terms of taxa identification and risk of assignment for false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs). Pyrosequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons was used to describe the structure of a DNA mixture comprising eight Phytophthora spp. and Pythium vexans. Pyrosequencing resulted in 16 965 reads, detecting all species in the template DNA mixture. Reducing the ITS1 sequence identity threshold resulted in a decrease in numbers of unmatched reads but a concomitant increase in the numbers of false MOTUs. The total error rate was 0·63% and comprised mainly mismatches (0·25%) Pyrosequencing of ITS1 region is an efficient and accurate technique for the detection and identification of Phytophthora spp. in environmental samples. However, the risk of allocating false MOTUs, even when demonstrated to be low, may require additional validation with alternative detection methods. Phytophthora spp. are considered among the most destructive groups of invasive plant pathogens, affecting thousands of cultivated and wild plants worldwide. Simultaneous early detection of Phytophthora complexes in environmental samples offers an unique opportunity for the interception of known and unknown species along pathways of introduction, along with the identification of these organisms in invaded environments. © 2012 The Authors Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Perceptual accent rating and attribution in psychogenic FAS: some further evidence challenging Whitaker’s operational definition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eKeulen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old, non-aphasic, right-handed, and polyglot (L1: French, L2: Dutch, L3: English woman with a 12 year history of addiction to opiates and psychoactive substances, and clear psychiatric problems, presented with a foreign accent of sudden onset in L1. Speech evolved towards a mostly fluent output, despite a stutter-like behavior and a marked grammatical output disorder. The psychogenic etiology of the accent foreignness was construed based upon the patient’s complex medical history, and psychodiagnostic, neuropsychological, and neurolinguistic assessments. The presence of a foreign accent was affirmed by a perceptual accent rating and attribution experiment. It is argued that this patient provides additional evidence demonstrating the outdatedness of Whitaker’s (1982 definition of Foreign Accent Syndrome, as only one of the four operational criteria was unequivocally applicable to our patient: her accent foreignness was not only recognized by her relatives and the medical staff, but also by a group of native French-speaking laymen. However, our patient defied the three remaining criteria, as central nervous system damage could not conclusively be demonstrated, psychodiagnostic assessment raised the hypothesis of a conversion disorder, and the patient was a polyglot whose newly gained accent was associated with a range of foreign languages, which exceeded the ones she spoke.

  15. Fatigue failure of the cephalomedullary nail: revision options, outcomes and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Adam; Warnock, Michael; McDonald, Sinead; Cusick, Laurence; Foster, Andrew P

    2018-04-01

    Cephalomedullary nail (CMN) failure is a rare entity following hip fracture treatment. However, it poses significant challenges for revision surgery, both mechanically and biologically. Nail failure rates have been reported at failure, compared to "adequate" and "good" (p = 0.027). Tip-Apex Distance (TAD) mean was 23.2 ± 8.3 mm, and an adequate TAD with three-point fixation was seen in only 35% of cases. Mean time to failure was 401.0 ± 237.2 days, with mean age at failure of 74.0 ± 14.8 years. Options after failure included revision CMN nail, proximal femoral locking plate (PFLP), long-stem or restoration arthroplasty, or femoral endoprosthesis. Barthel Functional Index scores showed no significant difference at 3 and 12 months post-operatively, nor any difference between treatment groups. Mean 12-month mortality was 30%, akin to a primary hip fracture mortality risk according to NICE guidelines. Mortality rates were lowest in revision nails. Subsequent revision rates were higher in the PFLP group. There is no reported evidence on the best surgical technique for managing the failed CMN, with no clear functional benefit in the options above. Good surgical technique at the time of primary CMN surgery is critical in minimising fatigue failure. After revision, overall mortality rates were equivalent to reported primary hip fracture mortality rates. Further multicentre evaluations are required to assess which technique convey the best functional outcomes without compromising 12-month mortality rates.

  16. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  17. 25 CFR 171.500 - How does BIA determine the annual operation and maintenance assessment rate for the irrigation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... costs needed for the reliable operation of the irrigation facility infrastructure; (8) Maintenance of a... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does BIA determine the annual operation and... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND...

  18. Biomedical waste management operating plan. Revision C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1996-02-14

    Recent national incidents involving medical and/or infectious wastes indicated the need for tighter control of medical wastes. Within the last five years, improper management of medical waste resulted in the spread of disease, reuse of needles by drug addicts, and the closing of large sections of public beaches due to medical waste that washed ashore from ocean disposal. Several regulations, both at the federal and state level, govern management (i.e., handling, storage, transport, treatment, and disposal) of solid or liquid waste which may present a threat of infection to humans. This waste, called infectious, biomedical, biohazardous, or biological waste, generally includes non-liquid human tissue and body parts; laboratory waste which contains human disease-causing agents; discarded sharps; human blood, blood products, and other body fluids. The information that follows outlines and summarizes the general requirements of each standard or rule applicable to biohazardous waste management. In addition, it informs employees of risks associated with biohazardous waste management.

  19. Optimization of automation: II. Estimation method of ostracism rate based on the loss of situation awareness of human operators in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Man Cheol; Kim, Jong Hyun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyze the relationship between Out-of-the-Loop and the loss of human operators’ situation awareness. • We propose an ostracism rate estimation method by only considering the negative effects of automation. • The ostracism rate reflects how much automation interrupts human operators to receive information. • The higher the ostracism rate is, the lower the accuracy of human operators’ SA will be. - Abstract: With the introduction of automation in various industries including the nuclear field, its side effect, referred to as the Out-of-the-Loop (OOTL) problem, has emerged as a critical issue that needs to be addressed. Many studies have been attempted to analyze and solve the OOTL problem, but this issue still needs a clear solution to provide criteria for introducing automation. Therefore, a quantitative estimation method for identifying negative effects of automation is proposed in this paper. The representative aspect of the OOTL problem in nuclear power plants (NPPs) is that human operators in automated operations are given less information than human operators in manual operations. In other words, human operators have less opportunity to obtain needed information as automation is introduced. From this point of view, the degree of difficulty in obtaining information from automated systems is defined as the Level of Ostracism (LOO). Using the LOO and information theory, we propose the ostracism rate, which is a new estimation method that expresses how much automation interrupts human operators’ situation awareness. We applied production rules to describe the human operators’ thinking processes, Bayesian inference to describe the production rules mathematically, and information theory to calculate the amount of information that human operators receive through observations. The validity of the suggested method was proven by conducting an experiment. The results show that the ostracism rate was significantly related to the accuracy

  20. Revision of migrated pelvic acetabular components in THA with or without vascular involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan Cristea

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The literature describes a high rate of mortality in cases of intrapelvic acetabular component migration, which is a rare but serious complication. Our aim is to establish and propose a treatment protocol according to our results and experience. Material and Methods. We performed eight (8 total hip revisions with acetabular cup migration between 2006 and 2012. A vascular graft was needed in four (4 of these cases. Two (2 cases were revisions after a spacer for infected arthroplasties. The protocol included the following: X-Ray examination (frontal and lateral views, CT angiography, a biological evaluation, a suitable pre-operative plan, at least six (6 units of blood stock, an experienced anesthesiologist, an experienced surgical team that included a vascular surgeon and a versatile arsenal of revision prostheses, bone grafts and vascular grafts. The anterolateral approach was generally used for hip revisions and the retroperitoneal approach in the dorsal decubitus position was used when vascular risk was involved. Results: The acetabular defect was reconstructed using bone grafts and tantalum revision cups in 4 cases, Burch-Schneider cages in 2 cases, a Kerboull ring in 1 case and a cementless oblong cup (Cotyle Espace in 1 case. In 4 cases, an iliac vessel graft procedure was conducted by the vascular surgeon. All patients survived the revision procedures and returned regularly for subsequent check-ups, during which they did not show any septic complications. Conclusions: Intrapelvic acetabular cup migration is a rare but serious complication that can occur after total hip arthroplasty in either septic or aseptic cases. An experienced, multidisciplinary team of surgeons should be involved in planning and conducting such complicated revisions.

  1. Developing a virtual reality application for training Nuclear Power Plant operators: Setting up a database containing dose rates in the refuelling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Zarza, I.; Burgos, M. C.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    Operators in Nuclear Power Plants can receive high doses during refuelling operations. A training programme for simulating refuelling operations will be useful in reducing the doses received by workers as well as minimising operation time. With this goal in mind, a virtual reality application is developed within the framework of the CIPRES project. The application requires doses, both instantaneous and accumulated, to be displayed at all times during operator training. Therefore, it is necessary to set up a database containing dose rates at every point in the refuelling plant. This database is based on radiological protection surveillance data measured in the plant during refuelling operations. Some interpolation routines have been used to estimate doses through the refuelling plant. Different assumptions have been adopted in order to perform the interpolation and obtain consistent data. In this paper, the procedures developed to set up the dose database for the virtual reality application are presented and analysed. (authors)

  2. Publishing and Revising Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editors and Webmasters can publish content without going through a workflow. Publishing times and dates can be set, and multiple pages can be published in bulk. Making an edit to published content created a revision.

  3. Microbiological diagnosis in revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Pitter, Frederik Taylor; Voldstedlund, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    . METHODS: One hundred and two partial revisions (open debridement and exchange of tibial insert) and 213 two-stage procedures performed due to infection in 275 patients from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2013 were included and analysed by linkage to data from a nationwide registry on microbiological test results....... RESULTS: 78 (24.8%) revisions were culture negative, 192 (60.9%) showed monomicrobial growth and 43 (14.3%) polymicrobial growth. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent isolate in mono-culture in 70 (22.2%) revisions and in polymicrobial culture in 15 revisions with a total frequency of 27.0%. Only...... one case (1.4%) of methicillin-resistance was registered. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were frequent, sole pathogen in 65 revisions and in polymicrobial cultures in 28 revisions with a total frequency of 29.5%. A pre-operative knee aspiration was performed in 50% and preoperative blood...

  4. Revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Bin; Yokota, Atsushi; Gill, Harpreet S; El Rassi, George; McFarland, Edward G

    2005-09-01

    With the failure of thermal capsulorrhaphy for shoulder instability, there have been concerns with capsular thinning and capsular necrosis affecting revision surgery. To report the findings at revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy and to evaluate the technical effects on subsequent revision capsular plication. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen patients underwent arthroscopic evaluation and open reconstruction for a failed thermal capsulorrhaphy. The cause of the failure, the quality of the capsule, and the ability to suture the capsule were recorded. The patients were evaluated at follow-up for failure, which was defined as recurrent subluxations or dislocations. The origin of the instability was traumatic (n = 6) or atraumatic (n = 8). At revision surgery in the traumatic group, 4 patients sustained failure of the Bankart repair with capsular laxity, and the others experienced capsular laxity alone. In the atraumatic group, all patients experienced capsular laxity as the cause of failure. Of the 14 patients, the capsule quality was judged to be thin in 5 patients and ablated in 1 patient. A glenoid-based capsular shift could be accomplished in all 14 patients. At follow-up (mean, 35.4 months; range, 22 to 48 months), 1 patient underwent revision surgery and 1 patient had a subluxation, resulting in a failure rate of 14%. Recurrent capsular laxity after failed thermal capsular shrinkage is common and frequently associated with capsular thinning. In most instances, the capsule quality does not appear to technically affect the revision procedure.

  5. 78 FR 59982 - Revisions to Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0268] Revisions to Radiation Protection AGENCY: Nuclear..., ``Radiation Sources,'' Section 12.3 -12.4, ``Radiation Protection Design Features,'' and Section 12.5, ``Operational Radiation Protection Program.'' DATES: The effective date of this Standard Review Plan update is...

  6. Issues in the use of ratings-based versus choice-based conjoint analysis in operations management research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karniouchina, E.; Moore, W.; Rhee, van der B.; Verma, R.

    2009-01-01

    Conjoint analysis has played an important role in helping make a number of operations management decisions including product and service design, supplier selection, and service operations capacity. Many recent advances in this area have raised questions about the most appropriate form of conjoint

  7. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Fast-track surgery has reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), morbidity, and convalescence in primary hip and knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether patients undergoing revision TKA for non-septic indications might also benefit from fast-track surgery....... Methods 29 patients were operated with 30 revision arthroplasties. Median age was 67 (34-84) years. All patients followed a standardized fast-track set-up designed for primary TKA. We determined the outcome regarding LOS, morbidity, mortality, and satisfaction. Results Median LOS was 2 (1-4) days...

  8. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239)

  9. Radiation Hardened High Speed Integrated Circuits Double Data Rate I/O for Extreme Operating Environments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Manned and robotic space missions require high-performance electronic control systems capable of operating for extended periods in harsh environments that are...

  10. Effects of the DRG-based prospective payment system operated by the voluntarily participating providers on the cesarean section rates in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangsoo; Lee, Sangil

    2007-05-01

    This study explored the effects of the diagnosis-related group (DRG)-based prospective payment system (PPS) operated by voluntarily participating organizations on the cesarean section (CS) rates, and analyzed whether the participating health care organizations had similar CS rates despite the varied participation periods. The study sample included delivery claims data from the Korean national health insurance program for the year 2003. Risk factors were identified and used in the adjustment model to distinguish the main reason for CS. Their risk-adjusted CS rates were compared by the reimbursement methods, and the organizations' internal and external environments were controlled. The final risk-adjustment model for the CS rates meets the criteria for an effective model. There were no significant differences of CS rates between providers in the DRG and fee-for-service system after controlling for organizational variables. The CS rates did not vary significantly depending on the providers' DRG participation periods. The results provide evidence that the DRG payment system operated by volunteering health care organizations had no impact on the CS rates, which can lower the quality of care. Although the providers joined the DRG system in different years, there were no differences in the CS rates among the DRG providers. These results support the future expansion of the DRG-based PPS plan to all health care services in Korea.

  11. Acetabular Cup Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The use of acetabular cup revision arthroplasty is on the rise as demands for total hip arthroplasty, improved life expectancies, and the need for individual activity increase. For an acetabular cup revision to be successful, the cup should gain stable fixation within the remaining supportive bone of the acetabulum. Since the patient's remaining supportive acetabular bone stock plays an important role in the success of revision, accurate classification of the degree of acetabular bone defect is necessary. The Paprosky classification system is most commonly used when determining the location and degree of acetabular bone loss. Common treatment options include: acetabular liner exchange, high hip center, oblong cup, trabecular metal cup with augment, bipolar cup, bulk structural graft, cemented cup, uncemented cup including jumbo cup, acetabular reinforcement device (cage), trabecular metal cup cage. The optimal treatment option is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable fixation upon supportive host bone. To achieve successful acetabular cup revision, accurate evaluation of bone defect preoperatively and intraoperatively, proper choice of method of acetabular revision according to the evaluation of acetabular bone deficiency, proper technique to get primary stability of implant such as precise grafting technique, and stable fixation of implant are mandatory.

  12. Heavy metal and waste metabolite accumulation and their affect on rainbow trout performance in a replicated water reuse system operated at low or high system flushing rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    A six-month trial was conducted to compare the effects of high and low make-up water flushing rates on rainbow trout performance and water quality in replicated water reuse aquaculture systems (WRAS). Six identical 9.5 m3 WRAS, containing a single 5.3 m3 tank and operated at a total recirculating fl...

  13. Impact of switched dose-rate irradiation on the response of the LM124 operational amplifier to pulsed X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, N.J.H.; Dusseau, L.; Mekki, J.; Perez, S.; Gonzalez Velo, Y.; Boch, J.; Saigne, F.; Vaille, J.R.; Vaille, J.R.; Marec, R.; Calvel, P.; Bezerra, F.; Auriel, G.; Azais, B.; Buchner, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    The Synergistic effect between TID and ATREEs (Analog Transient Radiation Effects on Electronics) in an operational amplifier (opamp) (LM124) is investigated for three different bias configurations. An accelerated irradiation technique is used to study these synergistic effects. The impact of TID on ATREEs is found to be identical regardless of whether the irradiation is performed at low dose rate or whether the dose rate is switched from high to low using the Dose Rate Switching (DRS) technique. The correlation between the deviations of the opamp's electrical parameters and the changes of ATREE widths is clearly established. (authors)

  14. Comparative economic efficiency, operating costs and fuel consumption rates of freight transport modes between the largest industrial cities and seaports in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W J (Wessel Pienaar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with aspects of efficiency within the five modes of freight transport, with special reference to the operating cost and fuel consumption rates between South Africa’s largest industrial cities and seaports. In particular, the paper deals with (a the opportunities that exist for the achievement of efficiency in freight transport; (b the subgroups of economies that can enhance efficiency attainment in the freight transport industry; (c prevailing cost structures, operating cost and fuel consumption rates within the five modes of freight transport; and (d the salient economic features of the freight transport market. The research approach and methodology combine (a a literature survey; (b empiric research, (c an analysis of the cost structures of freight transport operators from different modes of transport; and (d interviews conducted with specialists in the freight transport industry.

  15. Development of a new energy benchmark for improving the operational rating system of office buildings using various data-mining techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyo Seon; Lee, Minhyun; Kang, Hyuna; Hong, Taehoon; Jeong, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This study developed a new energy benchmark for office buildings. • Correlation analysis, decision tree, and analysis of variance were used. • The data from 1072 office buildings in South Korea were used. • As a result, six types of energy benchmarks for office buildings were developed. • The operational rating system can be improved by using the new energy benchmark. - Abstract: As improving energy efficiency in buildings has become a global issue today, many countries have adopted the operational rating system to evaluate the energy performance of a building based on the actual energy consumption. A rational and reasonable energy benchmark can be used in the operational rating system to evaluate the energy performance of a building accurately and effectively. This study aims to develop a new energy benchmark for improving the operational rating system of office buildings. Toward this end, this study used various data-mining techniques such as correlation analysis, decision tree (DT) analysis, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on data from 1072 office buildings in South Korea, this study was conducted in three steps: (i) Step 1: establishment of the database; (ii) Step 2: development of the new energy benchmark; and (iii) Step 3: application of the new energy benchmark for improving the operational rating system. As a result, six types of energy benchmarks for office buildings were developed using DT analysis based on the gross floor area (GFA) and the building use ratio (BUR) of offices, and these new energy benchmarks were validated using ANOVA. To ensure the effectiveness of the new energy benchmark, it was applied to three operational rating systems for comparison: (i) the baseline system (the same energy benchmark is used for all office buildings); (ii) the conventional system (different energy benchmarks are used depending on the GFA, currently used in South Korea); and (iii) the proposed system (different energy benchmarks are

  16. Study of radiation exposure rate on the measurement points in Kartini reactor hall as based to determine operation safety parameters (KBO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrus Salam; Elisabeth Supriyatni; Fajar Panuntun

    2016-01-01

    In the operation of nuclear facility there are safety parameters, which is the value of the conservatively maximum limit to ensure that all of the uncertainty in the analysis of facility operations safety have been considered, such as uncertainty of measurement, response time and uncertainty calculation tool, and is get a long to others value of normal operating condition limits, in other words, there are still allowed or permitted. Calculation of the radiation exposure rate on five measurement points (50 cm above the water surface of reactor pool, above interim storage (bulk shielding), reactor deck, thermal column and sub critical facility) and to be compared to the operation safety parameters (KBO) of Kartini reactor. The exposure rate value is obtained by calculating the source term of radioactivity on the core, attenuation resulting from the radiation shielding and measurement distance. From the calculation obtained that the value of gamma exposure rate of 50 cm above the water surface of reactor pool is 96.91 mR/hr (KBO<100 mR/hr), on the deck of Bulk Shielding amounted to 1.70 mR/h (KBO<2.5 mR/hr), on the reactor deck amounted to 5.73 mR/hr (KBO<10 mR/hr), on the Thermal Column amounted to 2.73 mR/hr (KBO<10 mR/hr) and on the sub critical facility amounted to 1.148 mR/hr (KBO<2.5 mR/hr). The value of gamma exposure rate at 5 locations measurements are still less than the operation safety parameters (KBO), it means that the reactor is safe to be operated. (author)

  17. A Formula for the Units to Satisfy an Operation's Desired Rate of Return in CVP Analysis--A Conceptual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Johann A.; Leese, Wallace R.

    2016-01-01

    A common formula presented in many managerial- and cost-accounting textbooks makes possible the determination of the quantity of units which must be produced and sold to generate a desired dollar-amount of operating income. This article addresses the question "What formula can be used to determine the quantity of units needed to yield a…

  18. Recurrent instability after revision anterior shoulder stabilization surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lisa Genevra Mandeville; Griesser, Michael J; Miniaci, Anthony A; Jones, Morgan H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to compare outcomes of revision anterior stabilization surgeries based on technique. This study also sought to compare the impact of bone defects on outcomes. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus was performed in July 2012 and March 2013. Of 345 articles identified in the search, 17 studies with Level I to IV Evidence satisfied the inclusion criteria and were analyzed according to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Recurrent instability was defined as redislocation, resubluxation, or a positive apprehensive test after revision surgery. Procedures were categorized as arthroscopic Bankart repair, open Bankart repair, Bristow-Latarjet procedure, and other open procedures. In total, 388 shoulders were studied. Male patients comprised 74.1% of patients, 66.7% of cases involved the dominant shoulder, the mean age was 28.2 years, and the mean follow-up period was 44.2 months. The surgical procedures classified as "other open procedures" had the highest rate of recurrent instability (42.7%), followed by arthroscopic Bankart repair (14.7%), the Bristow-Latarjet procedure (14.3%), and open Bankart repair (5.5%). Inconsistent reporting of bone defects precluded drawing significant conclusions. A number of different procedures are used to address recurrent instability after a primary operation for anterior shoulder instability has failed. There is significant variability in the rate of recurrent instability after revision anterior shoulder stabilization surgery. Level IV, systematic review of Level I to IV studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Study to Compare the Cost of Operation and Maintenance in Green Building Index (GBI and Non-Green Building Index (Non-GBI Rated Building in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Lee Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urges for sustainable development had pushed the government and professional bodies to respond and react by implementing regulations where possible to direct development in that manner. However, the outcome in most financial conferences and dialogues on sustainable buildings flagged on high construction and maintenance cost. Thus, this study is conducted to collect and analyze actual building operation and maintenance cost between GBI and Non-GBI rated buildings in Malaysia which are more than 2 years fully operated buildings. There are two categories of selected buildings which are residential and non-residential type of building. Each category of the building consists of similar building’s characteristic such as geographic location, mode of operation, building heights, total numbers of floors and units. The scope of building’s maintenance for this study is mainly on wear and tear of the wall painting, electrical light fittings, ceiling panels, roofing system and mechanical services like water pump system are recorded for their replacement frequency of service and the cost involved within a consistent period of 12 months operation at cost percentage saving of 78.9% and 40.4% for residential and non-residential buildings respectively compare against Non-GBI rated buildings. Electricity consumption for GBI rated buildings are lower than Non-GBI rated buildings which recorded at the cost variance of 23.8% and 6.3% and water consumption at 35.9% and 44.0% for the above mentioned two main categories of selected case study buildings. Results from this study conclude major savings on residential buildings category in term of maintenance cost and electricity consumption for GBI rated buildings. Whereby, non-residential category of buildings, GBI rated building had been proven to obtain significant savings in terms of maintenance cost and water consumption.

  20. Impact of epidural analgesia on cesarean and operative vaginal delivery rates classified by the Ten Groups Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucovnik, M; Blajic, I; Verdenik, I; Mirkovic, T; Stopar Pintaric, T

    2018-05-01

    The Ten Group Classification System (TGCS) allows critical analysis according to the obstetric characteristics of women in labor: singleton or multiple pregnancy, nulliparous, multiparous, or multiparous with a previous cesarean delivery, cephalic, breech presentation or other malpresentation, spontaneous or induced labor, and term or preterm births. Labor outcomes associated with epidural analgesia may be different among the different labor classification groups. The aim of this study was to explore associations between epidural analgesia and cesarean delivery, and epidural analgesia and assisted vaginal delivery, in women classified using the TGCS. Slovenian National Perinatal Information System data for the period 2007-2014 were analyzed. All women after spontaneous onset or induction of labor were classified according to the TGCS, within which cesarean and vaginal assisted delivery rates were investigated (P cesarean delivery rates. Women in group 1 (nulliparous term women with singleton fetuses in cephalic presentation in spontaneous labor) with epidural analgesia had a higher cesarean delivery rate. In most TGCS groups women with epidural analgesia had higher assisted vaginal delivery rates. Epidural analgesia is associated with different effects on cesarean delivery and assisted vaginal delivery rates in different TGCS groups. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Poorer survival after a primary implant during revision total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marrigje F.; Reininga, Inge H. F.; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Stevens, Martin; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA) is a complex procedure. Depending on the degree of ligament and bone damage, either primary or revision implants are used. The purpose of this study was to compare survival rates of primary implants with revision implants when used during rTKA. A retrospective

  2. Does preoperative breast MRI significantly impact on initial surgical procedure and re-operation rates in patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, K.; Sakellariou, S.; Dawson, N.; Litherland, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes the management of patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). Materials and methods: A retrospective, controlled, single-centre analysis of 138 cases of screen-detected ILC was performed. All patients were assessed by a single multidisciplinary team as to whether preoperative MRI altered the initial management decision or reduced re-operation rates. Results: Forty-three percent of patients had preoperative MRI. MRI guided surgical management in 40.7% patients. Primary mastectomy rates were not significantly different between the MRI and non-MRI groups (32% and 30% respectively, p=0.71). The MRI group had a lower secondary surgery rate (6.8% versus 15.2%); however, the results did not reach statistical significance, and there were no unnecessary mastectomies. Conclusion: MRI can be used appropriately to guide primary surgery in screen-detected ILC cases and affects the initial management decision in 40.7% of patients. It does not significantly affect the overall mastectomy rate or re-operation rates, but reduces the likelihood of the latter. As a result of this review, the authors' local policy for the use of MRI in screen-detected ILC patients has been modified. For patients undergoing mastectomy for ILC, MRI is no longer performed routinely to search for contralateral malignancy as this has no proven added benefit. - Highlights: • Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows more accurate tumour assessment and detects additional foci of disease in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). • Over the study's 3 year time frame, MRI guided surgical management of 40.7% screen-detected ILC patients scanned. • No statistically significant difference in mastectomy rates between MRI and non MRI groups. • Observed lower re-operation rate (6.8%-v-15.2%) in MRI group not statistically significant. • No MRI benefit for contralateral disease detection in ILC patients for

  3. Revision of Pachycentria (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausing, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    A revision of Pachycentria Blume, which includes the monotypic Pogonanthera Blume, is presented. Pachycentria comprises eight species and one subspecies. Two species, P. vogelkopensis and P. hanseniana, are newly described. The genus is distinguished from other genera in the Medinillinae by a small

  4. Revision of Oxandra (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junikka, L.; Maas, P.J.M.; Maas-van de Kamer, H.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic revision is given of the Neotropical genus Oxandra (Annonaceae). Within the genus 27 species are recognized, 4 of which are new to science. Most of the species are occurring in tropical South America, whereas a few (6) are found in Mexico and Central America and two in the West Indies

  5. Revision without ordinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivello, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Herzberger’s and Gupta’s revision theories of truth can be recast in purely inductive terms, without any appeal neither to the transfinite ordinal numbers nor to the axiom of Choice. The result is presented in an abstract and general setting, emphasising both its validity for a wide

  6. A study of survival rate of the patients with esophageal carcinoma treated by pre- and/or post-operative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eida, Koichiro

    1986-01-01

    So far there is still considerable disagreement as to the evaluation of the pre- and postoperative irradiation effects on the survival rate of the patients with esophageal carcinoma. From April 1973 to December 1983, 138 cases of thoracic esophageal carcinoma were surgically operated upon at our Department; 68 cases were irradiated and 70 cases were not irradiated prior to the surgical operation. Followup study was done and its result has been reported in this communication. A few cases treated by pre-operative irradiation survived longer than the expected longevity in spite of their low curative operation rates. Prognosis was better in the cases with well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, when marked or good responses to pre-operative irradiation with the calculated total dose of 30 Gy were recorded. There were differences in responsibility in the various histological types of esophageal carcinomas; good response in the group of well differentiated squamous carcinoma, less marked response in the groups of moderately and poorly differentiated squamous carcinomas, minor response in the types of undifferentiated and unclassifed carcinomas. From our observation it seems reasonable to say that prognosis of the patients with pre- and postoperative irradiation was better than that of those who received postoperative irradiation only. (author)

  7. Rhinoplasty for the multiply revised nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the problems encountered on revising a multiply operated nose and the methods used in correcting such problems. The study included 50 cases presenting for revision rhinoplasty after having had 2 or more previous rhinoplasties. An external rhinoplasty approach was used in all cases. Simultaneous septal surgery was done whenever indicated. All cases were followed for a mean period of 32 months (range, 1.5-8 years). Evaluation of the surgical result depended on clinical examination, comparison of pre- and postoperative photographs, and degree of patients' satisfaction with their aesthetic and functional outcome. Functionally, 68% suffered nasal obstruction that was mainly caused by septal deviations and nasal valve problems. Aesthetically, the most common deformities of the upper two thirds of the nose included pollybeak (64%), dorsal irregularities (54%), dorsal saddle (44%), and open roof deformity (42%), whereas the deformities of lower third included depressed tip (68%), tip contour irregularities (60%), and overrotated tip (42%). Nasal grafting was necessary in all cases; usually more than 1 type of graft was used in each case. Postoperatively, 79% of the patients, with preoperative nasal obstruction, reported improved breathing; 84% were satisfied with their aesthetic result; and only 8 cases (16%) requested further revision to correct minor deformities. Revision of a multiply operated nose is a complex and technically demanding task, yet, in a good percentage of cases, aesthetic as well as functional improvement are still possible.

  8. Revising and editing for translators

    CERN Document Server

    Mossop, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Revising and Editing for Translators provides guidance and learning materials for translation students learning to edit texts written by others, and professional translators wishing to improve their self-revision ability or learning to revise the work of others. Editing is understood as making corrections and improvements to texts, with particular attention to tailoring them to the given readership. Revising is this same task applied to draft translations. The linguistic work of editors and revisers is related to the professional situations in which they work. Mossop offers in-depth coverage of a wide range of topics, including copyediting, style editing, structural editing, checking for consistency, revising procedures and principles, and translation quality assessment. This third edition provides extended coverage of computer aids for revisers, and of the different degrees of revision suited to different texts. The inclusion of suggested activities and exercises, numerous real-world examples, a proposed gra...

  9. Similar failure rate in immediate post-operative weight bearing versus protected weight bearing following meniscal repair on peripheral, vertical meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Bryan; Gronbeck, Kyle R; Yue, Ruixian Alexander; Tompkins, Marc A

    2017-08-16

    Post-operative weight bearing after meniscal repair is a point of debate among physicians. This study sought to evaluate whether patients adhering to an immediate WBAT rehabilitation programme have a higher failure rate compared to those adhering to a more traditional, protected, NWB status following meniscal repair. The null hypothesis was that there would be no difference in failure between the two groups. A retrospective review of meniscal repair patients greater than 5 years from surgery was performed for patients receiving meniscal repair treatment. Patients were categorized by post-surgical weight-bearing status, either NWB or WBAT, and then analysed for failure of repair. Failure was defined as re-operation on the torn meniscus. The study controlled for variables including age at surgery, sex, height, weight, and BMI, classification of tear type, acuity of the tear, repair location (medial or lateral), repair location within the meniscus, repair technique, and concomitant procedures. Re-operations were performed in 61 of 157 patients [38.9%]. There was no difference between weight-bearing groups for failure of meniscus repair (n.s.). The tears were acute vertical tears located in the posterior horn and body. For the 61 patients with re-operation, the average time to re-operation was 2.2 years with 10 [16%] > 5 years from surgery, 17 [28%] 2-5 years from surgery, and 34 [56%] bearing groups for rate of re-operation (n.s.). Weight bearing as tolerated after meniscal repair for peripheral, vertical tears does not result in a higher failure rate than traditional, non-weight bearing over a five-year follow-up period. The clinical relevance is that, based on these data, it may be appropriate to allow weight bearing as tolerated following meniscal repair of peripheral, vertical tears. Retrospective cohort study, Level III.

  10. 42 CFR 412.79 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for Medicare-dependent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient... § 412.73(c)(14) through (c)(16). (e) DRG adjustment. The applicable hospital-specific cost per discharge...

  11. 42 CFR 412.64 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for Federal fiscal year 2005 and subsequent fiscal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prospective payment rate is based on the geographic location of the hospital facility at which the discharge... percentage change for updating the standardized amount is— (i) For fiscal year 2005 through fiscal year 2009... adjust the standardized amount for subsequent fiscal years so as to eliminate the effect of such coding...

  12. Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (2015) - Revision 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US International Trade Commission — This dataset is the 2015 Harmonized Tariff Schedule Revision 1 effective July 1, 2015. It provides the applicable tariff rates and statistical categories for all...

  13. Revision total hip arthoplasty: factors associated with re-revision surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatod, Monti; Cafri, Guy; Inacio, Maria C S; Schepps, Alan L; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Bini, Stefano A

    2015-03-04

    The survivorship of implants after revision total hip arthroplasty and risk factors associated with re-revision are not well defined. We evaluated the re-revision rate with use of the institutional total joint replacement registry. The purpose of this study was to determine patient, implant, and surgeon factors associated with re-revision total hip arthroplasty. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. The total joint replacement registry was used to identify patients who had undergone revision total hip arthroplasty for aseptic reasons from April 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010. The end point of interest was re-revision total hip arthroplasty. Risk factors evaluated for re-revision total hip arthroplasty included: patient risk factors (age, sex, body mass index, race, and general health status), implant risk factors (fixation type, bearing surface, femoral head size, and component replacement), and surgeon risk factors (volume and experience). A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used. Six hundred and twenty-nine revision total hip arthroplasties with sixty-three (10%) re-revisions were evaluated. The mean cohort age (and standard deviation) was 57.0 ± 12.4 years, the mean body mass index (and standard deviation) was 29.5 ± 6.1 kg/m(2), and most of the patients were women (64.5%) and white (81.9%) and had an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of associated with the risk of re-revision. For every ten-year increase in patient age, the hazard ratio for re-revision decreases by a factor of 0.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.90). For every five revision surgical procedures performed by a surgeon, the risk of revision decreases by a factor of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 0.99). At the time of revision, a new or retained cemented femoral implant or all-cemented hip implant increases the risk of revision by a factor of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 8.38) relative to a retained or new uncemented hip implant. A ceramic on a

  14. A System-Wide Approach to Physician Efficiency and Utilization Rates for Non-Operating Room Anesthesia Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Mitchell H; Huynh, Tinh T; Breidenstein, Max W; O'Donnell, Stephen E; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Urman, Richard D

    2017-07-01

    There has been little in the development or application of operating room (OR) management metrics to non-operating room anesthesia (NORA) sites. This is in contrast to the well-developed management framework for the OR management. We hypothesized that by adopting the concept of physician efficiency, we could determine the applicability of this clinical productivity benchmark for physicians providing services for NORA cases at a tertiary care center. We conducted a retrospective data analysis of NORA sites at an academic, rural hospital, including both adult and pediatric patients. Using the time stamps from WiseOR® (Palo Alto, CA), we calculated site utilization and physician efficiency for each day. We defined scheduling efficiency (SE) as the number of staffed anesthesiologists divided by the number of staffed sites and stratified the data into three categories (SE 1). The mean physician efficiency was 0.293 (95% CI, [0.281, 0.305]), and the mean site utilization was 0.328 (95% CI, [0.314, 0.343]). When days were stratified by scheduling efficiency (SE 1), we found differences between physician efficiency and site utilization. On days where scheduling efficiency was less than 1, that is, there are more sites than physicians, mean physician efficiency (95% CI, [0.326, 0.402]) was higher than mean site utilization (95% CI, [0.250, 0.296]). We demonstrate that scheduling efficiency vis-à-vis physician efficiency as an OR management metric diverge when anesthesiologists travel between NORA sites. When the opportunity to scale operational efficiencies is limited, increasing scheduling efficiency by incorporating different NORA sites into a "block" allocation on any given day may be the only suitable tactical alternative.

  15. Optimization of automation: I. Estimation method of cognitive automation rates reflecting the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jong Hyun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose an estimation method of the automation rate by taking the advantages of automation as the estimation measures. • We conduct the experiments to examine the validity of the suggested method. • The higher the cognitive automation rate is, the greater the decreased rate of the working time will be. • The usefulness of the suggested estimation method is proved by statistical analyses. - Abstract: Since automation was introduced in various industrial fields, the concept of the automation rate has been used to indicate the inclusion proportion of automation among all work processes or facilities. Expressions of the inclusion proportion of automation are predictable, as is the ability to express the degree of the enhancement of human performance. However, many researchers have found that a high automation rate does not guarantee high performance. Therefore, to reflect the effects of automation on human performance, this paper proposes a new estimation method of the automation rate that considers the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Automation in NPPs can be divided into two types: system automation and cognitive automation. Some general descriptions and characteristics of each type of automation are provided, and the advantages of automation are investigated. The advantages of each type of automation are used as measures of the estimation method of the automation rate. One advantage was found to be a reduction in the number of tasks, and another was a reduction in human cognitive task loads. The system and the cognitive automation rate were proposed as quantitative measures by taking advantage of the aforementioned benefits. To quantify the required human cognitive task loads and thus suggest the cognitive automation rate, Conant’s information-theory-based model was applied. The validity of the suggested method, especially as regards the cognitive automation rate, was proven by conducting

  16. Rates and causes of accidents for general aviation aircraft operating in a mountainous and high elevation terrain environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Marisa; Stolzer, Alan; Boyd, Douglas D

    2017-10-01

    Flying over mountainous and/or high elevation terrain is challenging due to rapidly changeable visibility, gusty/rotor winds and downdrafts and the necessity of terrain avoidance. Herein, general aviation accident rates and mishap cause/factors were determined (2001-2014) for a geographical region characterized by such terrain. Accidents in single piston engine-powered aircraft for states west of the US continental divide characterized by mountainous terrain and/or high elevation (MEHET) were identified from the NTSB database. MEHET-related-mishaps were defined as satisfying any one, or more, criteria (controlled flight into terrain/obstacles (CFIT), downdrafts, mountain obscuration, wind-shear, gusting winds, whiteout, instrument meteorological conditions; density altitude, dust-devil) cited as factors/causal in the NTSB report. Statistics employed Poisson distribution and contingency tables. Although the MEHET-related accident rate declined (pairplanes and flying under IFR to assure terrain clearance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkenburg, Daken J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Johns, Paul M. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Detection Systems Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, USA; Baciak, James E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nino, Juan C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Xue, Jiangeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA

    2017-12-14

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.28 µGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  18. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Daken J.; Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2017-12-01

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.18 μGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  19. Effect of pH and Monomer Dosing Rate in the Anionic Polymerization of Ethyl Cyanoacrylate in Semicontinuous Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hened Saade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate with more than 10% solids content were prepared by semicontinuous heterophase polymerization at monomer-starved conditions varying the initial pH in the interval of 1–1.75 and at two monomer dosing rates. Measurements by scanning-transmission electron microscopy allowed us to identify an inverse dependence of particle size on pH. Furthermore, all the polymerizations conducted at the slower monomer dosing rate rendered two particle populations, with the larger one formed from the aggregation of a fraction of the smaller particles. It was believed that the so slow addition of the monomer caused the formation of very small but instable particles, thereby a fraction of which aggregated to reduce the total interface particles-aqueous phase, increasing the latex stability. An increase in the monomer dosing rate led to larger and more stable particles in such way that only one population of nanoparticles with around 40 nm in average diameter was obtained.

  20. Microbial Population Dynamics and Ecosystem Functions of Anoxic/Aerobic Granular Sludge in Sequencing Batch Reactors Operated at Different Organic Loading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikö Szabó

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The granular sludge process is an effective, low-footprint alternative to conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment. The architecture of the microbial granules allows the co-existence of different functional groups, e.g., nitrifying and denitrifying communities, which permits compact reactor design. However, little is known about the factors influencing community assembly in granular sludge, such as the effects of reactor operation strategies and influent wastewater composition. Here, we analyze the development of the microbiomes in parallel laboratory-scale anoxic/aerobic granular sludge reactors operated at low (0.9 kg m-3d-1, moderate (1.9 kg m-3d-1 and high (3.7 kg m-3d-1 organic loading rates (OLRs and the same ammonium loading rate (0.2 kg NH4-N m-3d-1 for 84 days. Complete removal of organic carbon and ammonium was achieved in all three reactors after start-up, while the nitrogen removal (denitrification efficiency increased with the OLR: 0% at low, 38% at moderate, and 66% at high loading rate. The bacterial communities at different loading rates diverged rapidly after start-up and showed less than 50% similarity after 6 days, and below 40% similarity after 84 days. The three reactor microbiomes were dominated by different genera (mainly Meganema, Thauera, Paracoccus, and Zoogloea, but these genera have similar ecosystem functions of EPS production, denitrification and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA storage. Many less abundant but persistent taxa were also detected within these functional groups. The bacterial communities were functionally redundant irrespective of the loading rate applied. At steady-state reactor operation, the identity of the core community members was rather stable, but their relative abundances changed considerably over time. Furthermore, nitrifying bacteria were low in relative abundance and diversity in all reactors, despite their large contribution to nitrogen turnover. The results suggest that the OLR has

  1. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  2. Maximum surgical blood ordering schedules for revision lower limb arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Devendra; Challand, Christopher; Clarke, Andrew; Keenan, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    Effective utilisation of blood products is fundamental. The introduction of maximum surgical blood ordering schedules (MSBOS) for operations has been shown to improve transfusion services. A retrospective analysis was undertaken to establish an evidence-based MSBOS for revision total hip replacement (THR) and total knee revision (TKR). The impact of this schedule on blood conservation was analysed. A retrospective analysis was undertaken on 397 patients who underwent revision THR and TKR over a 4-year period. The cross-match-to-transfusion ratio (CTR) and transfusion index (TI) were calculated. A MSBOS protocol was created based on the TIs and its' impact on transfusion services was assessed prospectively on 125 patients by comparing CTRs. In revision THR, TI was 1.19 for elective cases, 1.55 for emergency cases and 2.35 for infected cases. There was no difference in TI for revisions of cemented and uncemented components. Single component THR revision required less transfusion. In revision TKR, TI was 0.31 for elective cases, 2.0 for emergency cases and 1.23 for cases with infection. The introduction of the MSBOS protocol had resulted in a considerable improvement in blood ordering. Reductions in the CTR were seen for all types of revision surgery, but most evident in elective revision THR (3.24-2.18) and elective revision TKR (7.95-1.2). Analysis confirmed that excessive cross-matching occurred for revision lower limb arthroplasty. The introduction of our MSBOS protocol promoted blood conservation and compliance with established national guidelines.

  3. A Method for Increasing the Operating Limit Capacity of Wind Farms Using Battery Energy Storage Systems with Rate of Change of Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hee Son

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the appropriate rated power of battery energy storage system (BESS and the operating limit capacity of wind farms are determined considering power system stability, and novel output control methods of BESS and wind turbines are proposed. The rated power of BESS is determined by correlation with the kinetic energy that can be released from wind turbines and synchronous generators when a disturbance occurs in the power system. After the appropriate rated power of BESS is determined, a novel control scheme for quickly responding to disturbances should be applied to BESS. It is important to compensate the insufficient power difference between demand and supply more quickly after a disturbance, and for this purpose, BESS output is controlled using the rate of change of frequency (ROCOF. Generally, BESS output is controlled by the frequency droop control (FDC, however if ROCOF falls below the threshold, BESS output increases sharply. Under this control for BESS, the power system’s stability can be improved and the operating limit capacity of wind farms can be increased. The operating limit capacity is determined as the smaller of technical limit and dynamic limit capacity. The technical limit capacity is calculated by the difference between the maximum power of the generators connected to the power system and the magnitude of loads, and the dynamic limit capacity is determined by considering dynamic stability of a power system frequency when the wind turbines drop out from a power system. Output of the dynamic model developed for wind turbine is based on the operating limit capacity and is controlled by blade pitch angle. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed control method, different case studies are conducted, with simulations for BESS and wind turbine using Power System Simulation for Engineering (PSS/E.

  4. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  5. Prediction of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale assessment using a genetic programming system with geometric semantic genetic operators

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Mauro; Vanneschi, Leonardo; Silva, Sara

    2014-01-01

    This work was supported by national funds through FCT under contract PEst-OE/EEI/LA0021/2013 and by projects MassGP (PTDC/EEI-CTP/2975/2012), EnviGP (PTDC/EIA-CCO/103363/2008) and InteleGen (PTDC/DTP-FTO/1747/2012), Portugal. Pergamon-elsevier science ltd Oxford Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) assessment is the most used scale for tracking Parkinson's disease symptom progression. Nowadays, the tracking process requires a patient to undergo invasive and time-consuming speci...

  6. Measurement of the Current Related Damage Rate at {-}50(°) C and Consequences on Macropixel Detector Operation in Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segneri, Gabriele; Brown, Craig; Carpenter, James-D.; Kuhnle, Bernd; Lauf, Thomas; Lechner, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Rummel, Stefan; Struder, Lothar; Treis, Johannes; Whitford, Chris

    2009-12-01

    A diode irradiation with 10-MeV protons was performed to measure the silicon current related damage rate at a temperature of -50°C. This measurement was fundamental to predict the performance of the detectors which will be used in the X-ray spectrometers of the Simbol-X and BepiColombo space missions. These detectors consist of arrays of large area silicon drift chambers with integrated depleted p-channel field effect transistors. The leakage current increase due to radiation damage and its consequent energy resolution degradation can be critical for these missions, specially for BepiColombo. These effects cannot be predicted because, during the whole missions, the sensors will be kept at temperatures below -40°C, and the existing models are based on measurements on structures which underwent annealing at higher temperatures. An irradiation experiment was performed to measure the current related damage rate at - 50°C, and the obtained value was (11.1 ± 0.2) X 10-17 A/cm. This result implies that it will be possible to achieve the Simbol-X energy resolution, whereas some annealing strategies will be needed for the BepiColombo mission. The annealing behaviour at 60°C was studied as well and the results are in agreement with the already available measurements.

  7. Study of long-term sustained operation of gaseous detectors for the high rate environment in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00366989; Sharma, Archana

    The muon system of CMS aims to provide an efficient and fast identification of the muons produced in the proton-proton collisions. However, the forward region of the end-caps is only instrumented with Cathode Strip Chambers. This lack of redundancy will be problematic after the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), for which the increase of the background rate would degrade the Level-1 trigger performance and thus the selection of interesting physics channels. The goal of the CMS muon upgrade is to maintain the L1 trigger rate with maximum selection efficiency in order to fully exploit the HL-LHC. The CMS GEM Collaboration has proposed to instrument the vacant high-eta region of the muon end-caps with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, called GE1/1 chambers. The Ph.D. subject proposed by the CMS GEM Collaboration aims to demonstrate that the GE1/1 technology is the most suitable choice for the upgrade of the muon end-caps. Three main research projects were conducted in this context. The first pro...

  8. Operation of a RPC with low resistivity bakelite for the endcap region of CMS in a high-rate environment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kang, D H; Kim, T J; Lee, K S; Park, S; Park, W J; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S; Youn, S W; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Nam, S K; Jung, S R; Lee, Y L; Rhee, J T; Lee, S J; Koo, D G; Bahk, S Y

    2002-01-01

    We present the beam-test results for a real-size prototype resistive plate chamber (RPC) for the endcap region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The chamber built with relatively low resistivity bakelite was tested at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN under a high photon-flux environment with an effective cluster rate up to about 1.2 kHz/cm/sup 2/. The characteristics of the present chamber are compatible with the previous results for the muon detection efficiency, time resolution, mean travel time, and rate capability, which were obtained using a higher resistivity bakelite. The present beam-test results ensure that the RPC made of relatively low resistivity bakelite is also suitable for the CMS muon trigger detector. In addition, we study the position resolution of the endcap RPC of the CMS. By using the median position of the cluster strips, the position resolution can be reduced to only half of the strip width. (15 refs).

  9. Trends in Revision Elbow Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Professional Baseball Pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alexander T; Pidgeon, Tyler S; Morrell, Nathan T; DaSilva, Manuel F

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequency of revision elbow ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction in professional baseball pitchers. Data were collected on 271 professional baseball pitchers who underwent primary UCL reconstruction. Each player was evaluated retrospectively for occurrence of revision UCL reconstructive surgery to treat failed primary reconstruction. Data on players who underwent revision UCL reconstruction were compiled to determine total surgical revision incidence and revision rate by year. The incidence of early revision was analyzed for trends. Average career length after primary UCL reconstruction was calculated and compared with that of players who underwent revision surgery. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess risk factors for revision including handedness, pitching role, and age at the time of primary reconstruction. Between 1974 and 2014, the annual incidence of primary UCL reconstructions among professional pitchers increased, while the proportion of cases being revised per year decreased. Of the 271 pitchers included in the study, 40 (15%) required at least 1 revision procedure during their playing career. Three cases required a second UCL revision reconstruction. The average time from primary surgery to revision was 5.2 ± 3.2 years (range, 1-13 years). The average length of career following primary reconstruction for all players was 4.9 ± 4.3 years (range, 0-22 years). The average length of career following revision UCL reconstruction was 2.5 ± 2.4 years (range, 0-8 years). No risk factors for needing revision UCL reconstruction were identified. The incidence of primary UCL reconstructions among professional pitchers is increasing; however, the rate of primary reconstructions requiring revision is decreasing. Explanations for the decreased revision rate may include improved surgical technique and improved rehabilitation protocols. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by

  10. Lessons learned: the effect of increased production rate on operation and maintenance of OPG's Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, L.; Smith, N.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility (WUFDSF) located at Ontario Power Generation's (OPG's) Western Waste Management Facility in Tiverton, ON, transferred, processed and stored a record-high number of Dry Storage Containers (DSC's) from Bruce Power's nuclear generating stations. The WUFDSF has been in operation since 2002. The facility transfers, processes, and stores the used fuel from the Bruce Power generating stations located in Tiverton, Ontario. As per a contractual agreement between OPG and Bruce Power, an annual DSC production and transfer schedule is agreed to between the two parties. In 2010, an increased annual production rate of 130 DSC's was agreed to between OPG and Bruce Power. Throughout 2007, 2008 and 2009, several facility modifications had been completed in anticipation of the increased production rate. These modifications included: Installation and commissioning of a second set of welding consoles; Addition of a second vacuum drying system; Procurement of a second transfer vehicle; and, Installation of a bulk gas system for welding cover gas. In 2010, the increased production rate of 130 DSC's/year came into effect. Throughout 2010, significant lessons learned were gained related to the impact of such a high production rate on the operation and maintenance of the facility. This paper presents the challenges and successes of that operation. The facility successfully achieved its production target with no safety incidents. This high rate of production is planned to continue for several years at the facility. Some challenges continue and these are being assessed and incorporated into the facility's business plan. In order to continue being successful, the facility must look to the future for opportunities for improvement and efficiencies to be gained. (author)

  11. Lessons learned: the effect of increased production rate on operation and maintenance of OPG's Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, L.; Smith, N. [Ontario Power Generation, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In 2010, the Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility (WUFDSF) located at Ontario Power Generation's (OPG's) Western Waste Management Facility in Tiverton, ON, transferred, processed and stored a record-high number of Dry Storage Containers (DSC's) from Bruce Power's nuclear generating stations. The WUFDSF has been in operation since 2002. The facility transfers, processes, and stores the used fuel from the Bruce Power generating stations located in Tiverton, Ontario. As per a contractual agreement between OPG and Bruce Power, an annual DSC production and transfer schedule is agreed to between the two parties. In 2010, an increased annual production rate of 130 DSC's was agreed to between OPG and Bruce Power. Throughout 2007, 2008 and 2009, several facility modifications had been completed in anticipation of the increased production rate. These modifications included: Installation and commissioning of a second set of welding consoles; Addition of a second vacuum drying system; Procurement of a second transfer vehicle; and, Installation of a bulk gas system for welding cover gas. In 2010, the increased production rate of 130 DSC's/year came into effect. Throughout 2010, significant lessons learned were gained related to the impact of such a high production rate on the operation and maintenance of the facility. This paper presents the challenges and successes of that operation. The facility successfully achieved its production target with no safety incidents. This high rate of production is planned to continue for several years at the facility. Some challenges continue and these are being assessed and incorporated into the facility's business plan. In order to continue being successful, the facility must look to the future for opportunities for improvement and efficiencies to be gained. (author)

  12. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt complications needing shunt revision in children: A review of 5 years of experience with 48 revisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra K Ghritlaharey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to review the management of ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt complications in children. Patients and Methods: During the last 5 years (January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010, 236 VP shunt operations were performed in children under 12 years of age; of these, 40 (16.94% developed shunt complications and those who underwent VP shunt revisions were studied. Results: This prospective study included 40 (28 boys and 12 girls children and required 48 shunt revisions. Complications following VP shunts that required shunt revisions were peritoneal catheter/peritoneal end malfunction (18, shunt/shunt tract infections (7, extrusion of peritoneal catheter through anus (5, ventricular catheter malfunction (4, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leak from abdominal wound (4, shunt system failure (2, ventricular end/shunt displacement (2, CSF pseudocysts peritoneal cavity (2, extrusion of peritoneal catheter from neck, chest, abdominal scar and through umbilicus, one each. Four-fifth of these shunt complications occurred within 6 months of previous surgery. Surgical procedures done during shunt revisions in order of frequency were revision of peritoneal part of shunt (27, 56.25%, revision of entire shunt system (6, 12.5%, extra ventricular drainage and delayed re-shunt (5, 10.41%, shunt removal and delayed re-shunt (5, 10.41%, opposite side shunting (2, 4.16%, cysts excision and revision of peritoneal catheter (2, 4.16% and revision of ventricular catheter (1, 2.08%. The mortalities following VP shunt operations were 44 (18.64% and following shunt revisions were 4 (10%. Conclusions: VP shunt done for hydrocephalus in children is not only prone for complications and need for revision surgery but also associated with considerable mortality.

  13. [The Use of Jumbo Cups in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Roth, Philipp; Wassilew, Georgi I

    2017-10-01

    Extra-large uncemented jumbo cups are among the most common methods of acetabular revision. Jumbo cups do not contribute to bone stock restoration, and in the case of a subsequent revision, an even larger bone defect is to be expected. Thus, understanding long-term survival is essential. The present article discusses the literature relevant to this topic and addresses technical and implant-specific characteristics of jumbo cups. In summary, jumbo cups show an acceptable long-term survival rate, with aseptic loosening as the most common reason for revision and dislocation being the most common complication. Through the development of alternative revision systems, jumbo cups have lost their importance in today's practice. However, they can serve as a benchmark for studies of newer technologies in revision total hip arthroplasty. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Peter; Evans, Jonathan R; Breen, David P; Mason, Sarah L; Barker, Roger A; Williams-Gray, Caroline H

    2012-08-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages, and appropriate screening tools are needed. We investigated the utility of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised for detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD in an incident population-representative cohort (n = 132) and investigated the relationship between performance on this instrument and behavior and quality of life (n = 219). Twenty-two percent met criteria for MCI. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.81. A cutoff Cognitive Rating Scale, and there were significant correlations with the Cambridge Behavioral Inventory-Revised and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire 39. This instrument is a useful screening tool for PD-MCI, and poor performance is significantly related to impaired behavior and quality of life. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Hot sample archiving. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Study revision evaluated the alternatives to provide tank waste characterization analytical samples for a time period as recommended by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Program. The recommendation of storing 40 ml segment samples for a period of approximately 18 months (6 months past the approval date of the Tank Characterization Report) and then composite the core segment material in 125 ml containers for a period of five years. The study considers storage at 222-S facility. It was determined that the critical storage problem was in the hot cell area. The 40 ml sample container has enough material for approximately 3 times the required amount for a complete laboratory re-analysis. The final result is that 222-S can meet the sample archive storage requirements. During the 100% capture rate the capacity is exceeded in the hot cell area, but quick, inexpensive options are available to meet the requirements

  16. Low-timing-jitter, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser with tunable repetition rate and high operation stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yuanshan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guofu; Zhao, Wei; Bai, Jing

    2010-01-01

    We design a low-timing-jitter, repetition-rate-tunable, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser by using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM), a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and a tunable optical delay line in the laser configuration. Low-timing-jitter optical pulses are stably produced when a SESAM and a 0.16 m dispersion compensation fiber are employed in the laser cavity. By inserting a tunable optical delay line between NALM and SESAM, the variable repetition-rate operation of a self-starting, passively mode-locked fiber laser is successfully demonstrated over a range from 49.65 to 50.47 MHz. The experimental results show that the newly designed fiber laser can maintain the mode locking at the pumping power of 160 mW to stably generate periodic optical pulses with width less than 170 fs and timing jitter lower than 75 fs in the 1.55 µm wavelength region, when the fundamental repetition rate of the laser is continuously tuned between 49.65 and 50.47 MHz. Moreover, this fiber laser has a feature of turn-key operation with high repeatability of its fundamental repetition rate in practice

  17. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Xia; Tripuraneni Prabhakar; Giap Huan; Lin Ray; Chu Colin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192 Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  18. Study of long-term operation of triple-GEM detectors for the high rate environment in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The CMS GEM collaboration is working on the possible instrumentation of the high-eta region of the CMS Endcap with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, a technology capable to sustain the hostile environment that will be encountered at the high-luminosity LHC. To ensure the long-term operation of large triple-GEM detectors in the CMS experiment, we are performing a set of studies in order to measure and understand the aging effect of triple-GEM Muon chambers. The aging includes all the processes that lead to a significant degradation of the performances of the detector gain drop, non-uniformity, dark current, discharges and resolution loss. The project is focused on monitoring continuously the response of the detector when irradiated by a source of Cs 137 at CERN in the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF). Moreover, the new technology employed for stretching the GEM foils, so called NS2, introduces new, carefully chosen materials and components in the detectors. Outgassing tests are performed in order to va...

  19. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  20. Operation characteristic of a R123-based organic Rankine cycle depending on working fluid mass flow rates and heat source temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Yong-Qiang; Hung, Tzu-Chen; Wu, Shang-Lun; Lin, Chih-Hung; Li, Bing-Xi; Huang, Kuo-Chen; Qin, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The operation characteristic of an Organic Rankine Cycle using R123 and a scroll expander have been investigated. • The behaviors and detailed discussion for those four major components are examined. • The expander isentropic efficiency presents a slight decrease first and then a sharp increase with mass flow rate. • The maximum electrical power and system generation efficiency are 2.01 kW and 3.25%, respectively. - Abstract: The test and operation characteristic of an organic Rankine cycle using R123 and a scroll expander have been investigated. The steady-state operation characteristic is addressed with the varying working fluid mass flow rates ranging of 0.124–0.222 kg/s and heat source temperatures ranging of 383.15–413.15 K. The behaviors and detailed discussion for those four major components (pump, evaporator, expander and condenser) are examined. The experimental results show that the environmental temperature presents a higher influence on the pump behaviors. The range of pump power consumption, isentropic efficiency and back work ratio are 0.21–0.32 kW, 26.76–53.96%, and 14–32%, respectively. The expander isentropic efficiency presents a slight decrease first and then a sharp increase with mass flow rate, while a degree of superheating more than 3 K is necessary to avoid expander cavitation. The expander isentropic and generator efficiencies are in range of 69.10–85.17% and 60–73%, respectively, while the respective heat transfer coefficients for evaporator and condenser are ranging of 200–400 and 450–2000 W/m"2 K. The maximum expander shaft power and electrical power are 2.78 kW and 2.01 kW, respectively, while the maximum system generating efficiency is 3.25%. Moreover, the tested thermal efficiency presents a slight decrease trend with mass flow rate.

  1. How to Revise, and Revise Really Well, for Premier Academic Journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaPlaca, Peter J.; Lindgreen, Adam; Vanhamme, Joelle

    2018-01-01

    Most of the premier academic journals in all fields routinely have rejection rates of 80%, 95%, or higher. All journals prefer articles that make significant contributions to the field. Revising a manuscript and responding properly to the comments of reviewers and editors often is challenging....... This article discusses how to revise effectively a manuscript according to the (minor or major) comments of reviewers and editors for premier academic journals. We provide a series of tips for helping the authors in their endeavor, making the process less arduous and improving the possibility of a positive...

  2. Dose rate and total dose dependence of the 1/f noise performance of a GaAs operational amplifier during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiemstra, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    A pictorial of a sectioned view of the torus of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is shown. Maintenance and inspection of the reactor are required to be performed remotely. This is due to the high gamma radiation environment in vessel during inspection and maintenance activities. The custom GaAs operational amplifier is to be used to readout sensors on the in-vessel manipulator and inspection equipment. The gamma dose rate during maintenance and inspection is anticipated to be 3 Mrad(GaAs)/hour. Here, dose rate and total dose dependence of the 1/f noise performance of a custom GaAs MESFET operational amplifier during irradiation are presented. Dose rate dependent 1/f noise degradation during irradiation is believed to be due to electron trapping in deep levels, enhanced by backgating and shallow traps excited during irradiation. The reduction of this affect with accumulated total dose is believed to be due a reduction of deep level site concentration associated with substitutional oxygen. Post irradiation 1/f noise degradation is also presented.The generation-recombination noise observed post irradiation can be attributed to the production of shallow traps due to ionizing radiation

  3. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Spanish Edition); Texto Revisado de Los Principios Rectores n Normas Generales de Ejecucion Para la Prestacion de Asistencia Tecnica por el Organismo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-03-15

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [Spanish] El 21 de febrero de 1979 la Junta de Gobernadores aprobo el texto revisado de los Principios rectores y normas generales de ejecucion para la prestacion de asistencia tecnica por el Organismo. Para informacion de todos los Estados Miembros, en el presente documento se transcribe dicho texto. En el Anexo del texto revisado de los Principios rectores y normas generales de ejecucion se transcriben tambien las disposiciones prescritas por la Junta de Gobernadores el 24 de septiembre de 1977 acerca de la aplicacion de salvaguardias en relacion con la asistencia tecnica.

  4. Predicting Agency Rating Migrations with Spread Implied Ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Jianming Kou; Dr Simone Varotto

    2005-01-01

    Investors traditionally rely on credit ratings to price debt instruments. However, rating agencies are known to be prudent in their approach to rating revisions, which results in delayed ratings adjustments to mutating credit conditions. For a large set of eurobonds we derive credit spread implied ratings and compare them with the ratings issued by rating agencies. Our results indicate that spread implied ratings often anticipate future movement of agency ratings and hence could help track cr...

  5. Revision of Krsko NPP Quality Assurance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscan, R.; Fifnja, I.; Kavsek, D.

    2012-01-01

    International standards from nuclear power plant operation area are being frequently upgraded and revised in accordance with the continuous improvement philosophy. This philosophy applies also to the area of Quality Assurance, which has also undergone significant improvement since the early 1950s. Besides just nuclear industry, there are also other international quality standards that are being continuously developed and revised, bringing needs for upgrades also in the nuclear application. Since the beginning of Krsko NPP construction, the overall Quality Assurance program and its applicable procedures were in place to assure that all planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that an item or service will satisfy given requirements to quality, are in place. The overall requirements for quality as one of the major objectives for Krsko NPP operation are also set forth in the Updated Safety Analyses Report, the document that serves as a base for operating license. During more than 30 years of Krsko NPP operation, the quality requirements and related documents were revised and upgraded in several attempts. The latest revision 6 of QD-1, Quality Assurance Plan was issued during the year 2011. The bases for the revision were: Changes of the Slovenian regulatory requirements (ZVISJV, JV5, JV9?), Changes of Krsko NPP licensing documents (USAR section 13?), SNSA inspection requirements, Changes of international standards (IAEA, ISO?), Conclusions of first PSR, Implementation of ISO standards in Krsko NPP (ISO14001, ISO17025), Changes of plant procedures, etc. One of the most obvious changes was the enlargement of the QA Plan scope to cover interdisciplinary areas defined in the plant management program MD-1, such as Safety culture, Self-assessment, Human performance, Industrial Safety etc. The attachment of the QA Plan defining relationships between certain standards was also updated to provide matrix for better correlation of requirements of

  6. Fixation of revision implants is improved by a surgical technique to crack the sclerotic bone rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, Søren; Bechtold, Joan E; Mouzin, Olivier; Elmengaard, Brian; Chen, Xinqian; Søballe, Kjeld

    2005-03-01

    Revision joint replacement has poorer outcomes compared with primary joint replacement, and these poor outcomes have been associated with poorer fixation. We investigated a surgical technique done during the revision operation to improve access from the marrow space to the implant interface by locally cracking the sclerotic bone rim that forms during aseptic loosening. Sixteen implants were inserted bilaterally by distal femur articulation of the knee joint of eight dogs, using our controlled experimental model that replicates the revision setting (sclerotic bone rim, dense fibrous tissue, macrophages, elevated cytokines) by pistoning a loaded 6.0-mm implant 500 microm into the distal femur with particulate PE. At 8 weeks, one of two revision procedures was done. Both revision procedures included complete removal of the membrane, scraping, lavaging, and inserting a revision plasma-spray Ti implant. The crack revision procedure also used a splined tool to circumferentially locally perforate the sclerotic bone rim before insertion of an identical revision implant. Superior fixation was achieved with the cracking procedure in this experimental model. Revision implants inserted with the rim cracking procedure had a significantly higher pushout strength (fivefold median increase) and energy to failure (sixfold median increase), compared with the control revision procedure. Additional evaluation is needed of local perforation of sclerotic bone rim as a simple bone-sparing means to improve revision implant fixation and thereby increase revision implant longevity.

  7. Does rating the operation videos with a checklist score improve the effect of E-learning for bariatric surgical training? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Garza, Javier Rodrigo; Kowalewski, Karl-Friedrich; Friedrich, Mirco; Schmidt, Mona Wanda; Bruckner, Thomas; Kenngott, Hannes Götz; Fischer, Lars; Müller-Stich, Beat-Peter; Nickel, Felix

    2017-03-21

    Laparoscopic training has become an important part of surgical education. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric procedure performed. Surgeons must be well trained prior to operating on a patient. Multimodality training is vital for bariatric surgery. E-learning with videos is a standard approach for training. The present study investigates whether scoring the operation videos with performance checklists improves learning effects and transfer to a simulated operation. This is a monocentric, two-arm, randomized controlled trial. The trainees are medical students from the University of Heidelberg in their clinical years with no prior laparoscopic experience. After a laparoscopic basic virtual reality (VR) training, 80 students are randomized into one of two arms in a 1:1 ratio to the checklist group (group A) and control group without a checklist (group B). After all students are given an introduction of the training center, VR trainer and laparoscopic instruments, they start with E-learning while watching explanations and videos of RYGB. Only group A will perform ratings with a modified Bariatric Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (BOSATS) scale checklist for all videos watched. Group B watches the same videos without rating. Both groups will then perform an RYGB in the VR trainer as a primary endpoint and small bowel suturing as an additional test in the box trainer for evaluation. This study aims to assess if E-learning and rating bariatric surgical videos with a modified BOSATS checklist will improve the learning curve for medical students in an RYGB VR performance. This study may help in future laparoscopic and bariatric training courses. German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS00010493 . Registered on 20 May 2016.

  8. Investigation of analytical methods in thermal stratification analysis. Evaluation of flow rates through flow holes for normal and scram conditions of 40% power operation with AQUA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Yoshihiro; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    1997-08-01

    Thermal stratification phenomena are observed in an upper plenum of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) under reactor scram conditions, which give rise to thermal stress on structural components. Therefore it is important to evaluate characteristics of phenomena in the design of the internal structure in an LMFBR plenum. To evaluate flow rates through flow holes of the prototype fast breeder reactor, MONJU, numerical analyses were carried out with AQUA code for normal and scram conditions with 40% power operation. Through comparison of analysis results and measured temperature, thermal stratification phenomena in 300 second period after the scram was evaluated. Flow rate through the upper flow holes, the lower flow holes and annular gap between the inner barrel and the reactor vessel were evaluated with the measured temperature and the analysis results individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Revised inspection program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates nuclear power plants to assure adequate protection of the public and the environment from the dangers associated with nuclear materials. NRC fulfills this responsibility through comprehensive safety reviews of nuclear facilities, licensing of organizations that use nuclear materials, and continuing inspection. The NRC inspection program is currently conducted from the five regional offices in or near Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and San Francisco. Inspectors travel from the regional offices to nuclear power plants in various phases of construction, test and operation in order to conduct inspections. However, in June 1977 the Commission approved a revision to the inspection program that will include stationing inspectors at selected plants under construction and at all plants in operation. In addition, the revised program provides for appraising the performance of licensees on a national basis and involves more direct measurement and observation by NRC inspectors of work and tests in progress. The program also includes enhanced career management consisting of improved training and career development for inspectors and other professionals. The report was requested in the Conference Report on the NRC Authorization for Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1978. The report provides a discussion of the basis for both the current and revised inspection programs, describes these programs, and shows how the NRC inspection force will be trained and utilized. In addition, the report includes a discussion of the actions that will be taken to assure the objectivity of inspectors

  10. Closed cooling water chemistry guidelines revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElrath, Joel; Breckenridge, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This second revision of the Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline addresses the use of chemicals and monitoring methods to mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in the closed cooling-water (CCW) systems of nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. This revision has been endorsed by the utility chemistry community and represents another step in developing a more proactive chemistry program to limit or control closed cooling system degradation with increased consideration of corporate resources and plant-specific design and operating concerns. These guidelines were developed using laboratory data, operating experience, and input from organizations and utilities within and outside of the United States of America. It is the intent of the Revision Committee that these guidelines are applicable to all nuclear and fossil-fueled generating stations around the world. A committee of industry experts—including utility specialists, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations representatives, water-treatment service-company representatives, consultants, a primary contractor, and EPRI staff—collaborated in reviewing available data on closed cooling-water system corrosion and microbiological issues. Recognizing that each plant owner has a unique set of design, operating, and corporate concerns, the Guidelines Committee developed a methodology for plant-specific optimization. The guideline provides the technical basis for a reasonable but conservative set of chemical treatment and monitoring programs. The use of operating ranges for the various treatment chemicals discussed in this guideline will allow a power plant to limit corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in CCW systems to acceptable levels. The guideline now includes closed cooling chemistry regimes proven successful in use in the international community. The guideline provides chemistry constraints for the use of phosphates control, as well as pure water with pH control. (author)

  11. Transient thermal stress wave and vibrational analyses of a thin diamond crystal for X-ray free-electron lasers under high-repetition-rate operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Songwei; Wu, Juhao

    2018-01-01

    High-brightness X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are perceived as fourth-generation light sources providing unprecedented capabilities for frontier scientific researches in many fields. Thin crystals are important to generate coherent seeds in the self-seeding configuration, provide precise spectral measurements, and split X-ray FEL pulses, etc. In all of these applications a high-intensity X-ray FEL pulse impinges on the thin crystal and deposits a certain amount of heat load, potentially impairing the performance. In the present paper, transient thermal stress wave and vibrational analyses as well as transient thermal analysis are carried out to address the thermomechanical issues for thin diamond crystals, especially under high-repetition-rate operation of an X-ray FEL. The material properties at elevated temperatures are considered. It is shown that, for a typical FEL pulse depositing tens of microjoules energy over a spot of tens of micrometers in radius, the stress wave emission is completed on the tens of nanoseconds scale. The amount of kinetic energy converted from a FEL pulse can reach up to ∼10 nJ depending on the layer thickness. Natural frequencies of a diamond plate are also computed. The potential vibrational amplitude is estimated as a function of frequency. Due to the decreasing heat conductivity with increasing temperature, a runaway temperature rise is predicted for high repetition rates where the temperature rises abruptly after ratcheting up to a point of trivial heat damping rate relative to heat deposition rate.

  12. Results of revision anterior shoulder stabilization surgery in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Andrew J; Krych, Aaron J; Kuzma, Scott A; Chow, Roxanne M; Camp, Christopher; Dahm, Diane L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine failure rates, functional outcomes, and risk factors for failure after revision anterior shoulder stabilization surgery in high-risk adolescent athletes. Adolescent athletes who underwent primary anterior shoulder stabilization were reviewed. Patients undergoing subsequent revision stabilization surgery were identified and analyzed. Failure rates after revision surgery were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Failure was defined as recurrent instability requiring reoperation. Functional outcomes included the Marx activity score; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; and University of California, Los Angeles score. The characteristics of patients who required reoperation for recurrent instability after revision surgery were compared with those of patients who required only a single revision to identify potential risk factors for failure. Of 90 patients who underwent primary anterior stabilization surgery, 15 (17%) had failure and underwent revision surgery (mean age, 16.6 years; age range, 14 to 18 years). The mean follow-up period was 5.5 years (range, 2 to 12 years). Of the 15 revision patients, 5 (33%) had recurrent dislocations and required repeat revision stabilization surgery at a mean of 50 months (range, 22 to 102 months) after initial revision. No risk factors for failure were identified. The Kaplan-Meier reoperation-free estimates were 86% (95% confidence interval, 67% to 100%) at 24 months and 78% (95% confidence interval, 56% to 100%) at 48 months after revision surgery. The mean final Marx activity score was 14.8 (range, 5 to 20); American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, 82.1 (range, 33 to 100); and University of California, Los Angeles score, 30.8 (range, 16 to 35). At 5.5 years' follow-up, adolescent athletes had a high failure rate of revision stabilization surgery and modest functional outcomes. We were unable to convincingly identify specific risk factors for failure of revision surgery. Level IV

  13. Revision allograft reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament complex in elbows with previous failed reconstruction and persistent posterolateral rotatory instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, Yaser M K; Morrey, Bernard F; O'Driscoll, Shawn W; Steinmann, Scott P; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2014-07-01

    Primary reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) using graft tissue restores elbow stability in many, but not all, elbows with acute or chronic posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI). Revision reconstruction using a tendon allograft is occasionally considered for persistent PLRI, but the outcome of revision ligament reconstruction in this setting is largely unknown. We determined whether revision allograft ligament reconstruction can (1) restore the stability and (2) result in improved elbow scores for patients with persistent PLRI of the elbow after a previous failed primary reconstructive attempt and in the context of the diverse pathology being addressed. Between 2001 and 2011, 160 surgical elbow procedures were performed at our institution for the LCLC reconstruction using allograft tissue. Only patients undergoing revision allograft reconstruction of the LCLC for persistent PLRI with a previous failed primary reconstructive attempt using graft tissue and at least I year of followup were included in the study. Eleven patients (11 elbows) fulfilled our inclusion criteria and formed our study cohort. The cohort consisted of six female patients and five male patients. The mean age at the time of revision surgery was 36 years (range, 14-59 years). The revision allograft reconstruction was carried out after a mean of 3 years (range, 2.5 months to 9 years) from a failed attempted reconstruction of the LCLC. Osseous deficiency to some extent was identified in the preoperative radiographs of eight elbows. Mean followup was 5 years (range, 1-12 years). Revision allograft reconstruction of the LCLC restored elbow stability in eight of the 11 elbows; two of the three elbows with persistent instability were operated on a third time (at 6 and 7 months after allograft revision reconstruction). For elbows with no persistent instability, the mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score at most recent followup was 83 points (range, 60-100 points), and

  14. B and W model boiler tests: effect of temperature on IGA rate. Initial and post-1878 operating conditions of the model boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) model boiler operated with 10 ppm weekly injections of NaOH for 41,900 hours (4.8 years). The model boiler operating conditions are given. Tube No. 24 failed by caustic intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) at the steam-water zone. IGA defect depths on tube 24 is compared at different locations, which also have different temperature conditions. The specific locations are: steam/water zone, drilled baffle plate, and lower tube sheet crevice. In all locations caustic will concentrate (although to different concentration levels). Nevertheless, an effect of temperature on IGA rate can be estimated. The degree of attack relative to the location and environment is shown. SEM fractographs illustrate the completely intergranular failure of Tube 24. A summary of the estimated results is presented. These results show the estimated IGA rate as a function of primary/secondary temperature and estimated caustic concentration. Details of the failure analysis of the model boiler can be found in the final report Destructive Examination of Babcock and Wilcox's Model Boiler for Intergranular Attack (IGA) on Tubes, EPRI S302-6, J.L.; Barna and L.W. Sarver

  15. Pilot-scale comparison of constructed wetlands operated under high hydraulic loading rates and attached biofilm reactors for domestic wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fountoulakis, M.S.; Terzakis, S.; Chatzinotas, A.; Brix, H.; Kalogerakis, N.; Manios, T.

    2009-01-01

    Four different pilot-scale treatment units were constructed to compare the feasibility of treating domestic wastewater in the City of Heraklio, Crete, Greece: (a) a free water surface (FWS) wetland system, (b) a horizontal subsurface flow (HSF) wetland system, (c) a rotating biological contactor (RBC), and (d) a packed bed filter (PBF). All units operated in parallel at various hydraulic loading rates (HLR) ranging from 50% to 175% of designed operating HLR. The study was conducted during an 8 month period and showed that COD removal efficiency of HSF was comparable (> 75%) to that of RBC and PBF, whereas that of the FWS system was only 57%. Average nutrient removal efficiencies for FWS, HSF, RBC and PBF were 6%, 21%, 40% and 43%, respectively for total nitrogen and 21%, 39%, 41% and 42%, respectively for total phosphorus. Removals of total coliforms were lowest in FWS and PBF (1.3 log units) and higher in HSF and RBC (2.3 to 2.6 log units). HSF showed slightly lower but comparable effluent quality to that of RBC and PBF systems, but the construction cost and energy requirements for this system are significantly lower. Overall the final decision for the best non-conventional wastewater treatment system depends on the construction and operation cost, the area demand and the required quality of effluent

  16. Opioids Consumed in the Immediate Post-Operative Period Do Not Influence How Patients Rate Their Experience of Care After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheson, Jennifer I; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; George, Nicole E; Virani, Sana; Mont, Michael A; Delanois, Ronald E

    2018-04-01

    Patient perception of care, commonly measured with Press Ganey (PG) surveys, is an important metric used to determine hospital and provider reimbursement. However, post-operative pain following total hip arthroplasty (THA) may negatively affect patient satisfaction. As a result, over-administration of opioids may occur, even without marked evidence of pain. Therefore, this study evaluated whether opioid consumption in the immediate postoperative period bears any influence on satisfaction scores after THA. Specifically, this study assessed the correlation between post-operative opioid consumption and 7 PG domains: (1) Overall hospital rating; (2) Communication with nurses; (3) Responsiveness of hospital staff; (4) Communication with doctors; (5) Hospital environment; (6) Pain Management; and (7) Communication about medicines. Our institutional PG database was reviewed for patients who received THA from 2011 to 2014. A total of 322 patients (mean age = 65 years; 61% female) were analyzed. Patient's opioid consumption was measured using a morphine milli-equivalent conversion algorithm. Bivariate correlation analysis assessed the association between opioid consumption and Press-Ganey survey elements. Pearson's r assessed the strength of the association. No correlation was found between total opioid consumption and Overall hospital rating (r = 0.004; P = .710), Communication with nurses (r = 0.093; P = .425), Responsiveness of hospital staff (r = 0.104; P = .381), Communication with doctors (r = 0.009; P = .940), Hospital environment (r = 0.081; P = .485), and Pain management (r = 0.075; P = .536). However, there was a positive correlation between total opioid consumption and "Communication about medicines" (r = 0.262; P = .043). Our report demonstrates that PG patient satisfaction scores are not influenced by post-operative opioid use, with the exception of PG domain, "Communication about medications." These results suggest that opioid medications should be

  17. Non-operative management of blunt trauma in abdominal solid organ injuries: a prospective study to evaluate the success rate and predictive factors of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemzadeh, S H; Hashemzadeh, K H; Dehdilani, M; Rezaei, S

    2010-06-01

    Over the past several years, non-operative management (NOM) has increasingly been recommended for the care of selected blunt abdominal solid organ injuries. No prospective study has evaluated the rate of NOM of blunt abdominal trauma in the northwest of Iran. The objective of our study was to evaluate the success rate of this kind of management in patients who do not require emergency surgery. This prospective study was carried out in Imam Khomeini Hospital (as a referral center of trauma) at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, between 20 March 2004 and 20 March 2007. All trauma patients who had suffered an injury to a solid abdominal organ (kidney, liver, or spleen) were selected for initial analysis, using the Student's t test or the c2 test. During the three years of the study, 98 patients (83 males and 15 females) with blunt trauma were selected to NOM for renal, hepatic and splenic injuries. Mean age was 26.1+/-17.7 years (range, 2 to 89) and mean injury severity score (ISS) was 14.5+/-7.4. The success rate of NOM was 93.8%. Fifty-one patients (43 males, 8 females; mean ISS, 14.2+/-5.8) underwent NOM of splenic trauma; 38 patients (33 males, 5 females; mean ISS, 12.9+/-8.2) hepatic trauma, and nine patients (7 males, 2 females; mean ISS, 22.2+/-7.6) renal trauma. Six patients underwent laparotomy due to the failure of NOM. The success rates of this treatment were 94.1%, 94.7% and 88.8% for the spleen, liver and kidney injuries, respectively. Age, female gender and ISS were significant predictors of the failure of NOM (Ptrauma. The study indicates that the rates of NOM vary in relation to the severity of the organ injury. This suggests trauma centers should use this approach.

  18. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  19. Emotion Processes in Knowledge Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Gregory J.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Butterfuss, Reese

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a number of insights have been gained into the cognitive processes that explain how individuals overcome misconceptions and revise their previously acquired incorrect knowledge. The current study complements this line of research by investigating the moment-by-moment emotion processes that occur during knowledge revision using a…

  20. Revision of failed hemiarthroplasty for painful glenoid arthrosis to anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Mihir M; Sholder, Daniel; Abboud, Joseph; Lazarus, Mark D; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R; Namdari, Surena

    2018-05-10

    The impending burden of revision shoulder arthroplasty has increased interest in outcomes of revision procedures. Painful glenoid arthrosis following hemiarthroplasty is a common cause of reoperation, and conversion to anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty is one option. We identified patients who underwent revision of painful hemiarthroplasty to total shoulder arthroplasty over a 15-year period in a single tertiary-care health system. Presurgical and operative data were analyzed for 28 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were contacted at a minimum of 2 years' follow-up after revision surgery for functional outcome scores, reoperations, and implant survival. The 2- and 5-year implant survival rates were 93% and 86%, respectively. Functional outcomes were obtained from 21 patients with surviving implants. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, visual analog scale score for pain, and Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation score were 78 ± 20, 2.3 ± 2.6, and 71 ± 24, respectively. The mean Short Form 12 mental and physical scores were 49 ± 10 and 43 ± 9, respectively. Of the patients, 17 (81%) were either satisfied or very satisfied with their outcome. Complications were seen in 10 patients (36%), and 6 patients (21%) required reoperation. Anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty following hemiarthroplasty can achieve successful outcomes and implant survival rates. Given our poor understanding of reverse shoulder arthroplasty longevity, this procedure should remain an option for patients with glenoid arthrosis and an intact rotator cuff. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Difference in clinical outcome between total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty used in hemiarthroplasty revision surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, B.P.; Alta, T.D.; Sewnath, M.E.; Willems, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The increase of shoulder replacements will lead to a higher revision rate of shoulder arthroplasties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical results of revision surgery performed in our hospital, distinguish the differences in clinical outcome according to revision

  2. Obtaining a W state from a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state via stochastic local operations and classical communication with a rate approaching unity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nengkun; Guo, Cheng; Duan, Runyao

    2014-04-25

    We introduce a notion of the entanglement transformation rate to characterize the asymptotic comparability of two multipartite pure entangled states under stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC). For two well known SLOCC inequivalent three-qubit states |GHZ⟩=(1/2)(|000⟩+|111⟩) and |W⟩=(1/3)(|100⟩+|010⟩+|001⟩), we show that the entanglement transformation rate from |GHZ⟩ to |W⟩ is exactly 1. That means that we can obtain one copy of the W state from one copy of the Greenberg-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state by SLOCC, asymptotically. We then apply similar techniques to obtain a lower bound on the entanglement transformation rates from an N-partite GHZ state to a class of Dicke states, and prove the tightness of this bound for some special cases which naturally generalize the |W⟩ state. A new lower bound on the tensor rank of the matrix permanent is also obtained by evaluating the tensor rank of Dicke states.

  3. Philippines revises power plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, D.

    1988-02-01

    Following an unexpected surge in electricity demand the Philippines has revised its medium term power development programme. The sharp increase in electricity consumption follows three years of slack demand due to civil disturbances before the end of the Macros administration and the election of Corazon Aquino as President in 1986. Originally, the Aquino government's medium term power development plans called for about 500MW of generating capacity to be installed between 1986 and 1992. The three proposed plants were scheduled for commissioning in 1991 and 1992. However, a spurt in power demand growth during the past nine months has caused concern among industrialists that power shortages could occur by the end of the decade. So additional capacity will be installed to prevent an anticipated shortfall in electricity supplies by the early 1990s.

  4. Revised SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Ishiguro, Yukio; Kaneko, Kunio; Ido, Masaru.

    1986-09-01

    Since the publication of JAERI-1285 in 1983 for the preliminary version of the SRAC code system, a number of additions and modifications to the functions have been made to establish an overall neutronics code system. Major points are (1) addition of JENDL-2 version of data library, (2) a direct treatment of doubly heterogeneous effect on resonance absorption, (3) a generalized Dancoff factor, (4) a cell calculation based on the fixed boundary source problem, (5) the corresponding edit required for experimental analysis and reactor design, (6) a perturbation theory calculation for reactivity change, (7) an auxiliary code for core burnup and fuel management, etc. This report is a revision of the users manual which consists of the general description, input data requirements and their explanation, detailed information on usage, mathematics, contents of libraries and sample I/O. (author)

  5. Microcomputers and the Improvement of Revision Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses use of word processing software as an effective tool in writing and revision instruction, and describes the role of the teacher. Examples of exercises that encourage revision and of software designed to teach effective revision skills are reviewed. (MBR)

  6. Containment leakage rate testing requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, E.G.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the status of several documents under revision or development that provide requirements and guidance for testing nuclear power plant containment systems for leakage rates. These documents include the general revision to 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix J; the regulatory guide affiliated with the revision to Appendix J; the national standard that the regulatory guide endorses, ANSI/ANS-56.8, 'Containment System Leakage Rate Testing Requirements'; and the draft industry Licensing Topical Report, 'Standardized Program for Primary Containment Integrity Testing'. The actual or potential relationships between these documents are also explored

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Reoperation for Failed Antireflux Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilshire, Candice L; Louie, Brian E; Shultz, Dale; Jutric, Zeljka; Farivar, Alexander S; Aye, Ralph W

    2016-04-01

    Up to 18% of patients undergoing antireflux operations will require reoperation. Authors caution that with each additional reoperation, fewer patients achieve satisfaction. The quality of life in patients who underwent revision operations was compared with patients who underwent primary antireflux operations to determine the effectiveness of revision operations. We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent revision after failed antireflux operations from 2004 to 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: first reoperation (Reop[1]) and more than one reoperation (Reop[>1]). For comparison, a control group of patients who underwent primary antireflux operations was included. Patients underwent quality of life assessment preoperatively and postoperatively. We identified 105 reoperative patients: 94 Reop(1), 11 Reop(>1), and 112 controls. The primary reason for failure was combined fundoplication herniation and slippage. Morbidity, mortality, and readmission rates were similar in all groups. Postoperative outcomes were improved in all groups but to a lesser degree in subsequent reoperations. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Health-Related Quality of Life: controls, 20.0 to 2.0; Reop(1), 26.5 to 4.0; and Reop(>1), 13.0 to 2.0. Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia: controls, 4.5 to 7.0; Reop(1), 3.7 to 6.7; and Reop(>1), 3.5 to 5.8. Dysphagia Severity Score: controls, 44.0 to 45.0; Reop(1), 36.0 to 45.0; and Reop(>1), 30.8 to 45.0. Patients undergoing revision antireflux operations have improved quality of life, relatively normal swallowing, and primary symptom resolution at a median of 20 months postoperatively. However, patients who undergo more than one reoperation have lower quality of life scores and less improvement in dysphagia, suggesting that other procedures such as Roux-en-Y or short colon interposition, should be considered after a failed initial reoperation. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Objective structured assessment of nontechnical skills: Reliability of a global rating scale for the in-training assessment in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedy, Nicolas J; Szasz, Peter; Louridas, Marisa; Bonrath, Esther M; Husslein, Heinrich; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2015-06-01

    Nontechnical skills are critical for patient safety in the operating room (OR). As a result, regulatory bodies for accreditation and certification have mandated the integration of these competencies into postgraduate education. A generally accepted approach to the in-training assessment of nontechnical skills, however, is lacking. The goal of the present study was to develop an evidence-based and reliable tool for the in-training assessment of residents' nontechnical performance in the OR. The Objective Structured Assessment of Nontechnical Skills tool was designed as a 5-point global rating scale with descriptive anchors for each item, based on existing evidence-based frameworks of nontechnical skills, as well as resident training requirements. The tool was piloted on scripted videos and refined in an iterative process. The final version was used to rate residents' performance in recorded OR crisis simulations and during live observations in the OR. A total of 37 simulations and 10 live procedures were rated. Interrater agreement was good for total mean scores, both in simulation and in the real OR, with intraclass correlation coefficients >0.90 in all settings for average and single measures. Internal consistency of the scale was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.80). The Objective Structured Assessment of Nontechnical Skills global rating scale was developed as an evidence-based tool for the in-training assessment of residents' nontechnical performance in the OR. Unique descriptive anchors allow for a criterion-referenced assessment of performance. Good reliability was demonstrated in different settings, supporting applications in research and education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Guidelines and workbook for of organization and administration of utilities seeking operating license for a nuclear power plant. Workbook for assessment of organization and management. Volume, 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, J.A.; Olson, J.; Osborn, R.N.; Sommers, P.; Widrig, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    This report is a partial response to the requirements of Item I.B.1.1 of the ''NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident,'' NUREG-0660, and is designed to serve as a basis for replacing the earlier NUREG-0731, ''Guidelines for Utility Management Structure and Technical Resources.'' The Guidelines are intended to provide guidance to the user in preparing a written plan for a proposed nuclear organization and administration. The purpose of the Workbook is to guide the NRC reviewer through a systematic review and assessment of a proposed organization and administration. It is the NRC's intention to incorporate these Guidelines and Workbook into a future revision of the Standard Review Plan (SRP), NUREG-0800. However, at this time the report is being published so that the material may be used on a voluntary basis by industry to systematically prepare or evaluate their organization or administration plans. Use of the report by the NRC would not occur until after it has been incorporated in the SRP

  10. Guidelines and workbook for assessment of organization and administration of utilities seeking operating license for a nuclear power plant. Guidelines for utility organization and administration plan. Volume 1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, J.A.; Olson, J.; Osborn, R.N.; Sommers, P.; Widrig, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    Volumes 1 and 2 of this report are a partial response to the requirements of Item I.B.1.1 of the ''NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident,'' NUREG-0660, and are designed to serve as a basis for replacing the earlier NUREG-0731, ''Guidelines for Utility Management Structure and Technical Resources.'' These Guidelines are intended to provide guidance to the user in preparing a written plan for a proposed nuclear organization and administration. The purpose of the Workbook (Vol. 2) is to guide the NRC reviewer through a systematic review and assessment of a proposed organization and administration. It is the NRC's intention to incorporate these Guidelines and Workbook into a future revision of the Standard Review Plan (SRP), NUREG-0800. However, at this time the report is being published so that the material may be used on a voluntary basis by industry to systematically prepare or evaluate their organization or administration plans. Use of the report by the NRC would not occur until after it has been incorpoarted in the SRP

  11. Development and first validation of a simplified CT-based classification system of soft tissue changes in large-head metal-on-metal total hip replacement: intra- and interrater reliability and association with revision rates in a uniform cohort of 664 arthroplasties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boomsma, Martijn F.; Warringa, Niek; Edens, Mireille A.; Lingen, Christiaan P. van; Ettema, Harmen B.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M.; Maas, Mario

    2015-01-01

    After implantation of a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA), a large incidence of pseudotumor formation has been described recently. Several centers have invited patients for follow-up in order to screen for pseudotumor formation. The spectrum of abnormalities found by CT in MoM THA patients can be unfamiliar to radiologists and orthopedic surgeons. Previously, a CT five-point grading scale has been published. In this paper, a simplification into a three-point classification system gives insight in the morphological distinction of abnormalities of the postoperative hip capsule in MoM implants in relation to the decision for revision. The reliability of this simplified classification regarding intra- and interrater reliability and its association with revision rate is investigated and discussed. All patients who underwent MoM THA in our hospital were invited for screening. Various clinical measures and CT scan were obtained in a cross-sectional fashion. A decision on revision surgery was made shortly after screening. CT scans were read in 582 patients, of which 82 patients were treated bilaterally. CT scans were independently single read by two board-certified radiologists and classified into categories I-V. In a second meeting, consensus was obtained. Categories were subsequently rubricated in class A (categories I and II), B (category III), and C (categories IV and V). Intra- and inter-radiologist agreement on MoM pathology was assessed by means of the weighted Cohen's kappa. Categorical data were presented as n (%), and tested by means of Fisher's exact test. Continuous data were presented as median (min-max) and tested by means of Mann-Whitney U test (two group comparison) or Kruskal-Wallis test (three group comparison). Logistic regression analysis was performed in order to study independence of CT class for association with revision surgery. Univariate statistically significant variables were entered in a multiple model. All statistical

  12. Development and first validation of a simplified CT-based classification system of soft tissue changes in large-head metal-on-metal total hip replacement: intra- and interrater reliability and association with revision rates in a uniform cohort of 664 arthroplasties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomsma, Martijn F.; Warringa, Niek [Isala Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Edens, Mireille A. [Isala Hospital, Department of Innovation and Science, Zwolle (Netherlands); Lingen, Christiaan P. van; Ettema, Harmen B.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M. [Isala Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Zwolle (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [AMC, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    After implantation of a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA), a large incidence of pseudotumor formation has been described recently. Several centers have invited patients for follow-up in order to screen for pseudotumor formation. The spectrum of abnormalities found by CT in MoM THA patients can be unfamiliar to radiologists and orthopedic surgeons. Previously, a CT five-point grading scale has been published. In this paper, a simplification into a three-point classification system gives insight in the morphological distinction of abnormalities of the postoperative hip capsule in MoM implants in relation to the decision for revision. The reliability of this simplified classification regarding intra- and interrater reliability and its association with revision rate is investigated and discussed. All patients who underwent MoM THA in our hospital were invited for screening. Various clinical measures and CT scan were obtained in a cross-sectional fashion. A decision on revision surgery was made shortly after screening. CT scans were read in 582 patients, of which 82 patients were treated bilaterally. CT scans were independently single read by two board-certified radiologists and classified into categories I-V. In a second meeting, consensus was obtained. Categories were subsequently rubricated in class A (categories I and II), B (category III), and C (categories IV and V). Intra- and inter-radiologist agreement on MoM pathology was assessed by means of the weighted Cohen's kappa. Categorical data were presented as n (%), and tested by means of Fisher's exact test. Continuous data were presented as median (min-max) and tested by means of Mann-Whitney U test (two group comparison) or Kruskal-Wallis test (three group comparison). Logistic regression analysis was performed in order to study independence of CT class for association with revision surgery. Univariate statistically significant variables were entered in a multiple model. All statistical

  13. On-Site Determination and Monitoring of Real-Time Fluence Delivery for an Operating UV Reactor Based on a True Fluence Rate Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Qiang, Zhimin; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2017-07-18

    At present, on-site fluence (distribution) determination and monitoring of an operating UV system represent a considerable challenge. The recently developed microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD) is able to measure the approximate true fluence rate (FR) at a fixed position in a UV reactor that can be compared with a FR model directly. Hence it has provided a connection between model calculation and real-time fluence determination. In this study, an on-site determination and monitoring method of fluence delivery for an operating UV reactor was developed. True FR detectors, a UV transmittance (UVT) meter, and a flow rate meter were used for fundamental measurements. The fluence distribution, as well as reduction equivalent fluence (REF), 10th percentile dose in the UV fluence distribution (F 10 ), minimum fluence (F min ), and mean fluence (F mean ) of a test reactor, was calculated in advance by the combined use of computational fluid dynamics and FR field modeling. A field test was carried out on the test reactor for disinfection of a secondary water supply. The estimated real-time REF, F 10 , F min , and F mean decreased 73.6%, 71.4%, 69.6%, and 72.9%, respectively, during a 6-month period, which was attributable to lamp output attenuation and sleeve fouling. The results were analyzed with synchronous data from a previously developed triparameter UV monitoring system and water temperature sensor. This study allowed demonstration of an accurate method for on-site, real-time fluence determination which could be used to enhance the security and public confidence of UV-based water treatment processes.

  14. A study on scar revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Talwar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims: To see the efficacy of various scar revision techniques including Z plasty, VY plasty and W plasty in 30 patients with disfiguring scars. Methods: We selected twenty patients of disfiguring scars for the study. The scars from various causes including trauma and burns were included in our study. Various techniques of scar revision include Z plasty, W plasty and VY plasty were performed according to the type and site of scar. Results: Male: female was 1.5: 1. The scar revision surgery yielded excellent results with minimal complications including haematoma formation, secondary infection and delayed healing seen in 5% patients each. Regarding the efficacy of scar revision, excellent improvement was seen in 60% patients, moderate improvement was seen in 30% patients and mild improvement was seen in 10% patients. Conclusions: Dermatologists can employ a number of surgical scar revision techniques. While some are better suited to treat specific types of scars, they can be used in combination with each other or with adjunctive therapies to achieve optimal results.

  15. Radiation protection planning and management during revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gewehr, K.

    1984-01-01

    During the operation of nuclear power plants it is normally possible for the in-house personnel to take care of arising radiation protection problems. However, in the comparatively short revision phases, the duties of radiation protection become much more varied. Additional trained radiation protection crews are needed at short notice. This is also the time in which the largest contributions are made to the annual cumulated doses of the personnel. Recent guidelines and rules trying to reduce the radiation exposure of personnel concentrate on this very point. The article outlines the radiation protection activities performed by the service personnel in the course of a steam generator check. (orig.) [de

  16. Operation of low-noise single-gap RPC modules exposed to ionisation rates up to 1 kHz/cm$^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Górski, M; Królikowski, J; 10.1016/j.nima.2004.06.123

    2004-01-01

    Two single gap medium-size RPC modules, made of bakelite plates of very good mechanical quality of the surface and having initial volume resistivity of 1 multiplied by 10**1**0 omegacm, were tested in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN at ionisation rates up to 1 kHz/cm **3. The internal surfaces facing the gas volume of one RPC module were cladded with a thin layer of linseed oil varnish for comparison of oiled and non-oiled RPC operation. The results refer to the gas mixture of C//2H//2F //4/isobutane (97:3) with SF//6 addition below 1%. The single gap modules exhibited full detection efficiency plateau for the high voltage range of about 1 kV at full intensity of gamma rays. Good timing characteristics allowed to reach 95% efficiency at fully opened irradiation source with time window of 20 ns. The intrinsic noise rate for a non-oiled and an oiled RPC gap was, respectively, below 5 and 1 Hz/cm**2 at full efficiency over 1 k V voltage range.

  17. Pain and Function Following Revision Cubital Tunnel Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Ebersole, Gregory C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pain and functional outcomes following revision cubital tunnel surgery and to identify predictors of poor postoperative outcome. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients undergoing revision cubital tunnel surgery over a 5-year period at a high-volume peripheral nerve center. Intraoperative findings, demographic and injury factors, and outcomes were reviewed. Average pain, worst pain, and impact of pain on self-perceived quality of life were each measured using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Function was evaluated using pinch and grip strength, as well as the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Differences in preoperative and postoperative pain, strength, and DASH were analyzed using nonparametric tests. Predictors of postoperative average pain were evaluated using odds ratios and linear regression analyses. The final cohort consisted of 50 patients (mean age: 46.3 ± 12.5 years; 29 [68%] male) undergoing 52 revision ulnar nerve transpositions (UNTs). Pain VAS scores decreased significantly following revision UNT. Strength and DASH scores demonstrated nonsignificant improvements postoperatively. Worse preoperative pain and greater than 1 prior cubital tunnel procedure were significant predictors of worse postoperative average pain VAS scores. Patients can and do improve following revision cubital tunnel surgery, particularly as it relates to pain. Intraoperative findings during the revision procedure suggest that adherence to specific principles in the primary operation is key to prevention of secondary cubital tunnel syndrome.

  18. 75 FR 15391 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Revision to Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... to control volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from storage tanks, transport vessels and marine... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Revision to Control Volatile Organic Compound.... Specifically, this revision subjects owners or operators of VOC storage tanks, transport vessels, and marine...

  19. 23 CFR 636.409 - Can offerors revise their proposals during communications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can offerors revise their proposals during communications? 636.409 Section 636.409 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges § 636.409 Can offerors revise their...

  20. 77 FR 23244 - Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Revised Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR12-22-000] Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Revised Baseline Filing Take notice that on April 10, 2012, Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division (Atmos) filed a revised baseline filing of their Statement of Operating...

  1. Revision of ASCE 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, T.A.; Murray, R.C.; Short, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The original version of ASCE Standard 4, ''Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures'' was published in September 1986. It is ASCE policy to update its standards on a five year interval and the Working Group on Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures was reconvened to formulate the revisions. The goal in updating the standard is to make sure that it is still relevant and that it incorporates the state of the practice in seismic engineering or, in some cases, where it has been demonstrated that state-of-the-art improvements need to be made to standard practice; new improvements are included. The contents of the new standard cover the same areas as the original version, with some additions. The contents are as follows: Input - response spectra and time histories; modeling of structures; analysis of structures; soil-structure interaction; input for subsystem analysis; special structures - buried pipes and conduits, earth-retaining walls, above-ground vertical tanks, raceways, and base-isolated structures; and an appendix providing seismic probabilistic risk assessment and margin assessment

  2. Contact activation: a revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaier, A H

    1997-07-01

    In conclusion, a revised view of the contact system has been presented. This system has little to do with the initiation of hemostasis. Like lupus anticoagulants, deficiencies of contact proteins give prolonged APTTs but may be risk factors for thrombosis. BK from kininogens is a potent modulator of vascular biology inducing vasodilation, tissue plasminogen activator release, and prostacyclin liberation. Kininogens, themselves, are selective inhibitors of alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation preventing alpha-thrombin from cleaving the cloned thrombin receptor after arginine41. Kininogens' alpha-thrombin inhibitory activity exists in intact kininogens, BK, and all of BK's breakdown products. HK also is the pivotal protein for contact protein assembly on endothelium. It is the receptor for prekallikrein which when bound to HK becomes activated to kallikrein by an endothelial cell enzyme system independent of activated forms of plasma factor XII. Prekallikrein activation on endothelial cells results in kinetically favorable single chain urokinase and plasminogen activation. Thus the "physiologic, negatively charged surface" for contact system activation is really the assembly of these proteins on cell membranes and activation by membrane-associated enzymes.

  3. EPR first responders revision test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In this revision test evaluates the acquired knowledge in case of radiological emergency confront. Actions to be taken in relation to people, equipment and the environment. Doses, radioactive sources, pollution

  4. Corporate Author Entries. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, P.L.

    1986-05-01

    This reference authority has been created and is maintained to provide standard forms for recording the names of organizations consistently in bibliographic citations. This revision includes approximately 42,000 entries established since 1973

  5. Peritoneal Dialysis Access Revision in Children: Causes, Interventions, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzych-Duzalka, Dagmara; Aki, T Fazil; Azocar, Marta; White, Colin; Harvey, Elizabeth; Mir, Sevgi; Adragna, Marta; Serdaroglu, Erkin; Sinha, Rajiv; Samaille, Charlotte; Vanegas, Juan Jose; Kari, Jameela; Barbosa, Lorena; Bagga, Arvind; Galanti, Monica; Yavascan, Onder; Leozappa, Giovanna; Szczepanska, Maria; Vondrak, Karel; Tse, Kei-Chiu; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A

    2017-01-06

    Little published information is available about access failure in children undergoing chronic peritoneal dialysis. Our objectives were to evaluate frequency, risk factors, interventions, and outcome of peritoneal dialysis access revision. Data were derived from 824 incident and 1629 prevalent patients from 105 pediatric nephrology centers enrolled in the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network Registry between 2007 and 2015. In total, 452 access revisions were recorded in 321 (13%) of 2453 patients over 3134 patient-years of follow-up, resulting in an overall access revision rate of 0.14 per treatment year. Among 824 incident patients, 186 (22.6%) underwent 188 access revisions over 1066 patient-years, yielding an access revision rate of 0.17 per treatment year; 83% of access revisions in incident patients were reported within the first year of peritoneal dialysis treatment. Catheter survival rates in incident patients were 84%, 80%, 77%, and 73% at 12, 24, 36, and 48 months, respectively. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, risk of access revision was associated with younger age (odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 0.95; P<0.001), diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.59; P=0.02), coexisting ostomies (odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.87; P=0.01), presence of swan neck tunnel with curled intraperitoneal portion (odds ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.63; P=0.02), and high gross national income (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.19; P=0.01). Main reasons for access revisions included mechanical malfunction (60%), peritonitis (16%), exit site infection (12%), and leakage (6%). Need for access revision increased the risk of peritoneal dialysis technique failure or death (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.65; P=0.003). Access dysfunction due to mechanical causes doubled the risk

  6. Peritoneal Dialysis Access Revision in Children: Causes, Interventions, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, T. Fazil; Azocar, Marta; White, Colin; Harvey, Elizabeth; Mir, Sevgi; Adragna, Marta; Serdaroglu, Erkin; Sinha, Rajiv; Samaille, Charlotte; Vanegas, Juan Jose; Kari, Jameela; Barbosa, Lorena; Bagga, Arvind; Galanti, Monica; Yavascan, Onder; Leozappa, Giovanna; Szczepanska, Maria; Vondrak, Karel; Tse, Kei-Chiu; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Little published information is available about access failure in children undergoing chronic peritoneal dialysis. Our objectives were to evaluate frequency, risk factors, interventions, and outcome of peritoneal dialysis access revision. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were derived from 824 incident and 1629 prevalent patients from 105 pediatric nephrology centers enrolled in the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network Registry between 2007 and 2015. Results In total, 452 access revisions were recorded in 321 (13%) of 2453 patients over 3134 patient-years of follow-up, resulting in an overall access revision rate of 0.14 per treatment year. Among 824 incident patients, 186 (22.6%) underwent 188 access revisions over 1066 patient-years, yielding an access revision rate of 0.17 per treatment year; 83% of access revisions in incident patients were reported within the first year of peritoneal dialysis treatment. Catheter survival rates in incident patients were 84%, 80%, 77%, and 73% at 12, 24, 36, and 48 months, respectively. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, risk of access revision was associated with younger age (odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 0.95; P<0.001), diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.59; P=0.02), coexisting ostomies (odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.87; P=0.01), presence of swan neck tunnel with curled intraperitoneal portion (odds ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.63; P=0.02), and high gross national income (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.19; P=0.01). Main reasons for access revisions included mechanical malfunction (60%), peritonitis (16%), exit site infection (12%), and leakage (6%). Need for access revision increased the risk of peritoneal dialysis technique failure or death (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1

  7. Revision washout decreases implant capsule tissue culture positivity: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gerard D; Carson, Culley C; Wilson, Steven K; Wiygul, Jeremy; Tornehl, Chris; Cleves, Mario A; Simmons, Caroline J; Donatucci, Craig F

    2008-01-01

    Positive cultures, visible biofilm and confocal micrography confirm bacterial presence on clinically uninfected inflatable penile prostheses at revision surgery. Salvage irrigation has been proved to rescue patients with clinically infected inflatable penile prostheses. Similar washout at revision for noninfectious reasons significantly lowers subsequent infection rates. We investigated a larger series of patients for positive culture rates and evaluated implant capsule tissue culture rates before and after revision washout. At 4 institutions a total of 148 patients with inflatable penile prostheses underwent revision surgery for noninfectious reasons between June 2001 and September 2005. Swab cultures of the fluid around the pump and visible biofilm were obtained. Also, in 65 patients a wedge of tissue from the capsule that forms around the pump was cultured. After implant removal revision washout of the implant spaces was performed and a second wedge of tissue was cultured. Of the 148 patients 97 (66%) had positive bacterial swab cultures of the fluid around the pump or biofilm. A total of 124 isolates were cultured. Of the 65 implant capsule tissue cultures obtained before washout 28 (43%) were positive for bacteria, while 16 (25%) obtained after revision washout were positive. Positive cultures and visible bacterial biofilm are present on clinically uninfected inflatable penile prostheses at revision surgery in most patients. Revision washout appears to decrease the bacterial load on implant capsule tissue at revision surgery of inflatable penile prostheses for noninfectious reasons.

  8. Concordance between DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for delirium diagnosis in a pooled database of 768 prospectively evaluated patients using the delirium rating scale-revised-98

    OpenAIRE

    Meagher, David J; Morandi, Alessandro; Inouye, Sharon K; Ely, Wes; Adamis, Dimitrios; Maclullich, Alasdair J; Rudolph, James L; Neufeld, Karin; Leonard, Maeve; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Davis, Daniel; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Kriesel, Stefan; Thomas, Christine; Hasemann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed Background: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5) provides new criteria for delirium diagnosis. We examined delirium diagnosis using these new criteria compared with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fourth edition (DSM-IV) in a large dataset of patients assessed for delirium and related presentations. Methods: Patient data (n = 768) from six prospectively collected cohorts, clinically assessed using DSM-IV and the Delirium Rating Scale-R...

  9. Request for interim approval to operate Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground as a chemical waste landfill for disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl waste in submarine reactor compartments. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, G.D.

    1994-06-01

    This request is submitted to seek interim approval to operate a Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 chemical waste landfill for the disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. Operation of a chemical waste landfill for disposal of PCB waste is subject to the TSCA regulations of 40 CFR 761. Interim approval is requested for a period not to exceed 5 years from the date of approval. This request covers only the disposal of small 10 quantities of solid PCB waste contained in decommissioned, defueled submarine reactor compartments (SRC). In addition, the request applies only to disposal 12 of this waste in Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground (Trench 94) in the 13 200 East Area of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Facility. Disposal of this waste will be conducted in accordance with the Compliance 15 Agreement (Appendix H) between the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and 16 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. During the 5-year interim approval period, the DOE-RL will submit an application seeking final 18 approval for operation of Trench 94 as a chemical waste landfill, including 19 any necessary waivers, and also will seek a final dangerous waste permit from 20 the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for disposal of lead 21 shielding contained in the SRCS.

  10. What Is the Impact of Smoking on Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Nicholas A; Dowdle, S Blake; Wilkinson, Brandon G; Duchman, Kyle R; Gao, Yubo; Callaghan, John J

    2018-07-01

    There is a paucity of literature evaluating the impact of smoking on revision arthroplasty procedures. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of smoking on complications after revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA). We queried the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database to identify patients who underwent rTKA between 2006 and 2014. Patients were divided into current smokers and nonsmokers according to the NSQIP definitions. Each cohort was compared in terms of demographic data, preoperative comorbidities, and operative time. Infection end points were created from composite surgical site infection variables defined by the NSQIP database. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to adjust for confounding variables and calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). In total, 8776 patients underwent rTKA. Of these patients, 11.6% were current smokers. Univariate analyses demonstrated that smokers had a higher rate of any wound complication (3.8% vs 1.8%, P < .0001), deep infection (2.5% vs 1.0%, P < .0001), pneumonia (1.3% vs 0.4%, P < .0001), and reoperation (5.0% vs 3.1%, P = .001) compared to nonsmokers undergoing revision total knee arthroplasty. Multivariate analysis identified current smokers as being at a significantly increased risk of any wound complication (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.4-3.1) and deep infection (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.6) after rTKA. This study demonstrates that smoking significantly increases the risk of infection, wound complications, and reoperation after rTKA. The results are even more magnified for revision procedures compared to published effects of smoking on primary total knee arthroplasty complications. Further research is needed regarding the impact of smoking cessation on mitigation of these observed risks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fixation of revision implants is improved by new surgical technique to crack the sclerotic endosteal rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, S; Soballe, K; Mouzin, O; Chen, Xiangmei; Toft, M; Bechtold, J

    2002-01-01

    We used an experimental model producing a tissue response with a sclerotic endosteal neo-cortical rim associated with implant loosening in humans: a 6 mm PMMA cylinder pistoned 500 m concentrically in a 7.5 mm hole, with polyethylene particles. At a second operation at eight weeks, the standard revision procedure removed the fibrous membrane in one knee, and the crack revision procedure was used to crack the sclerotic endosteal rim in the contralateral knee. Once stability was achieved following the revision procedures, loaded Ti plasma sprayed implants were inserted into the revision cavities of 8 dogs for an additional 4 weeks. Revision implant fixation (ultimate shear strength and energy absorption) was significantly enhanced by cracking the sclerotic endosteal rim. In conclusion, we demonstrated a simple technique of cracking the sclerotic endosteal rim as an additional method for improving revision fixation. (Hip International 2002; 2: 77-9).

  12. Psychometric properties of Conversion Disorder Scale- Revised (CDS) for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Tazvin; Nasir, Attikah; Sarfraz, Naema; Ijaz, Shirmeen

    2017-05-01

    To revise conversion disorder scale and to establish the psychometric properties of the revised scale. This case-control study was conducted from February to June, 2014, at the Government College University, Lahore, Pakistan, and comprised schoolchildren and children with conversion disorder. In order to generate items for revised version of conversion disorder scale, seven practising mental health professionals were consulted. A list of 42 items was finalised for expert ratings. After empirical validation, a scale of 40 items was administered on the participants and factor analysis was conducted. Of the240 participants, 120(50%) were schoolchildren (controls group) and 120(50%)were children with conversion disorder (clinical group).The results of factor analysis revealed five factors (swallowing and speech symptoms, motor symptoms, sensory symptoms, weakness and fatigue, and mixed symptoms) and retention of all 40 items of revised version of conversion disorder scale. Concurrent validity of the revised scale was found to be 0.81 which was significantly high. Similarly, discriminant validity of the scale was also high as both clinical and control groups had significant difference (pconversion disorder scale was 76% sensitive to predicting conversion disorder while specificity showed that the scale was 73% accurate in specifying participants of the control group. The revised version of conversion disorder scale was a reliable and valid tool to be used for screening of children with conversion disorder.

  13. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  14. Revision of failed shoulder hemiarthroplasty to reverse total arthroplasty: analysis of 157 revision implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, Giovanni; Wagner, Eric; Sperling, John W; Paladini, Paolo; Fabbri, Elisabetta; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    There remains a paucity of studies examining the conversion of failed hemiarthroplasty (HA) to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine a large series of revision HA to RTSA. A population of 157 patients who underwent conversion of a failed HA to a revision RTSA from 2006 through 2014 were included. The mean follow-up was 49 months (range, 24-121 months). The indications for revision surgery included instability with rotator cuff insufficiency (n = 127) and glenoid wear (n = 30); instability and glenoid wear were associated in 38 cases. Eight patients with infection underwent 2-stage reimplantation. Patients experienced significant improvements in their preoperative to postoperative pain and shoulder range of motion (P surgeries, secondary to glenoid component loosening (n = 3), instability (n = 3), humeral component disassembly (n = 2), humeral stem loosening (n = 1), and infection (n = 2). Implant survivorship was 95.5% at 2 years and 93.3% at 5 years. There were 4 reoperations including axillary nerve neurolysis (n = 2), heterotopic ossification removal (n = 1), and hardware removal for rupture of the metal cerclage for an acromial fracture (n = 1). At final follow-up, there were 5 "at-risk" glenoid components. Patients experience satisfactory pain relief and recovery of reasonable shoulder function after revision RTSA from a failed HA. There was a relatively low revision rate, with glenoid loosening and instability being the most common causes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [APPLICATION OF COMPUTER-ASSISTED TECHNOLOGY IN ANALYSIS OF REVISION REASON OF UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Di; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Guoliang; Gao, Huanyu; Yu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To conclude the revision reason of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) using computer-assisted technology so as to provide reference for reducing the revision incidence and improving the level of surgical technique and rehabilitation. The relevant literature on analyzing revision reason of UKA using computer-assisted technology in recent years was extensively reviewed. The revision reasons by computer-assisted technology are fracture of the medial tibial plateau, progressive osteoarthritis of reserved compartment, dislocation of mobile bearing, prosthesis loosening, polyethylene wear, and unexplained persistent pain. Computer-assisted technology can be used to analyze the revision reason of UKA and guide the best operating method and rehabilitation scheme by simulating the operative process and knee joint activities.

  16. Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management's objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL

  17. Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

  18. 中央银行再贷款利率与同业拆借利率的非对称动态传导机制%Unsymmetric Dynamic Transmitting System of Refinancing Rate and Inter Bank Operating Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐寒飞

    2004-01-01

    The interest rate is an important tool for the monetary policy, while in China it is not as effective as which the macroeconomics theory has expected. This paper makes a nonsymmetrical error correction model for the re-loan rate and inter-bank rate, to research the dynamic transmission mechanism of the relation of these interest rates. The significant nonsymmetrical relation is found between the two interest rates and it is the nonsymmetrical relation that has great influence in the transmission effect of the interest rate policy, furthermore, the economics explanation of the nonsymmetrical relation is the arbitrage of the banks and the single direction of the re-loan rate.

  19. MIDAS Website. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Allen; Shively, R. Joy (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    MIDAS, Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System, is a unique combination of software tools aimed at reducing design cycle time, supporting quantitative predictions of human-system effectiveness and improving the design of crew stations and their associated operating procedures. This project is supported jointly by the US Army and NASA.

  20. Graphic Display Development Program. Volume II, Revision 0. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of developing a set of graphic displays to support symptom-based emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Development of generic graphic displays is based on Revision 3 of the symptomatic Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) prepared by the BWR Owners' Group (BWROG), and development of plant-specific graphic displays is based on a set of emergency operating procedures developed from these EPGs

  1. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  2. Towards Revised Step IV MICE Optics in the Absence of M1 SSD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayes, R. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blackmore, V. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Hunt, C. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Liu, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pasternak, J. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Rogers, C. T. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL)

    2015-10-01

    During magnet commissioning in September 2015, the leads on coil M1 of the downstream spectrometer solenoid failed. The coil will not be operational for MICE Step IV. Revised optics settings for the Step IV data taking are reviewed.

  3. Towards Revised Step IV MICE Optics in the Absence of M1 SSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayes, R.; Berg, J. S.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Liu, A.; Pasternak, J.; Rogers, C. T.

    2015-01-01

    During magnet commissioning in September 2015, the leads on coil M1 of the downstream spectrometer solenoid failed. The coil will not be operational for MICE Step IV. Revised optics settings for the Step IV data taking are reviewed.

  4. Age and Early Revision After Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty for Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Zachary; Baca, Geneva; Rames, Richard; Barrack, Robert; Clohisy, John; Nam, Denis

    2017-11-01

    Prior reports have noted an increased risk of early revision among younger patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) but have been confounded by the inclusion of various diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to assess the revision rate and the time to revision for patients undergoing THA for osteoarthritis based on age. Patients with a diagnosis of osteoarthritis who underwent both primary and revision THA at the same institution were identified. The time between primary and revision surgery and the indication for revision were collected. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on age at the time of primary THA: 64 years or younger (group 1) or 65 years or older (group 2). Between 1996 and 2016, a total of 4662 patients (5543 hips) underwent primary THA for a diagnosis of osteoarthritis. Of these, 100 patients (104 hips) received a revision THA (62 in group 1 and 42 in group 2). Mean age was 52.7±8.4 years in group 1 vs 73.4±6.3 years in group 2 (Pprimary to revision surgery was 3.0±3.2 years for group 1 and 1.1±2.1 years for group 2 (P=.001). Among patients undergoing primary THA for a diagnosis of osteoarthritis, younger age is not associated with an increased rate of early failure or revision. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(6):e1069-e1073.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. NPP License Renewal and Aging Management: Revised Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.B.; Hiser, A.L.; Lindo-Talin, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Atomic Energy Act, the NRC issues licenses for commercial power reactors to operate for up to 40 years and allows these licenses to be renewed for up to another 20 years. NRC has approved license renewal (LR) for well over 50% of U.S. located reactors originally licensed to operate for 40 years. Of these 104 reactors (69 PWRs, 35 BWRs), the NRC has issued renewed licenses for 71 units and is currently reviewing applications for another 15 units. As of May 1, 2012, ten plants at nine sites had entered their 41st year of operation and thus are in their first period of extended operation (PEO). Five more plants will enter the PEO by the end of 2012. One foundation of the license renewal process has been license renewal guidance documents (LRGDs). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) revised key guidance documents used for nuclear power LR in 2010 and 2011. These include NUREG-1800, 'Standard Review Plan for Review of License Renewal Applications,' revision 2 (SRP-LR), and NUREG-1801, 'Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,' revision 2 (GALL Report). The guidance documents were updated to reflect lessons learned and operating experience gained since the guidance documents were last issued in 2005. The reactor LRGDs referenced in this poster can all be accessed at http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/licensing/renewal/guidance.html (author)

  6. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  7. Lifelong Adaptability: A Cultural Literacy Perspective (Revised Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, John Thayer

    2011-01-01

    This revised 1997 ex post facto study attempted to identify a lifelong adaptability curriculum from a cultural literacy perspective. It investigated students' lifelong adaptability ratings of 15 general school subjects as predicted by family structure, parental age, parental educational level, student cultural literacy, and student gender;…

  8. Nuclear safety guide. TID-7016, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1978-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Guide was first issued in 1956 as classified AEC report LA-2063 and was reprinted the next year, unclassified, as TID-7016. Revision 1, published in 1961, extended the scope and refined the guiding information. The present revision of the Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the formerGuides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information

  9. Nuclear safety guide. TID-7016, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J T [ed.

    1978-05-01

    The Nuclear Safety Guide was first issued in 1956 as classified AEC report LA-2063 and was reprinted the next year, unclassified, as TID-7016. Revision 1, published in 1961, extended the scope and refined the guiding information. The present revision of the Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the formerGuides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information.

  10. Draft revision of human factors guideline HF-010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Jung Woon; Cha, Woo Chang; Lee, Dhong Ha

    2003-05-01

    The Application of Human Factors to the design of Man-Machine Interfaces System(MMIS) in the nuclear power plant is essential to the safety and productivity of the nuclear power plants, human factors standards and guidelines as well as human factors analysis methods and experiments are weightily used to the design application. A Korean engineering company has developed a human factors engineering guideline, so-call HF-010, and has used it for human factors design, however the revision of HF-010 is necessary owing to lack of the contents related to the advanced MMI(Man-Machine Interfaces). As the results of the reviews of HF-010, it is found out that the revision of Section 9. Computer Displays of HF-010 is urgent, thus the revision was drafted on the basis of integrated human factors design guidelines for VDT, human factors design guidelines for PMAS SPADES display, human factors design guidelines for PMAS alarm display, and human factors design guidelines for electronic displays developed by the surveillance and operation support project of KOICS. The draft revision of HF-010 Section 9 proposed in this report can be utilized for the human factors design of the advanced MMI, and the high practical usability of the draft can be kept up through the continuous revision according to the advancement of digital technology

  11. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes

  12. Risk factors for revision of primary total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopetz Julian JZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous papers have been published examining risk factors for revision of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA, but there have been no comprehensive systematic literature reviews that summarize the most recent findings across a broad range of potential predictors. Methods We performed a PubMed search for papers published between January, 2000 and November, 2010 that provided data on risk factors for revision of primary THA. We collected data on revision for any reason, as well as on revision for aseptic loosening, infection, or dislocation. For each risk factor that was examined in at least three papers, we summarize the number and direction of statistically significant associations reported. Results Eighty-six papers were included in our review. Factors found to be associated with revision included younger age, greater comorbidity, a diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN as compared to osteoarthritis (OA, low surgeon volume, and larger femoral head size. Male sex was associated with revision due to aseptic loosening and infection. Longer operating time was associated with revision due to infection. Smaller femoral head size was associated with revision due to dislocation. Conclusions This systematic review of literature published between 2000 and 2010 identified a range of demographic, clinical, surgical, implant, and provider variables associated with the risk of revision following primary THA. These findings can inform discussions between surgeons and patients relating to the risks and benefits of undergoing total hip arthroplasty.

  13. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing; Melucci, Massimo [Padua Univ., Padova (Italy). Dept. of Information Engineering; Frommholz, Ingo [Bedfordshire Univ. (United Kingdom); Arafat, Sachi (eds.) [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing Science

    2011-07-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  14. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies

  15. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei; Arafat, Sachi

    2011-01-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  16. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  17. Revising Nabokov Revising”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouchet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nabokov revised his works as he translated them and, on another plane, canon revisionism has been having its backlash and provoked other refracting waves. The purpose of the conference was to advance Nabokov studies through the discussion of how our view of Nabokov’s standing and his works today should be revised, especially after the publication of The Original of Laura. However the conference was not confined to just this theme, since “revising” is a word rich with implications. To borrow s...

  18. Team interaction skills evaluation criteria for nuclear power plant control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Hauth, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Team interaction skills are an essential aspect of safe nuclear power plant control room operations. Previous research has shown that, when a group works together, rather than as individuals, more effective operations are possible. However, little research has addressed how such team interaction skills can be measured. In this study rating scales were developed specifically for such a measurement purpose. Dimensions of team skill performance were identified from previous research and experience in the area, incorporating the input of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contract operator licensing examiners. Rating scales were developed on the basis of these dimensions, incorporating a modified Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) as well as Behavioral Frequency formats. After a pilot-testing/revision process, rating data were collected using 11 control room crews responding to simulator scenarios at a boiling water and a pressurized water reactor. Statistical analyses of the resulting data revealed moderate inter-rater reliability using the Behavioral Frequency scales, relatively low inter-rater reliability using the BARS, and moderate support for convergent and discriminant validity of the scales. It was concluded that the scales show promise psychometrically and in terms of user acceptability, but that additional scale revision is needed before field implementation. Recommendations for scale revision and directions for future research were presented

  19. Introduction to Sonar, Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    own ship anddesign e andm constructiones ofmmechanicale andthe the target, measured in the deck plane. Thiserni equipntto ovehicol quantity is...attention of your security 6. You may associate with non-citizens on officer or commanding officer. State the facts: a close social basis. However, any...Rank/Rate Designator Social Security Number COURSE COMPLETION Letters of satisfactory completion are issued only to personnel whose courses are

  20. Experience gained from shifting a PK-19 boiler to operate with increased superheating and with a load higher than its rated value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholshchev, V. V.

    2011-08-01

    Failures of steam superheater tubes occurred after the boiler was shifted to operate with a steam temperature of 540°C. The operation of the steam superheater became more reliable after it had been subjected to retrofitting. The modernization scheme is described. An estimate is given to the temperature operating conditions of tubes taking into account the thermal-hydraulic nonuniformity of their heating.

  1. NPP License Renewal and Aging Management: Revised Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.B.; Hiser, A.L.; Lindo-Talin, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Atomic Energy Act, the NRC issues licenses for commercial power reactors to operate for up to 40 years and allows these licenses to be renewed for up to another 20 years. NRC has approved license renewal for well over 50% of U.S. located reactors originally licensed to operate for 40 years. Of these 104 reactors (69 PWRs, 35 BWRs), the NRC has issued renewed licenses for 71 units and is currently reviewing applications for another 15 units. As of May 1, 2012, ten plants at nine sites had entered their 41st year of operation and thus are in their first period of extended operation (PEO). Five more plants will enter the PEO by the end of 2012. One foundation of the license renewal process has been license renewal guidance documents (LRGDs). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) revised key guidance documents used for nuclear power license renewal in 2010 and 2011. These include NUREG-1800, 'Standard Review Plan for Review of License Renewal Applications,' revision 2 (SRP-LR), and NUREG-1801, 'Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,' revision 2 (GALL Report). The guidance documents were updated to reflect lessons learned and operating experience gained since the guidance documents were last issued in 2005. (author)

  2. Complications Following Primary and Revision Transsphenoidal Surgeries for Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, James G.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Wineland, Andre; Nepple, Kenneth G.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Getz, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to determine the incidence of major complications following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Major complications included endocrinopathic, skull base, orbital, hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, respiratory failure, and death. Secondarily, this study aimed to examine factors associated with the occurrence of complications. Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis of California and Florida all-payer databases from 2005-2008. Methods The major complication rate following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery was calculated. Bivariate analyses were performed to investigate the relationship of patient characteristics with complication occurrence, and a multivariate model was constructed to determine risk factors associated with these complications. Results 5,277 primary cases and 192 revision cases met inclusion criteria. There was a non-significant absolute difference of 3.09% (95% CI −11.00 to 16.14) between the rate of complications following primary (n=443; 8.39%) and revision (n=22; 11.46%) surgeries. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with Medicare (OR=1.74; 95% CI 1.17 to 2.61), Medicaid (OR=2.13; 95% CI 1.59 to 2.86), or a malignant neoplasm (OR=3.10; 95% CI 1.62 to 5.93) were more likely to have complications. Conclusions The rate of major complications following transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is lower than earlier retrospective reports. The overall complication rate following revision surgery was not significantly different from primary surgery. Insurance status and a diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm were associated with a higher rate of complications. PMID:25263939

  3. [Revision of the drinking water regulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, S

    2011-11-01

    The revision the Drinking Water Regulations will come into effect on 01.11.2011. Surveillance authorities and owners of drinking water supply systems had hoped for simplifications and reductions because of the new arrangements. According to the official statement for the revision the legislature intended to create more clarity, consider new scientific findings, to change regulations that have not been proved to close regulatory gaps, to deregulate and to increase the high quality standards. A detailed examination of the regulation text, however, raises doubts. The new classification of water supply systems requires different modalities of registration, water analyses and official observation, which will complicate the work of the authorities. In particular, the implementation of requirements of registration and examination for the owners of commercial and publicly-operated large hot-water systems in accordance with DVGW Worksheet W 551 requires more effort. According to the estimated 30 000 cases of legionellosis in Germany the need for a check of such systems for Legionella, however, is not called into question. Furthermore, the development of sampling plans and the monitoring of mobile water supply systems requires more work for the health authorities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Concise revision of the Sarcospermataceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Royen, van P.

    1952-01-01

    After the senior writer, together with W. W. Varossieau, had published a revision of this monogeneric family (Blumea III, 1938—’39 and IV, 1941), some more material has been examined by us and, moreover, some new species have been described. Thanks to the courtesy of Prof. F. Gagnepain of Paris, and

  5. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  6. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  7. How Adults Learn. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, J. R.

    The book's emphasis is on learning during the years of adulthood and examines present-day practice of adult education for practitioners. This revised edition brings up to date advances in such areas of learning as controversial theory; the effects of environment; sensory processes; intellectual capacities; motivation and attitude; transactional…

  8. A revision of the Paronychiinae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaudhri, Mohammad Nazeer

    1968-01-01

    This study was undertaken, in April 1964, at the suggestion of Prof. Dr. J. Lanjouw. The need for such a revision, was, however, stressed by the authors of the subtribe, viz. PAX et K. HOFFMANN, who, while delimiting these genera, remarked that the Systematics of both the (main) genera of this

  9. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  10. [Revised practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, M.; Jans, S.M.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The practice guideline of the Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives 'Anaemia in primary care midwifery practice' published in 2000, has recently been revised. The revised guideline takes physiological haemodilution during pregnancy into consideration and provides gestation specific reference values

  11. Revised Human Health Risk Assessment on Chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have revised our human health risk assessment and drinking water exposure assessment for chlorpyrifos that supported our October 2015 proposal to revoke all food residue tolerances for chlorpyrifos. Learn about the revised analysis.

  12. 75 FR 60485 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0497] NRC Enforcement Policy Revision AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Policy statement. SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) is publishing a major revision to its Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy) to...

  13. 75% success rate after open debridement, exchange of tibial insert, and antibiotics in knee prosthetic joint infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Anna; Thórhallsdóttir, Valdís Gudrún; Robertsson, Otto; W-Dahl, Annette; Stefánsdóttir, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a leading cause of early revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Open debridement with exchange of tibial insert allows treatment of infection with retention of fixed components. We investigated the success rate of this procedure in the treatment of knee PJIs in a nationwide material, and determined whether the results were affected by microbiology, antibiotic treatment, or timing of debridement. 145 primary TKAs revised for the first time, due to infection, with debridement and exchange of the tibial insert were identified in the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (37%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (23%). Failure was defined as death before the end of antibiotic treatment, revision of major components due to infection, life-long antibiotic treatment, or chronic infection. The overall healing rate was 75%. The type of infecting pathogen did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Staphylococcal infections treated without a combination of antibiotics including rifampin had a higher failure rate than those treated with rifampin (RR = 4, 95% CI: 2-10). In the 16 cases with more than 3 weeks of symptoms before treatment, the healing rate was 62%, as compared to 77% in the other cases (p = 0.2). The few patients with a revision model of prosthesis at primary operation had a high failure rate (5 of 8). Good results can be achieved by open debridement with exchange of tibial insert. It is important to use an antibiotic combination including rifampin in staphylococcal infections.

  14. Revised SNAP III Training Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Calvin Elroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzales, Samuel M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Mark Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rothrock, Richard Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salazar, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sorensen, Eric Byron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sundby, Gary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    The Shielded Neutron Assay Probe (SNAP) technique was developed to determine the leakage neutron source strength of a radioactive object. The original system consisted of an EberlineTM Mini-scaler and discrete neutron detector. The system was operated by obtaining the count rate with the EberlineTM instrument, determining the absolute efficiency from a graph, and calculating the neutron source strength by hand. In 2003 the SNAP III, shown in Figure 1, was designed and built. It required the operator to position the SNAP, and then measure the source-to-detector and detectorto- reflector distances. Next the operator entered the distance measurements and started the data acquisition. The SNAP acquired the required count rate and then calculated and displayed the leakage neutron source strength (NSS). The original design of the SNAP III is described in SNAP III Training Manual (ER-TRN-PLN-0258, Rev. 0, January 2004, prepared by William Baird) This report describes some changes that have been made to the SNAP III. One important change is the addition of a LEMO connector to provide neutron detection output pulses for input to the MC-15. This feature is useful in active interrogation with a neutron generator because the MC-15 has the capability to only record data when it is not gated off by a pulse from the neutron generator. This avoids recording of a lot of data during the generator pulses that are not useful. Another change was the replacement of the infrared RS-232 serial communication output by a similar output via a 4-pin LEMO connector. The current document includes a more complete explanation of how to estimate the amount of moderation around a neutron-emitting source.

  15. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  16. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laubenfels, de D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana

  17. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form prescribed...

  18. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of...

  19. 48 CFR 15.307 - Proposal revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Source Selection 15.307 Proposal revisions. (a) If an... allow proposal revisions to clarify and document understandings reached during negotiations. At the... submit a final proposal revision. The contracting officer is required to establish a common cut-off date...

  20. Local public document room directory. Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This directory (NUREG/BR-0088, Revision 7) lists local public document rooms (LPDRs) for commercial nuclear power plants with operating or possession-only licenses or under construction, plus the LPDRs for potential high-level radioactive waste repository sites, gaseous diffusion plants, certain fuel cycle facilities, certain low-level waste disposal facilities, and any temporary LPDRs established for the duration of licensing proceedings. In some instances, the LPDR libraries maintain document collections for more than one licensed facility. The library staff members listed are the persons most familiar with the LPDR collections. Reference librarians in the NRC Headquarters Public Document Room (PDR) are also available to assist the public in locating NRC documents