WorldWideScience

Sample records for returning international travelers

  1. The Prevalence of Norovirus in returning international travelers with diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löscher Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high incidence of diarrhea in traveling populations. Norovirus (NV infection is a common cause of diarrhea and is associated with 7% of all diarrhea related deaths in the US. However, data on the overall prevalence of NV infection in traveling populations is limited. Furthermore, the prevalence of NV amongst travelers returning to Europe has not been reported. This study determined the prevalence of NV among international travelers returning to Germany from over 50 destinations in and outside Europe. Methods Stool samples of a total of 104 patients with a recent ( Results In our cohort, NV infection was detected in 15.7% of returning travelers with diarrhea. The closer to the date of return symptoms appeared, the higher the incidence of NV, ranging as high as 21.2% within the first four days after return. Conclusions In our cohort, NV infection was shown to be frequent among returning travelers especially in those with diarrhea, with over 1/5 of diarrhea patients tested positive for NV within the first four days after their return to Germany. Due to this prevalence, routine testing for NV infection and hygienic precautions may be warranted in this group. This is especially applicable to patients at an increased risk of spreading the disease, such as healthcare workers, teachers or food-handlers.

  2. Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Han, Pauline V; Stauffer, William M; Miller, Andy O; Connor, Bradley A; Hale, DeVon C; Coyle, Christina M; Cahill, John D; Marano, Cinzia; Esposito, Douglas H; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2014-12-01

    US residents make 60 million international trips annually. Family practice providers need to be aware of travel-associated diseases affecting this growing mobile population. To describe demographics, travel characteristics and clinical diagnoses of US residents who present ill after international travel. Descriptive analysis of travel-associated morbidity and mortality among US travellers seeking care at 1 of the 22 US practices and clinics participating in the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network from January 2000 to December 2012. Of the 9624 ill US travellers included in the analysis, 3656 (38%) were tourist travellers, 2379 (25%) missionary/volunteer/research/aid workers (MVRA), 1580 (16%) travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), 1394 (15%) business travellers and 593 (6%) student travellers. Median (interquartile range) travel duration was 20 days (10-60 days). Pre-travel advice was sought by 45%. Hospitalization was required by 7%. Compared with other groups of travellers, ill MVRA travellers returned from longer trips (median duration 61 days), while VFR travellers disproportionately required higher rates of inpatient care (24%) and less frequently had received pre-travel medical advice (20%). Illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract were the most common (58%), followed by systemic febrile illnesses (18%) and dermatologic disorders (17%). Three deaths were reported. Diagnoses varied according to the purpose of travel and region of exposure. Returning ill US international travellers present with a broad spectrum of travel-associated diseases. Destination and reason for travel may help primary health care providers to generate an accurate differential diagnosis for the most common disorders and for those that may be life-threatening. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Self-reported infections during international travel and notifiable infections among returning international travellers, Sweden, 2009-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallensten, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We studied food and water-borne diseases (FWDs), sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme among Swedish international travellers, in order to identify countries associated with a high number of infections. We used the national database for notifiable infections to estimate the number of FWDs (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, giardiasis, shigellosis, EHEC, Entamoeba histolytica, yersinosis, hepatitis A, paratyphoid fever, typhoid fever, hepatitis E, listeriosis, cholera), STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea and acute hepatitis B), VBDs (dengue fever, malaria, West Nile fever, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever) and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria) acquired abroad 2009–2013. We obtained number and duration of trips to each country from a database that monthly collects travel data from a randomly selected proportion of the Swedish population. We calculated number of infections per country 2009–2013 and incidence/million travel days for the five countries with the highest number of infections. Thailand had the highest number of FWDs (7,697, incidence 191/million travel days), STIs (1,388, incidence 34/million travel days) and VBDs (358, incidence 9/million travel days). France had the highest number of cases of diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (8, 0.4/million travel days). Swedish travellers contracted most infections in Thailand. Special focus should be placed on giving advice to travellers to this destination. PMID:28753671

  4. Self-reported infections during international travel and notifiable infections among returning international travellers, Sweden, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Viktor; Wallensten, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We studied food and water-borne diseases (FWDs), sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme among Swedish international travellers, in order to identify countries associated with a high number of infections. We used the national database for notifiable infections to estimate the number of FWDs (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, giardiasis, shigellosis, EHEC, Entamoeba histolytica, yersinosis, hepatitis A, paratyphoid fever, typhoid fever, hepatitis E, listeriosis, cholera), STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea and acute hepatitis B), VBDs (dengue fever, malaria, West Nile fever, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever) and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria) acquired abroad 2009-2013. We obtained number and duration of trips to each country from a database that monthly collects travel data from a randomly selected proportion of the Swedish population. We calculated number of infections per country 2009-2013 and incidence/million travel days for the five countries with the highest number of infections. Thailand had the highest number of FWDs (7,697, incidence 191/million travel days), STIs (1,388, incidence 34/million travel days) and VBDs (358, incidence 9/million travel days). France had the highest number of cases of diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (8, 0.4/million travel days). Swedish travellers contracted most infections in Thailand. Special focus should be placed on giving advice to travellers to this destination.

  5. Self-reported infections during international travel and notifiable infections among returning international travellers, Sweden, 2009-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Dahl

    Full Text Available We studied food and water-borne diseases (FWDs, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs, vector-borne diseases (VBDs and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme among Swedish international travellers, in order to identify countries associated with a high number of infections. We used the national database for notifiable infections to estimate the number of FWDs (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, giardiasis, shigellosis, EHEC, Entamoeba histolytica, yersinosis, hepatitis A, paratyphoid fever, typhoid fever, hepatitis E, listeriosis, cholera, STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea and acute hepatitis B, VBDs (dengue fever, malaria, West Nile fever, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria acquired abroad 2009-2013. We obtained number and duration of trips to each country from a database that monthly collects travel data from a randomly selected proportion of the Swedish population. We calculated number of infections per country 2009-2013 and incidence/million travel days for the five countries with the highest number of infections. Thailand had the highest number of FWDs (7,697, incidence 191/million travel days, STIs (1,388, incidence 34/million travel days and VBDs (358, incidence 9/million travel days. France had the highest number of cases of diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (8, 0.4/million travel days. Swedish travellers contracted most infections in Thailand. Special focus should be placed on giving advice to travellers to this destination.

  6. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two provider-based traveler-focused networks allowed for the detection of a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS). Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with fever and myalgia noted the biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophi...

  7. Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michal Stevens, A.; Esposito, Douglas H.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Connor, Bradley A.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Goorhuis, Abraham; Hynes, Noreen A.; Libman, Michael; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; McCarthy, Anne E.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Schwartz, Eli; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Scott Benson, L.; Leung, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and

  8. Cluster of Imported Vivax Malaria in Travelers Returning From Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Thomas; Labarca, Jaime; Cortes, Claudia P; Rosas, Reinaldo; Balcells, M Elvira; Perret, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    We report a cluster of imported vivax malaria in three of five Chilean travelers returning from Peru in March 2015. The cluster highlights the high risk of malaria in the Loreto region in northern Peru, which includes popular destinations for international nature and adventure tourism. According to local surveillance data, Plasmodium vivax is predominating, but Plasmodium falciparum is also present, and the incidence of both species has increased during recent years. Travelers visiting this region should be counseled about the prevention of malaria and the options for chemoprophylaxis. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  9. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. [Fever in children returning from travel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, F; Velayudhan-Deschamps, N; Faye, A; Blondé, R; Naudin, J

    2016-04-01

    Child travelers are numerous, exposed to the risk of diseases, both infectious and noninfectious, for which practitioners often lack experience. The assessment of febrile returning child travelers is becoming more frequent and challenging. The question of previous travel should be foremost in the checklist of the interview of any febrile child traveler, because this implies a possible tropical disease such as malaria that may be life-threatening. These need to be investigated and treated effectively and rapidly. There are highly contagious infections that could pose public health risks requiring implementation of hygienic and public health measures. A detailed immunization, medical, and travel history for exposure to infectious risks using geographic, seasonal, environmental, sociocultural, and epidemiological data are needed. Along with clinical examination and elementary first-line investigations, the history should guide second-line exams, which will provide the etiology and optimal treatment in approximately 75 % of cases. The majority of children will have a cosmopolitan infection that resolves spontaneously or is simple to treat. Malaria will need urgent and specific treatment. This article describes guidance on first-line evaluation and management of febrile child travelers as recommended in France. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Persistent diarrhea in the returned traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielman, N M; Guerrant, R L

    1998-06-01

    In conclusion, the causes of chronic diarrhea in the returned traveler are protean. Careful evaluation requires an understanding of where the traveler has been, when they were there, the type of diarrheal illness, medications taken, and knowledge of the patients' other medical problems. Protozoa, particularly G. lamblia, C. parvum, and C. cayatenensis, are among the more commonly identified agents. If the patient is immunocompromised, microsporidia and Isospora become more likely, and a prior history of antimicrobial use raises the possibility of C. difficile colitis. Occasionally helminths, which establish intimate contact with the intestinal mucosa, may also cause prolonged diarrhea. If these and other gastrointestinal insults, such as tropical sprue, small bowel overgrowth, lactose intolerance, and processes unrelated to travel are excluded by more invasive studies or clinical history, the patient can be reassured that idiopathic chronic diarrhea is usually self-limited.

  12. Malaria in a returning traveler from Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Michael; Bavaro, Mary

    2014-06-01

    Malaria in Jamaica is a real, but uncommon entity and poses a health risk to our Department of Defense personnel, which should not be overlooked in returning travelers. Malaria in Jamaica was actually considered eradicated in the 1960s, but there has been a reemergence attributed to the combination of Haitian nationals as well as endemic Anopheles mosquitoes in the Kingston area. Our facility recently admitted a 33-year-old Marine who had two Emergency Department visits before being evaluated for malaria. He had returned from Kingston 14 days before presentation, which included fever, night sweats, and headache followed by a period of malaise prior to the next paroxysm. He was found to have a 1.5% parasitemia with Malaria falciparum that borders on severe malaria. Fortunately, he was treated effectively with atovaquone/proguanil and had a favorable outcome. The Center for Disease Control acknowledges that malaria is present in Jamaica, but only recommends mosquito avoidance without prophylaxis. This case emphasizes the need to consider malaria in differential diagnosis in Jamaica as well as in any returning travelers with fever because of broad global travel. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Self-motion perception compresses time experienced in return travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Takeharu; Ito, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Sunaga

    2011-01-01

    It is often anecdotally reported that time experienced in return travel (back to the start point) seems shorter than time spent in outward travel (travel to a new destination). Here, we report the first experimental results showing that return travel time is experienced as shorter than the actual time. This discrepancy is induced by the existence of self-motion perception.

  14. International travel and vaccinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvon, M K; Qazi, S.; Ward, L A

    1999-01-01

    With the increase in global travel, no disease is beyond the reach of any population. Traveling patients should be advised to follow food and water precautions and encouraged to receive the recommended immunizations. Travel medicine plays a vital role not only in limiting the morbidity of travel-related illnesses but also in limiting the spread of diseases. This article addresses the common issues related to travel, reviews the care of the immunocompromised traveler, and updates the available...

  15. Murine typhus in two travelers returning from Bali, Indonesia: an underdiagnosed disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Nozomi; Imoto, Kazuya; Ando, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Kunio; Ohji, Goh; Kato, Yasuyuki; Sakata, Akiko; Hosokawa, Naoto; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Two Japanese travelers from Bali were diagnosed with murine typhus in Japan during the same period. Although one had only mild illness, the other experienced liver and kidney dysfunction. Murine typhus may be missed not only in endemic areas around the world, but also in travelers, especially those returning from marine resorts in these areas. © 2010 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  16. A severe transmissible Majocchi's granuloma in an immunocompetent returned traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, James G; Woods, Marion; Graham, Rikki M; Jennison, Amy V

    2017-12-01

    Severe dermatophyte infection is rare in immunocompetent adults. Recently cases have been described in travelers returning from South East Asia (Luchsinger et al., 2015) [1]. These may be sexually transmitted and can have permanent sequelae. We describe the first reported case of Majocchi's granuloma (MG) in an Australian returned traveler and its subsequent transmission via sexual contact. Both patients were successfully treated with systemic antifungals. MG should be considered in patients with severe rash after travel to South East Asia.

  17. Prevalence of Stx-producing Shigella species isolated from French Travelers Returning from the Caribbean: An Emerging Pathogen with International Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Miranda D.; Lacher, David W.; Leonard, Susan R.; Abbott, Jason; Zhao, Shaohua; Lampel, Keith A.; Prothery, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Weill, François-Xavier; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxins are potent cytotoxins that inhibit host cell protein synthesis, leading to cell death. Classically, these toxins are associated with intestinal infections due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli or Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and infections with these strains can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome. Over the past decade there is increasing recognition that Shiga toxin is produced by additional Shigella species. We recently reported the presence and expression of stx genes in Shigella flexneri 2a clinical isolates. The toxin genes were carried by a new stx-encoding bacteriophage and infection with these strains correlated with recent travel to Haiti or the Dominican Republic. In this study we further explored the epidemiological link to this region by utilizing the French National Reference Center for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella collection to survey the frequency of Stx-producing Shigella species isolated from French travelers returning from the Caribbean. About 21% of the isolates tested were found to encode and produce Stx. These isolates included strains of S. flexneri 2a, S. flexneri Y, and S. dysenteriae 4. All of the travelers whom were infected with Stx-producing Shigella had recently traveled to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, or French Guiana. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing found that the toxin genes were encoded by a prophage that was highly identical to the phage we identified in our previous study. These findings demonstrate that this new stx-encoding prophage is circulating within that geographical area, has spread to other continents, and is capable of spreading to multiple Shigella serogroups. PMID:25980352

  18. Prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Shigella species isolated from French travellers returning from the Caribbean: an emerging pathogen with international implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, M D; Lacher, D W; Leonard, S R; Abbott, J; Zhao, S; Lampel, K A; Prothery, E; Gouali, M; Weill, F-X; Maurelli, A T

    2015-08-01

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) are potent cytotoxins that inhibit host cell protein synthesis, leading to cell death. Classically, these toxins are associated with intestinal infections due to Stx-producing Escherichia coli or Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1, and infections with these strains can lead to haemolytic-uraemic syndrome. Over the past decade, there has been increasing recognition that Stx is produced by additional Shigella species. We recently reported the presence and expression of stx genes in Shigella flexneri 2a clinical isolates. The toxin genes were carried by a new stx-encoding bacteriophage, and infection with these strains correlated with recent travel to Haiti or the Dominican Republic. In this study, we further explored the epidemiological link to this region by utilizing the French National Reference Centre for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella collection to survey the frequency of Stx-producing Shigella species isolated from French travellers returning from the Caribbean. Approximately 21% of the isolates tested were found to encode and produce Stx. These isolates included strains of S. flexneri 2a, S. flexneri Y, and S. dysenteriae 4. All of the travellers who were infected with Stx-producing Shigella had recently travelled to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, or French Guiana. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing showed that the toxin genes were encoded by a prophage that was highly identical to the phage that we identified in our previous study. These findings demonstrate that this new stx-encoding prophage is circulating within that geographical area, has spread to other continents, and is capable of spreading to multiple Shigella serogroups. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Massive intra-alveolar hemorrhage caused by Leptospira serovar Djasiman in a traveler returning from Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héry, Guillaume; Letheulle, Julien; Flécher, Erwan; Quentin, Charlotte; Piau, Caroline; Le Tulzo, Yves; Tattevin, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is one of the most common pathogens responsible for life-threatening tropical disease in travelers. We report a case of massive intra-alveolar hemorrhage caused by Leptospira serovar Djasiman in a 38-year-old man returning from Laos, who was cured with antibiotics and salvage treatment with extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  20. Chikungunya: acute fever, rash and debilitating arthralgias in a returning traveler from Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kathryn B; Pureza, Vincent; Walker, Patricia F

    2014-01-01

    The following case report details a case of chikungunya fever in a returning traveler from Haiti. The report highlights the clinical presentation and natural history of the disease, and emphasizes that chikungunya has become established in the western hemisphere, with a resultant need for heightened provider awareness. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  1. Medications and International Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-12

    This podcast answers a listener's question about her medications and an international trip she's planning.  Created: 4/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/12/2011.

  2. A severe transmissible Majocchi's granuloma in an immunocompetent returned traveler

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, James G.; Woods, Marion; Graham, Rikki M.; Jennison, Amy V.

    2017-01-01

    Severe dermatophyte infection is rare in immunocompetent adults. Recently cases have been described in travelers returning from South East Asia (Luchsinger et al., 2015) [1]. These may be sexually transmitted and can have permanent sequelae. We describe the first reported case of Majocchi's granuloma (MG) in an Australian returned traveler and its subsequent transmission via sexual contact. Both patients were successfully treated with systemic antifungals. MG should be considered in patients ...

  3. Toxigenic cutaneous diphtheria in a returned traveller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Nur R; Koehler, Ann P; Shaw, Doug D; Graham, Caitlin R

    2014-12-31

    Diphtheria is rarely reported in Australia. A case of cutaneous diphtheria was reported to the South Australian Department for Health and Ageing in April 2013 in an Australian-born 18-year-old female following travel in India. The case presented with a skin ulcer on her toe. Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae was isolated from a swab of the lesion. The case was treated with antibiotics. The public health response included infection control advice, assessing the case and household contacts for organism carriage and providing antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis to contacts. Although cutaneous diphtheria is not included as part of the Australian communicable disease surveillance case definition, this may be an oversight as international evidence demonstrates that it is a source of organism transmission and can potentially result in outbreaks among susceptible populations. This formed the rationale for the public health response to this particular case. The protocol for the public health management of diphtheria in South Australia has since been revised to include cutaneous lesions caused by the toxigenic strain of the organism as part of the surveillance case definition. This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce the whole or part of this work in unaltered form for your own personal use or, if you are part of an organisation, for internal use within your organisation, but only if you or your organisation do not use the reproduction for any commercial purpose and retain this copyright notice and all disclaimer notices as part of that reproduction. Apart from rights to use as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 or allowed by this copyright notice, all other rights are reserved and you are not allowed to reproduce the whole or any part of this work in any way (electronic or otherwise) without first being given the specific written permission from the Commonwealth to do so. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights are to be sent

  4. Parasitic diseases in the returning traveller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-11

    Jun 11, 2009 ... areas previously thought to be malaria free.2. • Rare cases of airport/odyssean malaria may be acquired in ..... relationship between leishmaniasis and AIDS: the second 10 years. Clin Microbiol Rev 2008;. 21: 334-359. 12. Jelinek T, Bisoffi Z, Bonazzi L, et al. Cluster of African trypanosomiasis in travellers to.

  5. Diagnosing Febrile Illness in a Returned Traveler

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-01

    This podcast will assist health care providers in diagnosing febrile illness in patients returning from a tropical or developing country.  Created: 3/1/2012 by National Center for Enteric, Zoonotic, and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/1/2012.

  6. Two Cases of Leptospirosis in French Travelers Returning From Koh Samui, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Jacques-Robert; Savini, Hélène; Pierrou, Candice; Boisnault, Gilles; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Kraemer, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    We report the first two cases of leptospirosis in French travelers returning from Koh Samui, a famous tourist island in Thailand, in September 2014 and March 2015. The first patient developed a severe form of the disease including hemodynamic instability, interstitial pneumonia, rhabdomyolysis with renal impairment, and deep thrombocytopenia. The second patient had a milder disease, with severe muscle pain, jaundice, and renal impairment. The two patients reported bathing in fresh water in Namuang waterfall. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  7. Virus isolation for diagnosing dengue virus infections in returning travelers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teichmann, D.; Göbels, K.; Niedrig, M.; Sim-Brandenburg, J.-W.; Làge-Stehr, J.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    Dengue fever is recognized as one of the most frequent imported acute febrile illnesses affecting European tourists returning from the tropics. In order to assess the value of virus isolation for the diagnosis of dengue fever, 70 cases of dengue fever confirmed in German travelers during the period

  8. Dermatobia hominis myiasis among travelers returning from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Jeremy; Haik, Josef; Orenstein, Arie; Schwartz, Eli

    2003-04-01

    Dermatobia hominis is the most common cause of myiasis in Central and South America, affecting mammals and humans, causing nonhealing furuncle-like lesions. During the years 1994 to 1999, 14 Israeli travelers returning from South America were diagnosed with D hominis myiasis. The approach consists of correct diagnosis and a proper removal of the larvae, after which the patients heal with no complications.

  9. Furuncular myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis in a returning traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Ramanath; Janos, David P; Sinnis, Photini

    2007-03-01

    Furuncular myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis is endemic throughout Central and South America. We report a case of furuncular myiasis in a traveler returned from Costa Rica. The case is unique because the primary care physician obtained magnetic resonance images. The images, however, do not show any characteristic features that assist in diagnosis.

  10. Marine envenomations in returning French travellers seen in a tropical diseases unit, 2008-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Aurélia; Pérignon, Alice; Monsel, Gentiane; Larréché, Sébastien; Caumes, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Travel and aquatic activities are increasing in tropical regions. The risk and the spectrum of marine envenomation are unknown in travellers. This work aims to evaluate the prevalence and the characteristics of marine envenomations in returning travellers. We retrospectively studied the medical charts of all returning travellers presenting with a health problem in a French tropical disease unit between 2008 and 2013, with focus on travellers complaining of marine envenomation. Characteristics of each type of envenomation are described. Of the 3315 travellers seen during the study period, 43 consulted for a presumed marine envenomation. Six patients were excluded, leaving 37 cases of confirmed marine envenomation. It corresponds to a prevalence of 1.1%. Sex ratio was balanced with 18 men and 19 women. Median age was 42 years (range 25-68 years). Median travel duration was 14 days (range: 6-62 days). The main travel destination was Southeast Asia in 10 cases, followed by islands of East Africa in seven cases. Median elapsed time between envenomation and consultation was 14 days (range: 2-130 days). The purpose of travel was tourism in all cases. The main clinical aspects were oedema, sting marks, cellulitis and flagellations. Eleven cases were presumably caused by corals, 10 by stonefish, 8 by jellyfish, 2 by weever fish, 2 by starfish, 2 by stingray, 1 by lionfish and 1 by sea anemone. Prevalence of marine envenomation is low in returning travellers. They are mostly caused by corals, stonefish and jellyfish. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Notes from the field: acute muscular sarcocystosis among returning travelers - Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    GeoSentinel (the surveillance program of the International Society of Travel Medicine and CDC) has identified 32 cases of suspected acute muscular sarcocystosis in travelers returning from Tioman Island off the east coast of peninsular Malaysia. All the patients traveled to Tioman Island during the summer of 2011. Within days or weeks of returning home, all experienced fever and muscle pain, often severe and prolonged. All had peripheral eosinophilia, and most had elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase levels. Most were tested for acute trichinosis and toxoplasmosis by serology, and all of these tests were negative. Approximately half of the patients were identified in Germany; others were reported elsewhere in Europe, and in North America and Asia. Muscle biopsy from two patients demonstrated organisms consistent with sarcocystosis, one from a group of five ill travelers and one from a group of three.

  12. Chronic Urticaria in Returning Travellers: The Role of Anthelmintic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahshoni, Avishai; Baum, Sharon; Barzilai, Aviv; Schwartz, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Chronic urticaria often poses a therapeutic challenge. The human immune response to helminths has a high degree of similarity to an allergic response in terms of skin manifestations, eosinophilia, and IgE elevation. Unfortunately, it is often complicated to diagnose such infections. We sought to assess the effect of empirical anthelmintic treatment among returning travellers diagnosed with chronic urticaria, without clear proof of helminthic infection. This is a retrospective case series of 19 returning travellers with chronic urticaria. All patients were treated with anthelmintic treatment given based on clinical suspicion only. A randomly selected control group of 20 patients with chronic urticaria, with no history of travel, was also enrolled. A positive clinical response was reported in 68.4% (13 patients) of the travellers' group within 3 months after treatment with anthelmintic therapy compared with 10% (2 patients) of chronic urticaria patients in the control group. No adverse effects from treatment were recorded. In patients with chronic urticaria, travel history to developing countries must be obtained. Empiric anthelmintic therapy might be beneficial, even in the absence of findings suggestive of helminthic infection. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. International Travelers' Sociodemographic, Health, and Travel Characteristics: An Italian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Gianmarco; Mercone, Astrid; Bagnoli, Alessandra; Nante, Nicola

    Approximately the 8% of travelers requires medical care, with the diagnosis of a vaccine-preventable disease. The aim of our study was to analyze the socio-demographic, health and travel characteristics of the Italian international travelers. We conducted a cross sectional study from January 2015 to June 2016, at the Travel Medicine Clinic of Siena, asking the doctor to interview patients who attended the Clinic, recording socio-demographic and travel information, malaria prophylaxis, vaccinations. The data were organized in a database and processed by software Stata®. We collected 419 questionnaires. Patients chose 71 countries for their travels; the favorite destinations were: India (6.31%), Thailand (6.31%), and Brazil (5.10%). The mean length of stay was 36.17 days. Italians, students, and freelancers tended to stay abroad for a longer time (mean: 36.4 days, 59.87 days and 64.16 days respectively). 33.17% of our sample used drugs for malaria chemoprophylaxis: 71.9% of them used Atovaquone/Proguanil (Malarone®), 26.6% used Mefloquine (Lariam®), 1.5% other drugs. The vaccinations that travelers mostly got in our study were to prevent hepatitis A (n = 264), the typhoid fever (n = 187), the Tetanus + Diphtheria + Pertussis (n = 165), the Yellow fever (n = 118) and the cholera (n = 78). Twenty-eight (6.68%) refused some recommended vaccinations. The vaccines mostly refused were for Typhoid fever (n = 20), hepatitis a (n = 9), and cholera (n = 9). Our results demonstrated that Italian international travelers are at-risk because of their poor vaccinations adherence. This implies that pre-travel counseling is fundamental to increase the knowledge of the risks and the compliance of future travelers. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recommended vaccines for international travelers to India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    India's tourism industry generated 6.6% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) during 2012. International travel to India is predicted to grow at an average annual rate of ∼ 8% over the next decade. The number of foreign tourists has increased by 9% to 5.8 million. Approximately 8% of travelers to developing countries require medical care during or after travel; the main diagnoses are vaccine-preventable diseases. Travelers to India can be exposed to various infectious diseases; water-borne, water-related, and zoonotic diseases may be imported to India where the disease is not endemic. The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasizes that all international travelers should be up to date with routine vaccinations. The recommended vaccinations for travelers to India vary according to the traveler's age, immunization history, existing medical conditions, duration, legal requirements for entry into countries being visited, travelers preferences, and values. Travelers should consult with a doctor so that there is sufficient time for completion of optimal vaccination schedules. No matter where traveling, one should be aware of potential exposure to certain organisms that can cause severely illnesses, even death. There is no doubt that vaccines have reduced or virtually eliminated many diseases that killed or severely disabled children and adults just a few generations ago. Thus, travelers must take recommended vaccines per schedule before traveling to India.

  15. Personal security a guide for international travelers

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Personal Security: A Guide for International Travelers provides the perfect mix of lessons-learned, tools, and recommendations from experts so that readers can personalize their own approach to managing travel risks. If followed, the information provided will allow readers to get out and experience the local culture while still traveling safely.-Bernie Sullivan, Director Global Security, Hanesbrands Inc....a must-have for any traveler. Having worked in South and Southeast Asia, I know the advice provided in the book holds the key to keeping safe, avoiding dangerous situations, and managing threats when they occur. The book's methodological framework, combined with the author's extensive experience and hands-on knowledge, provide very practical and useful advice.-Kathrine Alexandrowiz, Independent consultant at Kathalyst, former coordinator for the "Regional Risk Management Project for NGOs in Asia Pacific" (ECHO)... a go-to guide for all travelers irrespective of mission or purpose. An excellent piece of work...

  16. Healthy Travel for International Adoptions

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-22

    The number of international adoptions, many from developing countries, has doubled in the last 10 years. This podcast discusses ways adoptive families can protect their own health and the health of their new children.  Created: 10/22/2007 by National Center for the Prevention, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 10/24/2007.

  17. Neurocysticercosis among international travelers to disease-endemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2012-01-01

    Review of neurocysticercosis in citizens from non-endemic countries who developed the disease after a travel to endemic regions, to estimate the magnitude of the disease and to determine the pattern of disease expression in travelers to disease-endemic areas. MEDLINE and manual search of international travelers with neurocysticercosis diagnosed in countries where the disease is not endemic, from 1981 to October 2011. Abstracted data included: demographic profile of patients, clinical manifestations, form of neurocysticercosis, and therapy. A total of 35 articles reporting 52 patients were found. Most patients were originally from Western Europe, Australia, Israel, and Japan. Mean age was 36.5 ± 15.1 years, and 46% were women. Common places for travelling were the Indian Subcontinent, Latin America, and Southeast Asia. Mean time spent aboard was 56.6 ± 56.1 months. Most patients developed symptoms 2 years or more after returning home. Seizures were the most common clinical manifestation of the disease (73%), and all but six patients had parenchymal brain cysticercosis (a single cysticercus granuloma was the most common neuroimaging finding, in 21 patients). Twenty patients underwent surgical resection of the brain lesion for diagnostic purposes, and 22 received cysticidal drugs. Neurocysticercosis is rare in international travelers to endemic countries, and most often occurs in long-term travelers. It is possible that most of these patients get infected by contact with a taenia carrier. The time elapsed between disease acquisition and symptoms occurrence suggests that, at least in some patients, clinical manifestations are related to reactivation of an infection that has previously been controlled by the host immune system. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. What proportion of international travellers acquire a travel-related illness? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Kristina M; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Ryan, Edward T; Chen, Lin H; Sotir, Mark J

    2017-09-01

    As international travel increases, travellers may be at increased risk of acquiring infectious diseases not endemic in their home countries. Many journal articles and reference books related to travel medicine cite that between 22-64% of international travellers become ill during or after travel; however, this information is minimal, outdated and limited by poor generalizability. We aim to provide a current and more accurate estimate of the proportion of international travellers who acquire a travel-related illness. We identified studies via PubMed or travel medicine experts, published between January 1, 1976-December 31, 2016 that included the number of international travellers acquiring a travel-related illness. We excluded studies that focused on a single disease or did not determine a rate based on the total number of travellers. We abstracted information on traveller demographics, trip specifics, study enrollment and follow-up and number of ill travellers and their illnesses. Of 743 studies, nine met the inclusion criteria. The data sources were from North America (four studies) and Europe (five studies). Most travellers were tourists, the most frequent destination regions were Asia and Africa, and the median trip duration ranged from 8-21 days. Six studies enrolled participants at the travellers' pre-travel consultation. All studies collected data through either extraction from the medical record, weekly diaries, or pre- and post-travel questionnaires. Data collection timeframes varied by study. Between 6-87% of travellers became ill across all studies. Four studies provided the best estimate: between 43-79% of travellers who frequently visited developing nations (e.g. India, Tanzania, and Kenya) became ill; travellers most frequently reported diarrhoea. This is the most comprehensive assessment available on the proportion of international travellers that develop a travel-related illness. Additional cohort studies would provide needed data to more precisely

  19. Imported Leptospira licerasiae Infection in Traveler Returning to Japan from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Motoyuki; Koizumi, Nobuo; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We describe a case of intermediate leptospirosis resulting from Leptospira licerasiae infection in a traveler returning to Japan from Brazil. Intermediate leptospirosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for travelers with fever returning from South America. This case highlights the need for strategies that detect pathogenic and intermediate Leptospira species.

  20. Health problems among international travellers: from a subtropical region to tropical and non-tropical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiu-Hua; Lai, Jin-Lin

    2008-07-01

    International travel may be associated with the risk of a wide range of infectious diseases. This study was designed to obtain information on the health problems among international travellers from a subtropical region to the neighbouring tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions. Health problems among international travellers from Taiwan to the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand (tropical group), Hong Kong, Macao, China and Japan (non-tropical group) were surveyed through the telephone. Of 649 travellers surveyed, 8.2% had one or more health problems and insect bite (3.4%) and coughing or sore throats (3.2%) were the most important symptoms. The rate of coughing or sore throats was significantly higher among those returned from the non-tropical regions. However, no associations were found between health problems and the demographic factors, travel style or travelling duration of travel.

  1. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false International travel and work. 46.145... ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the EPA...

  2. Illness in travelers returned from Brazil: the GeoSentinel experience and implications for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mary E; Chen, Lin H; Han, Pauline V; Keystone, Jay S; Cramer, Jakob P; Segurado, Aluisio; Hale, DeVon; Jensenius, Mogens; Schwartz, Eli; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Leder, Karin

    2014-05-01

    Brazil will host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, events that are expected to attract hundreds of thousands of international travelers. Travelers to Brazil will encounter locally endemic infections as well as mass event-specific risks. We describe 1586 ill returned travelers who had visited Brazil and were seen at a GeoSentinel Clinic from July 1997 through May 2013. The most common travel-related illnesses were dermatologic conditions (40%), diarrheal syndromes (25%), and febrile systemic illness (19%). The most common specific dermatologic diagnoses were cutaneous larva migrans, myiasis, and tungiasis. Dengue and malaria, predominantly Plasmodium vivax, were the most frequently identified specific causes of fever and the most common reasons for hospitalization after travel. Dengue fever diagnoses displayed marked seasonality, although cases were seen throughout the year. Among the 28 ill returned travelers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, 11 had newly diagnosed asymptomatic infection and 9 had acute symptomatic HIV. Our analysis primarily identified infectious diseases among travelers to Brazil. Knowledge of illness in travelers returning from Brazil can assist clinicians to advise prospective travelers and guide pretravel preparation, including itinerary-tailored advice, vaccines, and chemoprophylaxis; it can also help to focus posttravel evaluation of ill returned travelers. Travelers planning to attend mass events will encounter other risks that are not captured in our surveillance network.

  3. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  4. Evaluation of fever in the international traveler. Unwanted 'souvenir' can have many causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Janis E

    2004-07-01

    As international travel becomes more common, primary care physicians will be increasingly involved in the treatment of patients who return home with febrile illnesses. The initial laboratory evaluation is critical. This approach to diagnosis involves taking a thorough history, asking specific questions about the patient's travel itinerary and activities, and giving a careful and complete physical examination. Malaria is the most common cause of febrile illness in travelers returning from endemic areas, and prompt evaluation is essential to initiating timely treatment. Various resources are available to assist in this evaluation.

  5. Preventing dengue and chikungunya fever among international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tither, Pauline Herold

    2014-11-01

    To describe the vulnerability of U.S. travelers in tropical and subtropical regions of the world to dengue and chikungunya fever, to provide practical recommendations to avoid these mosquito-borne diseases, and to offer a communication tool as an aid for pretravel health consultations. Medical, epidemiological, and entomological research articles and reviews, and reports from government agencies. Dengue and chikungunya fever have growing public health impact around the world. International travelers return to the United States infected with these diseases. Mosquito bite avoidance is the only way to prevent dengue and chikungunya fever. Informed travelers have many options for simple and practical measures to lessen the risk of mosquito bites. A message map can be used as a communication tool for pretravel counseling on the prevention of dengue and chikungunya fever within the time frame of an office visit. In a pretravel health consultation, a nurse practitioner can promote travelers' health and prevent dengue, chikungunya fever, and other mosquito-borne diseases by counseling on the risk of these diseases and giving practical recommendations for prevention using a message map. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. First Report of Nocardia asiatica Olecranon Bursitis in an Immunocompetent Traveler Returning to Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Eva; Valentin, Thomas; Lanz, Philipp; Flick, Holger; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Grisold, Andrea J.; Feierl, Gebhard; Krause, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are rarely isolated in extrapulmonary clinical specimens. We describe the first case of olecranon bursitis caused by Nocardia asiatica. The patient, a traveler returning from Thailand, was successfully treated with linezolid. PMID:23637291

  7. First report of Nocardia asiatica olecranon bursitis in an immunocompetent traveler returning to Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Eva; Valentin, Thomas; Hoenigl, Martin; Lanz, Philipp; Flick, Holger; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Grisold, Andrea J; Feierl, Gebhard; Krause, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Nocardia spp. are rarely isolated in extrapulmonary clinical specimens. We describe the first case of olecranon bursitis caused by Nocardia asiatica. The patient, a traveler returning from Thailand, was successfully treated with linezolid.

  8. Muscular Sarcocystosis in travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia — 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    In October 2011, the GeoSentinel global surveillance system for travel-related morbidity detected an unusual cluster of illnesses among travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia. Complete information was received for 17 of 32 (53%) patients reported to GeoSentinel; 9 probable and 1 confirmed ...

  9. Case report: West-Nile virus infection in two Dutch travellers returning from Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Aboutaleb; M.F.C. Beersma (Thijs); H.F. Wunderink; A.C.Th.M. Vossen (Ann); L.G. Visser (Leo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe report about West Nile virus (WNV) infections in a symptomatic traveller returning from Israel and in her asymptomatic travel companion. Knowledge of the current epidemiological situation in Israel from where WNV cases were reported recently enabled a rapid diagnosis. The described

  10. Dengue Virus Type 2 in Travelers Returning to Japan from Sri Lanka, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Motoyuki; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Maeki, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Tajima, Shigeru; Kato, Fumihiro; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Saijo, Masayuki; Takaya, Saho; Katanami, Yuichi; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-11-01

    In June 2017, dengue virus type 2 infection was diagnosed in 2 travelers returned to Japan from Sri Lanka, where the country's largest dengue fever outbreak is ongoing. Travelers, especially those previously affected by dengue fever, should take measures to avoid mosquito bites.

  11. Incidence of respiratory viruses among travelers with a febrile syndrome returning from tropical and subtropical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, M; Vilella, A; Marcos, M A; Letang, E; Muñoz, J; Salvadó, E; González, A; Gascón, J; Jiménez de Anta, M T; Pumarola, T

    2008-04-01

    Fifty million people are estimated to travel from industrial countries to the tropics annually. In spite of exhaustive studies and widely different diagnosis among returned patients, some cases of febrile illnesses remain without an etiological diagnosis, suggesting that these cases could be due to viral respiratory tract infections. From August 2005 to October 2006, 118 febrile patients without a specific diagnosis in their first visit at the Center for International Health of the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona were included. In all of them, in order to study respiratory viruses, a nasopharyngeal swab was collected. Clinical and radiological features and epidemiological data, as well as other samples for microbiologic studies, were also collected during consultation. Based on the physician's judgment at the time of consultation, patients were classified into four groups: respiratory symptoms (62%), febrile syndrome with nonspecific symptoms (24%), digestive symptoms (10%), and patients presenting both respiratory and digestive symptoms (4%). A pathogen microorganism was detected in 61 patients (52%). Respiratory viruses were detected in 44 out of 118 (37%) travelers included in the study, representing 56% of the patients with respiratory symptoms. The most frequently viruses detected were influenza virus (38%), rhinovirus (23%), adenovirus (9%), and respiratory syncytial virus (9%). Respiratory viruses have been shown to play an important role in imported fever. In light of the fact that international tourism is an increasing phenomenon, new strategies to prevent the spread of respiratory viruses should be considered, specially for influenza when a vaccine is available.

  12. (Penicillium) marneffei infection in a returning HIV-infected traveller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of disseminated fatal Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in an HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatment- experienced South African woman who had travelled to mainland China. The 37-year-old woman was admitted to a private hospital in fulminant septic shock and died within 12 h of admission.

  13. 78 FR 41128 - Market Test of International Merchandise Return Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... solution through the postal network, to create an ``unfair or otherwise inappropriate competitive advantage... test of a competitive experimental product called International Merchandise Return Service-Non... competitive experimental product called International Merchandise Return Service--Non-Published Rates (IMRS...

  14. You, too, can be an international medical traveler: Reading medical travel guidebooks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormond, M.E.; Sothern, M.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on literature on self-help and travel guide writing, this paper interrogates five international medical travel guidebooks aimed at encouraging American and British audiences to travel abroad to purchase medical care. These guidebooks articulate a three-step self-help “program” to produce a

  15. Quantifying International Travel Flows Using Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, Daniele; Moat, Helen Susannah; Alis, Christian; Bishop, Steven; Preis, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Online social media platforms are opening up new opportunities to analyse human behaviour on an unprecedented scale. In some cases, the fast, cheap measurements of human behaviour gained from these platforms may offer an alternative to gathering such measurements using traditional, time consuming and expensive surveys. Here, we use geotagged photographs uploaded to the photo-sharing website Flickr to quantify international travel flows, by extracting the location of users and inferring trajectories to track their movement across time. We find that Flickr based estimates of the number of visitors to the United Kingdom significantly correlate with the official estimates released by the UK Office for National Statistics, for 28 countries for which official estimates are calculated. Our findings underline the potential for indicators of key aspects of human behaviour, such as mobility, to be generated from data attached to the vast volumes of photographs posted online.

  16. Quantifying International Travel Flows Using Flickr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Barchiesi

    Full Text Available Online social media platforms are opening up new opportunities to analyse human behaviour on an unprecedented scale. In some cases, the fast, cheap measurements of human behaviour gained from these platforms may offer an alternative to gathering such measurements using traditional, time consuming and expensive surveys. Here, we use geotagged photographs uploaded to the photo-sharing website Flickr to quantify international travel flows, by extracting the location of users and inferring trajectories to track their movement across time. We find that Flickr based estimates of the number of visitors to the United Kingdom significantly correlate with the official estimates released by the UK Office for National Statistics, for 28 countries for which official estimates are calculated. Our findings underline the potential for indicators of key aspects of human behaviour, such as mobility, to be generated from data attached to the vast volumes of photographs posted online.

  17. International travel patterns and travel risks for stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Tarek; Griffin, Kenneth; Lane, Dakotah; Matasar, Matthew; Shah, Monika K

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is being increasingly utilized for multiple medical illnesses. However, there is limited knowledge about international travel patterns and travel-related illnesses of stem cell transplant recipients (SCTRs). An observational cross-sectional study was conducted among 979 SCTRs at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center using a previously standardized and validated questionnaire. International travel post SCT, pre-travel health advice, exposure risks, and travel-related illnesses were queried. A total of 516 SCTRs completed the survey (55% response rate); of these, 40% were allogeneic SCTRs. A total of 229 (44.3%) respondents reported international travel outside the United States and Canada post SCT. The international travel incidence was 32% [95% confidence interval CI 28-36] within 2 years after SCT. Using multivariable Cox regression analysis, variables significantly associated with international travel within first 2 years after SCT were history of international travel prior to SCT [hazard ratio (HR) = 5.3, 95% CI 2.3-12.0], autologous SCT (HR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-2.8), foreign birth (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.3), and high income (HR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-3.7). During their first trip, 64 travelers (28%) had traveled to destinations that may have required vaccination or malaria chemoprophylaxis. Only 56% reported seeking pre-travel health advice. Of those who traveled, 16 travelers (7%) became ill enough to require medical attention during their first trip after SCT. Ill travelers were more likely to have visited high-risk areas (60 vs 26%, p = 0.005), to have had a longer mean trip duration (24 vs 12 days, p = 0.0002), and to have visited friends and relatives (69 vs 21%, p travel was common among SCTRs within 2 years after SCT and was mainly to low-risk destinations. Although the overall incidence of travel-related illnesses was low, certain subgroups of travelers were at a significantly higher risk. Pre-travel

  18. An Update on Travel Vaccines and Issues in Travel and International Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie; Bunn, William B; Connor, Bradley A

    2016-08-23

    The fields of travel and international medicine are rapidly changing and growing. The role of occupational and travel health nurses is expanding and should be a focus for the future. At the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Annual meeting on March 24, 2015, in Boston, five presentations were included in the session, An Update on Travel Vaccines and Issues in Travel and International Medicine. This article summarizes three of the presentations and includes a portion of the information generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) included in the fourth presentation. The first section focuses on the Essential Elements of Travel Medicine Programs including the pre-travel care assessment, trip research and risk identification, medication intervention review, non-pharmaceutical and prevention strategies, and post-travel care. The next section is an overview of key issues for business travelers. The growth in the number of international business travelers and unique aspects of business travel are emphasized in a comprehensive travel health program. This section also includes a discussion of expatriates and their special risks identified in recent literature (e.g., an assessment of the significant costs of health events and productivity losses by both business travelers and expatriates). The final section offers a specific example of a vaccine-preventable disease, namely, Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, and needed changes in JE vaccine recommendations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. International Development Research Centre Corporate Policy Travel

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    dedicated travel supplier, the preferred carriers, preferred hotels, the acquisition card (A-Card) and the travel card (V-Card). All allowances and modalities of reimbursement have been designed to ensure that employees are reimbursed their true and actual costs of travel while on business. Therefore theses allowances are.

  20. Travel patterns and risk behaviour of HIV-positive people travelling internationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salit, Irving E; Sano, Marie; Boggild, Andrea K; Kain, Kevin C

    2005-03-29

    International travel is associated with an increased risk of enteric, vector-borne, sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. These risks are even higher among immunocompromised people, such as those with HIV infection. We conducted a study to determine HIV-positive people's travel patterns and risk behaviours while abroad. We conducted an anonymous survey of HIV-positive people attending an HIV clinic in a tertiary care hospital in Toronto about their travel activities and pretravel precautions as well as their burden of illness and risk exposure during travel. We compared the characteristics of respondents who had travelled outside Canada and the United States (international travellers) with those of respondents who had not travelled internationally. Of 290 HIV-positive people who participated in the study, 133 (45.9%) indicated that they had travelled internationally in the 5 years before the survey. These people were predominantly men (93.2%) and well educated (60.0% had a university level education), and they had travelled mostly for personal reasons (89.5%) on trips that lasted 3.6 weeks on average. Only 58 (43.6%) sought health advice before travelling, and only 17 (12.8%) sought advice from a travel clinic. Five (3.8%) had received live vaccines before travel, and 9 (6.8%) had taken malaria chemoprophylaxis. Of the 119 international travellers who were taking antiretroviral therapy; 35 (29.4%) reported either discontinuing their medications or being poorly compliant with the therapy while travelling. Thirty-one (23.3%) of the 133 international travellers reported having had casual sexual activity with new partners while travelling, and only 18 (58.1%) of them reported always using a condom. Twenty-one (15.8%) of the 133 reported having had risky exposure to sharps. Twenty-four (18.0%) said they had become ill enough while travelling to require medical attention. Only one-fifth of HIV-positive people surveyed who travelled internationally sought

  1. Risk factors and pre-travel healthcare of international travellers attending a Dutch travel clinic: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieten, Rosanne W; van der Schalie, Maurice; Visser, Benjamin J; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The number of international travellers is currently estimated to exceed one billion annually. To address travel related health risks and facilitate risk reduction strategies, detailed knowledge of travellers' characteristics is important. In this cross-sectional study, data of a 20% sample of travellers visiting the Academic Medical Center (AMC) travel clinic Amsterdam from July 2011 to July 2012 was collected. Itineraries and protection versus exposure rates of preventable infectious diseases were mapped and reported according to STROBE guidelines. 1749 travellers were included. South-Eastern Asia, South-America and West-Africa were most frequently visited. 26.2% of the population had pre-existing medical conditions (often cardiovascular). Young and VFR travellers had a longer median travel time (28 and 30 days) compared to the overall population (21 days). Young adult travellers were relatively often vaccinated against hepatitis B (43.9% vs. 20.5%, p travellers. Pre-travel guidelines were well adhered to. Young adult travellers had high-risk itineraries but were adequately protected. Improvement of hepatitis B and rabies protection would be desirable, specifically for VFRs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Common Factors in International Bond Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, J.J.A.G.; Melenberg, B.; Nijman, T.E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we estimate and interpret the factors that jointly determine bond returns of different maturities in the US, Germany and Japan.We analyze both currency-hedged and unhedged bond returns.For currency-hedged bond returns, we find that five factors explain 96.5% of the variation of bond

  3. Independent Senior Women Who Travel Internationally: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Nine independent women over age 55 who traveled internationally were investigated through a qualitative case study. The purpose of the study was to explore the women's attitudes, actions, and motivations during and after their international travel experiences. The adult, aging, experiential, and transformational theories of researchers such as…

  4. Medical insurance claims associated with international business travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, B; Mundt, K A; Dell, L D; Nagy, L; Demure, B

    1997-07-01

    Preliminary investigations of whether 10,884 staff and consultants of the World Bank experience disease due to work related travel. Medical insurance claims filed by 4738 travellers during 1993 were compared with claims of non-travellers. Specific diagnoses obtained from claims were analysed overall (one or more v no missions) and by frequency of international mission (1, 2-3, or > or = 4). Standardised rate of claims ratios (SSRs) for each diagnostic category were obtained by dividing the age adjusted rate of claims for travellers by the age adjusted rate of claims for non-travellers, and were calculated for men and women travellers separately. Overall, rates of insurance claims were 80% higher for men and 18% higher for women travellers than their non-travelling counterparts. Several associations with frequency of travel were found. SRRs for infectious disease were 1.28, 1.54, and 1.97 among men who had completed one, two or three, and four or more missions, and 1.16, 1.28, and 1.61, respectively, among women. The greatest excess related to travel was found for psychological disorders. For men SRRs were 2.11, 3.13, and 3.06 and for women, SRRs were 1.47, 1.96, and 2.59. International business travel may pose health risks beyond exposure to infectious diseases. Because travellers file medical claims at a greater rate than non-travellers, and for many categories of disease, the rate of claims increases with frequency of travel. The reasons for higher rates of claims among travellers are not well understood. Additional research on psychosocial factors, health practices, time zones crossed, and temporal relation between travel and onset of disease is planned.

  5. Travel Medical Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel." Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Emergence of new Salmonella Enteritidis phage types in Europe? Surveillance of infections in returning travellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Yvonne

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among human Salmonella Enteritidis infections, phage type 4 has been the dominant phage type in most countries in Western Europe during the last years. This is reflected in Salmonella infections among Swedish travellers returning from abroad. However, there are differences in phage type distribution between the countries, and this has also changed over time. Methods We used data from the Swedish infectious disease register and the national reference laboratory to describe phage type distribution of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Swedish travellers from 1997 to 2002, and have compared this with national studies conducted in the countries visited. Results Infections among Swedish travellers correlate well with national studies conducted in the countries visited. In 2001 a change in phage type distribution in S. Enteritidis infections among Swedish travellers returning from some countries in southern Europe was observed, and a previously rare phage type (PT 14b became one of the most commonly diagnosed that year, continuing into 2002 and 2003. Conclusions Surveillance of infections among returning travellers can be helpful in detecting emerging infections and outbreaks in tourist destinations. The information needs to be communicated rapidly to all affected countries in order to expedite the implementation of appropriate investigations and preventive measures.

  7. Severe leptospirosis in a Dutch traveller returning from the Dominican Republic, October 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Arcilla (Maris); P.J. Wismans (Pieter); Y. van Beek-Nieuwland (Yvonne); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn October 2011, a case of leptospirosis was identified in a Dutch traveller returning from the Dominican Republic to the Netherlands. The 51-year-old man had aspired muddy water in the Chavón river on 29 September. Twenty days later he presented with fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea,

  8. Zika virus and the risk of imported infection in returned travelers: Implications for clinical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorhuis, Abraham; Von Eije, Karin J.; Douma, Renée A.; Rijnberg, Noor; van Vugt, Michele; Stijnis, Cornelis; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    Since late 2015, an unprecedented outbreak of Zika virus is spreading quickly across Southern America. The large size of the current outbreak in The Americas will also result in an increase in Zika virus infections among travelers returning from endemic areas. We report five cases of imported Zika

  9. Myiasis of the scalp due to Dermatobia hominis in a traveler returning from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Adriana; Peruzzi, Simona; Gorrini, Chiara; Piccolo, Giovanna; Rossi, Sabina; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Gatti, Stefano; Caleffi, Edoardo; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2008-04-01

    This article describes a case of myiasis by Dermatobia hominis diagnosed in a young Italian man returning from a vacation through Brazil. Considering the increasing number of travels to tropical and subtropical areas, clinicians in nonendemic areas must think about the possibility of imported unusual infestations during their daily practice.

  10. Artesunate misuse and Plasmodium falciparum malaria in traveler returning from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinas, Dea; Lau, Rachel; Khairnar, Krishna; Hancock, David; Pillai, Dylan R

    2010-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria developed in an African-born traveler who returned to Canada after visiting Nigeria. While there, she took artesunate prophylactically. Isolates had an elevated 50% inhibitory concentration to artemisinin, artesunate, and artemether, compared with that of other African isolates. Inappropriate use of artemisinin derivatives can reduce P. falciparum susceptibility.

  11. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Knoester, M.; Berg, A.P. van den; GeurtsvanKessel, C.H.; Koopmans, M.P.; Leer-Buter, C. Van; Velthuis, B.; Pas, S.D.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Schmidt-Chanasit, J.; Vreden, S.G.; Werf, T.S. van der; Reusken, C.B.; Bierman, W.F.

    2017-01-01

    A Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q)RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient's condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring transfer to the

  12. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Knoester, M.; van den Berg, A. P.; GeurtsvanKessel, C. H.; Koopmans, M. P.; Van Leer-Buter, C.; Velthuis, B. Oude; Pas, S. D.; Ruijs, W. L.; Schmidt-Chanasit, J.; Vreden, S. G.; van der Werf, T. S.; Reusken, C. B.; Bierman, W. F.

    2017-01-01

    A Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q) RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient's condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring transfer to the

  13. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wouthuyzen-Bakker (Marjan); M. Knoester; A.P. van den Berg; C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); C. Van Leer-Buter (Coretta); B. Oude Velthuis; S.D. Pas (Suzan); W.L.M. Ruijs (Wilhelmina L.M.); J. Schmidt-Chanasit (Jonas); S.G. Vreden; T.S. van der Werf; C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); W.F.W. Bierman (Wouter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractA Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q)RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring

  14. Chloroquine-resistant malaria in travelers returning from Haiti after 2010 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Myriam; Pillai, Dylan R; Lau, Rachel; Hubert, Véronique; Khairnar, Krishna; Existe, Alexandre; Kendjo, Eric; Dahlström, Sabina; Guérin, Philippe J; Le Bras, Jacques

    2012-08-01

    We investigated chloroquine sensitivity to Plasmodium falciparum in travelers returning to France and Canada from Haiti during a 23-year period. Two of 19 isolates obtained after the 2010 earthquake showed mixed pfcrt 76K+T genotype and high 50% inhibitory concentration. Physicians treating malaria acquired in Haiti should be aware of possible chloroquine resistance.

  15. Travel and Hospitality | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 64 of 64 ... Our senior executives travel regularly to visit funded institutes, donors, and projects, and to participate in conferences and workshops around the world. Governors travel to attend Board meetings as well as to participate in training sessions and to familiarize themselves with field operations in order to ...

  16. International travel and acquisition of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassing, Robert Jan; Alsma, Jelmer; Arcilla, Maris S; van Genderen, Perry J; Stricker, Bruno H; Verbon, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    International travel is considered to be an important risk factor for acquisition of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MRE). The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect of international travel on the risk of post-travel faecal carriage of MRE. Secondary outcomes were risk factors for acquisition of MRE. A systematic search for relevant literature in seven international databases was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Articles needed to report on (i) foreign travel, (ii) screening of asymptomatic participants, (iii) antimicrobial susceptibility data and (iv) faecal Enterobacteriaceae carriage. Two researchers independently screened the abstracts, assessed the full article texts for eligibility and selected or rejected them for inclusion in the systematic review. In case of disagreement, a third researcher decided on inclusion. Eleven studies were identified. In all studies, a high prevalence (>20%) of carriage of MRE after international travel was found. The highest prevalence was observed in travellers returning from southern Asia. Foreign travel was associated with an increased risk of carriage of MRE. Further research is needed to assess if this leads to an increase in the number of infections with MRE. Systematic review registration number: PROSPERO CRD42015024973.

  17. Health risks, travel preparation, and illness among public health professionals during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Victor; Warnock, Eli; Ramana Dhara, V; Jean-Louis, Lee Ann; Sotir, Mark J; Kozarsky, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Few data currently exist on health risks faced by public health professionals (PHP) during international travel. We conducted pre- and post-travel health surveys to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP), and illnesses among PHP international travelers. Anonymous surveys were completed by PHP from a large American public health agency who sought a pre-travel medical consult from September 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010. Surveys were completed by 122 participants; travelers went to 163 countries. Of the 122 respondents, 97 (80%) reported at least one planned health risk activity (visiting rural areas, handling animals, contact with blood or body fluids, visiting malarious areas), and 50 (41%) reported exposure to unanticipated health risks. Of the 62 travelers who visited malarious areas, 14 (23%) reported inconsistent or no use of malaria prophylaxis. Illness during travel was reported by 33 (27%) respondents. Most of the PHP travelers in our study reported at least one planned health risk activity, and almost half reported exposure to unanticipated health risks, and one-quarter of travelers to malarious areas reported inconsistent or no use of malaria chemoprophylaxis. Our findings highlight that communication and education outreach for PHP to prevent travel-associated illnesses can be improved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Rabies exposure in international travelers: do we miss the target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Adehossi, Eric; Soula, Georges; Soavi, Marie-Josèphe; Delmont, Jean; Rotivel, Yolande; Brouqui, Philippe; Parola, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    Little data exist about the spatial distribution of the risk for travelers of being injured by a potentially rabid animal. Over the last 14 years, animal-associated injuries in 424 international travelers presenting to a travel medicine clinic in Marseille, southern France, were investigated. The majority of cases were reported from North Africa (41.5%) and Asia (22.2%). Most countries where at-risk injuries occurred (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Thailand, and Turkey) were those for which travelers do not usually seek advice at a specialized travel clinic, because these countries are not at risk for specific travel-associated diseases like malaria or yellow fever. The probability of travelers being attacked by each animal species varied significantly according to the destination country. Dogs were more frequently involved in Algeria, cats in Tunisia and the Middle East, and non-human primates in sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, and Asia. We suggest that rabies pre-exposure vaccination should be offered to individuals traveling regularly to North Africa to visit their relatives and who are at high risk of exposure to potentially rabid animal attacks. Pre-travel advice when addressing rabies prevention should consider the specific epidemiology of animal-related injuries in the traveled country, as well as the traveler's characteristics. Travelers should be advised about which species of animal are potentially aggressive in their destination country so that they can more easily avoid risk-contacts. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Medical insurance claims associated with international business travel.

    OpenAIRE

    Liese, B; Mundt, K A; L. D.; Nagy, L; Demure, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Preliminary investigations of whether 10,884 staff and consultants of the World Bank experience disease due to work related travel. Medical insurance claims filed by 4738 travellers during 1993 were compared with claims of non-travellers. METHODS: Specific diagnoses obtained from claims were analysed overall (one or more v no missions) and by frequency of international mission (1, 2-3, or > or = 4). Standardised rate of claims ratios (SSRs) for each diagnostic category were obtain...

  20. An Approach to Establishing International Quality Standards for Medical Travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej eKácha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traveling abroad to receive a non-elective treatment is expanding each year. Such rising popularity of medical travel and the absence of clear minimum quality requirements in this area urgently calls for setting international standards to ensure good practice and patient safety. The aim of this study is to identify the key domains in medical travel where such quality standards should be established. Drawing from the evidence-based OECD framework and an extensive literature review, this study proposes three critical areas for international quality standards in medical travel: minimum standards of health care facilities and third-party agencies, financial responsibility and patient-centeredness. Several cultural challenges are subsequently introduced that may pose a barrier to the development of the guidelines and should be additionally taken into consideration. Establishing international quality standards in medical travel enhances the benefits to patients and providers, which is urgently needed given the rapid growth in this industry.

  1. [Travelers attending an international vaccine center. Is the risk for the pediatric traveler increasing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calavia Garsaball, O; Otero Romero, S; Campins Martí, M; Martínez-Gómez, X; Rodrigo Pendas, J A; Armadans Gil, L

    2013-09-01

    There is a perception that the number of pediatric travelers is increasing, mainly due to the so-called visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) group. Both the demographic and trips characteristics in this group may lead to an increased risk and a greater complexity in vaccinations and other preventive recommendations. To analyze the outcomes of different groups of pediatric travelers. To describe the demographic and travel characteristics within the pediatric population, and to analyze whether the VFRs differ from non-VFRs with regards to the factors that may contribute to a greater risk. A cross sectional descriptive study of the characteristics of pediatric travelers treated in the International Pre-travel Consultation Unit of the University Hospital Vall d'Hebron, from July 2002 to January 2009. Of the 692 children analyzed, with a mean age of 8 years (SD 5.4), an increase in the overall number of travelers was identified, along with an initial increase in the number of VFR children in the early years of the study, although later on, the numbers of this group stabilized. The mean age of the VFR travelers was also found to be lower. A lack of planning prior to the start of the travel was also noted in the VFRs group, as well as longer trip durations. A routine vaccine was administered to 29.2% of children, and malaria prophylaxis was recommended for 52% of travelers. Despite the progressive increase in international travel and the initial increase in VFR travelers, the percentage of this group has remained stable in recent years. However, the perception of a low risk among the immigrant population suggests the need to encourage an adequate pre-travel consultation within this group. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. An approach to establishing international quality standards for medical travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lácha, O.; Kovács, B.E.; McCarthy, C.; Schuurmans, A.T.; Dobyns, C.; Haller, E.; Hinrichs, S.; Ruggeri, K.

    2016-01-01

    Traveling abroad to receive a non-elective treatment is expanding each year. Such rising popularity of medical travel and the absence of clear minimum quality requirements in this area urgently calls for setting international standards to ensure good practice and patient safety. The aim of this

  3. International students' image of rural Pennsylvania as a travel destination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po-Ju Chen; Deborah L. Kerstetter

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the image international students at Penn State have of rural travel destinations in the state of Pennsylvania. In addition, this study investigated whether destination image differed depending upon travel behavior and socio-demographic variables. Four distinct image dimensions, "tourism infrastructure," "...

  4. International Business Travel: An Engine of Innovation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nune Hovhannisyan; Wolfgang Keller

    2011-01-01

    While it is well known that managers prefer in-person meetings for negotiating deals and selling their products, face-to-face communication may be particularly important for the transfer of technology because technology is best explained and demonstrated in person. This paper studies the role of short-term cross-border labor movements for innovation by estimating the recent impact of U.S. business travel to foreign countries on their patenting rates. Business travel is shown to have a signifi...

  5. The causes of skin lesions in the returning travelers: with special reference to Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Tosson A

    2012-04-01

    Often people yearn of a greater travel adventure like a year in Africa to get away from their routine situations and locations, for a quick vacation or as a means of finding one's self, to enjoy new experiences, to learn and experience new languages, new food, and new cultures. While most people associate Sub-Saharan Africa with safaris, there are endless other possibilities for adventure. Some African countries have actual entry requirements and won't let you in unless you have proof you've been vaccinated against a specific disease. Every African country is unique in the quality of its parks and reserves, roads and other infrastructure, visitor accommodations and receptivity to tourists. Creating an itinerary and arranging travel logistics can intimidate even the most enthusiastic tourist. Others travel more nowadays for the better economy and the advancements in transportation make it easier to do so. If family members do not reside in the same country or are probably working abroad, other family members would want to visit them and would do so as frequently as their resources would allow. Visiting families and friends in different states or countries are probably the most important reasons for taking time off to travel. No doubt, travelling to different climates, cultures and environments abroad can expose to tropical infectious diseases and health risks. This review dealt with skin lesions in the returning travelers.

  6. Furuncular Myiasis Caused by Dermatobia hominis in a Traveler Returning from the Amazon Jungle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuşcu, Ferit; Özsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Ulu, Aslıhan; Kurtaran, Behice; Kömür, Süheyla; İnal, Ayşe Seza; Taşova, Yeşim; Aksu, Hasan Salih Zeki

    2017-09-01

    A 39-year-old man who was returning from the Amazon Jungle and had no medical history presented with a furuncular lesion on his right parietal scalp. Despite receiving appropriate antimicrobial treatment, his lesion did not heal. After surgical intervention, a Dermatobia hominis larva was extracted. The human botfly D. hominis is the most common causative agent of furuncular myiasis among travelers returning from Central and South America. Surgery is the main treatment option, and secondary bacterial infection should be kept in mind.

  7. International Development Research Centre Governor Travel Policy

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    Legitimate and essential expenses incurred during the course of IDRC-supported Governor travel, incurred in direct relation to IDRC's business. Business-related .... Agency, unless exceptionally agreed and justified in writing as between an individual governor and the Corporate Secretary and only where another option is ...

  8. Vaccines for travel and international adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    Vaccines have been one of the most important health advances of the 20th century. As more children emigrate from and travel to underdeveloped countries where they can be exposed to unusual endemic pathogens beyond their previous immunologic experience, it is critical to protect them against these potentially life-threatening infections.

  9. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan; Knoester, Marjolein; van den Berg, Aad P; GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H; Koopmans, Marion Pg; Van Leer-Buter, Coretta; Oude Velthuis, Bob; Pas, Suzan D; Ruijs, Wilhelmina Lm; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Vreden, Stephen Gs; van der Werf, Tjip S; Reusken, Chantal Bem; Bierman, Wouter Fw

    2017-03-16

    A Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q)RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient's condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring transfer to the intensive care. Although yellow fever has not been reported in the last four decades in Suriname, vaccination is recommended by the World Health Organization for visitors to this country. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  10. Clinical Features and Laboratory Findings of Travelers Returning to South Australia with Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Quinn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reported cases of dengue are rising in South Australia (SA in travellers returning from dengue-endemic regions. We have undertaken a retrospective analysis to identify the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients returning to SA with suspected dengue virus (DENV infection. From 488 requests, 49 (10% were defined by serology as acute dengue, with the majority of patients (75% testing as non-structural protein 1 (NS1 and/or IgM positive. Dengue was most commonly acquired in Indonesia (42.9% with clinical features of fever (95%, headache (41% and myalgia/arthralgia (56%. The presence of rash (36% and laboratory findings of neutropenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, but not elevated C-reactive protein, were distinct from findings in DENV-seronegative patients. Available dengue seropositive samples were analysed by RT-PCR, with 14/32 (43.8% positive by a serotype non-specific DENV assay, but 28/32 positive (87.5% when also assessed by serotype-specific RT-PCR. Serotype analysis revealed the predominance of DENV-1 and DENV-2 and the presence of DENV-3, but not DENV-4 or Zika virus (ZIKV. Thus, dengue in returned travellers in SA presents in a manner consistent with World Health Organization (WHO definitions, with symptoms, travel history and laboratory results useful in prioritising the likelihood of dengue. This definition will assist the future management in DENV-non-endemic regions, such as SA.

  11. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, Vanessa; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Caumes, Eric; Jensenius, Mogens; Castelli, Francesco; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Weld, Leisa; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; de Vries, Peter; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Weber, Rainer; Cramer, Jakob; Pérignon, Alice; Odolini, Silvia; Carosi, Giampiero; Chappuis, François

    2010-01-01

    Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in European travellers, we

  12. International travel of Korean children and Dengue fever: A single institutional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Han; Kim, Yae Jean; Shin, Ji Hun; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2010-06-01

    Dengue fever occurs in many popular tourist destinations and is increasingly imported by returning travelers in Korea. Since Korea is not an endemic country for dengue fever, pediatricians do not usually suspect dengue fever in febrile children even with typical presentation and exposure history. This study was performed to describe the international travel experiences and dengue fever in Korean children. Travel histories were collected based on questionnaires completed by all patients' guardians who visited the pediatric infectious diseases clinic at Samsung Medical Center from January 2008 to December 2008. For patients who were suspected of dengue fever, a serological test was performed. Five hundred and seventeen children visited the pediatric infectious diseases clinic for the first time during this period. About 30% of patients who responded to the questionnaire (101/339) had experienced international travel within the last 2 years. Four patients were diagnosed with dengue fever by serological test. Increasing numbers of Korean children visit dengue endemic areas and they may return home with dengue fever. Dengue fever should be suspected in patients who have a travel history to endemic areas.

  13. International Safety Regulation and Standards for Space Travel and Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, J. N.; Jakhu, R.

    The evolution of air travel has led to the adoption of the 1944 Chicago Convention that created the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), headquartered in Montreal, Canada, and the propagation of aviation safety standards. Today, ICAO standardizes and harmonizes commercial air safety worldwide. Space travel and space safety are still at an early stage of development, and the adoption of international space safety standards and regulation still remains largely at the national level. This paper explores the international treaties and conventions that govern space travel, applications and exploration today and analyzes current efforts to create space safety standards and regulations at the national, regional and global level. Recent efforts to create a commercial space travel industry and to license commercial space ports are foreseen as means to hasten a space safety regulatory process.

  14. Pretravel health advice among international travelers visiting Cuzco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; Maldonado, Fernando; Quispe, Wanda; Serrano, Edson; Mozo, Karen; Gonzales, Elsa; Seas, Carlos; Verdonck, Kristien; Echevarria, Juan I; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Cuzco, a Peruvian city of historical interest located 3,326 m above sea level, is a frequent destination for tourists. We conducted a descriptive study to assess the extent and sources of pretravel health advice received by international travelers before their arrival to Cuzco. Data were collected as part of a health survey among travelers. Between August and November 2002, travelers between 15 and 65 years old were invited to fill out a questionnaire in the departing area of Cuzco's international airport. A total of 5,988 travelers participated. The mean age was 35.4 years (SD 11.4 yr); 50.6% were female and 50.8% were single. Tourism was the reason for traveling in 90.2% of the participants, and 89.3% of them were traveling with companions. Pretravel health information was received by 93.6%. The median number of information sources was two, with books (41.5%), travel medicine clinics (38.8%), the Internet (23.3%), and general practitioners (22.7%) as the main sources. Most frequently received recommendations were about safe food and water consumption (85%), use of insect repellents (66.0%), sunburn protection (64.4%), and condom use (22%). Only 16.5% took medication to prevent altitude sickness, and 14.2% took medication to prevent traveler's diarrhea. Variables independently associated with receiving pretravel health information from a health care professional were female gender, country of residence other than the United States, length of stay in Cuzco > 7 days, length of stay in other Peruvian cities > 7 days, tourism as the main reason for visiting Cuzco, traveling with companions, and consulting of more than one source of information. Most travelers arriving to Cuzco had received pretravel health information, and the majority obtained it from more than one source. Recommendations addressed for specific health risks, such as altitude sickness prophylaxis, were received by few travelers.

  15. You, too, can be an international medical traveler: reading medical travel guidebooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Meghann; Sothern, Matthew

    2012-09-01

    Drawing on literature on self-help and travel guide writing, this paper interrogates five international medical travel guidebooks aimed at encouraging American and British audiences to travel abroad to purchase medical care. These guidebooks articulate a three-step self-help "program" to produce a "savvy" international medical traveler. First, readers are encouraged to view their home healthcare system as dysfunctional. Second, they are encouraged to re-read destinations' healthcare landscapes as hosting excellent and accessible care. Finally, these texts explicitly enjoin readers to see themselves as active, cosmopolitan consumers whose pursuits are central to rectifying the dysfunction of their home healthcare systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. First Imported Case of Chikungunya Virus Infection in a Travelling Canadian Returning from the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Therrien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first Canadian case of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection reported in a traveller returning from the Caribbean. Following multiple mosquito bites in Martinique Island in January 2014, the patient presented with high fever, headaches, arthralgia on both hands and feet, and a rash on the trunk upon his return to Canada. Initial serological testing for dengue virus infection was negative. Support therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was administered. The symptoms gradually improved 4 weeks after onset with residual arthralgia and morning joint stiffness. This clinical feature prompted the clinician to request CHIKV virus serology which was found to be positive for the presence of IgM and neutralizing antibodies. In 2014, over four hundred confirmed CHIKV infection cases were diagnosed in Canadian travellers returning from the Caribbean and Central America. Clinical suspicion of CHIKV or dengue virus infections should be considered in febrile patients with arthralgia returning from the recently CHIKV endemic countries of the Americas.

  17. High carriage rate of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae at presentation and follow-up among travellers with gastrointestinal complaints returning from India and Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto Miranda, Isabel; Ignatius, Ralf; Pfüller, Roland; Friedrich-Jänicke, Barbara; Steiner, Florian; Paland, Matthias; Dieckmann, Sebastian; Schaufler, Katharina; Wieler, Lothar H; Guenther, Sebastian; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2016-02-01

    International travel contributes to the spread of multidrug-resistant microorganisms including extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE). We assessed the proportion of faecal carriers of ESBL-PE among 211 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms who returned to Berlin, Germany, after international travel. ESBL-PE were screened for on chromogenic agar, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed, and ESBL-genes were genotyped. Travel-related data were assessed by questionnaire. Diarrhoea, abdominal pain and nausea were the main symptoms. Half of the travellers carried ESBL-PE (97% Escherichia coli); the proportion was highest for returnees from India (72%) and mainland Southeast Asia (59%), and comparatively lower for Africa (33%) and Central America (20%). Co-resistance to fluoroquinolones (particularly in isolates from India), gentamicin and cotrimoxazole was frequent but all isolates were carbapenem-susceptible. ESBL-PE carriage decreased with increasing timespan from return to presentation, and with age. At revisit of initially ESBL-PE positive patients half a year later, 28% (17/61) of the individuals were still carriers, CTX-M groups being congruent with the initial isolates. CTX-M groups 9 and 1/9, vegetarian diet and cat ownership tended to be associated with ESBL-PE carriage upon revisit. Travellers, particularly those returning from India and Southeast Asia, constitute a relevant source of potential spread of ESBL-PE. Carriage declines over time but ESBL-PE persist for at least 6 months in a substantial proportion of individuals. Both genetic characteristics of the bacteria and lifestyle factors seem to contribute to persistent carriage of ESBL-PE. A recent, extra-European travel history argues for ESBL-PE screening and contact precautions for patients admitted to hospital. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e

  18. An Approach to Establishing International Quality Standards for Medical Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kácha, Ondřej; Kovács, Beáta E; McCarthy, Cormac; Schuurmans, Angela A T; Dobyns, Christopher; Haller, Elisa; Hinrichs, Saba; Ruggeri, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals traveling abroad is increasing annually. The rising popularity of medical travel and the absence of clear minimum quality requirements in this area urgently call for the development of international standards to ensure good practice and patient safety. The aim of this study is to identify the key domains in medical travel where quality standards should be established. Drawing from the evidence-based OECD framework and an extensive literature review, this study proposes three critical areas for consideration: minimum standards of health-care facilities and third-party agencies, financial responsibility, and patient centeredness. Several cultural challenges have been introduced that may pose a barrier to development of the guidelines and should be taken into consideration. Establishing international quality standards in medical travel enhances benefits to patients and providers, which is an urgent necessity given the rapid growth in this industry.

  19. Investment Returns and Economic Fundamentals in International Art Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Works of art are neither easily tradable across borders, nor evaluated according to globally identical standards. We examine geographical segmentation and its effects on price formation and returns in the international art auction market. We find (i) a close connection between the country of sale and the type (e.g., nationality) of artworks sold; (ii) substantial international variation in average returns to art investments over the period 1971-2007; (iii) an impact of both global a...

  20. 76 FR 58243 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of International Air Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ..., ] administered by the Office of Travel and Tourism Industries (OTTI) of the International Trade Administration... International Trade Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of International Air Travelers AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of...

  1. Characteristics and spectrum of disease among ill returned travelers from pre- and post-earthquake Haiti: The GeoSentinel experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Douglas H; Han, Pauline V; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Walker, Patricia F; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Libman, Michael; McCarthy, Anne E; Field, Vanessa; Connor, Bradley A; Schwartz, Eli; MacDonald, Susan; Sotir, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    To describe patient characteristics and disease spectrum among foreign visitors to Haiti before and after the 2010 earthquake, we used GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network data and compared 1 year post-earthquake versus 3 years pre-earthquake. Post-earthquake travelers were younger, predominantly from the United States, more frequently international assistance workers, and more often medically counseled before their trip than pre-earthquake travelers. Work-related stress and upper respiratory tract infections were more frequent post-earthquake; acute diarrhea, dengue, and Plasmodium falciparum malaria were important contributors of morbidity both pre- and post-earthquake. These data highlight the importance of providing destination- and disaster-specific pre-travel counseling and post-travel evaluation and medical management to persons traveling to or returning from a disaster location, and evaluations should include attention to the psychological wellbeing of these travelers. For travel to Haiti, focus should be on mosquito-borne illnesses (dengue and P. falciparum malaria) and travelers' diarrhea.

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.512 - How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel? 302-3.512 Section 302-3.512 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES 3-RELOCATION...

  3. Controlling pandemic flu: the value of international air travel restrictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Epstein

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Planning for a possible influenza pandemic is an extremely high priority, as social and economic effects of an unmitigated pandemic would be devastating. Mathematical models can be used to explore different scenarios and provide insight into potential costs, benefits, and effectiveness of prevention and control strategies under consideration.A stochastic, equation-based epidemic model is used to study global transmission of pandemic flu, including the effects of travel restrictions and vaccination. Economic costs of intervention are also considered. The distribution of First Passage Times (FPT to the United States and the numbers of infected persons in metropolitan areas worldwide are studied assuming various times and locations of the initial outbreak. International air travel restrictions alone provide a small delay in FPT to the U.S. When other containment measures are applied at the source in conjunction with travel restrictions, delays could be much longer. If in addition, control measures are instituted worldwide, there is a significant reduction in cases worldwide and specifically in the U.S. However, if travel restrictions are not combined with other measures, local epidemic severity may increase, because restriction-induced delays can push local outbreaks into high epidemic season. The per annum cost to the U.S. economy of international and major domestic air passenger travel restrictions is minimal: on the order of 0.8% of Gross National Product.International air travel restrictions may provide a small but important delay in the spread of a pandemic, especially if other disease control measures are implemented during the afforded time. However, if other measures are not instituted, delays may worsen regional epidemics by pushing the outbreak into high epidemic season. This important interaction between policy and seasonality is only evident with a global-scale model. Since the benefit of travel restrictions can be substantial while

  4. International Patients’ Travel Decision Making Process- A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    KHAN, Mohammad Jamal; CHELLIAH, Shankar; HARON, Mahmod Sabri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Role of information source, perceived benefits and risks, and destination image has significantly been examined in travel and tourism literature; however, in medical tourism it is yet to be examined thoroughly. The concept discussed in this article is drawn form well established models in tourism literature. Methods: The purpose of this research was to identify the source of information, travel benefits and perceived risks related to movement of international patients and develop a conceptual model based on well-established theory. Thorough database search (Science Direct, utmj.org, nih.gov, nchu.edu.tw, palgrave-journals, medretreat, Biomedcentral) was performed to fulfill the objectives of the study. Results: International patients always concern about benefits and risks related to travel. These benefits and risks form images of destination in the minds of international patients. Different sources of information make international patients acquaint about the associated benefits and risks, which later leads to development of intention to visit. This conceptual paper helps in establishing model for decision-making process of international patients in developing visit intention. Conclusion: Ample amount of literature is available detailing different factors involved in travel decision making of international patients; however literature explaining relationship between these factors is scarce. PMID:27114978

  5. Zika virus and the risk of imported infection in returned travelers: Implications for clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorhuis, Abraham; von Eije, Karin J; Douma, Renée A; Rijnberg, Noor; van Vugt, Michele; Stijnis, Cornelis; Grobusch, Martin P

    2016-01-01

    Since late 2015, an unprecedented outbreak of Zika virus is spreading quickly across Southern America. The large size of the current outbreak in The Americas will also result in an increase in Zika virus infections among travelers returning from endemic areas. We report five cases of imported Zika virus infection to The Netherlands. Although the clinical course is usually mild, establishing the diagnosis is important, mainly because of the association with congenital microcephaly and the possibility of sexual transmission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Executive summary of imported infectious diseases after returning from foreign travel: Consensus document of the Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Górgolas-Hernández-Mora, Miguel; Salvador, Fernando; Carranza-Rodríguez, Cristina; Ramírez-Olivencia, Germán; Martín-Echeverría, Esteban; Rodríguez-Guardado, Azucena; Norman, Francesca; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Zubero-Sulibarría, Zuriñe; Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Muñoz-Gutierrez, José; Ramos-Rincón, José Manuel; Sánchez-Seco-Fariñas, M Paz; Velasco-Arribas, María; Belhassen-García, Moncef; Lago-Nuñez, Mar; Cañas García-Otero, Elías; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2017-04-07

    In a global world, knowledge of imported infectious diseases is essential in daily practice, both for the microbiologist-parasitologist and the clinician who diagnoses and treats infectious diseases in returned travelers. Tropical and subtropical countries where there is a greater risk of contracting an infectious disease are among the most frequently visited tourist destinations. The SEIMC considers it appropriate to produce a consensus document that will be useful to primary care physicians as well as specialists in internal medicine, infectious diseases and tropical medicine who help treat travelers returning from tropical and sub-tropical areas with infections. Preventive aspects of infectious diseases and infections imported by immigrants are explicitly excluded here, since they have been dealt with in other SEIMC documents. Various types of professionals (clinicians, microbiologists, and parasitologists) have helped produce this consensus document by evaluating the available evidence-based data in order to propose a series of key facts about individual aspects of the topic. The first section of the document is a summary of some of the general aspects concerning the general assessment of travelers who return home with potential infections. The main second section contains the key facts (causative agents, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic measures) associated with the major infectious syndromes affecting returned travelers [gastrointestinal syndrome (acute or persistent diarrhea); febrile syndrome with no obvious source of infection; localized cutaneous lesions; and respiratory infections]. Finally, the characteristics of special traveler subtypes, such as pregnant women and immunocompromised travelers, are described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Malaria in travellers returning or migrating to Canada: surveillance report from CanTravNet surveillance data, 2004-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, Andrea K; Geduld, Jennifer; Libman, Michael; Yansouni, Cedric P; McCarthy, Anne E; Hajek, Jan; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Vincelette, Jean; Kuhn, Susan; Freedman, David O; Kain, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains the most common specific cause of fever in returned travellers and can be life-threatening. We examined demographic and travel correlates of malaria among Canadian travellers and immigrants to identify groups for targeted pretravel intervention. Descriptive data on ill returned Canadian travellers and immigrants presenting to a CanTravNet site between 2004 and 2014 with a diagnosis of malaria were analyzed. Data were collected using the GeoSentinel data platform. This network comprises 63 specialized travel and tropical medicine clinics, including 7 Canadian sites (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa, Winnipeg and Montréal), that contribute anonymous, delinked, clinician- and questionnaire-based travel surveillance data on all ill travellers examined to a centralized Structure Query Language database. During the study period, 20 345 travellers and immigrants were evaluated, and 93% had a travel-related diagnosis. Of these, 437 (2.1%) patients received 456 malaria diagnoses, the most common species being Plasmodium falciparum (n = 282, 61.8%). People travelling to visit friends and relatives were most well-represented (n = 169, 38.7%), followed by business travellers (n = 71, 16.2%). Sub-Saharan Africa was the most common source region, accounting for 341 (74.8%) malaria diagnoses, followed by South Central Asia (n = 55, 12%). Nigeria was the most well-represented source country, accounting for 41 cases (9.0%). India, a high-volume destination for Canadians, accounted for 40 cases (8.8%), 36 of which were caused by Plasmodium vivax. Of 456 malaria diagnoses, 26 (5.7%) were severe. Of 377 nonimmigrant travellers with malaria, 19.9% (n = 75) travelled for less than 2 weeks, and 7.2% (n = 27) travelled for less than 1 week. This analysis provides an epidemiologic framework for Canadian practitioners encountering prospective and returned travellers. It confirms the importance of preventive measures and surveillance associated with travel to sub

  8. Nocardia transvalensis keratitis: an emerging pathology among travelers returning from Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The incidence rate of Nocardia keratitis is increasing, with new species identified thanks to molecular methods. We herein report a case of Nocardia transvalensis keratitis, illustrating this emerging pathology among travellers returning from Asia. Case presentation A 23-year-old man presented with a 10-week history of ocular pain, redness, and blurred vision in his right eye following a projectile foreign body impacting the cornea while motor biking in Thaïland. At presentation, a central epithelial defect with a central whitish stromal infiltrate associated with pinhead satellite infiltrates was observed. Identification with 16S rRNA PCR sequencing and microbiological culture of corneal scraping and revealed N. transvalensis as the causative organism. Treatment was initiated with intensive topical amikacin, oral ketoconazole and oral doxycycline. After a four-week treatment period, the corneal infiltrate decreased so that only a faint subepithelial opacity remained. Conclusion Nocardia organisms should be suspected as the causative agent of any case of keratitis in travelers returning from Asia. With appropriate therapy, Nocardia keratitis resolves, resulting in good visual outcome. PMID:22040176

  9. Chikungunya virus infections among travellers returning to Spain, 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Bangert, Mathieu; de Ory, Fernando; Potente, Arantxa; Hernandez, Lourdes; Lasala, Fatima; Herrero, Laura; Molero, Francisca; Negredo, Anabel; Vázquez, Ana; Minguito, Teodora; Balfagón, Pilar; de la Fuente, Jesus; Puente, Sabino; Ramírez de Arellano, Eva; Lago, Mar; Martinez, Miguel; Gascón, Joaquim; Norman, Francesca; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; Sulleiro, Elena; Pou, Diana; Serre, Nuria; Roblas, Ricardo Fernández; Tenorio, Antonio; Franco, Leticia; Sanchez-Seco, Maria Paz

    2016-09-08

    Since the first documented autochthonous transmission of chikungunya virus in the Caribbean island of Saint Martin in 2013, the infection has been reported within the Caribbean region as well as North, Central and South America. The risk of autochthonous transmission of chikungunya virus becoming established in Spain may be elevated due to the large numbers of travellers returning to Spain from countries affected by the 2013 epidemic in the Caribbean and South America, as well as the existence of the Aedes albopictus vector in certain parts of Spain. We retrospectively analysed the laboratory diagnostic database of the National Centre for Microbiology, Institute of Health Carlos III (CNM-ISCIII) from 2008 to 2014. During the study period, 264 confirmed cases, of 1,371 suspected cases, were diagnosed at the CNM-ISCIII. In 2014 alone, there were 234 confirmed cases. The highest number of confirmed cases were reported from the Dominican Republic (n = 136), Venezuela (n = 30) and Haiti (n = 11). Six cases were viraemic in areas of Spain where the vector is present. This report highlights the need for integrated active case and vector surveillance in Spain and other parts of Europe where chikungunya virus may be introduced by returning travellers. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  10. Travel medicine advice to UK based international motor sport teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, A

    2000-01-01

    International motor sport teams travel extensively. Over the years, the design and build of racing cars has improved so that morbidity and mortality in motor sport has been lessened. Those team members supporting the competitors need to be physically and mentally fit to perform complicated tasks, despite having traveled. This group of travelers has not been studied to any extent previously. An anonymous questionnaire asking some basic travel medicine related questions was distributed to the support team members of a Rally team, and Formula One Grand Prix team. Both teams were based in the UK, and competed in all the rounds of their respective world championships. Ten Rally team members and 18 Formula One team members responded to the questionnaire. The results showed moderate coverage of commonly used vaccinations; appropriate use of antimalarials and insect repellents, but by no means by all team members; little or no problems with traveler's diarrhea; some tendencies to problems related to jet lag, but no real attempt to prevent the problem; and finally some attempt at skin protection against solar damage. Support teams are reasonably well prepared for the combination of, the rigors of frequent travel, and a demanding job. There is a deficit in vaccine coverage, especially of both hepatitis A and B, some education is needed in preventing skin problems later in life due to sun exposure, and further study of jet lag and its implications might be appropriate.

  11. Neoliberal governance and International medical travel in Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormond, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    International medical travel (IMT), people crossing national borders in the pursuit of healthcare, has become a growing phenomenon. With many of the countries currently being promoted as IMT destinations located in the ‘developing’ world, IMT poses a significant challenge to popular assumptions

  12. Habit Formation, Surplus Consumption and Return Predictability: International Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Hyde, Stuart; Møller, Stig V.

    On an international post World War II dataset, we use an iterated GMM pro- cedure to estimate and test the Campbell-Cochrane (1999) habit formation model. In addition, we analyze the predictive power of the surplus consumption ratio for future asset returns. We find that, although there are impor......On an international post World War II dataset, we use an iterated GMM pro- cedure to estimate and test the Campbell-Cochrane (1999) habit formation model. In addition, we analyze the predictive power of the surplus consumption ratio for future asset returns. We find that, although...

  13. Daily happiness and stock returns: Some international evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiao; Shen, Dehua; Teglio, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we examine the relations between the daily happiness sentiment extracted from Twitter and the stock market performance in 11 international stock markets. By partitioning this happiness sentiment into quintiles from the least to the happiest days, we first show that the contemporary correlation coefficients between happiness sentiment and index return in the 4 and most-happiness subgroups are higher than that in least, 2 and 3-happiness subgroups. Secondly, the happiness sentiment can provide additional explanatory power for index return in the most-happiness subgroup. Thirdly, the daily happiness can granger-cause the changes in index return for the majority of stock markets. Fourthly, we find that the index return and the range-based volatility of the most-happiness subgroup are larger than those of other subgroups. These results highlight the important role of social media in stock market.

  14. Health Problems of the International Travellers Visiting Agra City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Mehto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: International travel to India is on the rise and the travellers comprise a diverse group of individuals in terms of their country of origin, preferences and risk taking behaviour. Different environment coupled with all other factors makes them more vulnerable to health problems. Aims & Objectives: To find out the health problems faced by the international travellers visiting Agra City, their perception and the factors associated with them. Material & Methods: Cross – sectional study design was used and International travellers in the age group 15 to 65 years were recruited from prominent tourist places and train stations of Agra, which was sometimes during their tour and just before their departure respectively. Data collection was carried out for a period of six months i.e. from November 2015 to April 2016.Results: Out of the total 422 study subjects, 208 (48.2% faced one or more health problems. Primary purpose of visit (religious, educational, visiting friends and relatives and the duration of visit (more than two weeks were found to be significantly associated with a negative health outcome. Diarrhoea (131, 63%, fever (87, 41.8% and respiratory problems (50, 24% were the most frequent problems and many of them had more than one problem. A majority of the participants perceived the risk of health problems to be high and more than half of the them reported having experienced culture shock (57.4%. Conclusions: There may be a need for a travel clinic at the destination. The benefit of such a new offer must be validated.

  15. What factors determine international real estate security returns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelink, F.; Hoesli, M.

    2004-01-01

    We use constrained cross-sectional regressions to disentangle the effects of various factors on international real estate security returns. Besides a common factor, pure country, property type, size and value/growth factors are considered. The value/growth measure that is used in this paper provides

  16. International Space Station Crew Return Vehicle: X-38. Educational Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The International Space Station (ISS) will provide the world with an orbiting laboratory that will have long-duration micro-gravity experimentation capability. The crew size for this facility will depend upon the crew return capability. The first crews will consist of three astronauts from Russia and the United States. The crew is limited to three…

  17. Investment returns and economic fundamentals in international art markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.; Velthuis, O.; Baia-Curioni, S.

    Works of art are neither easily tradable across borders, nor evaluated according to globally identical standards. This chapter examines geographical segmentation and its effects on price formation and returns in the international art auction market. The chapter finds (1) a close connection between

  18. Investment Returns and Economic Fundamentals in International Art Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Works of art are neither easily tradable across borders, nor evaluated according to globally identical standards. We examine geographical segmentation and its effects on price formation and returns in the international art auction market. We find (i) a close connection between the country

  19. False positive malaria rapid diagnostic test in returning traveler with typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meatherall, Bonnie; Preston, Keith; Pillai, Dylan R

    2014-07-09

    Rapid diagnostic tests play a pivotal role in the early diagnosis of malaria where microscopy or polymerase chain reaction are not immediately available. We report the case of a 39 year old traveler to Canada who presented with fever, headache, and abdominal pain after visiting friends and relatives in India. While in India, the individual was not ill and had no signs or symptoms of malaria. Laboratory testing upon his return to Canada identified a false positive malaria rapid diagnostic (BinaxNOW® malaria) result for P. falciparum with coincident Salmonella Typhi bacteraemia without rheumatoid or autoimmune factors. Rapid diagnostic test false positivity for malaria coincided with the presence or absence of Salmonella Typhi in the blood. Clinicians should be aware that Salmonella Typhi infection may result in a false positive malaria rapid diagnostic test. The mechanism of this cross-reactivity is not clear.

  20. International travellers from New Jersey: piloting a travel health module in the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Rhett J; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Bostick, Roberd M; Sotir, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the New Jersey Department of Health used the New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (NJBRFS), a state component of the national Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to pilot a travel health module designed to collect population-based data on New Jersey residents travelling internationally. Our objective was to use this population-based travel health information to serve as a baseline to evaluate trends in US international travellers. A representative sample of New Jersey residents was identified through a random-digit-dialing method and administered the travel health module, which asked five questions: travel outside of USA during the previous year; destination; purpose; if a healthcare provider was visited before travel and any travel-related illness. Additional health variables from the larger NJBRFS were considered and included in bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regression; weights were assigned to variables to account for survey design complexity. Of 4029 participants, 841 (21%) travelled internationally. Top destinations included Mexico (10%), Canada (9%), Dominican Republic (6%), Bahamas (5%) and Italy (5%). Variables positively associated with travel included foreign birth, ≥$75 000 annual household income, college education and no children living in the household. One hundred fifty (18%) of 821 travellers with known destinations went to high-risk countries; 40% were visiting friends and relatives and only 30% sought pre-travel healthcare. Forty-eight (6%) of 837 responding travellers reported travel-related illness; 44% visited high-risk countries. Approximately one in five NJBRFS respondents travelled internationally during the previous year, a sizeable proportion to high-risk destinations. Few reported becoming ill as a result of travel but almost one-half of those ill had travelled to high-risk destinations. Population-based surveillance data on travellers can help

  1. An outbreak of dengue virus (DENV) type 2 Cosmopolitan genotype in Israeli travellers returning from the Seychelles, April 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Yaniv; Wolf, Dana; Halutz, Ora; Schwartz, Eli

    2017-06-29

    Dengue virus infection was diagnosed in six Israeli travellers returning from the Seychelles in April 2017. Phylogenetic analysis identified identical sequences belonging to the Cosmopolitan genotype of dengue virus type 2 in all samples sequenced, thus providing evidence for a probable dengue type 2 outbreak in the Seychelles. This report further demonstrates the role of travellers as sentinels for arboviral infections, especially in countries with limited diagnostic capabilities. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  2. Brucella melitensis prosthetic joint infection in a traveller returning to the UK from Thailand: Case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Joseph M; Folb, Jonathan; Kalra, Sanjay; Squire, S. Bertel; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Beeching, Nick J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND\\ud Brucella spp. prosthetic joint infections are infrequently reported in the literature, particularly in returning travellers, and optimal treatment is unknown.\\ud \\ud METHOD\\ud We describe a prosthetic joint infection (PJI) caused by Brucella melitensis in a traveller returning to the UK from Thailand, which we believe to be the first detailed report of brucellosis in a traveller returning from this area. The 23 patients with Brucella-related PJI reported in the literature are su...

  3. Critical success factors for international travel fairs, using the Taipei International Travel Fair as an example

    OpenAIRE

    I.-Ying Chang

    2014-01-01

    The travel industry has experienced operating difficulties because of the intense competition within the industry, difficulties in developing new products as well as the overly transparent and continuously increasing operating cost that reduces the profit margin. As a result, it is urgent that the business operating bottleneck be overcome and some strategies be implemented. These include dumping the conventional operating model, reducing basic operating costs, increasing the profit margin, an...

  4. International travel as medical research: architecture and the modern hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cameron; Willis, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The design and development of the modern hospital in Australia had a profound impact on medical practice and research at a variety of levels. Between the late 1920s and the 1950s hospital architects, administrators, and politicians travelled widely in order to review the latest international developments in the hospital field They were motivated by Australia's geographic isolation and a growing concern with how to govern the population at the level of physical health. While not 'medical research' in the conventional sense of the term, this travel was a powerful generator of medical thinking in Australia and has left a rich archival legacy. This paper draws on that archive to demonstrate the ways in which architectural research and international networks of hospital specialists profoundly shaped the provision of medical infrastructure in Australia.

  5. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, V.; Gautret, P.; Schlagenhauf, P.; Burchard, G.D.; Caumes, E.; Jensenius, M.; Castelli, F.; Gkrania-Klotsas, E.; Weld, L.; Lopez-Velez, R.; de Vries, P.; von Sonnenburg, F.; Loutan, L.; Parola, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods: To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in

  6. Fairer flying: an international air travel levy for adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambwera, Muyeye; Muller, Benito

    2008-11-15

    For the world's poorest countries and communities, adaptation to climate change is urgently needed, but costly: estimates run into tens of billions of dollars a year. Given the shortfall in current international adaptation funding, how can resources for the developing world be raised? An adaptation levy on international air travel could help fill the gap. A small per-trip payment by passengers could contribute US$8 billion to US$10 billion a year towards adaptation. Similar schemes in France and elsewhere show that this kind of ethical solidarity and 'polluter pays' approach would be simple to implement in practical and institutional terms.

  7. Zika virus infection in 18 travellers returning from Surinam and the Dominican Republic, The Netherlands, November 2015-March 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, Janneke W.; Goorhuis, Abraham; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Visser, Leo G.; Koopmans, Marion P.; Reimerink, Johan H.; Grobusch, Martin P.; van der Eijk, Annemiek A.; van den Kerkhof, Johannes H. C. T.; Reusken, Chantal B.; Hahné, Susan J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report 18 cases of confirmed Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in travellers returning to the Netherlands from Surinam (South America, bordering northern Brazil) and the Dominican Republic. In a multi-centre study, we collected epidemiological, virological and clinical characteristics, as well as data

  8. Successful Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania aethiopica with Liposomal Amphothericin B in an Immunocompromised Traveler Returning from Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanger, Philipp; Kötter, Ina; Raible, Armin; Gelanew, Tesfaye; Schönian, Gabriele; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania aethiopica is rarely encountered outside disease-endemic areas and there have been no clinical trials evaluating its pharmacotherapy. We describe the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. aethiopica using liposomal amphothericin B in an immunocompromised traveler returning from Eritrea. PMID:21540377

  9. Fundraising flights: a levy on international air travel for adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birch, Tom; Chambwera, Muyeye

    2011-03-15

    Adapting to climate change will not be cheap: it will cost an estimated tens of billions of dollars each year. But where will the money come from? The UN climate negotiations have set up dedicated funds for the task but domestic politics have resulted in insufficient, variable and unreliable contributions from governments. An innovative adaptation levy on international air travel could help fill the gap. A small charge to individual travellers would raise up to US$10 billion a year. The levy, which follows the 'polluter pays' principle, could be implemented very quickly and at minimal cost and would go a long way to raising sums that could make a significant difference.

  10. Solidarity by demand? Exit and voice in international medical travel - The case of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormond, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more patients are intentionally travelling abroad as consumers for medical care. However, while scholars have begun to examine international medical travel's (IMT) impacts on the people and places that receive medical travellers, study of its impacts on medical travellers' home contexts

  11. Zika virus in semen: a prospective cohort study of symptomatic travellers returning to Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huits, Ralph; De Smet, Birgit; Ariën, Kevin K.; Van Esbroeck, Marjan; Bottieau, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To prospectively monitor Zika viral loads in semen from Belgian travellers with confirmed Zika virus infection, who returned from the Americas during the 2016 Zika virus epidemic. Methods We recruited symptomatic travellers consulting our clinic and we confirmed infection with either reverse-transcriptase (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay or virus neutralization test. The participants produced semen samples weekly, either at the clinic or at home. For the initial sample, the laboratory staff did a microscopy analysis if they received the sample within an hour of production. Using RT–PCR, we monitored Zika virus ribonucleic acid (RNA) loads in semen until we obtained two negative results. Findings We detected Zika virus RNA in nine of 15 participants’ semen, one of whom was vasectomized. The median time to loss of RNA detection in semen was 83 days after symptom onset (95% confidence interval, CI: 57−108). The longest duration of viral shedding in semen before obtaining the first negative RT–PCR result was 144 days after symptom onset. All of the 11 participants, for whom we microscopically analysed their semen, had presence of leukocytes, 10 showed haematospermia and six showed oligospermia. These abnormalities occurred irrespective of Zika virus detection in semen. Conclusion The majority of men in our study had detectable Zika virus RNA in their semen. We recommend that semen from Zika virus-infected men should be analysed with RT–PCR and that health professionals should advise infected men, even if they are vasectomized, about current recommendations for prevention of sexual transmission of the virus. PMID:29200521

  12. Species-directed therapy for leishmaniasis in returning travellers: a comprehensive guide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar J Hodiamont

    2014-05-01

    /SIGNIFICANCE: Our study highlights current knowledge about species-directed therapy of leishmaniasis in returning travellers and also demonstrates lack of evidence for treatment of several clinical categories. New data can easily be incorporated in the presented overview. Updates will be of use for clinical decision making and for defining further research.

  13. Rickettsial infections in Southeast Asia: implications for local populace and febrile returned travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Ar Kar; Spelman, Denis W; Murray, Ronan J; Graves, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Rickettsial infections represent a major cause of non-malarial febrile illnesses among the residents of Southeast Asia and returned travelers from that region. There are several challenges in recognition, diagnosis, and management of rickettsioses endemic to Southeast Asia. This review focuses on the prevalent rickettsial infections, namely, murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi), scrub typhus (Orientia tsutsugamushi), and members of spotted fever group rickettsiae. Information on epidemiology and regional variance in the prevalence of rickettsial infections is analyzed. Clinical characteristics of main groups of rickettsioses, unusual presentations, and common pitfalls in diagnosis are further discussed. In particular, relevant epidemiologic and clinical aspects on emerging spotted fever group rickettsiae in the region, such as Rickettsia honei, R. felis, R. japonica, and R. helvetica, are presented. Furthermore, challenges in laboratory diagnosis and management aspects of rickettsial infections unique to Southeast Asia are discussed, and data on emerging resistance to antimicrobial drugs and treatment/prevention options are also reviewed. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Management of infections in critically ill returning travellers in the intensive care unit—I: considerations on infection control and transmission of resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Leblebicioglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Depending on their destinations and activities, international travellers are at a significant risk of contracting both communicable and non-communicable diseases. On return to their home countries, such travellers may require intensive care. The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV, and more recently Ebola haemorrhagic fever, has highlighted the risks. Other well-known communicable pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae have been described previously. However, malaria remains by far the most important cause of death. The issues related to imported antibiotic resistance and protection from highly contagious diseases are reviewed here. Surveillance strategies based on epidemiological data (country visited, duration of travel, and time elapsed since return and clinical syndromes, together with systematic search policies, are usually mandatory to limit the risk of an outbreak. Single-bed hospital rooms and isolation according to symptoms should be the rule while awaiting laboratory test results. Because person-to-person contact is the main route of transmission, healthcare workers should implement specific prevention strategies.

  15. The visiting internet Fiancé/ée (VIF): an emerging group of international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofarelli, Theresa A; Birich, Holly K; Hale, DeVon C

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an emerging category of travelers called the Visiting Internet Fiancé/ée (VIF), characterized by their travel to pursue a romantic relationship with an individual they have only encountered online. The VIF is not well identified in travel medicine literature despite having a higher risk for several travel-related issues including sexually transmitted infections, monetary fraud, and international scams. We also propose specific counseling interventions designed to minimize the adverse outcomes faced by the VIF traveler. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  16. Travel grant program for the IX International Congresses of Mycology and Bacteriology -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granigan, Marion

    2000-05-25

    In 1999, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and the National Academy of Sciences' U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Microbiological Sciences (IUMS) jointly organized a competitive travel grant program to support the participation of U.S. scientists in the 9th International Congresses of the Bacteriological and Applied Microbiology, Mycology and Virology Divisions of the IUMS in Sydney, Australia, August 16-20, 1999. Funding was solicited for the program, and the ASM Minority and International Activities department administered the $40,000 raised. Travel grants in the amount of $2,000 were offered to U.S. investigators (citizens, including federal employees, and permanent residents working in the United States) in the early stages of their careers who planned to attend and present their research at the Congress. Teams of established and new investigators who applied jointly were eligible to received a combined $3,000 award. IUMS developed a questionnaire th at each applicant were required to complete and return, which asked each award recipient about their experience at the Congresses. Questionnaire results are included.

  17. International travel in the immunocompromised patient: a cross-sectional survey of travel advice in 254 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, C; Horne, K; Dendle, C; Kanellis, J; Littlejohn, G; Ratnam, I; Woolley, I

    2015-06-01

    Our primary aim was to determine the rate of overseas travel in immunocompromised individuals attending appropriate clinics at an Australian tertiary care hospital. We also aimed to characterise health-seeking behaviour prior to travel and investigated sources of pre-travel advice, compared travel patterns and activities between three specific immunosuppressed groups, and examined pre-immunosuppression patient serology. We implemented a cross-sectional survey of patients between February and August 2012. This survey was implemented among three outpatient populations at Monash Medical Centre, an Australian tertiary care hospital. We recruited 254 immunosuppressed adults from three patient populations: human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals, renal transplant patients and rheumatology patients requiring immunosuppressive therapy. No clinical intervention was performed. In the 10 years preceding the survey, 153 (60.2%) participants reported international travel. Of these, 105 (68.6%) were immunosuppressed at the time of travel. These patients were 47.6% male and 60% Australian born. Forty per cent were visiting friends and relatives as part of their travel. Fifty-four per cent of those immunocompromised at the time of travel were going to high-risk destinations. Pathology files indicated that serological screening was frequently not performed prior to immunosuppression in the renal transplant and rheumatology groups. Immunocompromised patients often travel to high-risk destinations with limited or inadequate pre-travel preparations. Doctors caring for the immunocompromised should be aware of travel risks, suitable vaccination protocols and when to refer to specialist travel clinics. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Schistosoma haematobium-Schistosoma bovis Hybrid Infection in a Cluster of Travelers Returning From Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soentjens, Patrick; Cnops, Lieselotte; Huyse, Tine; Yansouni, Cedric; De Vos, Daniel; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Clerinx, Jan; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2016-12-15

    Ten Belgian travelers returned from Mali with a Schistosoma haematobium-Schistosoma bovis hybrid infection, confirmed by DNA sequencing from eggs. Clinical symptoms and laboratory findings resembled those of classic acute schistosomiasis, but the detected eggs were morphologically unusual. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Prevalence of infection with dengue virus among international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, T; Dobler, G; Hölscher, M; Löscher, T; Nothdurft, H D

    1997-11-10

    Dengue has been recognized as a potential hazard to tourists. A prospective, controlled study in the outpatient clinic of a German infectious disease clinic was conducted to assess the prevalence of dengue virus infection among international travelers. Serum samples from 130 patients with signs or recent history clinically compatible with dengue (fever, headache, muscle and joint pain, or rash), 95 matched controls with diarrhea, and 26 patients who never visited a country endemic for dengue were investigated. Nine (6.9%) of the 130 patients with compatible symptoms and 1 (1%) of the 95 controls with diarrhea developed rising antibody titers against dengue virus. Of these 10 patients with probable dengue infection, 6 had been to Thailand, 2 to Malaysia, and 1 each to Indonesia and Brazil. Infection with dengue virus appears to be a realistic threat to travelers to Southeast Asia. Symptoms commonly associated with dengue, such as fever, myalgia, arthralgia, and vomiting, can be helpful for diagnosis when present, but the absence of typical symptoms does not exclude infection.

  20. Sleep, Travel, and Recovery Responses of National Footballers During and After Long-Haul International Air Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Hugh H; Duffield, Rob; Skorski, Sabrina; White, David; Bloomfield, Jonathan; Kölling, Sarah; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the sleep, travel, and recovery responses of elite footballers during and after long-haul international air travel, with a further description of these responses over the ensuing competitive tour (including 2 matches). In an observational design, 15 elite male football players undertook 18 h of predominantly westward international air travel from the United Kingdom to South America (-4-h time-zone shift) for a 10-d tour. Objective sleep parameters, external and internal training loads, subjective player match performance, technical match data, and perceptual jet-lag and recovery measures were collected. Significant differences were evident between outbound travel and recovery night 1 (night of arrival; P sleep duration. Sleep efficiency was also significantly reduced during outbound travel compared with recovery nights 1 (P = .001) and 2 (P = .004). Furthermore, both match nights (5 and 10), showed significantly less sleep than nonmatch nights 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 (all P .05), although large effects were evident for jet-lag on d 2 (2 d after arrival). Sleep duration is truncated during long-haul international travel with a 4-h time-zone delay and after night matches in elite footballers. However, this lost sleep appeared to have a limited effect on perceptual recovery, which may be explained by a westbound flight and a relatively small change in time zones, in addition to the significant increase in sleep duration on the night of arrival after the long-haul flight.

  1. Helping Others Travel Abroad: Careers in International Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilorio, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    People travel abroad for reasons as diverse as their destinations. Many travel to sightsee, some to work, and others to study. Some stay indefinitely. Behind a number of these trips, there are workers who help travelers overcome the challenges of going to a different country--such as learning about local customs and finding safe accommodations. As…

  2. Preparing children for international travel: need for training and pediatric-focused research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Leshem, Eyal; Fischer, Philip R; Stauffer, William M; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Christenson, John C

    2014-01-01

    The International Society of Travel Medicine (ISTM) Pediatric Interest Group (PedIG) was created in 2010. We studied the group's professional characteristics and practice patterns to identify clinical areas requiring further training and research related to pediatric international travel. PedIG members were emailed a two-part online questionnaire in September 2011, which comprised questions about professional and practice details, followed by a survey regarding decisions on nine patient scenarios that represent common pediatric pre-travel health challenges. Ninety-three (34%) of 273 members completed the survey. Most were physicians (80%) having a primary specialization in pediatrics (55%) and family medicine (19%). About a third (37%) had acquired the ISTM Certificate in Travel Health (CTH); 14 and 11% chose not to provide malaria chemoprophylaxis for a 2-month-old infant and a 13-year-old child traveling to West Africa, respectively. Azithromycin for empiric treatment of travelers' diarrhea in a 2-year-old traveler to Thailand and Mexico was suggested by 74 and 58%, respectively, while the use of acetazolamide for a 2-month old infant traveling to a high-altitude destination was rarely (13%) chosen. In vaccine-focused scenarios, 71, 69, 21, and 10% would prescribe the meningococcal vaccine for a 6-month-old traveler to Burkina Faso, Japanese encephalitis vaccine to a 10-year-old traveler to Cambodia, hepatitis A vaccine to a 6-month-old traveler to El Salvador, and the typhoid vaccine to a 1-year-old traveler to India, respectively. Members of the PedIG have diverse professional and practice backgrounds. Lack of awareness of established guidelines may place international pediatric travelers at risk for travel-associated morbidity. Strategies are needed to facilitate education and support research in pediatric travel medicine to formulate evidence-based guidelines wherever they are currently missing. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  3. Preparing for International Travel and Global Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Swaminatha V; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2017-05-01

    Thorough pretravel preparation and medical consultation can mitigate avoidable health and safety risks. A comprehensive pretravel medical consultation should include an individualized risk assessment, immunization review, and discussion of arthropod protective measures, malaria prophylaxis, traveler's diarrhea, and injury prevention. Travel with children and jet lag reduction require additional planning and prevention strategies; travel and evacuation insurance may prove essential when traveling to less resourced countries. Consideration should also be given to other high-risk travel scenarios, including the provision of health care overseas, adventure and extreme sports, water environments and diving, high altitude, and terrorism/unstable political situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diseases affecting patients returning from abroad: Experience of a travel clinic in Japan from 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Miyata, Nobuyuki; Miyajima, Makiko; Sakamoto, Yohei; Amano, Yuichiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo

    2017-01-01

    The number of patients returning from or staying abroad is likely to increase in the future. We performed a retrospective study of patients returning from abroad in our travel clinic in Japan. All patients presenting within 6 months of traveling abroad between 2004 and 2014 were included in the present study. A total of 2374 (mean age, 35 years) patients were seen by doctors specializing in treating infectious diseases. Of these, 918 were females and 87 of them lived abroad. Diagnoses and exposure regions were recorded for all patients. The most frequent region visited before attending our clinic was Southeast Asia (n = 1050, 44%), with a median duration for staying abroad of 8 days. The major purposes for overseas travel were tourism (n = 1302, 55%) and business (n = 684, 29%). Of the 2399 individual diagnoses made, the most frequent were diseases of the gastrointestinal system (n = 1083, 45%), skin and soft tissue (n = 440, 18%), systemic febrile disease without specific systems (419, 18%), and the respiratory system (353, 15%). The relative incidences of specific diseases changed drastically due to significant disease outbreaks, such as pandemic influenza in 2009. Exposure regions remained relatively constant throughout the study period, except for Japan. Vaccine-preventable diseases accounted for 5.3% of all the diseases, and 402 (26%) patients received pre-travel consultation and prophylaxis with vaccines and/or anti-malarial drug. We should make an effort to make more people notice the risk of travel and properly perform prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Köpp-Junk, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Travel was a crucial element of ancient Egyptian culture. An extensive traffic system by land and by water already existed as early as the Old Kingdom, including various means of transport that did not fundamentally change right through to the New Kingdom. Traveling activity attested for various professions demonstrates that Egyptian society exercised a high degree of mobility. In the majority of cases, a journey was undertaken within the scope of the traveler’s work and on behalf of the phar...

  6. Cerebral vascular reactivity on return from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuj, Kathryn; Greaves, Danielle; Shoemaker, Kevin; Blaber, Andrew; Hughson, Richard L.

    Returning from spaceflight, astronauts experience a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance and syncope. Longer duration space flight may result in greater adaptations to microgravity which could increase the post-flight incidence of syncope. CCISS (Cardiovascular and Cerebovascular Control on return from the International Space Station) is an ongoing project designed to help determine adaptations that occur during spaceflight which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance. One component of this project involves looking at cerebral vascular responses before and after long duration spaceflight. As a known vasodilator, carbon dioxide (CO2) has been frequently used to assess changes in cerebral vascular reactivity. In this experiment, end tidal PCO2 was manipulated through changes in respired air. Two breaths of a 10% CO2 gas mixture were administered at 1-min intervals resulting in an increase in end tidal PCO2 . Throughout the testing, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was determined using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The cerebral resistance index (RI) was calculated from the Doppler wave form using the equation; RI=(CBFVsystolic-CBFVdiastolic)/CBFVsystolic. Changes in this index have been shown to reflect changes in cerebral vascular resistance. Peak responses to the CO2 stimulus were determined and compared to baseline measures taken at the beginning of the testing. Cerebral blood flow velocity increased and RI decreased with the two breaths of CO2. Preliminary data show a 36.0% increase in CBFV and a 9.0% decrease in RI pre-flight. Post flight, the response to CO2 appears to change showing a potentially blunted decrease in resistance (6.8%) and a smaller increase in CBFV (22.8%). Long term spaceflight may result in cerebrovascular changes which could decrease the vasodilatory capacity of cerebral resistance vessels. Further investigations in the CCISS project will reveal the interactive role of CO2 and arterial blood pressure on maintenance of brain

  7. Patient awareness of need for hepatitis a vaccination (prophylaxis) before international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Stephen J; Sharapov, Umid; Klevens, Monina

    2015-01-01

    Although hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is preventable through vaccination, cases associated with international travel continue to occur. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of international travel and countries visited among persons infected with HAV and assess reasons why travelers had not received hepatitis A vaccine before traveling. Using data from sentinel surveillance for HAV infection in seven US counties during 1996 to 2006, we examined the role of international travel in hepatitis A incidence and the reasons for patients not being vaccinated. Of 2,002 hepatitis A patients for whom travel history was available, 300 (15%) reported traveling outside of the United States. Compared to non-travelers, travelers were more likely to be female [odds ratio (OR) = 1.74 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.35, 2.24)], aged 0 to 17 years [OR = 3.30 (1.83, 5.94)], Hispanic [OR = 3.69 (2.81, 4.86)], Asian [OR = 2.00 (1.06, 3.77)], and were less likely to be black non-Hispanic [OR = 0.30 (0.11, 0.82)]. The majority, 189 (61.6%), had traveled to Mexico. The most common reason for not getting pre-travel vaccination was "Didn't know I could [or should] get shots" [100/154 (65%)]. Low awareness of HAV vaccination was the predominant reason for not being protected before travel. Different modes of traveler education could improve prevention of hepatitis A. To highlight the risk of infection before traveling to endemic countries including Mexico, travel and consulate websites could list reminders of vaccine recommendations. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Extensive cutaneous larva migrans with folliculitis mimicking multimetameric herpes zoster presentation in an adult traveler returning from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvy, Denis; Ezzedine, Khaled; Pistone, Thierry; Receveur, Marie-Catherine; Longy-Boursier, Maïté

    2006-01-01

    Hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is a frequent cutaneous disease among travelers returning from the tropics. It can be misdiagnosed or treated incorrectly. We present a 42-year-old French patient who contracted the disease during a holiday in Thailand and who experienced an extensive CLM syndrome with a less frequent abdominal localization and a pseudo-multimetameric homolateral topography. The condition was late diagnosed and secondarily efficiently cured by a unique administration of ivermectin. Simple anamnestic information--often revealing beach activities--and clinical aspect of the creeping eruption allow to prevent diagnosis delay and to avoid aggressive or inadequate intervention.

  9. The return of international labour migrants in the ESCAP Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    The social phenomenon of massive temporary international labor migration from the ESCAP region has emerged extremely rapidly. Within 10 years, the number of persons from ESCAP countries grew from a negligible one to 3.5 million. Related research and government policies have lagged behind this latest surge in migration. Most research conducted has been small-scale and lacks an analytical or theoretical framework. Policy formulation for temporary labor migration is difficult because most of the rapid growth in the industry has occurred as a result of private efforts, with a minimum of government intervention. It is now difficult, for the government to provide effective regulations or measures to stimulate and assist the process. Regulations on compulsory remittances or overseas minimum wages have proved to be unrealistic and, if not rescinded, are routinely circumvented. The most effective policies to assist return migrants may not be those which are intended to do so, but those which control the earlier stages of the migration process, such as recruitment, working conditions, and banking arrangements. The most valuable policies may also include those affecting education, training, employment, and general socioeconomic growth. Governments are recommended to provide social services for migrants and their families who are experiencing problems, and to institute community programs in areas with a large number of labor migrants. Governmental efforts to promote forms of labor migration beneficial to the workers would be valuable and should include measures to identify overseas labor markets for employing its nationals, government ot government labor contracts, and government participation in joint-venture projects. International migration should be analyzed in the context of theories and social change in order for governments to formulate effective measures for the reintegration of returning workers. Labor migration on the current scale has many social implications for

  10. A return to the traveling salesman model: a network branch and bound approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Munapo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a network branch and bound approach for solving the traveling salesman problem. The problem is broken into sub-problems, each of which is solved as a minimum spanning tree model. This is easier to solve than either the linear programming-based or assignment models.

  11. Characterizing International Travel Behavior from Geotagged Photos: A Case Study of Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yihong; Medel, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multimedia and mobile technologies have facilitated large volumes of travel photos to be created and shared online. Although previous studies have utilized geotagged photos to model travel patterns at individual locations, there is limited research on how these datasets can model international travel behavior and inter-country travel flows-a crucial indicator to quantify the interactions between countries in tourism economics. Realizing the necessity to investigate the potential of geotagged photos in tourism geography, this research investigates international travel patterns from two perspectives: 1) We apply a series of indicators (radius of gyration (ROG), number of countries visited, and entropy) to measure the descriptive characteristics of international travel in different countries; 2) By constructing a gravity model of trade, we investigate how distance decay influences the magnitude of international travel flow between geographic entities, and whether (or how much) the popularity of a given destination (defined as the percentage of tourist income in national gross domestic product (GDP)) affects travel choices in different countries. The results provide valuable input to various commercial applications such as individual travel planning and destination suggestions.

  12. Emerging Salmonella Enteritidis anaerogenic phage type 14b: outbreak in Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish travellers returning from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, P J; Nygard, K; Siitonen, A; Vold, L; Kuusi, M; de Jong, B; Rottingen, J A; Alvseike, O; Olsson, A; Lassen, J; Andersson, Y; Aavitsland, P

    2006-01-01

    In July 2001, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet, FHI) reported a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis of phage type 14b infections in Norwegian travellers returning from Greece. An increase in the same uncommon phage type was also registered in Sweden and Finland at the same time. Cases of S. Enteritidis PT 14b in patients returning from Greece were reported in these three Nordic countries in 2001 (303 cases), 2002 (164 cases) and 2003 (199 cases). Case-control studies performed in 2001 in Norway and Sweden indicated that consumption of chicken was associated with illness. In 2002 and 2003, continuing case reports indicated that this uncommon phage type had probably become established in the Greek food chain. Tour operators were informed and contacts were made with Greek public health authorities. Because place of infection is not systematically included in most Salmonella notification systems, the S. Enteritidis phage type 14b outbreak reported here may represent only part of a larger outbreak among travellers visiting Greece. Infections are often reported only in the tourists' home countries and public health authorities in the tourist destinations may not be aware of the problem. Further collaboration between national institutes of public health in Europe is needed to detect outbreaks occurring among tourists.

  13. The 'selfie' phenomenon: reducing the risk of harm while using smartphones during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Choi, Joonkoo

    2016-02-01

    Photography is an integral component of the international travel experience. Self-photography is becoming a mainstream behaviour in society and it has implications for the practice of travel medicine. Travellers who take selfies, including with the use of selfie sticks, may be subject to traumatic injuries associated with this activity. This review article is the first in the medical literature to address this emerging phenomenon. Articles indexed on PubMed and Scopus databases through 2015 were retrieved, using the search terms 'travel', combined with 'selfie', 'self-photography', 'smartphone', 'mobile phone' and 'social media'. The reference lists of articles were manually searched for additional publications, and published media reports of travel-related self-photography were examined. The lack of situational awareness and temporary distraction inherent in selfie-taking exposes the traveller to potential hazards. A diverse group of selfie injuries has been reported, including injury and death secondary to selfie-related falls, attacks from wild animals, electrocution, lightning strikes, trauma at sporting events, road traffic and pedestrian accidents. Public health measures adopted by the Russian Federation in response to over 100 reported selfie injuries in 2015 alone are presented. The review also discusses the potential for direct trauma from the use of selfie sticks. Travel-related scenarios where selfies should be avoided include photographs taken from a height, on a bridge, in the vicinity of vehicular traffic, during thunderstorms, at sporting events, and where wild animals are in the background. Recommendations exist which discourage use of mobile phones in drivers and pedestrians. The travel medicine practitioner should routinely counsel travellers about responsible self-photography during international travel and should include this advice in printed material given to the patient. The travel and mobile phone industries should reinforce these health

  14. Feasibility and clinical outcomes when using practice guidelines for evaluation of fever in returning travelers and migrants: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Yolanda; D'Acremont, Valérie; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle; Rossi, Isabelle; Martin, Olivier; Burnand, Bernard; Genton, Blaise

    2014-01-01

    forget specific diagnoses but finally diverged from the proposed attitudes. These diversions should be scrutinized for further refinement of the guidelines to better fit to physician and patient needs. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  15. Management of infections in critically ill returning travellers in the intensive care unit-II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rello, Jordi; Manuel, Oriol; Eggimann, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    This position paper is the second ESCMID Consensus Document on this subject and aims to provide intensivists, infectious disease specialists, and emergency physicians with a standardized approach to the management of serious travel-related infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) or the emerge......This position paper is the second ESCMID Consensus Document on this subject and aims to provide intensivists, infectious disease specialists, and emergency physicians with a standardized approach to the management of serious travel-related infections in the intensive care unit (ICU......) and ESGCIP (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Critically Ill Patients), respectively. A relevant expert on the subject of each section prepared the first draft which was then edited and approved by additional members from both ESCMID study groups. This article summarises considerations regarding clinical...

  16. Early Detection of Schistosoma Egg-Induced Pulmonary Granulomas in a Returning Traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coron, Noémie; Le Govic, Yohann; Kettani, Sami; Pihet, Marc; Hemery, Sandrine; de Gentile, Ludovic; Chabasse, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a French traveler who developed acute pulmonary schistosomiasis 2 months after visiting Benin. He presented with a 1-month history of fever, cough, and thoracic pain. Initial investigations revealed hypereosinophilia and multiple nodular lesions on chest computed tomography scan. Lung biopsies were performed 2 months later because of migrating chest infiltrates and increasing eosinophilia. Histological examination showed schistosomal egg-induced pulmonary granulomas with ova exhibiting a prominent terminal spine, resembling Schistosoma haematobium. However, egg shells were Ziehl-Neelsen positive, raising the possibility of a Schistosoma intercalatum or a Schistosoma guineensis infection. Moreover, involvement of highly infectious hybrid species cannot be excluded considering the atypical early pulmonary oviposition. This case is remarkable because of the rarity of pulmonary schistosomiasis, its peculiar clinical presentation and difficulties in making species identification. It also emphasizes the need to consider schistosomiasis diagnosis in all potentially exposed travelers with compatible symptoms. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Myiasis with Dermatobia hominis in a Sicilian traveller returning from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, M R; Pistone, G; Aricò, M

    2007-05-01

    We report a case of a bot fly infestation of the scalp. A 45-year-old man after returning to Sicily noted a small white "worm" erupting from the upper lesion. Physical examination revealed a superficial furuncular lesion with central pores with sero-sanguineous discharge. The foreign body identified was diagnosed as the larva of the human bot fly, Dermatobia hominis.

  18. Dermatobia hominis misdiagnosed as abscesses in a traveler returning from Brazil to Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jonas; Nejsum, Peter; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a 62-year-old woman that consulted us for two boil-like lesions on her thighs after returning from a trip to São Paulo, Brazil, where she had swum in a freshwater lake. After consulting three specialist doctors and undergoing two antibiotic treatments, she was diagnosed...

  19. Returns to Education and Economic Transition: An International Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Fan-sing

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the returns to education in transitional economies in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), such as Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic and the Ukraine in the 1990s, and in China in the 1980s and 1990s. In the pre-transition period, the returns to education in the six CEE countries were low at about 2-4%,…

  20. Zika virus infection in a traveller returning from the Maldives, June 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Essi Marjana; Huhtamo, Eili; Smura, Teemu; Kallio-Kokko, Hannimari; Raassina, Markku; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-01-01

    We report a Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in a patient with fever and rash after returning to Finland from Maldives, June 2015. The patient had dengue virus (DENV) IgG and IgM antibodies but pan-flavivirus RT-PCR and subsequent sequencing showed presence of ZIKV RNA in urine. Recent association of ZIKV with microcephaly highlights the need for laboratory differentiation of ZIKV from DENV infection and the circulation of ZIKV in areas outside its currently known distribution range.

  1. Dermatobia hominis misdiagnosed as abscesses in a traveler returning from Brazil to Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jonas; Nejsum, Peter; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst

    2017-06-01

    We present the case of a 62-year-old woman that consulted us for two boil-like lesions on her thighs after returning from a trip to São Paulo, Brazil, where she had swum in a freshwater lake. After consulting three specialist doctors and undergoing two antibiotic treatments, she was diagnosed with furuncular myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis. The parasites were excised with no complications.

  2. Zika virus infection in a traveller returning to Europe from Brazil, March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammarchi, L; Tappe, D; Fortuna, C; Remoli, M E; Günther, S; Venturi, G; Bartoloni, A; Schmidt-Chanasit, J

    2015-06-11

    We report a case of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus infection imported into Europe from the Americas. The patient developed fever, rash, and oedema of hands and feet after returning to Italy from Brazil in late March 2015. The case highlights that, together with chikungunya virus and dengue virus, three major arboviruses are now co-circulating in Brazil. These arboviruses represent a burden for the healthcare systems in Brazil and other countries where competent mosquito vectors are present.

  3. December 2012 critical care case of the month: sepsis-like syndrome in a returning traveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloom J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract not available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness The patient is a 56 year old male with a past medical history that is significant only for well controlled hypertension presenting with acute onset of fever, hematuria, jaundice and fatigue. He had been hospitalized in Mexico for the last 5 days. When he failed to improve his friends chartered an airplane and brought him to the U.S. Prior to his hospitalization in Mexico he had traveled to Sierra Leone related to his work as a geologist. PMH, SH, FH Past Medical History: Hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease Past Surgical History: Vasectomy Medications: Omeprazole, Lisinopril Social History: Works as a geologist with recent travel to Sierra Leone, no history of alcohol abuse, intravenous drug abuse, or HIV. Physical Examination Vital signs: Temperature 97.5° F, Pulse 87 beats/min, Respiratory Rate 18 breaths/min, Blood Pressure 111/84 mm Hg, and SaO2 89% on room air. The patient was initially alert, …

  4. Educating international students about tuberculosis and infections associated with travel to visit friends and relatives (VFR-travel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Katherine B; Brass, Amanda; Hume, Sam C; Leder, Karin

    2014-01-01

    International students in Victoria, Australia, originate from over 140 different countries. They are over-represented in disease notifications for tuberculosis and travel-associated infections, including enteric fever, hepatitis A, and malaria. We describe a public health initiative aimed to increase awareness of these illnesses among international students and their support staff. We identified key agencies including student support advisors, medical practitioners, health insurers, and government and professional organisations. We developed health education materials targeting international students regarding tuberculosis and travel-related infections to be disseminated via a number of different media, including electronic and printed materials. We sought informal feedback from personnel in all interested agencies regarding the materials developed, their willingness to deliver these materials to international students, and their preferred media for disseminating these materials. Education institutions with dedicated international student support staff and on-campus health clinics were more easily engaged to provide feedback and disseminate the health education materials than institutions without such dedicated personnel. Response to contacting off-campus medical practices was poor. Delivery of educational materials via electronic and social media was preferred over face-to-face education. It is feasible to provide health education messages targeting international students for dissemination via appropriately-staffed educational institutions. This initiative could be expanded in terms of age-group, geographic range, and health issues to be targeted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Fatal Neuroinvasive West Nile Virus Infection in a Traveler Returning from Madagascar: Clinical, Epidemiological and Veterinary Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrieu, Sophie; Cardinale, Eric; Ocquidant, Philippe; Roger, Matthieu; Lepec, Richard; Delatte, Hélène; Camuset, Guillaume; Desprès, Philippe; Brottet, Elise; Charlin, Cyril; Michault, Alain

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman living in Reunion Island and returning from Madagascar was hospitalized for neuroinvasive encephalitis and died 1 month later. West Nile virus (WNV) infection was biologically confirmed by detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) reactive with WNV antigens in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and weak neutralizing activity was also detected. A veterinary survey performed in her traveling area showed a seroprevalence of WNV of 28.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.1–36.3) in adult poultry, confirming an active circulation of the virus. Development of a severe form could be related to a weak antibody response, because the patient presented low IgM and IgG titers. This case report underlines the constant risk of emergence of West Nile in Indian Ocean territories, including Reunion Island where competent vectors are widely present during the whole year. PMID:23751400

  6. International Travel by Speakers of Esperanto. Esperanto Documents, New Series, No. 9A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyblewski, Tyburcjusz

    This volume considers the value of Esperanto in relation to international tourism, and the characteristics of Esperantist tourists. Esperanto is seen as a solution to problems of language in international relations in general, and thus to international travel as well. The following are some of the general characteristics of the majority of…

  7. Volatility modeling of asset returns | Babayemi | International Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out using the daily close share price of Nestle Nigeria Plc to identify and model its volatility of returns in the Nigerian Stock Exchange Market. The result of the study showed that basic Generalized Conditionally Heteroskedastic Model (GARCH (1,1)) model (with Gaussian Error Assumptions) best ...

  8. Import and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae by international travellers (COMBAT study): a prospective, multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcilla, Maris S; van Hattem, Jarne M; Haverkate, Manon R; Bootsma, Martin C J; van Genderen, Perry J J; Goorhuis, Abraham; Grobusch, Martin P; Lashof, Astrid M Oude; Molhoek, Nicky; Schultsz, Constance; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Verbrugh, Henri A; de Jong, Menno D; Melles, Damian C; Penders, John

    2017-01-01

    International travel contributes to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. We investigated the acquisition of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) during international travel, with a focus on predictive factors for acquisition, duration of colonisation, and probability of onward transmission. Within the prospective, multicentre COMBAT study, 2001 Dutch travellers and 215 non-travelling household members were enrolled. Faecal samples and questionnaires on demographics, illnesses, and behaviour were collected before travel and immediately and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after return. Samples were screened for the presence of ESBL-E. In post-travel samples, ESBL genes were sequenced and PCR with specific primers for plasmid-encoded β-lactamase enzymes TEM, SHV, and CTX-M group 1, 2, 8, 9, and 25 was used to confirm the presence of ESBL genes in follow-up samples. Multivariable regression analyses and mathematical modelling were used to identify predictors for acquisition and sustained carriage, and to determine household transmission rates. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01676974. 633 (34·3%) of 1847 travellers who were ESBL negative before travel and had available samples after return had acquired ESBL-E during international travel (95% CI 32·1-36·5), with the highest number of acquisitions being among those who travelled to southern Asia in 136 of 181 (75·1%, 95% CI 68·4-80·9). Important predictors for acquisition of ESBL-E were antibiotic use during travel (adjusted odds ratio 2·69, 95% CI 1·79-4·05), traveller's diarrhoea that persisted after return (2·31, 1·42-3·76), and pre-existing chronic bowel disease (2·10, 1·13-3·90). The median duration of colonisation after travel was 30 days (95% CI 29-33). 65 (11·3%) of 577 remained colonised at 12 months. CTX-M enzyme group 9 ESBLs were associated with a significantly increased risk of sustained carriage (median duration 75 days, 95% CI 48

  9. Effects of sleep hygiene and artificial bright light interventions on recovery from simulated international air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Peter M; Duffield, Rob; Morrow, Ian; Roach, Greg; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-03-01

    Despite the reported detrimental effects of international air travel on physical performance, a paucity of interventions have been scientifically tested and confirmed to benefit travelling athletes. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of sleep hygiene and artificial bright light interventions on physical performance following simulated international travel. In a randomized crossover design, 13 physically active males completed 24 h of simulated international travel with (INT) and without (CON) the interventions. The mild hypoxia and cramped conditions typically encountered during commercial air travel were simulated in a normobaric, hypoxic room. Physical performance, subjective jet-lag symptoms and mood states were assessed in the morning and evening on the day prior to and for two days post-travel. Sleep quantity and quality were monitored throughout each trial. Sleep duration was significantly reduced during travel in both trials (P sleep duration during and following travel was almost significantly greater (P = 0.06) in INT (17.0 (16.2-17.8) h) compared to CON (15.7 (14.9-16.5) h). Maximal-sprint and countermovement jump (P Recovery level 1 test (P > 0.05) performance, were significantly reduced the evening of day 1 and 2 post-travel, with no differences between trials (P > 0.05). Furthermore, vigour was significantly greater (P = 0.04) the morning of day 2 in INT [5.3 (3.9-6.7)] compared to CON [2.8 (1.4-4.2)], and subjective jet-lag symptoms and mood states were significantly worse on day 2 in CON only (P sleep disruption may attenuate travel fatigue, no improvements in the recovery of physical performance were apparent.

  10. First case of Zika virus infection in a returning Canadian traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Kevin; Meatherall, Bonnie; Zarra, Danielle; Drebot, Michael; MacDonald, Judy; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Wong, Sallene; Webster, Patricia; Lindsay, Robbin; Tellier, Raymond

    2014-11-01

    A woman who recently traveled to Thailand came to a local emergency department with a fever and papular rash. She was tested for measles, malaria, and dengue. Positive finding for IgM antibody against dengue and a failure to seroconvert for IgG against dengue for multiple blood samples suggested an alternate flavivirus etiology. Amplification of a conserved region of the non-structural protein 5 gene of the genus Flavivirus yielded a polymerase chain reaction product with a matching sequence of 99% identity with Zika virus. A urine sample and a nasopharygeal swab specimen obtained for the measles investigation were also positive for this virus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, the urine sample yielded a Zika virus isolate in cell culture. This case report describes a number of novel clinical and laboratory findings, the first documentation of this virus in Canada, and the second documentation from this region in Thailand. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Sinonasal Melioidosis in a Returned Traveller Presenting with Nasal Cellulitis and Sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Sin Mei Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrate a case involving a 51-year-old man who presented to a tertiary hospital with sepsis secondary to an abscess of the nasal vestibule and pustular eruptions of the nasal mucosa. Associated cellulitis extended across the face to the eye, and mucosal thickening of the sinuses was seen on computed tomography. The patient underwent incision and drainage and endoscopic sinus surgery. Blood cultures and swabs were positive for a gram-negative bacillus, Burkholderia pseudomallei. He had multiple risk factors including travel to an endemic area. The patient received extended antibiotic therapy in keeping with published national guidelines. Melioidosis is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, found in the soil in Northern Australia and Asia. It is transmitted via cutaneous or inhaled routes, leading to pneumonia, skin or soft tissue abscesses, and genitourinary infections. Risk factors include diabetes, chronic lung disease, and alcohol abuse. It can exist as a latent, active, or reactivated infection. A high mortality rate has been identified in patients with sepsis. Melioidosis is endemic in tropical Northern Australia and northeastern Thailand where it is the most common cause of severe community-acquired sepsis. There is one other report of melioidosis in the literature involving orbital cellulitis and sinusitis.

  12. International travelers and unintentional fatal drowning in Australia--a 10 year review 2002-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Amy E; Franklin, Richard C; Leggat, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    . Drowning deaths of travelers are commonly reported in the media, creating a perception that they are at a higher risk of drowning than residents. This may be true, due in part to unfamiliarity with the risks posed by the hazard, however there is limited information about drowning deaths of travelers in Australia. This study aims to identify the incidence of drowning among international travelers in Australia and examine the risk factors to inform prevention strategies. . Data on unintentional fatal drowning in Australian waterways of victims with a residential postcode from outside Australia were extracted from the Royal Life Saving Society-Australia National Fatal Drowning Database. . Between 1 July 2002 and 30 June 2012 drowning deaths among people known to be international travelers accounted for 4.3% (N = 123) of the 2870 drowning deaths reported in Australian waterways. Key locations for drowning deaths included beaches (39.0%), ocean/harbour (22.0%) and swimming pools (12.2%). Leading activities prior to drowning included swimming (52.0%), diving (17.9%) and watercraft incidents (13.0%). . International travelers pose a unique challenge from a drowning prevention perspective. The ability to exchange information on water safety is complicated due to potential language barriers, possible differences in swimming ability, different attitudes to safety in the traveler's home country and culture, a lack of opportunities to discuss safety, a relaxed attitude to safety which may result in an increase in risk taking behaviour and alcohol consumption. . Prevention is vital both to reduce loss of life in the aquatic environment and promote Australia as a safe and enjoyable holiday destination for international travelers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Preventing malaria in international travellers: an evaluation of published English-language guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliner, Merav; Poole, Kristina; Sinclair, David; Garner, Paul

    2014-11-03

    People intending to travel may seek information on malaria prevention from a range of sources. To ensure the best protection, this information needs to be reliable, up-to-date, consistent, and useful to their decision making. This study appraises current international and national guidelines written in English for malaria prevention in travellers, and whether any recommendations conflict. We systematically identified national or international English-language guidelines on malaria prevention in travellers to July 2013 using standard and multiple searching methods. We critically appraised guidelines using the AGREE II tool, and report inconsistent recommendations within guidelines. We identified five sets of English-language guidelines on preventing malaria for travellers. Assessment against AGREE II indicate that all of the guidelines fall short of internationally accepted standards in guideline development: none include a transparent description of methods; only one describes sources of funding or potential conflicts of interest; and only one includes formal presentation of the evidence alongside transparent assessment of the quality of that evidence. There were a number of important discrepancies between guidelines, and some omit information about effectiveness, safety and adverse effects of chemoprophylaxis options. The methods used for developing guidelines for malaria prevention in travellers lags behind current internationally recognized standards. Healthcare professionals as well as travellers themselves could be better informed if guidelines were more systematic and transparent summaries of the current knowledge on drug interventions in relation to effects, safety, administration and contra-indications.

  14. An Analysis of the Relationship between Land Use and Weekend Travel: Focusing on the Internal Capture of Trips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyoung Tommy Gim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Weekend travel has not been duly considered in academics and practice regarding its relationship with land use. A lack of consideration is notable in terms of how land use internalizes weekend travel. Thus, by separating the internal and external travel of the traffic analysis zone, this study analyzes the land use effect on weekend travel in comparison with that on weekday travel. Two structural equation models, each of which is specified for weekday and weekend travel, construct the same sample and their results become comparable. At the travel variable level, the models find consistent results: Stronger effects are made on internal travel than on external travel and particularly, on trip frequency than on travel time. This implies that compact land use causes a stronger addition of internal trips and a less strong reduction of external trips, that is, changes in destinations rather than in total travel time. At the factor level, unlike the weekday model in which the sociodemographic factor exerts a stronger effect, the weekend model presents that land use more strongly affects travel patterns. This magnitude difference is explained by the different flexibility of compulsory weekday travel and discretionary weekend travel in relation to the choice of trip destination and frequency.

  15. Illness in Travelers Returned From Brazil: The GeoSentinel Experience and Implications for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Mary E.; Chen, Lin H.; Han, Pauline V.; Keystone, Jay S.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Segurado, Aluisio; Hale, DeVon; Jensenius, Mogens; Schwartz, Eli; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Leder, Karin; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Anand, Rahul; Gelman, Stephanie S.; Kain, Kevin; Boggild, Andrea; Perret, Cecilia; Valdivieso, Francisca; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; Libman, Michael D.; Ward, Brian; Maclean, J. Dick; Grobusch, Martin C.; Goorhuis, Abram; de Vries, Peter; Gadroen, Kartini; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Harms, Gunder; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Delmont, Jean; Carosi, Giampiero; Castelli, Francesco; Connor, Bradley A.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry; Fairley, Jessica; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Using, Johan; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Askling, Helena Hervius; Bronner, Ulf; Haulman, N. Jean; Roesel, David; Jong, Elaine C.; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Perez Molina, Jose Antonio; Torresi, Joseph; Brown, Graham; Licitra, Carmelo; Crespo, Antonio; McCarthy, Anne; Field, Vanessa; Cahill, John D.; McKinley, George; van Genderen, Perry J.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Stauffer, William M.; Walker, Patricia F.; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kato, Yasuyuki; Mizunno, Yasutaka; Shaw, Marc; Hern, Annemarie; Vincelette, Jean; Freedman, David O.; Anderson, Susan; Hynes, Noreen; Sack, R. Bradley; McKenzie, Robin; Nutman, Thomas B.; Klion, Amy D.; Rapp, Christophe; Aoun, Olivier; Doyle, Patrick; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Valdez, Luis M.; Siu, Hugo; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Kurai, Hanako; Sagara, Hiroko; Lalloo, David G.; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Gurtman, Alejandra; McLellan, Susan; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Hagmann, Stefan; Henry, Michael; Miller, Andy O.; Mendelson, Marc; Vincent, Peter; Lynch, Michael W.; Hoang Phu, Phi Truong; Anderson, Nicole; Batchelor, Trish; Meisch, Dominique; Yates, Johnnie; Ansdell, Vernon; Pandey, Prativa; Pradhan, Rashila; Murphy, Holly; Basto, Filipe; Abreu, Candida; Orduna, Tomas; Watson, Ashley; Forde, Andrea M.; Koeck, Thomas; Buzzolini, Tonia; Mills, Deborah; Quarry, Doug; Kenafake, John; Douglas, Annette; Streeton, Catherine; Matchett, Libby; Foong, Leopold; Haditsch, Martin; Kollaritsch, Herwig; van Gompel, Alfons; van Laethem, Yves; Callens, Steven; Alves, Jesse; Rocha, Jaime; Mayhew, W. James; Meatherall, Bonnie; Vaughan, Stephen; Devraj-kizuk, Rozemin; Siemens, Rick; Cherniwchan, Darin P.; Mistry, Dinesh; MacDonald, Susan C.; Plourde, Pierre; Owsianik, Walter D. J.; Baran, Greg; Dixon, Heather; McKee, Ryan; Lingley, Mike; Gamble, Kenneth; Whitsitt, Paul; Geduld, Jennifer; Kazemi, Mojdeh; Teitelbaum, Peter; Abdulla, Aly; Schell, Lisa; Wittes, Robert C.; Cyr, Lynne; Hii, John H.; Lam, Ray; Husain, Aisha; Cooke, Ray; Billick, Kendall; Boisvert, Caroline; Lavoie, Nancy; Dumontet, Christine; Lavoie, Helene; Diener, Tania; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Buhl, Mads; Petersen, Eskild; Magnussen, Pascal; Larson, Carsten Schade; Kantele, Anu; Siikamäki, Heli; Rummukainen, Maija; Bouchaud, Olivier; Mechain, Matthieu; Rouen, Jean-Philippe Leroy; Steiner, Florian; Zanger, Philipp; D'Almeida, Richard; Gerolymatos, Konstantinos G.; Pavli, Androula; Cheng, Michael; Simon, John; Wong, Chun Kwan Bonnie; Felkai, Peter; Collins, Simon; Borenstein, Annette; Odolini, Silvia; Foti, Fabio; Kimura, Mikio; Kurosu, Joe; Takeshita, Nozomi; Koga, Toshihiro; Sakai, Makoto Nomura; Nesbitt, Sidney; Vrij-Mazee, Henriette; Partridge, Yvonne; Ingram, Joan H.; Visser, Jenny; Celis-Salinas, Juan Carlos; de lou Saulog, Vienne; Varandas, Luis; Fonseca, Ana Gloria; Pombal, Rui; Florescu, Simin-Aysel; Popescu, Corneliu Petru; Erovichenkov, Alexander; Dobrodenkova, Silvia; Kotar, Tadeja; Perez-Arellano, Jose-Luis; Rombo, Lars; Meurling, Staffan; Luchinger, Pierre-Andre; Poumerol, Gilles; Balestra, Stefano; Gerber, Frédéric; Landry, Pierre; Gammeter, Hans; Schmid, Sabine; Smit, Ype; Kedward, Mary; Thomas, Michael J. G.; Ellis, Michael; Bryceson, Anthony; Miller, Alastair R. O.; Dawood, Richard; Zuckerman, Jane; Cave, William; Ross, Jonathan; Townend, Michael; Kassianos, George; Genasi, Fiona; Harris, Scott; Klecka, Eileen; Krotzer, Steven S.; Dover, Arthur; Wai, San A.; Tran, Lawrence Delano; Grassman, Lynn; Jacobson, Susan; Fink, Rhona; Sommer, Stephen; Goad, Jeffery; Johnson, Richard O.; Lehrhoff, Howard; Petrie, Arezou; Petrie, Louis; Spees, David N.; Nguyen, Philippe T.; Habis, Joseph; Barry, Michele; Harte, Jonathan; Sperry, Corydon; Hammer, John; Nash, Esther; Dardick, Kenneth; Smith, Kathy; Beaulieu, Nicholas; Leshem, Eyal; Phillips, Barbara; Goodale, Richard; Allen, James E.; Lee, Jenny; Roque, David; Trauscht, Ann; Jones, Jeffrey G.; Mclellan, Susan L. F.; Seybolt, Lorna; Sauri, Michael; Riddle, Forrest; Hamer, David; Ooi, Winnie; Butler, Edward P.; Bank, Laurie M.; Bacaner, Nina; Zents, James H.; Anglim, Anne; King, Todd; Galle, Rosanne; Natarajan, Usha; Barnish, Michael; Olmstead, Francine; Bunnell, Lynne; Chapnick, Edward; Neumann, Karl; Wittner, Murray; Acosta, Alberto M.; Johnson, Susan; Kalish, Scott; Narula, Rajiv; Oran, Bruce; Primas, Ronald A.; Wynne, Susan; Lee, Richard V.; Ritz, Howard; Brieff, David; Leach, Richard P.; Blair, Donald C.; Hall, John; Hall, Suzanne; Rhodes, Charles W.; Siraj, Dawd; Mawhorter, Steven D.; Czachor, John S.; Mull, Jeffrey; Daya, Mohamud; Gardner, Amy; Knouse, Mark C.; Sfedu, Emil; Urevick, Patricia; Neuburger, Ken; Hall, Jeffrey; Stocks, Steven; Benson, Lowell Scott; Magill, Alan J.; Smith, Robert L.; Lambe, Mary; Galka, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brazil will host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, events that are expected to attract hundreds of thousands of international travelers. Travelers to Brazil will encounter locally endemic infections as well as mass event-specific risks. Methods. We

  16. Travel-related MERS-CoV cases: An assessment of exposures and risk factors in a group of Dutch travellers returning from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, May 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.B. Fanoy (Ewout B.); M.A.B. van der Sande (Marianne); M. Kraaij-Dirkzwager (Marleen); K. Dirksen (Kees); M. Jonges (Marcel); W. van der Hoek (Wim); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); D.V. Werf (Douwe Vander); G.J.B. Sonder (Gerard); C. van der Weijden (Charlie); J. van der Heuvel (Jet); L.B.S. Gelinck (Luc); J.W. Bouwhuis (Jolande); A.B. van Gageldonk-Lafeber (Rianne)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ In May 2014, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, with closely related viral genomes, was diagnosed in two Dutch residents, returning from a pilgrimage to Medina and Mecca, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). These patients travelled with a

  17. Travelling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a respected and even senior member of the World. Medical Association. If we wish to accept the re- sponsibilities which adulthood brings in its wake, we will have to ... International hospitality among doctors is a pleasant reality; in fact, it can sometimes become a very fatiguing one. It makes it so much easier for the hosts if ...

  18. Beyond the Mincer Equation: The Internal Rate of Return to Higher Education in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Suaza, Andrés Felipe; Guataquí, Juan Carlos; Guerra, José Alberto; Maldonado, Darío

    2014-01-01

    In order to present an estimation of the internal rate of return (IRR) to higher education in Colombia, we take advantage of recent updates on the methodological approach towards earnings equations. In order to overcome the criticism that surrounds interpretations of the education coefficient of Mincer equations as being the rate of return to…

  19. 19 CFR 123.16 - Entry of returning trucks, busses, or taxicabs in international traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry of returning trucks, busses, or taxicabs in... Traffic § 123.16 Entry of returning trucks, busses, or taxicabs in international traffic. (a) Admission without entry or payment of duty. Trucks, busses, and taxicabs, whether of foreign or domestic origin...

  20. "Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica" Detected from a Febrile Traveller Returning to Germany from Vacation in Southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Fingerle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 26 year-old female patient presented to the Tropical Medicine outpatient unit of the Ludwig Maximilians-University in Munich with febrile illness after returning from Southern Africa, where she contracted a bite by a large mite-like arthropod, most likely a soft-tick. Spirochetes were detected in Giemsa stained blood smears and treatment was started with doxycycline for suspected tick-borne relapsing fever. The patient eventually recovered after developing a slight Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction during therapy. PCR reactions performed from EDTA-blood revealed a 16S rRNA sequence with 99.4% similarity to both, Borrelia duttonii, and B. parkeri. Further sequences obtained from the flagellin gene (flaB demonstrated genetic distances of 0.066 and 0.097 to B. parkeri and B. duttonii, respectively. Fragments of the uvrA gene revealed genetic distance of 0.086 to B. hermsii in genetic analysis and only distant relations with classic Old World relapsing fever species. This revealed the presence of a novel species of tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes that we propose to name "Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica", as it was contracted from an arthropod bite in the Kalahari Desert belonging to both, Botswana and Namibia, a region where to our knowledge no relapsing fever has been described so far. Interestingly, the novel species shows more homology to New World relapsing fever Borrelia such as B. parkeri or B. hermsii than to known Old World species such as B. duttonii or B. crocidurae.

  1. "Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica" Detected from a Febrile Traveller Returning to Germany from Vacation in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerle, Volker; Pritsch, Michael; Wächtler, Martin; Margos, Gabriele; Ruske, Sabine; Jung, Jette; Löscher, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    A 26 year-old female patient presented to the Tropical Medicine outpatient unit of the Ludwig Maximilians-University in Munich with febrile illness after returning from Southern Africa, where she contracted a bite by a large mite-like arthropod, most likely a soft-tick. Spirochetes were detected in Giemsa stained blood smears and treatment was started with doxycycline for suspected tick-borne relapsing fever. The patient eventually recovered after developing a slight Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction during therapy. PCR reactions performed from EDTA-blood revealed a 16S rRNA sequence with 99.4% similarity to both, Borrelia duttonii, and B. parkeri. Further sequences obtained from the flagellin gene (flaB) demonstrated genetic distances of 0.066 and 0.097 to B. parkeri and B. duttonii, respectively. Fragments of the uvrA gene revealed genetic distance of 0.086 to B. hermsii in genetic analysis and only distant relations with classic Old World relapsing fever species. This revealed the presence of a novel species of tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes that we propose to name "Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica", as it was contracted from an arthropod bite in the Kalahari Desert belonging to both, Botswana and Namibia, a region where to our knowledge no relapsing fever has been described so far. Interestingly, the novel species shows more homology to New World relapsing fever Borrelia such as B. parkeri or B. hermsii than to known Old World species such as B. duttonii or B. crocidurae.

  2. Longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus RNA in semen of a traveller returning from Barbados to the Netherlands with Zika virus disease, march 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.D. Pas (Suzan); C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); R. Mögling (Ramona); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); T. Langerak (Thomas); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report the longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in semen of a traveller who developed ZIKV disease after return to the Netherlands from Barbados, March 2016. Persistence of ZIKV RNA in blood, urine, saliva and semen was followed until the loads reached undetectable levels.

  3. Longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus RNA in semen of a traveller returning from Barbados to the Netherlands with Zika virus disease, March 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.D. Pas (Suzan); C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); R. Mögling (Ramona); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); T. Langerak (Thomas); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report the longitudinal follow-up of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in semen of a traveller who developed ZIKV disease after return to the Netherlands from Barbados, March 2016. Persistence of ZIKV RNA in blood, urine, saliva and semen was followed until the loads reached undetectable levels.

  4. Case report: Successful treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania aethiopica with liposomal amphothericin B in an immunocompromised traveler returning from Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanger, Philipp; Kötter, Ina; Raible, Armin; Gelanew, Tesfaye; Schönian, Gabriele; Kremsner, Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania aethiopica is rarely encountered outside disease-endemic areas and there have been no clinical trials evaluating its pharmacotherapy. We describe the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. aethiopica using liposomal amphothericin B in an immunocompromised traveler returning from Eritrea.

  5. Arboviral and other illnesses in travellers returning from Brazil, June 2013 to May 2016: implications for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautret, Philippe; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Grobusch, Martin P.; Rothe, Camilla; von Sonnenburg, Frank; van Genderen, Perry J.; Chappuis, Francois; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Caumes, Eric; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Malvy, Denis; Lopez-Vélez, Rogelio; Jensenius, Mogens; Larsen, Carsten Schade; Castelli, Francesco; Rapp, Christophe; Field, Vanessa; Molina, Israel; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Florescu, Simin; Lalloo, David; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated EuroTravNet (a GeoSentinel subnetwork) data from June 2013 to May 2016 on 508 ill travellers returning from Brazil, to inform a risk analysis for Europeans visiting the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Few dengue fever cases (n = 3) and no cases of chikungunya were

  6. Zika virus infection in 18 travellers returning from Surinam and the Dominican Republic, The Netherlands, November 2015–March 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Duijster (Janneke W.); A. Goorhuis (Abraham); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry); L.G. Visser (Leo); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); J.H.J. Reimerink (Johan); M.P. Grobusch (Martin P.); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); J.H.C.T. van Den Kerkhof (Johannes H. C. T.); C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.J. Hahné (Susan); The Dutch Zikv Study Team

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We report 18 cases of confirmed Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in travellers returning to the Netherlands from Surinam (South America, bordering northern Brazil) and the Dominican Republic. Methods: In a multi-centre study, we collected epidemiological, virological and clinical

  7. 50 CFR 23.49 - What are the requirements for an exhibition traveling internationally?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the requirements for an exhibition traveling internationally? 23.49 Section 23.49 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND...

  8. Pitfalls of using internal rate of return to rank investments in forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A. Gansner; David N. Larsen

    1969-01-01

    Using the internal rate of return concept to rank the economic desirability of investment opportunities can lead to incorrect investment decisions. Present value provides a correct and unambiguous means of judging such investment alternatives.

  9. Trends of norfloxacin and erythromycin resistance of Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli isolates recovered from international travelers, 1994 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieghe, Erika R; Jacobs, Jan A; Van Esbroeck, Marjan; Koole, Olivier; Van Gompel, Alfons

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter sp. is a major cause of bacterial enterocolitis and travelers' diarrhea. Empiric treatment regimens include fluoroquinolones and macrolides. Over the period 1994 to 2006, 724 Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli isolates recovered from international travelers at the outpatient clinic of the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium, were reviewed for their susceptibility to norfloxacin and erythromycin. Norfloxacin resistance increased significantly over time in isolates from travelers returning from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. For the years 2001 to 2006, norfloxacin resistance rates were 67 (70.5%) of 95 for Asia, 20 (60.6%) of 33 for Latin America, and 36 (30.6%) of 114 for Africa. The sharpest increase was noted for India, with no resistance in 1994, but 41 (78.8%) of 52 resistant isolates found during 2001 to 2006. Erythromycin resistance was demonstrated in 20 (2.7%) isolates, with a mean annual resistance of 3.1% +/- 2.8%; resistance increased over time, with up to 3(7.5%) of 40 and 3 (8.6%) of 35 resistant isolates in 2004 and 2006, respectively (p Campylobacter is the presumed cause. Continued monitoring of the incidence and the spread of resistant Campylobacter isolates is warranted.

  10. Migration, relationship capital and international travel : theory and evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Philip; Poot, Jacques; Sanderson, Lynda

    In this article we consider how international migration is related to the frequency and duration of trips to the home country. For many migrants, international migration triggers a series of trips to visit the home country that allow for a replenishment of the depleted relationship capital with

  11. International Utilization at the Threshold of "Assembly Complete"- Science Returns from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    The European Columbus and Japanese Kibo laboratories are now fully operational on the International Space Station (ISS), bringing decades of international planning to fruition. NASA is now completing launch and activation of major research facilities that will be housed in the Destiny U.S. Laboratory, Columbus, and Kibo. These facilities include major physical sciences capabilities for combustion, fluid physics, and materials science, as well as additional multipurpose and supporting infrastructure. Expansion of the laboratory space and expansion to a 6-person crew (planned for May 2009), is already leading to significant increases in research throughput even before assembly is completed. International research on the ISS includes exchanges of results, sharing of facilities, collaboration on experiments, and joint publication and communication of accomplishments. Significant and ongoing increases in research activity on ISS have occurred over the past year. Although research results lag behind on-orbit operations by 2-5 years, the surge of early research activities following Space Shuttle return to flight in 2005 is now producing an accompanying surge in scientific publications. Evidence of scientific productivity from early utilization opportunities combined with the current pace of research activity in orbit are both important parts of the evidence base for evaluating the potential future achievements of a complete and active ISS.

  12. Brucella melitensis prosthetic joint infection in a traveller returning to the UK from Thailand: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joseph M; Folb, Jonathan; Kalra, Sanjay; Squire, S Bertel; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Beeching, Nick J

    Brucella spp. prosthetic joint infections are infrequently reported in the literature, particularly in returning travellers, and optimal treatment is unknown. We describe a prosthetic joint infection (PJI) caused by Brucella melitensis in a traveller returning to the UK from Thailand, which we believe to be the first detailed report of brucellosis in a traveller returning from this area. The 23 patients with Brucella-related PJI reported in the literature are summarised, together with our case. The diagnosis of Brucella-related PJI is difficult to make; only 30% of blood cultures and 75% of joint aspiration cultures were positive in the reported cases. Culture of intraoperative samples provides the best diagnostic yield. In the absence of radiological evidence of joint loosening, combination antimicrobial therapy alone may be appropriate treatment in the first instance; this was successful in 6/7 [86%] of patients, though small numbers of patients and the likelihood of reporting bias warrant caution in drawing any firm conclusions about optimal treatment. Aerosolisation of synovial fluid during joint aspiration procedures and nosocomial infection has been described. Brucella-related PJI should be considered in the differential of travellers returning from endemic areas with PJI, including Thailand. Personal protective equipment including fit tested filtering face piece-3 (FFP3) mask or equivalent is recommended for personnel carrying out joint aspiration when brucellosis is suspected. Travellers can reduce the risk of brucellosis by avoiding unpasteurised dairy products and animal contact (particularly on farms and abattoirs) in endemic areas and should be counselled regarding these risks as part of their pre-travel assessment. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Former Intern: Amy Stull Returns to Her Roots | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer When Amy Stull, a 2000 graduate of Walkersville High School, began working in a laboratory at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick, she likely did not know the role NCI would play in her career. Stull started at NCI as a Werner H. Kirsten (WHK) student intern after her junior year of high school, working in a lab as she prepared for a career in chemical engineering. The student intern program pairs rising high school seniors with laboratory scientists to encourage the students to pursue careers in both science and health care fields.

  14. Zika and Chikungunya virus co-infection in a traveller returning from Colombia, 2016: virus isolation and genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherabuddi, Kartikeya; Iovine, Nicole M; Shah, Kairav; White, Sarah K; Paisie, Taylor; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J Glenn; Lednicky, John A

    2016-12-01

    Zikavirus (ZIKV) and Chikungunyavirus (CHIKV) can share the same mosquito vector, and co-infections by these viruses can occur in humans. While infections with these viruses share commonalities, CHIKV is unique in causing arthritis and arthralgias that may persist for a year or more. These infections are commonly diagnosed by RT-PCR-based methods during the acute phase of infection. Even with the high specificity and sensitivity characteristic of PCR, false negatives can occur, highlighting the need for additional diagnostic methods for confirmation. On her return to the USA, a traveller to Colombia, South America developed an illness consistent with Zika, Chikungunya and/or Dengue. RT-PCR of her samples was positive only for ZIKV. However, arthralgias persisted for months, raising concerns about co-infection with CHIKV or Mayaro viruses. Cell cultures inoculated with her original clinical samples demonstrated two types of cytopathic effects, and both ZIKV and CHIKV were identified in the supernatants. On phylogenetic analyses, both viruses were found to be related to strains found in Colombia. These findings highlight the need to consider CHIKV co-infection in patients with prolonged rheumatological symptoms after diagnosis with ZIKV, and the usefulness of cell culture as an amplification step for low-viremia blood and other samples.

  15. Providing travel health care--the nurses' role: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Irmgard; Hall, Sheila; Sato, Nahoko

    2013-01-01

    In many countries, the responsibility for travel health lies with medical practitioners who delegate certain tasks to nursing staff. Elsewhere, nurses have taken a leading role and work independently in private or hospital-based clinics, occupational health departments and general practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the roles and challenges faced by nurses providing travel health care in Australia, Japan and the UK, and to compare educational and professional needs. Nurses involved in travel health care were invited to complete an online questionnaire with multiple choice, open-ended, and Likert Scale questions. SurveyMonkey's statistical facilities analysed quantitative data; thematic content analysis was applied to qualitative responses. Differences and similarities between the three countries were conveyed by 474 participants focusing on current positions, work arrangements, and educational and practical concerns. Clinical practice issues, including vaccination and medication regulations, were highlighted with the differences between countries explained by the respective history of travel health care development and the involvement within their nursing profession. The call for more educational opportunities, including more support from employers, and a refinement of the role as travel health nurse appears to be international. Nurses require support networks within the field, and the development of a specialist "travel health nurse" would give a stronger voice to their concerns and needs for specific education and training in travel health care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Erskine, Stefanie; Jentes, Emily S; Walker, Allison T; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Chen, Lin H; Hamer, Davidson H; Ryan, Edward T

    2017-12-01

    To study characteristics and preventive interventions of adult pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seeking pretravel health care in the United States. This cross-sectional study analyzed data (2009-2014) of pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen at U.S. travel clinics participating in Global TravEpiNet. Nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers of childbearing age were used for comparison. We evaluated the prescription of malaria chemoprophylaxis and antibiotics for this population as well as the administration of three travel-related vaccines: hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever. We also evaluated use of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis and influenza vaccines, because these are widely recommended in pregnancy. Of 21,138 female travelers of childbearing age in Global TravEpiNet, 170 (0.8%) were pregnant and 139 (0.7%) were breastfeeding. Many traveled to destinations endemic for mosquito-borne illnesses, including malaria (pregnant: 95%; breastfeeding: 94%), dengue (pregnant: 87%; breastfeeding: 81%), or yellow fever (pregnant: 35%; breastfeeding: 50%). Compared with nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers, eligible pregnant travelers were less likely to be vaccinated against hepatitis A (28% compared with 51%, P<.001) and typhoid (35% compared with 74%, P<.001). More than 20% of eligible pregnant travelers did not receive influenza vaccination. Yellow fever vaccine was occasionally provided to pregnant and breastfeeding travelers traveling to countries entirely endemic for yellow fever (6 [20%] of 30 pregnant travelers and 18 [46%] of 39 breastfeeding travelers). Half of pregnant travelers and two thirds of breastfeeding travelers preparing to travel to malaria-holoendemic countries received a prescription for malaria prophylaxis. Most pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen for pretravel health consultations traveled to destinations with high risk for vector-borne or other travel-related diseases

  17. Characteristics of air travellers and travel processes at Mallam Aaminu Kano International Airport, Kano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Kundiri

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A study on passenger behaviour was carried out at the Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport (MAKIA in order to offer meaningful suggestions vital for airport management. Primary data were obtained through questionnaire administration and observations and analysed using the contigency tables. High-ranking civil servants and other respondents withy monthly incomes of more that #50,000 constituted 60%. Age wise, 26-40 age group accounted for 50% of the respondents. On the average, about 88% of the passengers at MAKIA engaged in discussions, watching TV or reading newspapers and magazines in the lounge. It was found that the airport handled 4042 and 1971 domestic and international passengers respectively, comprising 2703 in bound, 2727 out of bound and 583 transit passengers from a total of 58 landings and 65 take off operations during the 15 day-study period. It is envisaged that the findings in this research will assist both the airline carriers and the airport management in effective planning and management.

  18. Association between recent internal travel and malaria in Ugandan highland and highland fringe areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Caroline A; Bruce, Jane; Bhasin, Amit; Roper, Cally; Cox, Jonathan; Abeku, Tarekegn A

    2015-06-01

    To examine the association between travel (recency of travel, transmission intensity at destination compared to origin and duration of travel) and confirmed malaria in Uganda. Health facility-based case-control study in highland (~2200 m), and highland fringe (~1500 m) areas with adjustment for other covariates. In the highland site, patients who had travelled to areas of higher transmission intensity than their home (origin) areas recently were nearly seven times more likely to have confirmed malaria than those who had not (OR 6.9; P = 0.01, 95% CI: 1.4-33.1). In the highland fringe site, there was also a statistically significant association between travel and malaria (OR 2.1; P = 0.04, 95% CI: 1.1-3.9). For highland areas, or areas of low malaria transmission, health authorities need to consider internal migrants when designing malaria control programs. Control interventions should include information campaigns reminding residents in these areas of the risk of malaria infection through travel and to provide additional mosquito nets for migrants to use during travel. Health authorities may wish to improve diagnosis in health facilities in highland areas by adding travel history to malaria case definitions. Where routine monitoring data are used to evaluate the impact of interventions on the malaria burden in highland areas, health authorities and donors need ensure that only cases from the local area and not 'imported cases' are counted. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Solidarity by demand? Exit and voice in international medical travel - the case of Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Meghann

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more patients are intentionally travelling abroad as consumers for medical care. However, while scholars have begun to examine international medical travel's (IMT) impacts on the people and places that receive medical travellers, study of its impacts on medical travellers' home contexts has been negligible and largely speculative. While proponents praise IMT's potential to make home health systems more responsive to the needs of market-savvy healthcare consumers, critics identify it as a way to further de-politicise the satisfaction of healthcare needs. This article draws from work on political consumerism, health advocacy and social movements to argue for a reframing of IMT not as a 'one-off' statement about or an event external to struggles over access, rights and recognition within medical travellers' home health systems but rather as one of a range of critical forms of on-going engagement embedded within these struggles. To do this, the limited extant empirical work addressing domestic impacts of IMT is reviewed and a case study of Indonesian medical travel to Malaysia is presented. The case study material draws from 85 interviews undertaken in 2007-08 and 2012 with Indonesian and Malaysian respondents involved in IMT as care recipients, formal and informal care-providers, intermediaries, promoters and policy-makers. Evidence from the review and case study suggests that IMT may effect political and social change within medical travellers' home contexts at micro and macro levels by altering the perspectives, habits, expectations and accountability of, and complicity among, medical travellers, their families, communities, formal and informal intermediaries, and medical providers both within and beyond the container of the nation-state. Impacts are conditioned by the ideological foundations underpinning home political and social systems, the status of a medical traveller's ailment or therapy, and the existence of organised support for recognition and

  20. "Modelling International Travel Demand from Singapore to Australia"

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Prior to the recent Asian currency and economic crises, tourism from Asia had rapidly become Australia's major tourism export industry. Tourists from Singapore, which is Australia's fifth major market, represented 6% of international tourist arrivals to Australia in 1996. The average annual growth rate of tourist arrivals from Singapore of around 20% over 1990-96 far exceeded the 10.5% average annual percentage growth rate of all tourist arrivals to Australia over the same period (Australian ...

  1. Aetiology and epidemiology of fever in children presenting to the emergency department of a French paediatric tertiary care centre after international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Jérôme; Blondé, Renaud; Alberti, Corinne; Angoulvant, François; De Lauzanne, Agathe; Armoogum, Priscilla; Pull, Lauren; Lorrot, Mathie; Imbert, Patrick; Dauger, Stéphane; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Faye, Albert

    2012-02-01

    As few data are available on the causes of fever in children returning from international travel, the authors studied children presenting to a French tertiary care centre with fever. Children presenting to the emergency department of the Robert Debré Paediatric Hospital, Paris, France between July and December 2007 with fever that occurred within 3 months of a stay abroad were included in this retrospective study. The children (n=538) had most commonly visited North Africa (NA) (n=214), sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) (n=185) and Europe (n=67). Their median age was 2.8 years (IQR 1.4-5.8). The median time between their return to France and the onset of fever was 5 days (IQR 0-18). Cosmopolitan infections represented 85% of the established diagnoses (97.8% and 63.9% in the children returning from NA and SSA, respectively). Fever of unknown origin accounted for 19.3% of cases. Malaria was the leading tropical infection. Excluding malaria, diarrhoeal diseases were more frequent in the children returning from NA (38.5%) than in those returning from SSA (24.5%). Malaria was associated with stays in endemic countries that exceeded 30 days (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.02 to 9.59). Cosmopolitan infections are the leading cause of fever in French children returning from tropical and subtropical areas. However, all febrile children who have returned from an endemic area should be tested for malaria.

  2. 76 FR 55954 - Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker Products... securities of Cavit Sciences, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended...

  3. Return from space: from the International Space Station to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    On 16 May 2011, the space shuttle Endeavour took off for the last time from Cape Canaveral in Florida with six astronauts on board. Their mission (code-named STS-134) was to install the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), the dark matter and antimatter detector designed at CERN, on the International Space Station. Since then, AMS has been sending data to CERN from space.   On Wednesday 25 July do not miss a rare opportunity to meet the mission’s six astronauts at CERN: Mark E. Kelly, commander (NASA) Greg H. Johnson, pilot (NASA) and the mission’s specialists: Michael Fincke (NASA) Roberto Vittori (ESA and ASI) Andrew J. Feustel (NASA) Greg Chamitoff (NASA) 4:20 pm: the event will kick off with a photo and autograph session at the Globe of Science and Innovation. 5 pm: lecture given by the astronauts for CERN personnel and summer students in the Main Auditorium. (Seats reserved for the summer students - contact: summer.student.info@cern.ch). ...

  4. Effects of simulated domestic and international air travel on sleep, performance, and recovery for team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P; Duffield, R; Vaile, J

    2015-06-01

    The present study examined effects of simulated air travel on physical performance. In a randomized crossover design, 10 physically active males completed a simulated 5-h domestic flight (DOM), 24-h simulated international travel (INT), and a control trial (CON). The mild hypoxia, seating arrangements, and activity levels typically encountered during air travel were simulated in a normobaric, hypoxic altitude room. Physical performance was assessed in the afternoon of the day before (D - 1 PM) and in the morning (D + 1 AM) and afternoon (D + 1 PM) of the day following each trial. Mood states and physiological and perceptual responses to exercise were also examined at these time points, while sleep quantity and quality were monitored throughout each condition. Sleep quantity and quality were significantly reduced during INT compared with CON and DOM (P performance was significantly reduced at D + 1 PM following INT compared with CON and DOM (P performance remained unchanged (P > 0.05). Compared with baseline, physiological and perceptual responses to exercise, and mood states were exacerbated following the INT trial (P performance following simulated international air travel may be due to sleep disruption during travel and the subsequent exacerbated physiological and perceptual markers of fatigue. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Travellers' diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Christopher Stewart

    2015-04-30

    It is estimated that approximately 30% to 70% of international travellers will develop diarrhoea during their travels or after returning home. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 24 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (empirical), antibiotics plus antimotility agents, antimotility agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, oral rehydration solutions, and racecadotril for travellers' diarrhoea.

  6. 7 CFR 3402.6 - Overview of the special international study and/or thesis/dissertation research travel allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... thesis/dissertation research travel allowance. 3402.6 Section 3402.6 Agriculture Regulations of the... GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description § 3402.6 Overview of the special international study and/or thesis... special international study or thesis/dissertation research travel allowance, the Project Director must...

  7. Valuation of travel time for international long-distance travel - results from the Fehmarn Belt stated choice experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabit, Stefan Lindhard; Rich, Jeppe; Burge, Peter

    2013-01-01

    of travel time savings (VTTS). The final model, which was formulated as a nested logit model and included Box–Cox transformed travel time and cost attributes, revealed several interesting findings. Firstly, we found damping effects in both cost and time – most strongly in cost. Secondly, we found...... significant interactions among travel cost and time, and journey characteristics, such as distance and duration. This had direct impact on the VTTS, which was shown to decrease with distance and duration. Thirdly, we found that air travel implies a higher average VTTS, which is to be expected but rarely......The geographical scope of travel varies from short distances in urban areas to long distances across cities and countries. While urban travel has been widely analysed in the literature, travel over longer distances and particularly across countries, has received much less attention. While this may...

  8. An Internationally Coordinated Science Management Plan for Samples Returned from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltigin, T.; Smith, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) remains a high priority of the planetary exploration community. Such an effort will undoubtedly be too large for any individual agency to conduct itself, and thus will require extensive global cooperation. To help prepare for an eventual MSR campaign, the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) chartered the international Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II working group in 2014, consisting of representatives from 17 countries and agencies. The overarching task of the team was to provide recommendations for progressing towards campaign implementation, including a proposed science management plan. Building upon the iMARS Phase I (2008) outcomes, the Phase II team proposed the development of an International MSR Science Institute as part of the campaign governance, centering its deliberations around four themes: Organization: including an organizational structure for the Institute that outlines roles and responsibilities of key members and describes sample return facility requirements; Management: presenting issues surrounding scientific leadership, defining guidelines and assumptions for Institute membership, and proposing a possible funding model; Operations & Data: outlining a science implementation plan that details the preliminary sample examination flow, sample allocation process, and data policies; and Curation: introducing a sample curation plan that comprises sample tracking and routing procedures, sample sterilization considerations, and long-term archiving recommendations. This work presents a summary of the group's activities, findings, and recommendations, highlighting the role of international coordination in managing the returned samples.

  9. International medical travel and the politics of therapeutic place-making in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ormond, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic version excludes material for which permission has not been granted by the rights holder This thesis examines the shifting relationship between the state and its subjects with regard to responsibility for and entitlement to care. Using Malaysia as a case study the research engages with international medical travel (IMT) as an outcome of the neoliberal retrenchment of the welfare state. I offer a critical reading of postcolonial development strategies that negotiate the benefit...

  10. Stylized facts in internal rates of return on stock index and its derivative transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichl, Lukáš; Kaizoji, Taisei; Yamano, Takuya

    2007-08-01

    Universal features in stock markets and their derivative markets are studied by means of probability distributions in internal rates of return on buy and sell transaction pairs. Unlike the stylized facts in normalized log returns, the probability distributions for such single asset encounters incorporate the time factor by means of the internal rate of return, defined as the continuous compound interest. Resulting stylized facts are shown in the probability distributions derived from the daily series of TOPIX, S & P 500 and FTSE 100 index close values. The application of the above analysis to minute-tick data of NIKKEI 225 and its futures market, respectively, reveals an interesting difference in the behavior of the two probability distributions, in case a threshold on the minimal duration of the long position is imposed. It is therefore suggested that the probability distributions of the internal rates of return could be used for causality mining between the underlying and derivative stock markets. The highly specific discrete spectrum, which results from noise trader strategies as opposed to the smooth distributions observed for fundamentalist strategies in single encounter transactions may be useful in deducing the type of investment strategy from trading revenues of small portfolio investors.

  11. The challenge of diagnosing Plasmodium ovale malaria in travellers: report of six clustered cases in french soldiers returning from West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deparis Xavier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium ovale is responsible for 5% of imported malaria in French travellers. The clinical and biological features of six clustered cases of P. ovale malaria in an army unit of 62 French soldiers returning from the Ivory Coast are reported. Case report All patients were symptomatic and developed symptoms on average 50 days after their return and 20 days after the end of chemoprophylaxis (doxycycline. Clinical features included fever (6/6, mostly tertian (4/6, aches (6/6, nausea (3/6, abdominal pain (2/6, diarrhoea (2/6, or cough (2/6. Thrombocytopaenia was lower than 100,000/mm3 in half the cases only, and the haemoglobin count was normal for all patients. The diagnosis was made after at least three thick and thin blood smear searches. Parasitaemia was always lower than 0.5%. All rapid diagnostic tests were negative for HRP2 and pLDH antigens. Discussion Plasmodium ovale malaria is currently a problem to diagnose in travellers, notably in French soldiers returning from the Ivory Coast. Early attempts at diagnosis are difficult due to the lack of specific clinical features, the rarity of biological changes and the poor sensitivity of diagnostic tools to detect low parasitaemia. Thus, the diagnosis is commonly delayed or missed. Physicians should be aware of this diagnostic challenge to avoid relapses and provide prompt and adequate treatment with chloroquine and radical cure with primaquine.

  12. Forced migration and mental health: prolonged internal displacement, return migration and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Stewart, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Forced internal displacement has been rising steadily, mainly due to conflict. Many internally displaced people (IDP) experience prolonged displacement. Global research evidence suggests that many of these IDP are at high risk for developing mental disorders, adding weight to the global burden of disease. However, individual and community resilience may act as protective factors. Return migration may be an option for some IDP populations, especially when conflicts end, although return migration may itself be associated with worse mental health. Limited evidence is available on effects of resettlement or return migration following prolonged forced internal displacement on mental health. Also, the role of resilience factors remains to be clarified following situations of prolonged displacement. The public health impact of internal displacement is not clearly understood. Epidemiological and interventional research in IDP mental health needs to look beyond medicalised models and encompass broader social and cultural aspects. The resilience factor should be integrated and explored more in mental health research among IDP and a clearly focused multidisciplinary approach is advocated.

  13. Third International Scientific and Practical Conference «Space Travel is Approaching Reality» (Successful Event in Difficult Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusevych Tetiana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the presentations of participants of III International Scientific and Practical Conference «Space Travel – approaching reality», held on 6–7 November 2014 in Kharkiv, Ukraine

  14. International dispersal of dengue through air travel: importation risk for Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Sudre, Bertrand; Miniota, Jennifer; Rossi, Massimiliano; Hu, Wei; Kossowsky, David; Suk, Jonathan E; Van Bortel, Wim; Khan, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV) and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927-28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010. We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally. In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.17) for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23-2.35), 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02-2.10), and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01-1.81), respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010. The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is present. The

  15. Travel to invigorate the mind and the wallet : do the international tax rules appropriately encourage United States-Australian academic visits?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murray, Ian

    2012-01-01

    International tax treatment of payments for academics travelling between Australia and the US for research or teaching - current international research objectives - taxation inconsistencies - double...

  16. Toxocariasis Diagnosed in International Travelers at the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium, from 2000 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Broucke, Steven; Kanobana, Kirezi; Polman, Katja; Soentjens, Patrick; Vekemans, Marc; Theunissen, Caroline; Vlieghe, Erika; Van Esbroeck, Marjan; Jacobs, Jan; Van Den Ende, Jef; Van Gompel, Alfons; Clerinx, Jan; Bottieau, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Although infection with Toxocara canis or T. catis (commonly referred as toxocariasis) appears to be highly prevalent in (sub)tropical countries, information on its frequency and presentation in returning travelers and migrants is scarce. In this study, we reviewed all cases of asymptomatic and symptomatic toxocariasis diagnosed during post-travel consultations at the reference travel clinic of the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. Toxocariasis was considered as highly probable if serum Toxocara-antibodies were detected in combination with symptoms of visceral larva migrans if present, elevated eosinophil count in blood or other relevant fluid and reasonable exclusion of alternative diagnosis, or definitive in case of documented seroconversion. From 2000 to 2013, 190 travelers showed Toxocara-antibodies, of a total of 3436 for whom the test was requested (5.5%). Toxocariasis was diagnosed in 28 cases (23 symptomatic and 5 asymptomatic) including 21 highly probable and 7 definitive. All but one patients were adults. Africa and Asia were the place of acquisition for 10 and 9 cases, respectively. Twelve patients (43%) were short-term travelers (< 1 month). Symptoms, when present, developed during travel or within 8 weeks maximum after return, and included abdominal complaints (11/23 symptomatic patients, 48%), respiratory symptoms and skin abnormalities (10 each, 43%) and fever (9, 39%), often in combination. Two patients were diagnosed with transverse myelitis. At presentation, the median blood eosinophil count was 1720/μL [range: 510–14160] in the 21 symptomatic cases without neurological complication and 2080/μL [range: 1100–2970] in the 5 asymptomatic individuals. All patients recovered either spontaneously or with an anti-helminthic treatment (mostly a 5-day course of albendazole), except both neurological cases who kept sequelae despite repeated treatments and prolonged corticotherapy. Toxocariasis has to be considered in travelers

  17. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  18. Travel Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Daniel T; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T

    2018-01-02

    International travel can result in new illness or exacerbate existing conditions, and primary care clinicians have the opportunity to provide both pre- and posttravel health care. Providers should be familiar with destination-specific disease risks, be knowledgeable about travel and routine vaccines, be prepared to prescribe chemoprophylaxis and self-treatment regimens, and be aware of travel medicine resources.

  19. Stem cell tourism--a web-based analysis of clinical services available to international travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Ruairi; O'Brien, Timothy; Flaherty, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are advertised through online resources which describe a range of treatments with diverse clinical indications. Stem cell tourists may not be aware of the information they should seek when consulting these clinics, or of the potential risks involved. The aim of this study was to characterise the therapies offered by online stem cell clinics. A web based search utilising five search terms was employed. The first twenty pages of each search result were screened against 340 variables. 224 out of 1091 websites advertised stem cell clinics. 68 eligible sites covering 21 countries were evaluated. The top five clinical indications for stem cell therapy were multiple sclerosis, anti-ageing, Parkinson's disease, stroke and spinal cord injury. Adult, autologous stem cells were the most commonly utilised stem cell, and these were frequently sourced from bone marrow and adipose tissue and administered intravenously. Thirty-four per cent of sites mentioned the number of patients treated while one quarter of clinics provided outcome data. Twenty-nine per cent of clinics had an internationally recognised accreditation. Fifteen per cent of clinics stated that their therapies posed no risk. Eighty-eight per cent of clinics claimed treatment effectiveness, with 16% describing their curative potential. Over 40% of sites did not specify the number or duration of treatments. Fifty-three per cent of clinics requested access to patients' medical records, and 12% recommended patients discuss the proposed therapy with their doctor. No clinic recommended that travellers consult a travel medicine specialist or receive vaccinations prior to their intended travel. One quarter of sites discussed contraindications to treatment, with 41% of sites detailing follow up patient care. There is potential for stem cell tourists to receive misleading or deficient information from online stem cell clinics. Both the stem cell tourist and travel medicine practitioner should be educated

  20. Self-reported illness among Boston-area international travelers: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H.; Han, Pauline V.; Wilson, Mary E.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Jentes, Emily S.; Benoit, Christine; Ooi, Winnie W.; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The Boston Area Travel Medicine Network surveyed travelers on travel-related health problems. Methods Travelers were recruited 2009–2011 during pre-travel consultation at three clinics. The investigation included pre-travel data, weekly during-travel diaries, and a post-travel questionnaire. We analyzed demographics, trip characteristics, health problems experienced, and assessed the relationship between influenza vaccination, influenza prevention advice, and respiratory symptoms. Results Of 987 enrolled travelers, 628 (64%) completed all surveys, of which 400 (64%) reported health problems during and/or after travel; median trip duration was 12 days. Diarrhea affected the most people during travel (172) while runny/stuffy nose affected the most people after travel (95). Of those with health problems during travel, 25% stopped or altered plans; 1% were hospitalized. After travel, 21% stopped planned activities, 23% sought physician or other health advice; one traveler was hospitalized. Travelers who received influenza vaccination and influenza prevention advice had lower rates of respiratory symptoms than those that received influenza prevention advice alone (18% vs 28%, P = 0.03). Conclusions A large proportion of Boston-area travelers reported health problems despite pre-travel consultation, resulting in inconveniences. The combination of influenza prevention advice and influenza immunization was associated with fewer respiratory symptoms than those who received influenza prevention advice alone. PMID:27687076

  1. Health status among internally displaced persons in Louisiana and Mississippi travel trailer parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrance, Ryan; Anastario, Michael; Lawry, Lynn

    2007-05-01

    We used a global humanitarian aid perspective to assess basic needs, women's health, mental health, and opinions about the status of internally displaced persons living in travel trailer parks to inform recovery efforts for this population. This was a systematic randomized survey of 366 internally displaced persons, conducted with structured questionnaires. The study setting was commercial and group travel trailer parks in Louisiana and Mississippi. Information was gathered about respondent demographics, food security, basic needs, domestic and sexual violence, security concerns, reproductive health, mental health, morbidity, mortality, health care assessment, substance use, and opinions about internally displaced persons and social status. Respondents were 45.9 (standard deviation 0.8) years of age on average and were mostly white (62%) in Mississippi and mostly black (65%) in Louisiana. Shelter, transportation, security, and lack of financial means were listed as the worst problems since displacement. Sixteen percent of respondents reported not having enough drinking water, and only 13% of those living in counties and parishes under boil orders were doing so. More than half of households reported an ill adult or child in the previous 2 months. The number of parents reporting problems getting children to school more than tripled after displacement. Intimate partner violence rates postdisplacement were 3 times higher than US baseline rates. Fifty percent of respondents met criteria for major depression. Suicide completion rates after displacement were more than 14 times the baseline rates, and attempt rates were more than 78 times baseline. The health burdens identified present a formidable challenge for the health infrastructures in Louisiana and Mississippi without outside assistance. Those planning and leading recovery efforts must understand internally displaced persons in a more global context and tailor programming that follows well-developed international

  2. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Travel/Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir International ... The Parasitic Illnesses That Can Be Acquired During Travel* Contaminated Food and Water More Common giardiasis cryptosporidiosis ...

  3. Promoting medical tourism to India: messages, images, and the marketing of international patient travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Turner, Leigh; Snyder, Jeremy; Johnston, Rory; Kingsbury, Paul

    2011-03-01

    The practice of medical tourism depends on successfully informing potential patients about procedure options, treatment facilities, tourism opportunities, travel arrangements, and destination countries. The promotion of medical tourism includes a wide range of marketing materials such as flyers, booklets, and websites. Yet, there is a paucity of knowledge about the dissemination, content, and reception of these promotional materials. Drawing on a thematic content analysis of the promotional print material distributed at the first medical tourism trade show in Canada in 2009, the main purpose of this article is to identify and understand the messages and images that companies use to market India as a global destination. While researchers and news media frequently cite low cost procedures as a key determinant for international patient travel, particularly to developing nations, our analysis reveals few low cost-related images or messages in the promotional materials distributed at the trade show. To help explain this surprising disjuncture, we consider four related issues: (1) promotional materials may be designed to be circulated amongst potential patients' concerned family and friends who privilege knowing about things such as the use of advanced technologies; (2) developing nations need to portray safe and advanced treatment facilities in order to dispel potential patients' suspicions that their medical care is inferior; (3) companies may avoid making cost saving claims that cannot be fulfilled for all of their international patients, especially those traveling from developing nations; and (4) messages of low cost may detract from and even undermine messages about quality. We conclude by identifying numerous avenues for future research by social and health scientists, and by considering the implications of our findings for existing knowledge gaps and debates within health geography specifically. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Condom use among Swedes while traveling internationally: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejelind, Eva; Westerling, Ragnar; Sjögren Fugl-Meyer, Kerstin; Larsson, Kjerstin

    2017-06-01

    This study explores factors influencing condom use among Swedish women and men who visited a sexual health clinic after unprotected sex during international travel. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 women and 25 men. The data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. The informants' narratives were categorized as strategies and barriers. Strategies found were: risk assessment, testing, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections. The barriers were characterized as technical and personal or emotional. The findings indicate that sexual behavior may be different while traveling internationally, and that a release of social constraints and increased alcohol consumption were risk factors for practicing unprotected sex. Some of the strategies may be appropriate for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections, but several strategies and most barriers were used to explain why unprotected sex was practiced. Thus, people need the opportunity to reconsider strategies and strengthen confidence in their ability to use condoms. An individual-based approach employed within routine health care may support the practice of safer sex and prevent further transmission of sexually transmitted infections. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Vaccinations and Malaria Chemoprophylaxis of Adolescents Traveling from Greece to International Destinations: A Nine-Year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezou, Helena C; Pavli, Androula; Theodoridou, Kalliopi; Katerelos, Panos; Spilioti, Athina; Tedoma, Anastasia; Lymperi, Ioanna; Theodoridou, Maria

    2017-09-06

    There are few publications focusing on vaccination and malaria chemoprophylaxis in adolescent travelers. We assessed pre-travel vaccinations and malaria chemoprophylaxis of adolescents 12-18 old traveling from Greece to international destinations. We prospectively studied 239 adolescents 12-18 years old during 2008-2016. A standard questionnaire was used to collect data. Adolescents sought pre-travel services at a mean of 24.1 days before departure. Their main destinations were sub-Saharan Africa (79 adolescents; 33.1%), Latin America (56; 23.5%) and North America (26; 10.9%). Almost half (46.1%) planned to stay abroad for at least three months. Sixteen (7.4%) adolescents planned to visit friends and relatives. The yellow fever vaccine and the typhoid vaccine were the most frequently administered vaccines (74.1% and 20.5%, respectively), while the hepatitis A vaccine and the tetanus-diphtheria vaccine accounted for most routine vaccinations (18% and 14.2%, respectively). The rabies and the typhoid fever vaccines were administered inadequately to adolescents travelling to endemic areas. Malaria chemoprophylaxis should have been prescribed in many cases traveling to sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian subcontinent. Only a small number of adolescents from Greece traveling abroad seek pre-travel counseling. We found significant gaps in typhoid fever and rabies vaccinations of adolescents traveling to endemic areas. We also found gaps in prescription of malaria chemoprophylaxis for those traveling to high-risk areas. There is a need to develop communication strategies to access adolescent travelers and improve appropriate vaccination and use of malaria chemoprophylaxis.

  6. Feasibility and clinical outcomes when using practice guidelines for evaluation of fever in returning travelers and migrants : a validation study.

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Y; D'Acremont, V; Ambresin, A.E.; Rossi, I.; Martin, O; Burnand, B.; B. Genton

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practice guidelines for examining febrile patients presenting upon returning from the tropics were developed to assist primary care physicians in decision making. Because of the low level of evidence available in this field, there was a need to validate them and assess their feasibility in the context they have been designed for. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study were to (1) evaluate physicians' adherence to recommendations; (2) investigate reasons for non-adherence; and ...

  7. Dengue virus serotype 4 and chikungunya virus coinfection in a traveller returning from Luanda, Angola, January 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, R; Centeno-Lima, S; Lopes, A; Portugal-Calisto, D; Constantino, A; Nina, J

    2014-03-13

    A concurrent dengue virus serotype 4 and chikungunya virus infection was detected in a woman in her early 50s returning to Portugal from Luanda, Angola, in January 2014. The clinical, laboratory and molecular findings, involving phylogenetic analyses of partial viral genomic sequences amplified by RT-PCR, are described. Although the circulation of both dengue and chikungunya viruses in Angola has been previously reported, to our knowledge this is the first time coinfection with both viruses has been detected there.

  8. The Role of Attachment, Travel Experiences and English Proficiency in International Students' Acculturative Stress and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, Iskra

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between attachment, travel experiences, and English proficiency and international students' acculturative stress and depressive symptoms. A total of 91 graduate international students completed online surveys. Pearson correlations showed that both attachment anxiety and avoidance were positively correlated with…

  9. Using the economic surplus model to measure potential returns to international livestock research : the case of trypanosomosis vaccine research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristjanson, P.; Rowlands, J.; Swallow, B.

    1999-01-01

    This report addresses issues surrounding measurement of the potential productivity gains from new livestock technologies and the returns to international livestock research. The approach, applicable to many livestock production constraints and technologies, integrates a herd simulation model to

  10. Pre-Exposure Rabies Vaccination among US International Travelers: Findings from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Samantha B.; Sotir, Mark J.; Han, Pauline; Blanton, Jesse D.; Rao, Sowmya R.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: People who travel to areas with high rabies endemicity and have animal contact are at increased risk for rabies exposure. We examined characteristics of international travelers queried regarding rabies vaccination during pretravel consultations at Global TravEpiNet (GTEN) practices during 2009–2010. Material and Methods: We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses of data collected from 18 GTEN clinics. Travel destinations were classified by strength level of rabies vaccination recommendation. Results: Of 13,235 travelers, 226 (2%) reported previous rabies vaccination, and 406 (3%) received rabies vaccine at the consultation. Common travel purposes for these 406 travelers were leisure (26%), research/education (17%), and nonmedical service work (14%). Excluding the 226 who were previously vaccinated, 8070 (62%) of 13,009 travelers intended to visit one or more countries with a strong recommendation for rabies vaccination; 1675 (21%) of these 8070 intended to travel for 1 month or more. Among these 1675 travelers, 145 (9%) were vaccinated, 498 (30%) declined vaccination, 832 (50%) had itineraries that clinicians determined did not indicate vaccination, and 200 (12%) remained unvaccinated for other reasons. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, travelers with trip durations >6 months versus 1–3 months (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=4.9 [95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1, 11.4]) and those traveling for “research/education” or to “provide medical care” (adjusted OR=5.1 [95% CI 1.9, 13.7] and 9.5 [95% CI 2.2, 40.8], respectively), compared with leisure travelers, were more likely to receive rabies vaccination. Conclusions: Few travelers at GTEN clinics received rabies vaccine, although many planned trips 1 month long or more to a strong-recommendation country. Clinicians often determined that vaccine was not indicated, and travelers often declined vaccine when it was offered. The decision to vaccinate should take into account the

  11. Size, Value, and Momentum in Polish Equity Returns: Local or International Factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaremba Adam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper tests the performance of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM and the Fama-French three-factor and Carhart four-factor models on the Polish market. We use stock level data from April 2001 to January 2014 and find strong evidence for value and momentum effects, but only weak evidence for size premium. We formed portfolios double-sorted on size and book-to-market ratios, as well as on size and momentum, and we explain their returns with the above-mentioned asset pricing models. The CAPM is rejected and the three-factor and four-factor models perform well for the size and B/M sorted portfolios, but fail to explain returns on the size and momentum sorted portfolios. With the exception of the momentum factor, local Polish factors are not correlated with their European and global counterparts, suggesting market segmentation. Finally, the international value, size and momentum factors perform poorly in explaining cross-sectional variation in stock returns on the Polish market.

  12. Travel and tropical medicine practice among infectious disease practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Judy A; Marano, Cinzia; Beekmann, Susan E; Polgreen, Philip M; Moore, Thomas A; Brunette, Gary W; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease specialists who evaluate international travelers before or after their trips need skills to prevent, recognize, and treat an increasingly broad range of infectious diseases. Wide variation exists in training and percentage effort among providers of this care. In parallel, there may be variations in approach to pre-travel consultation and the types of travel-related illness encountered. Aggregate information from travel-medicine providers may reveal practice patterns and novel trends in infectious illness acquired through travel. The 1,265 members of the Infectious Disease Society of America's Emerging Infections Network were queried by electronic survey about their training in travel medicine, resources used, pre-travel consultations, and evaluation of ill-returning travelers. The survey also captured information on whether any of 10 particular conditions had been diagnosed among ill-returning travelers, and if these diagnoses were perceived to be changing in frequency. A majority of respondents (69%) provided both pre-travel counseling and post-travel evaluations, with significant variation in the numbers of such consultations. A majority of all respondents (61%) reported inadequate training in travel medicine during their fellowship years. However, a majority of recent graduates (55%) reported adequate preparation. Diagnoses of malaria, traveler's diarrhea, and typhoid fever were reported by the most respondents (84, 71, and 53%, respectively). The percent effort dedicated to pre-travel evaluation and care of the ill-returning traveler vary widely among infectious disease specialists, although a majority participate in these activities. On the basis of respondents' self-assessment, recent fellowship training is reported to equip graduates with better skills in these areas than more remote training. Ongoing monitoring of epidemiologic trends of travel-related illness is warranted. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  13. Carbon emissions from international cruise ship passengers' travel to and from New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howitt, Oliver J.A.; Revol, Vincent G.N.; Smith, Inga J.; Rodger, Craig J. [Department of Physics, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    2010-05-15

    Greenhouse gas emissions from international transport contribute to anthropogenic global warming, yet these emissions are not liable under the Kyoto Protocol. International attention is being given to quantifying such emissions. This paper presents the results of research into international cruise ship journeys to and from New Zealand. CO{sub 2} emissions from such journeys were calculated using an activity based, or 'bottom-up', model. Emissions factors for individual journeys by cruise ships to or from New Zealand in 2007 ranged between 250 and 2200 g of CO{sub 2} per passenger-kilometre (g CO{sub 2} per p-km), with a weighted mean of 390 g CO{sub 2} per p-km. The weighted mean energy use per passenger night for the 'hotel' function of these cruise vessels was estimated as 1600 MJ per visitor night, 12 times larger than the value for a land-based hotel. Using a simple price elasticities calculation, international cruise journeys for transport purposes were found to have a greater relative decrease in demand than plane journeys when the impact of carbon pricing was analysed. The potential to decrease the CO{sub 2} emissions per p-km was examined, and if passenger accommodation was compacted and some luxury amenities dispensed with values similar to those of economy-class air travel were obtained. (author)

  14. [A Case of Dengue Fever and Subsequent Long-lasting Depression Accompanied by Alopecia in a Japanese Traveler Returning from Bali, Indonesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitani, Akihiro; Yamaya, Waka; To, Masako; Kano, Ichino; Honda-Hosono, Natsue; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Haruki, Kosuke

    2015-03-01

    Recovery from dengue fever is generally rapid and uneventful. However, recuperation is often prolonged and may be accompanied by noticeable depression. We present herein on a traveler to Indonesia who developed long-lasting depression after the classic symptoms of dengue fever such as fever, arthralgia, and macropapular rash had resolved. A previously healthy 42-year old japanese woman presented to the Travel Clinic of Seirei Yokohama Hospital with complaints of 4 days of fever, joint aches, bone pain, and a macropapular rash on her torso. She had returned from Bali 5 days previously. During her 1-week stay, one day was spent in rural, mountainous areas where she was exposed to several mosquito bites. The 1st serum sample collected 4 days after the disease onset gave positive result in the rapid dengue IgM antibody test and the rapid dengue NS1 antigen immunechromatographic test. The DENV-1 genome was detected with RT-PCR. Her 13-year old son, who had accompanied her, was also diagnosed as having dengue fever and he recovered without event. The Above-mentioned symptoms resolved within one week. However, the patient suffered from prolonged depression. She also noticed loss of hair 3 months after the disease onset Administration of a Serotonin-Noradrenalin Reuptake Inhibitor and a minor tranquillizer required to allow her requied to lead a normal life. Although she gradually felt better, it took approximately 2 years until she had recovered completely without taking any antidepressant and minor tranquillizer. It is a well-known fact in endemic countries that dengue fever could have an significant impact on the patients' mental well-being. However, it appears that physicians in non-endemic countries are not fully aware of the prolonged depression, which can occur subsequent to the acute illness. Follow-up consultations of returing travelers who have recoverd from dengu fever should be arranged to monitor their mental and emotional states closely.

  15. Where are they now? - A case study of the impact of international travel support for early career Arctic researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaneva, Sanna; Hamon, Gwénaëlle; Fugmann, Gerlis; Lisowska, Maja; Baeseman, Jenny

    2016-09-01

    Supporting and training the next generation of researchers is crucial to continuous knowledge and leadership in Arctic research. An increasing number of Arctic organizations have developed initiatives to provide travel support for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) to participate in workshops, conferences and meetings and to network with internationally renowned scientific leaders. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of these initiatives. As a contribution to the 3rd International Conference on Arctic Research Planning, a study was conducted to analyze the career paths of ECRs who received travel funding from the International Arctic Science Committee between the start of the International Polar Year (2007-2008) and 2013. Two surveys were used: one sent to ECRs who received IASC travel support and one as a specific event study to those unsuccessfully applied for IASC travel support to the IPY 2010 Conference. The results of the surveys indicate that travel support was beneficial to both the research and careers of the respondents, especially if the ECR was engaged with a task or responsibility at the event. Survey responses also included suggestions on how funds could be better used to support the next generation of Arctic researchers.

  16. 26 CFR 31.6051-2 - Information returns on Form W-3 and Internal Revenue Service copies of Forms W-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information returns on Form W-3 and Internal Revenue Service copies of Forms W-2. 31.6051-2 Section 31.6051-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... returns on Form W-3 and Internal Revenue Service copies of Forms W-2. (a) In general. Every employer who...

  17. Toxocariasis diagnosed in international travelers at the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium, from 2000 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Broucke, Steven; Kanobana, Kirezi; Polman, Katja; Soentjens, Patrick; Vekemans, Marc; Theunissen, Caroline; Vlieghe, Erika; Van Esbroeck, Marjan; Jacobs, Jan; Van Den Enden, Erwin; Van Den Ende, Jef; Van Gompel, Alfons; Clerinx, Jan; Bottieau, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    Although infection with Toxocara canis or T. catis (commonly referred as toxocariasis) appears to be highly prevalent in (sub)tropical countries, information on its frequency and presentation in returning travelers and migrants is scarce. In this study, we reviewed all cases of asymptomatic and symptomatic toxocariasis diagnosed during post-travel consultations at the reference travel clinic of the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. Toxocariasis was considered as highly probable if serum Toxocara-antibodies were detected in combination with symptoms of visceral larva migrans if present, elevated eosinophil count in blood or other relevant fluid and reasonable exclusion of alternative diagnosis, or definitive in case of documented seroconversion. From 2000 to 2013, 190 travelers showed Toxocara-antibodies, of a total of 3436 for whom the test was requested (5.5%). Toxocariasis was diagnosed in 28 cases (23 symptomatic and 5 asymptomatic) including 21 highly probable and 7 definitive. All but one patients were adults. Africa and Asia were the place of acquisition for 10 and 9 cases, respectively. Twelve patients (43%) were short-term travelers (tropical stay with varying clinical manifestations or eosinophilia. Prognosis appears favorable with adequate treatment except in case of neurological involvement.

  18. Comparison of Climate Preferences for Domestic and International Beach Holidays: A Case Study of Canadian Travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Rutty

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal tourism is the largest segment of global leisure tourism and it is firmly linked to the destination’s natural resources—with climatic resources chief among them. Through observations and survey responses of beach users, studies have evaluated climatic resources for coastal tourism by quantifying optimal and unacceptable conditions. However, these studies have not taken into consideration that different forms of holidays (e.g., daytrips, short trips, main annual holiday, “once-in-a-lifetime” trip may have varying degrees of resilience to climatic conditions. This is the first study to explore whether ideal and unacceptable climatic conditions vary between domestic and international tourists. Using an in situ survey, Canadian beach users traveling domestically (n = 359 and internationally (n = 120 were examined. Key findings include statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 between the two sample groups for every climate variable, with the international sample more resilient to a broader range of weather conditions, including a greater acceptance for warm temperatures, longer rainfall durations, higher wind speeds, and greater cloud cover. This study adds further insight into the complexities of evaluating climate for tourism, with implications for the demand response of tourists to climate change.

  19. Outside the Continental United States International Travel and Contagion Impact Quick Look Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Lancaster, Mary J.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Kunkel, Brenda M.; Muller, George; McKenzie, Taylor K.

    2012-11-09

    ABSTRACT This paper describes a tool that will allow public health analysts to estimate infectious disease risk at the country level as a function of different international transportation modes. The prototype focuses on a cholera epidemic originating within Latin America or the Caribbean, but it can be expanded to consider other pathogens as well. This effort leverages previous work in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop the International Travel to Community Impact (IT-CI) model, which analyzes and assesses potential international disease outbreaks then estimates the associated impacts to U.S. communities and the nation as a whole and orient it for use Outside the Continental United States (OCONUS). For brevity, we refer to this refined model as OIT-CI. First, we developed an operationalized meta-population spatial cholera model for Latin America and the Caribbean at the secondary administrative-level boundary. Secondly, we developed a robust function of human airline critical to approximating mixing patterns in the meta- population model. In the prototype version currently presented here, OIT-CI models a cholera epidemic originating in a Latin American or Caribbean country and spreading via airline transportation routes. Disease spread is modeled at the country level using a patch model with a connectivity function based on demographic, geospatial, and human transportation data. We have also identified data to estimate the water and health-related infrastructure capabilities of each country to include this potential impact on disease transmission.

  20. The Travel Journal: An Assessment Tool for Overseas Study. Occasional Papers on International Educational Exchange 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nancy

    Arguing that journal writing is a particularly appropriate evaluation mode for travel experiences because it is a learning activity that encourages reflective observation, this booklet includes an instructor's guide for the student travel journal and a student's guide to writing a travel journal. The instructor's guide section discusses objective…

  1. Destination death: a review of Australian legal regulation around international travel to end life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sarah; Worswick, David

    2013-12-01

    Travel for euthanasia or assisted suicide--so-called "death tourism"--is a controversial emerging subset of medical travel. Both anecdotal reports and research indicate that individuals from around the world, including Australians, are travelling abroad to source medications or procedures that hasten death. This article surveys the laws that govern these markets, and asks--using the Australian framework as a case study--whether current criminal laws are themselves facilitating, even driving, this new form of medical travel. It is suggested that the complex, uncertain and often problematic nature of provisions around assisting death in Australia is making euthanasia travel increasingly desirable for those wishing to end their lives.

  2. Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm infection in Japanese traveler who presented chronic diarrhea after return from Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Nakatani, Toshiya; Tomo-Oka, Fumimasa; Fujimoto, Yuki; Ishida, Koji; Fujinaga, Yukihisa; Aihara, Yosuke; Nagamatsu, Shinsaku; Matsuo, Eijo; Tokoro, Masaharu; Ouji, Yukiteru; Kikuchi, Eiryo

    2016-12-01

    Ancylostoma (A.) ceylanicum, one of the most common species of hookworms infecting dogs and cats, also causes patent infections in humans and is now considered to be the second most common hookworm species infecting populations in southeast Asia. A Japanese patient who returned from a visit to Thailand and Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR) was presented with intermittent watery diarrhea with eosinophilia. Hookworm eggs were found in feces samples, and adult worms were confirmed to be present in the jejunum with capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy. A diagnosis of A. ceylanicum infection was made based on the morphology of the adult worms along with findings of a PCR-based molecular study using larvae obtained from a fecal sample culture. The infection was considered likely to have been obtained during a 1-month stay in a Laotian village, where the patient had eaten local food, worn sandals on bare feet, and lived as a local native villager, though he had stayed in modern hotels during the visit to Thailand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gay and bisexual men engage in fewer risky sexual behaviors while traveling internationally: a cross-sectional study in San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Fatch, Robin; Grasso, Michael; Robertson, Tyler; Tao, Luke; Chen, Yea-Hung; Curotto, Alberto; McFarland, Willi; Grant, Robert M; Reznick, Olga; Raymond, H Fisher; Steward, Wayne T

    2015-05-01

    International travel poses potential challenges to HIV prevention. A number of studies have observed an association between travel and behavioural disinhibition. In the present study, we assessed differences in sexual behaviour while travelling internationally and within the USA, compared with being in the home environment. A probability-based sample of men who have sex with men (MSM) from the San Francisco Bay Area who had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months was recruited through an adapted respondent-driven sampling methodology (N=501). Participants completed interviewer-administered, computer-assisted surveys. Detailed partner-by-partner behavioural data by destination type were collected on 2925 sexual partnerships: 1028 while travelling internationally, 665 while travelling within the USA and 1232 while staying in the San Francisco Bay Area. The proportion of partnerships during international travel that involved unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) was lower compared with during domestic travel and staying locally. International travel was associated with decreased odds of receptive UAI (AOR=0.65, p=0.02) compared with staying locally and there was a trend towards decreased odds of insertive UAI (AOR=0.70, p=0.07). MSM engaged in proportionately fewer sexual activities which present a high HIV transmission risk when travelling internationally, namely unprotected receptive and insertive anal intercourse and particularly with HIV serodiscordant partners. The lower sexual risk-taking during international travel was robust to controlling for many factors, including self-reported HIV serostatus, age, relationship status and type of partnership. These findings suggest that when travelling internationally, MSM may experience behavioural disinhibition to a lesser extent than had been described previously. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. 50 CFR 23.44 - What are the requirements to travel internationally with my personally owned live wildlife?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the requirements to travel internationally with my personally owned live wildlife? 23.44 Section 23.44 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION...

  5. Development of discrete choice model considering internal reference points and their effects in travel mode choice context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarif; Kurauchi, Shinya; Yoshii, Toshio

    2017-06-01

    In the conventional travel behavior models such as logit and probit, decision makers are assumed to conduct the absolute evaluations on the attributes of the choice alternatives. On the other hand, many researchers in cognitive psychology and marketing science have been suggesting that the perceptions of attributes are characterized by the benchmark called “reference points” and the relative evaluations based on them are often employed in various choice situations. Therefore, this study developed a travel behavior model based on the mental accounting theory in which the internal reference points are explicitly considered. A questionnaire survey about the shopping trip to the CBD in Matsuyama city was conducted, and then the roles of reference points in travel mode choice contexts were investigated. The result showed that the goodness-of-fit of the developed model was higher than that of the conventional model, indicating that the internal reference points might play the major roles in the choice of travel mode. Also shown was that the respondents seem to utilize various reference points: some tend to adopt the lowest fuel price they have experienced, others employ fare price they feel in perceptions of the travel cost.

  6. Airport Casualties: Non-Admission and Return Risks at Times of Internalized/Externalized Border Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maybritt Jill Alpes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes what can happen to forced returnees upon arrival in their country of nationality. Subjective configurations of state agents in the Global South have created return risks, which in turn transform subjectivities of post-colonial citizens. The article contributes to this Special Issue by tracing repercussions of the externalization and internalization of border controls. In the case of Cameroon, these connections have resulted in the criminalization of emigration. Aspiring migrants are prosecuted if their departure projects fail to respect the entry requirements of countries in the Global North. The article is based on research conducted in Douala, Cameroon, in the form of discussions with control agents at the international airport, investigations at a prison, a review of related case law, police registers and interviews with Cameroonians returnees (November 2013–January 2014. Border controls and connected anti-fraud programs suppress family-based forms of solidarity and allow only for subjectivities rooted in state-managed forms of national identity. The article illustrates how efforts to combat fraud fuel corruption in returnees’ social networks, whereby, instead of receiving remittances, families in emigration countries have to mobilize financial resources in order to liberate returnees from police stations or prison complexes. Migration related detention of nationals in the Global South highlights the growing significance of exit controls in migration management.

  7. International travelers as sentinels for sustained influenza transmission during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Xiaohong M; Hay, Kelly A; Plier, D Adam; Chaves, Sandra S; Lim, Poh Lian; Caumes, Eric; Castelli, Francesco; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Cetron, Martin S; Freedman, David O

    2013-01-01

    International travelers were at risk of acquiring influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (H1N1pdm09) virus infection during travel and importing the virus to their home or other countries. Characteristics of travelers reported to the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network who carried H1N1pdm09 influenza virus across international borders into a receiving country from April 1, 2009, through October 24, 2009, are described. The relationship between the detection of H1N1pdm09 in travelers and the level of H1N1pdm09 transmission in the exposure country as defined by pandemic intervals was examined using analysis of variance (anova). Among the 203 (189 confirmed; 14 probable) H1N1pdm09 case-travelers identified, 56% were male; a majority, 60%, traveled for tourism; and 20% traveled for business. Paralleling age profiles in population-based studies only 13% of H1N1pdm09 case-travelers were older than 45 years. H1N1pdm09 case-travelers sought pre-travel medical advice less often (8%) than travelers with non-H1N1pdm09 unspecified respiratory illnesses (24%), and less often than travelers with nonrespiratory illnesses (43%; p traveler originated from that country was inversely associated with each country's assigned pandemic interval, or local level of transmission intensity. Detection of travel-related cases appeared to be a reliable indicator of sustained influenza transmission within the exposure country and may aid planning for targeted surveillance, interventions, and quarantine protocols. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  8. Schistosoma real-time PCR as diagnostic tool for international travellers and migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnops, Lieselotte; Tannich, Egbert; Polman, Katja; Clerinx, Jan; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the use of a genus-specific PCR that combines high sensitivity with the detection of different Schistosoma species for diagnosis in international travellers and migrants in comparison to standard microscopy. The genus-specific real-time PCR was developed to target the 28S ribosomal RNA gene of the major human Schistosoma species. It was validated for analytical specificity and reproducibility and demonstrated an analytical sensitivity of 0.2 eggs per gram of faeces. Its diagnostic performance was further evaluated on 152 faecal, 32 urine and 38 serum samples from patients presenting at the outpatient clinic of the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp (Belgium). We detected Schistosoma DNA in 76 faecal (50.0%) and five urine (15.6%) samples of which, respectively, nine and one were not detected by standard microscopy. Only two of the 38 serum samples of patients with confirmed schistosomiasis were positive with the presently developed PCR. Sequence analysis on positive faecal samples allowed identification of the Schistosoma species complex. The real-time PCR is highly sensitive and may offer added value in diagnosing imported schistosomiasis. The genus-specific PCR can detect all schistosome species that are infectious to humans and performs very well with faeces and urine, but not in serum. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. The absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel: a cohort study of 8,755 employees of international organisations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Kuipers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of venous thrombosis is approximately 2- to 4-fold increased after air travel, but the absolute risk is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study among employees of large international companies and organisations, who were followed between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2005. The occurrence of symptomatic venous thrombosis was linked to exposure to air travel, as assessed by travel records provided by the companies and organisations. A long-haul flight was defined as a flight of at least 4 h and participants were considered exposed for a postflight period of 8 wk. A total of 8,755 employees were followed during a total follow-up time of 38,910 person-years (PY. The total time employees were exposed to a long-haul flight was 6,872 PY. In the follow-up period, 53 thromboses occurred, 22 of which within 8 wk of a long-haul flight, yielding an incidence rate of 3.2/1,000 PY, as compared to 1.0/1,000 PY in individuals not exposed to air travel (incidence rate ratio 3.2, 95% confidence interval 1.8-5.6. This rate was equivalent to a risk of one event per 4,656 long-haul flights. The risk increased with exposure to more flights within a short time frame and with increasing duration of flights. The incidence was highest in the first 2 wk after travel and gradually decreased to baseline after 8 wk. The risk was particularly high in employees under age 30 y, women who used oral contraceptives, and individuals who were particularly short, tall, or overweight. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of symptomatic venous thrombosis after air travel is moderately increased on average, and rises with increasing exposure and in high-risk groups.

  10. Epidemiology of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in international travellers to Western/Central Europe and conclusions on vaccination recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) endemicity is spreading in Europe becoming an increasing health risk also for travellers. Previous reviews on TBE in civilian travellers lacked of numerator data and offered at most rough estimates on denominator data. An evidence-based quantification of the risk so far has been impossible; that resulted in fundamentally differing vaccination recommendations. A standard internet search was conducted with a focus on the data used to formulate vaccination recommendations. As TBE became notifiable at the European Union (EU) level the databases of European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were analysed for cases imported from abroad 2012. Since these included only 19 EU countries, individual experts were contacted in countries, which had not submitted data and additional surveillance databases were investigated to obtain a comprehensive account on travel-associated TBE in Central and Western Europe. In 2012, the ECDC and other data sources included 38 reported cases of internationally acquired TBE. Basing on estimates of the exposed number of visitors, the attack rate for an undefined period of time could be very roughly extrapolated to be 0.5-1.3 per 100,000 (1 per 77,000-200.000) overall in Western/Central Europe endemic areas for the exposed at-risk population. As advised by the World Health Organization (WHO) travellers exposed outdoors in rural endemic areas to a risk of TBE during the period of transmission should be recommended immunization. In contrast, the advice to recommend TBE vaccination for all visitors of endemic areas is inappropriate. Implementation of the risk strategy is compromised by the fact that many at-risk travellers are unaware of the risk, thus they will not consult competent health professionals. Others may consult late, and in some countries of origin no TBE vaccine is marketed. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For

  11. International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Testing of Returned Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2017-01-01

    The air revitalization system aboard the International Space Station (ISS) provides the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation due to the microgravity environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Adsorption (HEPA) media filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Segment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. These filters see a replacement interval, as part of maintenance, of 2-5 years dependent on location in the ISS. In this work, we present particulate removal efficiency, pressure drop, and leak test results for a sample set of 8 BFEs returned from the ISS after filter replacement. The results can potentially be utilized by the ISS Program to ascertain whether the present replacement interval can be maintained or extended to balance the on-ground filter inventory with extension of the lifetime of ISS beyond 2024. These results can also provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  12. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and Modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design and tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges of that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  13. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from International Space Station (CCISS)- Heart Rate and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R. L.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Blaber, A. P.; Arbeille, Ph.; Zuj, K. A.; Greaves, D. K.

    2008-06-01

    CCISS is a project to study the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses of astronauts before, during and after long-duration (>60-day) stays on the International Space Station. The CCISS experiments consist of three phases that are designed to achieve an integrated examination of components responsible for return of blood to the heart, the pumping of blood from the heart and the distribution to the vascular territories including the brain. In this report the data are obtained from the 24-h monitoring of physical activity (Actiwatch on wrist and ankle) and of heart rate (Holter monitor). The data show clear patterns of change in physical activity from predominantly leg-based on Earth to relatively little activity of the ankles with maintained or increased activity of the wrists on ISS. Both on Earth and on ISS the largest changes in heart rate occur during the periods of leg activity. Average heart rate was changed little during the periods of minimal activity or of sleep in comparisons of Earth with in-flight recording both within the first two weeks of flight and the last two weeks. These data clearly show the importance of monitoring heart rate and physical activity simultaneously and show that attempts to derive indicators of autonomic activity from spectral analysis of heart rate variability should not be performed in the absence of knowledge of both variables.

  14. Using the Internal Rate of Return Method to Consider the Potential Degree Offerings of a Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, D. Adrian; Troxel, Stacy; Sumrall, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This paper considered the case of a liberal arts institution of higher learning that is hoping to improve its market competitiveness through the addition of either a graduate certificate program in human resources or the addition of a full graduate degree in human resources. An examination of internal rate of return financial value capital…

  15. Issues Encountered by Physicians During International Travel With Youth National Soccer Teams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Davis, Stephen W

    2011-01-01

    ...: Descriptive epidemiology. Methods: Physicians assigned to travel abroad with the under-17 men’s and women’s US national soccer teams during a 2-year period documented all encounters with team and staff members...

  16. The effects of integration and transnational ties on international return migration intentions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, H.; Fokkema, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    While return migration is receiving increasing attention, there is still insufficient insight into the factors which determine migrants’ intentions and decisions to return. It is often assumed that integration in receiving countries and the concomitant weakening of transnational ties decreases the

  17. Family compliance with counseling for children traveling to the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillet-Gossot, Stéphanie; Laporte, Rémi; Noël, Guilhem; Gautret, Philippe; Soula, Georges; Delmont, Jean; Faucher, Benoit; Parola, Philippe; Osei, Lindsay; Minodier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The number of people, both adults and children, traveling abroad, is on the rise. Some seek counseling at travel medicine centers before departure. A prospective study was conducted among children travel medicine center in Marseille, France, from February 2010 to February 2011. Parents were contacted by telephone 4 weeks after their return, and asked about compliance with pre-travel advice. One hundred sixty-seven children were evaluated after their trip. Compliance with immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, and food-borne disease prevention was 71, 66, and 31%, respectively. Compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis varied significantly with destination, and was higher for African destinations. Significant features associated with poor compliance with chemoprophylaxis were a trip to Asia or the Indian Ocean, age travel counseling in children traveling overseas was achieved only for drinking bottled water, using repellents, a routine vaccine update, and yellow fever immunization. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. Responses of Lower-Body Power and Match Running Demands Following Long-Haul Travel in International Rugby Sevens Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John A; Pumpa, Kate L; Pyne, David B

    2017-03-01

    Mitchell, JA, Pumpa, KL, and Pyne, DB. Responses of lowerbody power and match running demands after long-haul travel in international rugby sevens players. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 686-695, 2017-This study determined the effect of long-haul (>5 hours) travel on lower-body power and match running demands in international rugby sevens players. Lower-body power was assessed in 22 male international rugby sevens players (age 21.7 ± 2.7 years, mass 89.0 ± 6.7 kg, stature 180.5 ± 6.2 cm; mean ± SD) monitored over 17 rugby sevens tournaments. A countermovement jump was used to monitor lower-body power (peak and mean power) over repeated three week travel and competition periods (pretravel, posttravel, and posttournament). Small decreases were evident in peak power after both short and long-haul travel (-4.0%, ±3.2%; mean, ±90% confidence limits) with further reductions in peak and mean power posttournament (-4.5%, ±2.3% and -3.8%, ±1.5%) culminating in a moderate decrease in peak power overall (-7.4%, ±4.0%). A subset of 12 players (completing a minimum of 8 tournaments) had the effects of match running demands assessed with lower-body power. In this subset, long-haul travel elicited a large decrease in lower-body peak (-9.4%, ±3.5%) and mean power (-5.6%, ±2.9%) over the monitoring period, with a small decrease (-4.3%, ±3.0% and -2.2%, ±1.7%) posttravel and moderate decrease (-5.4%, ±2.5% and -3.5%, ±1.9%) posttournament, respectively. Match running demands were monitored through global positioning system. In long-haul tournaments, the 12 players covered ∼13%, ±13% greater total distance (meter) and ∼11%, ±10% higher average game meters >5 m·s when compared with short-haul (rugby sevens tournaments after long-haul travel.

  19. 76 FR 41440 - International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Filing, Retention, and Return of Export Licenses and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... return certain expired or exhausted DSP-5s. This change will reduce administrative burden on applicants... publication by any of the following methods: E-mail: [email protected] with the subject line, ``ITAR...

  20. The effects of integration and transnational ties on international return migration intentions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Haas, H; Fokkema, C.M

    2011-01-01

    .... Drawing on a dataset of four African immigrant groups in Spain and Italy, this article reviews these conflicting hypotheses by assessing the effects of integration and transnational ties on return migration intentions...

  1. Travel reported by pilgrims from Marseille, France before and after the 2010 Hajj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Bauge, Marie; Simon, Fabrice; Benkouiten, Samir; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Sixty-seven percent of French pilgrims reported to have traveled out of France just before the 2010 Hajj (mainly in North Africa) and 26% planned to do so after leaving Saudi Arabia. Surveillance of Hajj-associated infectious diseases in returned French pilgrims should be coordinated between France and North African countries. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  2. Measuring cross-border travel times for freight : Otay Mesa international border crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Cross border movement of people and goods is a vital part of the North American economy. : Accurate real-time data on travel times along the US-Mexico border can help generate a range : of tangible benefits covering improved operations and security, ...

  3. A Heart for Travel: Travel Health Considerations for Patients with Heart Disease and Cardiac Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, G; De Freitas, S

    2016-12-12

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in adult international travellers. Patients living with heart disease should receive specific, individualised pre-travel health advice. The purpose of this article is to provide evidence-based advice to physicians who are consulted by travellers with cardiovascular disease. Fitness-to-travel evaluation will often be conducted by the general practitioner but other medical specialists may also be consulted for advice. Patients with chronic medical conditions should purchase travel health insurance. The general pre-travel health consultation addresses food and water safety, insect and animal bite avoidance, malaria chemoprophylaxis, and travel vaccinations. Patients with devices such as cardiac pacemakers should be familiar with how these may be affected by travel. Cardiac medications may cause adverse effects in cold or hot environments, and specific precautions must be followed by anticoagulated travellers. The physician should be aware of how to access medical care abroad, and of the potential for imported tropical diseases in returned travellers.

  4. Essential travel medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This 1st edition of Essential Travel Medicine provides an excellent concise introduction to the specialty of Travel Medicine. This core text will enable health care practitioners particularly those new to the clinical practice of Travel Medicine, to gain a fundamental understanding of the diverse and complex issues which can potentially affect the health of the many millions of people who undertake international travel. Jane N Zuckerman is joined by Gary W Brunette from CDC and Peter A Leggat from Australia as Editors. Leading international specialists in their fields have contributed authoritative chapters reflecting current knowledge to facilitate best clinical practice in the different aspects of travel medicine. The aim of Essential Travel Medicine is to provide a comprehensive guide to Travel Medicine as well as a fundamental knowledge base to support international undergraduate and postgraduate specialty training programmes in the discipline of Travel Medicine. The 1st edition of Essential Travel ...

  5. Neglected chaos in international stock markets: Bayesian analysis of the joint return-volatility dynamical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsionas, Mike G.; Michaelides, Panayotis G.

    2017-09-01

    We use a novel Bayesian inference procedure for the Lyapunov exponent in the dynamical system of returns and their unobserved volatility. In the dynamical system, computation of largest Lyapunov exponent by traditional methods is impossible as the stochastic nature has to be taken explicitly into account due to unobserved volatility. We apply the new techniques to daily stock return data for a group of six countries, namely USA, UK, Switzerland, Netherlands, Germany and France, from 2003 to 2014, by means of Sequential Monte Carlo for Bayesian inference. The evidence points to the direction that there is indeed noisy chaos both before and after the recent financial crisis. However, when a much simpler model is examined where the interaction between returns and volatility is not taken into consideration jointly, the hypothesis of chaotic dynamics does not receive much support by the data ("neglected chaos").

  6. End to End Travel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E2 Solutions is a web based end-to-end travel management tool that includes paperless travel authorization and voucher document submissions, document approval...

  7. International Travel by Congress: Legislation in the 111th Congress, Background, and Potential Policy Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    was widely reported that a number of members were appointed by their respective chambers to attend the funeral rites of Pope John Paul II in 2005.17...Papal Funeral ,” Roll Call, April 6, 2005, retrieved through nexis.com. 18 For example, disclosures of travel to Zaire are listed under Democratic...Angola Dominican Republic Kyrgyzstan Qatar Antarctica East Timora Laos Romania Antigua and Barbuda Ecuador Latvia Russia Argentina Egypt Lebanon

  8. Tips for Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoid bringing bed bugs home by taking precautions when traveling such as inspecting bedding and luggage racks in hotel rooms, and upon returning home unpacking directly into a washing machine and dry at high temperatures.

  9. The best interests of the child and the return of results in genetic research: international comparative perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawati, Ma'n H; Parry, David; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2014-10-04

    Paediatric genomic research raises particularly challenging questions on whether and under what circumstances to return research results. In the paediatric context, decision-making is guided by the best interests of the child framework, as enshrined in the 1989 international Convention on the Rights of the Child. According to this Convention, rights and responsibilities are shared between children, parents, researchers, and the state. These "relational" obligations are further complicated in the context of genetic research. A comparative review of international, regional and national documents on the return of research results reveals that there is a dearth of normative documents in the paediatric context. The best interests of the child framework is increasingly complicated by a growing appreciation of pediatric autonomy and the development thereof; parental rights (particularly when parents are affected by the genomic information of their children); and the right not to know. This comparative analysis reveals that policy-makers and legislators have responded to the above challenges in different ways. Nevertheless, in Europe as well as in Canada, there is an emerging trend towards making the return of certain results mandatory in the paediatric context, should this course of action prove to be in the best interests of the child.

  10. International Sign Predictability of Stock Returns: The Role of the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Henri; Pönkä, Harri

    We study the directional predictability of monthly excess stock market returns in the U.S. and ten other markets using univariate and bivariate binary response models. Our main interest is on the potential benefits of predicting the signs of the returns jointly, focusing on the predictive power...... from the U.S. to foreign markets. We introduce a new bivariate probit model that allows for such a contemporaneous predictive linkage from one market to the other. Our in-sample and out-of-sample forecasting results indicate superior predictive performance of the new model over the competing models...... by statistical measures and market timing performance, suggesting gradual diffusion of predictive information from the U.S. to the other markets....

  11. Globalization of leptospirosis through travel and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Medhani; Ananda, Mahesha; Wickramage, Kolitha; Berger, Elisabeth; Agampodi, Suneth

    2014-08-12

    Leptospirosis remains the most widespread zoonotic disease in the world, commonly found in tropical or temperate climates. While previous studies have offered insight into intra-national and intra-regional transmission, few have analyzed transmission across international borders. Our review aimed at examining the impact of human travel and migration on the re-emergence of Leptospirosis. Results suggest that alongside regional environmental and occupational exposure, international travel now constitute a major independent risk factor for disease acquisition. Contribution of travel associated leptospirosis to total caseload is as high as 41.7% in some countries. In countries where longitudinal data is available, a clear increase of proportion of travel-associated leptospirosis over the time is noted. Reporting patterns is clearly showing a gross underestimation of this disease due to lack of diagnostic facilities. The rise in global travel and eco-tourism has led to dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Leptospirosis. We explore the obstacles to prevention, screening and diagnosis of Leptopirosis in health systems of endemic countries and of the returning migrant or traveler. We highlight the need for developing guidelines and preventive strategies of Leptospirosis related to travel and migration, including enhancing awareness of the disease among health professionals in high-income countries.

  12. Long-term kinetics of Zika virus RNA and antibodies in body fluids of a vasectomized traveller returning from Martinique: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeschl, Guenter; Huber, Kristina; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Nothdurft, Hans-Dieter; Bretzel, Gisela; Hoelscher, Michael; Zoeller, Lothar; Trottmann, Matthias; Pan-Montojo, Francisco; Dobler, Gerhard; Woelfel, Silke

    2017-01-10

    The magnitude of the current Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic has led to a declaration of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the WHO. Findings of viable viral particles in semen for several weeks are corroborating reports of sexual transmission of ZIKV. Serious consequences of a positive diagnostic result particularly in the pregnant patient are calling for precise diagnostic tools also at later time points after infection. Currently, recommendations suggest a diagnostic period of direct viral detection of 5 to 7 days after onset of symptoms in serum or plasma, and up to 3 weeks in urine samples. A vasectomized 41-year-old German returning from Martinique presented at the outpatient clinic of the Department for Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Munich, with subfebrile temperature, rash, malaise, severe retro-orbital pain and occipital lymphadenopathy. The main complaints resolved after ten days without specific treatment. We are reporting on clinical course and results of direct and indirect detection methods of ZIKV in different sample types including whole blood, ejaculate, urine, serum, plasma and saliva samples up to 119 days post symptom onset. Ejaculate samples remained PCR positive for ZIKV until day 77, whole blood samples until day 101. The case presentation adds to the still limited knowledge of kinetics of detection of ZIKV by direct as well as indirect methods. Here, a complete data set including results from PCR, serology and cell culture is provided allowing an improved evaluation of optimum diagnostic periods for testing a variety of sample types. Moreover, a high viral load of ZIKV RNA was detected in ejaculate of the vasectomized patient. This finding sheds new light on the possible localizations of ZIKV replication in the human male reproductive tract.

  13. ARE YOU PART OF THE GLOBAL WORKFORCE?: AN EXAMINATION OF THE "DUTY OF CARE" TO BUSINESS TRAVELERS AND INTERNATIONAL ASSIGNEES UNDER THE ILO OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY CONVENTIONS AND AS EMERGING INTERNATIONAL CUSTOMARY LAW

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiffany Mathiason

    2013-01-01

    ... to business travelers and international assignees. Also, it addresses how governments and employers often do not extend the duty of care to foreign workers at risk for kidnapping in areas of Africa, namely Nigeria, despite the general trend to extend...

  14. Active screening and surveillance in the United Kingdom for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in returning travellers and pilgrims from the Middle East: a prospective descriptive study for the period 2013–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowsan F. Atabani

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Respiratory tract infections in travellers/pilgrims returning to the UK from the Middle East are mainly due to rhinoviruses, influenza A, and influenza B. Whilst MERS-CoV was not detected in the 202 patients studied, heightened awareness of the possibility of MERS-CoV and continuous proactive surveillance are essential to rapidly identify cases of MERS-CoV and other seasonal respiratory tract viruses such as avian influenza, in patients presenting to hospital. Early identification and isolation may prevent outbreaks in nosocomial settings.

  15. Active screening and surveillance in the United Kingdom for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in returning travellers and pilgrims from the Middle East: a prospective descriptive study for the period 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabani, Sowsan F; Wilson, Steven; Overton-Lewis, Clare; Workman, Judith; Kidd, I Michael; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin; Smit, Erasmus; Osman, Husam

    2016-06-01

    Over 25000 pilgrims from the UK visit Saudi Arabia every year for the Umrah and Hajj pilgrimages. The recent outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in South Korea and the continuing reports of MERS-CoV cases from Saudi Arabia highlight the need for active surveillance for MERS-CoV in returning pilgrims or travellers from the Middle East. Public Health England Birmingham Laboratory (PHEBL) is one of a few selected UK public health laboratories responsible for MERS-CoV screening in travellers returning to the UK from the Middle East who present to hospital with severe respiratory symptoms. The results of the PHEBL MERS-CoV screening and surveillance over the past 3 years is presented. UK travellers/pilgrims who returned from the Middle East and presented to a hospital with respiratory symptoms were studied over the period February 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015. Patients with respiratory symptoms, who satisfied the Public Health England MERS-CoV case algorithm, were tested for MERS-CoV and other respiratory tract viruses on admission to hospital. Two hundred and two patients suspected of having MERS-CoV were tested. None of them had a laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV infection. A viral aetiology was detected in half (50.3%) of the cases, with rhinoviruses, influenza A (H1N1 and H3N2), and influenza B being most frequent. Peak testing occurred following the annual Hajj season and in other periods of raised national awareness. Respiratory tract infections in travellers/pilgrims returning to the UK from the Middle East are mainly due to rhinoviruses, influenza A, and influenza B. Whilst MERS-CoV was not detected in the 202 patients studied, heightened awareness of the possibility of MERS-CoV and continuous proactive surveillance are essential to rapidly identify cases of MERS-CoV and other seasonal respiratory tract viruses such as avian influenza, in patients presenting to hospital. Early identification and isolation may prevent outbreaks in

  16. Management of infections in critically ill returning travellers in the intensive care unit—II: clinical syndromes and special considerations in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Rello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This position paper is the second ESCMID Consensus Document on this subject and aims to provide intensivists, infectious disease specialists, and emergency physicians with a standardized approach to the management of serious travel-related infections in the intensive care unit (ICU or the emergency department. This document is a cooperative effort between members of two European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID study groups and was coordinated by Hakan Leblebicioglu and Jordi Rello for ESGITM (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Travellers and Migrants and ESGCIP (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Critically Ill Patients, respectively. A relevant expert on the subject of each section prepared the first draft which was then edited and approved by additional members from both ESCMID study groups. This article summarizes considerations regarding clinical syndromes requiring ICU admission in travellers, covering immunocompromised patients.

  17. Perceptions of an 'international hospital' in Thailand by medical travel patients: cross-cultural tensions in a transnational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Andrea; Chee, Heng Leng

    2015-01-01

    The growing trade in patients seeking health care in other countries, or medical travel, is changing the forms and experiences of health care seeking and producing changes to hospitals in terms of their design, organization and spaces. What is termed in marketing parlance in Thailand as an 'international hospital' oriented to attracting foreign patients, is a hotel-hospital hybrid that is locally produced through the inflexion of local practices to make a therapeutic space for international patients. The paper reports on work undertaken within a Thai hospital in 2012 which included observations and interviews with thirty foreign in-patients and nine informal interviews with hospital staff. Although theorized as a culturally neutral transnational 'space of connectivity', we show how cross-cultural tensions affect the experience of the hospital with implications for the organization of the hospital and notions of 'cultural competence' in care. There is no single universal experience of this space, instead, there are multiple experiences of the 'international hospital', depending on who patients are, where they are from, their expectations and relationships. Such hospitals straddle the expectations of both local patients and international clientele and present highly complex cross-cultural interactions between staff and patients but also between patients and other patients. Spatial organisation within such settings may either highlight cultural difference or help create culturally safe spaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rendimentos crescentes e a distribuição internacional de renda Increasing returns and the international distribution of income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Zagottis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of increasing returns in high technology industries assigns a path dependent character to the international division of labor. Rich countries, first entrants in these industries, enjoy permanent advantages that prevent, in a free market environment, the development of such industries in middle-income countries. This dynamics allows the former group of countries to experience a higher growth rate of labor productivity than the latter, and, as a result, increases the gap between the workers' standard of living in these countries. It is up to the States of middle-income countries the task of devising development strategies capable of breaking such pattern and improving the international distribution of income.

  19. An Analysis of Delay and Travel Times at Sao Paulo International Airport (AISP/GRU): Planning Based on Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Erico Soriano Martins; Mueller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of flight delays in Brazil, mostly verified at the ground (airfield), is responsible for serious disruptions at the airport level but also for the unchaining of problems in all the airport system, affecting also the airspace. The present study develops an analysis of delay and travel times at Sao Paulo International Airport/ Guarulhos (AISP/GRU) airfield based on simulation model. Different airport physical and operational scenarios had been analyzed by means of simulation. SIMMOD Plus 4.0, the computational tool developed to represent aircraft operation in the airspace and airside of airports, was used to perform these analysis. The study was mainly focused on aircraft operations on ground, at the airport runway, taxi-lanes and aprons. The visualization of the operations with increasing demand facilitated the analyses. The results generated in this work certify the viability of the methodology, they also indicated the solutions capable to solve the delay problem by travel time analysis, thus diminishing the costs for users mainly airport authority. It also indicated alternatives for airport operations, assisting the decision-making process and in the appropriate timing of the proposed changes in the existing infrastructure.

  20. Human travel and traveling bedbugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Pascal

    2012-12-01

    A dramatic increase of reported bedbug (Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus) infestations has been observed worldwide over the past decade. Bedbug infestations have also been detected across a wide range of travel accommodations, regardless of their comfort and hygiene levels. Travelers are increasingly exposed to the risks of bedbug bites, infestation of personal belongings, and subsequent contamination of newly visited accommodations and their homes. We searched Medline publications via the PubMed database. National bedbug recommendations, textbooks, newspapers, and Centers for Disease Control websites were also searched manually. To detect infested sites, avoid or limit bedbug bites, and reduce the risk of contaminating one's belongings and home, bedbug biology and ecology must be understood. A detailed search of their most classic hiding niches is a key to finding adult bedbugs, nymphs, eggs, and feces or traces of blood from crushed bedbugs. Locally, bedbugs move by active displacement to feed (bite) during the night. Bed, mattress, sofa, and/or curtains are the most frequently infested places. If you find bedbugs, change your room or, even better, the hotel. Otherwise, travelers should follow recommendations for avoiding bedbugs and their bites during the night and apply certain simple rules to avoid infesting other sites or their home. Travelers exposed to bedbugs can minimize the risks of bites and infestation of their belongings, and must also do their civic duty to avoid contributing to the subsequent contamination of other hotels and, finally, home. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  1. DIFFICULTIES IN INTERNATIONAL TRAVELLING FOR RESIDENTS OF AREAS WITH UNDEFINED POLITICAL STATUS. CASE STUDY: CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan Constantin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In March 2014 a change took place on Europe's political map. The Crimean Peninsula became part of Russia, switching sovereignty after more than 20 years during which it was part of Ukraine. This took place following a Russian military intervention and a referendum. A majority of the world's countries however, do not recognize the Russian control of Crimea and still consider it a part of Ukraine, rendering the territory an area with undefined political status. Shortly after the sovereignty change, the region and its population started experiencing all kinds of hardships. An often neglected type of hardship Crimeans are experiencing is the difficulty of obtaining visas. Following the referendum, many diplomatic missions in Russia have instituted a policy of not issuing visas to residents of Crimea who apply with Russian-issued documents. This article shall make a summary of EU and Schengen countries' positions regarding this issue, as these are the biggest groups of countries that requires both Russians and Ukrainians to obtain visas before travelling there. This research was made mostly directly, by requesting each country's diplomatic mission in Moscow to give an official position. The research had the purpose of verifying the information that certain countries do issue visas to Crimeans with Russian documents and also to give a more general and complex picture on the matter of visas for residents of Crimea. This theme is important as a policy of not issuing visas has significant repercussions on the region's economy and on the freedom of movement of its citizens.

  2. Transnational Connections, Competences and Identities: Experiences of Chinese International Students after Their Return "Home"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing; Schweisfurth, Michele

    2015-01-01

    International students constitute a substantial and growing mobile population globally. However, as yet, the experiences of returnees and the ways in which their overseas studies impact on their identity and professional and personal lives over time have been under-researched areas. In this article we employ concepts from theories of…

  3. Elevated Values of Clinically Relevant Transferases Induced by Imported Infectious Diseases: A Controlled Cross-Sectional Study of 14,559 Diseased German Travelers Returning from the Tropics and Subtropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Hanus, Ingrid; Felbinger, Thomas W; Weber, Christine; Beissner, Marcus; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Löscher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela; Nothdurft, Hans Dieter; Hoelscher, Michael; Alberer, Martin

    2016-08-03

    The aim of this controlled cross-sectional study was to assess the clinical validity of elevated values of three clinically relevant transferase enzymes (aspartate transaminase [AST], alanine transaminase [ALT], and gamma-glutamyl transferase [GGT]) induced by imported infectious diseases (IDs) seen among patients consulting the Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Medical Center of the University of Munich (from 1999 to 2014) after being in the sub-/tropics. Data sets of 14,559 diseased German travelers returning from Latin America (2,715), Africa (4,574), or Asia (7,270) and of 1,536 healthy controls of German origin without recent travels were analyzed. Among the cases, the proportions of those with elevated values of AST (7.8%) and of ALT (13.4%) were significantly larger than among controls (4.0% and 10.6%, respectively), whereas for GGT, no significant difference was found (cases: 10.0%; controls: 11.4%). The study identified IDs with significantly larger proportions of both AST and ALT (hepatitis A [100%/100%], cytomegalovirus [CMV] infection [77%/81%], chronic hepatitis C [67%/67%], infectious mononucleosis [65%/77%], typhoid fever [50%/50%], cyclosporiasis [45%/66%], dengue fever [43%/35%], malaria [20%/27%], and rickettsiosis [20%/24%]), of AST alone (paratyphoid fever [42%]), of ALT alone (giardiasis [20%]), and of GGT (hepatitis A [100%], infectious mononucleosis [71%], CMV infection [58%], rickettsiosis (20%], and dengue fever [19%]). The study demonstrates that the determination of AST and ALT among travelers returning from the sub-/tropics has a high clinical validity, as their elevated values are typically caused by several imported viral, bacterial, and protozoan IDs, whereas no additional clinical validity was found by the determination of GGT. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. Evaluation of the Coca-Cola company travel health kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lynne A; Bettinger, Julie; Dismukes, Roberta; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2002-01-01

    The Coca-Cola travel health kit has been used for about one decade for international travelers and required evaluation to see if the items contained were appropriate for the employees. Two hundred thirty-four travelers were sampled and filled out a voluntary survey including questions about demographic information, travel history, and usage and value of the contents of the travel health kit. One hundred eighty-one surveys were returned; 65% of the respondents were male, and the majority of travelers were between the ages of 36 and 45 years. The most useful items were analgesics and medications used for gastrointestinal problems. In general, the items identified as being the least useful were those requiring specialized use by a medical practitioner, such as needles and syringes. Suggestions of items to be added to the kit included vitamins, cough drops, sleep aids, and eye drops. A surprising result that Coca-Cola employees expressed the desire for brand name rather than generic items. Evaluation of the Coca-Cola Company travel health kit revealed it to be very useful to most corporate travelers. Suggestions that were made will be taken into consideration in designing a new kit, and consideration is being given to whether a basic travel health kit should be provided to which travelers can add other items depending on their personal needs.

  5. Hepatitis A in Hispanic children who live along the United States-Mexico border: the role of international travel and food-borne exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Michelle; Hopkins, Jackie; Farrington, Leigh; Gresham, Louise; Ginsberg, Michele; Bell, Beth P

    2004-07-01

    Hispanic children who live along the United States-Mexico border historically have had among the highest hepatitis A rates in the United States, but risk factors have not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine risk factors associated with acute hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in Hispanic children who live along the United States-Mexico border in San Diego County, California. In this case-control study, hepatitis A cases among Hispanic children who were younger than 18 years reported from June 1998 through August 2000 were matched by age group and exposure period to Hispanic children who were susceptible to HAV infection. Participants and their families were interviewed about demographic information and potential sources of HAV infection, including attending child care, food and waterborne exposures, cross-border and other international travel, and travel-related activities. Participants included 132 children with hepatitis A and 354 control subjects. The median age of study participants was 7 years (range: 1-17). Sixty-seven percent of case-patients traveled outside the United States during the incubation period, compared with 25% of the children without hepatitis A (odds ratio [OR]: 6.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.0-9.7); all children, except 1, had traveled to Mexico. In multivariate analysis, hepatitis A was associated with having eaten food from a taco stand or street food vendor (adjusted OR: 17.0; 95% CI: 4.1-71.1) and having eaten salad/lettuce (adjusted OR: 5.2; 95% CI: 1.3-20.1) during travel. Hepatitis A among Hispanic children who live in an urban area of the United States-Mexico border is associated with cross-border travel to Mexico and food-borne exposures during travel. Travelers to areas where hepatitis A is endemic should receive hepatitis A vaccine before travel.

  6. Travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kudo, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    Although the number of Japanese individuals traveling abroad has increased steadily, reaching approximately 17.3 million in 2007, the incidence of various travel-related health problems in Japan remains unknown. The travel-related health problems of Japanese travelers returning to Japan from abroad are analyzed by assessing the records. Data were collected retrospectively on returning travelers who visited the authors' travel clinic during the period from January 2005 through to December 2006 with any health problem acquired overseas. A total of 345 patients were included in this study (200 male, 145 female; average age, 34+/-12.3 years). Reasons for travel included leisure (45.8%); business (39.1%); visiting friends and relatives or accompanying other travelers (8.7%); volunteering (3.8%); and long stays in order to study or live (2.6%). The most visited destination was Asia (n=260), followed by Africa (n=105). The most commonly reported health problems were gastro-intestinal infections (39.1%), followed by respiratory tract infections (16.2%), animal bites (8.1%), and skin problems (5.8%). Together, malaria and dengue accounted for 10% of diagnoses in 125 febrile patients (36.2%). Although the profile of travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers is similar to that of Western travelers, the characteristics of travel were quite different. Therefore Japanese travel advice should be tailored to suit the Japanese traveler.

  7. Chasing the deal with the money: Measuring the required risk premium and expected abnormal returns of private equity funds to maximize their internal rate of return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Scarpati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of scholars of private equity (“PE” have attempted to assess the ex-post returns, or performance, of PEs by adopting an ex-post perspective of asset pricing. In doing so a set of phenomena has been recognized that is thought to be specific to the PE sector, such as “money-chasing deal phenomenon” (Gompers and Lerner, 2000 and “performance persistence” (Lerner and Schoar, 2005. However, based on their continuing use of an ex-post perspective, few scholars have paid attention to the possible extent to which these and other PE phenomena may affect expected returns from PE investments. To address this problem this article draws on an ex-ante perspective of investment decision-making in suggesting how a number of drivers and factors of PE phenomena may produce “abnormal returns”, and that each of those drivers and factors should therefore be considered in accurately assessing the required risk premium and expected abnormal returns of PE investments. In making these contributions we examined a private equity investment of a regional PE in Italy and administered a telephone questionnaire to 40 PEs in Italy and the UK and found principally that while size is the most important driver in producing abnormal returns illiquidity alone cannot explain the expected returns of PE investments (cf. Franzoni et al., 2012. Based on our findings we developed a predictive model of PE decision-making that draws on an ex-ante perspective of asset pricing and takes into account PE phenomena and abnormal returns. This model extends the work of Franzoni et al. (2012, Jegadeesh et al. (2009, and Korteweg and Sorensen (2010 who did not consider the possible influence of PE phenomena in decision-making and will also help PE managers in making better-informed decisions.

  8. Measuring and optimizing the level of employee engagement and internal service quality. Case: travel agency.

    OpenAIRE

    Guscina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    In an increasingly competitive world internal customers of organizations became crucial for success. Yet still many companies fail to perform the expected level due to the low commitment of their own employees. Various researches show that many companies worldwide are facing talent shortages and suffer from a serious engagement deficit. The biggest challenges occur in unleashing the power and potential of own people. The objective of this thesis is to investigate the topic of employee en...

  9. International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Drop Testing of Returned Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon M.; Perry, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    The air quality control equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and future deep space exploration vehicles provide the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation. The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Seg-ment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. In our previous work, we presented results of efficiency and pressure drop measurements for a sample set of two returned BFEs with a service life of 2.5 years. In this follow-on work, we present similar efficiency, pressure drop, and leak tests results for a larger sample set of six returned BFEs. The results of this work can aid the ISS Program in managing BFE logistics inventory through the stations planned lifetime as well as provide insight for managing filter element logistics for future exploration missions. These results also can provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  10. Destination specific risks of acquisition of notifiable food- and waterborne infections or sexually transmitted infections among Finnish international travellers, 1995-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöldi, Viktor; Sane, Jussi; Kantele, Anu; Rimhanen-Finne, Ruska; Salmenlinna, Saara; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2017-10-10

    Overnight international travels made by Finns more than doubled during 1995-2015. To estimate risks and observe trends of travel-related notifiable sexually transmitted and food- and water-borne infections (STIs and FWIs) among travellers, we analysed national reports of gonorrhoea, syphilis, hepatitis A, shigellosis, campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis cases and related them to travel statistics. Cases notified as travel-related to the Finnish infectious diseases register were used as numerators and overnight stays of Statistics Finland surveys as denominator. We calculated overall risks (per 100,000 travellers) and assessed trends (using regression model) in various geographic regions. Of all travel-related cases during 1995-2015, 2304 were STIs and 70,929 FWIs. During 2012-2015, Asia-Oceania showed highest risk estimates for gonorrhoea (11.0; 95%CI, 9.5-13), syphilis (1.4; 0.93-2.1), salmonellosis (157; 151-164), and campylobacteriosis (135; 129-141), and Africa for hepatitis A (4.5; 2.5-7.9), and shigellosis (35; 28-43). When evaluating at country level, the highest risks of infections was found in Thailand, except for hepatitis A ranking Hungary the first. During 2000-2011, significantly decreasing trends occurred for most FWIs particularly in the European regions and for STIs in Russia-Baltics. Our findings can be used in targeting pre-travel advice, which should also cover those visiting Thailand or European hepatitis A risk areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Return to Galileo? The Inquisition of the International Narcotic Control Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Dan; Drucker, Ernest

    2008-05-07

    Nearly 400 years after Galileo Galilei of Florence was arraigned and convicted of suspected heresy by the ten member Congregation of the Holy Office (Inquisition), the International Narcotic Control Board (INCB) is similarly inserting itself into matters pertaining to innovations in healthcare and the public health response to addiction throughout the world. Like that earlier Inquisition of 1633 that convicted Galileo of heresy for holding that the sun is the centre of the universe with the earth revolving around it (in contradiction to church doctrine of the time) the INCB and its thirteen-member panel, now rails against any evidence out of sync with the established doctrine of the war on drugs--particularly those innovations in public health called harm reduction. The latest healthcare and harm reduction practices to attract the ire of the INCB Inquisition are elements of Canada's most effective and innovative measures to minimize the harms of drugs in Vancouver--supervised injection facilities and, recently, the potential establishment of supervised inhalation rooms--along with the long established practice of providing safer mouthpieces for pulmonary inhalation in British Columbia. This is particularly significant as it comes in the midst of a crucial battle between municipal and provincial authorities in BC with the federal government in Ottawa, which seems determined to undermine all the most effective HR programs that are the result of years of steady local and governmental support in Vancouver and now threatens to derail all these programs and spread doubt about their usefulness despite the overwhelmingly positive findings of serous research.

  12. Return to Galileo? The Inquisition of the International Narcotic Control Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Small Dan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nearly 400 years after Galileo Galilei of Florence was arraigned and convicted of suspected heresy by the ten member Congregation of the Holy Office (Inquisition, the International Narcotic Control Board (INCB is similarly inserting itself into matters pertaining to innovations in healthcare and the public health response to addiction throughout the world. Like that earlier Inquisition of 1633 that convicted Galileo of heresy for holding that the sun is the centre of the universe with the earth revolving around it (in contradiction to church doctrine of the time the INCB and its thirteen-member panel, now rails against any evidence out of sync with the established doctrine of the war on drugs – particularly those innovations in public health called harm reduction. The latest healthcare and harm reduction practices to attract the ire of the INCB Inquisition are elements of Canada's most effective and innovative measures to minimize the harms of drugs in Vancouver – supervised injection facilities and, recently, the potential establishment of supervised inhalation rooms – along with the long established practice of providing safer mouthpieces for pulmonary inhalation in British Columbia. This is particularly significant as it comes in the midst of a crucial battle between municipal and provincial authorities in BC with the federal government in Ottawa, which seems determined to undermine all the most effective HR programs that are the result of years of steady local and governmental support in Vancouver and now threatens to derail all these programs and spread doubt about their usefulness despite the overwhelmingly positive findings of serous research.

  13. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  14. Travel health attitudes among Turkish business travellers to African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Engin Burak; Kayabas, Uner; Binbasioglu, Hulisi; Otlu, Baris; Bayindir, Yasar; Bozdogan, Bulent; Karatas, Mehmet

    The number of international travellers is increasing worldwide. Although health risks related to international travel are important and generally well-understood, the perception of these risks was unclear among Turkish travellers. We aimed to evaluate the attitudes and health risk awareness of Turkish travellers travelling to African countries. A survey was performed of Turkish travellers bound for Africa from Istanbul International Ataturk Airport in July 2013. A total of 124 travellers were enrolled in the study. Among them, 62.9% had information about their destination but only 11.3% had looked for information on health problems related to travel and their destination. Of all travellers, 53.2% had at least one vaccination before travelling. The most commonly administered vaccine was for typhoid. Among the travellers, 69.3% and 80.6% had "no idea" about yellow fever vaccination and malaria prophylaxis, respectively. A positive correlation was found between a higher level of travellers' education and receiving the recommended vaccination for the destination. Our study revealed significant gaps in the vaccination and chemoprophylaxis uptake of Turkish travellers departing to Africa. An awareness and training program should be developed for travellers, as well as public health workers, to address health risks related to travel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of short- compared to long-haul international travel on the sleep and wellbeing of national wheelchair basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Heidi R; Miller, Joanna; Taylor, Lee; Sargent, Charli; Lastella, Michele; Fowler, Peter M

    2017-11-03

    Currently, very little is known about the impact of short- or long-haul air travel on the sleep and wellbeing of wheelchair basketball athletes. Eleven national wheelchair basketball athletes wore actigraphy monitors prior, during, and after air travel to the United Kingdom. Upon arrival, participants rated their subjective jet-lag, fatigue, and vigor. Individuals traveled to the United Kingdom from different locations in Australia, the United States, and Europe and were categorised according to travel length [LONG (up to 30.2 h) or SHORT (up to 6.5 h)]. Linear mixed models determined effects of travel length on sleep and subjective ratings of jet-lag, fatigue, and vigor. During competition, subjective fatigue and jet-lag were substantially higher (ES = 0.73; ±0.77) and (ES = 0.57; ±0.60), subjective vigor was lower (ES = 1.94; ±0.72), and get-up time was earlier (ES = 0.57; ±0.60) for LONG when compared to SHORT. Travelling greater distances by airplane had a larger effect on subjective ratings of jet-lag, fatigue and vigor, rather than sleep. Irrespective of travel group, sleep and subjective responses were compromised, reflecting the travel requirements, competition-mediated influences, and/or due to a change in environment.

  16. Isolation of cytopathic small round virus (Aichi virus) from Pakistani children and Japanese travelers from Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, T; Sakae, K; Kobayashi, S; Ishihara, Y; Miyake, T; Mubina, A; Isomura, S

    1995-01-01

    Aichi virus was isolated in Vero cells from 5 (2.3%) of 222 Pakistani children with gastroenteritis but none was found in 91 healthy children. Aichi virus was also isolated from 5 (0.7%) of 722 Japanese travelers returned from tours to Southeast Asian countries and complained of gastrointestinal symptoms at the quarantine station of Nagoya International Airport in Japan. Of 5 Japanese travelers, 3 were returning from Indonesia, and 2 from Thailand or Malaysia. These results indicate that Aichi virus or a similar agent is endemic in Southeast Asian countries and is a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in children in these areas or in Japanese travelers who visit there.

  17. Health problems among Thai tourists returning from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanwijitwong, Jutarmas; Piyaphanee, Watcharapong; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Chanthavanich, Pornthep; Wichainprasast, Pongdej; Tantawichien, Terapong

    2017-07-01

    The number of Thai tourists visiting India is increasing each year. Most studies investigating health problems among international travellers to India have focused on travellers from Europe or North America, and the applicability of these studies to Asian travellers is unknown. This cross-sectional study used data collected from Thai tourists who had recently completed a trip to India. A questionnaire on demographic data, travel characteristics, pre-travel health preparation, and health problems during the trip to India was administered. All participants were also invited to answer a follow-up questionnaire 15 days after their arrival. The study included 1,304 Thai tourists returning from India between October 2014 and March 2015. Sixty-two percent were female. Overall median age was 49 years, and the median length of stay was 10.6 days. Most were package tourists, and 52% (675) reported health problems during their trip. Common health problems were cough, runny nose, and sore throat (31.1%), followed by musculoskeletal problems (21.7%), fever (12.7%), diarrhea (9.8%) and skin problems (6.6%). Other reported problems were related to the eyes/ears (2.1%), animal exposure (1.9%) and accidents (0.8%). We found that several factors may be associated with the incidence of health problems among these tourists, including travelling style and travel health preparation. In the follow-up questionnaire, 16.8% of the participants reported new or additional symptoms that developed after their return to Thailand. Respiratory symptoms were still the most common health problems during this 15-day period. Over half (52%) of Thai tourists experienced health problems during their trip to India. The most common health problem was not travellers' diarrhoea, as would be expected from published studies. Rather, respiratory and musculoskeletal problems were common symptoms. This information will be useful in pre-travel assessment and care. Our findings may indicate that health risks among

  18. The Carriage Of Multiresistant Bacteria After Travel (COMBAT) prospective cohort study: methodology and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcilla, Maris S; van Hattem, Jarne M; Bootsma, Martin C J; van Genderen, Perry J; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schultsz, Constance; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Verbrugh, Henri A; de Jong, Menno D; Melles, Damian C; Penders, John

    2014-04-28

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the major threats to public health around the world. Besides the intense use and misuse of antimicrobial agents as the major force behind the increase in antimicrobial resistance, the exponential increase of international travel may also substantially contribute to the emergence and spread of AMR. However, knowledge on the extent to which international travel contributes to this is still limited. The Carriage Of Multiresistant Bacteria After Travel (COMBAT) study aims to 1. determine the acquisition rate of multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae during foreign travel 2. ascertain the duration of carriage of these micro-organisms 3. determine the transmission rate within households 4. identify risk factors for acquisition, persistence of carriage and transmission of multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae. The COMBAT-study is a large-scale multicenter longitudinal cohort study among travellers (n = 2001) and their non-travelling household members (n = 215). Faecal samples are collected before and immediately after travel and 1 month after return from all participants. Follow-up faecal samples are collected 3, 6 and 12 months after return from travellers (and their non-travelling household members) who acquired multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae. Questionnaires are collected from all participants at each time-point. Faecal samples are screened phenotypically for the presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Positive post-travel isolates from travellers with negative pre-travel samples are genotypically analysed for ESBL and carbapenemase genes with microarray and gene sequencing. The design and scale of the COMBAT-study will enable us to provide much needed detailed insights into the risks and dynamics of introduction and spread of ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae by healthy travellers and the potential need and measures to monitor or manage these risks

  19. Application of numerical method in calculating the internal rate of return of joint venture investment using diminishing musyarakah model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslan, Siti Zaharah Mohd; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2017-05-01

    Islamic banking in Malaysia offers variety of products based on Islamic principles. One of the concepts is a diminishing musyarakah. The concept of diminishing musyarakah helps Muslims to avoid transaction which are based on riba. The diminishing musyarakah can be defined as an agreement between capital provider and entrepreneurs that enable entrepreneurs to buy equity in instalments where profits and losses are shared based on agreed ratio. The objective of this paper is to determine the internal rate of return (IRR) for a diminishing musyarakah model by applying a numerical method. There are several numerical methods in calculating the IRR such as by using an interpolation method and a trial and error method by using Microsoft Office Excel. In this paper we use a bisection method and secant method as an alternative way in calculating the IRR. It was found that the diminishing musyarakah model can be adapted in managing the performance of joint venture investments. Therefore, this paper will encourage more companies to use the concept of joint venture in managing their investments performance.

  20. Travelers' Health: International Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... findings of sexual abuse Extremities: presence of bowing (rickets) or deformities Neurologic: presence and quality of reflexes In addition, all children should receive a developmental screening by a clinician ...

  1. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state health department or CDC’s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases at 970-221-6400 . Data from clinical and ... or animal waste, for example). Travelers with liver disease should avoid direct exposure to salt water that may contain Vibrio spp., and all immunocompromised ...

  2. Performance and Return to Sport After Clavicle Open Reduction and Internal Fixation in National Football League Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Robert A; Sochacki, Kyle R; Navarro, Sergio M; McCulloch, Patrick C; Lintner, David M; Harris, Joshua D

    2017-08-01

    Clavicle fractures are common injuries in professional football. Surgical fixation of these injuries may lead to decreased nonunion rates, improved shoulder strength, and decreased residual functional impairment. To determine (1) return-to-sport (RTS) rate in National Football League (NFL) players after clavicle fracture open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), (2) postoperative career length and games per season, (3) pre- and postoperative performance, and (4) postoperative performance compared with control players matched by position, age, years of experience, and performance. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Publicly available records were used to identify players who underwent surgical treatment of a clavicle fracture while playing in the NFL. Demographic and performance data were collected for each player, and matched controls were identified. Control and case performance scores were calculated using a standardized scoring system. RTS was defined as playing in 1 NFL game after surgery. Comparisons between case and control groups at preoperative and postoperative time points were made using paired-samples Student t tests. Seventeen surgeries (16 players) were analyzed. Fifteen players (94.1%) were able to RTS in the NFL at a mean 211.3 ± 144.7 days postsurgery; 7 (44%) returned within the same season as their injury and subsequent fixation. The overall rate of a player's remaining in the NFL 1 year after surgery was 88.2%. Players who underwent surgery played in a similar number of games per season and had similar career lengths in the NFL as controls (P > .05). There were no significant (P > .05) differences between cases and matched controls presurgery and preindex. There was no difference (P > .05) in postoperative performance scores or games per season compared with preoperative scores or games per season for any position. Quarterbacks (n = 3, P = .049) and running backs (n = 5, P = .039) had significantly worse postoperative performance scores when

  3. US screening of international travelers for radioactive contamination after the Japanese nuclear plant disaster in March 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Todd; Chang, Arthur; Berro, Andre; Still, Aaron; Brown, Clive; Demma, Andrew; Nemhauser, Jeffrey; Martin, Colleen; Salame-Alfie, Adela; Fisher-Tyler, Frieda; Smith, Lee; Grady-Erickson, Onalee; Alvarado-Ramy, Francisco; Brunette, Gary; Ansari, Armin; McAdam, David; Marano, Nina

    2012-10-01

    On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami damaged nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi complex in Japan, resulting in radionuclide release. In response, US officials augmented existing radiological screening at its ports of entry (POEs) to detect and decontaminate travelers contaminated with radioactive materials. During March 12 to 16, radiation screening protocols detected 3 travelers from Japan with external radioactive material contamination at 2 air POEs. Beginning March 23, federal officials collaborated with state and local public health and radiation control authorities to enhance screening and decontamination protocols at POEs. Approximately 543 000 (99%) travelers arriving directly from Japan at 25 US airports were screened for radiation contamination from March 17 to April 30, and no traveler was detected with contamination sufficient to require a large-scale public health response. The response highlighted synergistic collaboration across government levels and leveraged screening methods already in place at POEs, leading to rapid protocol implementation. Policy development, planning, training, and exercising response protocols and the establishment of federal authority to compel decontamination of travelers are needed for future radiological responses. Comparison of resource-intensive screening costs with the public health yield should guide policy decisions, given the historically low frequency of contaminated travelers arriving during radiological disasters.

  4. [Travelers' vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  5. Electronic network for monitoring travellers' diarrhoea and detection of an outbreak caused by Salmonella enteritidis among overseas travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, K; Inouye, S; Okabe, N; Taniguchi, K; Izumiya, H; Watanabe, H; Matsumoto, Y; Yokota, T; Hashimoto, S; Sagara, H

    1999-12-01

    The Traveller's Diarrhoea Network, by which the Infectious Disease Surveillance Center is electronically connected with two major airport quarantine stations and three infectious disease hospitals, was launched in February 1988 in Japan. The data on travellers' diarrhoea detected is reported weekly by e-mail. Two clusters of infection among travellers returning from Italy were reported by two airport quarantine stations at the end of September 1998. A total of 12 salmonella isolates from 2 clusters were examined. All were identified as Salmonella enteritidis, phage type 4 and showed identical banding patterns on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A case-control study showed that the scrambled eggs served at the hotel restaurant in Rome were the likely source of this outbreak. This outbreak could not have been detected promptly and investigated easily without the e-mail network. International exchange of data on travellers' diarrhoea is important for preventing and controlling food-borne illnesses infected abroad.

  6. Measles associated with international travel in the region of the Americas, Australia and Europe, 2001-2013: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, M; Luzi, D; Metzler, S; Miran, B; Mutsch, M

    2015-01-01

    Travel volumes are still increasing resulting in a more interconnected world and fostering the spread of infectious diseases. We aimed to evaluate the relevance of travel-related measles, a highly transmissible and vaccine-preventable disease. Between 2001 and 2013, surveillance and travel-related measles data were systematically reviewed according to the PRISMA guidelines with extraction of relevant articles from Medline, Embase, GoogleScholar and from public health authorities in the Region of the Americas, Europe and Australia. From a total of 960 records 44 articles were included and they comprised 2128 imported measles cases between 2001 and 2011. The proportion of imported cases in Europe was low at 1-2%, which reflects the situation in a measles-endemic region. In contrast, imported and import-related measles accounted for up to 100% of all cases in regions with interrupted endemic measles transmission. Eleven air-travel related reports described 132 measles index cases leading to 47 secondary cases. Secondary transmission was significantly more likely to occur if the index case was younger or when there were multiple infectious cases on board. Further spread to health care settings was found. Measles cases associated with cruise ship travel or mass gatherings were sporadically observed. Within both, endemic and non-endemic home countries, pretravel health advice should assess MMR immunity routinely to avoid measles spread by nonimmune travelers. To identify measles spread as well as to increase and sustain high vaccination coverages joint efforts of public health specialists, health care practitioners and travel medicine providers are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Travel health prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    All around the world there has been a rapid growth in the number of international travels. According to the World Tourism Organisation the number of international tourist arrivals reached 1,235 billion in 2016 and continues to grow at a high rate. This has been much due to the development of air transport (including low-cost airlines), increasingly common economic migration, a growing number of travellers visiting friends and relatives, and an increase in medical tourism. With tropical destinations becoming increasingly popular among travellers, doctors have seen a rising number of patients who seek medical advice on health risks prevalent in hot countries and health prevention measures to be taken in tropical destinations, especially where sanitation is poor. The risk for developing a medical condition while staying abroad depends on a variety of factors, including the traveller's general health condition, health prevention measures taken before or during travel (vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, health precautions during air, road and sea travel, proper acclimatisation, prevention of heat injuries, protection against local flora and fauna, personal hygiene, water, food and feeding hygiene), as well as the prevalence of health risk factors in a given location. Health prevention is a precondition for safe travel and maintaining good physical health; in the era of a rapid growth in international tourism it has become of key importance for all travellers.

  8. Impact of Rabies Vaccination History on Attainment of an Adequate Antibody Titre Among Dogs Tested for International Travel Certification, Israel - 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakobson, B; Taylor, N; Dveres, N; Rotblat, S; Spero, Ż; Lankau, E W; Maki, J

    2017-06-01

    Rabies is endemic in wildlife or domestic carnivore populations globally. Infection of domestic dogs is of particular concern in many areas. In regions where domestic animals are at risk of exposure to rabies virus, dogs should be routinely vaccinated against rabies to protect both pet and human populations. Many countries require demonstration of an adequate level of serum rabies neutralizing antibodies to permit entry of dogs during international travel. We analysed rabies titres of dogs seeking travel certification in Israel to assess demographic and vaccine history factors associated with antibody titres below the acceptable threshold for travel certification. Having received only one previous rabies vaccination and a longer duration since the most recent vaccination was received were primary risk factors for not achieving an adequate rabies virus neutralizing antibody titre for travel certification. These risk factors had stronger effects in younger animals, but were consistent for dogs of all ages. In particular, these findings reiterate the importance of administering at least two rabies vaccinations (the primo vaccination and subsequent booster) to ensure population-level protection against rabies in dogs globally. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. [Travels and spreading of multi-resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta

    2017-05-23

    The increasing number of international travel for tourism, business and for medical reasons rises the risk of spreading of multi-resistant bacteria. It has been shown that an intercontinental travel, mainly to Asia (Indian Subcontinent), promotes a colonization of the digestive tract, mainly by multi-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MRE) and increases the risk of symptomatic infections caused by these agents. The colonization of the digestive tract by MRE is reported in 29-88% of travelers. It sustains 3 to 12 months, respectively in 10% and 2% of travelers. Risk factors for the acquisition of colonization with MRE include: travel duration and destination, treatment with betalactam antibiotics during the travel, the use of local medical services, including hospitalization, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms during the travel (mainly diarrhea), age >65 years. The need of the hospitalization during the travel increases the risk of colonization, but is not a prerequisite factor for the acquisition of the colonization, as cases of the MRE carriage are reported in patients who had never used medical services outside the country. It indicates other possible transmission routes, including food. In order to reduce the risk of MRE spreading, it is recommended to ask patients about a history of travel and treatment within the last 12 months. All patient who report such events and require hospitalization in their home countries should be microbiologically screened. Hospitalized patients colonized with multiple resistant bacteria require an isolation or cohortation. Educational activities related to the hand hygiene compliance should be performed. The risk of the home transmission of MRE is not high, it lasts for a short period (up to 3 months). Routine microbiological testing for all persons returning from an international or intercontinental travel is not recommended, neither microbiological screening among their households.

  10. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Vanessa; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Caumes, Eric; Jensenius, Mogens; Castelli, Francesco; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Weld, Leisa; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; de Vries, Peter; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis; Parola, Philippe

    2010-11-17

    Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in European travellers, we analysed diagnoses with demographic, clinical and travel-related predictors of disease, in 6957 ill returned travellers who presented in 2008 to EuroTravNet centres with a presumed travel associated condition. Gastro-intestinal (GI) diseases accounted for 33% of illnesses, followed by febrile systemic illnesses (20%), dermatological conditions (12%) and respiratory illnesses (8%). There were 3 deaths recorded; a sepsis caused by Escherichia coli pyelonephritis, a dengue shock syndrome and a Plasmodium falciparum malaria.GI conditions included bacterial acute diarrhea (6.9%), as well as giardiasis and amebasis (2.3%). Among febrile systemic illnesses with identified pathogens, malaria (5.4%) accounted for most cases followed by dengue (1.9%) and others including chikungunya, rickettsial diseases, leptospirosis, brucellosis, Epstein Barr virus infections, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and viral hepatitis. Dermatological conditions were dominated by bacterial infections, arthropod bites, cutaneous larva migrans and animal bites requiring rabies post-exposure prophylaxis and also leishmaniasis, myasis, tungiasis and one case of leprosy. Respiratory illness included 112 cases of tuberculosis including cases of multi-drug resistant or extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, 104 cases of influenza like illness, and 5 cases of Legionnaires disease. Sexually transmitted infections (STI) accounted for 0.6% of total diagnoses and included HIV infection and syphilis. A total of 165 cases of potentially vaccine preventable diseases were reported. Purpose of travel and destination specific risk factors was identified for several diagnoses such as Chagas disease in immigrant

  11. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Velez Rogelio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in European travellers, we analysed diagnoses with demographic, clinical and travel-related predictors of disease, in 6957 ill returned travellers who presented in 2008 to EuroTravNet centres with a presumed travel associated condition. Results Gastro-intestinal (GI diseases accounted for 33% of illnesses, followed by febrile systemic illnesses (20%, dermatological conditions (12% and respiratory illnesses (8%. There were 3 deaths recorded; a sepsis caused by Escherichia coli pyelonephritis, a dengue shock syndrome and a Plasmodium falciparum malaria. GI conditions included bacterial acute diarrhea (6.9%, as well as giardiasis and amebasis (2.3%. Among febrile systemic illnesses with identified pathogens, malaria (5.4% accounted for most cases followed by dengue (1.9% and others including chikungunya, rickettsial diseases, leptospirosis, brucellosis, Epstein Barr virus infections, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE and viral hepatitis. Dermatological conditions were dominated by bacterial infections, arthropod bites, cutaneous larva migrans and animal bites requiring rabies post-exposure prophylaxis and also leishmaniasis, myasis, tungiasis and one case of leprosy. Respiratory illness included 112 cases of tuberculosis including cases of multi-drug resistant or extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, 104 cases of influenza like illness, and 5 cases of Legionnaires disease. Sexually transmitted infections (STI accounted for 0.6% of total diagnoses and included HIV infection and syphilis. A total of 165 cases of potentially vaccine preventable diseases were reported. Purpose of travel and destination specific risk factors was identified for several

  12. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in European travellers, we analysed diagnoses with demographic, clinical and travel-related predictors of disease, in 6957 ill returned travellers who presented in 2008 to EuroTravNet centres with a presumed travel associated condition. Results Gastro-intestinal (GI) diseases accounted for 33% of illnesses, followed by febrile systemic illnesses (20%), dermatological conditions (12%) and respiratory illnesses (8%). There were 3 deaths recorded; a sepsis caused by Escherichia coli pyelonephritis, a dengue shock syndrome and a Plasmodium falciparum malaria. GI conditions included bacterial acute diarrhea (6.9%), as well as giardiasis and amebasis (2.3%). Among febrile systemic illnesses with identified pathogens, malaria (5.4%) accounted for most cases followed by dengue (1.9%) and others including chikungunya, rickettsial diseases, leptospirosis, brucellosis, Epstein Barr virus infections, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and viral hepatitis. Dermatological conditions were dominated by bacterial infections, arthropod bites, cutaneous larva migrans and animal bites requiring rabies post-exposure prophylaxis and also leishmaniasis, myasis, tungiasis and one case of leprosy. Respiratory illness included 112 cases of tuberculosis including cases of multi-drug resistant or extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, 104 cases of influenza like illness, and 5 cases of Legionnaires disease. Sexually transmitted infections (STI) accounted for 0.6% of total diagnoses and included HIV infection and syphilis. A total of 165 cases of potentially vaccine preventable diseases were reported. Purpose of travel and destination specific risk factors was identified for several diagnoses such as Chagas

  13. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  14. Long distance travel ‘today’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Dane’s long distance travel. It is a part of the Drivers and Limits project about long distance travel. Long distance travel is in the project defined as infrequent travel with overnight stay. Danes 15-85 years-old travel in average 5.5 long distance travel...... per year og which a third is for international destinations, a third is for domestic second homes and a third are other domestic trips. However, 87% of the kilometres are for international destinations and only 4% are for domestic second homes. Travel activity is very uneven distributed with only half...... of the population having had a journey during the last three month. At the other hand 60% have travelled internationally during the last year and only 2% have never travelled abroad. The paper presents among other things how the travel activity is distributed on travel purpose and mode and how the mode choice...

  15. Travel Time and Distance in International Perspective : A Comparison between Nanjing (China) and the Randstad (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/342291327; Dijst, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070793085; Prillwitz, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328231797; Wissink, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/148010202

    2013-01-01

    While Western countries are trying to reduce car dependency on the back of low carbon objectives, the ownership and use of private cars in urban China is increasing dramatically. In this paper, light is shed on both developments through a comparative study of the travel behaviour in two regions with

  16. Travel sketches

    OpenAIRE

    Kolakowski, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Collection of quick travel sketches from private sketchbooks (mixed techniques, pencil, ink pens, water colour, pastels). Contributions to University Gallery showing travel sketches of alumni of Leibniz Universität Hannover - Landscape Architecture Faculty

  17. Travelers' Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning ... Japan) as well as the Middle East, Africa, Mexico, and Central and South America. Prevention In otherwise ...

  18. Incidence and spectrum of health problems among travellers to Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanwijitwong, Jutarmas; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Ponam, Thitiya; Puengpholpool, Preechapol; Sharma, Chollasap; Chatapat, Lapakorn; Pawan, Vichan; Kittitrakul, Chatporn; Piyaphanee, Watcharapong

    2018-01-01

    The number of international travellers visiting Myanmar increases each year. However, information about pre-travel preparation and incidence of health problems among these travellers is limited. This cross-sectional study was conducted at three international airports in Thailand. Travellers returning from Myanmar completed questionnaires querying demographic profile, pre-travel health preparations and health problems during their stay in Myanmar. From March 2015 to May 2017, we collected and analysed questionnaires completed by 397 Thai and 467 non-Thai travellers (total: 50.1% men, median age 37 years). Non-Thai travellers were from Europe (59%), Northern America (21.4%), Asia (16.5%) and Australia or New Zealand (3.0%). Approximately 74% of non-Thais sought pre-travel health information; only 36% of Thais did so. Tourism was the main purpose for travel among both Thais (58.4%) and non-Thais (85.2%). Non-Thais were more likely than Thais to travel as backpackers and perform outdoor activities such as trekking, cycling or swimming. The average length of stay in Myanmar among non-Thais was significantly longer than that of Thais (26.58 days vs 7.08 days, P problems were reported by 22.9% of non-Thais; the most common was diarrhoea (21.0%) followed by upper respiratory tract symptoms (9.2%), fever (3.4%) and skin problems (3.0%). Only 12.6% of Thais reported health problems, the most common being upper respiratory tract symptoms (7.6%), followed by diarrhoea (3.1%), fever (2.8%) and skin problems (2.0%). Most health problems were mild and self-limited in both groups. Only one Thai and eight non-Thai travellers required a doctor's visit during their trip to Myanmar, and two non-Thais required hospitalization. Health problems are not very common among travellers to Myanmar. Overall, health problems were reported among 18.2% of travellers in our study. Most problems were mild, with spontaneous recovery. Only two foreign travellers required hospitalization.

  19. Travelers' Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Destination See a Doctor Pre-Travel Appointment Your Health Status How Diseases Spread Pack Smart Plan Ahead Sick While Traveling Know and Share Info Traveler Registration During Trip After Your Trip CDC-TV ... Presentations for Health Professionals Yellow Fever Vaccine Course About the Yellow ...

  20. The difference in the position of Mexico, Japan and China as recipients of international tourism and their position in Competitiveness Index Travel and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Magaña Carrillo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mexico, as a tourist destination that is recipient of tourists, ranks among the top ten in terms of international arrivals. Nevertheless, in terms of competitiveness, according to the index of Travel and Tourism Competitiveness, its ranking is very low. This research project looks to understand and explain the differences in tourist competitiveness between Mexico and other countries within the Asia-Pacific Basin. This article is preoccupied with the question posed by Mexico’s evident contradicting position as that of being on the one hand, leader in terms of international arrivals, and on the other, having a low competitive performance, according to the index of international tourist competitiveness. Comparing Mexico to Japan and China, helps to understand what aspects, among those considered in the index pillars, should be contemplated in order to strengthen Mexico’s levels of competitiveness, as suggested in the Tourist Sectorial Plan 2007-2012.

  1. Parasitic diseases in the returning traveller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-11

    Jun 11, 2009 ... Other enteric amoebae are indicators of ingestion of contaminated water rather than causative agents of intestinal disease. Similarly, Giardia lamblia causes asymptomatic infection in most cases, but may lead to bouts of diarrhoea, weakness, weight loss, abdominal pain and less frequently to other related ...

  2. Returning home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jytte; Brøgger, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Migration to domestic and international destinations has become an emblematic feature of Nepal’s societal changes. Part of this development is education migration from rural to urban areas within the borders of Nepal, an often overlooked but increasingly important aspect of contemporary migration...... flows. By focusing on these educational migrants, this paper explores how they connect to their rural homes. Guided by a critical reading of the migration-development scholarship, the paper examines how migrants and their relatives make sense of educational migrants’ remitting and returning practices......, and by comparing three groups of educational migrants, the migrants’ reasons for staying connected and sending remittances are scrutinized. The paper finds that although educational migrants do not generate extensive economic remittances for local development in Nepal, they stay connected to their rural homes...

  3. Artemether resistance in vitro is linked to mutations in PfATP6 that also interact with mutations in PfMDR1 in travellers returning with Plasmodium falciparum infections.

    KAUST Repository

    Pillai, Dylan R

    2012-04-27

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring resistance phenotypes for Plasmodium falciparum, using in vitro growth assays, and relating findings to parasite genotype has proved particularly challenging for the study of resistance to artemisinins. METHODS: Plasmodium falciparum isolates cultured from 28 returning travellers diagnosed with malaria were assessed for sensitivity to artemisinin, artemether, dihydroartemisinin and artesunate and findings related to mutations in pfatp6 and pfmdr1. RESULTS: Resistance to artemether in vitro was significantly associated with a pfatp6 haplotype encoding two amino acid substitutions (pfatp6 A623E and S769N; (mean IC50 (95% CI) values of 8.2 (5.7 - 10.7) for A623/S769 versus 623E/769 N 13.5 (9.8 - 17.3) nM with a mean increase of 65%; p = 0.012). Increased copy number of pfmdr1 was not itself associated with increased IC50 values for artemether, but when interactions between the pfatp6 haplotype and increased copy number of pfmdr1 were examined together, a highly significant association was noted with IC50 values for artemether (mean IC50 (95% CI) values of 8.7 (5.9 - 11.6) versus 16.3 (10.7 - 21.8) nM with a mean increase of 87%; p = 0.0068). Previously described SNPs in pfmdr1 are also associated with differences in sensitivity to some artemisinins. CONCLUSIONS: These findings were further explored in molecular modelling experiments that suggest mutations in pfatp6 are unlikely to affect differential binding of artemisinins at their proposed site, whereas there may be differences in such binding associated with mutations in pfmdr1. Implications for a hypothesis that artemisinin resistance may be exacerbated by interactions between PfATP6 and PfMDR1 and for epidemiological studies to monitor emerging resistance are discussed.

  4. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    2004-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL would like to remind you of the entry formalities applicable to those travelling to the United States. Nationals of Switzerland and of the following countries : Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, entering the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (no visa requirement), must be in possession of an machine-readable passport that is valid for at least six months after the date of the return trip. Children, including infants, must have their own passport. An entry in the parents' passport is not sufficient. For entry into the United States, an e-ticket (fax or e-mail confirmation or passenger receipt) or a return ticket to the departure point or a ticket to a subsequent onward destination (valid for 90 days) must be presented together with the green ...

  5. [Pre-travel advice and patient education of Hungarian travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Ingrid; Felkai, Péter

    2018-03-01

    According to international surveys, over half of the travellers face some kind of health issue when travelling. The overwhelming majority of travel-related illnesses can be prevented with pre-travel medical consultations, but the syllabus and content of the consultation have to match the travel habits and culture of the given society. This publication explores the specificities and travel habits of Hungarian travellers. One hundred participants of a travel exhibition completed a survey about their international travel. As the survey was not representative, the data could only be processed through simple statistical methods. However, since the exhibition was presumably attended by those wishing to travel, the conclusions drawn from the results are worth publishing, since no similar survey in Hungary has been published before. Based on the suitable classification of age groups in travel medicine, 11% of the participants were adolescents / young adults (aged 15-24), 81% adults (25-59) and 8% elderly (60-74). Twenty-eight percent of the participants travel multiple times a year, 40% yearly and 32% of them less frequently; 16% of the adults, 8% of the adolescents and 4% of the elderly age group travel multiple times a year. The travel destinations of Hungarian travellers have remained practically unchanged since a study was conducted 13 years ago: the vast majority (95%) travelled within Europe, 2% to the United States, and 11% of them elsewhere. Since Hungarians do not travel to endemic areas, only 5% consulted their general practitioners (GPs) prior to travelling, and 29% did when they had to be vaccinated. Forty-two percent of those wishing to travel never consult their GPs, even though 29% of them are aware of some chronic illness. Instead, 51% gather their health information from the internet and only 6% from their doctors. By the contradiction between the poor health status of the majority of Hungarian travellers and the negligence of seeking pre-travel advice

  6. The reliability of pre-travel history to decide on appropriate counseling and vaccinations: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Isabelle A; Genton, Blaise

    2012-01-01

    Although medical and travel plans gathered from pre-travel interviews are used to decide the provision of specific pre-travel health advice and vaccinations, there has been no evaluation of the relevance of this strategy. In a prospective study, we assessed the agreement between pre-travel plans and post-travel history and the effect on advice regarding the administration of vaccines and recommendations for malaria prevention. We included prospectively all consenting adults who had not planned an organized tour. Pre- and post-travel information included questions on destination, itineraries, departure and return dates, access to bottled water, plan of bicycle ride, stays in a rural zone, and close contact with animals. The outcomes measured included: agreement between pre- and post-travel itineraries and activities; and the effect of these differences on pre-travel health recommendations, had the traveler gone to the actual versus intended destinations for actual versus intended duration and activities. Three hundred and sixty-five travelers were included in the survey, where 188 (52%) were males (median age 38 years). In 81(23%) travelers, there was no difference between pre- and post-travel history. Disagreement between pre- and post-travel history were the highest for stays in rural zones or with local people (66% of travelers), close contact with animals (33%), and bicycle riding (21%). According to post-travel history, 125 (35%) travelers would have needed rabies vaccine and 9 (3%) typhoid fever vaccine. Potential overprovision of vaccine was found in travelers. A change in the malaria prescription would have been recommended in 18 (5%) travelers. Pre-travel history does not adequately reflect what travelers do. However, difference between recommendations for the actual versus intended travel plans was only clinically significant for the need for rabies vaccine. Particular attention during pre-travel health counseling should focus on the risk of rabies, the

  7. ESA astronaut (and former physicist at CERN) Christer Fuglesang returning a symbolic neutralino particle to CERN Director for research Sergio Bertolucci. Fuglesang flew the neutralino to the International Space Station on the occasion of his STS128 mission in 2009.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    ESA astronaut (and former physicist at CERN) Christer Fuglesang returning a symbolic neutralino particle to CERN Director for research Sergio Bertolucci. Fuglesang flew the neutralino to the International Space Station on the occasion of his STS128 mission in 2009.

  8. Travel Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintrat, Iva; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Argues that travelogues can be used in teacher training to demonstrate how representations of other countries are formed. Analysis of travelogues results in an understanding of the typologies of travelers and travel-writers and provides a rich source of materials and ideas to be used as a basis for inservice teacher education. (39 references)…

  9. RETURN ON INVESTMENT OF PUBLIC SPENDING IN TOURISM POLICY AND INTERNATIONAL TOURISM GROWTH: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN COUNTRIES.

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Gardenia Ramos Higuera.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the international tourism growth and public funding invested in the tourism policy by United States, Australia and Mexico. The research method is quantitative, based on country level data; an econometric statistical analysis was carried out, using simple linear regressions. This study found that the public investment in the tourism policy is strongly statistically related to (1) international tourist expenditure generated and (2...

  10. Statewide Implementation of Parenting with Love and Limits Among Youth with Co-Existing Internalizing and Externalizing Functional Impairments Reduces Return to Service Rates and Treatment Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett-Hong, Emma M; Karam, Eli; Kiaer, Lynn

    2017-09-01

    Many community mental health (CMH) systems contain inefficiencies, contributing to unmet need for services among youth. Using a quasi-experimental research design, we examined the implementation of an adapted structural-strategic family intervention, Parenting with Love and Limits, in a state CMH system to increase efficiency of services to youth with co-existing internalizing and externalizing functional impairments (PLL n = 296; Treatment-As-Usual n = 296; 54% male; 81% Caucasian). Youth receiving PLL experienced shorter treatment durations and returned to CMH services at significantly lower rates than youth receiving treatment-as-usual. They also demonstrated significant decreases in internalizing and externalizing symptoms over time. Findings lay the foundation for further examination of the role of an adapted structural-strategic family treatment in increasing the efficiency of CMH systems.

  11. HOW TO FACILITATE THE MOVEMENT OF PASSENGERS BY INTRODUCING BAGGAGE COLLECTION SYSTEMS FOR TRAVEL FROM NORTH SHIELDS TO NEWCASTLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Connor REECE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews current systems that either transport baggage or have the potential to transport baggage, as well as proposed systems, before modelling some of them in a modal choice model to examine how effective they would be if implemented. It was hoped that the introduction of a baggage collection system would increase the number of passengers using public transport which would be good for the environment. The specific location of the study was Tyne and Wear and a journey from North Shields to Newcastle International Airport was chosen for the analysis. The system proposed is compared to an existing systems known as InPost and Virgin Bag Magic. It was found that for the average passenger in North Shields, a system based on the way InPost operates would offer the greatest utility. However, with the introduction of a new utility equation that could analyse mixed-mode travel, a baggage collection hub based in Newcastle upon Tyne city centre offered a more significant number of users provided that the cost of the system was either covered in the travel ticket or provided by the airport or airline free of charge. This dedicated baggage collection system would be much more expensive to introduce compared to the InPost system as the infrastructure to run the InPost system is already in place, however, the ridership of the newly proposed system would be much larger therefore it could potentially recoup the development costs.

  12. Culture shock and travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  13. Danish travel activities: do we travel more and longer – and to what extent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    Two separate Danish National travel surveys are analysed to outline the amount and extent of national and international travelling during the latest 15-20 years; the national travel survey (TU) describes mainly national daily travel activities, whereas the holiday and business travel survey...... describes national and international travel activities including overnight stay(s). When sampling only respondents with trips above 100 kilometres, they only accounts for around 2% of all daily travel activities, however, this share appears to increase and suggest in general that we do travel longer....... But due to this limited share of trips, the overall impacts of longer distance travelling vanish when considering all daily travel activities. Especially as about 95% of all daily travel destinations range less than 50 kilometres away and in total induce an average trip length of 20 kilometres. If focus...

  14. Global health surveillance and travelers' health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Cinzia; Freedman, David O

    2009-10-01

    Monitoring disease trends among travelers can inform both pretravel advice and posttravel management. Data from sentinel travelers upon their return to medically sophisticated environments can also benefit local populations in resource-limited countries. Provider-based surveillance of travelers is increasingly sophisticated. Recently, networks such as GeoSentinel have provided cumulative trends in travel-related illness to assess pretravel risk for a mass gathering event--the Beijing Olympic Games. Data provided by the GeoSentinel also helped in determining the seasonality of dengue by region of travel and risk of acquiring schistosomiasis after a single short exposure. For chikungunya fever, detailed study of returned travelers exposed new clinical aspects of a disease previously studied in the tropics only. Clusters of hepatitis A, a vaccine-preventable disease, among European travelers, illustrated continued gaps in the preparation of the traveling public. Plasmodium knowlesi has emerged as the fifth human malaria parasite and is now a consideration in the diagnosis of febrile travelers from Asia. Automated global news scanning software is increasingly being able to detect and prioritize disease events. Every year millions of travelers visit countries where they are exposed to pathogens that are usually rare in their home countries. Global surveillance of travel-related disease represents a powerful tool for the detection of infectious diseases. These data should encourage clinicians to take a detailed travel history during every patient encounter.

  15. Measles outbreak in an unvaccinated family and a possibly associated international traveler - Orange County, Florida, December 2012-January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Tania A; Klekamp, Benjamin; Rico, Edhelene; Mejia-Echeverry, Alvaro

    2014-09-12

    The Florida Department of Health in Orange County (DOH-Orange) was notified by a child care facility on January 11, 2013, that a parent had reported that an attendee and three siblings were ill with measles. All four siblings were unvaccinated for measles and had no travel history outside of Orange County during the periods when they likely had been exposed. A fifth, possibly associated case was later reported in a Brazilian citizen who had become ill while vacationing in Florida. The outbreak investigation that was conducted at multiple community settings in Orange County, including at an Orlando-area theme park, identified no additional cases. The genotype sequence was identical for cases 2-5, and visits to the same theme park suggested an unknown, common exposure and link between the cases. Sources of measles exposure can be difficult to identify for every measles case. Measles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of febrile rash illness, especially in unvaccinated persons. Reporting a confirmed or suspected case immediately to public health authorities is critical to limit the spread of measles.

  16. Characteristics of HIV infected individuals traveling abroad. Results from the +REDIVI Collaborative Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Molina, Jose A; Martinez-Perez, Angela; Serre, Nuria; Treviño, Begoña; Ruiz-Giardín, José Manuel; Torrús, Diego; Goikoetxea, Josune; Echevarría, Esteban Martín; Malmierca, Eduardo; Rojo, Gerardo; Calabuig, Eva; Gutierrez, Belén; Norman, Francesca; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio

    2016-02-01

    The improvement in the prognosis of HIV infection, coupled with the increase in international travel and migration, has led to a rising number of HIV infected travelers. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological and clinical features of returning travelers, according to their HIV status. An observational prospective study was conducted including travelers and immigrants who traveled to visit friends and relatives (VFRs) registered in the +REDIVI collaborative network (January-2009; October-2014). +REDIVI is a national network that registers information regarding infections imported by travelers and immigrants at 21 different centers using a standardized protocol. A total of 3464 travellers were identified: 72 were HIV+ (2.1%) and 3.392 HIV- (98%). HIV+ vs. HIV- travelers were often older (40.5y vs. 34.2y P=.001), VFRs (79.1% vs. 44.4%; P<.001), and consulted less for pre-travel advice (27% vs. 37%; P=.078). The main destinations for both groups were sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. The most frequent reasons for consultation after travel were fever, request for a health examination, gastrointestinal complaints, and abnormal laboratory tests (mainly eosinophilia and anemia), which differed between groups. The most frequent diagnoses in HIV+ travelers were malaria (38.8%), newly diagnosed HIV infection (25%), and intestinal parasites (19.4%), while for HIV- travelers the main diagnoses were "healthy" (17.9%), malaria (14%), and intestinal parasites (17.3%). The typical profile of an HIV+ traveler in +REDIVI was that of a VFR traveler who did not seek pre-travel advice and made high-risk trips. This may increase the chance of acquiring travel-related infections which may pose a special risk for HIV-infected travelers. The post-travel visit was a good opportunity for HIV infection screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Danish long distance travel A study of Danish travel behaviour and the role of infrequent travel activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    and increasing income, emphasised a travel type segment with significant impact on the total level of travelling. International travel has increased its market shares considerably, and the strong relation with income changes suggests a travel type segment of significant importance regarding future travel.......g. socio-economic variables. The analysis of Danish travel activities described in the three different travel surveys has outlined detailed information on Danish travel behaviour at an aggregated level during the past two decades. It has above all revealed the significant role of leisure travel. Private...... in part II. The first paper outlines and exemplifies the presence and magnitude of different survey biases in the Danish National Travel Survey (TU). The study finds that response biases are heterogeneously distributed across the population and that the bias leads to significant overestimation of car...

  18. Have eggs. Will travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroløkke, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Feminist scholars have critically questioned the practices and ethics of reproductive mobility. While the reproductive mobility of fertility patients has been foregrounded, little is known of egg donor mobility including the experiences of travelling internationally to donate eggs. Based on written...

  19. 26 CFR 1.162-2 - Traveling expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Traveling expenses. 1.162-2 Section 1.162-2...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.162-2 Traveling expenses. (a) Traveling expenses include travel fares, meals and lodging, and expenses incident to travel...

  20. Travelling Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012......Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012...

  1. [Traveller's diarrhoea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Jordi; Oliveira, Ines; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Gascon, Joaquim

    2016-11-01

    Traveller's diarrhoea (TD) is acquired primarily through ingestion of food and drinks contaminated with pathogens that cause diarrhoea. They can be bacteria, protozoa, helminths, and viruses. Globally, the most common causes of TD are two pathotypes of Escherichia coli (enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative) and Campylobacter, although there are significant variations by geographic area visited. Most TD occurs in individuals traveling to low-middle income countries. The type of travel, length of stay, traveller's age, and the presence of certain underlying conditions are important risk factors to consider for the acquisition of TD. While TD is usually a mild and self-limiting disease, half of travellers with TD experience some limitation of activities during their trip, while up to 10% will experience persistent diarrhoea or other complications. The purpose of this article is to provide an updated microbiological, epidemiological, and clinical profile of traveller's diarrhoea, including known risk factors, as well as to make recommendations on the prevention and treatment of TD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Rail travel: Conceptualizing a study on slow tourism approaches in sustaining rural development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Noor Farah Atiqah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rail transportation in Peninsular Malaysia is a popular transportation mode for locals to return to their hometown but is not frequently used as the mode of transport when travelling for holidays. Rural towns in Peninsular Malaysia have immense opportunity to be promoted as a popular tourism destination without the need of intense modern development. Using train rather than taking a car or a bus would endorse the concept of slowness during travel enabling tourists to enjoy the time taken to travel rather than rushing to travel to a destination. Encouragement of travelling by rail to the rural towns will enable improved utilization of the existing rail network and further uplift the travel appeal to rural towns in Peninsular Malaysia. In order to promote the concept of slow tourism that would benefit the rural towns’ sustainability, the perception of tourists on travelling slowly by train should first be understood and taken for consideration. A qualitative methodology of in depth interviews with domestic and international tourists whom have travel on trains to the rural towns will be conducted.

  3. The Abongo Abroad: Military Internationalism, Travel, Training, and Peace in Ghana and the United States, 1960-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    plastic and the future unlimited.” 162 Rostow crowed, “Since Nov. 8, 1960, [Kennedy’s election], a most extraordinary concentration of thought and...in Kansas City The organization was so perfected this year that things really hummed, – – enough straw to sit upon, beverages galore, expert...disassociated international visitors from the community’s efforts to overcome racism. Sometimes, Leavenworth sources fabricated a straw man of

  4. The return of the phoenix: the 1963 International Congress of Zoology and American zoologists in the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the International Congress of Zoology held in Washington D.C. in 1963 as a portrait of American zoologists' search for effective and rewarding relationships with both each other and the public. Organizers of the congress envisioned the congress as a last ditch effort to unify the disparate subdisciplines of zoology, overcome the barriers of specialization, and ward off the heady claims of more reductionist biologists. The problems zoologists faced as they worked to fulfill these ambitious goals illuminate some of the challenges faced by members of the naturalist tradition as they worked to establish disciplinary unity while seeking public support in the competitive world of twentieth century science.

  5. Burn patients' return to daily activities and participation as defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Candice L; Meyer, Walter J; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Arcari, Christine M

    2017-06-01

    The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a universal classification system of health and health-related domains. The ICF has been successfully applied to a wide range of health conditions and diseases; however, its application in the field of burn recovery has been minimal. This systematic review uses the domains of the ICF component 'activities and participation' to explore: (1) the extent to which return to daily activities and community participation after burn has been examined in the pediatric population, (2) the most common assessments used to determine activity and participation outcomes, and (3) what activity and participation areas are most affected in the pediatric burn population after discharge from acute care. Results determined that it is difficult to draw overarching conclusions in the area of return to 'activities and participation' for children with burn based on the paucity of current evidence. Of the studies conducted, few examined the same subtopics or used similar measurements. This suggests a need for more robust studies in this area in order to inform and improve burn rehabilitation practices to meet the potential needs of burn patients beyond an acute care setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Travelers' Health: Cruise Ship Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kara Tardivel, Susan A. Lippold, Krista Kornylo Duong INTRODUCTION Cruise ship travel presents a unique combination of ... may include countries where vectorborne diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and Zika are ...

  7. PPL Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — PTRAMS is a travel data collection system for PPL that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  8. DCHA Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — DTRAMS is a travel data collection system for DCHA that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.)...

  9. GH Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HTRAMS is a travel data collection system for GH that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  10. Risk of African swine fever introduction into the European Union through transport-associated routes: returning trucks and waste from international ships and planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Lina; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2012-08-30

    The uncontrolled presence of African swine fever (ASF) in Russian Federation (RF) poses a serious risk to the whole European Union (EU) pig industry. Although trade of pigs and their products is banned since the official notification in June 2007, the potential introduction of ASF virus (ASFV) may occur by other routes, which are very frequent in ASF, and more difficult to control, such as contaminated waste or infected vehicles. This study was intended to estimate the risk of ASFV introduction into the EU through three types of transport routes: returning trucks, waste from international ships and waste from international planes, which will be referred here as transport-associated routes (TAR). Since no detailed and official information was available for these routes, a semi-quantitative model based on the weighted combination of risk factors was developed to estimate the risk of ASFV introduction by TAR. Relative weights for combination of different risk factors as well as validation of the model results were obtained by an expert opinion elicitation. Model results indicate that the relative risk for ASFV introduction through TAR in most of the EU countries (16) is low, although some countries, specifically Poland and Lithuania, concentrate high levels of risk, the returning trucks route being the analyzed TAR that currently poses the highest risk for ASFV introduction into the EU. The spatial distribution of the risk of ASFV introduction varies importantly between the analyzed introduction routes. Results also highlight the need to increase the awareness and precautions for ASF prevention, particularly ensuring truck disinfection, to minimize the potential risk of entrance into the EU. This study presents the first assessment of ASF introduction into the EU through TAR. The innovative model developed here could be used in data scarce situations for estimating the relative risk associated to each EU country. This simple methodology provides a rapid and easy to

  11. 76 FR 22611 - Specified Tax Return Preparers Required To File Individual Income Tax Returns Using Magnetic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ52 Specified Tax Return Preparers Required To File Individual Income Tax Returns Using Magnetic Media; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS...) providing guidance to specified tax return preparers who prepare and file individual income tax returns...

  12. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    . Peromyscus generally used and maintained several or many different home sites and refuges in various parts of their home ranges, and frequently shifted about so that their principal activities centered on different sets of holes at different times. Once established, many Peromyscus remained in the same general area for a long time, perhaps for the duration of their lives. Extent of their travels in different directions and intensity of use of different portions of their home ranges varied within a general area in response to habitat changes, loss of neighbors, or other factors. Various authors have obtained both direct and indirect evidence of territoriality, in some degree, among certain species of Peromyscus. Young mice dispersed from their birth sites to establish home ranges of their own. Adults also sometimes left their home areas; some re-established elsewhere; others returned after exploratory travels. Most populations contained a certain proportion of transients; these may have been wanderers or individuals exploring out from established home ranges or seeking new ones. When areas were depopulated by removal trapping, other Peromyscus invaded. Invasion rates generally followed seasonal trends of reproduction and population density. Peromyscus removed from their home areas and released elsewhere returned home from various distances, but fewer returned from greater distances than from nearby; speed of return increased with successive trials. The consensus from present evidence is that ho-ming is made possible by a combination of random wandering and familiarity with a larger area than the day-to-day range. Records of juvenile wanderings during the dispersal phase and of adult explorations very nearly encompassed the distances over which any substantial amount of successful homing occurred. Methods of measuring sizes of home ranges and the limitations of these measurements were discussed in brief synopsis. It was co

  13. Current immunizations for travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Alston, W Kemper

    2003-10-01

    International travelers may be at risk from a variety of potentially severe and life-threatening infections. Some of these diseases are preventable, and vaccination remains a cornerstone of travel medicine. Vaccines that are important for international travel are reviewed, in a succinct update based on the most recent literature. Discussed are vaccines for enteric infections (polio, cholera, hepatitis A, and typhoid), as well as those for hepatitis B, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, and meningococcal vaccines. The controversial end to the polio eradication campaign and the recognition of vaccine-derived polioviruses are discussed. New monovalent cholera vaccines, including the live attenuated Peru-15 and CVD 103-HgR and the oral killed whole cell B subunit vaccine are reviewed, as well as a new oral bivalent vaccine that may offer protection against Vibrio cholerae 0139. Advances in typhoid vaccination include promising preclinical and clinical trial results of recombinant ZH9 and CVD 908-htrA vaccines, which, in addition to providing protection against typhoid fever, may be useful vectors for heterologous antigens. A growing recognition of rare adverse reactions to the 17D yellow fever vaccine, especially postvaccinal encephalitis, has led to a reassessment of its risks and benefits. Development of a novel chimeric vaccine may improve the safety and efficacy of the current Japanese encephalitis vaccine. Vaccination for meningococcal disease is characterized by the need for polyvalent, conjugate vaccines as well as a product that affords protection against serotype B. This travel vaccination review highlights progress in new travel-related vaccine development and updates the reader on issues surrounding licensed products. It will be useful for generalists, infectious disease physicians, and travel medicine specialists.

  14. Environmental Impact of Long Distance Travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    This paper presents an analysis of the CO2 emission resulting from long distance travel by Danes. The emissions are analysed as the Danes’ footprint the whole way from Denmark to the final destination. International travel represents 31% of the Danes’ CO2 emission from passenger travel...... and the climate burden from long overseas distances is especially high even though only few travel overseas. The travel activity is furthermore increasing much more for long distances than for European destinations. Domestic travel activity with overnight stay is nearly stagnating. The study furthermore shows...

  15. Environmental Impact of Long Distance Travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the CO2 emission resulting from long distance travel by Danes. The emissions are analysed as the Danes’ footprint the whole way from Denmark to the final destination. International travel represents 31% of the Danes’ CO2 emission from passenger travel...... and the climate burden from long overseas distances is especially high even though only few travel overseas. The travel activity is furthermore increasing much more for long distances than for European destinations. Domestic travel activity with overnight stay is nearly stagnating. The study furthermore shows...

  16. Reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Salmonella enterica isolates from travelers, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Marianne M; Kotilainen, Pirkko; Huovinen, Pentti; Hurme, Saija; Lukinmaa, Susanna; Webber, Mark A; Piddock, Laura J V; Siitonen, Anja; Hakanen, Antti J

    2009-05-01

    We tested the fluoroquinolone susceptibility of 499 Salmonella enterica isolates collected from travelers returning to Finland during 2003-2007. Among isolates from travelers to Thailand and Malaysia, reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility decreased from 65% to 22% (p = 0.002). All isolates showing nonclassical quinolone resistance were from travelers to these 2 countries.

  17. 77 FR 76040 - Government-wide Travel Advisory Committee (GTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Federal travel trends and provide advice and make recommendations for improvements to increase travel... by GSA. Members may include Federal agency travel managers, hoteliers, rental car companies, airline... complete professional biography or resume of the nominee; and (3) the name, return address, email address...

  18. Time Travel?

    OpenAIRE

    Deser, Stanley; Jackiw, Roman

    1992-01-01

    To travel into the past, to observe it, perhaps to influence it and correct mistakes of one's youth, has been an abiding fantasy of mankind for as long as we have been aware of a past. Here are described some recent scientific investigations on this topic.

  19. High Efficiency Traveling-Wave Tube Power Amplifier for Ka-Band Software Defined Radio on International Space Station-A Platform for Communications Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication and RF performance of the output traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for a space based Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) is presented. The TWTA, the SDR and the supporting avionics are integrated to forms a testbed, which is currently located on an exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SDR in the testbed communicates at Ka-band frequencies through a high-gain antenna directed to NASA s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which communicates to the ground station located at White Sands Complex. The application of the testbed is for demonstrating new waveforms and software designed to enhance data delivery from scientific spacecraft and, the waveforms and software can be upgraded and reconfigured from the ground. The construction and the salient features of the Ka-band SDR are discussed. The testbed is currently undergoing on-orbit checkout and commissioning and is expected to operate for 3 to 5 years in space.

  20. Many Healthy Returns

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-08

    International travel is usually very safe but there are things you should do to stay safe and healthy. Experts show you how to avoid problems when visiting developing nations. This includes being cautious about the food you eat and the water you drink, and to be aware of vehicles and road conditions to prevent problems.  Created: 2/8/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/8/2010.

  1. Constraints to leisure travel and visitation to natural areas: An international comparison of four cities.In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick T. Tierney; Deborah J. Chavez; James D. Absher

    2008-01-01

    Leisure travel and visitation to natural areas and constraints to undertaking these activities are important concerns for recreation resource managers and tourism businesses. Surveys were administered to Los Angeles, Barcelona, Glasgow, and Morelia, Mexico, residents to ascertain leisure travel and undeveloped natural area visitation levels and constraints. A...

  2. Zika beyond the Americas: Travelers as sentinels of Zika virus transmission. A GeoSentinel analysis, 2012 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobusch, Martin P.; Gautret, Philippe; Kuhn, Susan; Lim, Poh Lian; Yates, Johnnie; McCarthy, Anne E.; Rothe, Camilla; Kato, Yasuyuki; Huber, Kristina; Schwartz, Eli; Shaw, Marc T. M.; Rapp, Christophe; Blumberg, Lucille; Jensenius, Mogens; van Genderen, Perry J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) was first isolated in Africa; decades later, caused large outbreaks in the Pacific, and is considered endemic in Asia. We aim to describe ZIKV disease epidemiology outside the Americas, the importance of travelers as sentinels of disease transmission, and discrepancies in travel advisories from major international health organizations. Methods and findings This descriptive analysis using GeoSentinel Surveillance Network records involves sixty-four travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries. Ill returned travelers with a confirmed or probable diagnosis of ZIKV disease acquired in Africa, Asia and the Pacific seen between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2016 are included, and the frequencies of demographic, trip, and diagnostic characteristics described. ZIKV was acquired in Asia (18), the Pacific (10) and Africa (1). For five countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Cameroon), GeoSentinel patients were sentinel markers of recent Zika activity. Additionally, the first confirmed ZIKV infection acquired in Kiribati was reported to GeoSentinel (2015), and a probable case was reported from Timor Leste (April 2016), representing the only case known to date. Review of Zika situation updates from major international health authorities for country risk classifications shows heterogeneity in ZIKV country travel advisories. Conclusions Travelers are integral to the global spread of ZIKV, serving as sentinel markers of disease activity. Although GeoSentinel data are collected by specialized clinics and do not capture all imported cases, we show that surveillance of imported infections by returned travelers augments local surveillance system data regarding ZIKV epidemiology and can assist with risk categorization by international authorities. However, travel advisories are variable due to risk uncertainties. PMID:28973011

  3. Risk of African swine fever introduction into the European Union through transport-associated routes: returning trucks and waste from international ships and planes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mur Lina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uncontrolled presence of African swine fever (ASF in Russian Federation (RF poses a serious risk to the whole European Union (EU pig industry. Although trade of pigs and their products is banned since the official notification in June 2007, the potential introduction of ASF virus (ASFV may occur by other routes, which are very frequent in ASF, and more difficult to control, such as contaminated waste or infected vehicles. This study was intended to estimate the risk of ASFV introduction into the EU through three types of transport routes: returning trucks, waste from international ships and waste from international planes, which will be referred here as transport-associated routes (TAR. Since no detailed and official information was available for these routes, a semi-quantitative model based on the weighted combination of risk factors was developed to estimate the risk of ASFV introduction by TAR. Relative weights for combination of different risk factors as well as validation of the model results were obtained by an expert opinion elicitation. Results Model results indicate that the relative risk for ASFV introduction through TAR in most of the EU countries (16 is low, although some countries, specifically Poland and Lithuania, concentrate high levels of risk, the returning trucks route being the analyzed TAR that currently poses the highest risk for ASFV introduction into the EU. The spatial distribution of the risk of ASFV introduction varies importantly between the analyzed introduction routes. Results also highlight the need to increase the awareness and precautions for ASF prevention, particularly ensuring truck disinfection, to minimize the potential risk of entrance into the EU. Conclusions This study presents the first assessment of ASF introduction into the EU through TAR. The innovative model developed here could be used in data scarce situations for estimating the relative risk associated to each EU country

  4. Risk of African swine fever introduction into the European Union through transport-associated routes: returning trucks and waste from international ships and planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The uncontrolled presence of African swine fever (ASF) in Russian Federation (RF) poses a serious risk to the whole European Union (EU) pig industry. Although trade of pigs and their products is banned since the official notification in June 2007, the potential introduction of ASF virus (ASFV) may occur by other routes, which are very frequent in ASF, and more difficult to control, such as contaminated waste or infected vehicles. This study was intended to estimate the risk of ASFV introduction into the EU through three types of transport routes: returning trucks, waste from international ships and waste from international planes, which will be referred here as transport-associated routes (TAR). Since no detailed and official information was available for these routes, a semi-quantitative model based on the weighted combination of risk factors was developed to estimate the risk of ASFV introduction by TAR. Relative weights for combination of different risk factors as well as validation of the model results were obtained by an expert opinion elicitation. Results Model results indicate that the relative risk for ASFV introduction through TAR in most of the EU countries (16) is low, although some countries, specifically Poland and Lithuania, concentrate high levels of risk, the returning trucks route being the analyzed TAR that currently poses the highest risk for ASFV introduction into the EU. The spatial distribution of the risk of ASFV introduction varies importantly between the analyzed introduction routes. Results also highlight the need to increase the awareness and precautions for ASF prevention, particularly ensuring truck disinfection, to minimize the potential risk of entrance into the EU. Conclusions This study presents the first assessment of ASF introduction into the EU through TAR. The innovative model developed here could be used in data scarce situations for estimating the relative risk associated to each EU country. This simple methodology

  5. Profile of medical information sought by Polish travelers

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Korzeniewski

    2016-01-01

    Background. International travel is growing constantly throughout the world, with an annual growth rate estimated at 4%. According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization, the number of international travelers reached 1.184 billion in 2015. Owing to unprecedented interest in foreign travel, including travel to tropical countries, it is important for travelers to gain access to information on the most prevalent health hazards in destination countries and on recommended prevention mea...

  6. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  7. Travel During Pregnancy: Considerations for the Obstetric Provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Kathleen M; Ehrenthal, Deborah; Evensen, Ann; Iruretagoyena, J Igor

    2017-02-01

    Travel among US citizens is becoming increasingly common, and travel during pregnancy is also speculated to be increasingly common. During pregnancy, the obstetric provider may be the first or only clinician approached with questions regarding travel. In this review, we discuss the reasons women travel during pregnancy, medical considerations for long-haul air travel, destination-specific medical complications, and precautions for pregnant women to take both before travel and while abroad. To improve the quality of pretravel counseling for patients before or during pregnancy, we have created 2 tools: a guide for assessing the pregnant patient's risk during travel and a pretravel checklist for the obstetric provider. A PubMed search for English-language publications about travel during pregnancy was performed using the search terms "travel" and "pregnancy" and was limited to those published since the year 2000. Studies on subtopics were not limited by year of publication. Eight review articles were identified. Three additional studies that analyzed data from travel clinics were found, and 2 studies reported on the frequency of international travel during pregnancy. Additional publications addressed air travel during pregnancy (10 reviews, 16 studies), high-altitude travel during pregnancy (5 reviews, 5 studies), and destination-specific illnesses in pregnant travelers. Travel during pregnancy including international travel is common. Pregnant travelers have unique travel-related and destination-specific risks. We review those risks and provide tools for obstetric providers to use in counseling pregnant travelers.

  8. Do travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk abroad in travel health brochures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croughs, Mieke; de Gouw, Annemarie; Remmen, Roy; Van den Ende, Jef

    2016-01-01

    Background: A substantial proportion of travel clinic visitors have sexual encounters while abroad. Hence, guidelines on travel health recommend discussing sexual risk in a pre-travel consultation. However, previous studies showed that it often is not discussed. Although travel clinic visitors usually do receive written information on sexual risk abroad, few data are available on whether this information is read. Therefore, this prospective cohort study in travel clinic visitors was performed. Methods: Travel clinic visitors were invited to complete a questionnaire after return from their journey. Results: A total of 130 travellers (55%) responded. Half of them recorded they read the information on sexual risk. Male gender (OR 9.94 95% CI 3.12 – 31.63) and ‘travelling with others’ (OR 2.7 95% CI 1.29 – 5.78) were significant independent predictors of reading the information on sexual risk. High risk travellers, i.e. those travelling without a steady partner, were less likely to have read it. Although websites and apps were mentioned as better methods of providing information, none of the participants visited the websites on sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted infections recommended in the travel health brochure. Conclusion: Only half of travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk in the health brochure received in the clinic and none of them visited the related websites mentioned in the brochure. Further research to identify the most effective way to inform travellers about sexual risk is needed. PMID:28989499

  9. Do travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk abroad in travel health brochures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croughs, Mieke; de Gouw, Annemarie; Remmen, Roy; Van den Ende, Jef

    2017-01-01

    A substantial proportion of travel clinic visitors have sexual encounters while abroad. Hence, guidelines on travel health recommend discussing sexual risk in a pre-travel consultation. However, previous studies showed that it often is not discussed. Although travel clinic visitors usually do receive written information on sexual risk abroad, few data are available on whether this information is read. Therefore, this prospective cohort study in travel clinic visitors was performed. Travel clinic visitors were invited to complete a questionnaire after return from their journey. A total of 130 travellers (55%) responded. Half of them recorded they read the information on sexual risk. Male gender (OR 9.94 95% CI 3.12 - 31.63) and 'travelling with others' (OR 2.7 95% CI 1.29 - 5.78) were significant independent predictors of reading the information on sexual risk. High risk travellers, i.e. those travelling without a steady partner, were less likely to have read it. Although websites and apps were mentioned as better methods of providing information, none of the participants visited the websites on sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted infections recommended in the travel health brochure. Only half of travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk in the health brochure received in the clinic and none of them visited the related websites mentioned in the brochure. Further research to identify the most effective way to inform travellers about sexual risk is needed.

  10. Travel during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Travel During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Travel During Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ055, April 2017 PDF Format Travel During Pregnancy Pregnancy Is travel safe during pregnancy? When is ...

  11. Tuberculosis Information for International Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Journal Articles Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Epidemiology of Tuberculosis Among Non-U.S.​–Born Persons in the United ... Facilitator Guide Introduction to TB Genotyping Core Curriculum Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993-2014 Prevention ...

  12. The practice of travel medicine in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagenhauf, P; Santos-O'Connor, F; Parola, P

    2010-03-01

    Europe, because of its geographical location, strategic position on trade routes, and colonial past, has a long history of caring for travellers' health. Within Europe, there is great diversity in the practice of travel medicine. Some countries have travel medicine societies and provisions for a periodic distribution of recommendations, but many countries have no national pre-travel guidelines and follow international recommendations such as those provided by the WHO. Providers of travel medicine include tropical medicine specialists, general practice nurses and physicians, specialist 'travel clinics', occupational physicians, and pharmacists. One of the core functions of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control-funded network of travel and tropical medicine professionals, EuroTravNet, is to document the status quo of travel medicine in Europe. A three-pronged approach is used, with a real-time online questionnaire, a structured interview with experts in each country, and web searching.

  13. Educational Travel to Israel in the Era of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezrachi, Elan

    2015-01-01

    Travel to Israel has been a central feature of Jewish and Zionist education yet it is time for this educational travel to be examined in the context of current cultural trends of travel and transnational experiences. The Jewish educational community has not yet internalized the impact of global trends on the field of travel to Israel from a…

  14. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heywood, Anita E; Zhang, Meng; MacIntyre, C Raina; Seale, Holly

    2012-01-01

    .... Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education...

  15. Sentinel surveillance of imported dengue via travellers to Europe 2012 to 2014: TropNet data from the DengueTools Research Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayr, Andreas; Muñoz, Jose; Schunk, Mirjam; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Cramer, Jakob; Calleri, Guido; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Angheben, Andrea; Zoller, Thomas; Visser, Leo; Serre-Delcor, Núria; Genton, Blaise; Castelli, Francesco; Van Esbroeck, Marjan; Matteelli, Alberto; Rochat, Laurence; Sulleiro, Elena; Kurth, Florian; Gobbi, Federico; Norman, Francesca; Torta, Ilaria; Clerinx, Jan; Poluda, David; Martinez, Miguel; Calvo-Cano, Antonia; Sanchez-Seco, Maria Paz; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Hatz, Christoph; Franco, Leticia

    2017-01-05

    We describe the epidemiological pattern and genetic characteristics of 242 acute dengue infections imported to Europe by returning travellers from 2012 to 2014. The overall geographical pattern of imported dengue (South-east Asia > Americas > western Pacific region > Africa) remained stable compared with 1999 to 2010. We isolated the majority of dengue virus genotypes and epidemic lineages causing outbreaks and epidemics in Asia, America and Africa during the study period. Travellers acted as sentinels for four unusual dengue outbreaks (Madeira, 2012-13; Luanda, 2013; Dar es Salaam, 2014; Tokyo, 2014). We were able to characterise dengue viruses imported from regions where currently no virological surveillance data are available. Up to 36% of travellers infected with dengue while travelling returned during the acute phase of the infection (up to 7 days after symptom onset) or became symptomatic after returning to Europe, and 58% of the patients with acute dengue infection were viraemic when seeking medical care. Epidemiological and virological data from dengue-infected international travellers can add an important layer to global surveillance efforts. A considerable number of dengue-infected travellers are viraemic after arrival back home, which poses a risk for dengue introduction and autochthonous transmission in European regions where suitable mosquito vectors are prevalent. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  16. Patterns of illness in travelers visiting Mexico and Central America: the GeoSentinel experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Dupont, Herbert L.; Libman, Michael D.; Keystone, Jay S.; Hale, Devon C.; Burchard, Gerd; Han, Pauline V.; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Freedman, David O.; Kain, Kevin C.; Gelman, Stephanie S.; Ward, Brian; Dick Maclean, J.; Jean Haulman, N.; Roesel, David; Jong, Elaine C.; Schwartz, Eli; Stauffer, William M.; Walker, Patricia F.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Pandey, Prativa; Murphy, Holly; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François; McCarthy, Anne; Connor, Bradley A.; Chen, Lin H.; Wilson, Mary E.; Lynch, Michael W.; Licitra, Carmelo; Crespo, Antonio; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; de Vries, Peter J.; Gadroen, Kartini; Nutman, Thomas B.; Klion, Amy D.; Hynes, Noreen; Bradley Sack, R.; McKenzie, Robin; Field, Vanessa; Gurtman, Alejandra; Coyle, Christina M.; Wittner, Murray; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Delmont, Jean; Leder, Karin; Torresi, Joseph; Brown, Graham; Jensenius, Mogens; Wang, Andy; MacDonald, Susan; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Antonio Perez Molina, Jose; Cahill, John D.; McKinley, George; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; Shaw, Marc; Hern, Annemarie; Perret, Cecilia; Valdivieso, Francisca; Valdez, Luis; Siu, Hugo; Carosi, Giampiero; Castelli, Francesco; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Kurai, Hanako; Sagara, Hiroko; Kass, Robert; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; McLellan, Susan; Holtom, Paul; Goad, Jeff; Anglim, Anne; Hagmann, Stefan; Henry, Michael; Miller, Andy O.; Ansdell, Vernon; Kato, Yasuyuki; Borwein, Sarah; Anderson, Nicole; Batchelor, Trish; Meisch, Dominique; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Doyle, Patrick; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Piper Jenks, Nancy; Kerr, Christine; Lian Lim, Poh; Piyaphanee, Watcharapong; Silachamroon, Udomsak; Mendelson, Marc; Vincent, Peter; Africa, South; Virk, Abinash; Sia, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Mexico and Central America are important travel destinations for North American and European travelers. There is limited information on regional differences in travel related morbidity. We describe the morbidity among 4779 ill travelers returned from Mexico and Central America who were evaluated at

  17. Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Acquired in the Americas Through February 2016: A GeoSentinel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Davidson H; Barbre, Kira A; Chen, Lin H; Grobusch, Martin P; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Goorhuis, Abraham; van Genderen, Perry J J; Molina, Israel; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Caumes, Eric; Hagmann, Stefan H; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Eperon, Gilles; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Boggild, Andrea K; Gautret, Philippe; Hynes, Noreen A; Kuhn, Susan; Lash, R Ryan; Leder, Karin; Libman, Michael; Malvy, Denis J M; Perret, Cecilia; Rothe, Camilla; Schwartz, Eli; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Cetron, Martin S; Esposito, Douglas H

    2017-01-17

    Zika virus has spread rapidly in the Americas and has been imported into many nonendemic countries by travelers. To describe clinical manifestations and epidemiology of Zika virus disease in travelers exposed in the Americas. Descriptive, using GeoSentinel records. 63 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 30 countries. Ill returned travelers with a confirmed, probable, or clinically suspected diagnosis of Zika virus disease seen between January 2013 and 29 February 2016. Frequencies of demographic, trip, and clinical characteristics and complications. Starting in May 2015, 93 cases of Zika virus disease were reported. Common symptoms included exanthema (88%), fever (76%), and arthralgia (72%). Fifty-nine percent of patients were exposed in South America; 71% were diagnosed in Europe. Case status was established most commonly by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of blood and less often by PCR testing of other body fluids or serology and plaque-reduction neutralization testing. Two patients developed Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 of 4 pregnancies had adverse outcomes (microcephaly, major fetal neurologic abnormalities, and intrauterine fetal death). Surveillance data collected by specialized clinics may not be representative of all ill returned travelers, and denominator data are unavailable. These surveillance data help characterize the clinical manifestations and adverse outcomes of Zika virus disease among travelers infected in the Americas and show a need for global standardization of diagnostic testing. The serious fetal complications observed in this study highlight the importance of travel advisories and prevention measures for pregnant women and their partners. Travelers are sentinels for global Zika virus circulation and may facilitate further transmission. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, International Society of Travel Medicine, and Public Health Agency of Canada.

  18. Febre do viajante associada com adenite cervical e sororreatividade para Bartonella sp em paciente brasileira, após retorno da África do Sul Traveler's fever associated with cervical adenomegaly and antibodies for Bartonella sp in a Brazilian patient returning from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba Regina Sampaio de Lemos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Um grande número de viajantes visita anualmente, por estudo, turismo ou trabalho o continente africano. Um caso de adenomegalia cervical e hepatoesplenomegalia associado à febre de duas semanas de duração com teste sorológico positivo para Bartonella sp em uma paciente de 22 anos do sexo feminino que retornou da África do Sul após realização de trabalho de campo com primatas em área silvestre é apresentado.A large number of travelers visit the African continent annually for studying, tourism or business reasons. The authors report a case of cervical adenomegaly, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly associated with a two-week history of fever and seropositivity for Bartonella sp in a 22-year-old female patient who returned from South Africa after field work with primates in a wild area.

  19. 26 CFR 301.6103(h)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... administration. 301.6103(h)(2)-1 Section 301.6103(h)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(h)(2)-1 Disclosure of returns and return information (including..., shall, to the extent provided by section 6103(h)(2) (A), (B), and (C) and subject to the requirements of...

  20. [Monkey malaria (Plasmodium knowlesi infection) after travelling to Thailand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroidl, Inge; Seilmaier, Michael; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Bretzel, Gisela; Wendtner, Clemens; Löscher, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    A case of malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi is described in a 52-year-old female German traveler after returning from Thailand. P. knowlesi is a parasite of macaques in Southeast Asia and has been recognized in recent years as an important and probably increasing cause of human malaria in some areas. At least 16 cases in international travelers have been published so far. This includes four cases imported to Germany. All German patients visited forested areas in Southern Thailand inhabited by the natural monkey host prior to their illness. Most cases diagnosed in endemic areas present as mild disease. However in some patients P. knowlesi may take a severe and life-threatening course. Diagnosis is usually is based on microscopy whereas rapid tests are not reliable. However, microscopic differentiation of P. knowlesi from other plasmodium species (eg, P. malariae, P. falciparum) is difficult, especially when parasitemia is low. Thus PCR methods are required for definite species determination. Changing endemicity as well as changing tourism patterns such as the trend towards eco-tourism might increase the risk of infection for travelers even in areas which are considered as low endemic for malaria. Malaria has to be considered in all febrile patients returning from endemic areas. In Southeast Asia this has to include Plasmodium knowlesi infection. Especially if microscopy suggests P. falciparum/P. malariae double infection, or when results indicate P. malariae but the clinical presentation differs from that of quartan malaria (eg, daily fever), diagnostic procedures for P. knowlesi should be initiated. Currently available rapid diagnostic tests are not reliable for the detection of P. knowlesi. The definite diagnosis of P. knowlesi infection usually requires PCR techniques Changing tourism patterns such as the trend towards eco-tourism might increase the risk of infection for travelers even in low prevalence areas. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. 75 FR 76940 - Specified Tax Return Preparers Required To File Individual Income Tax Returns Using Magnetic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 301 RIN 1545-BJ52 Specified Tax Return Preparers Required To File Individual Income Tax Returns Using Magnetic Media; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... provide further guidance relating to the requirement for ``specified tax return prepares,''. FOR FURTHER...

  2. 77 FR 38039 - Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... International Trade Administration Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA) AGENCY: International Trade... membership on the Board of Directors of The Corporation for Travel Promotion (Board) (dba Brand USA). The... individuals with the appropriate expertise and experience from specific sectors of the travel and tourism...

  3. 78 FR 44531 - Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... International Trade Administration Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA) AGENCY: International Trade... Promotion (dba Brand USA). The purpose of the Board is to guide the Corporation for Travel Promotion on... expertise and experience from specific sectors of the travel and tourism industry to serve on the Board as...

  4. 48 CFR 731.205-46 - Travel costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Travel costs. 731.205-46 Section 731.205-46 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GENERAL....205-46 Travel costs. It is USAID policy to require prior written approval of international travel by...

  5. 78 FR 3398 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce... meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The Board will meet to present...

  6. 78 FR 70274 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce... meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). This will be the last meeting of...

  7. HIV in elderly women after travelling abroad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; David, Kim Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of HIV infection among female travellers of older age. A Danish woman in her eighties was diagnosed with acute HIV infection after travelling to West Africa. A sexual history was not recorded before her third hospital visit. A West African woman in her seventies who had been...... living in Denmark for 40 years was diagnosed with advanced HIV after having been to West Africa for family visits. We want to emphasize that women of older age also have sex that may put them at risk of HIV, that febrile returning travellers should be tested for HIV, and that presence of HIV indicator...... diseases should lead to HIV testing....

  8. Bonds to the homeland: Patterns and determinants of women's transnational travel frequency among three immigrant groups in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarmolenko, Svitlana; Titzmann, Peter F; Silbereisen, Rainer K

    2016-04-01

    Technology developments have changed immigrants' adaptation patterns in modern societies, allowing immigrants to sustain dense, complex connections with homeland while adjusting in the host country, a new phenomenon termed transnationalism. As empirical studies on immigrant transnationalism are still scarce, the purpose of this study was to investigate mean levels and determinants of a core component of transnationalism-transnational travel. Hypotheses were based on context of exiting homeland, living conditions in Germany and demographic and sociocultural variables. Transnational travel behaviour was assessed as frequency of return trips in three immigrant groups in Germany: ethnic Germans, Russian Jews and Turks. Interviews were conducted with 894 women participants from these groups. Results showed substantial transnational travel behaviour in all groups with Turks reporting higher levels than ethnic Germans and Russian Jews. Interindividual differences in transnational travel within groups were also examined. Results indicated similarities (e.g. network size in home country related positively to transnational travel frequency in all groups) and group-specific associations (e.g. co-ethnic identifying related positively to transnational travel frequency among Turks, but negatively for the other groups). Our study highlights the need for a new understanding of immigration and emphasises the consideration of group-specific mechanisms in transnational travel behaviour. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  9. Travelers' Health: Cryptosporidiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning ... Epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in North American travelers to Mexico. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2008 Aug;79( ...

  10. Learning Latent Factor Models of Human Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Guerzhoy, Michael; Hertzmann, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    NIPS Workshop on Social Network and Social Media Analysis; International audience; This paper describes probability models for human travel, using latent factors learned from data. The latent factors represent interpretable properties: travel distance cost, desirability of destinations, and affinity between locations. Individuals are clustered into distinct styles of travel. The latent factors combine in a multiplicative manner, and are learned using Maximum Likelihood. The resulting models e...

  11. Epidemiologic and biogeographic analysis of 542 VFR traveling children in Catalonia (Spain). A rising new population with specific needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Lluís; Roure, Sílvia; Sabrià, Miquel; de Balanzó, Xavier; Moreno, Nemesio; Martinez-Cuevas, Octavio; Peguero, Carme

    2011-01-01

    Imported diseases recorded in the European Union (EU) increasingly involve traveling immigrants returning from visits to their relatives and friends (VFR). Children of these immigrant families can represent a population of extreme vulnerability. A randomized cross-sectional study of 698 traveling children under the age of 15 was performed. VFR traveling children and non-VFR (or tourist) children groups were compared. A total of 698 individuals were analyzed: 354 males (50.7%) and 344 females (49.3%), with a median age (interquartile range) of 4 (2-9) years. Of these, 578 (82.8%) had been born in the EU with 542 (77.7%) being considered as VFR, whereas 156 (22.3%) were considered tourists. VFR children were younger (4.7 vs 8.2 yr; p travel time interval was shorter (21.8 vs 32.2 d; p traveling children showed a greater risk of exposure to infectious diseases compared with tourists. Immigrant families may represent a target group to prioritize international preventive activities. © 2011 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  12. Overview of selected infectious disease risks for the corporate traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, T Warner; Fortuna, Joseph

    2008-08-01

    International business travel to under-developed and developing countries has increased considerably over the past two decades. Most of these destinations are endemic to a variety of infectious diseases, many of which are associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, or both and the nonimmune, unprepared corporate traveler is at risk. Comprehensive pretravel consultation is essential to prevent travel-related illness. This review addresses some of the infectious diseases that can be acquired during international travel, including regions of endemicity, assessment of risk, and available means of prevention. In addition, we discuss data concerning current practices and attitudes of travelers, along with some of the issues surrounding the counseling of corporate travelers.

  13. Children with chronic health disorders travelling to the tropics: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, Camille; Sommet, Julie; Levy, Dora; Trieu, Thanh-Van; Quercia, Fabrice; Morin, Laurence; Belletre, Xavier; Koehl, Bérengère; Sorge, Frederic; Alberti, Corinne; de Pontual, Loic; Faye, Albert

    2016-11-01

    The number of trips to the tropics taken by children with chronic health disorders (CHDs) is increasing. All of the children with CHDs who attended two international vaccination centres in France before travelling to the tropics were included in a prospective, exposed/unexposed study. Each child was age-matched with two control children and followed for 1 month after returning from the tropics. Fifty-six children with CHDs and 107 control children were included. The children's median age was 6 years old (IQR 2-11). Of the study participants, 127/163 (78%) travelled to West Africa, mainly to visit relatives. The median duration of the stay was 42 days (IQR 31-55). The age of the children, the destination and the duration of the trip were similar between the two groups. Sickle cell disease (23/56) and asthma (16/56) were the most common CHDs. Overall, the children with CHDs experienced more clinical events than the control patients did (pchildren with CHDs travelling abroad are mainly related to chronic disease exacerbations, which mostly occur after the children return. Patients with diseases that require highly specialised care for an exacerbation should avoid travelling to resource-limited tropical countries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. The Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley

    2017-04-24

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing energy efficient travel behavior.

  15. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis).

  16. Language Skills and Economic Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Garrouste, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the contributions from the emerging positivist epistemological approach, endorsed by the economics of language and the economics of education, to study the returns to language skills, assuming that language competencies constitute key components of human capital. It presents initial results from a study on economic returns to language skills in eight countries enrolled in the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) – Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, H...

  17. Travel time and travel cost in European air travel

    OpenAIRE

    Dusek, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine two issues of consumer air travel accessibility in Europe, namely flight time and ticket costs. The first part of the paper discusses the various methodological problems of creating time matrix and cost matrix of air travel. Because of problems of conceptualizing of the air travel network and the modifiable areal unit problem the analysis is conducted on several spatial levels. The smallest network consists of 15 busiest airports and the largest network has ...

  18. Expatriates ill after travel: Results from the Geosentinel Surveillance Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Poh-Lian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expatriates are a distinct population at unique risk for health problems related to their travel exposure. Methods We analyzed GeoSentinel data comparing ill returned expatriates with other travelers for demographics, travel characteristics, and proportionate morbidity (PM for travel-related illness. Results Our study included 2,883 expatriates and 11,910 non-expatriates who visited GeoSentinel clinics ill after travel. Expatriates were more likely to be male, do volunteer work, be long-stay travelers (>6 months, and have sought pre-travel advice. Compared to non-expatriates, expatriates returning from Africa had higher proportionate morbidity (PM for malaria, filariasis, schistosomiasis, and hepatitis E; expatriates from the Asia-Pacific region had higher PM for strongyloidiasis, depression, and anxiety; expatriates returning from Latin America had higher PM for mononucleosis and ingestion-related infections (giardiasis, brucellosis. Expatriates returning from all three regions had higher PM for latent TB, amebiasis, and gastrointestinal infections (other than acute diarrhea compared to non-expatriates. When the data were stratified by travel reason, business expatriates had higher PM for febrile systemic illness (malaria and dengue and vaccine-preventable infections (hepatitis A, and volunteer expatriates had higher PM for parasitic infections. Expatriates overall had higher adjusted odds ratios for latent TB and lower odds ratios for acute diarrhea and dermatologic illness. Conclusions Ill returned expatriates differ from other travelers in travel characteristics and proportionate morbidity for specific diseases, based on the region of exposure and travel reason. They are more likely to present with more serious illness.

  19. A systematic review of return-to-work after mild traumatic brain injury: Results of the International Collaboration on MTBI Prognosis (ICoMP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancelliere, Carol; Kristman, Vicki; Cassidy, John David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To synthesize the best available evidence on return-to-work (RTW) after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Data sources: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001–2012) with terms including ‘craniocerebral trauma’ and ‘employment’. Reference lists of eligible articles were also...

  20. Approach to Immunization for the Traveling Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Angela L; Christenson, John C

    2015-12-01

    Children are traveling to regions of the world that could pose a risk of acquiring diseases such as malaria, dermatosis, and infectious diarrhea. Most of these can be prevented by modifying high-risk behaviors or through the use of medications. Many of these same regions are endemic with diseases that are preventable through vaccination. Clinicians must be able to effectively prepare their pediatric-age travelers for international travel. Preventive education, prophylactic and self-treating medications, and vaccinations are all important components of this preparation. Familiarity with the use of travel vaccines is imperative. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Children travelling for treatment: what we don't know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Lorraine; Hudson, Nicky; Baldwin, Kylie; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2013-06-01

    Travel for the purposes of obtaining medical treatment is increasing, but very little is known about the extent or nature of child medical travel. This paper discusses the outcome of a systematic search for academic literature on paediatric medical travel, outlines the potential significance of 'return health migration' by parents and children from minority ethnic groups in the UK, and suggests an agenda for future multidisciplinary research in this field.

  2. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travel and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Travel precautions help people with heart disease. Traveling to a faraway place ... you do so. Tell your doctor about your travel plans to get the best ... some people might need compression stockings or additional oxygen. Others ...

  3. 26 CFR 40.6091-1 - Place for filing returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Place for filing returns. 40.6091-1 Section 40.6091-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6091-1 Place for filing returns. (a) Quarterly returns. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of...

  4. 26 CFR 40.7701-1 - Tax return preparer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Tax return preparer. 40.7701-1 Section 40.7701-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.7701-1 Tax return preparer. (a) In general. For the definition of a tax return preparer, see §...

  5. Travel-related illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Carol C

    2013-06-01

    Travel abroad for business and pleasure should be safe and meaningful for the traveler. To assure that safe experience, certain processes should be considered before travel. A thorough pretravel health assessment will offer patients and health care providers valuable information for anticipatory guidance before travel. The destination-based risk assessment will help determine the risks involved in travel to specific locations and guide in the development of contingency plans for all travelers, especially those with chronic conditions. Diseases are more prevalent overseas, and immunizations and vaccinations are all important considerations for persons traveling abroad. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vaccination for safe travel to India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Bharti; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Kumar, Vijay; Singh Choudhary, Satvinder

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide more than 900 million international journeys are undertaken every year. India is one of the favorite tourist destinations around the world. International travel exposes travelers to a range of health risks. Traveling to India possess a threat to travelers with waterborne diseases like bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, and typhoid fever; vector borne diseases like dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, and malaria; animal contact disease like rabies. Furthermore diseases spreading through behavior aspects cannot be ruled out hence posing a risk for hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C as well. Hence, before travel the travelers are advised about the risk of disease in the country or countries they plan to visit and the steps to be taken to prevent illness. Vaccination offers the possibility of avoiding a number of infectious diseases that may be countered abroad. There is no single vaccination schedule that fits all travelers. Each schedule must be individualized according to the traveler's previous immunizations, countries to be visited, type and duration of travel, and the amount of time available before departure.

  7. 26 CFR 40.6109-1 - Tax return preparers furnishing identifying numbers for returns or claims for refund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Tax return preparers furnishing identifying numbers for returns or claims for refund. 40.6109-1 Section 40.6109-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6109-1 Tax return preparers...

  8. Travel-related infection in European travelers, EuroTravNet 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Ben; Weld, Leisa H; Cramer, Jakob P; Field, Vanessa K; Grobusch, Martin P; Caumes, Eric; Jensenius, Mogens; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Castelli, Francesco; Lalloo, David G; Ursing, Johan; Chappuis, François; von Sonnenburg, Frank; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Rapp, Christophe; Smith, Kitty C; Parola, Philippe; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni

    2014-01-01

    preventable through comprehensive pre-travel advice, chemoprophylaxis, and vaccination. Targeted interventions for high-risk groups such as travelers VFRs and migration-associated travelers are of particular importance. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  9. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Anita E; Zhang, Meng; MacIntyre, C Raina; Seale, Holly

    2012-02-17

    Forward planning and preventative measures before travelling can significantly reduce the risk of many vaccine preventable travel-related infectious diseases. Higher education students may be at an increased risk of importing infectious disease as many undertake multiple visits to regions with higher infectious disease endemicity. Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education. This study aimed to assess travel-associated health risks and preventative behaviours in a sample of both domestic and international university students in Australia. In 2010, a 28 item self-administered online survey was distributed to students enrolled at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Multiple methods of distributing links to the online survey were utilised. The survey examined the international travel history, travel intentions, infection control behaviours and self-reported vaccination history. A total of 1663 respondents completed the online survey, 22.1% were international students and 83.9% were enrolled at an undergraduate level. Half had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months, with 69% of those travelling only once during that time with no difference in travel from Australia between domestic and international students (p = 0.8). Uptake of pre-travel health advice was low overall with 68% of respondents reporting they had not sought any advice from a health professional prior to their last international trip. Domestic students were more likely to report uptake of a range of preventative travel health measures compared to international students, including diarrhoeal medication, insect repellent, food avoidance and condoms (P travel threats and a low corresponding concern for these threats. Our study highlights the need to educate students about the risk associated with travel and improve preventative

  10. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Forward planning and preventative measures before travelling can significantly reduce the risk of many vaccine preventable travel-related infectious diseases. Higher education students may be at an increased risk of importing infectious disease as many undertake multiple visits to regions with higher infectious disease endemicity. Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education. This study aimed to assess travel-associated health risks and preventative behaviours in a sample of both domestic and international university students in Australia. Methods In 2010, a 28 item self-administered online survey was distributed to students enrolled at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Multiple methods of distributing links to the online survey were utilised. The survey examined the international travel history, travel intentions, infection control behaviours and self-reported vaccination history. Results A total of 1663 respondents completed the online survey, 22.1% were international students and 83.9% were enrolled at an undergraduate level. Half had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months, with 69% of those travelling only once during that time with no difference in travel from Australia between domestic and international students (p = 0.8). Uptake of pre-travel health advice was low overall with 68% of respondents reporting they had not sought any advice from a health professional prior to their last international trip. Domestic students were more likely to report uptake of a range of preventative travel health measures compared to international students, including diarrhoeal medication, insect repellent, food avoidance and condoms (P travel threats and a low corresponding concern for these threats. Conclusions Our study highlights the need to educate students about the risk associated

  11. Travellers' profile, travel patterns and vaccine practices--a 10-year prospective study in a Swiss Travel Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Rim; Meige, Pierrette; Mialet, Catherine; Buffat, Chantal Ngarambe; Uwanyiligira, Mediatrice; Widmer, Francine; Rochat, Jacynthe; Fossati, Annie Hérard; Souvannaraj-Blanchant, Manisinh; Payot, Sylvie; Rochat, Laurence; de Vallière, Serge; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The travel clinic in Lausanne serves a catchment area of 700 000 of inhabitants and provides pre- and post-travel consultations. This study describes the profile of attendees before departure, their travel patterns and the travel clinic practices in terms of vaccination over time. We included all pre-travel first consultation data recorded between November 2002 and December 2012 by a custom-made program DIAMM/G. We analysed client profiles, travel characteristics and vaccinations prescribed over time. Sixty-five thousand and forty-six client-trips were recorded. Fifty-one percent clients were female. Mean age was 32 years. In total, 0.1% were aged Latin America and 1% (each) to Oceania and Europe; 19% visited more than one country. India was the most common destination (9.6% of travellers) followed by Thailand (8.6%) and Kenya (6.4%). Seventy-three percent of travellers were planning to travel for ≤ 4 weeks. The main reasons for travel were tourism (75%) and visiting friends and relatives (18%). Sixteen percent were backpackers. Pre-travel advice were sought a median of 29 days before departure. Ninety-nine percent received vaccine(s). The most frequently administered vaccines were hepatitis A (53%), tetanus-diphtheria (46%), yellow fever (39%), poliomyelitis (38%) and typhoid fever (30%). The profile of travel clinic attendees was younger than the general Swiss population. A significant proportion of travellers received vaccinations that are recommended in the routine national programme. These findings highlight the important role of travel clinics to (i) take care of an age group that has little contact with general practitioners and (ii) update vaccination status. The most commonly prescribed travel-related vaccines were for hepatitis A and yellow fever. The question remains to know whether clients do attend travel clinics because of compulsory vaccinations or because of real travel health concern or both. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016

  12. 14 CFR 1260.36 - Travel and transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel and transportation. 1260.36 Section... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.36 Travel and transportation. Travel and Transportation October 2000 (a... international air transportation of personnel and property to the extent that service by those carriers is...

  13. The impact of international service on the development of volunteers' intercultural relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Benjamin J; Sherraden, Margaret Sherrard; McBride, Amanda Moore; Xiang, Xiaoling

    2014-07-01

    Approximately one million people from the United States perform international volunteer service each year, representing a significant flow of ideas, people, resources, and aid across international borders. This quasi-experimental study assesses the longitudinal impact of international volunteer service on volunteers' intercultural relations, international social capital, and concern about international affairs. Using linear mixed regression models that control for a counterfactual comparison group of individuals that did not travel abroad, international volunteers are more likely to report significant increases in international social capital and international concern two to three years after returning from service. Results indicate that intercultural relations may also continue to increase years after returning from service. International service may be a useful approach to helping people gain skills and networks that are needed in an increasingly global society. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MANAGERIAL PERCEPTION OF EMPLOYEES IN TRAVEL AGENCIES IN MONTENEGRO

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aleksa Vucetic

    2012-01-01

    .... Specificity of perception of managers in that respect is influenced by a lot of factors, from personal characteristic of managers, internal forces of travel agencies, migrations and performance...

  15. The spatiotemporal dynamic analysis of the implied market information and characteristics of the correlation coefficient matrix of the international crude oil price returns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Lixin [Jiangsu University, Energy Development and Environmental Protection Strategy Research Center, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Nanjing Normal University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Ding, Zhenqi; Zhen, Zaili [Jiangsu University, Energy Development and Environmental Protection Strategy Research Center, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Minggang [Nanjing Normal University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-08-15

    The international crude oil market plays a crucial role in economies, and the studies of the correlation, risk and synchronization of the international crude oil market have important implications for the security and stability of the country, avoidance of business risk and people's daily lives. We investigate the information and characteristics of the international crude oil market (1999-2015) based on the random matrix theory (RMT). Firstly, we identify richer information in the largest eigenvalues deviating from RMT predictions for the international crude oil market; the international crude oil market can be roughly divided into ten different periods by the methods of eigenvectors and characteristic combination, and the implied market information of the correlation coefficient matrix is advanced. Secondly, we study the characteristics of the international crude oil market by the methods of system risk entropy, dynamic synchronous ratio, dynamic non-synchronous ratio and dynamic clustering algorithm. The results show that the international crude oil market is full of risk. The synchronization of the international crude oil market is very strong, and WTI and Brent occupy a very important position in the international crude oil market. (orig.)

  16. Time travel a history

    CERN Document Server

    Gleick, James

    2016-01-01

    From the acclaimed author of The Information and Chaos, here is a mind-bending exploration of time travel: its subversive origins, its evolution in literature and science, and its influence on our understanding of time itself. The story begins at the turn of the previous century, with the young H. G. Wells writing and rewriting the fantastic tale that became his first book and an international sensation: The Time Machine. It was an era when a host of forces was converging to transmute the human understanding of time, some philosophical and some technological: the electric telegraph, the steam railroad, the discovery of buried civilizations, and the perfection of clocks. James Gleick tracks the evolution of time travel as an idea that becomes part of contemporary culture—from Marcel Proust to Doctor Who, from Jorge Luis Borges to Woody Allen. He investigates the inevitable looping paradoxes and examines the porous boundary between pulp fiction and modern physics. Finally, he delves into a temporal shift that...

  17. Health challenges of young travelers visiting friends and relatives compared with those traveling for other purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pauline; Yanni, Emad; Jentes, Emily S; Hamer, Davidson H; Chen, Lin H; Wilson, Mary E; Macleod, William B; Ooi, Winnie W; Kogelman, Laura; Karchmer, Adolf W; Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2012-09-01

    The study objective was to assess differences in demographics and travel health challenges between youths ≤18 years old traveling internationally to visit friends and relatives (VFRs) compared with those traveling for other purposes (non-VFR). The Boston Area Travel Medicine Network consists of 5 clinics collecting anonymous data from international pretravel consultations. Data on all travelers ≤18 years of age seen between January 2008 and July 2010 were used. VFRs were compared with non-VFRs on demographics, primary language, trip characteristics, travel vaccinations administered, malaria prophylaxis and antidiarrheal medications prescribed. Thirty-five percent (610/1731) listed VFR as their purpose of travel. Almost half of VFRs were travel to countries that were yellow fever holoendemic, had malaria risk and were high-risk for typhoid (44% versus 20%, 39% versus 12%, 25% versus 15%, P travel-related morbidity, healthcare providers should be prepared to give travel advice to parents of VFR infants and children, particularly those US-born VFRs with foreign-born parents, regarding antimalarial and antidiarrheal medications and preventing yellow fever, malaria and typhoid.

  18. Retrograde suction decompression of a large internal carotid aneurysm using a balloon guide catheter combined with a blood-returning circuit and STA-MCA bypass: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, Fumihiro; Mizunari, Takayuki; Kominami, Shushi; Suzuki, Masanori; Fujiki, Yu; Kubota, Asami; Kobayashi, Shiro; Murai, Yasuo; Morita, Akio

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to treat large internal carotid aneurysms with simple surgical clipping. Here, we present a retrograde suction decompression (RSD) procedure for large internal carotid aneurysms using a balloon guide catheter combined with a blood-returning circuit and a superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass.All patients underwent an STA-MCA bypass before the temporary occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA). A 6-French sheath was inserted into the common carotid artery (CCA), and a 6-French Patrive balloon catheter was placed into the ICA 5 cm past the bifurcation. Aneurysm exposure was obtained; temporary clips were placed on the proximal M1, A1, and posterior communicating (Pcom) segments; and an extension tube was then connected to the balloon catheter. A three-way stopcock was placed, and aspiration was performed through the device to collapse the aneurysm. The aspirated blood was returned to a venous line with an added heparin to prevent anemia after aspiration. During the decompression, the blood flow to the cortical area was supplied through the STA-MCA bypass. After the aneurysm collapse, the surgeon carefully dissected the perforating artery from the aneurysm dome or neck, and permanent clips were then placed on the aneurysm neck. Our procedure has several advantages, such as STA-MCA bypass without external carotid artery occlusion for preventing ischemic complications of the cortical area, anemia may be avoided because of the return of the aspirated blood, and a hybrid operation room is not required to perform this method.

  19. Traveling with children: beyond car seat safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Janaina Borges; Polli, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    To spread knowledge and instigate the health professional to give advice on childcare during travels and on child transport safety. Literature review through the LILACS and MEDLINE(®) databases, using the terms: travel, safety, protective equipment, child, preventive medicine, retrieving articles published in the last 21 years. The authors analyzed 93 articles, of which 66 met the inclusion criteria after summaries were read. For drafting this article, the following sub-themes were proposed: getting ready to travel with children; knowing some of the transfer risks (air, land and water transportation) and exploring the destination with children (sun exposure, accommodations, altitude, food, traveler's diarrhea, insect bites) and return from the trip with children. Over the years, there has been an increase in the number of children who travel around the world. However, this population is still subject to health problems while traveling and may be even more susceptible than the adult age group. These problems arise from a variety of factors, including exposure to infectious organisms, the use of certain types of transportation, and participation in some activities, such as hiking at high altitudes, among others. However, when traveling with children, these risk factors can be overlooked; a trip that is considered safe for an adult might not be a good choice for this age group. The pediatric consultation should be a good opportunity to optimize preventive guidelines at the pre-trip planning. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. 26 CFR 40.6011(a)-1 - Returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Returns. 40.6011(a)-1 Section 40.6011(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6011(a)-1 Returns. (a) In general—(1) Return required. The return of any tax to which this part 40 applies...

  1. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heywood Anita E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forward planning and preventative measures before travelling can significantly reduce the risk of many vaccine preventable travel-related infectious diseases. Higher education students may be at an increased risk of importing infectious disease as many undertake multiple visits to regions with higher infectious disease endemicity. Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education. This study aimed to assess travel-associated health risks and preventative behaviours in a sample of both domestic and international university students in Australia. Methods In 2010, a 28 item self-administered online survey was distributed to students enrolled at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Multiple methods of distributing links to the online survey were utilised. The survey examined the international travel history, travel intentions, infection control behaviours and self-reported vaccination history. Results A total of 1663 respondents completed the online survey, 22.1% were international students and 83.9% were enrolled at an undergraduate level. Half had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months, with 69% of those travelling only once during that time with no difference in travel from Australia between domestic and international students (p = 0.8. Uptake of pre-travel health advice was low overall with 68% of respondents reporting they had not sought any advice from a health professional prior to their last international trip. Domestic students were more likely to report uptake of a range of preventative travel health measures compared to international students, including diarrhoeal medication, insect repellent, food avoidance and condoms (P Conclusions Our study highlights the need to educate students about the risk associated with travel and improve preventative

  2. Should travellers to rabies-endemic countries be pre-exposure vaccinated? An assessment of post-exposure prophylaxis and pre-exposure prophylaxis given to Danes travelling to rabies-endemic countries 2000-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Annette H; Rodriguez, Anna B; Nielsen, Jens; Cowan, Susan A

    2016-04-01

    Since 2000, a steady increase of vaccines used for both rabies Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and rabies Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) given to Danish travellers was observed. This study aims to evaluate whether the increase of PEP and PrEP was due to increased travelling, increased awareness of the need for PrEP, or more animal bites per travel, leading to more PEP being administered, in order to assess the need for changing the recommendations. We also described in which countries Danish travelers most frequently reported possible exposure to rabies, and evaluated the timeliness of rabies PEP, including rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). We included all Danes reported to the National Database for Rabies Treatment as having started rabies PEP either abroad or after returning to Denmark, between 2000 and 2012. Data on the yearly number of Danish travelers from 2004 to 2012 to Thailand were collected to calculate the incidence of animal bites at this destination. We also included data on rabies vaccines sold for PrEP or for booster vaccination in Denmark. PEP after possible exposure to rabies abroad increased yearly by 8.8 %. Likewise vaccines sold for PrEP increased by 8.2% annually. The number of Danish travelers to Thailand increased by 7.3% per year, resulting in a stable incidence of animal bites per 100,000 travelers. Seventy-five % started PEP in the country of exposure, while only 10 % received RIG. The yearly increase in PEP and PrEP are parallel to the yearly increase in number of travelers, and can thus be explained by the increased rate of traveling, and not by a rise in awareness of rabies risk or more bites per traveler.Even short term travelers should be given the option of including PrEP in their travel immunisation program, as PEP and especially RIG is not always available in rabies-endemic countries. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. 26 CFR 301.6103(j)(5)-1 - Disclosures of return information reflected on returns to officers and employees of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... agriculture. 301.6103(j)(5)-1 Section 301.6103(j)(5)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(j)(5)-1 Disclosures of return information reflected on returns to...) General rule. Pursuant to the provisions of section 6103(j)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code and subject to...

  4. Surveillance of travellers: an additional tool for tracking antimalarial drug resistance in endemic countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Gharbi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There are growing concerns about the emergence of resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs. Since the widespread adoption of ACTs, there has been a decrease in the systematic surveillance of antimalarial drug resistance in many malaria-endemic countries. The aim of this work was to test whether data on travellers returning from Africa with malaria could serve as an additional surveillance system of local information sources for the emergence of drug resistance in endemic-countries. METHODOLOGY: Data were collected from travellers with symptomatic Plasmodium falciparum malaria returning from Senegal (n = 1,993, Mali (n = 2,372, Cote d'Ivoire (n = 4,778 or Cameroon (n = 3,272 and recorded in the French Malaria Reference Centre during the period 1996-2011. Temporal trends of the proportion of parasite isolates that carried the mutant genotype, pfcrt 76T, a marker of resistance to chloroquine (CQ and pfdhfr 108N, a marker of resistance to pyrimethamine, were compared for travellers and within-country surveys that were identified through a literature review in PubMed. The in vitro response to CQ was also compared between these two groups for parasites from Senegal. RESULTS: The trends in the proportion of parasites that carried pfcrt 76T, and pfdhfr 108N, were compared for parasites from travellers and patients within-country using the slopes of the curves over time; no significant differences in the trends were found for any of the 4 countries. These results were supported by in vitro analysis of parasites from the field in Senegal and travellers returning to France, where the trends were also not significantly different. CONCLUSION: The results have not shown different trends in resistance between parasites derived from travellers or from parasites within-country. This work highlights the value of an international database of drug responses in travellers as an additional tool to assess the emergence of drug

  5. Travel During Pregnancy: Results From an Ultrasound Unit-Based Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Kathleen M; Gupta, Vivek K; Hoppe, Kara K; Quamme, Tracy; Feldman, Nora; Stewart, Katharina

    2017-12-01

    The frequency of domestic and international travel among women residing in the United States, and specifically Wisconsin, during pregnancy is not known. Given the recent epidemic of Zika virus disease, clinicians should be aware of the frequency of travel during pregnancy and should inquire about travel by pregnant women, women of reproductive age, and their sexual partners. Due to the Zika epidemic, our obstetric ultrasound center added questions about international and domestic travel to a general health form that is routinely distributed to all patients presenting for anatomic ultrasounds. The forms were then collected and recorded in order to provide an estimate of the frequency of travel during the first half of pregnancy. Of 1,256 women screened, 64 (5.1%) traveled internationally and 498 (39.6%) traveled domestically prior to their anatomic ultrasound. Additionally, 77 (6.1%) women screened reported international travel by their sexual partner. Among international travelers, 20 (28.1%) traveled to destinations with active ongoing transmission of Zika virus disease, and 16 (25%) traveled after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a travel alert for the area. Among domestic travelers, Florida was the sixth most common destination, and Texas was the 10th most common. In the population of women screened by this questionnaire, 5.1% traveled internationally and 39.6% traveled domestically prior to their anatomic ultrasound. Notably, Florida and Texas are common travel destinations among women at this clinic, and both have had active local transmission of Zika virus.

  6. Travelling Policies and Global Buzzwords: How International Non-Governmental Organizations and Charities Spread the Word about Early Childhood in the Global South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a web-search commissioned by an international charity to review the work of international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) and charities which promote and support early childhood education and care (ECEC) in the global South. The article examines examples of such initiatives. It is suggested that there is…

  7. Travel-related acquisition of diarrhoeagenic bacteria, enteral viruses and parasites in a prospective cohort of 98 Dutch travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hattem, Jarne M; Arcilla, Maris S; Grobusch, Martin P; Bart, Aldert; Bootsma, Martin C; van Genderen, Perry J; van Gool, Tom; Goorhuis, Abraham; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Molenkamp, Richard; Molhoek, Nicky; Oude Lashof, Astrid M; Stobberingh, Ellen E; de Wever, Bob; Verbrugh, Henri A; Melles, Damian C; Penders, John; Schultsz, Constance; de Jong, Menno D

    2017-09-01

    Limited prospective data are available on the acquisition of viral, bacterial and parasitic diarrhoeagenic agents by healthy individuals during travel. To determine the frequency of travel associated acquisition of 19 pathogens in 98 intercontinental travellers, qPCR was used to detect 8 viral pathogens, 6 bacterial enteric pathogens and 5 parasite species in faecal samples collected immediately before and after travel. We found high pre-travel carriage rates of Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis of 32% and 19% respectively. Pre-travel prevalences of all other tested pathogens were below 3%. Blastocystis spp. (10%), Plesiomonas shigelloides (7%), D. fragilis (6%) and Shigella spp. (5%) were the most frequently acquired pathogens and acquisition of enteral viruses and hepatitis E virus in this relatively small group of travellers was rare or non-existent. Our findings suggest that the role of viruses as the cause of persisting traveller's diarrhoea is limited and bacterial pathogens are more likely as a cause of traveller's diarrhoea. The substantial proportion of travellers carrying Blastocystis spp. and D. fragilis before travel warrants cautious interpretation of positive samples in returning travellers with gastrointestinal complaints. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Travel to Brazil: analysis of data from the Boston Area Travel Medicine Network (BATMN) and relevance to travelers attending world cup and olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliaki, Eirini; Chen, Lin H; Hamer, Davidson H; Macleod, William B; Jentes, Emily S; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Wilson, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    We describe travelers who were evaluated pre-travel to Brazil from March 2008 through July 2010 in the Boston area. Of 599 Brazil travelers, 71%, 58%, and 50% received vaccines for yellow fever (YF), typhoid, and hepatitis A, respectively. Fewer received influenza and hepatitis B vaccines (14%, 11%). A total of 60% traveled during Brazil's peak influenza season, and one fourth visited during peak dengue transmission. The 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics include events throughout Brazil. Travelers should seek pre-travel assessment including YF and malaria risk; travelers should be vaccinated against influenza, be up to date on other routine vaccines, and be prepared to protect themselves against mosquitoes. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  9. A Schistosoma haematobium-specific real-time PCR for diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis in serum samples of international travelers and migrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieselotte Cnops

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis by microscopy and serological tests may be elusive in travelers due to low egg load and the absence of seroconversion upon arrival. There is need for a more sensitive diagnostic test. Therefore, we developed a real-time PCR targeting the Schistosoma haematobium-specific Dra1 sequence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The PCR was evaluated on urine (n = 111, stool (n = 84 and serum samples (n = 135, and one biopsy from travelers and migrants with confirmed or suspected schistosomiasis. PCR revealed a positive result in 7/7 urine samples, 11/11 stool samples and 1/1 biopsy containing S. haematobium eggs as demonstrated by microscopy and in 22/23 serum samples from patients with a parasitological confirmed S. haematobium infection. S. haematobium DNA was additionally detected by PCR in 7 urine, 3 stool and 5 serum samples of patients suspected of having schistosomiasis without egg excretion in urine and feces. None of these suspected patients demonstrated other parasitic infections except one with Blastocystis hominis and Entamoeba cyst in a fecal sample. The PCR was negative in all stool samples containing S. mansoni eggs (n = 21 and in all serum samples of patients with a microscopically confirmed S. mansoni (n = 22, Ascaris lumbricoides (n = 1, Ancylostomidae (n = 1, Strongyloides stercoralis (n = 1 or Trichuris trichuria infection (n = 1. The PCR demonstrated a high specificity, reproducibility and analytical sensitivity (0.5 eggs per gram of feces. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The real-time PCR targeting the Dra1 sequence for S. haematobium-specific detection in urine, feces, and particularly serum, is a promising tool to confirm the diagnosis, also during the acute phase of urogenital schistosomiasis.

  10. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery: Informing healthcare practitioners and providers while improving patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevan, R; Birch, J; Armstrong, A P

    2011-02-01

    Travelling abroad for surgery is a phenomenon reported internationally. It is particularly likely for aesthetic procedures not undertaken routinely by national health services. We assessed the impact of these patients presenting to the UK National Health Service (NHS) with concerns or complications on their return. All 326 UK consultant members of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) were asked to complete a short questionnaire about patients that had presented to the NHS with complications or concerns following surgery abroad. The results were subsequently presented to the Department of Health (DH). 203 (62%) UK consultant plastic surgeons responded. 76 (37%) of the 203 respondents had seen such patients in their NHS practice, most commonly following breast or abdominal procedures. A quarter underwent emergency surgery, a third out-patient treatment and a third elective surgical revision. In response to these findings, the DH clarified that NHS teams should provide emergency care to such patients but should not undertake any elective revision procedures. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery may reduce its cost. However, aesthetic procedures have high minor complication rates, and peri-operative travel is associated with increased risks. Fully informed consent is unlikely when patients do not meet their surgeon prior to paying and travelling for surgery, and national health services are used to provide a free safety net on their return. To help minimise the potential risks, BAPRAS has clarified the responsibilities of the NHS and is acting to better inform UK patients considering travelling abroad. Copyright © 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. EuropeanaTravel

    OpenAIRE

    Sadler, K.; Moyle, M.; Pitman, L.

    2010-01-01

    EuropeanaTravel is an EU-funded initiative to digitise cultural heritage treasures on the themes of travel, tourism, trade routes and exploration from Europe’s national and leading research libraries.

  12. Travel Inside the Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Travel Inside the Ear Video When sound waves reach ... are smaller than an orange seed. It then travels into the inner ear, which is filled with ...

  13. Travel Inside the Ear

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Travel Inside the Ear Video When sound waves reach ... are smaller than an orange seed. It then travels into the inner ear, which is filled with ...

  14. Zika Travel Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning ... El Salvador , Guatemala , Honduras , Nicaragua , Panama North America: Mexico The Pacific Islands: Fiji , Papua New Guinea , Samoa , ...

  15. Travelling with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla S; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Pedersen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to describe travel patterns, extent of professional pre-travel advice and health problems encountered during travel among HIV-infected individuals. METHODS: During a six-month period a questionnaire was handed out to 2821 adult HIV-infected individuals attending any...... of the eight Danish medical HIV care centers. RESULTS: A total of 763 individuals responded. During the previous two years 49% had travelled outside Europe; 18% had travelled less and 30% were more cautious when choosing travel destination than before the HIV diagnosis. Pre-travel advice was sought by only 38......%, and travel insurance was taken out by 86%. However, 29%/74% did not inform the advisor/the insurance company about their HIV status. Nearly all patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were adherent, but 58% worried about carrying HIV-medicine and 19% tried to hide it. Only 19% experienced...

  16. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in ... May 31, 2017 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic ...

  17. Travelers' Health: Traveling Safely with Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swimming and Diving Study Abroad Tick Bites Travelers' Diarrhea Travelers with Chronic Illnesses Travelers with a Disability Travelers with Weakened ... stool or vomiting episode. The American Academy of Pediatrics provides ... diarrhea; see www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/ ...

  18. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stress How Cliques Make Kids Feel Left Out Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma Print A A A en español ... handy at all times. So if you're traveling by car, keep them where you can get ...

  19. Travel, infection and immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soonawala, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Preface: The content of this thesis is based on research that was conducted at the travel and vaccination clinic at Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC). This clinic provides pre-travel care to the general population, and to special groups of travellers, such as patients who use

  20. Modelling urban travel times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, F.

    2011-01-01

    Urban travel times are intrinsically uncertain due to a lot of stochastic characteristics of traffic, especially at signalized intersections. A single travel time does not have much meaning and is not informative to drivers or traffic managers. The range of travel times is large such that certain

  1. The quantified self during travel: mapping health in a prospective cohort of travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Andrea; Furrer, Reinhard; Blanke, Ulf; Stone, Emily; Hatz, Christoph; Puhan, Milo A

    2017-09-01

    Travel medicine research has remained relatively unchanged in the face of rapid expansion of international travel and is unlikely to meet health challenges beyond infectious diseases. Our aim was to identify the range of health outcomes during travel using real-time monitoring and daily reporting of health behaviours and outcomes and identify traveller subgroups who may benefit from more targeted advice before and during travel. We recruited a prospective cohort of travellers ≥ 18 years and planning travel to Thailand for clinics in Zurich and Basel (Switzerland). Participants answered demographic, clinical and risk behaviour questionnaires pre-travel and a daily health questionnaire each day during travel using a smartphone application. Environmental and location data were collected passively by GPS. Classification trees were used to identify predictors of health behaviour and outcomes during travel. Non-infectious disease events were relatively common, with 22.7% (17 out of 75 travellers) experiencing an accident, 40.0% ( n  = 30) a wound or cut and 14.7% ( n  = 11) a bite or lick from an animal. Mental health associated events were widely reported, with 80.0% ( n  = 60) reporting lethargy, 34.7% ( n  = 26) anxiety and 34.7% ( n  = 26) feeling tense or irritable. Classification trees identified age, trip length, previous travel experience and having experienced a sports injury in the past year as the most important discriminatory variables for health threats. Our study offers a revolutionary look at an almost real-time timeline of health events and behaviours during travel using mHealth technology. Non-infectious disease related health issues were common in this cohort, despite being largely unaddressed in traditional travel medicine research and suggest a substantial potential for improving evidence-based travel medicine advice.

  2. An Empirical Investigation on International Journals of Tourism, Travel, Recreation and Leisure Dünya Genelinde "Turizm", "Rekreasyon" ve "Boş Zamanlar ve Değerlendirilmesi" Alanlarında Yayımlanmakta Olan Akademik Dergiler Üzerinde Bir Araştırma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmi Kozak

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of an empirical research carried out amongst tourism, travel, recreation and leisure journals published, internationally. The findings of previous research were used for the development of the questionnaire instrument. The questionnaire was mailed to the Chief-Editors of 115 journals. A total of 33 usable questionnaires were returned yielding a 29 Chief-Editors of 115 journals. A total of 33 usable questionnaires were returned yielding a 29 percent response rate. SPSS for Macintosh was used for the analysis of data. Findings were analysed on the basis of three groups entitled general issues 'review process of manuscripts' and 'publication of manuscripts'. The study revealed that the journals were in an attempt to be consistent with the manuscript review and publication guidelines recognised, in the international academia. Bu çalışma, uluslararası boyutta yayımlanmakta olan "Turizm", Rekreasyon" ve "Boş Zamanlar ve Değerlendirilmesi" alanlarındaki akademik dergiler üzerinde yürütülen araştırmanın verileri baz alınarak hazırlanmıştır. Araştırma, daha önce bu alanda gerçekleştirilmiş çalışmaların bulgularından yararlanılarak hazırlanan sorular ile yürütülmüştür. Adresleri saptanan 115 derginin editörüne postayla gönderilerilen araştırma sorularına 33 derginin editöründen yanıt alınmıştır. Elde edilen bulguların SPPS for Mackintosh istatistik paket programında analiz edilmesiyle, dergilerle ilgili "genel", "makale denetleme" ve makale yayımlama" uygulamalarına ilişkin çeşitli bulgulara ulaşılmıştır. Araştırmada sonuç olarak, genel itibariyle dergilerin dünya genelinde geçerliliği kabul edilmiş makale denetleme ve yayımlama kurallarına uyma çabası içerisinde olduğu ortaya çıkarılmıştır.

  3. Tropical sprue after travel to Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetermans, W E; Vonck, A

    2000-01-01

    Tropical sprue (TS) is a diagnosis to consider in travelers with prolonged diarrhea and a malabsorption syndrome after return from tropical countries, particularly India and Southeast Asia. TS is an unusual condition in tropical Africa. Textbooks of tropical medicine indicate a low endemicity in Nigeria and a limited number of cases in South Africa and Zimbabwe. A Medline search from 1979 to mid 1998 using "Tanzania and tropical sprue" as key words disclosed no hits. We report herein a case of TS in a European traveler, who lived in Tanzania for 8 months.

  4. The traveling salesman problem a computational study

    CERN Document Server

    Applegate, David L; Chvatal, Vasek; Cook, William J

    2006-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on one of the most intensely investigated subjects in computational mathematics--the traveling salesman problem. It sounds simple enough: given a set of cities and the cost of travel between each pair of them, the problem challenges you to find the cheapest route by which to visit all the cities and return home to where you began. Though seemingly modest, this exercise has inspired studies by mathematicians, chemists, and physicists. Teachers use it in the classroom. It has practical applications in genetics, telecommunications, and neuroscience.

  5. Sickle cell children traveling abroad: primary risk is infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runel-Belliard, Camille; Lesprit, Emmanuelle; Quinet, Béatrice; Grimprel, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Pediatricians taking care of sickle cell children in France are concerned about giving travel advice. Very few articles are published and no study has been done about it. A lot of pediatricians are using their own experience to decide if sickle cell children can travel abroad. Studying the consequences of such travel for sickle cell children is important to discuss common recommendations. We conducted a prospective study from June 2006 to December 2007 on desires to travel expressed during our consultations with sickle cell children. We studied notable events that occurred during travel and at least 2 months after return. Of 52 desires to travel, 10 were cancelled. All of the 42 trips were to Africa. Median duration of travel was 1.29 months (0.5-3). Median age at travel was 7.6 years (0.2-17.7). Events during travel were two hospitalizations (4.8%), a transfusion (2.4%), and four paramedical or medical examinations (9.6%). After return, four events occurred: two SS children had Plasmodium falciparum malaria (4.8%) and two had digestive bacteremia (4.8%) in SC and Sbeta+ children. No event occurred during plane travel. None of our patients died. The primary risk for sickle cell children traveling to Africa is infection: malaria first and digestive septicemia second. These risks are increased by long travel and poor sanitary conditions. Each travel should be prepared a long time before departure, and each pediatrician should insist on malaria prophylaxis and sanitary conditions, especially for young children. Trips should be shorter than 1 month when possible. A longer prospective study will be done to confirm these results.

  6. Profile of travel-associated illness in children, Zürich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Thomas; Berger, Christoph; Staubli, Georg; Tschopp, Alois; Weber, Rainer; Nadal, David; Hatz, Christoph; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    between geographic regions visited, and VFR child travelers constituted a large proportion of sick-returned children presenting for emergency care. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  7. Systematic review of prognosis and return to play after sport concussion: results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelliere, Carol; Hincapié, Cesar A; Keightley, Michelle; Godbolt, Alison K; Côté, Pierre; Kristman, Vicki L; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Carroll, Linda J; Hung, Ryan; Borg, Jörgen; Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Coronado, Victor G; Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David

    2014-03-01

    To synthesize the best available evidence on prognosis after sport concussion. MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001-2012) with terms including "craniocerebral trauma" and "sports." Reference lists of eligible articles were also searched. Randomized controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to have a minimum of 30 concussion cases. Eligible studies were critically appraised using a modification of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. Two reviewers independently reviewed and extracted data from accepted studies into evidence tables. Evidence was synthesized qualitatively according to modified SIGN criteria, and studies were categorized as exploratory or confirmatory based on the strength of their design and evidence. After 77,914 records were screened, 52 articles were eligible for this review, and 24 articles (representing 19 studies) with a low risk of bias were accepted. Our findings are based on exploratory studies of predominantly male football players at the high school, collegiate, and professional levels. Most athletes recover within days to a few weeks, and American and Australian professional football players return to play quickly after mild traumatic brain injury. Delayed recovery appears more likely in high school athletes, in those with a history of previous concussion, and in those with a higher number and duration of postconcussion symptoms. The evidence concerning sports concussion course and prognosis is very preliminary, and there is no evidence on the effect of return-to-play guidelines on prognosis. Our findings have implications for further research. Well-designed, confirmatory studies are urgently needed to understand the consequences of sport concussion, including recurrent concussion, across different athletic populations and sports. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Terrorism, Tourism and Religious Travellers

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, A.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K.; Clarke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Curiously, while tourism is cited as the world’s largest industry (UNWTO, 2016), it is simultaneously a fragile industry that is highly vulnerable to the impact of the ongoing threat of terrorism. Internationally, terrorism influences the tourist mind-set in a number of ways, in particular it creates fear for travellers and causes economic and social impacts to change the behaviour of people and dissuade them from visiting certain places in the world. Thus, the impact of terrorism has caused ...

  9. [International migration: 1979].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Statistics on international migration in Panama in 1979 are provided for the 3 airports, 6 seaports, and 2 border crossings used by international travelers. The categories of visitors, temporary visitors, immigrants, and residents among those entering and leaving the country are defined and the data collection procedures are briefly specified. Between 1975-79, the number of persons entering the country through all points increased from 392,449 to 520,454, while the number departing increased from 397,759 to a figure provisionally estimated at 514,250. In 1979, 317,303 men and 203,151 women entered the country, 427,527 by air, 89,764 by land, and 3,163 by sea. 473 men and 355 women immigrated, all arriving by air. 391,502 of those entering were visitors, 2,407 were temporary visitors, and 98,589 were residents, of whom 81,462 were Panamanian and 17,127 foreign. Another table indicates the number of persons by category entering at each point by month; December had the highest number of arrivals, 56,070, followed by July, with 47,889. Other tables indicate the number of arrivals by category according to country of nationality and country of permanent residence; the number of arrivals by sex and category in 5-year age groups; the number of visitors entering for motives related to travel according to nationality and country of residence; the number entering by duration of stay, according to reasons for travel and country of residence; the number entering through the airport at Tocumen or the border crossing at Paso de Canoa, by motives for travel, according to country of residence, and by sex and age; and the number of returning Panamanian residents by port of entry and nationality, according to point of origin. Data are also provided on the number leaving by category for each point of departure and month of departure.

  10. Roman and early-medieval routes in north-western Europe: modelling national and international frequent-travel zones in the Netherlands using a multi-proxy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lanen, Rowin J.; Jansma, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The end of the Roman period in many parts of north-western Europe coincided with severe population decline and collapsing trade routes. To what extent the long-distance transport routes changed from Roman to early-medieval periods and what their exact nature was, is generally unknown. Only few historical sources are available for this period, and archaeological records complex. Traditionally, research on the long-distance exchange of goods therefore generally has focussed on the spatial analyses of archaeologically recognizable goods (e.g. jewellery, religious artefacts). Although these endeavours greatly increase our understanding of long-distance trade networks, they probably in itself do not represent the full spectrum of common exchange networks and transport routes. By using a dendroarchaeological approach we were able to analyse long-distance transport routes of imported timber in the Roman and early-medieval Netherlands. By combining the provenance of exogenous timbers with data on modelled Roman and early-medieval route networks, we were able to reconstruct: (a) Roman and early-medieval trade networks in structural timbers, (b) changing transport routes in structural timbers and (c) model spatially shifting frequent-travel zones in the research area.

  11. Pre-travel health preparation for malaria prevention among Hong Kong travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kevin K C; Lin, Agatha K Y; Cheng, Calvin K Y; Chan, Emily Y Y; Graham, Colin A

    2015-03-01

    Malaria remains a significant cause of travel-related mortality and morbidity. Asians are known to have higher risks because they are less careful in pre-travel health preparations. This study reports on a cohort of travellers to malaria-prone regions examined in a previous study, which explored general levels of pre-travel health preparation. To describe the preparations taken by travellers at Hong Kong International Airport going to destinations with significant malaria risks according to the WHO. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by personal interviews at the boarding gates of flights in April 2013. The flights were chosen from those to malaria-prone regions (type I or above) from the 2012 WHO International Travel and Health Country List. 403 respondents (75.6% Chinese ethnicity) were travelling to malaria-prone regions. 95.3% were travelling to developing countries including China, Thailand, Malaysia and India. 55.1% of respondents had taken at least one mosquito prevention measure and 8.9% of respondents had malaria chemoprophylaxis. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that female gender (OR=2.21, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.97), residence outside Hong Kong (OR=2.71, 95% CI 1.46 to 5.04) and travel including rural areas (OR=5.67, 95% CI 3.11 to 10.34) were predictors of optimum pre-travel health preparations. Underestimation of malaria risks was a major barrier to adequate pre-travel health preparations. Targeted health education and information about risk is necessary to improve levels of travel health preparedness. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Travel characteristics and risk-taking attitudes in youths traveling to nonindustrialized countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pauline; Balaban, Victor; Marano, Cinzia

    2010-01-01

    International travel to developing countries is increasing with rising levels of disposable income; this trend is seen in both adults and children. Risk-taking attitude is fundamental to research on the prevention of risky health behaviors, which can be an indicator of the likelihood of experiencing illness or injury during travel. The aim of this study is to investigate whether risk-taking attitudes of youths are associated with travel characteristics and likelihood of experiencing illness or injury while traveling to nonindustrialized countries. Data were analyzed from the 2008 YouthStyles survey, an annual mail survey gathering demographics and health knowledge, attitudes, and practices of individuals from 9 through 18 years of age. Travelers were defined as respondents who reported traveling in the last 12 months to a destination other than the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan, Australia, or New Zealand. Risk-taking attitude was measured by using a four-item Brief Sensation-Seeking Scale. All p values ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Of 1,704 respondents, 131 (7.7%) traveled in the last 12 months. Females and those with higher household income were more likely to travel (odds ratio = 1.6,1.1). Of those who traveled, 16.7% reported seeking pretravel medical care, with most visiting a family doctor for that care (84.0%). However, one-fifth of respondents reported illness and injury during travel; of these, 83.3% traveled with their parents. Males and older youths had higher mean sensation-seeking scores. Further, travelers had a higher mean sensation-seeking score than nontravelers. Those who did not seek pretravel medical care also had higher mean sensation-seeking scores (p = 0.1, not significant). Our results show an association between risk-taking attitudes and youth travel behavior. However, adult supervision during travel and parental directives prior to travel should be taken into consideration. Communication messages should emphasize the

  13. Returners and explorers dichotomy in human mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Luca; Simini, Filippo; Rinzivillo, Salvatore; Pedreschi, Dino; Giannotti, Fosca; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-09-01

    The availability of massive digital traces of human whereabouts has offered a series of novel insights on the quantitative patterns characterizing human mobility. In particular, numerous recent studies have lead to an unexpected consensus: the considerable variability in the characteristic travelled distance of individuals coexists with a high degree of predictability of their future locations. Here we shed light on this surprising coexistence by systematically investigating the impact of recurrent mobility on the characteristic distance travelled by individuals. Using both mobile phone and GPS data, we discover the existence of two distinct classes of individuals: returners and explorers. As existing models of human mobility cannot explain the existence of these two classes, we develop more realistic models able to capture the empirical findings. Finally, we show that returners and explorers play a distinct quantifiable role in spreading phenomena and that a correlation exists between their mobility patterns and social interactions.

  14. Returners and explorers dichotomy in human mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Luca; Simini, Filippo; Rinzivillo, Salvatore; Pedreschi, Dino; Giannotti, Fosca; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-09-08

    The availability of massive digital traces of human whereabouts has offered a series of novel insights on the quantitative patterns characterizing human mobility. In particular, numerous recent studies have lead to an unexpected consensus: the considerable variability in the characteristic travelled distance of individuals coexists with a high degree of predictability of their future locations. Here we shed light on this surprising coexistence by systematically investigating the impact of recurrent mobility on the characteristic distance travelled by individuals. Using both mobile phone and GPS data, we discover the existence of two distinct classes of individuals: returners and explorers. As existing models of human mobility cannot explain the existence of these two classes, we develop more realistic models able to capture the empirical findings. Finally, we show that returners and explorers play a distinct quantifiable role in spreading phenomena and that a correlation exists between their mobility patterns and social interactions.

  15. 75 FR 16438 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of the rescheduling of an Open Meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board...

  16. 76 FR 21703 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION... the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change to accommodate Board...

  17. 75 FR 14135 - U.S. Travel And Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Travel And Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board) will hold a...

  18. 76 FR 53666 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION... the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change to accommodate Board...

  19. 75 FR 39496 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board) will hold a...

  20. 75 FR 80039 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION... the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change to accommodate Board...

  1. Topic Map for Authentic Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Wandsvik, Atle; Zare, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    E-business is a new trend in Internet use. Authentic travel is an approach to travel and travel business which helps the traveler experience what is authentic in the travel destination. But how can the traveler find those small authentic spots and organize them together to compose a vacation? E-business techniques, combined withTopic Maps, can help.

  2. Twitter for travel medicine providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Deborah J; Kohl, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Travel medicine practitioners, perhaps more so than medical practitioners working in other areas of medicine, require a constant flow of information to stay up-to-date, and provide best practice information and care to their patients. Many travel medicine providers are unaware of the popularity and potential of the Twitter platform. Twitter use among our travellers, as well as by physicians and health providers, is growing exponentially. There is a rapidly expanding body of published literature on this information tool. This review provides a brief overview of the ways Twitter is being used by health practitioners, the advantages that are peculiar to Twitter as a platform of social media, and how the interested practitioner can get started. Some key points about the dark side of Twitter are highlighted, as well as the potential benefits of using Twitter as a way to disseminate accurate medical information to the public. This article will help readers develop an increased understanding of Twitter as a tool for extracting useful facts and insights from the ever increasing volume of health information. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Economics of malaria prevention in US travelers to West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kenji; Coleman, Margaret S; Khan, Nomana; Jentes, Emily S; Arguin, Paul; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Sotir, Mark J; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T; Meltzer, Martin I

    2014-01-01

    Pretravel health consultations help international travelers manage travel-related illness risks through education, vaccination, and medication. This study evaluated costs and benefits of that portion of the health consultation associated with malaria prevention provided to US travelers bound for West Africa. The estimated change in disease risk and associated costs and benefits resulting from traveler adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis were calculated from 2 perspectives: the healthcare payer's and the traveler's. We used data from the Global TravEpiNet network of US travel clinics that collect de-identified pretravel data for international travelers. Disease risk and chemoprophylaxis effectiveness were estimated from published medical reports. Direct medical costs were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and published literature. We analyzed 1029 records from January 2009 to January 2011. Assuming full adherence to chemoprophylaxis regimens, consultations saved healthcare payers a per-traveler average of $14 (9-day trip) to $372 (30-day trip). For travelers, consultations resulted in a range of net cost of $20 (9-day trip) to a net savings of $32 (30-day trip). Differences were mostly driven by risk of malaria in the destination country. Our model suggests that healthcare payers save money for short- and longer-term trips, and that travelers save money for longer trips when travelers adhere to malaria recommendations and prophylactic regimens in West Africa. This is a potential incentive to healthcare payers to offer consistent pretravel preventive care to travelers. This financial benefit complements the medical benefit of reducing the risk of malaria.

  4. 78 FR 53728 - Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... International Trade Administration Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA) AGENCY: International Trade... Promotion (dba Brand USA). The purpose of the Board is to guide the Corporation for Travel Promotion on... will be selecting four individuals with the appropriate expertise and experience from specific sectors...

  5. Solving standard traveling salesman problem and multiple traveling salesman problem by using branch-and-bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Shakila; Wan Jaafar, Wan Nurhadani; Jamil, Siti Jasmida

    2013-04-01

    The standard Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) is the classical Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) while Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MTSP) is an extension of TSP when more than one salesman is involved. The objective of MTSP is to find the least costly route that the traveling salesman problem can take if he wishes to visit exactly once each of a list of n cities and then return back to the home city. There are a few methods that can be used to solve MTSP. The objective of this research is to implement an exact method called Branch-and-Bound (B&B) algorithm. Briefly, the idea of B&B algorithm is to start with the associated Assignment Problem (AP). A branching strategy will be applied to the TSP and MTSP which is Breadth-first-Search (BFS). 11 nodes of cities are implemented for both problem and the solutions to the problem are presented.

  6. 26 CFR 40.6071(a)-1 - Time for filing returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Time for filing returns. 40.6071(a)-1 Section 40.6071(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6071(a)-1 Time for filing returns. (a) Quarterly returns. Each quarterly return required...

  7. Assisting the return of displaced Dinka Bor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Murphy

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The issues involved in supporting the return of internally displaced Dinka Bor communities highlight the complex, and often ignored, challenges of addressing the consequencesof South-South conflict.

  8. Animal-associated exposure to rabies virus among travelers, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Harvey, Kira; Pandey, Prativa; Lim, Poh Lian; Leder, Karin; Piyaphanee, Watcharapong; Shaw, Marc; McDonald, Susan C; Schwartz, Eli; Esposito, Douglas H; Parola, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Among travelers, rabies cases are rare, but animal bites are relatively common. To determine which travelers are at highest risk for rabies, we studied 2,697 travelers receiving care for animal-related exposures and requiring rabies postexposure prophylaxis at GeoSentinel clinics during 1997-2012. No specific demographic characteristics differentiated these travelers from other travelers seeking medical care, making it challenging to identify travelers who might benefit from reinforced pretravel rabies prevention counseling. Median travel duration was short for these travelers: 15 days for those seeking care after completion of travel and 20 days for those seeking care during travel. This finding contradicts the view that preexposure rabies vaccine recommendations should be partly based on longer travel durations. Over half of exposures occurred in Thailand, Indonesia, Nepal, China, and India. International travelers to rabies-endemic regions, particularly Asia, should be informed about potential rabies exposure and benefits of pretravel vaccination, regardless of demographics or length of stay.

  9. Alcohol problems, aggression, and other externalizing behaviors after return from deployment: understanding the role of combat exposure, internalizing symptoms, and social environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kathleen M; Foran, Heather M; Wood, Michael D; Eckford, Rachel D; McGurk, Dennis

    2012-07-01

    The study examined whether elevated rates of externalizing behaviors following deployment could be explained by internalizing symptoms (depression, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms), and health of the social environment (unit leadership, organizational support, and stigma/barriers to care). A model of combat exposure, social environment, internalizing symptoms, and externalizing behaviors was tested in a military unit following a fifteen-month deployment to Iraq. The sample included 1,397 soldiers assessed four month post-deployment; 589 of these soldiers were assessed again nine months post-deployment. Externalizing behaviors were highly stable over the five-month post-deployment period. Both social environment and internalizing symptoms were significantly associated with level of externalizing behaviors at four months and nine months post-deployment, but combat exposure alone significantly predicted change in externalizing behaviors over the follow-up period. Results suggest the need to broaden the scope of interventions targeted to combat veterans and have implications for care providers and military leaders. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effectiveness of pre-travel consultation in the prevention of travel-related diseases: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafuri, Silvio; Guerra, Rocco; Gallone, Maria Serena; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Lanotte, Serafina; Quarto, Michele; Germinario, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of pre-travel counselling carried out in Travel Clinics. This is a retrospective cohort. Three hundred international travellers were enrolled; 150 people were from users of Bari Travel Clinic, 150 were users of a travel agency. Enrolled subjects were interviewed using a questionnaire. The average age of the enrolled subjects was 37.5 ± 13.9, without statistically significant differences between the two groups. 86% of cases and 19.3% of the controls reported the use of anti-malaria prophylaxis (p Travel Clinic users, 6% reported diarrhoea and these figures were 27% in the control group (p travel counselling; in the future, new studies must investigate the cost-effectiveness of pre-travel prevention measures.

  11. The Image of travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2017-01-01

    The Danish painter Martinus Rørbye was among of the Danish artists to reinvent the traditions of the genre of travel painting in the 1830s. His changes and developments of a new complex pictorial strategy were in many ways an answer to the changes in society, especially the advent of tourism....... The new travel image had its focus on concurrency, everyday life and the secular world, resulting in images that anticipated the photographic travel image, the snapshot and the travel postcard. The advent of this new strategy proved to have a very long after-life, as tourists and travellers of today still...... and experienced and how he interpreted this knowledge, visually and in words. Rørbye is my primary research focus, but his artistic struggles are very similar to other artists travelling in Italy at the time. I therefore use Martinus Rørbye’s Italian sojourn as a prism of interpretation....

  12. The Image of travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2017-01-01

    and experienced and how he interpreted this knowledge, visually and in words. Rørbye is my primary research focus, but his artistic struggles are very similar to other artists travelling in Italy at the time. I therefore use Martinus Rørbye’s Italian sojourn as a prism of interpretation.......The Danish painter Martinus Rørbye was among of the Danish artists to reinvent the traditions of the genre of travel painting in the 1830s. His changes and developments of a new complex pictorial strategy were in many ways an answer to the changes in society, especially the advent of tourism....... The new travel image had its focus on concurrency, everyday life and the secular world, resulting in images that anticipated the photographic travel image, the snapshot and the travel postcard. The advent of this new strategy proved to have a very long after-life, as tourists and travellers of today still...

  13. TRAVEL AND HOME LEAVE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative procedures for : Travel to the home station and home leave (hl) Additional travel to the home station (at) Travel to the home station and home leave for family reasons (hlf) As part of the process of simplifying administrative procedures, HR and AS Divisions have devised a new, virtually automatic procedure for payment of travel expenses to the home station. The changes are aimed at rationalising administrative procedures and not at reducing benefits. The conditions of eligibility are unchanged. The new procedure, which will be operational with effect from 1st June 2002, will greatly simplify the administrative processing of claims for travel expenses and the recording of home leaves. Currently, requests for payment are introduced manually into the Advances and Claims system (AVCL) by divisional secretariats. All travel to the home station starting prior to 1st June 2002 will be processed according to the existing system whereas that starting on 1st June and after will be processed accordi...

  14. Predictability of Stock Returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Sekreter

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Predictability of stock returns has been shown by empirical studies over time. This article collects the most important theories on forecasting stock returns and investigates the factors that affecting behavior of the stocks’ prices and the market as a whole. Estimation of the factors and the way of estimation are the key issues of predictability of stock returns.

  15. Pre-Travel Medical Preparation of Business and Occupational Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nomana M.; Jentes, Emily S.; Brown, Clive; Han, Pauline; Rao, Sowmya R.; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to understand more about pre-travel preparations and itineraries of business and occupational travelers. Methods: De-identified data from 18 Global TravEpiNet clinics from January 2009 to December 2012 were analyzed. Results: Of 23,534 travelers, 61% were non-occupational and 39% occupational. Business travelers were more likely to be men, had short times to departure and shorter trip durations, and commonly refused influenza, meningococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. Most business travelers indicated that employers suggested the pre-travel health consultation, whereas non-occupational travelers sought consultations because of travel health concerns. Conclusions: Sub-groups of occupational travelers have characteristic profiles, with business travelers being particularly distinct. Employers play a role in encouraging business travelers to seek pre-travel consultations. Such consultations, even if scheduled immediately before travel, can identify vaccination gaps and increase coverage. PMID:26479857

  16. Abbreviated atovaquone-proguanil prophylaxis regimens in travellers after leaving malaria-endemic areas: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelkoel, Jelmer; Binnendijk, Klaas Hendrik; Spijker, Rene; van Vugt, Michèle; Tan, Kathrine; Hänscheid, Thomas; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Grobusch, Martin Peter

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated existing data on the prophylactic efficacy of atovaquone-proguanil (AP) in order to determine whether prophylaxis in travellers can be discontinued on the day of return from a malaria-endemic area instead of seven days after return as per currently recommended post-travel schedule.

  17. Travel medicine research priorities: establishing an evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Elizabeth A; Chen, Lin H; Sanford, Christopher; McCarthy, Anne; Leder, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Travel medicine is the medical subspecialty which promotes healthy and safe travel. Numerous studies have been published that provide evidence for the practice of travel medicine, but gaps exist. The Research Committee of the International Society of Travel Medicine (ISTM) established a Writing Group which reviewed the existing evidence base and identified an initial list of research priorities through an interactive process that included e-mails, phone calls, and smaller meetings. The list was presented to a broader group of travel medicine experts, then was presented and discussed at the Annual ISTM Meeting, and further revised by the Writing Group. Each research question was then subject to literature search to ensure that adequate research had not already been conducted. Twenty-five research priorities were identified and categorized as intended to inform pre-travel encounters, safety during travel, and post-travel management. We have described the research priorities that will help to expand the evidence base in travel medicine. This discussion of research priorities serves to highlight the commitment that the ISTM has in promoting quality travel-related research. © 2010 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. 26 CFR 40.6011(a)-2 - Final returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Final returns. 40.6011(a)-2 Section 40.6011(a)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6011(a)-2 Final returns. (a) In general—(1) Permanent cessation of operations. Any person that is...

  19. Travails of travel. Subtle and obscure causes of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, M E

    1988-07-01

    Knowledge of patients' travel history is an important facet of diagnosis. Malaria, Chagas' disease, toxoplasmosis, Lyme disease, arboviruses, and many other relatively unusual diseases can be contracted while the patient is traveling, and the symptoms, which may mimic another disease, may not become obvious until the patient returns. The Roman philosopher Marcus Aurelius Antoninus alerts us to easier resolutions of our daily diagnostic dilemmas: "Look within and let neither the peculiar quality of anything nor its value escape thee."

  20. Business travelers' risk perception of infectious diseases: where are the knowledge gaps, and how serious are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynberg, Elke; Toner, Sharyn; Wendt, Judy K; Visser, Leo G; Breederveld, Daan; Berg, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have explored the risk perception of frequent business travelers (FBT) toward malaria. However, less is known about their knowledge of other infectious diseases. This study aimed to identify knowledge gaps by determining the risk perception of FBT toward 11 infectious diseases. Our retrospective web-based survey assessed the accuracy of risk perception among a defined cohort of FBT for 11 infectious diseases. We used logistic regression and the chi-square test to determine the association of risk perception with source of travel advice, demographic variables, and features of trip preparation. Surveys were returned by 63% of the 608 self-registered FBT in Rijswijk, and only the 328 completed questionnaires that adhered to our inclusion criteria were used for analysis. The majority (71%) sought pre-travel health advice and used a company health source (83%). Participants seeking company travel health advice instead of external had significantly more accurate risk knowledge (p = 0.03), but more frequently overestimated typhoid risk (odds ratio = 2.03; 95% confidence interval = 1.23-3.34). While underestimation of disease risk was on average 23% more common than overestimation, HIV risk was overestimated by 75% of FBT. More accurate knowledge among FBT seeking company health advice demonstrates that access to in-company travel clinics can improve risk perception. However, there is an obvious need for risk knowledge improvement, given the overall underestimation of risk. The substantial overestimation of HIV risk is probably due to both public and in-company awareness efforts. Conversely, typhoid risk overestimation was statistically associated with seeking company health advice, and therefore specifically reflects the high focus on typhoid fever within Shell's travel clinic. This study serves as a reminder that a knowledge gap toward infectious diseases besides malaria still exists. Our article will explore the future requirements for more

  1. Prescribed Travel Schedules for Fatigue Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Johnston, Smith; Lockley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Fatigue Management Team is developing recommendations for managing fatigue during travel and for shift work operations, as Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Circadian Desynchrony in ISS Operations. The Guidelines provide the International Space Station (ISS ) flight surgeons and other operational clinicians with evidence-based recommendations for mitigating fatigue and other factors related to sleep loss and circadian desynchronization. As much international travel is involved both before and after flight, the guidelines provide recommendations for: pre-flight training, in-flight operations, and post-flight rehabilitation. The objective of is to standardize the process by which care is provided to crewmembers, ground controllers, and other support personnel such as trainers, when overseas travel or schedule shifting is required. Proper scheduling of countermeasures - light, darkness, melatonin, diet, exercise, and medications - is the cornerstone for facilitating circadian adaptation, improving sleep, enhancing alertness, and optimizing performance. The Guidelines provide, among other things, prescribed travel schedules that outline the specific implementation of these mitigation strategies. Each travel schedule offers evidence based protocols for properly using the NASA identified countermeasures for fatigue. This presentation will describe the travel implementation schedules and how these can be used to alleviate the effects of jet lag and/or schedule shifts.

  2. 78 FR 42041 - Travel and Tourism Trade Mission to Taiwan, Japan, and Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... International Trade Administration Travel and Tourism Trade Mission to Taiwan, Japan, and Korea AGENCY... notice for the Travel and Tourism Trade Mission to Taiwan, Japan and Korea scheduled for March 10-14... INFORMATION: The International Trade Administration will have a senior executive lead the Travel and Tourism...

  3. 75 FR 59227 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade.... Travel and Tourism Advisory Board. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce is currently seeking applications to fill three vacant positions on the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The purpose of...

  4. Travel-Related Parasitic Infections in Travellers to Southeast Asia and Western Pacific Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdur Öztürk, Eylem; Ünver, Ayşegül

    2017-12-01

    In the last decades, there has been a significant increase in international human mobility with increase in the prosperity, travel possibilities, and number of refugees. In the first half of 2016, the Asian continent showed the fastest growth in the number of tourists. Such increase is seen due to the interest in Asian history, culture, and cuisine. In the globalizing world, human mobility causes changes in the epidemiology of diseases and the spread of various infections across continents. Parasitic infections that may pose a risk for travellers to the Asia-Pacific are malaria, leishmaniasis, filariasis, foodborne trematode infections, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted infections, and tourist diarrhea. Consulting a travel medical expert and using health services such as pre-travel vaccination and chemoprophylaxis will reduce the risk of infectious diseases among travelers.

  5. Pregnancy course and outcome in women traveling to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammour, Rami N; Bahous, Rabia; Grupper, Moti; Ohel, Gonen; Steinlauf, Shmuel; Schwartz, Eli; Potasman, Israel

    2012-01-01

    The issue of travel to developing countries during pregnancy has not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the rate, course, and outcome of pregnancies in women who traveled to developing countries while pregnant, or became pregnant during such travel. Women visiting two major travel clinics in Israel for consultation within the years 2004 to 2009, who were pregnant or declared an intention of becoming pregnant during travel were contacted. This was followed by a telephone interview by an obstetrician with those women who were actually pregnant. Background characteristics, morbidity during travel, and pregnancy course and outcome were collected. Overall 52,430 travelers' records had been screened. Of these, we identified 49 women who were pregnant during their trip, but 3 declined participation. Of the remaining 46 women, 33 were pregnant at departure, and 13 conceived during travel. The incidence of pregnancy during travel was thus 0.93/1000 travelers. Thirty-three women traveled to East Asia, 8 to South and Central America, 5 to Africa. More than two thirds of women received pretravel vaccinations. Adherence to the World Health Organization recommendations regarding food and drink was high (87%) and travelers' diarrhea occurred in only 11% of women. Five of 22 women traveling to malarious areas had taken antimalarial prophylaxis. Six women required medical therapy during travel. Pregnancy outcome was not different from the normal population except for an unusually low rate of preterm delivery. In this cohort, travel to developing countries was not associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Larger studies are needed to support these findings. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  6. Travelling or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus; Lai, Signe Sophus

    2017-01-01

    -12) travelling to multiple countries on several continents. The article shows that there are systematic differences in terms of formal characteristics, themes, and characters’ communicative style between the series that travel and the series that do not. Especially, the analysis finds that the presence of strong...

  7. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    2004-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 17 December 2004 at 16:30 until 3 January 2005 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at WHO (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 788 10 65 We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  8. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 22 December 2006 at 16:30 until 8 January 2007 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at W.H.O. (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 791 55 95. We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  9. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and ConditionsPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... Diseases and ConditionsPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ...

  10. Travel and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  11. Carlson Wagonlit Travel informs

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    From 7 to 9 September come and visit our "Andalusia" stand at the entrance to Restaurant No. 1 – Novae. Take part in our competition where you could win over 1000 Swiss francs worth of travel vouchers from our partner VT Vacances! Carlson Wagonlit Travel http://www.carlsonwagonlit.com

  12. Impact of advice given to travelers concerning the main infectious risks associated with traveling in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestelle, C; Aymeric, S; Maakaroun-Vermesse, Z; Pouliquen, A; Bernard, L; Chandenier, J; Grammatico-Guillon, L

    2015-06-01

    The prevention of sanitary risks related to traveling in the tropics implies delivering a large amount of information to travelers. The objective of our study was to assess the knowledge acquired by travelers during a pre-travel consultation. A before and after study was conducted among 202 travelers having consulted at the Tours international vaccine center. We used self-administrated questionnaires (score out of 100 marks) concerning diet, hygiene, anti-vectorial prevention (AVP), and sexual-transmitted infections (STI). The scores obtained before and after consultation were compared globally and for each topic. The travelers' global knowledge had improved after consultation (66.1 vs. 75.5%; P traveling compared to humanitarian mission prepared ahead of departure time). The recommendations for diet were less well acquired in travelers > 50 years of age than in those travel consultation improves the travelers' knowledge for the main prevention measures but does not allow them to acquire all required knowledge. Taking into account the travelers' initial knowledge and their ability to learn could improve the impact of the pre-travel consultation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Travel Safety: A Social Media Enabled Mobile Travel Risk Application

    OpenAIRE

    Noyen, Kay; Wortmann, Felix

    2014-01-01

    We present the design artifact Travel Safety, a mobile travel risk information system (IS). Besides offering general travel risk information, the iPhone application leverages social media, in particular Twitter, to source travel risk information from multiple foreign offices. This provides a comprehensive real-time information base for the application and enables dispatch of automatic travel warnings. On the basis of Travel Safety we want to explore if content from social media can be leverag...

  14. Travel to France as Chief US Delegate at a meeting of International Standards Organization ISO/TC-85, ``Nuclear Technology``. Foreign trip report, March 17--March 26, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, R.M.

    1994-04-11

    As overall US Advisor for ISO/TC-85, SC-5, Dr. Westfall met with (1) Work Group 1, ``Measurement Techniques for the Chemical and Physical Characterization of UF{sub 6}, UO{sub 2}, and Mixed Oxide,`` on Monday, March 21, (2) Work Group 5, ``Standardization of Measurement Methods for the Characterization of Solid and Solidified Waste Forms, and for the Corrosion of their Primary Containers,`` on Tuesday, March 22; and (3) the full Subcommittee-5 on Wednesday, March 23. The status of work by all seven work groups in SC-5 was reported. Those having to do with nuclear fuel transportation (WG-4: UF, Containers, WG-9: Cask Trunnions, and WG-10: Cask Confinement) either have approved standards or drafts at an advanced stage of development. These work group convenors were asked to maintain their membership and establish new work areas in the field of nuclear fuel packaging. Definition of scope for new work is to be done in coordination with the interested staff members of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria. On Thursday, March 24, the Cogema-Marcoule Plant staff hosted the SC-5 members to technical tours of their nuclear fuel reprocessing and waste vitrification and storage facilities.

  15. 26 CFR 40.6107-1 - Tax return preparer must furnish copy of return to taxpayer and must retain a copy or record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Tax return preparer must furnish copy of return to taxpayer and must retain a copy or record. 40.6107-1 Section 40.6107-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6107-1 Tax return preparer...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6103(j)(1)-1 - Disclosures of return information reflected on returns to officers and employees of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... related activities. 301.6103(j)(1)-1 Section 301.6103(j)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(j)(1)-1 Disclosures of return information reflected on... related activities. (a) General rule. Pursuant to the provisions of section 6103(j)(1) of the Internal...

  17. LeishMan recommendations for treatment of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis in travelers, 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Johannes; Buffet, Pierre; Visser, Leo; Harms, Gundel; Bailey, Mark S; Caumes, Eric; Clerinx, Jan; van Thiel, Pieter P A M; Morizot, Gloria; Hatz, Christoph; Dorlo, Thomas P C; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) in travelers is still controversial. Over the last decade, national and international consortia have published recommendations for treating CL in travelers. These guidelines harmonize many issues, but there are some

  18. Pre-travel advice at a crossroad: Medical preparedness of travellers to South and Southeast-Asia - The Hamburg Airport Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolling, Thierry; Mühlenpfordt, Melina; Addo, Marylyn M; Cramer, Jakob P; Vinnemeier, Christof D

    Specific travel-related recommendations exist for the prevention or self-treatment of infectious diseases contracted by travellers to the tropics. In the current study, we assessed the medical preparedness per these recommendations, focusing on whether travellers carried antidiarrheal and antimalarial medication with them stratified by type of pre-travel advice. We surveyed travellers departing from Hamburg International Airport to South or Southeast Asia, using a questionnaire on demographic, medical and travel characteristics. 975 travellers were analysed - the majority (817, 83%) being tourists. A large proportion packed any antidiarrheal medication (612, 63%) - most frequently loperamide (440, 72%). Only 176 of 928 (19%) travellers to destinations with low-to medium risk for malaria packed a recommended antimalarial medication. The majority (162, 17%) of them carried antimalarials as stand-by emergency treatment (SBET). 468 (48%) travellers had a pre-travel medical consultation. This lead to higher odds of carrying SBET- with the highest odds associated with a consultation at a travel medicine specialist (OR 7.83 compared to no consultation). Attending a travel medicine specialist was associated with better adherence to current recommendations concerning the carriage of stand-by emergency treatment of malaria. However, the proportion of travellers seeking pre-travel health advice was overall low in our population. Promoting pre-travel consultations may, therefore, lead to higher adherence to the current recommendations in travel medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Traveler's Health: Avoid Bug Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Area with Zika? Find a Clinic Yellow Fever Vaccination Clinics FAQ Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold ...

  20. Travel time data collection handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This Travel Time Data Collection Handbook provides guidance to transportation : professionals and practitioners for the collection, reduction, and presentation : of travel time data. The handbook should be a useful reference for designing : travel ti...