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Sample records for retinopathy prevention cohort

  1. Preventing radiation retinopathy with hyperfractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroe, Alan T.; Bhandare, Niranjan; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with the development of radiation retinopathy in a large series of patients with head-and-neck cancer. In particular, we addressed whether the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy was effective in reducing the risk of retinopathy. Methods and materials: One hundred eighty-six patients received a significant dose to the retina as part of curative radiotherapy. Primary sites included: nasopharynx, 46; paranasal sinus, 64; nasal cavity, 69; and palate, 7. Prescription doses varied depending on primary site and histology. Hyperfractionated (twice-daily) radiation was delivered to 42% of the patients in this study, typically at 1.10 to 1.20 Gy per fraction. The remainder were treated once-daily. Retinal doses were determined from computerized dosimetry plans when available. For all other patients, retinal doses were retrospectively calculated using reconstructed off-axis dosimetry taken from contours through the center of the globes. Retinal dose was defined as the minimum dose received by at least 25% of the globe. The median retinal dose was 56.85 Gy. Patients were followed for a median of 7.6 years. Results: Thirty-one eyes in 30 patients developed radiation retinopathy, resulting in monocular blindness in 25, bilateral blindness in 1, and decreased visual acuity in 4. The median time to the diagnosis of retinopathy was 2.6 years (range, 11 months to 5.3 years). The actuarial incidence of developing radiation retinopathy was 20% at both 5 and 10 years. The incidence of developing ipsilateral blindness due to retinopathy was 16% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. Site-specific incidences varied considerably, with ethmoid sinus (9 of 25, 36%), nasal cavity (13 of 69, 19%), and maxillary sinus (6 of 35, 17%) being the most common sites associated with radiation retinopathy. Three of 72 patients (4%) receiving retinal doses less than 50 Gy developed retinopathy. Higher retinal doses resulted in a

  2. Role of macular xanthophylls in prevention of common neovascular retinopathies: retinopathy of prematurity and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoming; Rubin, Lewis P

    2015-04-15

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are important causes of blindness among children and working-age adults, respectively. The development of both diseases involves retinal microvascular degeneration, vessel loss and consequent hypoxic and inflammatory pathologic retinal neovascularization. Mechanistic studies have shown that oxidative stress and subsequent derangement of cell signaling are important factors in disease progression. In eye and vision research, role of the dietary xanthophyll carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, has been more extensively studied in adult onset macular degeneration than these other retinopathies. These carotenoids also may decrease severity of ROP in preterm infants and of DR in working-age adults. A randomized controlled clinical trial of carotenoid supplementation in preterm infants indicated that lutein has functional effects in the neonatal eye and is anti-inflammatory. Three multicenter clinical trials all showed a trend of decreased ROP severity in the lutein supplemented group. Prospective studies on patients with non-proliferative DR indicate serum levels of lutein and zeaxanthin are significantly lower in these patients compared to normal subjects. The present review describes recent advances in lutein and zeaxanthin modulation of oxidative stress and inflammation related to ROP and DR and discusses potential roles of lutein/zeaxanthin in preventing or lessening the risks of disease initiation or progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Retinopathy of prematurity: the need for prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegl, Raffael; Hellström, Ann; Smith, Lois EH

    2016-01-01

    More than 450,000 babies are born prematurely in the USA every year. The improved survival of even the most vulnerable low body weight preterm infants has, despite improving health outcomes, led to the resurgence in preterm complications including one of the major causes for blindness in children, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). The current mainstay in ROP therapy is laser photocoagulation and the injection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies in the late stages of the disease after the onset of neovascularization. Both are proven options for ophthalmologists to treat the severe forms of late ROP. However, laser photocoagulation destroys major parts of the retina, and the injection of VEGF antibodies, although rather simple to administer, may cause a systemic suppression of normal vascularization, which has not been studied in sufficient depth. However, the use of neither VEGF antibody nor laser treatment prevents ROP, which should be the long-term goal. It should be possible to prevent ROP by more closely mimicking the intrauterine environment after preterm birth. Such preventive measures include preventing the toxic postbirth influences (eg, oxygen excess) as well as providing the missing intrauterine factors (eg, insulin growth factor 1) and are likely to also reduce other complications of premature birth as well as ROP. This review is meant to summarize the current knowledge on the prevention of ROP with a particular emphasize on the use of insulin growth factor 1 supplementation. PMID:28539804

  4. Retinopathy in an obesity WHO III cohort: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Juri; Lammert, Alexander; Otto, Mirko; Hammes, Hans-Peter

    2017-11-01

    To assess retinopathy and its risk factors in an obesity WHO III cohort. In the Mannheim Obesity Study , 277 subjects with obesity WHO III aged 18-64 years were examined in a cross-sectional approach. Screening for retinopathy was performed using 3-field retinal photography. Endothelial function was assessed using arteriole-to-venule ratio and flicker light analysis. Subjects with and without retinopathy were analysed for anthropometry, metabolic, vascular and renal parameters. Retinopathy was found in 18 of the 277 subjects (6.5%). Prevalence of retinopathy was 16.7% in subjects with and 3.4% in subjects without diabetes mellitus. Between subjects with and without retinopathy there were significant differences in diabetes prevalence (61.1% vs 21.7%, pretinopathy (OR 8.3, p=0.049, 95% CI 1.01 to 67.49), whereas risk for retinopathy decreased by nearly 50% (OR 0.54, p=0.032, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.95) with each percentage increase in venous dilatation in response to flicker light. Retinopathy prevalence in our obesity WHO III cohort is low. Presence of diabetes mellitus is the most important risk factor for retinopathy. Preserved venular function indicates protection from retinopathy. NCT00770276, Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Does bariatric surgery prevent progression of diabetic retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Laybourne, J P; Sandinha, M T; de Alwis, N M W; Avery, P; Steel, D H

    2017-08-01

    PurposeTo assess the changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR) in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients post bariatric surgery and report on the risk factors that may be associated with it.Patients and methodsRetrospective observational study of T2DM patients who underwent bariatric surgery in a UK specialist bariatric unit between 2009 and 2015. Preoperative and postoperative weight, HbA1c, and annual DR screening results were collected from medical records. Patients with preoperative retinal screening and at least one postoperative retinal screening were eligible for analysis. Multivariate analysis was used to explore significant clinical predictors on postoperative worsening in DR.ResultsA total of 102 patients were eligible for analysis and were followed up for 4 years. Preoperatively, 68% of patients had no DR compared to 30% with background retinopathy, 1% pre-proliferative retinopathy, and 1% proliferative retinopathy. In the first postoperative visit, 19% of patients developed new DR compared to 70% stable and 11% improved. These proportions remained similar for each postoperative visit over time. Young age, male gender, high preoperative HbA1c, and presence of preoperative retinopathy were the significant predictors of worsening postoperatively.ConclusionBariatric surgery does not prevent progression of DR. Young male patients with pre-existing DR and poor preoperative glycaemic control are most at risk of progression. All diabetic patients should attend regular DR screening post bariatric surgery to allow early detection of potentially sight-threatening changes, particularly among those with identifiable risk factors. Future prospective studies with prolonged follow-up are required to clarify the duration of risk.

  6. Does renin-angiotensin system blockade have a role in preventing diabetic retinopathy? A clinical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjølie, A K; Dodson, P; Hobbs, F R R

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes management has increasingly focused on the prevention of macrovascular disease, in particular for type 2 diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy, one of the main microvascular complications of diabetes, is also an important public health problem. Much of the care invested in retinopathy relates...... the primary trial end-points were not met, there was a clear trend to less severe retinopathy with RAS blockade. A smaller trial, RASS, reported reduced retinopathy progression in type 1 diabetes from RAS blockade with both the ARB losartan and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril...

  7. THE PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS AND VISUAL IMPAIRMENT IN CHILDREN WITH RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Neroev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The system of blindness prevention and visual impairment in children with retinopathy of prematurity is a multidisciplinary medical problem, and includes the prevention of the preterm birth, the correction of terms of caring for premature babies, early detection, monitoring, and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity, as well as the organization of the long clinical supervision. Patients with retinopathy of prematurity need a comprehensive approach to the prevention of the visual impairment in order to ensure high functional outcomes and improve their quality of life. 

  8. Sixteen-year incidence of diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in a nationwide cohort of young Danish type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg; Peto, Tunde

    2013-01-01

    Design of study: Prospective cohort-study Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess long-term incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and associated risk factors in a Danish population-based cohort of young type 1 diabetic patients. Methods: Eighty...... percent of all Danish type 1 diabetic patients below the age of 18 (n=1033) were examined in 1986-89. In 1995, baseline retinopathy was graded and other risk factors were assessed in 324 patients (31.4% of the original cohort). Of these, 132 (40.7%) were re-examined at follow-up in 2011. At baseline two...... and diabetes duration. Results: The mean age and diabetes duration at baseline were 21.1±3.1 and 13.3±3.5 years, respectively. At baseline 31.8% had no retinopathy, 67.4% had non-PDR and 0.8% had PDR. At follow-up, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 96.9%. Thirty-eight patients with no DR at baseline...

  9. Retinopathy of prematurity in a cohort of neonates at Groote Schuur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a preventable cause of visual impairment in premature ... and extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) premature infants from the West Metro ...... Arch Ophthalmol 2000;118(5):645-649. http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/.

  10. [Deficient prevention and late treatment of diabetic retinopathy in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Castañeda, René A; Menchaca-Díaz, Rufino; Alfaro-Trujillo, Beatriz; Guerrero-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Chayet-Berdowsky, Arturo S

    2014-01-01

    Retinopathy is a frequent complication of diabetes, causing visual impairment in 10% and blindness in 2% of diabetic patients. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical profile of diabetic patients in an ophthalmologic unit in Tijuana, México. Retrospective study of a random sample of 500 clinical charts of patients with diabetes who attended the Retina Service of "Fundación CODET para la Prevención de la Ceguera IBP" Ophthalmologic Center between 2006 and 2010. The main complaint of 58% of patients was decreased visual acuity in first evaluation. Only 6.2% of patients were referred by a health professional. Forty-six percent of the patients had a history of diabetes of at least 15 years. Thirty percent had clinically significant visual impairment at first visit, which was associated with a long history of diabetes and previous eye surgery. Twenty-five percent of these patients who were treated at our clinic experienced visual deterioration due to advanced retinopathy. Patients with diabetic retinopathy are referred to ophthalmological service tardily, when visual loss is usually severe and irreversible.

  11. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration-like retinopathy by rapamycin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Muraleva, Natalia A; Zhdankina, Anna A; Stefanova, Natalia A; Fursova, Anzhela Z; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration, a neurodegenerative and vascular retinal disease, is the most common cause of blindness in the Western countries. Evidence accumulates that target of rapamycin is involved in aging and age-related diseases, including neurodegeneration. The target of rapamycin inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses the senescent cell phenotype and extends life span in diverse species, including mice. Rapamycin decreases senescence-associated phenotypes in retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on spontaneous retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats, an animal model of age-related macular degeneration. Rats were treated with either 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg rapamycin, which was given orally as a food mixture. In a dose-dependent manner, rapamycin decreased the incidence and severity of retinopathy. Rapamycin improved some (but not all) histological abnormalities associated with retinopathy. Thus, in retinal pigment epithelial cell layers, rapamycin decreased nuclei heterogeneity and normalized intervals between nuclei. In photoreceptor cells, associated neurons, and radial glial cells, rapamycin prevented nuclear and cellular pyknosis. More important, rapamycin prevented destruction of ganglionar neurons in the retina. Rapamycin did not exert any adverse effects on the retina in control disease-free Wistar rats. Taken together, our data suggest the therapeutic potential of rapamycin for treatment and prevention of retinopathy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Agent-Based Modeling Template for a Cohort of Veterans with Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Eugene Day

    Full Text Available Agent-based models are valuable for examining systems where large numbers of discrete individuals interact with each other, or with some environment. Diabetic Veterans seeking eye care at a Veterans Administration hospital represent one such cohort.The objective of this study was to develop an agent-based template to be used as a model for a patient with diabetic retinopathy (DR. This template may be replicated arbitrarily many times in order to generate a large cohort which is representative of a real-world population, upon which in-silico experimentation may be conducted.Agent-based template development was performed in java-based computer simulation suite AnyLogic Professional 6.6. The model was informed by medical data abstracted from 535 patient records representing a retrospective cohort of current patients of the VA St. Louis Healthcare System Eye clinic. Logistic regression was performed to determine the predictors associated with advancing stages of DR. Predicted probabilities obtained from logistic regression were used to generate the stage of DR in the simulated cohort.The simulated cohort of DR patients exhibited no significant deviation from the test population of real-world patients in proportion of stage of DR, duration of diabetes mellitus (DM, or the other abstracted predictors. Simulated patients after 10 years were significantly more likely to exhibit proliferative DR (P<0.001.Agent-based modeling is an emerging platform, capable of simulating large cohorts of individuals based on manageable data abstraction efforts. The modeling method described may be useful in simulating many different conditions where course of disease is described in categorical stages.

  13. Validation of WINROP for detecting retinopathy of prematurity in a North American cohort of preterm infants.

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    Jung, Jennifer L; Wagner, Brandie D; McCourt, Emily A; Palestine, Alan G; Cerda, Ashlee; Cao, Jennifer H; Enzenauer, Robert W; Singh, Jasleen K; Braverman, Rebecca S; Wymore, Erica; Lynch, Anne M

    2017-06-01

    WINROP (weight, insulin-like growth factor 1, neonatal, retinopathy of prematurity) is a web-based retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) risk algorithm that uses postnatal weight gain as a surrogate of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) to predict the risk of severe ROP in premature infants. The purpose of this study was to validate the web-based algorithm WINROP in detecting severe (type 1 or type 2) ROP in a North American cohort of infants. The records of consecutive infants who underwent ROP examinations between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Infants were classified into categories of "alarm" (at risk for developing severe ROP) and "no alarm" (minimal risk for severe ROP). A total of 483 were included. Alarm occurred in 241 neonates (50%), with the median time from birth to alarm of 2 weeks. WINROP had a sensitivity of 81.8% (95% CI, 67.3%-91.8%) and specificity of 53.3% (95% CI, 48.5%-58.0%) for identifying infants with severe ROP. Eight of the 44 infants with severe ROP were not detected (5 with type 1 and 3 with type 2). Of these 8 infants, 7 (88%) had birth weight in excess of the 70 th pecentile. With additional weight data entry, sensitivity of WINROP rose to 88.6%. Very preterm infants (gestational age of ≤27 weeks) with relatively high birth weight for gestational age may not be detected by WINROP as high risk for developing severe ROP. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of candesartan on prevention (DIRECT-Prevent 1) and progression (DIRECT-Protect 1) of retinopathy in type 1 diabetes: randomised, placebo-controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaturvedi, N.; Porta, M.; Klein, R.

    2008-01-01

    of retinopathy in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Two randomised, double-blind, parallel-design, placebo-controlled trials were done in 309 centres worldwide. Participants with normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes without retinopathy were recruited to the DIRECT-Prevent 1 trial and those with existing...... retinopathy were recruited to DIRECT-Protect 1, and were assigned to candesartan 16 mg once a day or matching placebo. After 1 month, the dose was doubled to 32 mg. Investigators and participants were unaware of the treatment allocation status. The primary endpoints were incidence and progression......BACKGROUND: Results of previous studies suggest that renin-angiotensin system blockers might reduce the burden of diabetic retinopathy. We therefore designed the DIabetic REtinopathy Candesartan Trials (DIRECT) Programme to assess whether candesartan could reduce the incidence and progression...

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy, General Preventive Strategies, and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Sher Zaman; Kumar, Selva; Ismail, Ikram Shah Bin

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of people with diabetes worldwide suggests that diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) will continue to be sight threatening factors. The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is a widespread cause of visual impairment in the world and a range of hyperglycemia-linked pathways have been implicated in the initiation and progression of this condition. Despite understanding the polyol pathway flux, activation of protein kinase C (KPC) isoforms, increased hexosamine pathway flux, and increased advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation, pathogenic mechanisms underlying diabetes induced vision loss are not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to review molecular mechanisms that regulate cell survival and apoptosis of retinal cells and discuss new and exciting therapeutic targets with comparison to the old and inefficient preventive strategies. This review highlights the recent advancements in understanding hyperglycemia-induced biochemical and molecular alterations, systemic metabolic factors, and aberrant activation of signaling cascades that ultimately lead to activation of a number of transcription factors causing functional and structural damage to retinal cells. It also reviews the established interventions and emerging molecular targets to avert diabetic retinopathy and its associated risk factors. PMID:25105142

  16. Pharmacologic interventions for the prevention and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beharry, Kay D; Valencia, Gloria B; Lazzaro, Douglas R; Aranda, Jacob V

    2016-04-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a significant morbidity in prematurely born infants, is the most common cause of visual impairment and blindness in children and persists till adulthood. Strict control of oxygen therapy and prevention of intermittent hypoxia are the keys in the prevention of ROP, but pharmacologic interventions have decreased risk of ROP. Various drug classes such as methylxanthines (caffeine), VEGF inhibitors, antioxidants, and others have decreased ROP occurrence. The timing of pharmacologic intervention remains unsettled, but early prevention rather than controlling disease progression may be preferred. These drugs act through different mechanisms, and synergistic approaches should be considered to maximize efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Benfotiamine blocks three major pathways of hyperglycemic damage and prevents experimental diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Hans-Peter; Du, Xueliang; Edelstein, Diane; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ju, Qida; Lin, Jihong; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nawroth, Peter; Hannak, Dieter; Neumaier, Michael; Bergfeld, Regine; Giardino, Ida; Brownlee, Michael

    2003-03-01

    Three of the major biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia induced vascular damage (the hexosamine pathway, the advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation pathway and the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway) are activated by increased availability of the glycolytic metabolites glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. We have discovered that the lipid-soluble thiamine derivative benfotiamine can inhibit these three pathways, as well as hyperglycemia-associated NF-kappaB activation, by activating the pentose phosphate pathway enzyme transketolase, which converts glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate into pentose-5-phosphates and other sugars. In retinas of diabetic animals, benfotiamine treatment inhibited these three pathways and NF-kappaB activation by activating transketolase, and also prevented experimental diabetic retinopathy. The ability of benfotiamine to inhibit three major pathways simultaneously might be clinically useful in preventing the development and progression of diabetic complications.

  18. Diagnosis System for Diabetic Retinopathy and Glaucoma Screening to Prevent Vision Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Sundhara Raja DHANUSHKODI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetic retinopathy (DR and glaucoma are two most common retinal disorders that are major causes of blindness in diabetic patients. DR caused in retinal images due to the damage in retinal blood vessels, which leads to the formation of hemorrhages spread over the entire region of retina. Glaucoma is caused due to hypertension in diabetic patients. Both DR and glaucoma affects the vision loss in diabetic patients. Hence, a computer aided development of diagnosis system for Diabetic retinopathy and Glaucoma screening is proposed in this paper to prevent vision loss. Method: The diagnosis system of DR consists of two stages namely detection and segmentation of fovea and hemorrhages. The diagnosis system of glaucoma screening consists of three stages namely blood vessel segmentation, Extraction of optic disc (OD and optic cup (OC region and determination of rim area between OD and OC. Results: The specificity and accuracy for hemorrhages detection is found to be 98.47% and 98.09% respectively. The accuracy for OD detection is found to be 99.3%. This outperforms state-of-the-art methods. Conclusion: In this paper, the diagnosis system is developed to classify the DR and glaucoma screening in to mild, moderate and severe respectively.

  19. Retinopathy of prematurity in a cohort of neonates at Groote Schuur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) can cause blindness. Before 2016, resource limitations precluded routine screening for ROP at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH), Cape Town, South Africa. Previous pilot studies at GSH found no patients with ROP requiring treatment; however, improved preterm infant ...

  20. Exploration of the preventive effect of ursolic acid on retinopathy in diabetic mice and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Zhong Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the preventive effect of ursolic acid on retinopathy in diabetic mice through adjusting insulin sensitivity, glucose transport, angiogenesis and inflammation. Methods:Male C57BL/6 mice were selected as experimental animals and randomly divided into control group (N group), model group (D group) and intervention group (D+UA group), D group and D+UA group established diabetes models through intraperitoneal injection of STZ, D+UA group received intragastric administration of ursolic acid, and then insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism in retina as well as the expression levels of GLUTs, HIF-1α/VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway and IKKβ/IKBα/NF-κB pathway in retina tissue of three groups were detected. Results:AUC of D group was significantly lower than that of N group, and HOMA-IR, sugar content in retina tissue as well as GLUT-1, GLUT-3, HIF-1α, VEGF, VEGFR2, IKKβ, IKBα, NF-κB, TNF-α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin levels were significantly higher than those of N group;AUC of D+UA group was significantly higher than that of D group, and HOMA-IR, sugar content in retina tissue as well as GLUT-1, GLUT-3, HIF-1α, VEGF, VEGFR2, IKK毬, IKBα, NF-κB, TNF-α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin levels were significantly lower than those of D group. Conclusion:Ursolic acid can increase insulin sensitivity, reduce sugar content in retina tissue and inhibit angiogenesis and inflammation degree in retina tissue, and has preventive effect on retinopathy in diabetic mice.

  1. Jiangtang Xiaozhi Recipe () prevents diabetic retinopathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Li, Yan-Lin; Zhou, Yun-Feng; Ge, Zheng-Yan; Wang, Li-Li; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Guo, Yu-Jie; Jin, Long; Ren, Ye; Liu, Jian-Xun; Xu, Yang

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the prevention effect of diabetic retinopathy of Jiangtang Xiaozhi Recipe (, JXR) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal control group and diabetic group. Rats in the diabetic group were induced by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (50 mg/kg), and subdivided into 5 groups. Rats in the diabetic control group were given saline; four treatment groups were given metformin (300 mg/kg), JXR (2, 4 and 8 g/kg) respectively for 8 weeks, while rats in the normal control group were injected with citrate buffer and given the same volume of vehicle. Body weight and food intake were measured every week. The hypoglycaemic effects were determined by testing fasting blood glucose (FBG) every other week, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin, and glucagon at the end of the treatment. The preventive effects of JXR on STZ-induced diabetic rats were determined by histopathological examination with hematoxylin and eosin staining, and periodic acid-schiff staining. The effects were further evaluated by serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA). High-dose JXR significantly reduced FBG and HbA1c level at the 8th week of administration (Pdiabetic rats. Histopathological studies revealed that there were no basement membrane thickening and mild destruction in the treated groups. Morphometric measurements of retina microvascular showed that acellular capillary and capillary density decreased in treated rats while pericyte and endothelial cell increasing after the treatment. JXR have protective effect of diabetic retinopathy and its mechanism may be associated with the obvious hypoglycemic and antioxidant effect.

  2. Retrospective cohort study shows that the risks for retinopathy of prematurity included birth age and weight, medical conditions and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aliaa A; Gomaa, Nancy A S; Awadein, Ahmed R; Al-Hayouti, Huda H; Hegazy, Ahmed I

    2017-12-01

    This study described the characteristics and risk factors of neonates who developed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and severe treatable ROP in two Egyptian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This retrospective cohort study comprised 108 preterm neonates who were screened for ROP after being admitted to the two NICUs run by Cairo University Hospital from June 2014 to May 2015. Patients were examined using digital fundus photography and indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed if ROP was detected. Retinopathy of prematurity occurred in 75 patients. Late-onset sepsis, ventilation and hypercapnia were independently associated with ROP. Patients who developed severe treatable ROP had a younger gestational age (GA) than patients who did not develop ROP or developed mild or moderate ROP (29 weeks, range 27-33 weeks versus 32 weeks, range 28-36 weeks, p = 0.002) and a lower birthweight (1200 g, range 980-1590 g versus 1460 g, range 770-2475 g, p = 0.029). The risk factors associated with severe treatable ROP included the duration of admission, the duration of incubator oxygen, late-onset sepsis, intraventricular haemorrhage, total parenteral nutrition and the duration of caffeine citrate therapy. This study showed that the risks for ROP were wide-ranging and included GA and weight, medical conditions and treatment. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Methodology and early findings of the Diabetes Management Project: a cohort study investigating the barriers to optimal diabetes care in diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Ecosse Luc; Fenwick, Eva; Xie, Jing; Mcauley, Annie; Nicolaou, Theona; Larizza, Melanie; Rees, Gwyn; Qureshi, Salmaan; Wong, Tien Yin; Benarous, Rehab; Dirani, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The Diabetes Management Project is investigating the clinical, behavioural and psychosocial barriers to optimal diabetes care in individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy. Prospective cohort. Two hundred and twenty-three and 374 patients without and with diabetic retinopathy, respectively. All individuals underwent a comprehensive dilated eye test, anthropometric measurements, blood and urine samples, and psychosocial questionnaires. Good glycaemic control was defined as glycosylated haemoglobin Management Project, developed to assess factors associated with suboptimal diabetes care. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  4. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy among dialysis patients and their awareness about the need for screening to prevent blindness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, I.; Hameed, A.; Akram, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe frequency and spectrum of diabetic retinopathy among patients undergoing haemodialysis and to assess the awareness of importance of ophthalmic screening among these patients. Study Design: Observational descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at Combined Military Hospital Kharian, from August 2011 to January 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 49 patients were included in the study who were under going maintenance hemodialysis during the observation period. All the patients were examined with ophthalmoscope after mydriasis. Patients who were not willing, irritable or in coma were not included in the study. Results: A total of 49 patients (n=49) were examined with 26 males and 13 females. Age of patients with diabetic retinopathy ranged from 45 years to 68 years, mean age of patients was 57.5 years. Nineteen patients (38.7%) were suffering from diabetes mellitus. Four had been operated for cataract out of which only one was advised regular follow up for effect of diabetes on vision. Only one patient who was UK national was aware of need and importance of regular eye examination to avoid preventable blindness and to monitor for end organ damage. Conclusion: These results indicate that hospital needs integrated diabetic clinics for patient awareness and management to prevent blindness due to diabetic retinopathy. In fact, Pakistan needs a national level retinopathy screening programme keeping in mind the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus. National programme for retinopathy is doable as fundus cameras are widely available and can be operated by optometrists and integrated care protocols between different departments to avoid financial burden of care for diabetic gerartric patients. (author)

  5. The 16-year incidence, progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy in a young population-based Danish cohort with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the long-term incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and associated risk factors in young Danish patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In 1987-89, a pediatric cohort involving approximately 75...... % of all children with Type 1 diabetes in Denmark diabetic parameters assessed. Of those, 185 (54.6 %) were evaluated again in 2011 for the same clinical parameters. All retinal images...... were graded using modified early treatment of DR study for 1995 and 2011. In 1995, mean age was 21.0 years and mean diabetes duration 13.5 years. The 16-year incidence of proliferative retinopathy, 2-step progression and 2-step regression of DR was 31.0, 64.4 and 0.0 %, respectively, while...

  6. Proliferative retinopathy predicts nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Charlotte; Falk, Christine; Green, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We wanted to examine proliferative retinopathy as a marker of incident nephropathy in a 25-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients and to examine cross-sectional associations between nephropathy and retinopathy in long-term surviving patients of the same...... cohort. All type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, were identified as of 1 July 1973. One hundred and eighty four patients were examined in 1981-1982 (baseline) and in 2007-2008 (follow-up). The level of retinopathy was graded by ophthalmoscopy at baseline and nine-field digital colour fundus...... and proliferative retinopathy, respectively. In conclusion, proliferative retinopathy is an independent marker of long-term nephropathy in type 1 diabetes. Upcoming studies should examine whether these microvascular complications are also causally linked in type 1 diabetes....

  7. A systematic study on the prevention and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuman; Liang, Zhijiang; Du, Qiyun; Li, Zhankui; Tan, Guangming; Nie, Chuan; Yang, Yang; Lv, Xuzai; Zhang, Chunyi; Luo, Xianqiong

    2018-02-14

    To identify the prevention situation, the main factors influencing prevention effects and to develop control measures over retinopathy of prematurity in China. Using stratified random sampling method, we randomly selected 23 provincial and ministerial hospitals (8 in Guangdong province, 5 in Hunan province and 10 in Shaanxi province), 81 municipal hospitals (38 in Guangdong province, 19 in Hunan province and 24 in Shaanxi province), 180 district and county hospitals (76 in Guangdong province, 57 in Hunan province and 47 in Shaanxi province) in China. A total of 284 hospitals were enrolled in the study, with questionnaires distributed investigating the status and constrain factors of ROP presentation. Significant outcomes were analyzed thereafter by SPSS 19.0. The screening rate of ROP in medical institutions from eastern, central and western China were 84.6%, 35.0% and 56.7%, respectively. The screening rate of tertiary and secondary medical institutions were 84.6% and 25.7% in the eastern, 35.0% and 4.9% in the central, 56.7% and 5.9% in the western region. Screening was carried out better in the tertiary than that in the secondary and primary institutions. Treatment for ROP was available in 15.7% of all the tertiary hospitals surveyed. Lack of professionals, equipments and technologies were considered to be major restrain factors for screening. The ROP screening and treatment status have demonstrated significant regional diversity due to uneven distribution of medical resources in China. Developed areas had established intraregional cooperation models, whereas less-developed areas should consider set up a large-scale, three-level ROP prevention network. It is of paramount importance that education and training towards ophthalmologists should be vigorously strengthened. It is strongly recommended that implement ROP telemedicine and integrated ROP prevention and management platforms through the Internet should be established.

  8. Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. Alleviates Diabetic Retinopathy by Preventing Retinal Inflammation and Tight Junction Protein Decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zengyang; Gong, Chenyuan; Lu, Bin; Yang, Li; Sheng, Yuchen; Ji, Lili; Wang, Zhengtao

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to observe the alleviation of the ethanol extract of Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. (DC), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on DR and its engaged mechanism. After DC (30 or 300 mg/kg) was orally administrated, the breakdown of blood retinal barrier (BRB) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats was attenuated by DC. Decreased retinal mRNA expression of tight junction proteins (including occludin and claudin-1) in diabetic rats was also reversed by DC. Western blot analysis and retinal immunofluorescence staining results further confirmed that DC reversed the decreased expression of occludin and claudin-1 proteins in diabetic rats. DC reduced the increased retinal mRNA expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin- (IL-) 6, and IL-1β in diabetic rats. In addition, DC alleviated the increased 1 and phosphorylated p65, IκB, and IκB kinase (IKK) in diabetic rats. DC also reduced the increased serum levels of TNFα, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-12, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 in diabetic rats. Therefore, DC can alleviate DR by inhibiting retinal inflammation and preventing the decrease of tight junction proteins, such as occludin and claudin-1. PMID:25685822

  9. Social well-being of young adults with type 1 diabetes since childhood. The Oulu cohort study of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Virva; Hautala, Nina M; Tossavainen, Päivi; Falck, Aura A K

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the social performance of young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) since childhood with particular interest in its relation to the severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The prevalence of DR was evaluated in a population-based Finnish cohort of children with T1D during 1989-1990. The subjects were contacted 18 years later for evaluation of DR, education, employment, and family relations. 136 of 216 subjects participated in the study in 2007 (mean age 30 ± 3 years, mean diabetes duration 23 ± 4 years, 78 men). There were 42 subjects (31%) with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). A university degree was held by 9%, a degree from a university of applied sciences by 33%, and 45% had a vocational school education; 7% were full-time students while 4% had received no education after comprehensive school. PDR was associated with lower education. Sixty percent of the subjects with PDR and 68% of those with non-PDR held full-time jobs. Four percent of the non-PDR group were unemployed while 26% of subjects with PDR were outside working life because of either unemployment or retirement. Seventy-one percent of the subjects had a spouse, and 60 subjects had a total of 119 children. PDR did not compromise the likelihood of having a spouse and children. The majority of young adults with T1D take active roles in society by working and raising families. However, patients with PDR lacked secondary education significantly more often and were less likely to work than those with non-PDR. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  10. No advanced retinopathy of prematurity stages 4 or 5 in a large high-risk German cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muether, Philipp S; Kribs, Angela; Hahn, Moritz; Schumacher, Jasmin; Eifinger, Frank; Kirchhof, Bernd; Roth, Bernhard; Fauser, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) remains a major cause of juvenile blindness. As screening recommendations are refined, decreasing gestational age (GA) and birth weight (BW) constitute an increasing risk for ROP. This retrospective case series reviews the screening results of a very immature cohort in Germany. We conducted ROP screening according to the German guidelines of 1999: all preterm infants with a GA of 3 days, were assigned for screening. Dense laser coagulation was performed according to the current treatment criteria. All 767 consecutive inborn (patients born at the Department of Neonatology, University Hospital of Cologne, Germany) preterm infants of a tertiary medical centre of maximum care underwent complete screening from 2001 to 2009. The treatment incidence was 7.0%. No preterm infant developed stage 4/5 ROP. Mean GA and BW of untreated/treated preterm infants were 28.4/24.6 weeks and 1109/635 g, respectively. Increasing treatment incidence was associated with lower GA, but not with lower BW in logistic regression analysis. In this very immature high-risk cohort, advanced stages 4 and 5 were avoided throughout 9 years of screening. We suggest three factors that contributed to this outcome: (1) strict adherence to current ROP screening and treatment guidelines; (2) prompt and very dense laser coagulation if necessary; and (3) a specialised neonatal intensive care unit with experience of very immature babies.

  11. Retinitis pigmentosa reduces the risk of proliferative diabetic retinopathy: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Fang Chen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the association between retinitis pigmentosa (RP and the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR. METHODS: Using the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 of Taiwan, we identified individuals with an initial diagnosis for RP during the period of 1997-2008. A non-RP comparison group, 10-fold frequency matched by sex, age, index year and the year of diabetes diagnosed, were randomly selected from the same database. The occurrence of DR was observed for all subjects until the end of 2009. The Kaplan-Meier curves were used to illustrate the cumulative probability of developing DR for the RP group and comparison groups. The hazard ratio (HR of DR for the RP group relative to the comparison group was estimated using Cox proportional hazards model after adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: The Kaplan-Meier curves were not statistically significant different between the RP group and the comparison group. However, the RP group had a higher cumulative probability of developing DR during the first six to seven years. The cumulative probability kept increasing and became higher in the comparison group but remained unchanged in the RP group. The HR for the RP patients comparing with the comparison group was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI = 0.43-2.14. Stratified by severity, RP was associated with a non-statistically significant reduced risk of proliferative DR (PDR (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.16-3.14. The HR for non-proliferative DR (NPDR was 1.08 (95% CI = 0.40-2.86. CONCLUSION: In this study, RP was not statistically significant associated with the incidence of DR.

  12. Association between human breast milk and retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciana Teixeira; Senna, Denise C; Eckert, Gabriela Unchalo; Silveira, Rita de Cássia; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the possible protective effect of breast milk against retinopathy of prematurity by comparing the amount of breast milk received by patients who developed retinopathy of prematurity and those who did not and to determine both the required minimum amount of breast milk and the time of life during which neonates need to receive breast milk for this effect to be significant. Cohort study of newborns with a birth weight of prematurity of any degree was 31% (100 of 323 patients) and that of severe retinopathy of prematurity was of 9% (29 of 323 patients). The median amounts of breast milk received daily by patients with and without retinopathy of prematurity were 4.9 mL/kg (interquartile range, 0.3-15.4) and 10.2 mL/kg (1.5-25.5), respectively. The amount of breast milk received in the first 6 weeks of life was inversely associated with the incidence of both retinopathy of prematurity of any degree and severe retinopathy of prematurity in the univariate analyses. However, the statistical significance was maintained only during the sixth week of life in a per-period multivariate analysis controlling for confounding factors. Small amounts of breast milk are inadequate to prevent retinopathy of prematurity in premature newborns at risk for the disease.

  13. Blantyre Malaria Project Epilepsy Study (BMPES) of neurological outcomes in retinopathy-positive paediatric cerebral malaria survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbeck, Gretchen L; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Kaplan, Peter W; Seydel, Karl B; Chimalizeni, Yamikani F; Kawaza, Kondwani; Taylor, Terrie E

    2010-12-01

    Cerebral malaria, a disorder characterised by coma, parasitaemia, and no other evident cause of coma, is challenging to diagnose definitively in endemic regions that have high rates of asymptomatic parasitaemia and limited neurodiagnostic facilities. A recently described malaria retinopathy improves diagnostic specificity. We aimed to establish whether retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria is a risk factor for epilepsy or other neurodisabilities. Between 2005 and 2007, we did a prospective cohort study of survivors of cerebral malaria with malaria retinopathy in Blantyre, Malawi. Children with cerebral malaria were identified at the time of their index admission and age-matched to concurrently admitted children without coma or nervous system infection. Initially matching of cases to controls was 1:1 but, in 2006, enrolment criteria for cerebral malaria survivors were revised to limit inclusion to children with cerebral malaria and retinopathy on the basis of indirect ophthalmoscopic examination; matching was then changed to 1:2 and the revised inclusion criteria were applied retrospectively for children enrolled previously. Clinical assessments at discharge and standardised nurse-led follow-up every 3 months thereafter were done to identify children with new seizure disorders or other neurodisabilities. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was done for incident epilepsy. 132 children with retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria and 264 age-matched, non-comatose controls were followed up for a median of 495 days (IQR 195-819). 12 of 132 cerebral malaria survivors developed epilepsy versus none of 264 controls (odds ratio [OR] undefined; pepilepsy in children with cerebral malaria were a higher maximum temperature (39·4°C [SD 1·2] vs 38·5°C [1·1]; p=0·01) and acute seizures (11/12 vs 76/120; OR 6·37, 95% CI 1·02-141·2), and male sex was a risk factor for new neurodisabilities (20/28 vs 38/93; OR 3·62, 1·44-9·06). Almost a third of retinopathy-positive cerebral

  14. 'Teaching corner': Management of Diabetic Retinopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based interventions in three areas: primary prevention of retinopathy by optimum ... disease and management of established retinopathy to prevent or mitigate visual loss. ... of retinopathy and timely treatment all diminish the risk of ... types: macular oedema and macular ischaemia which may .... Variation in age of onset.

  15. [The experimental study of captopril and valsartan on the preventing and treatment of diabetic retinopathy in diabetic mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xi-Wei; Zhao, Ping

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the action of Angiotensin II (AngII) on the occurrence and development of diabetic retinopathy and the effect of captopril and valsartan on preventing and treating diabetic retinopathy. Male C57BL/KsJ db/+ mice were obtained at 3 weeks of age and maintained on diets enriched animal fat for 4 weeks. After exposure to high-fat diet for 4 weeks, mice were injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin (STZ) 100 mg/kg body weight. After 2 weeks, nonfasting plasma glucose concentration was measured by nipping the distal part of the tail. Mice whose plasma glucose concentrations were higher than 11.1 mmol/L were selected for the study as model groups. Starting from day 2, captopril 12.5 mg/kg or valsartan 40 mg/kg was given to treatment group via the oral route After treatment for 4, 8, 12 weeks, respectively, eyeballs of mice from each group were enucleated, embedded in paraffin to make tissue sections for immunohistochemistry analysis. The instrument for computer image-analysis was used to analyze the expression of AngII and VEGF in ganglion cell layer. The analyzed indices were mean gray scale value and area density value. With increased duration of diabetes, the mean gray scale values of AngII and VEGF decreased significantly. At the same time, area density values of AngII and VEGF increased significantly. The area density values of VEGF in captopril treated-group was significantly lower than that in valsartan-treated group for the same duration. Moreover, the area density values of VEGF at 4 weeks was significantly lower than that at 8 weeks or 12 weeks. The area density value in captopril treated-group had a significant negative correlation with diabetes duration. AngII had significant positive correlation with VEGF. AngII possibly participated directly and/or indirectly in the occurrence and development of diabetic retinopathy via the upregulation the expression of VEGF. Early treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and

  16. Therapeutic implications of curcumin in the prevention of diabetic retinopathy via modulation of anti-oxidant activity and genetic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldebasi, Yousef H; Aly, Salah M; Rahmani, Arshad H

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus that affects the blood vessels of the retina, leading to blindness. The current approach of treatment based on anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenesis drugs and laser photocoagulation are effective but also shows adverse affect in retinal tissues and that can even worsen the visual abilities. Thus, a safe and effective mode of treatment is needed to control or delaying the DR. Based on the earlier evidence of the potentiality of natural products as anti-oxidants, anti-diabetic and antitumor, medicinal plants may constitute a good therapeutic approach in the prevention of DR. Curcumin, constituents of dietary spice turmeric, has been observed to have therapeutic potential in the inhibition or slow down progression of DR. In this review, we summarize the therapeutic potentiality of curcumin in the delaying the DR through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth and nuclear transcription factors. The strength of involvement of curcumin in the modulation of genes action creates a strong optimism towards novel therapeutic strategy of diabetic retinopathy and important mainstay in the management of diabetes and its complications DR. PMID:24379904

  17. Beta-blockers for prevention and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaempfen, Siree; Neumann, Roland P; Jost, Kerstin; Schulzke, Sven M

    2018-03-02

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vision-threatening disease of preterm neonates. The use of beta-adrenergic blocking agents (beta-blockers), which modulate the vasoproliferative retinal process, may reduce the progression of ROP or even reverse established ROP. To determine the effect of beta-blockers on short-term structural outcomes, long-term functional outcomes, and the need for additional treatment, when used either as prophylaxis in preterm infants without ROP, stage 1 ROP (zone I), or stage 2 ROP (zone II) without plus disease or as treatment in preterm infants with at least prethreshold ROP. We searched the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group Specialized Register; CENTRAL (in the Cochrane Library Issue 7, 2017); Embase (January 1974 to 7 August 2017); PubMed (January 1966 to 7 August 2017); and CINAHL (January 1982 to 7 August 2017). We checked references and cross-references and handsearched abstracts from the proceedings of the Pediatric Academic Societies Meetings. We considered for inclusion randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials that used beta-blockers for prevention or treatment of ROP in preterm neonates of less than 37 weeks' gestational age. We used the standard methods of Cochrane and the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. We included three randomised trials (N = 366) in this review. Two of these studies were at high risk of bias. All studies reported on prevention of ROP and compared oral propranolol with placebo or no treatment. We found no trials assessing beta-blockers in infants with established stage 2 or higher ROP with plus disease.In one trial, study medication was started after one week of life, i.e. prior to the first ROP screening. The other two trials included preterm infants if they had stage 2 or lower ROP without plus disease. Based on the GRADE assessment, we considered evidence to be of low quality for the following outcomes: rescue treatment with anti-VEGF or

  18. Prediction of severe retinopathy of prematurity using the WINROP algorithm in a cohort from Malopolska. A retrospective, single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagła, Mateusz; Peterko, Anna; Olesińska, Katarzyna; Szymońska, Izabela; Kwinta, Przemko

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is one of the leading avoidable causes of blindness in childhood in developed countries. Accurate diagnosis and treatment are essential for preventing the loss of vision. WINROP (https://www.winrop.com) is an online monitoring system which predicts the risk for ROP requiring treatment based on gestational age, birth weight, and body weight gain. To validate diagnostic accuracy of the WINROP algorithm for the detection of severe ROP in a single centre cohort of Polish, high-risk preterm infant population. Medical records of neonates born before 32 weeks of gestation admitted to the third level neonatal centre in a 2-year retrospective investigation 79 patients were included in the study: their gestational age, birth weight and body weight gain were set in the WINROP system. The algorithm evaluated the risk for ROP divided into low or high-risk of disease and identified infants with high risk of developing severe ROP (type 1 ROP). Out of 79 patients 37 received a high-risk alarm, of whom 22 developed severe ROP. Low-risk alarm was triggered in 42 infants; five of them developed type 1 ROP. The sensitivity of the WINROP was found to be 81.5% (95% CI 61.9-93.7), specificity 71.2% (95% CI 56.9-82.9), negative predictive value (NPV) 88.1% (95% CI 76.7-94.3), and positive predictive value (PPV) 59.5 (95% CI 48.1-69.9), respectively. The accuracy of the test significantly increased after combined WINROP and surfactant therapy as an additional factor - sensitivity 96.3% (95% CI 81.0-99.9), specificity 63.5% (95% CI 49.0-76.4), NPV 97.1% (95% CI 82.3-99.6), and PPV 57.8 (95% CI 48.7-66.4). The WINROP algorithm sensitivity from the Polish cohort was not as high as that reported in developed countries. However, combined with additional factors (e.g. surfactant treatment) it can be useful for identifying the risk groups of sight-threatening ROP. The accuracy of the WINROP algorithm should be validated in a large multi-center prospective study in

  19. Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy may have rapid onset or worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms and Detection What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy and ... with diabetes protect their vision? Vision lost to diabetic retinopathy is ... However, early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness ...

  20. Clinical inertia causing new or progression of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osataphan, Soravis; Chalermchai, Thep; Ngaosuwan, Kanchana

    2017-03-01

    Clinical inertia is a failure to intensify treatment according to evidence-based guidelines, and can have both short- and long-term adverse effects for type 2 diabetes (T2D). The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the effects of clinical inertia on glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a university-based hospital in Thailand. Medical records were evaluated retrospectively from January 2010 to December 2014. Patients were classified into two groups: clinical inertia and non-inertia. Clinical inertia was defined as failure to initiate insulin within 3 months in patients with HbA1c ≥9 % who were already taking two oral antidiabetic agents. From 1206 records, 98 patients with mean HbA1c of 10.3 % were identified and enrolled in the study. The median follow-up time of these patients was 29.5 months and 68.4 % were classified into the clinical inertia group. The mean (± SD) HbA1c decrement in the clinical inertia and non-inertia groups was 0.82 ± 1.50 % and 3.02 ± 1.80 %, respectively, at 6 months (P inertia was associated with a significantly shorter median time to progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR); log rank test, P = 0.02 and a higher incidence of DR progression (10 vs 2.2 cases per 1000 person-months; P = 0.003). The adjusted incidence rate ratio for DR progression in the clinical inertia group was 4.92 (95 % confidence interval 1.11-21.77; P = 0.036). Being treated by general practitioners was the strongest risk factor associated with clinical inertia. Clinical inertia can cause persistently poor glycemic control and speed up the progression of DR in T2D. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Effect of candesartan on prevention (DIRECT-Prevent 1) and progression (DIRECT-Protect 1) of retinopathy in type 1 diabetes: randomised, placebo-controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaturvedi, Nish; Porta, Massimo; Klein, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results of previous studies suggest that renin-angiotensin system blockers might reduce the burden of diabetic retinopathy. We therefore designed the DIabetic REtinopathy Candesartan Trials (DIRECT) Programme to assess whether candesartan could reduce the incidence and progression of ...

  2. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J.; Joglekar, Mugdha V.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Keech, Anthony C.; O'Neal, David N.; Januszewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    diabetic retinopathy, there is need to reliably identify and triage people with diabetes. Biomarkers may facilitate a better understanding of diabetic retinopathy, and contribute to the development of novel treatments and new clinical strategies to prevent vision loss in people with diabetes. This article reviews key aspects related to biomarker research, and focuses on some specific biomarkers relevant to diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26676667

  3. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    diabetic retinopathy, there is need to reliably identify and triage people with diabetes. Biomarkers may facilitate a better understanding of diabetic retinopathy, and contribute to the development of novel treatments and new clinical strategies to prevent vision loss in people with diabetes. This article reviews key aspects related to biomarker research, and focuses on some specific biomarkers relevant to diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  5. Restructuring of the Gut Microbiome by Intermittent Fasting Prevents Retinopathy and Prolongs Survival in db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beli, Eleni; Yan, Yuanqing; Moldovan, Leni; Vieira, Cristiano P; Gao, Ruli; Duan, Yaqian; Prasad, Ram; Bhatwadekar, Ashay; White, Fletcher A; Townsend, Steven; Chan, Luisa; Ryan, Caitlin N; Morton, Daniel; Moldovan, Emil G; Chu, Fang-I; Oudit, Gavin Y; Derendorf, Hartmut; Adorini, Luciano; Wang, Xiaoxin X; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Boulton, Michael E; Yoder, Mervin C; Li, Qiuhong; Levi, Moshe; Busik, Julia V; Grant, Maria B

    2018-04-30

    Intermittent fasting (IF) protects against the development of metabolic diseases and cancer, but whether it can prevent diabetic microvascular complications is not known. In db/db mice, we examined the impact of long-term IF on diabetic retinopathy (DR). Despite no change in glycated hemoglobin, db/db mice on the IF regimen displayed significantly longer survival and a reduction in DR endpoints, including acellular capillaries and leukocyte infiltration. We hypothesized that IF mediated changes in the gut microbiota would produce beneficial metabolites and prevent the development of DR. Microbiome analysis revealed increased levels of Firmicutes and decreased Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia Compared to db/db mice on ad-libitum (AL) feeding, changes in the microbiome of the db/db mice on IF were associated with increases in gut mucin, goblet cell number and villi length and reductions in plasma peptidoglycan. Consistent with the known modulatory effects of Firmicutes on bile acid (BA) metabolism, measurement of BAs demonstrated a significant increase of tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA), a neuroprotective BA, in db/db on IF but not in db/db on AL feeding. TGR-5, the TUDCA receptor, was found in neural cells of the retina primary ganglion cells. Expression of TGR5 did not change with IF or diabetes. However, IF reduced retinal TNF-α mRNA, which is a key downstream target of TGR-5 activation. Pharmacological activation of TGR5 using INT-767 prevented DR in a second diabetic mouse model. These findings support the concept that IF prevents DR by restructuring the microbiota towards species producing TUDCA and subsequent retinal protection by TGR5 activation. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. A preliminary trial to determine whether prevention of dark adaptation affects the course of early diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, G B; Gündüz, M K; Kurtenbach, A; Völker, M; Zrenner, E; Gündüz, S B; Kamis, U; Oztürk, B T; Okudan, S

    2010-07-01

    This study was designed to determine whether a new form of treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR) was acceptable to patients and whether reduction in the maximal activity of rods in diabetes could affect the progress of DR. In 12 patients, trans-lid retinal illumination of one eye was employed during sleep to prevent the depolarisation of rods and thus reduce their metabolic activity. A headband was used to place a source of chemical light over one eye, with its fellow as a control. Colour contrast thresholds were measured before and after a period of treatment in treated eyes, and the changes were compared to those in untreated fellow eyes, and areas of 'dark retinal anomalies' (microaneurysms, dot haemorrhages) were measured at the same time points. Patients found this intervention to be acceptable, and no adverse effects were noted. In the majority of cases, and for each outcome measure, the treated eyes improved relative to their fellows. The intervention significantly reduced the tritan thresholds in treated eyes relative to their fellows (P=0.03), and the area of dark retinal anomalies decreased in treated eyes and increased in untreated eyes, with a similar probability. The study showed that this intervention is safe. Although the study was not powered to study efficacy, the results are promising and consistent with other reports that indicate the retina in DR is suffering from hypoxia; however, further trials should be undertaken.

  7. The incidence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy in a population-based cohort study of people age 50 years and over in Nakuru, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastawrous, Andrew; Mathenge, Wanjiku; Wing, Kevin; Bastawrous, Madeleine; Rono, Hillary; Weiss, Helen A; Macleod, David; Foster, Allen; Peto, Tunde; Blows, Peter; Burton, Matthew; Kuper, Hannah

    2017-03-23

    The epidemic rise of diabetes carries major negative public health and economic consequences particularly for low and middle-income countries. The highest predicted percentage growth in diabetes is in the sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region where to date there has been no data on the incidence of diabetic retinopathy from population-based cohort studies and minimal data on incident diabetes. The primary aims of this study were to estimate the cumulative six-year incidence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and DR (Diabetic Retinopathy), respectively, among people aged ≥50 years in Kenya. Random cluster sampling with probability proportionate to size were used to select a representative cross-sectional sample of adults aged ≥50 years in 2007-8 in Nakuru District, Kenya. A six-year follow-up was undertaken in 2013-14. On both occasions a comprehensive ophthalmic examination was performed including LogMAR visual acuity, digital retinal photography and independent grading of images. Data were collected on general health and risk factors. The primary outcomes were the incidence of diabetes mellitus and the incidence of diabetic retinopathy, which were calculated by dividing the number of events identified at 6-year follow-up by the number of people at risk at the beginning of follow-up. Age-adjusted risk ratios of the outcomes (DM and DR respectively) were estimated for each covariate using a Poisson regression model with robust error variance to allow for the clustered design and including inverse-probability weighting. At baseline, 4414 participants aged ≥50 years underwent complete examination. Of the 4104 non-diabetic participants, 2059 were followed-up at six-years (50 · 2%). The cumulative incidence of DM was estimated at 61 · 0 per 1000 (95% CI: 50 · 3-73 · 7) in people aged ≥50 years. The cumulative incidence of DR in the sample population was estimated at 15 · 8 per 1000 (95% CI: 9 · 5-26 · 3) among those without DM at baseline

  8. Retinopathy of prematurity and induced changes in arterial oxygen saturation with near infrared spectrophotometry: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Siebenthal, K.; Keel, M.; Dietz, V.; Fauchere, J. C.; Martin, X.; Wolf, Martin; Duc, G.; Bucher, H. U.

    1996-10-01

    Near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) is a noninvasive method for measuring oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in the neonatal brain. Using oxygen as a tracer, it is possible to calculate cerebral blood flow (cbf) and hemoglobin concentration (cHbc), which corresponds to cerebral blood volume, by inducing small changes in arterial oxygen saturation. Variability of tcpO2 is considered to be associated with severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A preliminary analysis without control found a 51 percent incidence of ROP in infants subjected to NIRS measurements whereas among infants who were not exposed to oxygen changes, only 29 percent developed ROP. A controlled study with matched pairs was performed. Thirty-nine premature newborns who had received NIRS recordings were matched with 39 out of 172 infants who had not received NIRS. Using this controlled study design there was no difference in the incidence and severity of ROP between the two groups. The conclusions are that: 1) small changes in oxygen saturation of 3 to 10 percent to measure cbf and cHbc did not increase the incidence or the degree of severity of ROP. 2) A controlled study design is important. Analyses of uncontrolled data would have led to the conclusion that oxygen changes as used with NIRS increase the risk of ROP.

  9. Fruit intake and incident diabetic retinopathy with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shiro; Yoshimura, Yukio; Kawasaki, Ryo; Kamada, Chiemi; Tanaka, Sachiko; Horikawa, Chika; Ohashi, Yasuo; Araki, Atsushi; Ito, Hideki; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2013-03-01

    Antioxidants and dietary fiber are postulated to have preventive effects on diabetic retinopathy, but evidence is lacking. We investigated this association in a cohort with type 2 diabetes 40-70 years of age with hemoglobin (Hb)A1C ≥6.5%, originally part of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study. After excluding people who did not respond to a dietary survey and patients with diabetic retinopathy or a major ocular disease at baseline, we analyzed 978 patients. Baseline dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire based on food groups and 24-hour dietary records. Primary outcome was incident diabetic retinopathy determined using international severity scales. Mean fruit intake in quartiles ranged from 23 to 253 g/day, with increasing trends across quartiles of fruit intake for vitamin C, vitamin E, carotene, retinol equivalent, dietary fiber, potassium, and sodium. Mean energy intake ranged from 1644 to 1863 kcal/day, and fat intake was approximately 25%. HbA1C, body mass index, triglycerides, and systolic blood pressure were well controlled. During the 8-year follow-up, the numbers of incident cases of diabetic retinopathy from the first through the fourth quartiles of fruit intake were 83, 74, 69, and 59. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of fruit intake compared with the first quartile were 0.66 (95% confidence interval = 0.46-0.92), 0.59 (0.41-0.85), and 0.48 (0.32-0.71) (test for trend, P diabetes duration, overweight, smoking, and hypertension. Risk for diabetic retinopathy declined with increased intake of fruits and vegetables, vitamin C, and carotene. Increased fruit intake in ranges commonly consumed was associated with reduced incident diabetic retinopathy among patients adhering to a low-fat energy-restricted diet.

  10. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for prevention of postoperative vitreous cavity haemorrhage after vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan M; Steel, David H W

    2015-08-07

    surgery, the incidence of vitreous cavity washout or revision vitrectomy at six months, adverse effects of intervention (cataract, iris rubeosis and rubeotic glaucoma, retinal detachment, increased inflammation and systemic side effects), quality of life measures performed at least six months following vitrectomy, and density of POVCH. The current review included 12 RCTs that looked at the pre- or intraoperative use of intravitreal bevacizumab to prevent postoperative vitreous haemorrhage during pars plana vitrectomy for complications of PDR. The studies were conducted in a variety of countries (three from Iran, two from Italy, two from Egypt, and the remaining from South Korea, USA, Mexico, Pakistan, and Japan). The inclusion criteria for entry into the studies were standard complications of proliferative retinopathy: non-clearing vitreous haemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment involving the macula, or combined tractional rhegmatogenous detachment. The included studies randomised a total of 654 eyes. The average age of the participants was 54 years.We identified methodological issues in all included studies. Risk of bias was highest for masking of participants and investigators (four studies were an 'open label' design), and a number of studies were unclear when describing randomisation methods and sequence allocation.Participants receiving intravitreal bevacizumab in addition to pars plana vitrectomy were less likely to experience early POVCH (grade 2) compared to people undergoing pars plana vitrectomy alone (risk ratio (RR) 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.96, 2 studies, 144 eyes, high-quality evidence). This corresponds to an absolute effect of 130 fewer people (95% CI 167 fewer to 7 fewer) with early POVCH per 1000 people when treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. We saw similar results for all grades of POVCH (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.53, 9 studies, 512 eyes) and when excluding cases where assessment of outcome was impossible due to presence of

  11. 34 CFR 668.207 - Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates. 668.207 Section 668.207 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Cohort Default Rates § 668.207 Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates. (a...

  12. 34 CFR 668.188 - Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates. 668.188 Section 668.188 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Two Year Cohort Default Rates § 668.188 Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates...

  13. Radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumbroso, L.; Desjardins, L.; Dendale, R.; Fourquet, A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is a retinal micro-angiopathy, observed after irradiation of the eye. It can rarely lead to neo-vascular glaucoma and enucleation due to pain. It is due to a progressive retinal capillary then vascular occlusion. Total irradiation dose, dose fraction, and surface of the irradiated retina seem to be strong predictive factors for radiation retinopathy. Patients who underwent an irradiation near the eye (skull base tumors, nasal and paranasal tumors, or brain tumors) should be followed by periodic ophthalmologic examination to detect and treat when necessary the non perfusion areas. (authors)

  14. Hydroxychloroquine retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, I H; Sharma, S; Luqmani, R; Downes, S M

    2017-06-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ; Plaquenil) is used increasingly in the management of a variety of autoimmune disorders, with well established roles in dermatology and rheumatology and emerging roles in oncology. Hydroxychloroquine has demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus; some clinicians advocate its use in all such patients. However, Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine (CQ) have been associated with irreversible visual loss due to retinal toxicity. Hydroxychloroquine retinal toxicity is far more common than previously considered; an overall prevalence of 7.5% was identified in patients taking HCQ for greater than 5 years, rising to almost 20% after 20 years of treatment. This review aims to provide an update on HCQ/CQ retinopathy. We summarise emerging treatment indications and evidence of efficacy in systemic disease, risk factors for retinopathy, prevalence among HCQ users, diagnostic tests, and management of HCQ retinopathy. We highlight emerging risk factors such as tamoxifen use, and new guidance on safe dosing, reversing the previous recommendation to use ideal body weight, rather than actual body weight. We summarise uncertainties and the recommendations made by existing HCQ screening programmes. Asian patients with HCQ retinopathy may demonstrate an extramacular or pericentral pattern of disease; visual field testing and retinal imaging should include a wider field for screening in this group. HCQ is generally safe and effective for the treatment of systemic disease but because of the risk of HCQ retinal toxicity, modern screening methods and ideal dosing should be implemented. Guidelines regarding optimal dosing and screening regarding HCQ need to be more widely disseminated.

  15. Radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.G.; Withers, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    A letter to the editor discusses the effectiveness and risk of radiation treatment of Grave's ophthalmopathy. The authors are unable to document a single instance in which retinopathy can be attributed to therapy with a total dose of 2000 cGy when delivered in daily increments of 180 to 200 cGy

  16. [A New Way to Look Up. Solar Retinopathy Risks and Methods of Prevention Prior to the 2015 Solar Eclipse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsos, M; MacGregor, C; Gousia, D; Moschos, M; Detorakis, E

    2017-06-01

    A solar eclipse is an impressive natural phenomenon that was last experienced in Europe in 2006. Last year, on March 20th 2015, a solar eclipse was visible in much of Europe. Solar retinopathy is a recognised potentially sight threatening condition that has been associated with direct or unprotected sun gazing. Public education has been shown to improve behaviour and attitudes that could influence the development of solar retinopathy during an eclipse. We have performed a study through newspapers prior to the 2015 solar eclipse in different European countries, in order to determine the level of public health awareness and attitudes to protection. Methods: 31 online editions of national newspapers were reviewed from six countries where the eclipse was most visible. Solar retinopathy, potential warnings, safe methods of viewing an eclipse and assessment of use and dangers of modern technologies were assessed. Results: All 25 newspapers examined mentioned the solar eclipse and risk to eyesight. Safe methods for viewing the eclipse were discussed in all newspapers. Eclipse eyeglasses were mentioned in 29 of the 31 newspapers reviewed. Children were identified as a high-risk group but advice for children viewing the eclipse varied between countries. Conclusion: Since the solar eclipse of 2006, there has been an increase in the level of education available in the media. Although the safe methods for viewing an eclipse have not changed in recent years, emerging technologies, such as camera phones and the "selfie" trend, have potentially increased the risk of eclipse-associated retinopathy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Prevention of retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants through changes in clinical practice and SpO₂technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Armando; Deulofeut, Richard; Critz, Ann; Sola, Augusto

    2011-02-01

    To identify whether pulse oximetry technology is associated with decreased retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and laser treatment. Inborn infants large group of inborn infants <1250 g, a change in clinical practice in combination with pulse oximetry with Masimo SET, but not without it, led to significant reduction in severe ROP and need for laser therapy. Pulse oximetry selection is important in managing critically ill infants. © 2010 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2010 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  18. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  19. Screening for diabetic retinopathy | Rice | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Good glucose control and the treatment of hypertension and hyperlipidaemia remain the key strategies in preventing diabetic retinopathy and its progression. Unfortunately, some degree of retinopathy will eventually develop in almost all type 1 diabetics and over 60% of type 2 diabetics over a 20-year period.

  20. Evaluation of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphisms in retinopathy of prematurity in a Turkish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Hatip; Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Gunay, Betul Onal; Aydin, Umeyye Taka; Karaman, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To assess Factor V Leiden (FVL) (rs6025), Prothrombin G20210A (rs1799963), MTHFR C677T (rs1801133), and MTHFR A1298C (rs1801131) gene mutations as risk factors in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A total of 105 children were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients were divided into two groups. The study group consisted of 55 infants with a history of ROP and the control group comprised 50 healthy infants with term birth. All subjects were screened for the presence of certain mutations (FVL, Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C) by Real-Time PCR at 1 year of age. The mean gestational age (GA) and birth weight (BW) of the study group were, 28.65 ± 2.85 weeks and 1171 ± 385.74 g, respectively. There were no significant differences of genotype and allele frequency of Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR A1298C and MTHFR C677T between the study and control groups (p > 0.05). Eight children (14.5 %) had heterozygous and one child (1.8%) had homozygous FVL mutation in the study group. One child (2%) in the control group had heterozygous FVL mutation. There was statistically significant differences of FVL allele and genotype frequencies between the groups (p < 0.05). The prevalence of FVL polymorphism (16.3 %) was higher in ROP patients than control subjects in this Turkish cohort. We suggest a possible association of FVL mutation with ROP at the end of the study.

  1. Retinopathy of prematurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides Vargas, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity has been the leading cause of childhood blindness. Early and effective screening has helped to diagnose the visual target of an infant by the difference between growing up with a disability or not. A joint effort between ophthalmologists and neonatologists is proposed to control this disease, ensuring success. An appropriate, early, effective and timely treatment has been the laser and cryotherapy like good choices for the neonate to prevent disease progression. Evaluation of screening program, to determine the incidence, compare statistics variables have been measures as other medical pathologies should be encouraged as research topics. A decrease in the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity is expected, controlling the risk factors during the child's stay in intrahospital neonatal unit [es

  2. Radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wara, W.M.; Irvine, A.R.; Neger, R.E.; Howes, E.L. Jr.; Phillips, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    The records were reviewed of all patients treated with irradiation to the eye at the University of California, San Francisco, between 1960 and 1975. Eight patients were identified who had developed radiation retinopathy 1 to 3 years postrirradiation. Lesions included retinal vascular occlusions, hemorrhages, microaneurysms, exudates, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachments, and optic atrophy with blindness. Four patients had received less than 5000 rad in 6 weeks to the retina, a dose usually considered within normal tissue tolerance

  3. [Application of cohort study in cancer prevention and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Min; Bai, Yana; Pu, Hongquan; Cheng, Ning; Li, Haiyan; He, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Cancer control is a long-term work. Cancer research and intervention really need the support of cohort study. In the recent years, more and more cohort studies on cancer control were conducted in China along with the increased ability of scientific research in China. Since 2010, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, collaborated with Lanzhou University and the Worker' s Hospital of Jinchuan Group Company Limited, have carried out a large-scale cohort study on cancer, which covered a population of more than 50 000 called " Jinchang cohort". Since 2012, a National Key Public Health Project, "cancer screening in urban China" , has been conducted in Jinchang, which strengthened the Jinchang cohort study. Based on the Jinchang cohort study, historical cohort study, cross-sectional study and prospective cohort study have been conducted, which would provide a lot of evidence for the cancer control in China.

  4. Refractive outcome of premature infants with or without retinopathy of prematurity at 2 years of age: A prospective controlled cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-ju Hsieh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the extent to which refractive morbidity is correlated to preterm birth or retinopathy of prematurity (ROP itself, or both, and examined the risk factors associated with refractive errors in a cohort of preterm infants with and without ROP compared with full-term infants. This longitudinal, prospective, controlled cohort study enrolled 109 infants, including 74 preterm and 35 full-term infants. Infants were divided into the following groups: no ROP, regressed ROP, laser-treated threshold ROP, and full-term. Cycloplegic refraction was determined at 6 and 24 months’ corrected age. Multiple regression models, analysis of variance (ANOVA with post hoc comparisons, paired t test, and the χ2 test were used for data analysis. ROP status was highly predictive of significant refractive errors in preterm infants. Eyes with laser-treated threshold ROP had significant myopia at both ages (mean spherical equivalent [MSE] in right eye at both refractions −0.72, −1.21 diopters [D], astigmatism (MSE −1.62, −1.80 D, and anisometropia (MSE 0.82, 1.02 D; ANOVA p  0.05. Thus, the persistent hyperopic status across ages in patients with regressed ROP and in patients without ROP differed significantly (paired t test p > 0.05 from that in the full-term infants, with a reduction in hypermetropia noted for the first 2 years of life (paired t test p < 0.05. The incidence and magnitude of significant refractive errors increased with severe ROP and with age. Although the emmetropization process of preterm birth, including regressed ROP and no ROP, differed from full-term birth in early infancy, we found no differences in the refractive status after 1 year in patients with regressed ROP and in patients without ROP, who were at risk of developing ametropia similar to that of full-term patients. Therefore, apart from laser-treated ROP, children with regressed ROP and without ROP can likely be observed with a verbal vision screening at 3

  5. Retinal photography screening programs to prevent vision loss from diabetic retinopathy in rural and urban Australia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, Robyn J; Svoboda, Jean; Fredericks, Bronwyn; Jackson, A Jonathan; Taylor, Hugh R

    2015-02-01

    This review assessed the effectiveness of diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening programs, using retinal photography in Australian urban and rural settings, and considered implications for public health strategy and policy. An electronic search of MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase for studies published between 1 January 1996 and the 30 June 2013 was undertaken. Key search terms were "diabetic retinopathy," "screening," "retinal photography" and "Australia." Twelve peer-reviewed publications were identified. The 14 DR screening programs identified from the 12 publications were successfully undertaken in urban, rural and remote communities across Australia. Locations included a pathology collection center, and Indigenous primary health care and Aboriginal community controlled organizations. Each intervention using retinal photography was highly effective at increasing the number of people who underwent screening for DR. The review identified that prior to commencement of the screening programs a median of 48% (range 16-85%) of those screened had not undergone a retinal examination within the recommended time frame (every year for Indigenous people and every 2 years for non-Indigenous people in Australia). A median of 16% (range 0-45%) of study participants had evidence of DR. This review has shown there have been many pilot and demonstration projects in rural and urban Australia that confirm the effectiveness of retinal photography-based screening for DR.

  6. Changes in detection of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes in the first 4 years of a population-based diabetic eye screening program: retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Alice S; Forbes, Angus; Dodhia, Hiten; Connor, Clare; Du Chemin, Alain; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Mann, Samantha; Gulliford, Martin C

    2013-09-01

    Annual diabetic eye screening has been implemented in England since 2008. This study aimed to estimate changes in the detection of retinopathy in the first 4 years of the program. Participants included 32,340 patients with type 2 diabetes resident in three London boroughs with one or more screening records between 2008 and 2011. Data for 87,570 digital images from 2008 to 2011 were analyzed. Frequency of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) was estimated by year of screen for first screens and for subsequent screens according to retinopathy status at first screen. Among 16,621 first-ever screens, the frequency of STDR was 7.1% in 2008, declining to 6.4% in 2011 (P = 0.087). The proportion with a duration of diabetes of retinopathy at first screen, the proportion with STDR at second or later screen declined from 21.6% in 2008 to 8.4% in 2011 (annual change -2.2% [95% CI -3.3 to -1.0], P retinopathy at first screen, STDR declined from 9.2% in 2008 to 3.2% in 2011 (annual change -1.8% [-2.0 to -1.7], P diabetic eye screening, patients at lower risk of STDR contribute an increasing proportion to the eligible population, and the proportion detected with STDR at second or subsequent screening rounds declines rapidly.

  7. Predicted impact of extending the screening interval for diabetic retinopathy: the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, H C; Nyangoma, S O; Cromie, D T; Olson, J A; Leese, G P; Philip, S; Black, M W; Doig, J; Lee, N; Briggs, A; Hothersall, E J; Morris, A D; Lindsay, R S; McKnight, J A; Pearson, D W M; Sattar, N A; Wild, S H; McKeigue, P; Colhoun, H M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to identify subgroups of patients attending the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening (DRS) programme who might safely move from annual to two yearly retinopathy screening. This was a retrospective cohort study of screening data from the DRS programme collected between 2005 and 2011 for people aged ≥12 years with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Scotland. We used hidden Markov models to calculate the probabilities of transitions to referable diabetic retinopathy (referable background or proliferative retinopathy) or referable maculopathy. The study included 155,114 individuals with no referable diabetic retinopathy or maculopathy at their first DRS examination and with one or more further DRS examinations. There were 11,275 incident cases of referable diabetic eye disease (9,204 referable maculopathy, 2,071 referable background or proliferative retinopathy). The observed transitions to referable background or proliferative retinopathy were lower for people with no visible retinopathy vs mild background retinopathy at their prior examination (respectively, 1.2% vs 8.1% for type 1 diabetes and 0.6% vs 5.1% for type 2 diabetes). The lowest probability for transitioning to referable background or proliferative retinopathy was among people with two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy, where the probability was <0.3% for type 1 and <0.2% for type 2 diabetes at 2 years. Transition rates to referable diabetic eye disease were lowest among people with type 2 diabetes and two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy. If such people had been offered two yearly screening the DRS service would have needed to screen 40% fewer people in 2009.

  8. Photocoagulation treatment of radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Chittum, M.E.; Wells, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the visual and anatomic effects of focal photocoagulation for clinically significant radiation macular edema in five eyes of four patients and panretinal photocoagulation for proliferative radiation retinopathy in six eyes of three patients. Focal and limited scatter photocoagulation was successful in preventing further vision loss in all five eyes treated for macular edema. Three eyes treated with panretinal photocoagulation had regression of neovascularization. The other three eyes treated for proliferative retinopathy subsequently had dense vitreous hemorrhages that required vitrectomy for restoration of useful vision

  9. Prospects for angiotensin receptor blockers in diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjølie, Anne Katrin

    2007-01-01

    Retinopathy is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, and is an important cause of blindness worldwide. Clinical trials have demonstrated that tight metabolic control inhibits the progression of retinopathy. Good blood pressure control has been shown to be protective...... in type 2 diabetes, and it may also reduce proliferative retinopathy in type 1 diabetes. However, such control is often difficult to achieve in clinical practice, and may be associated with problems such as hypoglycaemia. New therapies are therefore needed to reduce the risk of retinopathy....... There is growing evidence that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, and this has led to interest in RAS inhibitors as agents to prevent retinopathy. Several trials have suggested that ACE inhibitor therapy can inhibit progression of retinopathy...

  10. Parenteral Fish-Oil Lipid Emulsions in the Prevention of Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayalthrikkovil, Sakeer; Bashir, Rani A; Rabi, Yacov; Amin, Harish; Spence, Jill-Marie; Robertson, Helen Lee; Lodha, Abhay

    2017-06-01

    Objective  Omega-3 fatty acids are vital for brain and retinal maturation. It is not clear if early use of ω-3 fatty acids in the form of fish-oil lipid emulsions (FLEs) prevents retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in preterm infants. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate whether early administration of parenteral FLEs reduces ROP requiring laser therapy or severe ROP ≥stage 3 in preterm infants. Methods  A literature search was performed to identify studies comparing parenteral FLEs with soybean-based lipid emulsions (SLEs) in preventing ROP. The main outcome was incidence of severe ROP or ROP requiring laser therapy. Results  Studies met the inclusion criteria (four RCTs and two observational studies). The pooled relative risk of ROP requiring laser therapy or severe ROP ≥ stage 3 in FLEs group was 0.47 [95% CI: 0.24-0.90] and 0.40 [95% CI: 0.22-0.76] in RCTs and observational studies, respectively. FLEs also reduced cholestasis; however, other secondary outcomes of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), sepsis, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and mortality were similar. Conclusion  The use of FLEs may reduce the incidence of severe ROP or need for laser therapy in preterm infants. A large multicenter RCT is required to confirm this. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Hypertensive retinopathy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... retina from high blood pressure is called hypertensive retinopathy. It occurs as the existing high blood pressure ... flame hemorrhages and cotton wool spots. As hypertensive retinopathy progresses, hard exudates can appear around the macula ...

  12. Scutellaria barbata attenuates diabetic retinopathy by preventing retinal inflammation and the decreased expression of tight junction protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Yu Mei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the attenuation of ethanol extract of Herba Scutellaria barbata (SE against diabetic retinopathy (DR and its engaged mechanism. METHODS: C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days to induce diabetes. The diabetic mice were orally given with SE (100, 200 mg/kg for 1mo at 1mo after STZ injection. Blood-retinal barrier (BRB breakdown was detected by using Evans blue permeation assay. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect mRNA and protein expression. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect serum contents of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-1β. RESULTS: SE (100, 200 mg/kg reversed the breakdown of BRB in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The decreased expression of retinal claudin-1 and claudin-19, which are both tight junction (TJ proteins, was reversed by SE. SE decreased the increased serum contents and retinal mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-1β. SE also decreased the increased retinal expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. SE reduced the increased phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB p65 and its subsequent nuclear translocation in retinas from STZ-induced diabetic mice. Results of Western blot and retinal immunofluorescence staining of ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1 demonstrated that SE abrogated the activation of microglia cells in STZ-induced diabetic mice. CONCLUSION: SE attenuates the development of DR by inhibiting retinal inflammation and restoring the decreased expression of TJ proteins including claudin-1 and claudin-19.

  13. Local anaesthetic eye drops for prevention of pain in preterm infants undergoing screening for retinopathy of prematurity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dempsey, Eugene

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Screening examinations for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) are performed routinely in the neonatal intensive care unit and are a recognised cause of pain in the newborn. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of instillation of topical anaesthetic eye drops compared with placebo or no treatment on pain in infants undergoing ROP screening. SEARCH STRATEGY: We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included a search of the Cochrane Neonatal Group register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 10, 2010). We identified relevant studies by searching the following: (1) computerised bibliographic databases: MEDLINE (1966 to October 2010), EMBASE (1988 to October 2010) and Web of Science (1975 to March 2010; (2) the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials. We searched electronically abstracts from PAS from 2000 to 2010 and handsearched abstracts from ESPR from 2000 to 2009. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised, or quasi-randomised controlled trials, or randomised cross-over trials. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. MAIN RESULTS: We identified two studies for inclusion. Both studies were randomised cross-over trials performed in single centres. Both studies used the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) score as a measure of pain response. Different methods of evaluating PIPP scores are presented including the absolute PIPP score, a PIPP score > 10 or > 12 and an increase in PIPP >\\/= 4 from the baseline value. There is a nonsignificant reduction in pain scores at one minute and a nonsignificant increase at five minutes post insertion of the speculum. PIPP score > 12 at one minute resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the number of patients who experienced pain (typical risk ratio (RR) 0.56, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.89; typical risk difference (RD) -0.23, 95% CI -0.39 to -0.86; number needed to treat to

  14. DIABETIC RETINOPATHY AND THE EFFECT OF PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYED ALWI SAR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is associated with increased risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Although pregnancy does not have any long term effect on DR, progression of retinopathy changes occur in 50%-70% of cases. The greatest risk of worsening occurs during the second trimester and persists as long as 12 months postpartum. The other factors found to be associated with its progression include duration of the diabetes, severity of retinopathy at conception, hyperglycaemic control, anaemia and progression of coexisting hypertension. Because of the increased risk of progression of the disease inpregnancy, conception should be delayed till the ocular disease is treated and stabilized and laser photocoagulation should be promptly instituted in all cases of severe non-proliferative retinopathy and should not be delayed till the patient develops early proliferative changes. Good diabetic control before and during pregnancy can help prevent this increase in the progression and serious vision loss.

  15. Prevalence and 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy among Danish type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Green, A; Sjølie, A K

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of retinopathy in long-surviving type 1 diabetic patients. It also investigated the 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy and associated risk factors in a Danish population-based cohort. METHODS: A population-based cohort of 727...... type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, was identified in 1973. In 1981-1982, baseline retinopathy was graded and other risk factors were assessed in 573 patients. Twenty-five years later, 308 patients were still alive. Of these, 201 (65.3%) were re-examined at follow-up in 2007......-2008. RESULTS: The median age and duration of diabetes at follow-up were 58.8 and 43 years, respectively. At follow-up, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 97.0%. Non-proliferative retinopathy was found in 45.8%, and 51.2% had proliferative retinopathy. The 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy...

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  17. An effective suicide prevention program in the Israeli Defense Forces: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, L; Tatsa-Laur, L; Derazne, E; Mann, J J; Fruchter, E

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the IDF Suicide Prevention Program, implemented since 2006. Quasi-experimental (before and after) cohort study. Two cohorts of IDF mandatory service soldiers: the first inducted prior to (1992-2005, n=766,107) and the second subsequent to (2006-2012, n=405,252) the launching of the intervention program. The IDF Suicide Prevention Program is a population-based program, incorporating: reducing weapon availability, de-stigmatizing help-seeking behavior, integrating mental health officers into service units, and training commanders and soldiers to recognize suicide risk factors and warning signs. Suicide rate and time to suicide in cohorts before and after exposure to the Suicide Prevention Program. Trend analysis showed lower suicide rates in the cohort after intervention. The hazard ratio for the intervention effect on time to suicide was 0.44 (95% CI=0.34-0.56, Psuicide rate following the administration of the IDF Suicide Prevention Program. The effect of the intervention appears to be related to use of a weapon, and being able to benefit from improved help-seeking and de-stigmatization. Future efforts should seek to extend the program's prevention reach to other demographic groups of soldiers. The success of the IDF program may inform suicide prevention in other military organizations and in the civilian sector. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic diabetic retinopathy classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, María. A.; Arbeláez, Pablo A.

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a disease in which the retina is damaged due to augmentation in the blood pressure of small vessels. DR is the major cause of blindness for diabetics. It has been shown that early diagnosis can play a major role in prevention of visual loss and blindness. This work proposes a computer based approach for the detection of DR in back-of-the-eye images based on the use of convolutional neural networks (CNNs). Our CNN uses deep architectures to classify Back-of-the-eye Retinal Photographs (BRP) in 5 stages of DR. Our method combines several preprocessing images of BRP to obtain an ACA score of 50.5%. Furthermore, we explore subproblems by training a larger CNN of our main classification task.

  19. Outcomes of vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy at Groote ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Present limitations in primary and secondary prevention of diabetic retinopathy mean that many patients with diabetes present with advanced retinal complications, often requiring surgery (vitrectomy). Objectives. To determine the outcomes of vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy and to examine ...

  20. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  1. Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinweg, Sue Byrd; Griffin, Harold C.; Griffin, Linda W.; Gingras, Happy

    2005-01-01

    The eyes of premature infants are especially vulnerable to injury after birth. A serious complication is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is abnormal growth of the blood vessels in an infant's eye. Retinopathy of prematurity develops when abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina, which is the nerve tissue at the…

  2. Use of erythropoietin is associated with threshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in preterm ELBW neonates: a retrospective, cohort study from two large tertiary NICUs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Paolo; Memo, Luigi; Mostert, Michael; Gallo, Elena; Guardione, Roberta; Maestri, Andrea; Saia, Onofrio Sergio; Opramolla, Anna; Calabrese, Sara; Tavella, Elena; Luparia, Martina; Farina, Daniele

    2014-09-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a multifactorial disease with evidence of many associated risk factors. Erythropoietin has been reported to be associated with this disorder in a murine model, as well as in humans in some single-center reports. We reviewed the data from two large tertiary NICUs in Italy to test the hypothesis that the use of erythropoietin may be associated with the development of the most severe stages of ROP in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) neonates. Retrospective study by review of patient charts and eye examination index cards on infants with birth weight large tertiary NICUs in Northern Italy (Sant'Anna Hospital NICU in Torino, and Ca' Foncello Hospital Neonatology in Treviso) in the years 2005 to 2007. Standard protocol of administration of EPO in the two NICUs consisted of 250 UI/kg three times a week for 6-week courses (4-week in 1001-1500g infants). Univariate analysis was performed to assess whether the use of EPO was associated with severe (threshold) ROP. A control, multivariate statistical analysis was performed by entering into a logistic regression model a number of neonatal and perinatal variables that - in univariate analysis - had been associated with threshold ROP. During the study period, 211 ELBW infants were born at the two facilities and survived till discharge. Complete data were obtained for 197 of them. Threshold retinopathy of prematurity occurred in 26.9% (29 of 108) of ELBW infants who received erythropoietin therapy, as compared with 13.5% (12 of 89) of those who did not receive erythropoietin (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.121-4.949; p=0.02 in univariate analysis, and p=0.04 at multivariate logistic regression after controlling for the following variables: birth weight, gestational age, days on supplemental oxygen, systemic fungal infection, vaginal delivery). Use of erythropoietin was not significantly associated with other major sequelae of prematurity (intraventricular hemorrhage, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing

  3. Radiation retinopathy; Les retinopathies radio-induites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumbroso, L.; Desjardins, L. [Institut Curie, Serv. d' Ophtalmologie, 75 - Paris (France); Dendale, R.; Fourquet, A. [Institut Curie, Serv. de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-09-01

    Radiation retinopathy is a retinal micro-angiopathy, observed after irradiation of the eye. It can rarely lead to neo-vascular glaucoma and enucleation due to pain. It is due to a progressive retinal capillary then vascular occlusion. Total irradiation dose, dose fraction, and surface of the irradiated retina seem to be strong predictive factors for radiation retinopathy. Patients who underwent an irradiation near the eye (skull base tumors, nasal and paranasal tumors, or brain tumors) should be followed by periodic ophthalmologic examination to detect and treat when necessary the non perfusion areas. (authors)

  4. Multimorbidity and quality of preventive care in Swiss university primary care cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Streit

    Full Text Available Caring for patients with multimorbidity is common for generalists, although such patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and thus such trials lack of generalizability. Data on the association between multimorbidity and preventive care are limited. We aimed to assess whether comorbidity number, severity and type were associated with preventive care among patients receiving care in Swiss University primary care settings.We examined a retrospective cohort composed of a random sample of 1,002 patients aged 50-80 years attending four Swiss university primary care settings. Multimorbidity was defined according to the literature and the Charlson index. We assessed the quality of preventive care and cardiovascular preventive care with RAND's Quality Assessment Tool indicators. Aggregate scores of quality of provided care were calculated by taking into account the number of eligible patients for each indicator.Participants (mean age 63.5 years, 44% women had a mean of 2.6 (SD 1.9 comorbidities and 67.5% had 2 or more comorbidities. The mean Charlson index was 1.8 (SD 1.9. Overall, participants received 69% of recommended preventive care and 84% of cardiovascular preventive care. Quality of care was not associated with higher numbers of comorbidities, both for preventive care and for cardiovascular preventive care. Results were similar in analyses using the Charlson index and after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, center and number of visits. Some patients may receive less preventive care including those with dementia (47% and those with schizophrenia (35%.In Swiss university primary care settings, two thirds of patients had 2 or more comorbidities. The receipt of preventive and cardiovascular preventive care was not affected by comorbidity count or severity, although patients with certain comorbidities may receive lower levels of preventive care.

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivakumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects according to changes in visual evoked potential spectral components and an anatomically realistic computer model of the human eye under normal and retinopathy conditions in a virtual environment using 3D Max Studio and Windows Movie Maker.

  6. [Diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to evaluate the prevalence and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dilated fundal photography was performed at approximately 10 and 28 gestational weeks in 58 and 18 women with type 1 and type...... 2 diabetes, respectively. Retinopathy was classified as five stages +/- macular oedema. Progression was defined as deterioration corresponding to at least one stage between the two examinations. Clinical parameters were obtained from the medical records. RESULTS: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 36...... (62%) women with type 1 and three (17%) with type 2 diabetes at the first examination. In 26 (34%) retinopathy progressed; four women developed proliferations, three macular oedema and three reduction of visual acuity >/=0.2 on Snellen's chart in at least one eye. HbA1c in early pregnancy was the only...

  7. Role of Serum Lactate and Malarial Retinopathy in Prognosis and Outcome of Falciparum and Vivax Cerebral Malaria: A Prospective Cohort Study in Adult Assamese Tribes

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari, Kaustubh Suresh; Uttarwar, Sahil Prashant; Tambe, Nikhil Narayan; Sharma, Rohan S; Takalkar, Anant Arunrao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is no comprehensive data or studies relating to clinical presentation and prognosis of cerebral malaria (CM) in the tribal settlements of Assam. High rates of transmission and deaths from complicated malaria guided us to conduct a prospective observational cohort study to evaluate the factors associated with poor outcome and prognosis in patients of CM. Materials and Methods: We admitted 112 patients to the Bandarpara and Damodarpur Tribal Health Centers (THCs) between 201...

  8. Radiation retinopathy in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, S.P.; Joshi, A.V.; Banerjee, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    A case of radiation retinopathy in a diabetic individual who received a total dose of 45 Gy for lymphoblastic lymphoma of the orbit is reported. The relationship between radiation retinopathy and diabetes mellitus is discussed. (Auth.)

  9. Person mobility in the design and analysis of cluster-randomized cohort prevention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuchinich, Sam; Flay, Brian R; Aber, Lawrence; Bickman, Leonard

    2012-06-01

    Person mobility is an inescapable fact of life for most cluster-randomized (e.g., schools, hospitals, clinic, cities, state) cohort prevention trials. Mobility rates are an important substantive consideration in estimating the effects of an intervention. In cluster-randomized trials, mobility rates are often correlated with ethnicity, poverty and other variables associated with disparity. This raises the possibility that estimated intervention effects may generalize to only the least mobile segments of a population and, thus, create a threat to external validity. Such mobility can also create threats to the internal validity of conclusions from randomized trials. Researchers must decide how to deal with persons who leave study clusters during a trial (dropouts), persons and clusters that do not comply with an assigned intervention, and persons who enter clusters during a trial (late entrants), in addition to the persons who remain for the duration of a trial (stayers). Statistical techniques alone cannot solve the key issues of internal and external validity raised by the phenomenon of person mobility. This commentary presents a systematic, Campbellian-type analysis of person mobility in cluster-randomized cohort prevention trials. It describes four approaches for dealing with dropouts, late entrants and stayers with respect to data collection, analysis and generalizability. The questions at issue are: 1) From whom should data be collected at each wave of data collection? 2) Which cases should be included in the analyses of an intervention effect? and 3) To what populations can trial results be generalized? The conclusions lead to recommendations for the design and analysis of future cluster-randomized cohort prevention trials.

  10. Assessing Progress in Retinopathy Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCaire, Tamara J.; Palta, Mari; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Wisconsin Diabetes Registry Study (WDRS) cohort consisted of patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the same geographic region as, but 8–34 years later than the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (WESDR) cohort, providing a unique opportunity to assess changes in complications. We estimated the current prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy at 20 years of diabetes duration, compared these between eras, and evaluated the influence of diabetes management. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-year examinations, including fundus photographs, were completed on 305 WDRS subjects during 2007–2011. A subgroup of the WESDR cohort participated in one of four study visits during 1980–1996, at similar diabetes duration (n = 583). Adjusted ordinal logistic regression with three retinopathy severity categories was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of more severe retinopathy with diagnosis during an earlier era. RESULTS Mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was lower in WDRS than in WESDR (8.0% vs. 9.3% [P < 0.001], and 93.4% vs. 21.3% [P < 0.001]) used ≥3 daily insulin injections or an insulin pump. In WDRS, 18% had vision-threatening levels of retinopathy vs. 43% in WESDR. The adjusted OR of more severe retinopathy in the earlier era (OR 3.0 [95% CI 2.2–4.0]) was reduced by including 20-year HbA1c in the model (OR 2.2 [1.6–3.0]). CONCLUSIONS Retinopathy severity at a diabetes duration of 20 years is lower in the more recent era of type 1 diabetes. Updated projections should be used when informing newly diagnosed individuals of prognosis and for health care cost assessments. Current glycemic control explained a limited amount of the difference. PMID:23193204

  11. Research on diabetic retinopathy prevention and control of key target groups%糖尿病视网膜病变防治重点目标人群的调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小红; 胡雅国; 陈芳建; 郑美霞

    2013-01-01

    目的:为了解糖尿病人群相关危险因素对糖尿病视网膜病变(DR)发病的影响,从而为开展DR的防治工作提供对策和依据.方法:收集588例2型糖尿病患者的眼底检查情况及其它临床资料.根据眼底检查结果将患者分为糖尿病无视网膜病变(NDR)组398例及糖尿病视网膜病变(DR)组190例,并检测相关生化指标.结果:两组间比较,DR组病程较长,且收缩压(SBP)、舒张压(DBP)、空腹血糖(FPG)、餐后2h血糖(P2BG)、糖化血红蛋白(HbAlc)均高于NDR组(P<0.05).结论:应加强DR防治知识的普及,尤其是病程较长,SBP、DBP、FPG、P2BG和HbA1c较高的糖尿病患者应作为重点目标人群.%Objective;To understand the risk factors of the diabetic population on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy ( DR), so as to provide the basis for the prevention of the DR. Methods; Fundus examination and other clinical data of 588 patients with type 2 diabetes were collected. According to fundus examination results, they were divided into diabetic patients without retinopathy (NDR) group (398 cases) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) group (190 cases), and detected chemical and biological indicators. Results; Compared with the NDR group, the DR group showed the longer course and the indicators including systolic blood pressure ( SBP) , diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 - hour postprandial glucose (2hPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc) increased,which were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion; The popularity of DR prevention knowledge should be strengthened for the key target population, especially the diabetic patients with the longer course and the higher SBP, DBP, FPG,2hPG and HbAlc.

  12. [Retinopathy of prematurity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promelle, V; Milazzo, S

    2017-05-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a retinal vasoproliferative disease affecting extremely preterm infants exposed to high concentrations of oxygen therapy. Infants born before 32 post-menstrual weeks or with a birth weight of less than 1500g should systematically have a dilated fundus examination. The time of screening and schedule for follow-up are guided by the various risk factors. This disease results from immaturity of the peripheral retinal vessels at the time of premature birth. The classification of ROP depends on the anteroposterior extent of involvement (from center to periphery: zone I, II and III), its extension in 30° sectors (clock hours) and its stage (stage 1 to 5). "Plus" disease is defined as dilation and tortuosity of the retinal blood vessels in the posterior pole of the eye and represents a major risk factor for rapid unfavorable progression. A majority of patients will spontaneously recover, but patients with a high risk of progression will require treatment to prevent retinal detachment and blindness. The indications for treatment are threshold disease and type 1 pre-threshold disease. The current treatment of choice is peripheral retinal ablation with transpupillary laser, but ab externo cryotherapy may be used instead. Intravitreal injection of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors may be an attractive therapeutic option and is currently under investigation. After laser treatment, unfavorable outcomes occur in only 9 to 14 % of eyes, but at the price of peripheral retinal destruction. For all patients, whether treated or not, a regular fundus examination should be insured until complete retinal vascularization has occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparing carotid intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetes between patients with and without retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naroi Nejad M

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy seems to be associated with increased intima-media thickness of carotid arteries in T2DM. It may be a common denominator of pathogene-sis of microvascular complications and atherosclerosis in T2DM. Evaluations of carotid arteries are to be done by non-invasive methods such as color Doppler sonography for screening and preventing prospective cereberovascular accidents in patients with diabetic retinopathy, especially proliferative retinopathy, in routine ophthalmological examination of patients with T2DM.

  14. [Diabetic retinopathy: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelikánová, Terezie

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) develops in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is the major cause of vision loss and blindness in the working population. The main risk factor of DR is hyperglycemia accompanied by enhanced mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and hexosamines, increase in polyol metabolism of glucose. The severity of vascular injury depends on the individual genetic background and is modified by other epigenetic, metabolic and haemodynamic factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. In diabetes, damage to the retina occurs in the vasculature (endothelial cells and pericytes), neurons and glia, pigment epithelial cells and infiltrating immunocompetent cells: monocytes, granulocytes, lymfocytes. These activated cells change the production pattern of a number of mediators such as growth factors, proinflammatory cytokines, vasoactive molecules, coagulation factors and adhesion molecules resulting in increased blood flow, increased capillary permeability, proliferation of extracellular matrix and thickening of basal membranes, altered cell turnover (apoptosis, proliferation, hypertrophy), procoagulant and proaggregant pattern, and finally in angiogenesis and tissue remodelling. Brain, liver, adipose tissue, GUT, skeletal muscle and other tissues could be another source of mediators. Therapeutic approaches used for patients with or at risk for diabetic retinopathy include drug therapy to reduce modifiable risk factors, laser photocoagulation, intravitreous administration of anti-VEGF agents/steroids and intraocular surgery. Screening plays an important role in early detection and intervention to prevent the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Described insights into pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for DR, could help in the development of more targeted approach for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy. anti

  15. Arginase in Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. Priya; Rojas, Modesto; Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Toque, Haroldo A.; Caldwell, R. William; Caldwell, Ruth B.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic retinopathies, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinopathy of prematurity and retinal vein occlusion are a major cause of blindness in developed nations worldwide. Each of these conditions is associated with early neurovascular dysfunction. However, conventional therapies target clinically significant macula edema or neovascularization, which occur much later. Intraocular injections of anti-VEGF show promise in reducing retinal edema, but the effects are usually transient and the need for repeated injections increases the risk of intraocular infection. Laser photocoagulation can control pathological neovascularization, but may impair vision and in some patients the retinopathy continues to progress. Moreover, neither treatment targets early stage disease or promotes repair. This review examines the potential role of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic retinopathy. Arginase metabolizes L-arginine to form proline, polyamines and glutamate. Excessive arginase activity reduces the L-arginine supply for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causing it to become uncoupled and produce superoxide and less NO. Superoxide and NO react and form the toxic oxidant peroxynitrite. The catabolic products of polyamine oxidation and glutamate can induce more oxidative stress and DNA damage, both of which can cause cellular injury. Studies indicate that neurovascular injury during retinopathy is associated with increased arginase expression/activity, decreased NO, polyamine oxidation, formation of superoxide and peroxynitrite and dysfunction and injury of both vascular and neural cells. Furthermore, data indicate that the cytosolic isoform arginase I (AI) is involved in hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction and injury of vascular endothelial cells whereas the mitochondrial isoform arginase II (AII) is involved in neurovascular dysfunction and death following hyperoxia exposure. Thus, we postulate that activation of the arginase

  16. Recessive Stargardt Disease Phenocopying Hydroxychloroquine Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noupuu, Kalev; Lee, Winston; Zernant, Jana; Greenstein, Vivienne C.; Tsang, Stephen; Allikmets, Rando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a series of Stargardt disease (STGD1) patients exhibiting a phenotype usually associated with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) retinopathy on spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Observational case series from Columbia University Medical Center involving 8 patients with genetically-confirmed STGD1. Patients selected for the study presented no history of HCQ use. Horizontal macular SD-OCT scans and accompanying 488nm autofluorescence (AF) images, color fundus photographs, and full-field electroretinograms were analyzed. Results All study patients exhibited an abrupt thinning of the parafoveal region or disruption of the outer retinal layers on SD-OCT resembling the transient HCQ retinopathy phenotype. Funduscopy and AF imaging revealed variations of bull’s eye maculopathy (BEM). Five patients exhibited local fleck-like deposits around the lesion. Genetic screening confirmed two disease-causing ABCA4 mutations in 5 patients and one mutation in 3 patients. Conclusions A transient SD- OCT phenotype ascribed to patients with HCQ retinopathy is associated with an early subtype of STGD1. This finding may also present with HCQ retinopathy-like BEM lesions on AF imaging and funduscopy. A phenotypic overlap may not be surprising given certain shared mechanistic disease processes between the two conditions. A thorough work-up, including screening of genes that are causal in retinal dystrophies associated with foveal sparing, may prevent the misdiagnoses of more ambiguous cases. PMID:26311262

  17. Role of Serum Lactate and Malarial Retinopathy in Prognosis and Outcome of Falciparum and Vivax Cerebral Malaria: A Prospective Cohort Study in Adult Assamese Tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Kaustubh Suresh; Uttarwar, Sahil Prashant; Tambe, Nikhil Narayan; Sharma, Rohan S; Takalkar, Anant Arunrao

    2016-01-01

    There is no comprehensive data or studies relating to clinical presentation and prognosis of cerebral malaria (CM) in the tribal settlements of Assam. High rates of transmission and deaths from complicated malaria guided us to conduct a prospective observational cohort study to evaluate the factors associated with poor outcome and prognosis in patients of CM. We admitted 112 patients to the Bandarpara and Damodarpur Tribal Health Centers (THCs) between 2011 and 2013 with a strict diagnosis of CM. We assessed the role of clinical, fundoscopy and laboratory findings (mainly lactic acid) in the immediate outcome in terms of death and recovery, duration of hospitalization, neurocognitive impairment, cranial nerve palsies and focal neurological deficit. The case fatality rate of CM was 33.03% and the prevalence of residual neurological sequelae at discharge was 16.07%. These are significantly higher than the previous studies. The mortality rate and neurological complications rate in patients with retinal whitening was 38.46% and 23.07%, with vessel changes was 25% and 18.75%, with retinal hemorrhage was 55.55% and 11.11% and with hyperlactatemia was 53.85% and 18.46%, respectively. Three patients of papilledema alone died. Our study suggests a strong correlation between hyperlactatemia, retinal changes (whitening, vessel changes and hemorrhage) and depth and duration of coma with longer duration of hospitalization, increased mortality, neurological sequelae and death. Plasmodium vivax mono-infection as a cause of CM has been confirmed. Prognostic evaluation of CM is useful for judicious allocation of resources in the THC.

  18. Role of serum lactate and malarial retinopathy in prognosis and outcome of falciparum and vivax cerebral Malaria: A prospective cohort study in adult assamese tribes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Suresh Chaudhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is no comprehensive data or studies relating to clinical presentation and prognosis of cerebral malaria (CM in the tribal settlements of Assam. High rates of transmission and deaths from complicated malaria guided us to conduct a prospective observational cohort study to evaluate the factors associated with poor outcome and prognosis in patients of CM. Materials and Methods: We admitted 112 patients to the Bandarpara and Damodarpur Tribal Health Centers (THCs between 2011 and 2013 with a strict diagnosis of CM. We assessed the role of clinical, fundoscopy and laboratory findings (mainly lactic acid in the immediate outcome in terms of death and recovery, duration of hospitalization, neurocognitive impairment, cranial nerve palsies and focal neurological deficit. Results: The case fatality rate of CM was 33.03% and the prevalence of residual neurological sequelae at discharge was 16.07%. These are significantly higher than the previous studies. The mortality rate and neurological complications rate in patients with retinal whitening was 38.46% and 23.07%, with vessel changes was 25% and 18.75%, with retinal hemorrhage was 55.55% and 11.11% and with hyperlactatemia was 53.85% and 18.46%, respectively. Three patients of papilledema alone died. Conclusion: Our study suggests a strong correlation between hyperlactatemia, retinal changes (whitening, vessel changes and hemorrhage and depth and duration of coma with longer duration of hospitalization, increased mortality, neurological sequelae and death. Plasmodium vivax mono-infection as a cause of CM has been confirmed. Prognostic evaluation of CM is useful for judicious allocation of resources in the THC.

  19. PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bostak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of type II diabetes mellitus and carries with it the threat of blindness. Accurate information regarding the incidence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors is important in the prevention of its development and of the visual impairment caused by this complication. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes mellitus. We have also evaluated the association of diabetic retinopathy with clinical and biochemical variables. In a cross-sectional study, 152 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus were referred from two outpatient clinics in Tehran for ophthalmologic exam to detect retinopathy. Indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed and data regarding risk factors were extracted from routine medical records. Chi square and Mann Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. The overall prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 13.8 %( 21 cases: three cases with microaneurysm only, 10 with mild, 5 with moderate and 2 with severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Only one patient had advanced proliferative retinopathy. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was positively associated with age, duration of disease, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure. Diabetic retinopathy is common in newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus patients. Ophthalmologic consultation is essential at the time of diagnosis for all patients.

  20. Levels of serum vascular endothelial growth factor in type 2 diabetics with retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parveen, N.; Rahman, S.; Khan, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ischemic retina in diabetic patients releases a number of chemical substances including vascular endothelial growth factor which leads to retinal vascular proliferation and blindness following rupture and bleeding of vessels. Strategies to control this action can considerably halt this process. Objectives: To determine the relationship of various stages of diabetic retinopathy with the levels vascular endothelial growth factor in the serum of type 2 diabetic patients. Study type, settings and duration: This cross sectional analytical study was done over one year (2010-2011) in three major public sector hospitals of Peshawar. Patients and Methods: Adult patients of either gender having type 2 diabetes mellitus with proliferative or non proliferative retinopathy and those without retinopathy were selected for the study. Retinopathy was diagnosed on fundoscopy. Non-diabetic patients without retinopathy were selected as controls. Serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor were done in patients and controls using ELISA. Results: Serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were significantly higher in all cases having retinopathy as compared to controls. These levels progressively increased with the grades of retinopathy. Levels were higher in females. Conclusions: Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor are raised in diabetic retinopathy and rising levels can alert the clinician in worsening of retinopathy so that preventive and therapeutic measures can be taken promptly. Policy message: Further larger scale studies are recommended on national level to pave way for the establishment of appropriate management paradigms for diabetic retinopathy through anti-VEGF treatment. (author)

  1. Retinopathy of prematurity in infants with birth weight above 1500 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To identify the rate and prognosis of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) among newborn infants of birthweight of above 1500 grams, and the possible risk factors associated with the disease. Design: A prospective cohort study. Setting: Neonatal unit at Maternity Hospital, Kuwait city, Kuwait. Methods: All low birth ...

  2. Postnatal corticosteroids and risk of retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movsas, Tammy Z; Spitzer, Alan R; Gewolb, Ira H

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the association between postnatal steroids and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in neonates born with birth weights at the limit of viability (large study cohort of critically low birth weight infants ROP was more common in neonates exposed to postnatal steroids. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in Africa: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, P I; MacCormick, I J C; Harding, S P; Bastawrous, A; Beare, N A V; Garner, P

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim To summarize findings from studies reporting the prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy in African countries in light of the rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Methods Using a predefined search strategy, we systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation index and Conference Proceedings Citation index, African Index Medicus and the grey literature database ‘OpenSIGLE’ for studies published between January 1990 and February 2011. Included studies reported prevalence or incidence of diabetic retinopathy or diabetic maculopathy of subjects with diabetes resident in African countries. Results Sixty-two studies from 21 countries were included: three population-based surveys; two cohort studies; five case–control studies; 32 diabetes clinic-based, nine eye clinic-based and 11 other hospital-based surveys. Included studies varied considerably in terms of patient selection, method of assessing the eye and retinopathy classification. In population-based studies, the reported prevalence range in patients with diabetes for diabetic retinopathy was 30.2 to 31.6%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0.9 to 1.3%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 4.5%. In diabetes clinic-based surveys, the reported prevalence range for diabetic retinopathy was 7.0 to 62.4%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0 to 6.9%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 31.1%. No obvious association between prevalence and income level of the country was detected. Conclusions Large, community-based cross-sectional and cohort studies are needed to investigate rates and determinants of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, incidence and progression in Africa. Consensus is needed on the most appropriate methods of identification and classification of retinopathy for research and clinical practice. Estimates of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy are comparable with recent European and American studies. PMID:22817387

  4. Diabetic retinopathy in acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Azzoug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although growth hormone (GH has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR, DR is deemed to be rare in patients with GH excess. Our aim was to study its prevalence in subjects with acromegaly suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM, to analyze its characteristics, and to look for predictive factors such as age at diagnosis, GH concentration and duration, DM duration, DM control, and family background. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with acromegaly and DM (21 males, 19 females, median age = 50 years, underwent a systematic ophthalmological examination with dilated funduscopy to seek diabetic retinopathy. Results: Among this population, 05 (12.5% had DR. It was at an early stage or background retinopathy in 3 cases and at a more advanced stage or proliferative retinopathy in 2 cases. We did not find any correlation with age at diagnosis, GH levels and duration, DM duration and family history of DM, but poor glycemic control seems to play a role although statistical analysis showed borderline significance. Conclusion: From this study, we conclude that prevalence of DR in patients with acromegaly is 12.5%, and it is slight or moderate. Among studied factors, only poor glycemic control seems to be implicated in its development.

  5. Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  6. Detection of Hypertension Retinopathy Using Deep Learning and Boltzmann Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triwijoyo, B. K.; Pradipto, Y. D.

    2017-01-01

    hypertensive retinopathy (HR) in the retina of the eye is disturbance caused by high blood pressure disease, where there is a systemic change of arterial in the blood vessels of the retina. Most heart attacks occur in patients caused by high blood pressure symptoms of undiagnosed. Hypertensive retinopathy Symptoms such as arteriolar narrowing, retinal haemorrhage and cotton wool spots. Based on this reasons, the early diagnosis of the symptoms of hypertensive retinopathy is very urgent to aim the prevention and treatment more accurate. This research aims to develop a system for early detection of hypertension retinopathy stage. The proposed method is to determine the combined features artery and vein diameter ratio (AVR) as well as changes position with Optic Disk (OD) in retinal images to review the classification of hypertensive retinopathy using Deep Neural Networks (DNN) and Boltzmann Machines approach. We choose this approach of because based on previous research DNN models were more accurate in the image pattern recognition, whereas Boltzmann machines selected because It requires speedy iteration in the process of learning neural network. The expected results from this research are designed a prototype system early detection of hypertensive retinopathy stage and analysed the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed methods.

  7. Exercise and the Prevention of Depression: Results of the HUNT Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Samuel B; Øverland, Simon; Hatch, Stephani L; Wessely, Simon; Mykletun, Arnstein; Hotopf, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to address 1) whether exercise provides protection against new-onset depression and anxiety and 2) if so, the intensity and amount of exercise required to gain protection and, lastly, 3) the mechanisms that underlie any association. A "healthy" cohort of 33,908 adults, selected on the basis of having no symptoms of common mental disorder or limiting physical health conditions, was prospectively followed for 11 years. Validated measures of exercise, depression, anxiety, and a range of potential confounding and mediating factors were collected. Undertaking regular leisure-time exercise was associated with reduced incidence of future depression but not anxiety. The majority of this protective effect occurred at low levels of exercise and was observed regardless of intensity. After adjustment for confounders, the population attributable fraction suggests that, assuming the relationship is causal, 12% of future cases of depression could have been prevented if all participants had engaged in at least 1 hour of physical activity each week. The social and physical health benefits of exercise explained a small proportion of the protective effect. Previously proposed biological mechanisms, such as alterations in parasympathetic vagal tone, did not appear to have a role in explaining the protection against depression. Regular leisure-time exercise of any intensity provides protection against future depression but not anxiety. Relatively modest changes in population levels of exercise may have important public mental health benefits and prevent a substantial number of new cases of depression.

  8. The effect of preventive oral care on treatment outcomes of a cohort of oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Marilia Oliveira; Elias, Marcela Ramos Abrahão; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Dourado Pinezi, Juliana Castro; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess patient adherence to an oral preventive measures (OPM) protocol and its impact on cancer treatment outcomes. A retrospective cohort of oral cancer of 133 patients submitted to radiotherapy (RT) was selected, excluding those with metastasis. Patients were grouped according to their local tumor response after finishing RT (favorable or unfavorable) and adherence to an OPM (none, ≤6 months, and >6 months). OPM included education and counseling about adverse effects, elimination of infection foci, restorative procedures, fluoride therapy, oral rehydration, and maintenance and supervision of oral hygiene throughout treatment. Clinical and pathological characteristics were recorded, and patient outcomes (frequency of adverse effects, RT interruption, and overall survival) were analyzed. Patients with higher adherence to the OPM had greater occurrence of RT interruption as a consequence of symptoms (p = 0.01); however, these patients were more likely to complete the established RT protocol (p = 0.02). Overall survival (p = 0.01) was higher in the group with higher adherence. This study suggests that the implementation of oral preventive measures may contribute to improving the prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treatment by reducing the negative impact of oral complications.

  9. Relationship between retinal vessel diameters and retinopathy in the Inter99 Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drobnjak, Dragana; Munch, Inger Christine; Glümer, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the association between retinal vessel diameters and retinopathy in participants with and without type 2 diabetes in a Danish population-based cohort. METHODS: The study included 878 persons aged 30 to 60 years from the Inter99 Eye Study. Retinopathy was defined as a presence...... was 6.3 µm (CI 95%: 1.0 to 11.6, p = 0.020) wider and CRVE was 7.9 µm (CI 95%: 0.7 to 15.2, p = 0.030) wider in those with retinopathy compared to those without retinopathy, after adjusting for age, gender, HbA1c, blood pressure, smoking, serum total and HDL cholesterol. In all participants, CRAE.......001), and decreased with higher HDL cholesterol (p gender was associated with wider CRVE (p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS: Wider retinal vessel diameters were associated with the presence of retinopathy in participants with diabetes, but not in participants without diabetes...

  10. Efficacy of Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Stage 3+ Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz-Hittner, Helen A.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Chuang, Alice Z.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Retinopathy of prematurity is a leading cause of childhood blindness worldwide. Peripheral retinal ablation with conventional (confluent) laser therapy is destructive, causes complications, and does not prevent all vision loss, especially in cases of retinopathy of prematurity affecting zone I of the eye. Case series in which patients were treated with vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors suggest that these agents may be useful in treating retinopathy of prematurity. METHODS We conducted a prospective, controlled, randomized, stratified, multicenter trial to assess intravitreal bevacizumab monotherapy for zone I or zone II posterior stage 3+ (i.e., stage 3 with plus disease) retinopathy of prematurity. Infants were randomly assigned to receive intravitreal bevacizumab (0.625 mg in 0.025 ml of solution) or conventional laser therapy, bilaterally. The primary ocular outcome was recurrence of retinopathy of prematurity in one or both eyes requiring retreatment before 54 weeks’ postmenstrual age. RESULTS We enrolled 150 infants (total sample of 300 eyes); 143 infants survived to 54 weeks’ postmenstrual age, and the 7 infants who died were not included in the primary-outcome analyses. Retinopathy of prematurity recurred in 4 infants in the bevacizumab group (6 of 140 eyes [4%]) and 19 infants in the laser-therapy group (32 of 146 eyes [22%], P = 0.002). A significant treatment effect was found for zone I retinopathy of prematurity (P = 0.003) but not for zone II disease (P = 0.27). CONCLUSIONS Intravitreal bevacizumab monotherapy, as compared with conventional laser therapy, in infants with stage 3+ retinopathy of prematurity showed a significant benefit for zone I but not zone II disease. Development of peripheral retinal vessels continued after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab, but conventional laser therapy led to permanent destruction of the peripheral retina. This trial was too small to assess safety. PMID:21323540

  11. Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Johnny; Kern, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities in the retina, but which of these abnormalities contribute to recognized features of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is less clear. Many of the molecular and physiologic abnormalities that have been found to develop in the retina in diabetes are consistent with inflammation. Moreover, a number of anti-inflammatory therapies have been found to significantly inhibit development of different aspects of DR in animal models. Herein, we review the inflammatory mediators and their relationship to early and late DR, and discuss the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to inhibit development of different stages of the retinopathy. We focus primarily on information derived from in vivo studies, supplementing with information from in vitro studies were important. PMID:21635964

  12. Monitoring of Diabetic Retinopathy in relation to Bariatric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Troels; Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Svenningsen, Annette Lykke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the need for closer perioperative monitoring of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. METHODS: Prospective observational clinical study of 56 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. The patients were...... examined with 7-field fundus images and optical coherence tomography scans 2 weeks before and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Worsening was defined as a two-step change in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy scale or appearance or worsening of macular edema......%) of the 32 patients without preoperative diabetic retinopathy had a transient worsening at 6 months. No patients developed macular edema, but the whole cohort had a minor increase in center point foveal thickness that peaked 6 months postoperatively. The patients were required to have good glucose control...

  13. Linezolid induced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Hyun; Park, Tae Kwann; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Jong Sook; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-12-01

    While optic neuropathy is a well-known cause of visual disturbances in linezolid-treated patients, the possibility of linezolid-related retinopathy has not been investigated. Here, we report a case of retinopathy demonstrated by multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) in a linezolid-treated patient. A 61-year-old man with extensively drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis treated with linezolid for 5 months presented with painless loss of vision in both eyes. The patient's best corrected visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/100 in the left eye. Fundus examination revealed mild disc edema, and color vision was defective in both eyes. Humphrey visual field tests showed a superotemporal field defect in the right eye and central and pericentral field defect in the left eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed only mild optic disc swelling. In mfERG, central amplitudes were depressed in both eyes. Four months after the cessation of linezolid, visual acuity was restored to 20/20 right eye and 20/25 left eye. The color vision and visual field had improved. The OCT and mfEFG findings improved as well. Although the clinical features were similar to linezolid-induced optic neuropathy, the mfERG findings suggest the possibility of a retinopathy through cone dysfunction.

  14. Plasma carotenoids and breast cancer risk in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Furtado, Jeremy D; Campos, Hannia; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2015-09-01

    Several circulating carotenoids have been inversely associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk in large cohort studies and a pooled analysis. Whether associations differ by tumor or participant characteristics remains unclear. We investigated the associations of plasma carotenoids with postmenopausal breast cancer risk overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status, tumor stage, smoking status, and body mass index, in a case-control study nested in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. A total of 496 invasive breast cancer cases diagnosed between blood draw in 1998-2001 and June 30, 2007 and matched 1:1 with controls on race, birth date, and blood draw date were included. Multivariable-adjusted conditional and unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Plasma α-carotene above the lowest quartile was associated with significant 40-43% lower risk of invasive breast cancer risk (fourth vs. first quartile OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.41-0.87, P-trend = 0.037) after adjustment for multiple covariates. This inverse association was strengthened after further adjustment for other plasma carotenoids and total fruit and vegetable intake (fourth vs. first quartile OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29-0.85, P-trend = 0.041). Other plasma carotenoids or total carotenoids were not associated with breast cancer risk. The inverse association of α-carotene with breast cancer remained for ER+, but not for ER- tumors, although test for heterogeneity was not statistically significant (P-heterogeneity = 0.49). These results suggest that higher plasma α-carotene is associated with lower risk of invasive breast cancer.

  15. Targeting VEGF in canine oxygen-induced retinopathy - a model for human retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLeod DS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available D Scott McLeod, Gerard A Lutty Department of Ophthalmology, Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Development of the dog superficial retinal vasculature is similar to the mechanism of human retinal vasculature development; they both develop by vasculogenesis, differentiation, and assembly of vascular precursors called angioblasts. Canine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR was first developed by Arnall Patz in an effort to experimentally determine the effects of hyperoxia on the development of the retinal vasculature. The canine OIR model has many characteristics in common with human retinopathy of prematurity. Exposure of 1-day-old dogs to hyperoxia for 4 days causes a vaso-obliteration throughout the retina. Vasoproliferation, after the animals have returned to room air, is robust. The initial small preretinal neovascular formations anastomose to form large preretinal membranes that eventually cause tractional retinal folds. The end-stage pathology of the canine model is similar to stage IV human retinopathy of prematurity. Therefore, canine OIR is an excellent forum to evaluate the response to drugs targeting VEGF and its receptors. Evaluation of an antibody to VEGF-R2 and the VEGF-Trap demonstrated that doses should be titered down so that preretinal neovascularization is inhibited but retinal revascularization is able to proceed, vascularizing peripheral retina and preventing it from being a source of VEGF. Keywords: angioblasts, blood vessels, endothelial cells, oxygen, retinopathy, retina, vascular endothelial cell growth factor

  16. Proliferative retinopathy and proteinuria predict mortality rate in type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Green, A; Sjølie, A K

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the effect of diabetic retinopathy on 25 year survival rate among a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark. METHODS: In 1973 all diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark with onset before the age of 30 years as of 1 July 1973...... were identified (n=727). In 1981, only 627 patients were still alive and resident in Denmark. Of these, 573 (91%) participated in a clinical baseline examination, in which diabetic retinopathy was graded and other markers of diabetes measured. Mortality rate was examined in a 25 year follow....../INTERPRETATION: Proliferative retinopathy and proteinuria predict mortality rate in a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients. In combination they act even more strongly. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy did not affect survival rate....

  17. Lipasin, a biomarker of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chen; Huang, Yun; Guo, Heming; Gao, Yan; Ji, Xiaoyan; Hu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    The present study recruited 74 participants with type 2 diabetes, among which 23 had retinopathy. Those with retinopathy had a longer duration of diabetes and higher levels of lipasin compared with those without retinopathy. Logistic regression revealed that lipasin was independently and significantly associated with retinopathy even after adjustments for confounders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Coffee prevents proximal colorectal adenomas in Japanese men: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomiyo; Ishikawa, Hideki; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Kawano, Atsuko; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2016-09-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to show that coffee prevents the recurrence of colorectal tumors (adenomas, precursors of colorectal cancer, and early-stage colorectal cancers) as well as colorectal cancer. The present study included 307 patients who participated in a clinical study that required endoscopy to remove a colorectal tumor. The amount of coffee consumed by the patients at study inclusion and the frequency of colorectal tumors, as detected by colonoscopy over the subsequent 4 years, were assessed. Coffee consumption was determined using a diet survey that included 3-consecutive-day food records. The risk of colorectal tumor recurrence was significantly lower (odds ratio=0.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.74) in patients who consumed more than three cups of coffee per day compared with those who consumed no coffee. No correlation was observed between the examined factors, including green tea and black tea intake and the amount of caffeine consumed. In subanalysis divided by the tumor location within the colorectum, the odds ratio of colorectal tumor recurrence in the proximal colon showed a tendency toward reduction as coffee consumption increased; however, increased coffee consumption significantly increased colorectal tumor recurrence in the distal colon. We showed that high coffee consumption reduced the overall occurrence of colorectal tumors, affected by the reduction in the proximal colon.

  19. Alcohol intake and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer: The Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Gapstur, Susan M; Newton, Christina C; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, but to the authors' knowledge its influence on survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer is unclear. The authors investigated associations between prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol intake with mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. The authors identified 2458 men and women who were diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic colorectal cancer between 1992 (enrollment into the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort) and 2011. Alcohol consumption was self-reported at baseline and updated in 1997, 1999, 2003, and 2007. Postdiagnosis alcohol data were available for 1599 participants. Of the 2458 participants diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 1156 died during follow-up through 2012. Prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol consumption were not found to be associated with all-cause mortality, except for an association between prediagnosis consumption of colorectal cancer-specific mortality, although there was some suggestion of increased colorectal cancer-specific mortality with postdiagnosis drinking (RR, 1.27 [95% CI, 0.87-1.86] for current drinking of colorectal cancer. The association between postdiagnosis drinking and colorectal cancer-specific mortality should be examined in larger studies of individuals diagnosed with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2006-2013. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. [The German program for disease management guidelines: type 2 diabetes--diabetic retinopathy/maculopathy guideline 2006. Short review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Kopp, Ina; Thole, Henning; Lelgemann, Monika

    2007-02-15

    In Germany, the first national consensus between six medical scientific associations on evidence-based recommendations for prevention and therapy of retinopathy/maculopathy in type 2 diabetes was reached in fall 2006. The recommendations' main sources are the NICE Retinopathy Guideline 2002, and existing German guidelines and reviews of recent scientific evidence. The article gives an overview on authors, sources, and key recommendations of the German National Disease Management Guideline Type 2 Diabetes-Retinopathy/Maculopathy 2006 (www.diabetes.versorgungsleitlinien.de).

  1. Update on the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Wilkinson-Berka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy is the most feared complication of diabetes, compromising quality of life in most sufferers. Almost all patients with type 1 diabetes will develop retinopathy over a 15- to 20-year period, and approximately 20–30% will advance to the blinding stage of the disease[1]. Greater than 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes will have retinopathy. This situation is highlighted by the frightening statistic that diabetic retinopathy (DR remains the most common cause of vision impairment in people of working age in Western society. With the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, this predicament is set to worsen as over 360 million people are projected to suffer from diabetes and its complications by 2030. Vision loss from diabetes is due to a number of factors, including haemorrhage from new and poorly formed blood vessels, retinal detachment due to contraction of deposited fibrous tissue, and neovascular glaucoma resulting in an increase in intraocular pressure. Diabetic macular oedema is now the principal cause of vision loss in diabetes and involves leakage from a disrupted blood-retinal barrier. In terms of treatment, there is clear evidence that strict metabolic and blood pressure control can lower the risk of developing DR and reduce disease progression. Laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy are effective in preventing severe vision loss in DR, particularly in the most advanced stages of the disease. However, both procedures have limitations. This review examines evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that shows that targeting inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids, protein kinase C, growth hormone, and advanced glycation end-products are potential treatments for DR.

  2. Social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Eva; Rees, Gwyn; Pesudovs, Konrad; Dirani, Mohamed; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Y; Lamoureux, Ecosse

    2012-01-01

    People with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy are likely to experience enhanced social and emotional strain. Critically, those with both vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy and psychosocial problems may have significantly reduced levels of functioning compared with psychologically healthy counterparts. This can cause inadequate compliance, increased strain on family functioning, worse diabetes control, increased progression of diabetic retinopathy and, consequently, further psychosocial stress resulting in a number of concerning implications for disease management, clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. However, the emotional and social health consequences of diabetic retinopathy have not yet been systematically explored. This information is crucial as it allows for a targeted approach to treatment and prevention and avoidance of the potentially detrimental implications described above. Therefore, this paper reviews the current qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and identifies directions for future research. Key search terms were applied to the electronic databases Pubmed, ISI Web of Science and Embase and the bibliographies of relevant papers were systematically reviewed for additional references. Overall, the evidence suggests that diabetic retinopathy and associated vision loss have several debilitating effects, including disruption of family functioning, relationships and roles; increased social isolation and dependence; and deterioration of work prospects resulting in increased financial strain. Adverse emotional responses include fear, anxiety, vulnerability, guilt, loss of confidence, anger, stress and self-perception issues. However, the research to date is largely qualitative in nature, with most quantitative studies being small, cross-sectional and somewhat outdated. Similarly, the outcome measures used in many studies to date are suboptimal in terms of content and validity

  3. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in various ethnic groups: a worldwide perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Gupta, Bhaskar; Crosby-Nwaobi, Roxanne; Evans, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The alarming rise in diabetes prevalence is a global public health and economic problem. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common complication of diabetes and the leading cause of blindness among working-age populations in the Western world. Screening and prompt treatment of diabetic retinopathy are not top priorities in many regions of the world, because the impacts of other causes of preventable blindness remain an issue. Ethnicity is a complex, independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. Observations from white populations cannot be extrapolated fully to other ethnic groups. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy, and clinically significant macular edema are higher in people of South Asian, African, Latin American, and indigenous tribal descent compared to the white population. Although all ethnic groups are susceptible to the established risk factors of diabetic retinopathy-such as length of exposure and severity of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia-ethnic-specific risk factors also may influence these rates. Such risk factors may include differential susceptibility to conventional risk factors, insulin resistance, differences in anthropometric measurements, truncal obesity, urbanization, variations in access to healthcare systems, genetic susceptibility, and epigenetics. The rates of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy appear to be declining in the United States, supporting the observation that better medical management of diabetes and prompt treatment of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy substantially improve the long-term diabetic retinopathy incidence; studies from other parts of the world are limited and do not mirror this finding, however. We examine the ethnicity and region-based prevalence of diabetic retinopathy around the world and highlight the need to reinforce ethnicity-based screening and treatment thresholds in diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Automatic Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy in Digital Fundus Photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, M.

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common ocular complication of diabetes. It is the most frequent cause of blindness in the working population of the United States and the European Union. Early diagnosis, and treatment can prevent vision loss in the majority of cases. Yet only approximately 50% of people

  5. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and end‑stage renal disease respectively in adults of both ... Departments of Medicine, and 1Ophthalmology, Era's Lucknow Medical ... The collected data included age, gender, duration of diabetes and ..... also shown to be effective in preventing DR in individuals .... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema disease severity.

  6. Automated screening for retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rodin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Retinal pathology is a common cause of an irreversible decrease of central vision commonly found amongst senior population. Detection of the earliest signs of retinal diseases can be facilitated by viewing retinal images available from the telemedicine networks. To facilitate the process of retinal images, screening software applications based on image recognition technology are currently on the various stages of development.Purpose: To develop and implement computerized image recognition software that can be used as a decision support technologyfor retinal image screening for various types of retinopathies.Methods: The software application for the retina image recognition has been developed using C++ language. It was tested on dataset of 70 images with various types of pathological features (age related macular degeneration, chorioretinitis, central serous chorioretinopathy and diabetic retinopathy.Results: It was shown that the system can achieve a sensitivity of 73 % and specificity of 72 %.Conclusion: Automated detection of macular lesions using proposed software can significantly reduce manual grading workflow. In addition, automated detection of retinal lesions can be implemented as a clinical decision support system for telemedicine screening. It is anticipated that further development of this technology can become a part of diagnostic image analysis system for the electronic health records.

  7. Neovascularization in Purtscher's retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Annie Chan, Douglas R Fredrick, Theodore Leng Department of Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: We report a case of neovascularization secondary to Purtscher's retinopathy that showed minimal improvement with photocoagulation treatment. A 14-year-old boy with a history of cerebellar medulloblastoma presented with blurry vision and floaters after being struck by a motor vehicle while riding his bike. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/400 in his right eye and counting fingers in his left eye. Fundus examination showed disk edema, retinal whitening, and retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated thinning of the temporal retina and disruption of the inner segment–outer segment junction of the photoreceptor layer in the right eye and thickening and edema of the nasal macula, as well as a central foveal hyper-reflectivity, in the left eye. At the initial visit, there was no ischemia or neovascularization (NV. One month later, the patient developed NV of the disk and ischemia in the mid-periphery of the left eye. The patient underwent treatment with pan-retinal photocoagulation. The NV regressed, but visual outcome remained poor at his 5-month follow-up visit. Keywords: Purtscher's retinopathy, neovascularization, laser photocoagulation, disk edema

  8. Dietary Energy Density and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Terryl J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Shah, Roma; Flanders, W Dana; Wang, Ying; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2016-10-01

    Dietary energy density (ED) is a measure of diet quality that estimates the amount of energy per unit of food (kilocalories per gram) consumed. Low-ED diets are generally high in fiber and fruits and vegetables and low in fat. Dietary ED has been positively associated with body mass index (BMI) and other risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. We evaluated the associations of total dietary ED and energy-dense (high-ED) foods with postmenopausal breast cancer incidence. Analyses included 56,795 postmenopausal women from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort with no previous history of breast or other cancers and who provided information on diet, lifestyle, and medical history in 1999. Multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs and 95% CIs) were estimated for quintiles of total dietary ED and for the consumption of high-ED foods in Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a median follow-up of 11.7 y, 2509 invasive breast cancer cases were identified, including 1857 estrogen receptor-positive and 277 estrogen receptor-negative tumors. Median dietary ED was 1.5 kcal/g (IQR: 1.3-1.7 kcal/g). After adjusting for age, race, education, reproductive characteristics, and family history, high compared with low dietary ED was associated with a statistically significantly higher risk of breast cancer (RR for fifth quintile compared with first quintile: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.36; P-trend = 0.03). The association between the amount of high-ED foods consumed and breast cancer risk was not statistically significant. We observed no differences by estrogen receptor status or effect modification by BMI, age, or physical activity. These results suggest a modest positive association between total dietary ED and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Endocrinological disturbances in diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Shalaby, E.; Atia, H.; Abdel-Hafez, M.A.; Hammad, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus were extensively studied from various points of view. The aim was to elucidate the possible interaction of insulin, glucagon, prolactin, growth hormone, T 3 , and T 4 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Forty patients with diabetic retinopathy (group II) and twenty age-matched controls (group I) were investigated. Plasma levels of both insulin and glucagon were significantly elevated in group II versus group I, whereas other hormones were insignificantly changed. This shows the role that might be played by T 3 , T 4 , growth hormone, and prolactin in the established cases of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  10. Automated microaneurysm detection algorithms applied to diabetic retinopathy retinal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akara Sopharak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is the commonest cause of blindness in working age people. It is characterised and graded by the development of retinal microaneurysms, haemorrhages and exudates. The damage caused by diabetic retinopathy can be prevented if it is treated in its early stages. Therefore, automated early detection can limit the severity of the disease, improve the follow-up management of diabetic patients and assist ophthalmologists in investigating and treating the disease more efficiently. This review focuses on microaneurysm detection as the earliest clinically localised characteristic of diabetic retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Algorithms used for microaneurysm detection from retinal images are reviewed. A number of features used to extract microaneurysm are summarised. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of reported methods used to automatically detect microaneurysms is presented and discussed. The performance of methods and their complexity are also discussed.

  11. Evidence from a natural experiment that malaria parasitemia is pathogenic in retinopathy-negative cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Dylan S; Taylor, Terrie E; Postels, Douglas G; Beare, Nicholas Av; Cheng, Jing; MacCormick, Ian Jc; Seydel, Karl B

    2017-06-07

    Cerebral malaria (CM) can be classified as retinopathy-positive or retinopathy-negative, based on the presence or absence of characteristic retinal features. While malaria parasites are considered central to the pathogenesis of retinopathy-positive CM, their contribution to retinopathy-negative CM is largely unknown. One theory is that malaria parasites are innocent bystanders in retinopathy-negative CM and the etiology of the coma is entirely non-malarial. Because hospitals in malaria-endemic areas often lack diagnostic facilities to identify non-malarial causes of coma, it has not been possible to evaluate the contribution of malaria infection to retinopathy-negative CM. To overcome this barrier, we studied a natural experiment involving genetically inherited traits, and find evidence that malaria parasitemia does contribute to the pathogenesis of retinopathy-negative CM. A lower bound for the fraction of retinopathy-negative CM that would be prevented if malaria parasitemia were to be eliminated is estimated to be 0.93 (95% confidence interval: 0.68, 1).

  12. Why does diabetic retinopathy happen, and how can we stop it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ockrim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a complication of diabetes. We can prevent DR both by preventing diabetes (primary prevention and by improving the management of diabetes to slow down the onset, and reduce the severity, of DR (secondary prevention.

  13. Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia as a Risk Factor for the Development of Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Alper I; Demiryürek, Seniz; Aksoy, Sefika Nur; Perk, Peren; Saygili, Oguzhan; Güngör, Kivanc

    2015-08-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a proliferative vascular disease affecting premature newborns and occurs during vessel development and maturation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maternal iron deficiency anemia as possible risk factors associated with the development of retinopathy of prematurity among premature or very low birth weight infants. In this study, mothers of 254 infants with retinopathy of prematurity were analyzed retrospectively, and their laboratory results of medical records during pregnancy were reviewed for possible iron deficiency anemia. In a cohort of 254 mothers of premature infants with retinopathy of prematurity, 187 (73.6%) had iron deficiency, while the remaining 67 (26.4%) mothers had no deficiency. Babies born to mothers with iron deficiency anemia with markedly decreased hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, serum iron, and ferritin levels were more likely to develop retinopathy of prematurity. Our results are the first to suggest that maternal iron deficiency is a risk factor for the development of retinopathy of prematurity. Our data suggest that maternal iron supplementation therapy during pregnancy might lower the risk of retinopathy of prematurity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in patients after ten years of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.A.; Yakta, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common and serious complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a leading cause of blindness not only in Pakistan but also worldwide. So we conducted this study to record the frequency of diabetic retinopathy in known diabetic patients ten years after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The study was conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan for a period of 1 year from January 2008 to January 2010. The study group comprised of 200 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus attending the medical clinic. All patients who were diagnosed as type 2 diabetes mellitus since ten years duration were included in the study. Retinopathy was graded into background, pre proliferative and proliferative retinopathy. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed using the WHO criteria. Statistical analysis was carried out using the SPSS-11. Results: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 25.5% of the total Type 2 patients after ten years of diagnosis, and of these 4% of patients had proliferative retinopathy. Conclusion: Type 2 diabetic patients should be screened as early as possible to prevent permanent visual loss by timely management of diabetic retinopathy because diabetes is one of most common preventable cause of blindness in the world. (author)

  15. Role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and oxidative stress in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Ueda, Seiji; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Okuda, Seiya

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common and potentially devastating microvascular complication in diabetes and is a leading cause of acquired blindness among the people of occupational age. However, current therapeutic options for the treatment of sight-threatening proliferative diabetic retinopathy such as photocoagulation and vitrectomy are limited by considerable side effects and far from satisfactory. Therefore, to develop novel therapeutic strategies that specifically target diabetic retinopathy is actually desired for most of the patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major initiator of diabetic retinopathy. However, recent clinical study has substantiated the concept of 'hyperglycemic memory' in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial-Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT-EDIC) Research, has revealed that the reduction in the risk of progressive retinopathy resulting from intensive therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes persisted for at least several years after the DCCT trial, despite increasing hyperglycemia. These findings suggest a long-term beneficial influence of early metabolic control on clinical outcomes in type 1 diabetic patients. Among various biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, the process of formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their mode of action are most compatible with the theory 'hyperglycemic memory'. Further, there is a growing body of evidence that AGEs-RAGE (receptor for AGEs) interaction-mediated oxidative stress generation plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. This article summarizes the role of AGEs and oxidative stress in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy and the therapeutic interventions that could prevent this devastating disorder. We also discuss here the pathological crosstalk between the AGEs-RAGE and the renin-angiotensin system in

  16. Targeting VEGF in canine oxygen-induced retinopathy - a model for human retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, D Scott; Lutty, Gerard A

    2016-01-01

    Development of the dog superficial retinal vasculature is similar to the mechanism of human retinal vasculature development; they both develop by vasculogenesis, differentiation, and assembly of vascular precursors called angioblasts. Canine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) was first developed by Arnall Patz in an effort to experimentally determine the effects of hyperoxia on the development of the retinal vasculature. The canine OIR model has many characteristics in common with human retinopathy of prematurity. Exposure of 1-day-old dogs to hyperoxia for 4 days causes a vaso-obliteration throughout the retina. Vasoproliferation, after the animals have returned to room air, is robust. The initial small preretinal neovascular formations anastomose to form large preretinal membranes that eventually cause tractional retinal folds. The end-stage pathology of the canine model is similar to stage IV human retinopathy of prematurity. Therefore, canine OIR is an excellent forum to evaluate the response to drugs targeting VEGF and its receptors. Evaluation of an antibody to VEGF-R2 and the VEGF-Trap demonstrated that doses should be titered down so that preretinal neovascularization is inhibited but retinal revascularization is able to proceed, vascularizing peripheral retina and preventing it from being a source of VEGF.

  17. Micronutrients and Diabetic Retinopathy A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Chee-Tin Christine; Gayton, Emma L.; Beulens, Joline W. J.; Flanagan, Declan W.; Adler, Amanda I.

    Background: We have evaluated the evidence for the association between intake and blood levels of micronutrients and diabetic retinopathy. Treatment for diabetic retinopathy requires significant clinical input and specialist ophthalmologic care. Micronutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin E, and

  18. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Simpson, E. Rand (Princess Margaret Hospital, Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto (Canada)), e-mail: gpgiuliari@gmail.com; Sadaka, Ama (Schepens Eye Research Inst., Boston, MA (United States)); Hinkle, David M. (Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    2011-01-15

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  19. Statins and Hip Fracture Prevention – A Population Based Cohort Study in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Korhonen, Maarit J.; Lehenkari, Petri; Junnila, Seppo Y. T.; Neuvonen, Pertti J.; Ruokoniemi, Päivi; Huupponen, Risto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the association of long-term statin use and the risk of low-energy hip fractures in middle-aged and elderly women. Design A register-based cohort study. Setting Finland. Participants Women aged 45–75 years initiating statin therapy between 1996 and 2001 with adherence to statins ≥80% during the subsequent five years (n = 40 254), a respective cohort initiating hypertension drugs (n = 41 610), and women randomly selected from the population (n = 62 585). Main Outcome Measures Incidence rate of and hazard ratio (HR) for low-energy hip fracture during the follow-up extending up to 7 years after the 5-year exposure period. Results Altogether 199 low-energy hip fractures occurred during the 135 330 person-years (py) of follow-up in the statin cohort, giving an incidence rate of 1.5 hip fractures per 1000 py. In the hypertension and the population cohorts, the rates were 2.0 per 1000 py (312 fractures per 157 090 py) and 1.0 per 1000 py (212 fractures per 216 329 py), respectively. Adjusting for a propensity score and individual variables strongly predicting the outcome, good adherence to statins for five years was associated with a 29% decreased risk (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.58–0.86) of a low-energy hip fracture in comparison with adherent use of hypertension drugs. The association was of the same magnitude when comparing the statin users with the population cohort, the HR being 0.69 (0.55–0.87). When women with poor (statins were compared to those with good adherence to hypertension drugs (≥80%) or to the population cohort, the protective effect associated with statin use attenuated with the decreasing level of adherence. Conclusions 5-year exposure to statins is associated with a reduced risk of low-energy hip fracture in women aged 50–80 years without prior hospitalizations for fractures. PMID:23144731

  20. Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2011-04-01

    Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted.

  1. Clinical features of radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Shoko; Oda, Itsuo; Okawa, Tomohiko

    1977-01-01

    The clinical features of 25 cases with radiation retinopathy are described. Retinopathy was induced following therapeutic irradiation of paraobital malignancies with megavoltage Linac x-ray of 3,000 rads or more. Retinal vessels, particularly the proximal portion of retinal arteries, seemed to be the primary site of damage due to radiation. According to the type of lesion and dosage, fundus features simulated papillitis, retinal angiosclerosis, or hard exudates due to capillary obliteration. Acute obstruction of the central retinal artery and ischemic optic neuropathy could result from heavy irradiation of over 5,000 rads. (Evans, J.)

  2. Diabetic retinopathy in sub-Saharan Africa: meeting the challenges of an emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Philip I; Msukwa, Gerald; Beare, Nicholas A V

    2013-07-02

    Sub-Saharan Africa faces an epidemic of diabetes. Diabetes causes significant morbidity including visual loss from diabetic retinopathy, which is largely preventable. In this resource-poor setting, health systems are poorly organized to deliver chronic care with multiple system involvement. The specific skills and resources needed to manage diabetic retinopathy are scarce. The costs of inaction for individuals, communities and countries are likely to be high. Screening for and treatment of diabetic retinopathy have been shown to be effective, and cost-effective, in resource-rich settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, clinical services for diabetes need to be expanded with the provision of effective, integrated care, including case-finding and management of diabetic retinopathy. This should be underpinned by a high quality evidence base accounting for differences in diabetes types, resources, patients and society in Africa. Research must address the epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy in Africa, strategies for disease detection and management with laser treatment, and include health economic analyses. Models of care tailored to the local geographic and social context are most likely to be cost effective, and should draw on experience and expertise from other continents. Research into diabetic retinopathy in Africa can drive the political agenda for service development and enable informed prioritization of available health funding at a national level. Effective interventions need to be implemented in the near future to avert a large burden of visual loss from diabetic retinopathy in the continent. An increase in visual loss from diabetic retinopathy is inevitable as the diabetes epidemic emerges in sub-Saharan Africa. This could be minimized by the provision of case-finding and laser treatment, but how to do this most effectively in the regional context is not known. Research into the epidemiology, case-finding and laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy in sub

  3. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in karachi, pakistan: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhairy, S.; Rasheed, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes patients presenting to the National Institute of Diabetes and Eye out patient department of Dow University Hospital (Ohja campus), Dow University of Health Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional study in which known diabetics were recruited between the period of 1st July 2011 till 31st July 2012.They were then referred to the Ophthalmology unit for eye examination. Subjective refraction was done with Snellens chart, anterior segment examination and fundus examined was done using a TopCon PS-61E Slit lamp BioMicroscope. All patients were dilated with eye drop tropicamide 1% instilled every ten minutes for thirty minutes and the fundus was examined with Volk 90D lens. Classification of diabetic retinopathy was done using the International clinical diabetic retinopathy disease severity scale study. The data was analyzed using Statistical package for social Science (SPSS version 20) and a p value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: There were a total number of 570 patients included in this study. Amongst them 325 were males and 245 were females. Out of these patients those that who were found to have diabetic retinopathy were 315 (55.3%).The age range was between 25 and 75 years and the mean age was 52.30 ± 9.333.Patients that were found to have mild non proliferative diabetic retinopathy were 231(40.5% ) while 33 (5.8%) had moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy,11(1.9%) had severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 40 (7.0)% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic Maculopathy was seen in a total number of 72(12.6%) of patients. Conclusions: Diabetic retinopathy is highly prevalent in Karachi, Pakistan thus it is vital to detect as well as manage the disease early so as to prevent the onset of blindness in relation to it. (author)

  4. Development of a screening tool for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Bency, Mayur Joseph; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Bansal, Reema; Gupta, Amod

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a condition of the eye of diabetic patients where the retina is damaged because of long-term diabetes. The condition deteriorates towards irreversible blindness in extreme cases of diabetic retinopathy. Hence, early detection of diabetic retinopathy is important to prevent blindness. Regular screening of fundus images of diabetic patients could be helpful in preventing blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we propose techniques for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images using several shape and texture features computed from detected microaneurysms, exudates, and hemorrhages. The classification accuracy is reported in terms of the area (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic curve using 200 fundus images from the MESSIDOR database. The value of Az for classifying normal images versus mild, moderate, and severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) is 0:9106. The value of Az for classification of mild NPDR versus moderate and severe NPDR is 0:8372. The Az value for classification of moderate NPDR and severe NPDR is 0:9750.

  5. Epigenetic Modifications and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu A. Kowluru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1, and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease.

  6. Relationship between retinopathy and cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colakoglu Onder; Taskiran Bengur; Dayi Selcuk; Sozmen Bulent; Unsal Belkis; Maden Ahmet; Pasa Eser; Aslan S. Leyla

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ophthalmic disorders with special attention to retinopathy in cirrhotic patients. Vitamin A deficiency-related ophthalmopathy, xerophthalmia, and color blindness may be documented in cirrhosis due to various etiologies. Retinopathy is an obscure feature of cirrhosis. METHODS: Thirty-two cirrhotic patients, who were followed up by Clinics of Gastroenterology, Izmir Ataturk Teaching and Research Hospital, were enrolled to the study. Associated systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension were excluded. Thirty-two healthy volunteers took part as the control subjects. All participants had ophthalmologic examination in the same hospital. RESULTS: Five (15.6%) of the cirrhotic subjects had soft exudate in the retina. None of the control subjects had retinopathy (P<0.05). Intraocular pressure (IOP) measured for both eyes were also significantly lower in the cirrhotics (P<0.05 vs P = 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of other ophthalmic pathologies. The ophthalmic findings did not show up any differences according to the etiology of cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: Soft exudates may develop in cirrhotic patients probably due to loss of synthetic function of liver and hemodynamic effects of portal hypertension. Retinopathy must be sought in cirrhosis because of its severe morbidity.

  7. NADPH Oxidase, NOX1, Mediates Vascular Injury in Ischemic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliyanti, Devy; Rana, Indrajeetsinh; Miller, Antonia G.; Agrotis, Alex; Armani, Roksana; Szyndralewiez, Cédric; Wingler, Kirstin; Touyz, Rhian M.; Cooper, Mark E.; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A.; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Ischemic retinal diseases such as retinopathy of prematurity are major causes of blindness due to damage to the retinal microvasculature. Despite this clinical situation, retinopathy of prematurity is mechanistically poorly understood. Therefore, effective preventative therapies are not available. However, hypoxic-induced increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been suggested to be involved with NADPH oxidases (NOX), the only known dedicated enzymatic source of ROS. Our major aim was to determine the contribution of NOX isoforms (1, 2, and 4) to a rodent model of retinopathy of prematurity. Results: Using a genetic approach, we determined that only mice with a deletion of NOX1, but not NOX2 or NOX4, were protected from retinal neovascularization and vaso-obliteration, adhesion of leukocytes, microglial accumulation, and the increased generation of proangiogenic and proinflammatory factors and ROS. We complemented these studies by showing that the specific NOX inhibitor, GKT137831, reduced vasculopathy and ROS levels in retina. The source of NOX isoforms was evaluated in retinal vascular cells and neuro-glial elements. Microglia, the immune cells of the retina, expressed NOX1, 2, and 4 and responded to hypoxia with increased ROS formation, which was reduced by GKT137831. Innovation: Our studies are the first to identify the NOX1 isoform as having an important role in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that strategies targeting NOX1 have the potential to be effective treatments for a range of ischemic retinopathies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2726–2740. PMID:24053718

  8. Dental treatment and caries prevention preceding treatment under general anaesthesia in healthy children and adolescents: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindefjord, M; Persson, J; Jansson, L; Tsilingaridis, G

    2018-04-01

    This was to examine healthy children and adolescents treated under general anaesthesia (GA) and a matched control group not receiving GA to compare treatment and preventive care received prior to GA treatment. This retrospective cohort study included 71 healthy subjects and 213 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The treatment group had been consecutively referred from the Public Dental Health Service (PDS) in Stockholm to the Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Eastman Institute, Stockholm during 2006-2007. Data was extracted from the patient records at the PDS, including variables such as number of dental visits, treatment/prophylaxis prior to GA, number of missed and cancelled appointments, and number of decayed teeth. On average, the treatment group had significantly more decayed teeth (p general dentists to paediatric specialists had no behaviour management treatment and nearly half, no preventive treatment, despite receiving significantly more operative treatment compared with matched controls. General dentists should target high caries-risk patients for additional behaviour management and preventive care to reduce the need for treatment under GA.

  9. Effectiveness of pre-travel consultation in the prevention of travel-related diseases: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafuri, Silvio; Guerra, Rocco; Gallone, Maria Serena; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Lanotte, Serafina; Quarto, Michele; Germinario, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of pre-travel counselling carried out in Travel Clinics. This is a retrospective cohort. Three hundred international travellers were enrolled; 150 people were from users of Bari Travel Clinic, 150 were users of a travel agency. Enrolled subjects were interviewed using a questionnaire. The average age of the enrolled subjects was 37.5 ± 13.9, without statistically significant differences between the two groups. 86% of cases and 19.3% of the controls reported the use of anti-malaria prophylaxis (p Travel Clinic users, 6% reported diarrhoea and these figures were 27% in the control group (p study demonstrated the effectiveness of pre-travel counselling; in the future, new studies must investigate the cost-effectiveness of pre-travel prevention measures.

  10. Validation of the Colorado Retinopathy of Prematurity Screening Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Emily A; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Lynch, Anne M; Palestine, Alan G; Wagner, Brandie D; Wymore, Erica; Tomlinson, Lauren A; Binenbaum, Gil

    2018-04-01

    The Colorado Retinopathy of Prematurity (CO-ROP) model uses birth weight, gestational age, and weight gain at the first month of life (WG-28) to predict risk of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In previous validation studies, the model performed very well, predicting virtually all cases of severe ROP and potentially reducing the number of infants who need ROP examinations, warranting validation in a larger, more diverse population. To validate the performance of the CO-ROP model in a large multicenter cohort. This study is a secondary analysis of data from the Postnatal Growth and Retinopathy of Prematurity (G-ROP) Study, a retrospective multicenter cohort study conducted in 29 hospitals in the United States and Canada between January 2006 and June 2012 of 6351 premature infants who received ROP examinations. Sensitivity and specificity for severe (early treatment of ROP [ETROP] type 1 or 2) ROP, and reduction in infants receiving examinations. The CO-ROP model was applied to the infants in the G-ROP data set with all 3 data points (infants would have received examinations if they met all 3 criteria: birth weight, large validation cohort. The model requires all 3 criteria to be met to signal a need for examinations, but some infants with a birth weight or gestational age above the thresholds developed severe ROP. Most of these infants who were not detected by the CO-ROP model had obvious deviation in expected weight trajectories or nonphysiologic weight gain. These findings suggest that the CO-ROP model needs to be revised before considering implementation into clinical practice.

  11. Neonatal Risk Factors for Treatment-Demanding Retinopathy of Prematurity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slidsborg, Carina; Jensen, Aksel; Forman, Julie Lyng

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: One goal of the study was to identify "new" statistically independent risk factors for treatment-demanding retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Another goal was to evaluate whether any new risk factors could explain the increase in the incidence of treatment-demanding ROP over time in Denmark....... DESIGN: A retrospective, register-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: The study included premature infants (n = 6490) born in Denmark from 1997 to 2008. METHODS: The study sample and the 31 candidate risk factors were identified in 3 national registers. Data were linked through a unique civil registration...

  12. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTOR BLOCKERS ON DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthy K

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic Retinopathy (DR is the most common microvascular complication of Diabetes Mellitus (DM and is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults of patients with type 1 and 2 DM. Large observational and randomised studies shown that optimal blood glucose and blood pressure control halt or regress the disease and limit the risk of progression to the proliferative stage and visual loss. Recently, evidence has also emerged that Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS inhibitors may electively prevent or delay progression of retinopathy by acting on local RAS. Thus, metabolic and blood pressure control by RAS inhibition is to prevent or limit the onset of retinopathy and its progression towards visual-threatening stages. The aim of the study is to categorise and analyse grading of DR who are on currently ACE and ARBs unchanged for at least 2 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS 178 patients with type 1 and 2 DM of both genders on ARBs and ACEI unchanged for at least 2 years are divided into two groups as follows- 1. ARB group, which includesa 28 patients on losartan (50 mg. b 32 patients on losartan (50 mg + hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg. c 28 patients on telmisartan (40 mg. d 32 patients on telmisartan (40 mg + hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg. 2. ACE inhibitor group includesa 30 patients on enalapril (5 mg. b 28 patients on ramipril (2.5 mg + hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg. Retinopathy grading assessed by indirect ophthalmoscope and comparison of retinopathy grading between ARBs and ACEI groups have done. Two-tailed Chi-square test, GraphPad Prism Software used for statistical calculations. RESULTS Losartan and telmisartan (ARB group showed significant protection from diabetic retinopathy than enalapril and ramipril (ACEI group (p<0.05. CONCLUSION ARBs help in preventing the progression of DR and vision loss in those belonging to mild and moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy patients.

  13. Diabetic macular oedema: under-represented in the genetic analysis of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadgate, Suzanne; Kiire, Christine; Halford, Stephanie; Chong, Victor

    2018-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, is a complex disease and is one of the leading causes of blindness in adults worldwide. It can be divided into distinct subclasses, one of which is diabetic macular oedema. Diabetic macular oedema can occur at any time in diabetic retinopathy and is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the large number of genetic association studies that have been performed in cohorts of patients with type 2 diabetes and published in English-language journals up to February 2017. Many of these studies have produced positive associations with gene polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy. However, this review highlights that within this large body of work, studies specifically addressing a genetic association with diabetic macular oedema, although present, are vastly under-represented. We also highlight that many of the studies have small patient numbers and that meta-analyses often inappropriately combine patient data sets. We conclude that there will continue to be conflicting results and no meaningful findings will be achieved if the historical approach of combining all diabetic retinopathy disease states within patient cohorts continues in future studies. This review also identifies several genes that would be interesting to analyse in large, well-defined cohorts of patients with diabetic macular oedema in future candidate gene association studies. © 2018 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Association of Metformin Treatment with Reduced Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate effects of long-term metformin on the severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR in high-risk type 2 diabetic (T2D patients. Methods. A retrospective chart review study was conducted involving 335 DR patients with T2D ≥ 15 years from 1990 to 2013. The severity of DR was determined by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. The associations between metformin and DR severity were evaluated. Comparison with stratification for the use of sulfonylurea and insulin was performed to identify possible confounding effects. Results. Severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (SNPDR/PDR was more often diagnosed in nonmetformin users (67/142, 47% versus metformin users (48/193, 25% (p<0.001, regardless of gender and race of the patients. The odds ratio of metformin associated with SNPDR/PDR was 0.37 in all cases (p<0.001, 0.35 in sulfonylurea use cohort (p<0.05, 0.45 in nonsulfonylurea use cohorts (p<0.01, and 0.42 in insulin use cohort (p<0.01. Insulin users had a higher rate of SNPDR/PDR. Metformin had no influence on the occurrence of clinical significant diabetic macular edema. Conclusions. Long-term use of metformin is independently associated with a significant lower rate of SNPDR/PDR in patients with type 2 diabetes ≥ 15 years.

  15. Open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy at the Puerto Rico Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-lñigo, Yousef; Izquierdo, Natalio J; García, Omar; Pérez, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    The association of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) with diabetes mellitus remains controversial. We report on the frequency of open-angle glaucoma in patients having diabetic retinopathy in a population of the Puerto Rico Medical Center. A cross-sectional study of 1,442 patients was done. Only the chart of patients 40 years-of-age and older, with a diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and/or open-angle glaucoma were included. Descriptive analysis was done. Unadjusted and gender-adjusted logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk of developing open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy for each subsequent decade. 1,040 patients were diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy from July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2009. Also, 402 patients were diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2009. Of the 1,040 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 64 patients (6.15%) also had OAG. According to our gender-adjusted logistic regression analysis the estimated risk of developing open-angle glaucoma for patients 40 years-of-age with diabetic retinopathy increased for each subsequent decade until the seventh decade, odds ratio = 5.07 (95% confidence interval: 1.62-15.86). Thereafter, it decreased, odds ratio = 2.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.36-11.82). Our findings suggest that Puerto Rico patients between 40 to 79 years of age with diabetic retinopathy have an increased risk of developing open-angle glaucoma with each subsequent decade. Screening for open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy is of utmost importance in the aging Puerto Rico population to prevent blindness.

  16. Plasma E-selectin levels can play a role in the development of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, Márta; Meleg, J; Vardai, J; Nagy, B; Szalai, E; Damjanovich, J; Csutak, A; Ujhelyi, B; Nagy, V

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness. There are several risk factors, such as the duration of diabetes or glycemic control of the patient; however, several biochemical factors also alter the process. Our aim was to investigate the role of soluble E-selectin in the formation of diabetic retinopathy. Fifty-seven patients (37 female and 20 male, aged 61.71 ± 12.31 years) and 14 healthy control subjects (ten female and four male, aged 63.06 ± 10.46 years) were enrolled in the study. We measured the soluble E-selectin level in the plasma of patients by ELISA. All patients underwent careful ophthalmological examination, including ophthalmoscopy and color fundus photography, while diabetic retinopathy grading was performed in line with the 2012 classification of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). The soluble E-selectin level was significantly higher in patients with diabetes compared to controls (32.95 ng/ml vs. 26.55 ng/ml, p = 0.03). Dividing patients into groups by the presence of retinopathy, the E-selectin level was also significantly higher in the retinopathy group (p diabetic patients by the severity of retinopathy (groups A, B, and C, by the guidelines of the AAO), however, we did not find any significant difference in soluble E-selectin levels, although it tended to be higher in group B. An elevated E-selectin level can play a role in the development of diabetic retinopathy, but it does not seem to alter disease severity. However, glycemic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors may also alter the level of E-selectin that might play a role in the prevention of diabetic retinopathy.

  17. Nondiabetic retinal pathology - prevalence in diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Nathan; Jackson, Claire; Spurling, Geoffrey; Cranstoun, Peter

    2011-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of photographic signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology in Australian general practice patients with diabetes. Three hundred and seven patients with diabetes underwent retinal photography at two general practices, one of which was an indigenous health centre. The images were assessed for signs of pathology by an ophthalmologist. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were detected in 31% of subjects with adequate photographs. Features suspicious of glaucoma were detected in 7.7% of subjects. Other abnormalities detected included signs of age related macular degeneration (1.9%), epiretinal membranes (2.4%), vascular pathology (9.6%), chorioretinal lesions (2.9%), and congenital disc anomalies (2.9%). Indigenous Australian patients were more likely to have signs of retinal pathology and glaucoma. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were frequently encountered. In high risk groups, general practice based diabetic retinopathy screening may reduce the incidence of preventable visual impairment, beyond the benefits of detection of diabetic retinopathy alone.

  18. A Decision Support Framework for Automated Screening of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The early signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR are depicted by microaneurysms among other signs. A prompt diagnosis when the disease is at the early stage can help prevent irreversible damages to the diabetic eye. In this paper, we propose a decision support system (DSS for automated screening of early signs of diabetic retinopathy. Classification schemes for deducing the presence or absence of DR are developed and tested. The detection rule is based on binary-hypothesis testing problem which simplifies the problem to yes/no decisions. An analysis of the performance of the Bayes optimality criteria applied to DR is also presented. The proposed DSS is evaluated on the real-world data. The results suggest that by biasing the classifier towards DR detection, it is possible to make the classifier achieve good sensitivity.

  19. Coffee consumption, gender, and Parkinson's disease mortality in the cancer prevention study II cohort: the modifying effects of estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascherio, Alberto; Weisskopf, Marc G; O'Reilly, Eilis J; McCullough, Marjorie L; Calle, Eugenia E; Rodriguez, Carmen; Thun, Michael J

    2004-11-15

    Caffeine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease in men but not in women. This gender difference may be due to an interaction between caffeine and use of postmenopausal estrogens. The authors prospectively assessed the relation between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease mortality among participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a cohort of over 1 million people enrolled in 1982. Causes of deaths were ascertained through death certificates from January 1, 1989, through 1998. Parkinson's disease was listed as a cause of death in 909 men and 340 women. After adjustment for age, smoking, and alcohol intake, coffee consumption was inversely associated with Parkinson's disease mortality in men (p(trend) = 0.01) but not in women (p = 0.6). In women, this association was dependent on postmenopausal estrogen use; the relative risk for women drinking 4 or more cups (600 ml) of coffee per day compared with nondrinkers was 0.47 (95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.80; p = 0.006) among never users and 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 2.30; p = 0.34) among users. These results suggest that caffeine reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease but that this hypothetical beneficial effect may be prevented by use of estrogen replacement therapy.

  20. The Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Nigel M.; Giardini, Mario E.; Bastawrous, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Complications of diabetes mellitus, namely diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy, are the leading cause of blindness in working aged people. Sufferers can avoid blindness if identified early via retinal imaging. Systematic screening of the diabetic population has been shown to greatly reduce the prevalence and incidence of blindness within the population. Many national screening programs have digital fundus photography as their basis. In the past 5 years several techniques and adapters have been developed that allow digital fundus photography to be performed using smartphones. We review recent progress in smartphone-based fundus imaging and discuss its potential for integration into national systematic diabetic retinopathy screening programs. Some systems have produced promising initial results with respect to their agreement with reference standards. However further multisite trialling of such systems’ use within implementable screening workflows is required if an evidence base strong enough to affect policy change is to be established. If this were to occur national diabetic retinopathy screening would, for the first time, become possible in low- and middle-income settings where cost and availability of trained eye care personnel are currently key barriers to implementation. As diabetes prevalence and incidence is increasing sharply in these settings, the impact on global blindness could be profound. PMID:26596630

  1. HYPERAUTOFLUORESCENT RING IN AUTOIMMUNE RETINOPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIMA, LUIZ H.; GREENBERG, JONATHAN P.; GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; SMITH, R. THEODORE; SALLUM, JULIANA M. F.; THIRKILL, CHARLES; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the presence of a hyperautofluorescent ring and corresponding spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) features seen in patients with autoimmune retinopathy. Methods All eyes were evaluated by funduscopic examination, full-fleld electroretinography, fundus autofluorescence, and SD-OCT. Further confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained with immunoblot and immunohistochemistry testing of the patient’s serum. Humphrey visual fields and microperimetry were also performed. Results Funduscopic examination showed atrophic retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) associated with retinal artery narrowing but without pigment deposits. The scotopic and photopic full-field electroretinograms were nondetectable in three patients and showed a cone–rod pattern of dysfunction in one patient. Fundus autofluorescence revealed a hyperautofluorescent ring in the parafoveal region, and the corresponding SD-OCT demonstrated loss of the photoreceptor inner segment–outer segment junction with thinning of the outer nuclear layer from the region of the hyperautofluorescent ring toward the retinal periphery. The retinal layers were generally intact within the hyperautofluorescent ring, although the inner segment–outer segment junction was disrupted, and the outer nuclear layer and photoreceptor outer segment layer were thinned. Conclusion This case series revealed the structure of the hyperautofluorescent ring in autoimmune retinopathy using SD-OCT. Fundus autofluorescence and SD-OCT may aid in the diagnosis of autoimmune retinopathy and may serve as a tool to monitor its progression. PMID:22218149

  2. Solar Retinopathy: A Multimodal Analysis

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    Claudia Bruè

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Solar retinopathy is a rare clinical disturbance, for which spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings are not always consistent. We report on two cases of solar retinopathy and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods. This is an observational case study. Results. A 12-year-old female was referred to ophthalmology for bilateral scotoma. Visual acuity was 20/50 in both eyes. Fundus examination was unremarkable, except for slight yellowish material in the central macula, bilaterally. SD-OCT revealed juxtafoveal microcystic cavities in the outer retina, interruption of the external limiting membrane and the inner and outer segment junctions, with disorganized material in the vitelliform space. Fundus autofluorescence showed hypoautofluorescence surrounded by a relatively hyperautofluorescent ring, bilaterally. Similar clinical and morphological findings were detected in a 27-year-old male. Conclusions. Solar retinopathy has a subtle presentation and patients often deny sun-gazing. SD-OCT and fundus autofluorescence are noninvasive and useful tools for its diagnosis.

  3. Two cases of radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, Miho; Yuzawa, Mitsuko; Matsui, Mizuo; Kaneko, Akihiro.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is characterized by retinal micovascular abnormalities after radiation therapy of the eye and its surrounding structures. The authors performed focal laser photocoagulation in two cases of radiation retinopathy. Case 1 was a 16 year old woman with radiation retinopathy who had been treated for retioblastoma in her right eye using cobalt 60-applicator 16 years prior to the first visit. Her corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 0.4. Ophthalmoscopy revealed large macular deposits, soft exudates, and retinal hemorrhage. Fluorescein angiography showed hyperpermeability of capillaries in the vicinity of the lower temporal retinal vessels. The visual acuity improved to 1.2 after the photocoagulation. Case 2 was a 16 year old man who had received 50 gray of external beam for a primary rhabdo-myosarcoma in the temporal region. Retinal avascular areas in the posterior pole of his both eyes were observed and the area showed increased retinal vessel permeability in the right eye was photocoagulated. The visual acuity in his right eye increased from 0.08 to 1.0 following the treatment. (author)

  4. Educational paper: Retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteels, Ingele; Cassiman, Catherine; Van Calster, Joachim; Allegaert, Karel

    2012-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a proliferative retinal vascular disease affecting the premature infant with an incompletely vascularized retina. The spectrum of ophthalmological findings in ROP exists from minimal sequelae, which do not affect vision, to bilateral retinal detachment and total blindness. With the increased survival of very small infants, retinopathy of prematurity has become one of the leading causes of childhood blindness. Over the past two decades, major advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis of ROP, to a large extent as a result of changes in clinical risk factors (oxygen and non-oxygen related) and characteristics observed in ROP cases. This article provides a literature review on the evolution in clinical characteristics, classification and treatment modalities and indications of ROP. Special attention is hereby paid to the neonatal factors influencing the development of ROP and to the necessity for everyone caring for premature babies to have a well-defined screening and treatment protocol for ROP. Such screening protocol needs to be based on a unit-specific ROP risk profile and, consequently, may vary between different European regions. Retinopathy of prematurity is an important cause of ocular morbidity and blindness in children. With better understanding of the pathogenesis, screening and treatment guidelines have changed over time and are unit specific.

  5. The role of serial measurements of serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels in the development of retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorum, Bayram Ali; Yılmaz, Cansu Canbolat; Köksal, Nilgün; Özkan, Hilal; Yıldız, Meral; Özmen, Ahmet Tuncer

    2017-03-01

    To determine the role of serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels in the development of retinopathy of prematurity, which is a major cause of childhood blindness worldwide. We prospectively studied newborn infants born at a postmenstrual age of prematurity screening and follow-up. Retinopathy of prematurity was classified according to the international classification of retinopathy of prematurity. Serum Insulin like growth factor 1 levels were measured serially in blood samples on the 1 st , 3 rd , 7 th , 21 st , and 28 th day. Among the 40 infants, 11 (27.5%) constituted the retinopathy of prematurity group and 29 comprised the non-retinopathy of prematurity group. In the retinopathy of prematurity group, the mean gestational age and birth weight was significantly lower. The demographic features of the study cohort were similar. The duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly greater in the retinopathy of prematurity group compared with the non-retinopathy of prematurity group (p=0.036). In terms of neonatal morbidities such as respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, patent ductus arteriosus, and necrotizing enterocolitis, no differences were detected between the groups. The mean serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels in retinopathy of prematurity group were significantly lower than those in the non-retinopathy of prematurity group at each time point (1 st , 3 rd , 7 th , 21 st , and 28 th day of postnatal life) (p=0.001). This study demonstrated the low serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels was associated with retinopathy of prematurity development.

  6. Genome-wide association study of retinopathy in individuals without diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Jensen

    Full Text Available Mild retinopathy (microaneurysms or dot-blot hemorrhages is observed in persons without diabetes or hypertension and may reflect microvascular disease in other organs. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS of mild retinopathy in persons without diabetes.A working group agreed on phenotype harmonization, covariate selection and analytic plans for within-cohort GWAS. An inverse-variance weighted fixed effects meta-analysis was performed with GWAS results from six cohorts of 19,411 Caucasians. The primary analysis included individuals without diabetes and secondary analyses were stratified by hypertension status. We also singled out the results from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs previously shown to be associated with diabetes and hypertension, the two most common causes of retinopathy.No SNPs reached genome-wide significance in the primary analysis or the secondary analysis of participants with hypertension. SNP, rs12155400, in the histone deacetylase 9 gene (HDAC9 on chromosome 7, was associated with retinopathy in analysis of participants without hypertension, -1.3±0.23 (beta ± standard error, p = 6.6×10(-9. Evidence suggests this was a false positive finding. The minor allele frequency was low (∼2%, the quality of the imputation was moderate (r(2 ∼0.7, and no other common variants in the HDAC9 gene were associated with the outcome. SNPs found to be associated with diabetes and hypertension in other GWAS were not associated with retinopathy in persons without diabetes or in subgroups with or without hypertension.This GWAS of retinopathy in individuals without diabetes showed little evidence of genetic associations. Further studies are needed to identify genes associated with these signs in order to help unravel novel pathways and determinants of microvascular diseases.

  7. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy: Advancing from Bench towards Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Leer Blindbæk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber and fractals with micro- and macrovascular dysfunction in diabetes. Likewise, the retinal metabolism can be evaluated by retinal oximetry, and higher retinal venular oxygen saturation has been demonstrated in patients with diabetic retinopathy. So far, most studies have been cross-sectional, but these can only disclose associations and are not able to separate cause from effect or to establish the predictive value of retinal vascular dysfunction with respect to long-term complications. Likewise, retinal markers have not been investigated as markers of treatment outcome in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. The Department of Ophthalmology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, has a strong tradition of studying the retinal microvasculature in diabetic retinopathy. In the present paper, we demonstrate the importance of the retinal vasculature not only as predictors of long-term microvasculopathy but also as markers of treatment outcome in sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in well-established population-based cohorts of patients with diabetes.

  8. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy: Advancing from Bench towards Bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian; Soelberg, Kerstin; Vergmann, Anna Stage; Poulsen, Christina Døfler; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg; Wied, Jimmi; Lind, Majbrit; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Peto, Tunde

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber and fractals with micro- and macrovascular dysfunction in diabetes. Likewise, the retinal metabolism can be evaluated by retinal oximetry, and higher retinal venular oxygen saturation has been demonstrated in patients with diabetic retinopathy. So far, most studies have been cross-sectional, but these can only disclose associations and are not able to separate cause from effect or to establish the predictive value of retinal vascular dysfunction with respect to long-term complications. Likewise, retinal markers have not been investigated as markers of treatment outcome in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. The Department of Ophthalmology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, has a strong tradition of studying the retinal microvasculature in diabetic retinopathy. In the present paper, we demonstrate the importance of the retinal vasculature not only as predictors of long-term microvasculopathy but also as markers of treatment outcome in sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in well-established population-based cohorts of patients with diabetes. PMID:28491870

  9. Feasibility and quality of cardiovascular disease prevention within a community-based health insurance program in rural Nigeria: an operational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Marleen E.; Bolarinwa, Oladimeji A.; Wit, Ferdinand W. N. W.; Brewster, Lizzy M.; Odusola, Aina O.; Rosendaal, Nicole T. A.; Bindraban, Navin R.; Adenusi, Peju; Agbede, Kayode; Lange, Joep M. A.; Akande, Tanimola M.; Schultsz, Constance

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of providing guideline-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention care within the context of a community-based health insurance program (CBHI) in rural Nigeria. A prospective operational cohort study was conducted in a primary healthcare clinic in rural Nigeria,

  10. Lp-PLA2 activity is associated with increased risk of diabetic retinopathy: a longitudinal disease progression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Moneeza K; Kennedy, Gwen; Carr, Fiona; Doney, Alexander S F; Pearson, Ewan R; Morris, Andrew D; Johnson, Toby; McLaughlin, Megan M; Williams, Rachel E; Palmer, Colin N A

    2018-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 (Lp-PLA 2 ) activity levels and incident diabetic retinopathy and change in retinopathy grade. This was a cohort study of diabetic participants with serum collected at baseline and routinely collected diabetic retinal screening data. Participants with type 2 diabetes from the GoDARTS (Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland) cohort were used. This cohort is composed of individuals of white Scottish ancestry from the Tayside region of Scotland. Survival analysis accounting for informative censoring by modelling death as a competing risk was performed for the development of incident diabetic retinopathy from a disease-free state in a 3 year follow-up period (n = 1364) by stratified Lp-PLA 2 activity levels (in quartiles). The same analysis was performed for transitions to more severe grades. The hazard of developing incident diabetic retinopathy was 2.08 times higher (95% CI 1.64, 2.63) for the highest quartile of Lp-PLA 2 activity compared with the lowest. Higher Lp-PLA 2 activity levels were associated with a significantly increased risk for transitions to all grades. The hazards of developing observable (or more severe) and referable (or more severe) retinopathy were 2.82 (95% CI 1.71, 4.65) and 1.87 (95% CI 1.26, 2.77) times higher for the highest quartile of Lp-PLA 2 activity compared with the lowest, respectively. Higher Lp-PLA 2 levels are associated with increased risk of death and the development of incident diabetic retinopathy, as well as transitions to more severe grades of diabetic retinopathy. These associations are independent of calculated LDL-cholesterol and other traditional risk factors. Further, this biomarker study shows that the association is temporally sensitive to the proximity of the event to measurement of Lp-PLA 2.

  11. A familial risk enriched cohort as a platform for testing early interventions to prevent severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Rudolf; Cumby, Jill; MacKenzie, Lynn E; Morash-Conway, Jessica; Glover, Jacqueline M; Aylott, Alice; Propper, Lukas; Abidi, Sabina; Bagnell, Alexa; Pavlova, Barbara; Hajek, Tomas; Lovas, David; Pajer, Kathleen; Gardner, William; Levy, Adrian; Alda, Martin

    2014-12-02

    Severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression, is responsible for a substantial proportion of disability in the population. This article describes the aims and design of a research study that takes a novel approach to targeted prevention of SMI. It is based on the rationale that early developmental antecedents to SMI are likely to be more malleable than fully developed mood or psychotic disorders and that low-risk interventions targeting antecedents may reduce the risk of SMI. Families Overcoming Risks and Building Opportunities for Well-being (FORBOW) is an accelerated cohort study that includes a large proportion of offspring of parents with SMI and embeds intervention trials in a cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (cmRCT) design. Antecedents are conditions of the individual that are distressing but not severely impairing, predict SMI with moderate-to-large effect sizes and precede the onset of SMI by at least several years. FORBOW focuses on the following antecedents: affective lability, anxiety, psychotic-like experiences, basic symptoms, sleep problems, somatic symptoms, cannabis use and cognitive delay. Enrolment of offspring over a broad age range (0 to 21 years) will allow researchers to draw conclusions on a longer developmental period from a study of shorter duration. Annual assessments cover a full range of psychopathology, cognitive abilities, eligibility criteria for interventions and outcomes. Pre-emptive early interventions (PEI) will include skill training for parents of younger children and courses in emotional well-being skills based on cognitive behavioural therapy for older children and youth. A sample enriched for familial risk of SMI will enhance statistical power for testing the efficacy of PEI. FORBOW offers a platform for efficient and unbiased testing of interventions selected according to best available evidence. Since few differences exist between familial and 'sporadic' SMI, the

  12. Automated early detection of diabetic retinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abràmoff, M.D.; Reinhardt, J.M.; Russell, S.R.; Folk, J.C.; Mahajan, V.B.; Niemeijer, M.; Quellec, G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the performance of automated diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection, using the algorithm that won the 2009 Retinopathy Online Challenge Competition in 2009, the Challenge2009, against that of the one currently used in EyeCheck, a large computer-aided early DR detection project.

  13. Diabetic retinopathy in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Burn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that between 2010 and 2030 there will be a 98% increase in the number of adults in sub-Saharan Africa with diabetes.1 This is just one aspect of the epidemic of non-communicable diseases facing sub-Saharan Africa, driven by urbanisation, ageing, and changes to lifestyle and environment. The diabetes epidemic poses a significant challenge to health services, as non-communicable conditions should be managed by multi-disciplinary teams, with prevention as a primary aim.

  14. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yau, Joanne W Y; Rogers, Sophie L; Kawasaki, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes.......To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes....

  15. Low Vision Rehabilitation and Diabetic Retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sarfaraz A.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is emerging as a major cause of blindness. Diabetic retinopathy calls for a multidisciplinary to the patients. Management of the patient requires a team work by the internist, diabetologist, dietician, ophthalmologist and low vision therapist. Diabetic retinopathy very often results in vision loss. It is important for ophthalmologist to recognize the importance of low vision rehabilitation in formulating appropriate treatment strategies. People with low vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy usually experience difficulty in daily life. Most people with diabetic retinopathy (who have remaining useful vision) can be helped with low vision devices. However, often one low vision device may not be suitable for all purposes. A comprehensive low vision evaluation is required to assess the person's current visual status, identify the goals and the visual needs, and then design an individualized vision rehabilitation program to meet these needs. (author)

  16. The Role of Red Meat and Flavonoid Consumption on Cancer Prevention: The Korean Cancer Screening Examination Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Wie, Gyung-Ah; Cho, Yeong-Ah; Kang, Hyun-Hee; Ryu, Kyoung-A; Yoo, Min-Kyong; Jun, Shinyoung; Kim, Seong-Ah; Ha, Kyungho; Kim, Jeongseon; Cho, Yoon Hee; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee

    2017-08-25

    Markedly increased red meat consumption is a cancer risk factor, while dietary flavonoids may help prevent the disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of red meat and flavonoid consumption with cancer risk, based on data from 8024 subjects, drawn from the 2004-2008 Cancer Screening Examination Cohort of the Korean National Cancer Center. Hazard ratios (HRs) were obtained by using a Cox proportional hazard model. During the mean follow-up period of 10.1 years, 443 cases were newly diagnosed with cancer. After adjusting for age, there was a significant correlation between cancer risk and the daily intake of ≥43 g of red meat per day (HR 1.31; 95% CI 1.01, 1.71; p = 0.045), and total flavonoid intake tended to decrease cancer risk (HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.49, 0.99; highest vs. lowest quartile; p -trend = 0.073) in men. Following multivariable adjustment, there were no statistically significant associations between flavonoid intake and overall cancer risk in individuals with high levels of red meat intake. Men with low daily red meat intake exhibited an inverse association between flavonoid consumption and cancer incidence (HR 0.41; 95% CI 0.21, 0.80; highest vs. lowest; p -trend = 0.017). Additional research is necessary to clarify the effects of flavonoid consumption on specific cancer incidence, relative to daily red meat intake.

  17. Adherence to antiretroviral prophylaxis for HIV prevention: a substudy cohort within a clinical trial of serodiscordant couples in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Haberer

    Full Text Available Randomized clinical trials of oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for HIV prevention have widely divergent efficacy estimates, ranging from 0% to 75%. These discrepancies are likely due to differences in adherence. To our knowledge, no studies to date have examined the impact of improving adherence through monitoring and/or intervention, which may increase PrEP efficacy, or reported on objective behavioral measures of adherence, which can inform PrEP effectiveness and implementation.Within the Partners PrEP Study (a randomized placebo-controlled trial of oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir among HIV-uninfected members of serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda, we collected objective measures of PrEP adherence using unannounced home-based pill counts and electronic pill bottle monitoring. Participants received individual and couples-based adherence counseling at PrEP initiation and throughout the study; counseling was intensified if unannounced pill count adherence fell to 80% adherence. Study limitations include potential shortcomings of the adherence measures and use of a convenience sample within the substudy cohort.The high PrEP adherence achieved in the setting of active adherence monitoring and counseling support was associated with a high degree of protection from HIV acquisition by the HIV-uninfected partner in heterosexual serodiscordant couples. Low PrEP adherence was associated with sexual behavior, alcohol use, younger age, and length of PrEP use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  18. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy at presentation to screening services in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damato, Erika M; Murray, Neil; Szetu, John; Sikivou, Biu Telaite; Emma, Stephanie; McGhee, Charles N J

    2014-10-01

    To report the spectrum of retinopathy at first presentation to photoscreening services, to determine the proportion of patients that present with sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR), and to raise awareness of the burden of diabetic eye disease in Fiji. This retrospective observational cohort study used data from the initial visit of all new patients presenting to the diabetes retinal screening service at the Pacific Eye Institute in Fiji over the 3-month period between July and September 2012. Patients were assessed using a detailed questionnaire regarding diabetes type, duration of disease, medications, complications and co-morbidities, and blood sugar control. Patients subsequently underwent non-mydriatic fundus photography according to Pacific diabetes retinal screening guidelines. Images were graded at the time of acquisition, and data were entered onto a computerized database. For the purposes of this study, information regarding retinopathy grading, visual acuity and patient demographics was used. A total of 522 new patients were screened over the 3-month period. STDR was observed in 27% of patients, with 15% observed to have bilateral STDR. Diabetes control was generally poor. Blindness and visual impairment were observed in 2.7% and 6.7% of the cohort, respectively. Severe and advanced diabetic retinopathy was present in this population presenting to screening. This was observed 4 years after the formal expansion of the screening services and reflects the high prevalence of diabetes in the population. The need for increased public awareness and greater resource allocation into diabetes and its complications is emphasized.

  19. Angiogenic Factors and Cytokines in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abcouwer, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a sight-threatening complication of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes. The recent success of treatments inhibiting the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) demonstrates that specific targeting of a growth factor responsible for vascular permeability and growth is an effective means of treating DR-associated vascular dysfunction, edema and angiogenesis. This has stimulated research of alternative therapeutic targets involved in the control of retinal vascular function. However, additional treatment options and preventative measures are still needed and these require a greater understanding of the pathological mechanisms leading to the disturbance of retinal tissue homeostasis in DR. Although severe DR can be treated as a vascular disease, abundant data suggests that inflammation is also occurring in the diabetic retina.Thus, anti-inflammatory therapies may also be useful for treatment and prevention of DR. Herein, the evidence for altered expression of angiogenic factors and cytokines in DR is reviewed and possible mechanisms by which the expression of VEGF and cytokines may be increased in the diabetic retina are examined. In addition, the potential role for microglial activation in diabetic retinal neuroinflammation is explored. PMID:24319628

  20. Retinopathy of prematurity: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parag K; Prabhu, Vishma; Karandikar, Smita S; Ranjan, Ratnesh; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Kalpana, Narendran

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina occurring principally in new born preterm infants. It is an avoidable cause of childhood blindness. With the increase in the survival of preterm babies, ROP has become the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness throughout the world. A simple screening test done within a few weeks after birth by an ophthalmologist can avoid this preventable blindness. Although screening guidelines and protocols are strictly followed in the developed nations, it lacks in developing economies like India and China, which have the highest number of preterm deliveries in the world. The burden of this blindness in these countries is set to increase tremendously in the future, if corrective steps are not taken immediately. ROP first emerged in 1940s and 1950s, when it was called retrolental fibroplasia. Several epidemics of this disease were and are still occurring in different regions of the world and since then a lot of research has been done on this disease. However, till date very few comprehensive review articles covering all the aspects of ROP are published. This review highlights the past, present and future strategies in managing this disease. It would help the pediatricians to update their current knowledge on ROP. PMID:26862500

  1. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The study objective was to examine the effect of glycaemic control and variations on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR among the diabetes mellitus patients visiting Medicine and Ophthalmology OPD Sapthagiri Medical college, Bangalore. MATERIALS AND METHODS 10 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and 70 persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, visiting the Medicine OPD of Sapthagiri Medical College and referred to Ophthalmology department of the above to detect the Diabetic Retinopathy changes in a diabetes mellitus management programme conducted for 3 months in Bangalore, participated in the study. Patients who were followed up for 6 months the same above were also included in the study. Analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the risk factors, incidence and progression of Diabetic Retinopathy among Diabetes Mellitus patients and management. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES To determine the risk factors associated with it, stage of retinopathy diagnosed at presentation, management of it, and final visual outcome. The prevention is by strict glycaemic control, prompt use of anti-diabetic drugs and regular exercises. These included age and gender-adjusted prevalence of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy, 1 and correlation of prevalence with history-based risk factors. RESULTS The three months cumulative incidence of DR was 58 %in type I diabetes mellitus and 42 % among type II Diabetes mellitus. After controlling for known risk factors for DR,1 a high baseline haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, ethnicity, age, type of diabetes mellitus, duration were associated with the incidence of referable DR in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence rate of diabetes in urban Bangalore 28.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], and the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in general population was 3.5% (95% CI. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the population with diabetes

  2. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teras, Lauren R., E-mail: lauren.teras@cancer.org [Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Diver, W. Ryan [Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Turner, Michelle C. [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Krewski, Daniel [McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Disease Prevention, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Sahar, Liora [Statistics and Evaluation Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ward, Elizabeth [Intramural Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Gapstur, Susan M. [Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148 Bq/m{sup 3}) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74 Bq/m{sup 3}) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23–2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HR{sub continuous}=1.38, 95% CI:1.15–1.65 per 100 Bq/m{sup 3}; p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings. - Highlights: • This is the first prospective, general population study of residential radon and risk of hematologic cancer. • Findings from this study suggest that residential radon exposure may be a risk factor

  3. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teras, Lauren R.; Diver, W. Ryan; Turner, Michelle C.; Krewski, Daniel; Sahar, Liora; Ward, Elizabeth; Gapstur, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148 Bq/m 3 ) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74 Bq/m 3 ) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23–2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HR continuous =1.38, 95% CI:1.15–1.65 per 100 Bq/m 3 ; p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings. - Highlights: • This is the first prospective, general population study of residential radon and risk of hematologic cancer. • Findings from this study suggest that residential radon exposure may be a risk factor for lymphoid

  4. Adequate vitamin D status is associated with the reduced odds of prevalent diabetic retinopathy in African Americans and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, Amy E; Sahli, Michelle W; Nie, Jing; LaMonte, Michael J; Lutsey, Pamela L; Klein, Barbara E K; Mares, Julie A; Meyers, Kirstin J; Andrews, Christopher A; Klein, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D status has been hypothesized to protect against development of diabetic retinopathy via its anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic properties. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo studies suggest vitamin D favorably influences blood pressure and blood glucose control, strong risk factors for diabetic retinopathy. We examined the association between vitamin D status and prevalent diabetic retinopathy in participants with diabetes from a population-based cohort. Among participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study with diabetes at visit 3 (1993-1995), 1339 (906 Caucasians, 433 African Americans) had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin (25[OH]D) concentrations assessed at visit 2 (1989-1992) and nonmydriatic retinal photographs taken at visit 3. Dietary intake of vitamin D was assessed at visit 1 (1987-1989). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for diabetic retinopathy by categories of season-adjusted 25(OH)D (diabetes. We further adjusted for HBA1c and hypertension to examine if 25(OH)D influenced diabetic retinopathy via its effects on either glycemic control or blood pressure. ORs (95 % CIs) for retinopathy, adjusted for race and duration, were 0.77 (0.45-1.32), 0.64 (0.37-1.10), and 0.39 (0.20-0.75), p for trend = 0.001, for participants with 25(OH)D of 30-retinopathy. 25(OH)D concentrations ≥75 nmol/L were associated with lower odds of any retinopathy assessed 3 years later. We speculate this may be due in part to vitamin D's influence on blood glucose control.

  5. Sirtuin1 Over-Expression Does Not Impact Retinal Vascular and Neuronal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michan, Shaday; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Cui, Zhenghao; Evans, Lucy P.; Hatton, Colman J.; Pei, Dorothy T.; Ju, Meihua; Sinclair, David A.; Smith, Lois E. H.; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found that Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a metabolically dependent protein deacetylase, regulates vascular regeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy (OIR), as neuronal depletion of Sirt1 in retina worsens retinopathy. In this study we assessed whether over-expression of Sirtuin1 in retinal neurons and vessels achieved by crossing Sirt1 over-expressing flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice or Tie2-Cre mice, respectively, may protect against retinopathy. We found that over-expression of Sirt1 in Nestin expressing retinal neurons does not impact vaso-obliteration or pathologic neovascularization in OIR, nor does it influence neuronal degeneration in OIR. Similarly, increased expression of Sirt1 in Tie2 expressing vascular endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages does not protect retinal vessels in OIR. In addition to the genetic approaches, dietary supplement with Sirt1 activators, resveratrol or SRT1720, were fed to wild type mice with OIR. Neither treatment showed significant vaso-protective effects in retinopathy. Together these results indicate that although endogenous Sirt1 is important as a stress-induced protector in retinopathy, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with small molecule activators at the examined doses do not provide additional protection against retinopathy in mice. Further studies are needed to examine in depth whether increasing levels of Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic approach to treat or prevent retinopathy. PMID:24416337

  6. Sirtuin1 over-expression does not impact retinal vascular and neuronal degeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michan, Shaday; Juan, Aimee M; Hurst, Christian G; Cui, Zhenghao; Evans, Lucy P; Hatton, Colman J; Pei, Dorothy T; Ju, Meihua; Sinclair, David A; Smith, Lois E H; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found that Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a metabolically dependent protein deacetylase, regulates vascular regeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy (OIR), as neuronal depletion of Sirt1 in retina worsens retinopathy. In this study we assessed whether over-expression of Sirtuin1 in retinal neurons and vessels achieved by crossing Sirt1 over-expressing flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice or Tie2-Cre mice, respectively, may protect against retinopathy. We found that over-expression of Sirt1 in Nestin expressing retinal neurons does not impact vaso-obliteration or pathologic neovascularization in OIR, nor does it influence neuronal degeneration in OIR. Similarly, increased expression of Sirt1 in Tie2 expressing vascular endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages does not protect retinal vessels in OIR. In addition to the genetic approaches, dietary supplement with Sirt1 activators, resveratrol or SRT1720, were fed to wild type mice with OIR. Neither treatment showed significant vaso-protective effects in retinopathy. Together these results indicate that although endogenous Sirt1 is important as a stress-induced protector in retinopathy, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with small molecule activators at the examined doses do not provide additional protection against retinopathy in mice. Further studies are needed to examine in depth whether increasing levels of Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic approach to treat or prevent retinopathy.

  7. Diabetic retinopathy at the Yaoundé Central Hospital in Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We carried out a cross-sectional analytical survey using data from patients who had done Fluorescein Angiography at the Yaounde Central Hospital Diabetic Retinopathy Prevention and Management Project between October 2007 and January 2010 to identify the risk factors, incidence and severity of different types of ...

  8. The Prize Is Healthy Eyes: Using Games to Educate about Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastny, Sherri N.; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a program for prevention of diabetic retinopathy (DR) that was designed for Extension in collaboration with optometrists. The program was created to increase knowledge and awareness about risk factors for DR and included a game and take-home materials. Participants were asked to play a game similar to Wheel of Fortune. A…

  9. Diabetic Retinopathy Grading by Digital Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Hajeb Mohammad Alipour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major complications of diabetes is diabetic retinopathy. As manual analysis and diagnosis of large amount of images are time consuming, automatic detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy are desired. In this paper, we use fundus fluorescein angiography and color fundus images simultaneously, extract 6 features employing curvelet transform, and feed them to support vector machine in order to determine diabetic retinopathy severity stages. These features are area of blood vessels, area, regularity of foveal avascular zone, and the number of micro-aneurisms therein, total number of micro-aneurisms, and area of exudates. In order to extract exudates and vessels, we respectively modify curvelet coefficients of color fundus images and angiograms. The end points of extracted vessels in predefined region of interest based on optic disk are connected together to segment foveal avascular zone region. To extract micro-aneurisms from angiogram, first extracted vessels are subtracted from original image, and after removing detected background by morphological operators and enhancing bright small pixels, micro-aneurisms are detected. 70 patients were involved in this study to classify diabetic retinopathy into 3 groups, that is, (1 no diabetic retinopathy, (2 mild/moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, (3 severe nonproliferative/proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and our simulations show that the proposed system has sensitivity and specificity of 100% for grading.

  10. Prevalence of type-II diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy: the gaddap study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, P.S.; Awan, Z.; Manzar, N.; Memon, S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of type-II Diabetes mellitus (DM) in the endogenous population of Gaddap town and also to evaluate the status of Diabetic retinopathy (DR) in this group. This community based study of subjects of either gender was carried out in the Gaddap town. Three primary eye care centres were established in the existing primary health care (PHC) facilities, to screen the target Population aged 30 years and above, and who met other inclusion criteria for DM and DR respectively. Patients requiring intervention were managed accordingly. Data was entered and analyzed using Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and Microsoft Access. Out of the cohort of 19211 subjects, 1677 patients were found Diabetic, giving the prevalence of DM in Gaddap town at 8.73%, with 1258 (6.55%) known and 419 (2.18%) newly diagnosed cases. DR was seen in 460 (27.43%) of the Diabetic cases with 126 (7.51%) patients requiring urgent intervention for vision threatening complications. The result validates the importance of early screening of DR in people suffering from DM for possible management and prevention of sight threatening complications in the early stage of the disease and advocates the inclusion of primary eye care as a part of PHC system. (author)

  11. Determining diabetic retinopathy screening interval based on time from no retinopathy to laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Daniel; Nair, Sunil; Harvey, John N

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To determine the necessary screening interval for retinopathy in diabetic patients with no retinopathy based on time to laser therapy and to assess long-term visual outcome following screening. Methods In a population-based community screening programme in North Wales, 2917 patients were followed until death or for approximately 12 years. At screening, 2493 had no retinopathy; 424 had mostly minor degrees of non-proliferative retinopathy. Data on timing of first laser therapy and visual outcome following screening were obtained from local hospitals and ophthalmology units. Results Survival analysis showed that very few of the no retinopathy at screening group required laser therapy in the early years compared with the non-proliferative retinopathy group ( p retinopathy at screening group required laser therapy, and at three years 0.2% (cumulative), lower rates of treatment than have been suggested by analyses of sight-threatening retinopathy determined photographically. At follow-up (mean 7.8 ± 4.6 years), mild to moderate visual impairment in one or both eyes due to diabetic retinopathy was more common in those with retinopathy at screening (26% vs. 5%, p diabetes occurred in only 1 in 1000. Conclusions Optimum screening intervals should be determined from time to active treatment. Based on requirement for laser therapy, the screening interval for diabetic patients with no retinopathy can be extended to two to three years. Patients who attend for retinal screening and treatment who have no or non-proliferative retinopathy now have a very low risk of eventual blindness from diabetes.

  12. Prevalence and outcomes of laser treatment of aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, David J; Cartwright, David W; Gole, Glen A

    2014-07-01

    To describe outcomes in a cohort of extremely premature infants treated for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity by diode laser panretinal photocoagulation. Retrospective study. Fifteen eyes in eight infants. A review was carried out on infants between 23 and 25.6 weeks gestational age admitted to The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital neonatal intensive care unit between 1992 and 2009. Success of treatment, visual and refractive outcomes. Five hundred fifty-four infants were admitted to neonatal intensive care unit, 373 survived till screening, and 304 had retinopathy of prematurity. Sixty-six infants required treatment, and eight of these had aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (2.5% of all infants with retinopathy of prematurity). Mean gestational age was 24.2 weeks, mean birthweight was 634 g, and treatment occurred at mean 34.1 weeks post-menstrual age. The mean total number of burns per eye was 2967. Five of 15 treated eyes required retreatment. Two patients subsequently died of unrelated causes. Regression occurred in 9 of 11 remaining eyes; one eye progressed to stage 4b and another to stage 5 retinopathy of prematurity. Vitrectomy was performed in two eyes. Five eyes had 6/12 vision, one had 3/60, and three had no perception of light. Of the remaining two eyes, one had good fixation and the other had poor fixation. Despite good structural outcomes, visual outcomes for conventional laser treatment of aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity are poor. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  13. Features of retinopathy of prematurity in a tertiary care hospital in Lahore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Ahmad Zeeshan; Tahir, Muhammad Younis; Ayub, Muhammad Hammad; Mirza, Khurram Azam

    2015-02-01

    To study the demographic and clinical features of Retinopathy of Prematurity in urban Punjab. The cross-sectional study was performed at Hameed Latif Hospital, Lahore, from April 2010 to October 2013 and comprised neonates born with birth weight less than 2000 g, gestational age less than 37 weeks, or those who were considered high risk for Retinopathy of Prematurity. Variables recorded included history, birth weight, gestational age, oxygen supplementation, development of Retinopathy of Prematurity, and laser treatment. Data was analysed using SPSS 17. There were 285 neonates in the study with a mean birth weight of 1280.34 ± 350.43 g and mean gestational age being 29.38 ± 3.14 weeks. Overall, 167 (58.6%) received supplemental oxygen, 86(30.2%) were anaemic and 44 (15.4%) received blood transfusion. Besides, 47 (16.5%) premature babies were product of multiple gestation, 34 (11.9%) were having respiratory distress, 25 (8.8%) had sepsis and received intravenous antibiotics, 70(24.6%) developed Retinopathy of Prematurity, and 22 (7.7%) developed threshold disease and received laser treatment at mean gestational age of 32.11 ± 2.53 weeks. Screening is key to preventing childhood blindness caused by Retinopathy of Prematurity. Prematurity, low birth weight and supplemental oxygen therapy are significant risk factors for the condition.

  14. The role of O-GlcNAc signaling in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semba, Richard D; Huang, Hu; Lutty, Gerard A; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Hart, Gerald W

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Despite laser and surgical treatments, antiangiogenic and other therapies, and strict metabolic control, many patients progress to visual impairment and blindness. New insights are needed into the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy in order to develop new methods to improve the detection and treatment of disease and the prevention of blindness. Hyperglycemia and diabetes result in increased flux through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which, in turn, results in increased PTM of Ser/Thr residues of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). O-GlcNAcylation is involved in regulation of many nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in a manner similar to protein phosphorylation. Altered O-GlcNAc signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. The goal of this review is to summarize the biology of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway and O-GlcNAc signaling, to present the current evidence for the role of O-GlcNAc signaling in diabetes and diabetic retinopathy, and to discuss future directions for research on O-GlcNAc in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A prospective cohort study evaluating the cost-effectiveness of carbetocin for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in caesarean sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luni, Yasmin; Borakati, Aditya; Matah, Arti; Skeats, Katie; Eedarapalli, Padma

    2017-07-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Prophylaxis with oxytocic medication is recommended by the WHO to prevent its occurrence. Carbetocin is a newer oxytocic, with potential to lower PPH rates, reduce the total use of oxytocic drugs and lead to financial savings. Meta-analyses have confirmed a reduction in the use of additional oxytocic medication with the use of carbetocin compared to oxytocin. However, there are few studies evaluating the costs of carbetocin prophylaxis. We carried out a prospective cohort study evaluating the financial impact of carbetocin, following its introduction at our centre for caesarean section. We collected data for 400 patients in total, making this, to our knowledge, the largest study conducted on this topic. We found a significant reduction in PPH rates and the use of additional oxytocics with projected overall financial savings of £68.93 per patient with the use of carbetocin. Impact statement It is well established that carbetocin reduces the use of secondary oxytocics compared to oxytocin alone in the active management of the third stage of labour. Evidence for reduction of post-partum haemorrhage and its cost effectiveness are more equivocal. Our study demonstrates that carbetocin also reduces post-partum haemorrhage, use of blood and blood products and midwifery recovery time in the setting of caesarean section. We have also demonstrated that despite the increased index cost of carbetocin it delivers an overall substantial cost benefit. The implications of these findings are of reduced morbidity, faster recovery and cost savings in these times of austerity in the UK. It allows more efficient labour distribution of midwives, particularly in the setting of staff shortages across the NHS. A randomised control trial in this area needs to be conducted to determine the cost benefit of carbetocin and with this and post-partum haemorrhage rates as the primary outcome measures.

  16. Type II diabetes mellitus and the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer in the cancer prevention study-II nutrition cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapstur, Susan M; Patel, Alpa V; Diver, W Ryan; Hildebrand, Janet S; Gaudet, Mia M; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2012-11-01

    Despite consistent associations of type II diabetes mellitus with hormonally related cancers such as breast and endometrium, the relation between type II diabetes mellitus and ovarian cancer risk is unclear. Associations of type II diabetes mellitus status, duration, and insulin use with epithelial ovarian cancer overall, and with serous and nonserous histologic subtypes were examined in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort, a prospective study of U.S. men and women predominantly aged 50 years and older. Between 1992 and 2007, 524 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified among 63,440 postmenopausal women. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using extended Cox regression to update diabetes status and bilateral oophorectomy status during follow-up. Type II diabetes mellitus status (RR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.75-1.46) and duration were not associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk. Although not statistically significantly different (P(difference) = 0.39), the RR was higher for type II diabetes mellitus with insulin use (RR = 1.28; 95% CI, 0.74-2.24) than for type II diabetes mellitus without insulin use (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.64-1.43). Diabetes seemed to be more strongly associated with nonserous (RR = 1.41; 95% CI, 0.70-2.85) than serous (RR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.41-1.23) histologic subtypes. Type II diabetes mellitus was not associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer, although higher risks with nonserous subtypes and among insulin users cannot be ruled out. Larger studies are needed to clarify associations of type II diabetes mellitus with or without insulin use with risk of ovarian cancer overall and by histologic subtypes. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Treatment-Induced Changes in Plasma Adiponectin Do Not Reduce Urinary Albumin Excretion in the Diabetes Prevention Program Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieren J Mather

    Full Text Available Molecular data suggests that adiponectin may directly regulate urinary albumin excretion. In the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP we measured adiponectin and albuminuria before and after intervention, and we previously reported increases in adiponectin with interventions. Here we have used the DPP dataset to test the hypothesis that treatment-related increases in adiponectin may reduce albuminuria in obesity.We evaluated cross-sectional correlations between plasma adiponectin and urinary albumin excretion at baseline, and the relationship of treatment-related changes in adiponectin and albuminuria. Baseline and follow-up urine albumin to creatinine ratios (ACR (albumin to creatinine ratio and plasma adiponectin concentration were available in 2553 subjects.Adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity, we observed a statistically significant but weak inverse relationship between adiponectin and ACR at baseline (conditional Spearman's rho = (- 0.04, p = 0.04. Although DPP treatments significantly increased plasma adiponectin, there were no treatment effects on ACR and no differences in ACR across treatment groups. There was a weak direct (not inverse association between change in adiponectin and change in albuminuria (adjusted Spearman's rho = (+ 0.04, p = 0.03.In a large, well-characterized cohort of obese dysglycemic subjects we observed a weak inverse association between circulating adiponectin concentrations and urinary albumin excretion at baseline. Contrary to the hypothesized effect, treatment-related increases in plasma adiponectin were not associated with a reduction in ACR. The association of change in adiponectin with change in ACR should be assessed in populations with overt albuminuria before excluding a beneficial effect of increasing adiponectin to reduce ACR in obesity.

  18. Adherence to antiretroviral prophylaxis for HIV prevention: a substudy cohort within a clinical trial of serodiscordant couples in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberer, Jessica E; Baeten, Jared M; Campbell, James; Wangisi, Jonathan; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Psaros, Christina; Safren, Steven A; Ware, Norma C; Thomas, Katherine K; Donnell, Deborah; Krows, Meighan; Kidoguchi, Lara; Celum, Connie; Bangsberg, David R

    2013-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials of oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention have widely divergent efficacy estimates, ranging from 0% to 75%. These discrepancies are likely due to differences in adherence. To our knowledge, no studies to date have examined the impact of improving adherence through monitoring and/or intervention, which may increase PrEP efficacy, or reported on objective behavioral measures of adherence, which can inform PrEP effectiveness and implementation. Within the Partners PrEP Study (a randomized placebo-controlled trial of oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir among HIV-uninfected members of serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda), we collected objective measures of PrEP adherence using unannounced home-based pill counts and electronic pill bottle monitoring. Participants received individual and couples-based adherence counseling at PrEP initiation and throughout the study; counseling was intensified if unannounced pill count adherence fell to counseling, and HIV testing. A total of 1,147 HIV-uninfected participants were enrolled: 53% were male, median age was 34 years, and median partnership duration was 8.5 years. Fourteen HIV infections occurred among adherence study participants--all of whom were assigned to placebo (PrEP efficacy = 100%, 95% confidence interval 83.7%-100%, pmarriage were associated with >80% adherence. Study limitations include potential shortcomings of the adherence measures and use of a convenience sample within the substudy cohort. The high PrEP adherence achieved in the setting of active adherence monitoring and counseling support was associated with a high degree of protection from HIV acquisition by the HIV-uninfected partner in heterosexual serodiscordant couples. Low PrEP adherence was associated with sexual behavior, alcohol use, younger age, and length of PrEP use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  19. Inhibition of the adrenomedullin/nitric oxide signaling pathway in early diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Jan J; Giove, Thomas J; Favazza, Tara L; Akula, James D; Eldred, William D

    2011-06-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway is integrally involved in visual processing and changes in the NO pathway are measurable in eyes of diabetic patients. The small peptide adrenomedullin (ADM) can activate a signaling pathway to increase the enzyme activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). ADM levels are elevated in eyes of diabetic patients and therefore, ADM may play a role in the pathology of diabetic retinopathy. The goal of this research was to test the effects of inhibiting the ADM/NO signaling pathway in early diabetic retinopathy. Inhibition of this pathway decreased NO production in high-glucose retinal cultures. Treating diabetic mice with the PKC β inhibitor ruboxistaurin for 5 weeks lowered ADM mRNA levels and ADM-like immunoreactivity and preserved retinal function as assessed by electroretinography. The results of this study indicate that inhibiting the ADM/NO signaling pathway prevents neuronal pathology and functional losses in early diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Cohort Randomised Controlled Trial of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People (The REFORM Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockayne, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Clarke, Arabella; Corbacho, Belen; Fairhurst, Caroline; Green, Lorraine; Hewitt, Catherine E; Hicks, Kate; Kenan, Anne-Maree; Lamb, Sarah E; McIntosh, Caroline; Menz, Hylton B; Redmond, Anthony C; Richardson, Zoe; Rodgers, Sara; Vernon, Wesley; Watson, Judith; Torgerson, David J

    2017-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity among older people. A multifaceted podiatry intervention may reduce the risk of falling. This study evaluated such an intervention. Pragmatic cohort randomised controlled trial in England and Ireland. 1010 participants were randomised (493 to the Intervention group and 517 to Usual Care) to either: a podiatry intervention, including foot and ankle exercises, foot orthoses and, if required, new footwear, and a falls prevention leaflet or usual podiatry treatment plus a falls prevention leaflet. The primary outcome was the incidence rate of self-reported falls per participant in the 12 months following randomisation. Secondary outcomes included: proportion of fallers and those reporting multiple falls, time to first fall, fear of falling, Frenchay Activities Index, Geriatric Depression Scale, foot pain, health related quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. In the primary analysis were 484 (98.2%) intervention and 507 (98.1%) control participants. There was a small, non statistically significant reduction in the incidence rate of falls in the intervention group (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.88, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.05, p = 0.16). The proportion of participants experiencing a fall was lower (49.7 vs 54.9%, adjusted odds ratio 0.78, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.00, p = 0.05) as was the proportion experiencing two or more falls (27.6% vs 34.6%, adjusted odds ratio 0.69, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.90, p = 0.01). There was an increase (p = 0.02) in foot pain for the intervention group. There were no statistically significant differences in other outcomes. The intervention was more costly but marginally more beneficial in terms of health-related quality of life (mean quality adjusted life year (QALY) difference 0.0129, 95% CI -0.0050 to 0.0314) and had a 65% probability of being cost-effective at a threshold of £30,000 per QALY gained. There was a small reduction in falls. The intervention may be cost-effective. ISRCTN ISRCTN68240461.

  1. Cohort Randomised Controlled Trial of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People (The REFORM Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Cockayne

    Full Text Available Falls are a major cause of morbidity among older people. A multifaceted podiatry intervention may reduce the risk of falling. This study evaluated such an intervention.Pragmatic cohort randomised controlled trial in England and Ireland. 1010 participants were randomised (493 to the Intervention group and 517 to Usual Care to either: a podiatry intervention, including foot and ankle exercises, foot orthoses and, if required, new footwear, and a falls prevention leaflet or usual podiatry treatment plus a falls prevention leaflet. The primary outcome was the incidence rate of self-reported falls per participant in the 12 months following randomisation. Secondary outcomes included: proportion of fallers and those reporting multiple falls, time to first fall, fear of falling, Frenchay Activities Index, Geriatric Depression Scale, foot pain, health related quality of life, and cost-effectiveness.In the primary analysis were 484 (98.2% intervention and 507 (98.1% control participants. There was a small, non statistically significant reduction in the incidence rate of falls in the intervention group (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.88, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.05, p = 0.16. The proportion of participants experiencing a fall was lower (49.7 vs 54.9%, adjusted odds ratio 0.78, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.00, p = 0.05 as was the proportion experiencing two or more falls (27.6% vs 34.6%, adjusted odds ratio 0.69, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.90, p = 0.01. There was an increase (p = 0.02 in foot pain for the intervention group. There were no statistically significant differences in other outcomes. The intervention was more costly but marginally more beneficial in terms of health-related quality of life (mean quality adjusted life year (QALY difference 0.0129, 95% CI -0.0050 to 0.0314 and had a 65% probability of being cost-effective at a threshold of £30,000 per QALY gained.There was a small reduction in falls. The intervention may be cost-effective.ISRCTN ISRCTN68240461.

  2. Effect of disease stage on progression of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Michael F; Hu, Julia

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxychloroquine sulfate retinopathy can progress after the drug is stopped. It is not clear how this relates to the stage of retinopathy or whether early screening with modern imaging technology can prevent progression and visual loss. To determine the relationship between progression of retinopathy and the severity of disease using objective data from optical coherence tomography and assess the value of early screening for the toxic effects of hydroxychloroquine. Clinical findings in patients with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy were monitored with repeated anatomical and functional examinations for 13 to 40 months after the drug was stopped in a referral practice in a university medical center. Eleven patients participated, with the severity of toxic effects categorized as early (patchy parafoveal damage shown on field or objective testing), moderate (a 50%-100% parafoveal ring of optical coherence tomography thinning but intact retinal pigment epithelium), and severe (visible bull's-eye damage). Visual acuity, white 10-2 visual field pattern density plots, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-density optical coherence tomography cross sections, thickness (from cube diagrams), and ellipsoid zone length. Visual acuity and visual fields showed no consistent change. Fundus autofluorescence showed little or no change except in severe cases in which the bull's-eye damage expanded progressively. Optical coherence tomography cross sections showed little visible change in early and moderate cases but progressive foveal thinning (approximately 7 μm/y) and loss of ellipsoid zone (in the range of 100 μm/y) in severe cases, which was confirmed by quantitative measurements. The measurements also showed some foveal thinning (approximately 4 μm/y) and deepening of parafoveal loss in moderate cases, but the breadth of the ellipsoid zone remained constant in both early and moderate cases. A few cases showed a suggestion of ellipsoid zone improvement. Patients with

  3. The relationship of the subtypes of preterm birth with retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Anne M; Wagner, Brandie D; Hodges, Jennifer K; Thevarajah, Tamara S; McCourt, Emily A; Cerda, Ashlee M; Mandava, Naresh; Gibbs, Ronald S; Palestine, Alan G

    2017-09-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is an adverse outcome of preterm birth and is a leading cause of childhood blindness. The relationship between the subtypes of preterm birth with retinopathy of prematurity is understudied. To investigate whether there is a difference in the incidence of type 1 or type 2 retinopathy of prematurity in infants with preterm birth resulting from spontaneous preterm labor, a medical indication of preterm birth, or preterm premature rupture of the membranes. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 827 infants screened for retinopathy of prematurity who were delivered at a single tertiary care center in Colorado. All infants fulfilled the American Academy of Pediatrics 2013 screening criteria for retinopathy of prematurity defined as "infants with a birth weight of ≤1500 g or gestational age of 30 weeks or less (as defined by the attending neonatologist) and selected infants with a birth weight between 1500 and 2000 g or gestational age of >30 weeks with an unstable clinical course, including those requiring cardiorespiratory support and who are believed by their attending pediatrician or neonatologist to be at high risk for retinopathy of prematurity." Two independent reviewers masked to retinopathy of prematurity outcomes determined whether preterm birth resulted from spontaneous preterm labor, medical indication of preterm birth, or preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Discrepancies were resolved by a third reviewer. Data were analyzed with univariate and multivariable logistic regression. In our cohort, the frequency of preterm birth resulting from spontaneous preterm labor, medical indication of preterm birth, or preterm premature rupture of the membranes was 34%, 40%, and 26%, respectively. The mean gestational age (weeks, days) ± SD (range) in the cohort and across the preterm birth subtypes was as follows: entire cohort, 28 weeks, 6 days ± 2 weeks, 3 days (23 weeks, 3 days - 36 weeks, 4 days); spontaneous preterm labor

  4. Diabetic retinopathy is a neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Stephanie K; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2017-10-01

    Since 1875, controversy has ensued over whether ocular diabetic complications are primarily vasculopathic or neuropathic in nature. Here, we discuss the historical context by which diabetic retinopathy (DR) came to be considered a primary vasculopathy, in contrast to more recent data suggesting the importance of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration (DRN) as the primary manifestation of ocular diabetic damage. Unsurprisingly, DRN parallels other diabetic complications related to neuropathy. In general, there are three possible relationships between microvascular DR and DRN: i) microvasculopathy causes neurodegeneration; ii) neurodegeneration causes microvasculopathy or iii) they are mutually independent. The authors' group has recently produced experimental data showing that DRN precedes even the earliest manifestations of DR microvasculopathy. In combination with earlier studies showing that focal implicit time delays predicted future development of DR microvasculopathy in the same location, relationships i) and iii) are unlikely. As such, ii) is the most likely relationship: DRN is a cause of DR. Granted, additional studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis and elucidate the mechanism of diabetes-induced neurodegeneration. We conclude this review by proposing experimental approaches to test the hypothesis that DRN causes DR. If confirmed, this new paradigm may lead to earlier detection of ocular diabetic damage and earlier treatment of early DR, thereby preventing visual loss in people with diabetes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber...... and fractals with micro- and macrovascular dysfunction in diabetes. Likewise, the retinal metabolism can be evaluated by retinal oximetry, and higher retinal venular oxygen saturation has been demonstrated in patients with diabetic retinopathy. So far, most studies have been cross-sectional, but these can only...... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. The Department of Ophthalmology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, has a strong tradition of studying the retinal microvasculature in diabetic retinopathy. In the present paper, we demonstrate the importance of the retinal vasculature not only as predictors of long...

  6. Evaluation of VEGF gene polymorphisms and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria C; Garcia-Aguirre, Gerardo; Morales-Canton, Virgilio; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Soberon-Ventura, Vidal R; Gonzalez, Victoria; Lechuga, Rodrigo; Garcia-Solis, Pablo; Garcia-Gutierrez, David G; Garcia-Solis, Marco Vinicio; Saenz de Viteri, Manuel; Solis-S, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    To assess if the included vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms rs3025035, rs3025021 and rs2010963 are associated to proliferative retinopathy in a Mexican population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A case-control study was conducted in adult individuals with T2DM associated to proliferative retinopathy or non-proliferative retinopathy from Oct. 2014 to Jun. 2015 from the Retina Department of the Asociation to Prevent Blindness in Mexico. The selected patients were adults with a diagnosis of T2DM ≥5y. All subjects had a comprehensive ocular examination and the classification of the retinopathy severity was made considering the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) standardization protocols. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole fresh blood. All samples were genotyped by qPCR for selected VEGF polymorphisms. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was calculated by comparing Chi-square values between the expected and the observed values for genotype counts. In total 142 individuals were enrolled, 71 individuals with T2DM and associated proliferative retinopathy and 71 individuals with non-proliferative retinopathy. One-sided Fisher's exact test was performed for rs3025021 [OR (95% CI)=0.44(0.08-2.2); P =0.25] and rs2010963 [OR (95% CI)=0.63(0.25-1.6); P =0.23]. The minor allelic frequencies obtained were 26% for rs3025021, 10% for rs3025035 and 61% for rs2010963. The pairwise linkage disequilibrium between the three SNP was assessed, and was as follows: rs3025021 vs rs3025035: D'=1.0, r 2 =0.1043, P ≤0.0001; rs3025021 vs rs2010963: D'=0.442, r 2 =0.0446, P =0.149; rs3025035 vs rs2010963: D'=0.505, r 2 =0.0214, P =0.142. This is the first analysis involving VEGF polymorphisms and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in a Mexican population. A major finding of the present study is that none of the polymorphisms studied was significantly associated with proliferative retinopathy. Based on these results, we can infer that different populations

  7. xidative Stress and Retinopathy of Prematurity

    OpenAIRE

    Ümeyye Taka Aydın; Hatip Aydın; Osman Çekiç

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of retinopathy of prematurity. Insufficient antioxidant system and increased oxidative stress in premature infants lead to the development of the disease. Understanding the mechanism of oxidative stress and antioxidant system and the related signaling pathways contribute to the development of novel options for diagnosis and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity. The current review aimed to evaluate the relationship between ox...

  8. A case of early-onset radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoko; Den, Seika; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2001-01-01

    We encountered a 27-year-old male early caused by radiation retinopathy five months after radiotherapy (51 Gy) for astrocytoma. The retinopathy was the proliferative retinopathy, with several dot and blot hemorrhages, hard and soft exudate, increased capillary permeability, macula edema and avasucular areas. So it was treated with panretial photocoagulation like diabetic retinopathy. Now hemorrhage, exudate, edema and avascular areas were improved. Photocoagulation treatment is effective to stop the progression of radiation retinopathy. Radiation retinopathy is sometimes early caused, therefore long-term follow up is recommended on starting radiotherapy. (author)

  9. A case of early-onset radiation retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yoko; Den, Seika; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Tsunehiko [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    We encountered a 27-year-old male early caused by radiation retinopathy five months after radiotherapy (51 Gy) for astrocytoma. The retinopathy was the proliferative retinopathy, with several dot and blot hemorrhages, hard and soft exudate, increased capillary permeability, macula edema and avasucular areas. So it was treated with panretial photocoagulation like diabetic retinopathy. Now hemorrhage, exudate, edema and avascular areas were improved. Photocoagulation treatment is effective to stop the progression of radiation retinopathy. Radiation retinopathy is sometimes early caused, therefore long-term follow up is recommended on starting radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Antiretinal antibody- proven autoimmune retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharanya Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A young female presented with bilateral subacute onset of progressive decrease in night vision and reduced peripheral field of vision. The short duration and rapid progression of symptoms along with the lack of family history of night blindness prompted a diagnosis of autoimmune retinopathy (AIR. Fundus fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, visual fields, and electroretinogram were suggestive of AIR. A differential diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP was also made. Antiretinal autoantibodies were detected in the blood sample. Treatment was with oral steroids and subsequently oral immunosuppressive agents. Visual acuity was maintained, fundus examination reverted to normal, and investigations repeated at every visit were stable with improvement in visual fields. Our case suggests that AIR, if diagnosed early and treated appropriately, may have a good outcome and should be considered in patients with an atypical presentation of RP.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy screening: global and local perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwani, R A; Lian, J X; McGhee, S M; Wong, D; Li, K Kw

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a global epidemic. It causes significant macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and stroke; as well as microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Diabetic retinopathy is known to be the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population and may be asymptomatic until vision loss occurs. Screening for diabetic retinopathy has been shown to reduce blindness by timely detection and effective laser treatment. Diabetic retinopathy screening is being done worldwide either as a national screening programme or hospital-based project or as a community-based screening programme. In this article, we review different methods of screening including grading used to detect the severity of sight-threatening retinopathy and the newer screening methods. This review also includes the method of systematic screening being carried out in Hong Kong, a system that has helped to identify diabetic retinopathy among all attendees in public primary care clinics using a Hong Kong-wide public patients' database.

  12. Diabetic retinopathy screening using deep neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Nishanthan; Hong, Sheng Chiong; Sime, Mary J; Wilson, Graham A

    2017-09-07

    There is a burgeoning interest in the use of deep neural network in diabetic retinal screening. To determine whether a deep neural network could satisfactorily detect diabetic retinopathy that requires referral to an ophthalmologist from a local diabetic retinal screening programme and an international database. Retrospective audit. Diabetic retinal photos from Otago database photographed during October 2016 (485 photos), and 1200 photos from Messidor international database. Receiver operating characteristic curve to illustrate the ability of a deep neural network to identify referable diabetic retinopathy (moderate or worse diabetic retinopathy or exudates within one disc diameter of the fovea). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity. For detecting referable diabetic retinopathy, the deep neural network had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.901 (95% confidence interval 0.807-0.995), with 84.6% sensitivity and 79.7% specificity for Otago and 0.980 (95% confidence interval 0.973-0.986), with 96.0% sensitivity and 90.0% specificity for Messidor. This study has shown that a deep neural network can detect referable diabetic retinopathy with sensitivities and specificities close to or better than 80% from both an international and a domestic (New Zealand) database. We believe that deep neural networks can be integrated into community screening once they can successfully detect both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  13. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Molina, J. M.; Anaya-Alaminos, R.; Uberos-Fernández, J.; Solans-Pérez de Larraya, A.; Chaves-Samaniego, M. J.; Salgado-Miranda, A.; Piñar-Molina, R.; Jerez-Calero, A.; García-Serrano, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goals were to isolate and study the genetic susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), as well as the gene-environment interaction established in this disease. Methods. A retrospective study (2000–2014) was performed about the heritability of retinopathy of prematurity in 257 infants who were born at a gestational age of ≤32 weeks. The ROP was studied and treated by a single pediatric ophthalmologist. A binary logistic regression analysis was completed between the presence or absence of ROP and the predictor variables. Results. Data obtained from 38 monozygotic twins, 66 dizygotic twins, and 153 of simple birth were analyzed. The clinical features of the cohorts of monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different. Genetic factors represented 72.8% of the variability in the stage of ROP, environmental factors 23.08%, and random factors 4.12%. The environmental variables representing the highest risk of ROP were the number of days of tracheal intubation (p < 0.001), postnatal weight gain (p = 0.001), and development of sepsis (p = 0.0014). Conclusion. The heritability of ROP was found to be 0.73. The environmental factors regulate and modify the expression of the genetic code. PMID:26089603

  14. Automated detection of diabetic retinopathy in three European populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Hansen, Morten B.; Tang, H L

    2016-01-01

    photocoagulation (PRP) in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Method: Forty eyes from 38 newly diagnosed patients with PDR were included and followed for 6 months. All patients received standard PRP treatment by a navigated laser (NAVILAS®; OD-OS GmbH, Berlin, Germany) at baseline...... to month 6 (group 1 p=0.71, group 2 p=0.62). Conclusion: In our cohort, retinal vascular fractal dimension does not seem to be a valid marker for prediction of activity in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy 6 months after panretinal photocoagulation....... of diabetes were 52±14 years and 21±11 years, respectively, and 75% were male. HbA1c was 68 ±16 mmol/mol, and the mean blood pressure was 183/84 mmHg. Groups 1 and 2 did not differ according to the mean number of laser spots (1581 vs. 1573, p=0.84) or the total laser energy delivered (13.67 joule vs. 13...

  15. Macular micropseudocysts in early stages of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolada, Gemma; Pierro, Luisa; de Benedetto, Umberto; Margari, Sergio; Gagliardi, Marco; Maestranzi, Gisella; Calori, Giliola; Lorenzi, Mara; Lattanzio, Rosangela

    2011-01-01

    To identify by noninvasive means early retinal abnormalities that may predict diabetic macular edema. The authors analyzed retrospectively data from consecutive patients with Type 1 (n = 16) or Type 2 (n = 23) diabetes who presented for routine follow-up of early retinopathy, had no clinical signs or symptoms of diabetic macular edema, and were evaluated with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Age- and gender-matched nondiabetic subjects provided normative data. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed in the macular region of diabetic patients small hyporeflective areas (median diameter, 55 μm) contained within discrete retinal layers that we named micropseudocysts (MPCs). Micropseudocysts are associated with vascular leakage. The patients showing MPCs had more frequently systemic hypertension and increased central foveal thickness than those without MPCs. The association with increased central foveal thickness was only in the patients with Type 2 diabetes. Macular MPCs in patients with mild diabetic retinopathy appear to reflect leakage and can precede macular thickening. The association of MPCs with increased central foveal thickness in patients with Type 2 diabetes, but not in patients with Type 1 diabetes, points to a greater tendency to retinal fluid accumulation in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Studies in larger cohorts will determine the usefulness of MPCs in strategies to abort diabetic macular edema.

  16. Retinopathy screening in patients with type 1 diabetes diagnosed in young age using a non-mydriatic digital stereoscopic retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuto, N; Emmanuele, V; Vannati, M; Russo, C; Rebora, C; Panarello, S; Pistorio, A; Lorini, R; d'Annunzio, G

    2012-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy seriously impairs patients' quality of life, since it represents the first cause of blindness in industrialized countries. To estimate prevalence of retinopathy in young Type 1 diabetes patients using a non-mydriatic digital stereoscopic retinal imaging (NMDSRI), and to evaluate the impact of socio-demographic, clinical, and metabolic variables. In 247 young patients glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), gender, age, pubertal stage, presence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), HLA-DQ heterodimers of susceptibility for Type 1 diabetes, and β-cell autoimmunity at clinical onset were considered. At retinopathy screening, we evaluated age, disease duration, pubertal stage, body mass index (BMI-SDS), insulin requirement, HbA1c levels, other autoimmune diseases, diabetes-related complications, serum concentrations of cholesterol and triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Retinopathy was found in 26/247 patients: 25 showed background retinopathy, and 1 had a sight-threatening retinopathy. A significant relationship between retinopathy and female gender (p=0.01), duration of disease ≥15 yr (p65 mg/dl (p=0.012) and mean HbA1c ≥7.5% or >9% (p=0.0014) were found at the multivariate logistic analysis. Metabolic control is the most important modifiable factor and promotion of continuous educational process to reach a good metabolic control is a cornerstone to prevent microangiopathic complications. Symptoms appear when the complication is already established; a screening program with an early diagnosis is mandatory to prevent an irreversible damage.

  17. Clinical study on the expression differences of biochemical indicators between Uygur and Han patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Li Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To detect the related biochemical indicators of the Uygur and Han patients with diabetic retinopathy,to judge progression of diabetic retinopathy and evaluate the relation between ethnic and progression. So as to give a more accurate guide for regional clinical treatment, early detection, early prevention, reduce concurrency disease and improve quality of life. METHODS:One hundred and twenty patients with diabetic retinopathy aged 38~70 were diagnosed by fundus fluorescein angiography, including 60 patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDR, 30 Uygur and Han respectively(devided into Uygur group 1, Han group 1; 60 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR, 30 Uygur and Han respectively(devided into Uygur group 2, Han group 2. All patients were detected for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein(hs-CRP, serum total bilirubin(TBIL, fibrinogen(FIB, D-dimer(DDindicators using fasting blood. RESULTS:Regardless of ethnic, NPDR group and PDR group were significant differences in the four indicators; there was no significant difference between the Han and the Uygur group on the hs-CRP. But for the TBIL, FIB and DD, it was significantly different between the two ethnical groups, and it was more obvious in Uygur group. CONCLUSION:Diabetic retinopathy generally was more severe in Xinjiang Uygur groups, more attention should be paid in clinical practice.

  18. Analysis of the ABCR (ABCA4) gene in 4-aminoquinoline retinopathy: is retinal toxicity by chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine related to Stargardt disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroyer, N F; Lewis, R A; Lupski, J R

    2001-06-01

    To determine if mutations in ABCR (ABCA4) are associated with chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. DNA from eight patients with chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine retinopathy was studied. Controls were 80 individuals over age 65 years with normal retinal examinations. Ophthalmoscopy, color vision testing, visual fields, retinal photography, and fluorescein angiography were performed on the eight patients. Direct DNA sequencing of the exons and flanking intronic regions of the ABCR gene was completed for all patients. Clinical evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine retinopathy and excluded Stargardt disease in each patient. Two patients had heterozygous ABCR missense mutations previously associated with Stargardt disease. None of the controls had these missense mutations. Three other patients had other missense polymorphisms. Some individuals who have ABCR mutations may be predisposed to develop retinal toxicity when exposed to chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine. We urge further study of a larger cohort of patients with chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine retinopathy.

  19. Cohort profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiberg, Michael; Bandak, Mikkel; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    The cohort was set up in order to analyze late effects in long-term testicular cancer survivors (TCS) and to contribute to the design of future follow-up programs addressing and potentially preventing late effects. Data for this cross-sectional study were collected between January 1, 2014, and De...

  20. A comparison of 3 antibiotic regimens for prevention of postcesarean endometritis: an historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Erin; Duff, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Prophylactic antibiotics are of proven value in decreasing the frequency of postcesarean endometritis. The beneficial effect of prophylaxis is enhanced when the antibiotics are administered before the surgical incision as opposed to after the clamping of the umbilical cord. However, the optimal antibiotic regimen for prophylaxis has not been established firmly. The purpose of this study was to compare 3 different antibiotic regimens for the prevention of postcesarean endometritis. This retrospective historical cohort study was conducted at the University of Florida, which is a tertiary care facility that serves a predominantly indigent patient population. In the period January 2003 to December 2007, our standard prophylactic antibiotic regimen for all women who had cesarean delivery was cefazolin (1 g) administered immediately after the baby's umbilical cord was clamped. In November 2008, we began to administer the combined regimen of cefazolin (1 g intravenously) plus azithromycin (500 mg intravenously); both were given 30-60 minutes before the skin incision. In the period of January-December 2014, we continued the dual agent regimen but based the dose of cefazolin on the patient's body mass index: 2 g intravenously if the body mass index was 30 kg/m(2). The surgical technique was consistent throughout all 3 time periods. Our primary endpoint was the frequency of endometritis in each time period. This diagnosis was based on fever ≥37.5°C, lower abdominal pain and tenderness, the exclusion of other localizing signs of infection, and the requirement for administration of therapeutic antibiotics. In the first year after beginning the new antibiotic regimen, we also monitored the frequency of neonatal sepsis evaluations and compared it with the frequency that was recorded during the year immediately preceding the change in antibiotic regimens. During the entire period 2003-2014, 29,633 women delivered at our institution; 6455 women (22%) had a cesarean delivery. In

  1. Epigenetic Modifications and Potential New Treatment Targets in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Perrone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy is a debilitating vascular complication of diabetes. As with other diabetic complications, diabetic retinopathy (DR is characterized by the metabolic memory, which has been observed both in DR patients and in DR animal models. Evidences have provided that after a period of poor glucose control insulin or diabetes drug treatment fails to prevent the development and progression of DR even when good glycemic control is reinstituted (glucose normalization, suggesting a metabolic memory phenomenon. Recent studies also underline the role of epigenetic chromatin modifications as mediators of the metabolic memory. Indeed, epigenetic changes may lead to stable modification of gene expression, participating in DR pathogenesis. Moreover, increasing evidences suggest that environmental factors such as chronic hyperglycemia are implicated DR progression and may also affect the epigenetic state. Here we review recent findings demonstrating the key role of epigenetics in the progression of DR. Further elucidation of epigenetic mechanisms, acting both at the cis- and trans-chromatin structural elements, will yield new insights into the pathogenesis of DR and will open the way for the discovery of novel therapeutic targets to prevent DR progression.

  2. Delay in diabetic retinopathy screening increases the rate of detection of referable diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, P H; Aldington, S J; Stratton, I M

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether there is a relationship between delay in retinopathy screening after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and level of retinopathy detected. Patients were referred from 88 primary care practices to an English National Health Service diabetic eye screening programme. Data for screened patients were extracted from the primary care databases using semi-automated data collection algorithms supplemented by validation processes. The programme uses two-field mydriatic digital photographs graded by a quality assured team. Data were available for 8183 screened patients with diabetes newly diagnosed in 2005, 2006 or 2007. Only 163 with type 1 diabetes were identified and were insufficient for analysis. Data were available for 8020 with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Of these, 3569 were screened within 6 months, 2361 between 6 and 11 months, 1058 between 12 and 17 months, 366 between 18 and 23 months, 428 between 24 and 35 months, and 238 at 3 years or more after diagnosis. There were 5416 (67.5%) graded with no retinopathy, 1629 (20.3%) with background retinopathy in one eye, 753 (9.4%) with background retinopathy in both eyes and 222 (2.8%) had referable diabetic retinopathy. There was a significant trend (P = 0.0004) relating time from diagnosis to screening detecting worsening retinopathy. Of those screened within 6 months of diagnosis, 2.3% had referable retinopathy and, 3 years or more after diagnosis, 4.2% had referable retinopathy. The rate of detection of referable diabetic retinopathy is elevated in those who were not screened promptly after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  3. Effect of isoniazid preventive therapy on tuberculosis or death in persons with HIV : a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayele, Henok Tadesse; van Mourik, Maaike S M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is a recommended strategy for prevention of tuberculosis (TB) in persons with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) although the benefits have not been unequivocally demonstrated in routine clinical practice with widespread ART adoption. Therefore, we

  4. Retinopathy risk factors among diabetics in a tertiary care military hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizi, M.K.; Ameen, S.S.; Saeed, K.; Yaqub, M.A.; Khan, M.D.; Arain, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and risk factors for severity of retinopathy in diabetic patients referred to a tertiary military hospital. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi from Jun 2008 to Dec 2009. Patients and Methods: Diabetic patients aged 40 to 79, referred for suspected diabetic retinopathy (DR) on fundoscopy from medical outpatient clinic of Military Hospital Rawalpindi were randomly included in the study. Participants underwent a standardized interview and examination. Retinopathy was assessed through dilated pupils, and graded into absent retinopathy, mild to moderate, or advanced. Presence of clinically significant macular edema (CSME) was also recorded. To evaluate the simultaneous effect of significant risk factors on the different stages of DR, multivariate regression analysis was carried out. Results: Out of five hundred and ten patients, DR was confirmed in 63% cases with advanced retinopathy in 21.3%. In univariate analysis, duration of diabetes, fasting blood glucose, and presence of macular oedema were significantly associated with retinopathy (P<0.005). On multivariate analysis, however, only duration of diabetes (Odds Ratio 6.15 for 5 to 10 years and 38.29 for more than 10 years) and macular oedema (OR 6.617 95% CI 3.95-11.07) remained significant. CSME was present in 173 (33%) patients and its frequency increased with the severity of DR (P <0.001). Conclusion: The frequency of DR among military personnel and their dependants was high with strong association to duration of diabetes. This underscores the importance of regular retinal examination to detect DR in the early stages and timely intervention to prevent diabetes related blindness. (author)

  5. Stronger relationship of serum apolipoprotein A-1 and B with diabetic retinopathy than traditional lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the most common preventable cause of blindness where early detection and treatment can be sight-saving. Search for biomarkers of the disease has been relentless. We aimed to determine whether lipoproteins apolipoproteins A1 and B1 (Apo-A1 and Apo-B1 have stronger associations with DR in contrast to conventionally measured low-density lipoprotein (LDL and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Materials and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study and studied 117 patients. Serum lipid profile was assessed by autoanalyzer. Serum Apo-A1 and Apo-B were measured using immunoturbidimetric kit on an autoanalyzer. Apo-B/A1 ratio was calculated. Retinopathy was graded from the digital retinal photographs, taken with nonmydriatic auto fundus camera and classified according to International Clinical DR Disease Severity Scale. Results: Mean Apo-A1 for mild, moderate, severe retinopathy, and proliferative DR (PDR shows a significant negative correlation (P = 0.001 with severity of retinopathy. Mean Apo-B for mild, moderate, severe, PDR displayed a significant positive correlation with severity of retinopathy (P = 0.001. Mean Apo-B/A1 for mild, moderate, severe, PDR showed highly significant positive correlation with severity of retinopathy (P < 0.001. In contrast, mean LDL for mild, moderate, severe, PDR showed insignificant association with severity of DR (P = 0.081. Conclusion: Apo-A1 and Apo-B have a stronger association with the development of DR than traditional lipids and can thus facilitate early detection and treatment of the disease.

  6. barriers to an effective diabetic retinopathy service in ibadan, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like UK and USA,6,7 barriers identified include fear of ... blindness as well as the cost of attending clinic. Diabetic retinopathy .... cost of treatment for diabetic retinopathy - laser treatment ..... harness compliance to diabetic care, treatment and.

  7. Diabetic retinopathy: A predictor of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia El Demerdash

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy is a good predictor of coronary artery disease that exceeds the conventional risk factors. Diabetics with retinopathy would benefit from early coronary angiography and diabetic retinocoronary clinics are warranted.

  8. 670nm photobiomodulation as a novel protection against retinopathy of prematurity: evidence from oxygen induced retinopathy models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Natoli

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To investigate the validity of using 670nm red light as a preventative treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity in two animal models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During and post exposure to hyperoxia, C57BL/6J mice or Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 670 nm light for 3 minutes a day (9J/cm². Whole mounted retinas were investigated for evidence of vascular abnormalities, while sections of neural retina were used to quantify levels of cell death using the TUNEL technique. Organs were removed, weighed and independent histopathology examination performed. RESULTS: 670 nm light reduced neovascularisation, vaso-obliteration and abnormal peripheral branching patterns of retinal vessels in OIR. The neural retina was also protected against OIR by 670 nm light exposure. OIR-exposed animals had severe lung pathology, including haemorrhage and oedema, that was significantly reduced in 670 nm+OIR light-exposed animals. There were no significance differences in the organ weights of animals in the 670 nm light-exposed animals, and no adverse effects of exposure to 670 nm light were detected. DISCUSSION: Low levels of exposure to 670 nm light protects against OIR and lung damage associated with exposure to high levels of oxygen, and may prove to be a non-invasive and inexpensive preventative treatment for ROP and chronic lung disease associated with prematurity.

  9. Choroidal Thinning Associated With Hydroxychloroquine Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Seong Joon; Ryu, So Jung; Joung, Joo Young; Lee, Byung Ro

    2017-11-01

    To investigate choroidal thickness in patients using hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and compare choroidal thickness between eyes with and without HCQ retinopathy. Retrospective case series. Setting: Institutional. We included 124 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with HCQ. The patients were divided into an HCQ retinopathy group and a control group, according to the presence or absence of HCQ retinopathy. Total choroidal thickness and choriocapillaris-equivalent thickness were measured manually by 2 independent investigators using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT; DRI-OCT, Topcon Inc, Tokyo, Japan). These measurements were made at the fovea and at nasal and temporal locations 0.5, 1.5, and 3 mm from the fovea. Medium-to-large vessel layer thickness was calculated accordingly. The thicknesses were compared between the HCQ retinopathy and control groups. We performed correlation analyses between choroidal thicknesses and details regarding HCQ use. Total choroidal thickness and choriocapillaris-equivalent thickness. Choroidal thicknesses were significantly decreased (P < .05) in the HCQ retinopathy group compared to the control group, except at the temporal choroid 1.5 mm from the fovea. Choriocapillaris-equivalent thicknesses were significantly different in all choroidal locations between the groups. In contrast, the medium-to-large vessel layer thickness was only significantly different at a few locations. The cumulative dose/body weight was significantly correlated with subfoveal choroidal and choriocapillaris-equivalent thicknesses (both P = .001). The association between presence of HCQ retinopathy and choroidal thicknesses was also statistically significant after adjusting for age, diagnosis for HCQ use, refractive errors, and duration of HCQ use (P = .001 and P = .003 for subfoveal choroidal and choriocapillaris-equivalent thickness, respectively). These results all suggest that HCQ retinopathy is

  10. Fundus fluorescence Angiography in diagnosing diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuhui; Zuo, Yuqin; Wang, Ning; Tong, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the manifestation characteristics of fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and its values in diagnosing diabetic retinopathy through comparing direct ophthalmoscopy. Two hundred fifty patients (500 eyes) who were suspected as diabetic retinopathy and admitted to the hospital between February 2015 and December 2016 were selected. They underwent direct ophthalmoscopy and FFA. The manifestation characteristics of FFA in the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy were summarized. The two examination methods were compared. In the diagnosis with direct ophthalmoscopy, 375 eyes out of 500 eyes were diagnosed as diabetic retinopathy (75%); there were 74 eyes at stage I, 88 eyes at stage II, 92 eyes at stage III, 83 eyes of stage IV, 28 eyes of stage V and 10 eyes of stage VI. In the diagnosis with FFA, 465 eyes out of 500 eyes were diagnosed as diabetic retinopathy (93%); there were 94 eyes at stage I, 110 eyes at stage II, 112 at stage III, 92 eyes at stage IV, 41 eyes at stage V and 16 eyes at stage VI. The detection rate of diabetic retinopathy using FFA was significantly higher than that using direct ophthalmoscopy (Pretinopathy (67.96%), 75 eyes had pre-proliferative lesions (16.13%), 149 eyes had proliferative lesions (32.04%), 135 eyes had diabetic maculopathy (29.03%) and 31 eyes had diabetic optic disc lesions (6.67%). The detection rate of diabetic retinopathy using FFA is higher than that using direct ophthalmoscopy. FFA could accurately determine clinical stage. Therefore, it is an important approach in treatment efficacy evaluation and treatment guidance, suggesting a significant application value.

  11. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o'clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibited hypochromic iris. Hypopigmentation of the fundus was seen in the superior part of her right eye. This eye also had a huge neovascularization on the optic disc that was 7 discs in diameter. Conversely, her left fundi showed hypopigmentation of the fundus in the entire region of the left eye, and dot hemorrhages were observed all over the left fundi, although no neovascularization could be seen microscopically. Fluorescein angiography showed a huge neovascularization in the right eye and a tiny neovascularization in the left eye. Gene analysis revealed the presence of the PAX3 gene homeobox domain mutation, which led to her being diagnosed as Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Magnetic resonance angiography showed there was no obstructive region at either of the internal carotid arteries and ophthalmic arteries. The severity of the diabetic retinopathy appeared to be correlated with the degree of hypopigmentation in the posterior fundus. We speculate that hypopigmentation of the fundus in Waardenburg syndrome may be responsible for the reduction in retinal metabolism, which led to a reduction in oxygen consumption and prevented further aggravation of the diabetic retinopathy. Only laser treatments using short wavelengths was effective in this case. While the extinction coefficient for hemoglobin when using green light is higher than when using yellow light, the differences between these wavelengths tend to disappear when oxygenated hemoglobin is present. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with Waardenburg syndrome and diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Health and Prevention Enhancement (H-PEACE): a retrospective, population-based cohort study conducted at the Seoul National University Hospital Gangnam Center, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhyun; Choe, Eun Kyung; Choi, Ji Min; Hwang, Yunji; Lee, Young; Park, Boram; Chung, Su Jin; Kwak, Min-Sun; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Joo Sung; Park, Sue Kyung; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2018-04-19

    The Health and Prevention Enhancement (H-PEACE) study was designed to investigate the association of diagnostic imaging results, biomarkers and the predisease stage of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as malignancies and metabolic diseases, in an average-risk population in Korea. This study enrolled a large-scale retrospective cohort at the Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul National University Hospital, from October 2003 to December 2014. The baseline and follow-up information collected in the predisease stage of NCDs allows for evaluation of an individual's potential NCD risk, which is necessary for establishing personalised prevention strategies. A total of 91 336 health examinees were included in the cohort, and we repeatedly measured and collected information for 50.9% (n=46 484) of the cohort members. All participants completed structured questionnaires (lifestyle, medical history, mini-dietary assessment index, sex-specific variables and psychiatric assessment), doctors' physical examinations, laboratory blood and urine tests and digital chest X-ray imaging. For participants with available data, we also obtained information on specific diagnostic variables using advanced diagnostic tests, including coronary CT for coronary calcium scores, colonoscopy and brain MRI. Furthermore, 17 455 of the participants who provided informed consent and donated blood samples were enrolled into the Gene-environmental interaction and phenotype study, a subcohort of the H-PEACE, from October 2013, and we analysed genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism array data for 6579 of these blood samples. The data obtained from this cohort will be used to facilitate advanced and accurate diagnostic techniques related to NCDs while considering various phenotypes. Potential collaborators can access the dataset after receiving approval from our institutional review board. Applications can be submitted on the study homepage (http://en-healthcare.snuh.org/HPEACEstudy).

  13. Development and Validation of a Deep Learning System for Diabetic Retinopathy and Related Eye Diseases Using Retinal Images From Multiethnic Populations With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Daniel Shu Wei; Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Lim, Gilbert; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Quang, Nguyen D; Gan, Alfred; Hamzah, Haslina; Garcia-Franco, Renata; San Yeo, Ian Yew; Lee, Shu Yen; Wong, Edmund Yick Mun; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Baskaran, Mani; Ibrahim, Farah; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Finkelstein, Eric A; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Wong, Ian Y; Bressler, Neil M; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Varma, Rohit; Jonas, Jost B; He, Ming Guang; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cheung, Gemmy Chui Ming; Aung, Tin; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong Li; Wong, Tien Yin

    2017-12-12

    A deep learning system (DLS) is a machine learning technology with potential for screening diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases. To evaluate the performance of a DLS in detecting referable diabetic retinopathy, vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy, possible glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in community and clinic-based multiethnic populations with diabetes. Diagnostic performance of a DLS for diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases was evaluated using 494 661 retinal images. A DLS was trained for detecting diabetic retinopathy (using 76 370 images), possible glaucoma (125 189 images), and AMD (72 610 images), and performance of DLS was evaluated for detecting diabetic retinopathy (using 112 648 images), possible glaucoma (71 896 images), and AMD (35 948 images). Training of the DLS was completed in May 2016, and validation of the DLS was completed in May 2017 for detection of referable diabetic retinopathy (moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or worse) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or worse) using a primary validation data set in the Singapore National Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Program and 10 multiethnic cohorts with diabetes. Use of a deep learning system. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and sensitivity and specificity of the DLS with professional graders (retinal specialists, general ophthalmologists, trained graders, or optometrists) as the reference standard. In the primary validation dataset (n = 14 880 patients; 71 896 images; mean [SD] age, 60.2 [2.2] years; 54.6% men), the prevalence of referable diabetic retinopathy was 3.0%; vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy, 0.6%; possible glaucoma, 0.1%; and AMD, 2.5%. The AUC of the DLS for referable diabetic retinopathy was 0.936 (95% CI, 0.925-0.943), sensitivity was 90.5% (95% CI, 87.3%-93.0%), and specificity was 91.6% (95% CI, 91.0%-92.2%). For

  14. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness worldwide. The associated loss of productivity and quality of life of the patients with diabetic retinopathy will lead to additional socioeconomic burden. This study aims to determine the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients. Materials ...

  15. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Have Normoalbuminuria. R Karoli, J Fatima, V Shukla, P Garg, A Ali. Abstract. Background: Microalbuminuria is an independent predictor of retinopathy, so absence of microalbuminuria may tend clinician not to screen for diabetic retinopathy (DR).

  16. Role of Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübsam, Anne; Parikh, Sonia; Fort, Patrice E.

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and remains the leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. For decades, diabetic retinopathy was considered only a microvascular complication, but the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia, which are affected even prior to clinically detectable vascular lesions. While progress has been made to improve the vascular alterations, there is still no treatment to counteract the early neuro-glial perturbations in diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia along with dyslipidemia, hypoinsulinemia and hypertension. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as one key player in diabetes-associated retinal perturbations, however, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Interlinked molecular pathways, such as oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end-products and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor have received a lot of attention as they all contribute to the inflammatory response. In the current review, we focus on the involvement of inflammation in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy with special emphasis on the functional relationships between glial cells and neurons. Finally, we summarize recent advances using novel targets to inhibit inflammation in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:29565290

  17. New Therapeutic Approaches in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Relhan, Nidhi; Kishor, Krishna S.; Flynn Jr, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It affects a substantial proportion of US adults over age 40. The condition is a leading cause of visual loss. Much attention has been given to expanding the role of current treatments along with investigating various novel therapies and drug delivery methods. In the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME), intravitreal pharmacotherapies, especially anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents, have gained popularity. Currently, anti-VEGF agents are often used as first-line agents in center-involved DME, with recent data suggesting that among these agents, aflibercept leads to better visual outcomes in patients with worse baseline visual acuities. While photocoagulation remains the standard treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), recent FDA approvals of ranibizumab and aflibercept in the management of diabetic retinopathy associated with DME may suggest a potential for pharmacologic treatments of PDR as well. Novel therapies, including small interfering RNAs, chemokines, kallikrein-kinin inhibitors, and various anti-angiogenic agents, are currently being evaluated for the management of diabetic retinopathy and DME. In addition to these strategies, novel drug delivery methods such as sustained-release implants and refillable reservoir implants are either under active evaluation or have recently gained FDA approval. This review provides an update on the novel developments in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26676668

  18. Role of Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Rübsam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and remains the leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. For decades, diabetic retinopathy was considered only a microvascular complication, but the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia, which are affected even prior to clinically detectable vascular lesions. While progress has been made to improve the vascular alterations, there is still no treatment to counteract the early neuro-glial perturbations in diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia along with dyslipidemia, hypoinsulinemia and hypertension. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as one key player in diabetes-associated retinal perturbations, however, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Interlinked molecular pathways, such as oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end-products and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor have received a lot of attention as they all contribute to the inflammatory response. In the current review, we focus on the involvement of inflammation in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy with special emphasis on the functional relationships between glial cells and neurons. Finally, we summarize recent advances using novel targets to inhibit inflammation in diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Automated analysis of retinal images for detection of referable diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael D; Folk, James C; Han, Dennis P; Walker, Jonathan D; Williams, David F; Russell, Stephen R; Massin, Pascale; Cochener, Beatrice; Gain, Philippe; Tang, Li; Lamard, Mathieu; Moga, Daniela C; Quellec, Gwénolé; Niemeijer, Meindert

    2013-03-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of computer detection programs has been reported to be comparable to that of specialists and expert readers, but no computer detection programs have been validated in an independent cohort using an internationally recognized diabetic retinopathy (DR) standard. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) to detect referable diabetic retinopathy (RDR). In primary care DR clinics in France, from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2010, patients were photographed consecutively, and retinal color images were graded for retinopathy severity according to the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy scale and macular edema by 3 masked independent retinal specialists and regraded with adjudication until consensus. The IDP analyzed the same images at a predetermined and fixed set point. We defined RDR as more than mild nonproliferative retinopathy and/or macular edema. A total of 874 people with diabetes at risk for DR. Sensitivity and specificity of the IDP to detect RDR, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity of the retinal specialists' readings, and mean interobserver difference (κ). The RDR prevalence was 21.7% (95% CI, 19.0%-24.5%). The IDP sensitivity was 96.8% (95% CI, 94.4%-99.3%) and specificity was 59.4% (95% CI, 55.7%-63.0%), corresponding to 6 of 874 false-negative results (none met treatment criteria). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.937 (95% CI, 0.916-0.959). Before adjudication and consensus, the sensitivity/specificity of the retinal specialists were 0.80/0.98, 0.71/1.00, and 0.91/0.95, and the mean intergrader κ was 0.822. The IDP has high sensitivity and specificity to detect RDR. Computer analysis of retinal photographs for DR and automated detection of RDR can be implemented safely into the DR screening pipeline, potentially improving access to screening and health care productivity and reducing visual loss

  20. Costs and consequences of automated algorithms versus manual grading for the detection of referable diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, G S; McNamee, P; Fleming, A D; Goatman, K A; Philip, S; Prescott, G J; Sharp, P F; Williams, G J; Wykes, W; Leese, G P; Olson, J A

    2010-06-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of an improved automated grading algorithm for diabetic retinopathy against a previously described algorithm, and in comparison with manual grading. Efficacy of the alternative algorithms was assessed using a reference graded set of images from three screening centres in Scotland (1253 cases with observable/referable retinopathy and 6333 individuals with mild or no retinopathy). Screening outcomes and grading and diagnosis costs were modelled for a cohort of 180 000 people, with prevalence of referable retinopathy at 4%. Algorithm (b), which combines image quality assessment with detection algorithms for microaneurysms (MA), blot haemorrhages and exudates, was compared with a simpler algorithm (a) (using image quality assessment and MA/dot haemorrhage (DH) detection), and the current practice of manual grading. Compared with algorithm (a), algorithm (b) would identify an additional 113 cases of referable retinopathy for an incremental cost of pound 68 per additional case. Compared with manual grading, automated grading would be expected to identify between 54 and 123 fewer referable cases, for a grading cost saving between pound 3834 and pound 1727 per case missed. Extrapolation modelling over a 20-year time horizon suggests manual grading would cost between pound 25,676 and pound 267,115 per additional quality adjusted life year gained. Algorithm (b) is more cost-effective than the algorithm based on quality assessment and MA/DH detection. With respect to the value of introducing automated detection systems into screening programmes, automated grading operates within the recommended national standards in Scotland and is likely to be considered a cost-effective alternative to manual disease/no disease grading.

  1. Early postnatal weight gain as a predictor for the development of retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniwale, Manoj; Weiner, Angela; Sardesai, Smeeta; Cayabyab, Rowena; Barton, Lorayne; Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to validate the reliability of early postnatal weight gain as an accurate predictor of type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) requiring treatment in a large predominantly Hispanic US cohort with the use of an online tool called WINROP (weight, neonatal retinopathy of prematurity (IGF-1), neonatal retinopathy of prematurity). Retrospective cohort study consisted of preterm infants <32 weeks gestation and birth weight <1500 g. Weekly weights to 36 weeks post-menstrual age or discharge if earlier were entered into the WINROP tool. This tool generated alarm and risk indicator for developing ROP. The infants with type 1 ROP requiring treatment as well as all stages of ROP were compared with the alarms and risks generated by WINROP tool. A total of 492 infants were entered into the WINROP tool. The infants who developed type 1 ROP requiring treatment, the WINROP tool detected 80/89 (90%) at less than 32 weeks gestation. Nine infants developed type 1 ROP were classified as low risk and did not alarm. Postnatal weight gain alone, in predominantly Hispanic US population, predicted type 1 ROP requiring treatment before 32 weeks of gestation in infants with a sensitivity of 90%. The tool appeared to identify majority of affected infants much earlier than the scheduled screening.

  2. Vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Peng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the clinical effect of vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS: The clinical data of 55 cases(65 eyes, underwent vitrectomy, membrane peeling, endolaser photocoagulation and silicone oil or C3F8 injection, were retrospectively studied. During 6 months to 1 year follow-up period, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, retinal conditions and complications were observed.RESULTS: All 65 eyes received vitrectomy, of which silicone oil was tamponaded in 32 eyes, C3F8 was injected in 8 eyes, BBS was filled in 25 eyes. Visual improvement achieved in 42 eyes. Two eyes were manually vision, form count fingers to 0.05 in 18 eyes, >0.05-0.1 in 28 eyes, >0.1-0.3 in 12 eyes and >0.3 in 5 eyes. Retinal hole was occurred in 7 eyes, limitations fibrosis membrane remained in 8 eyes, retinal detachment appeared in 5 eyes, IOP increased in 18 eyes, vitreous hemorrhage relapsed in 12 eyes, 36 eyes received supplemental photocoagulation treatment 1-3 times after operation.CONCLUSION:Vitrectomy combined endophotocoagulation is an effective treatment for PDR. Silicone oil tamponade can limit the hemorrhage.

  3. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashima T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Kashima, Hideo Akiyama, Shoji KishiDepartment of Ophthalmology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Gunma 371-8511, JapanAbstract: A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o’clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibited hypochromic iris. Hypopigmentation of the fundus was seen in the superior part of her right eye. This eye also had a huge neovascularization on the optic disc that was 7 discs in diameter. Conversely, her left fundi showed hypopigmentation of the fundus in the entire region of the left eye, and dot hemorrhages were observed all over the left fundi, although no neovascularization could be seen microscopically. Fluorescein angiography showed a huge neovascularization in the right eye and a tiny neovascularization in the left eye. Gene analysis revealed the presence of the PAX3 gene homeobox domain mutation, which led to her being diagnosed as Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Magnetic resonance angiography showed there was no obstructive region at either of the internal carotid arteries and ophthalmic arteries. The severity of the diabetic retinopathy appeared to be correlated with the degree of hypopigmentation in the posterior fundus. We speculate that hypopigmentation of the fundus in Waardenburg syndrome may be responsible for the reduction in retinal metabolism, which led to a reduction in oxygen consumption and prevented further aggravation of the diabetic retinopathy. Only laser treatments using short wavelengths was effective in this case. While the extinction coefficient for hemoglobin when using green light is higher than when using yellow light, the differences between these wavelengths tend to disappear when oxygenated hemoglobin is present. To the best of

  4. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy after Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Francis, Andrew W; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-08-01

    To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female subject after lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. A 38-year-old woman presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery that was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately after witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal, and subretinal involvement. At 4-month follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy after lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted after episodes of seizure in adults.

  5. The Adenosinergic System in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vindeirinho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative and inflammatory environment that is prevalent in the diabetic eye is a key player in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The adenosinergic system is widely regarded as a significant modulator of neurotransmission and the inflammatory response, through the actions of the four types of adenosine receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R, and thus could be revealed as a potential player in the events unfolding in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we review the studies that explore the impact of diabetic conditions on the retinal adenosinergic system, as well as the role of the said system in ameliorating or exacerbating those conditions. The experimental results described suggest that this system is heavily affected by diabetic conditions and that the modulation of its components could reveal potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, particularly in the early stages of the disease.

  6. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase’s latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  7. Targeting Neovascularization in Ischemic Retinopathy: Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Elsherbiny, Mohamed; Nussbaum, Julian; Othman, Amira; Megyerdi, Sylvia; Tawfik, Amany

    2014-01-01

    Pathological retinal neovascularization (RNV) is a common micro-vascular complication in several retinal diseases including retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and central vein occlusion. The current therapeutic modalities of RNV are invasive and although they may slow or halt the progression of the disease they are unlikely to restore normal acuity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop treatment modalities, which are less invasive and therefore associated with fewer procedural complications and systemic side effects. This review article summarizes our understanding of the pathophysiology and current treatment of RNV in ischemic retinopathies; lists potential therapeutic targets; and provides a framework for the development of future treatment modalities. PMID:25598837

  8. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase's latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  9. Microvascular retinopathy in subjects without diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Kessel, Line; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Purpose:  Retinal vascular lesions such as microaneurysms and haemorrhages, while typical of diabetic retinopathy, are also seen in subjects without diabetes where they are associated with elevated cardiovascular mortality. In theory, these lesions could be a consequence of past hyperglycaemia. We...... examined the prevalence and risk factors for retinopathy, including lens fluorescence, a biomarker of cumulative life-time glycaemia in adults without diabetes. Methods:  Cross-sectional population-based study of 711 subjects without diabetes (WHO 1999 criteria) aged 30-60 years, including oral glucose...... tolerance testing, clinical and laboratory examinations, non-invasive ocular lens fluorometry and seven-field fundus photography. Results:  Retinopathy was present in 8.3% (CI(95) 6.3-10.3%) of subjects. Higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p = 0.032), increasing body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.014) and wider...

  10. Multicolor Scanning Laser Imaging in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad S Z; Carrim, Zia Iqbal

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of blindness in individuals younger than 60 years. Screening for retinopathy is undertaken using conventional color fundus photography and relies on the identification of hemorrhages, vascular abnormalities, exudates, and cotton-wool spots. These can sometimes be difficult to identify. Multicolor scanning laser imaging, a new imaging modality, may have a role in improving screening outcomes, as well as facilitating treatment decisions. Observational case series comprising two patients with known diabetes who were referred for further examination after color fundus photography revealed abnormal findings. Multicolor scanning laser imaging was undertaken. Features of retinal disease from each modality were compared. Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior visualization of retinal anatomy and pathology, thereby facilitating risk stratification and treatment decisions. Multicolor scanning laser imaging is a novel imaging technique offering the potential for improving the reliability of screening for diabetic retinopathy. Validation studies are warranted.

  11. The progress of prophylactic treatment in retinopathy of prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Bing; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Kun; Li, Xiao-Gang

    2018-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a retinal vascular disorder frequently found in premature infants. Different therapeutic strategies have been developed to treat ROP. However, there are still many children with ROP suffering by severe limitations in vision or even blindness. Recently, ROP has been suggested to be caused by abnormal development of the retinal vasculature, but not simply resulted by retinal neovascularization which takes about 4 to 6wk after birth in premature infants. Thus, instead of focusing on how to reduce retinal neovascularization, understanding the pathological changes and mechanisms that occur prior to retinal neovascularization is meaningful, which may lead to identify novel target(s) for the development of novel strategy to promote the healthy growth of retinal blood vessels rather than passively waiting for the appearance of retinal neovascularization and removing it by force. In this review, we discussed recent studies about, 1) the pathogenesis prior to retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR; a ROP in animal model) and in premature infants with ROP; 2) the preclinical and clinical research on preventive treatment of early OIR and ROP. We will not only highlight the importance of the mechanisms and signalling pathways in regulating early stage of ROP but also will provide guidance for actively exploring novel mechanisms and discovering novel treatments for early phase OIR and ROP prior to retinal neovascularization in the future. PMID:29862189

  12. Effective panphotocoagulation in a case of radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Tatsuhiko; Tochikubo, Tetsuo; Shinohara, Atsuko; Komoto, Michiji; Tabata, Toshifumi.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a case of radiation retinopathy caused by 60 Co and Ra radiation therapy following surgery for carcinoma of the maxillary sinus in a 42-year-old male. The retinopathy was found at onset of vitreous hemorrhage; the proliferative retinopathy was disclosed by fluorescein angiography (FAG). The retinopathy was treated a total of five times with both argon and krypton laser photocoagulation (PHC). As a result, both the subjective and objective symptoms improved. When radiation retinopathy is suspected, FAG must be conducted as soon as possible, to decide whether PHC is needed or not. (author)

  13. Retinopathy and risk factors in diabetic patients from Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Sisi A

    2012-02-01

    , being of moderate grade in 8% and of severe grade in 8.1%. A further 6.4% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy.Conclusion: Regular screening to detect diabetic retinopathy is strongly recommended because early detection has the best chance of preventing retinal complications.Keywords: diabetic retinopathy, diabetes complications, risk factors

  14. Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography: a new modality for early detection of angle neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Rajvardhan; Arora, Tarun; Sihota, Ramanjit; Chandra, Parijat; Mahajan, Deepankur; Sain, Siddarth; Sharma, Yograj

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the role of Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography in detecting neovascularization of the angle and correlate the same with gonioscopy in diabetic retinopathy. One hundred and fifty eyes of 150 patients (25 each of mild, moderate, severe, very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR); and PDR with high-risk characteristics) were recruited. They underwent complete ocular examination including applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography, and fundus fluorescein angiography. Using Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography, of 150 eyes neovascularization of the angle was detected in 37 eyes (24.66%) compared with 22 eyes (14.66%) on gonioscopy (P = 0.04). Small newly formed vessels were evident only with Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography. In 10 of 50 patients (20%) with severe/very severe NPDR, angle neovascularization was appreciable on Retcam fluorescein angiography compared with 5 patients (10%) on gonioscopy. Similarly, 25 of 50 patients (50%) with PDR/PDR with high-risk characteristics had neovascularization of the angle on Retcam gonioangiography compared with 17 (34%) on gonioscopy. Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography is a novel technique for early detection of angle neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy and hence preventing progression to neovascular glaucoma. The objective nature of this test helps in precise decision making compared with gonioscopy for early intervention especially in cases of pre-PDR.

  15. Serum TNF-Alpha Level Predicts Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Zorena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was identification of the immunologic markers of the damage to the eye apparatus at early stages of diabetes mellitus (DM type 1 children. One hundred and eleven children with DM type 1 were divided into two groups: those with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and without retinopathy. All the children had their daily urine albumin excretion, HbA1c, C-peptide measured, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, and ophthalmologic examination. Levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 in serum were measured by ELISA tests (Quantikine High Sensitivity Human by R&D Systems, Minneapolis, Minn, USA. The NPDR children demonstrated a significantly longer duration of the disease in addition to higher HbA1c, albumin excretion rate, C-reactive protein, systolic blood pressure, as well as TNF-α and IL-6 levels than those without retinopathy. The logistic regression revealed that the risk of NPDR was strongly dependent on TNF-α [(OR 4.01; 95%CI 2.01–7.96]. TNF-α appears to be the most significant predictor among the analyzed parameters of damage to the eye apparatus. The early introduction of the TNF-α antagonists to the treatment of young patients with DM type 1 who show high serum activity of the TNF-α may prevent them from development of diabetic retinopathy.

  16. An automated retinal imaging method for the early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, S Wilfred; Rajan, S Edward

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular complication of long-term diabetes and is the major cause for eyesight loss due to changes in blood vessels of the retina. Major vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy is highly preventable with regular screening and timely intervention at the earlier stages. Retinal blood vessel segmentation methods help to identify the successive stages of such sight threatening diseases like diabetes. To develop and test a novel retinal imaging method which segments the blood vessels automatically from retinal images, which helps the ophthalmologists in the diagnosis and follow-up of diabetic retinopathy. This method segments each image pixel as vessel or nonvessel, which in turn, used for automatic recognition of the vasculature in retinal images. Retinal blood vessels were identified by means of a multilayer perceptron neural network, for which the inputs were derived from the Gabor and moment invariants-based features. Back propagation algorithm, which provides an efficient technique to change the weights in a feed forward network, is utilized in our method. Quantitative results of sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were obtained in our method and the measured accuracy of our segmentation algorithm was 95.3%, which is better than that presented by state-of-the-art approaches. The evaluation procedure used and the demonstrated effectiveness of our automated retinal imaging method proves itself as the most powerful tool to diagnose diabetic retinopathy in the earlier stages.

  17. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  18. Retinopathy of Prematurity in Triplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ali Şekeroğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the incidence, severity and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP in triplets. Materials and Methods: The medical records of consecutive premature triplets who had been screened for ROP in a single maternity hospital were analyzed and presence and severity of ROP; birth weight, gender, gestational age of the infant; route of delivery and the mode of conception were recorded. Results: A total of 54 triplets (40 males, 14 females who were screened for ROP between March 2010 and February 2013 were recruited for the study. All triplets were delivered by Caesarean section and 36 (66.7% were born following an assisted conception. During follow-up, seven (13% of the infants developed ROP of any stage and two (3.7% required laser photocoagulation. The mean gestational age of triplets with ROP was 27.6±1.5 (27-31 weeks whereas it was 32.0±1.5 (30-34 weeks in those without ROP (p=0.002. The mean birth weights of triplets with and without ROP were 1290.0±295.2 (970-1600 g and 1667.5±222.2 (1130-1960 g, respectively (p<0.001. The presence of ROP was not associated with gender (p=0.358 or mode of conception (p=0.674. Conclusion: ROP in triplets seems to be mainly related to low gestational age and low birth weight. Further prospective randomized studies are necessary to demonstrate risk factors of ROP in triplets and to determine if and how gemelarity plays a role in the development of ROP.

  19. Characterization of Retinal Disease Progression in a 1-Year Longitudinal Study of Eyes With Mild Nonproliferative Retinopathy in Diabetes Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Luisa; Bandello, Francesco; Tejerina, Amparo Navea

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify eyes of patients with diabetes type 2 that show progression of retinal disease within a 1-year period using noninvasive techniques. METHODS: Three hundred seventy-four type 2 diabetic patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy......DR and in central retinal thickness in eyes with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetes type 2 are able to identify eyes at risk of progression. These eyes/patients should be selected for inclusion in future clinical trials of drugs targeted to prevent diabetic retinopathy progression to vision...... (SD-OCT) were assessed by a central reading center at all visits and ETDRS severity level in the first and last visits. RESULTS: Three hundred thirty-one eyes/patients completed the study. Microaneurysm formation rate greater than or equal to 2 was present in 68.1% of the eyes and MA turnover greater...

  20. The association of hospital prevention processes and patient risk factors with the risk of Clostridium difficile infection: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneman, N; Guttmann, A; Wang, X; Ma, X; Gibson, D; Stukel, T A

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of healthcare-acquired infection; the real-world impacts of some proposed C. difficile prevention processes are unknown. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to acute care hospitals between April 2011 and March 2012 in Ontario, Canada. Hospital prevention practices were determined by survey of infection control programmes; responses were linked to patient-level risk factors and C. difficile outcomes in Ontario administrative databases. Multivariable generalised estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to assess the impact of selected understudied hospital prevention processes on the patient-level risk of C. difficile infection, accounting for patient risk factors, baseline C. difficile rates and structural hospital characteristics. C. difficile infections complicated 2341 of 653 896 admissions (3.6 per 1000 admissions). Implementation of the selected C. difficile prevention practices was variable across the 159 hospitals with isolation of all patients at onset of diarrhoea reported by 43 (27%), auditing of antibiotic stewardship compliance by 26 (16%), auditing of cleaning practices by 115 (72%), on-site diagnostic testing by 74 (47%), vancomycin as first-line treatment by 24 (15%) and reporting rates to senior leadership by 52 (33%). None of these processes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of C. difficile after adjustment for baseline C. difficile rates, structural hospital characteristics and patient-level factors. Patient-level factors were strongly associated with C. difficile risk, including age, comorbidities, non-elective and medical admissions. In the largest study to date, selected hospital prevention strategies were not associated with a statistically significant reduction in patients' risk of C. difficile infection. These prevention strategies have either limited effectiveness or were ineffectively implemented during the study

  1. Influence of Age at Diagnosis and Time-Dependent Risk Factors on the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Forga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the influence of age at onset of type 1 diabetes and of traditional vascular risk factors on the development of diabetic retinopathy, in a cohort of patients who have been followed up after onset. Methods. Observational, retrospective study. The cohort consists of 989 patients who were followed up after diagnosis for a mean of 10.1 (SD: 6.8 years. The influence of age at diagnosis, glycemic control, duration of diabetes, sex, blood pressure, lipids, BMI, and smoking is analyzed using Cox univariate and multivariate models with fixed and time-dependent variables. Results. 135 patients (13.7% developed diabetic retinopathy. The cumulative incidence was 0.7, 5.9, and 21.8% at 5-, 10-, and 15-year follow-up, respectively. Compared to the group with onset at age 44 years, respectively. During follow-up we also observed an association between diabetic retinopathy and HbA1c levels, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion. The rate of diabetic retinopathy is higher in patients who were older at type 1 diabetes diagnosis. In addition, we confirmed the influence of glycemic control, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure on the occurrence of retinopathy.

  2. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  3. Quality assurance for diabetic retinopathy telescreening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S; Aldington, S J; Kohner, E M; Luzio, S; Owens, D R; Schmidt, V; Schuell, H; Zahlmann, G

    2005-06-01

    TOSCA was an EU-Commission supported international research project designed to develop telescreening services in diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper describes the quality assurance methods developed for the diabetic retinopathy telescreening service within the TOSCA project. The study was performed in 1895 patients with diabetes between 2000 and 2002 at diabetic retinopathy screening sites in five European countries. Data were analysed centrally. Patients attending each clinic's diabetic retinopathy screening service received standardized retinal photography. The images and associated data were transferred electronically to a remote location for grading. Each photographer uploading images and each grader downloading images for assessment was controlled by a systematic quality management approach. The quality assurance measures defined were image quality, intragrader reliability. A cockpit chart was developed for the management and presentation of relevant results and quality measures. For the intragrader reliability tests, 10% of the images were processed for a second grading. An algorithm for calculating differences between repeated gradings was developed. The assessment of image quality for the different sites showed that only 0-0.7% were unassessable. One hundred per cent agreement for both gradings was achieved in 50-85% of graded cases, depending on site and grader, and an agreement better than 95% in 71-100% of cases. A telemedicine-supported quality assurance process is practical and advantageous. The cockpit charts have proven to be useful tools when monitoring the performance of a telescreening service. Grader feedback showed high satisfaction with the quality assurance process.

  4. Presumed Chloroquine Retinopathy in Ibadan | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review patients with clinical features of chloroquine retinopathy seen during the study period with the view of identifying the trend and creating public awareness for behavioural change. Methods: A retrospective review of case notes of patients seen between 1996 and 2002. Results: 19 patients with features of ...

  5. Oxidative stress in diabetic patients with retinopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic retinopathy, which is a leading cause of acquired blindness. ... cataract. Chronic hyperglycemia and its associated ... microvascular disease. This may be ... as ulcers, neuropathy, and nephropathy which are ... 10 ml of venous blood was collected from the median.

  6. Retinopathy of prematurity: Revisiting incidence and risk factors from Oman compared to other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Zenaida Soriano; Al-Mulaabed, Sharef Waadallah; Bataclan, Flordeliz; Montemayor, Cheryl; Ganesh, Anuradha; Al-Zuhaibi, Sanaa; Al-Waili, Huda; Al-Wahibi, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and the maternal/neonatal risk factors at a tertiary care hospital in Oman, compared to other countries. A retrospective analysis of premature neonates born with gestational age (GA) 24-32 weeks at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman, from January 2007 to December 2010. Maternal and neonatal in-hospital course was retrieved. The incidence of ROP was reported. Risk factors analyses were performed using univariate and multivariate statistics. A total of 171 neonates (57% males, 43% females) were included for analysis. The incidence of ROP (any stage) was 69/171 (40.4%). Infants with ROP had significantly lower GA (27.7±2 weeks) compared to non-ROP group (30.2±1.7 weeks), P < 0.001),P < 0.001) and significantly lower birth weight (BW) (948 ± 242 g in ROP group vs. 1348 ± 283 g in non-ROP group;P < 0.001). Other significant risk factors associated with ROP were: small for GA, respiratory distress syndrome, requirement for ventilation, duration of ventilation or oxygen therapy, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, hyperglycemia, late onset sepsis (clinical or proven), necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, seizures, and number of blood transfusions. There was no significant difference in maternal characteristics between the ROP and non-ROP groups except that mothers of infants with ROP were found to be significantly younger. Logistic regression analysis revealed early GA, low BW, duration of Oxygen therapy, and late-onset clinical or proven sepsis as independent risk factors. ROP is still commonly encountered in neonatal practice in Oman and other countries. Early GA, low BW, and prolonged oxygen therapy continue to be the main risk factors associated with the occurrence of ROP in our setting. In addition, an important preventable risk factor identified in our cohort includes clinical or proven late-onset sepsis.

  7. Association between assisted reproductive technology and advanced retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RV Paul Chan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available RV Paul Chan1, Yoshihiro Yonekawa1, Margaux A Morrison2,3, Grace Sun1, Ryan K Wong1, Jeffrey M Perlman4, Michael F Chiang5,6, Thomas C Lee7, M Elizabeth Hartnett3, Margaret M DeAngelis2,31Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; 2Ocular Molecular Genetics Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; 3University of Utah School of Medicine, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; 4Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; Departments of 5Ophthalmology and 6Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York; 7The Vision Center, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, California, USAPurpose: To investigate the associations between assisted reproductive technology (ART and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP requiring treatment. Methods: Retrospective analyses of inborn preterm infants screened for severe ROP at the Weill Cornell Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital by single factor logistic regression and multifactor models.Results: Of 399 ethnically diverse infants, 253 were conceived naturally and 146 by ART. Eight (3.16% patients conceived naturally, and 11 (7.53% with ART required laser treatment. In multifactor analyses, significant risks for severe ROP requiring treatment included both gestational age (odds ratio [OR] 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–0.52; P< 0.001 and ART ([OR] 4.70; [CI], 1.52–4.57; P = 0.007.Conclusions: ART is associated with severe ROP requiring treatment in this cohort. This is the first report that demonstrates a statistically significant association between ART and severe ROP requiring treatment in infants in the US.Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity, low birth rate, blindness, assisted reproductive technology

  8. To report a case of unilateral proliferative retinopathy following noncerebral malaria with Plasmodium falciparum in Southern India

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    Aditya Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinopathy in association with malaria fever described so far includes retinal hemorrhages, vessel changes, retinal discoloration/whitening and papilledema. Malaria retinopathy has been mostly described in severe cases, associated with Plasmodium falciparum, correlating the patho-physiology of retinal and cerebral manifestations. We report an unusual case of proliferative retinopathy as a manifestation of malaria fever, caused by P. falciparum with no cerebral involvement. The patient had features of unilateral retinal vascular occlusion with proliferative changes and vitreous hemorrhage. To the best of our knowledge, such a case has never been reported so far in the literature. This report highlights the possible occurrence of severe proliferative changes associated with malaria fever, which if diagnosed early can prevent possible blindness.

  9. Determinants of participation in a fall assessment and prevention programme among elderly fallers in Hong Kong: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eliza L Y; Woo, Jean; Cheung, Annie W L; Yeung, Pui-Yi

    2011-04-01

    The study was undertaken to estimate the uptake rate of a fall prevention programme among older fallers and explore related factors. Fall injuries are a major cause nationally of the loss of independence in old age, but they are preventable. Acceptance of fall prevention programmes is therefore important to reduce the risk of falling. Patients aged ≥60 attending the Department of Accident & Emergency of a regional hospital in Hong Kong between 2006 and 2007 were recruited. The study included a baseline interview, focus group interview and a cross-sectional 1-year follow-up telephone survey to assess uptake and its related factors. A total 68% of 1194 older people attended the fall programme. Factors associated with programme participation included the perception of fall as being preventable [OR=3.47, 95% CI (1.59-7.56)] or recoverable [OR=1.73, 95% CI (1.06-2.82)], a safe outside environment; absence of chronic illness, and ability to walk without aids. Old-age people, those living in old-age homes and of lower education level were less likely to join the programme. Older people with the selected characteristics were less likely to attend the fall prevention programme, thus were less likely to benefit from them. Support from family/carers may be an important element in participation. In a nursing context, in primary care practice, all of these factors should be taken into account in any future development of a fall prevention programme in Hong Kong of this nature. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Preeclampsia and retinopathy of prematurity in preterm births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao Dan; Branch, D Ware; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Zhang, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The relationship between gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and the risk of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) remains unclear. Thus, we used a large cohort database to study the influence of maternal gestational hypertension and preeclampsia on the occurrence of ROP in preterm infants. We used data from a previous retrospective cohort study that includes 25,473 eligible preterm neonates. We examined the association between gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and ROP while controlling for potential confounders by multiple logistic regression analysis. Of the 8758 early preterm infants (gestational age <34 weeks), 1024 (11.69%) had ROP, while of the 16,715 late preterm infants, only 29 (0.17%) had ROP. After adjusting for confounders, preeclampsia was associated with a significantly reduced risk of ROP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49-0.86 for early preterm birth; aOR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.01-0.93 for late preterm birth; aOR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.50-0.87 for all preterm births). Gestational hypertension was not significantly associated with ROP at early or late preterm births. Preeclampsia, but not gestational hypertension, was associated with a reduced risk of ROP in preterm births.

  11. Automatic Tortuosity-Based Retinopathy of Prematurity Screening System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkaew, Lassada; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Makhanov, Stanislav S.; Barman, Sarah; Pangputhipong, Pannet

    Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) is an infant disease characterized by increased dilation and tortuosity of the retinal blood vessels. Automatic tortuosity evaluation from retinal digital images is very useful to facilitate an ophthalmologist in the ROP screening and to prevent childhood blindness. This paper proposes a method to automatically classify the image into tortuous and non-tortuous. The process imitates expert ophthalmologists' screening by searching for clearly tortuous vessel segments. First, a skeleton of the retinal blood vessels is extracted from the original infant retinal image using a series of morphological operators. Next, we propose to partition the blood vessels recursively using an adaptive linear interpolation scheme. Finally, the tortuosity is calculated based on the curvature of the resulting vessel segments. The retinal images are then classified into two classes using segments characterized by the highest tortuosity. For an optimal set of training parameters the prediction is as high as 100%.

  12. Planning diabetic retinopathy services – lessons from Latin America

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    Pedro Gomez-Bastar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization encourages the promotion and development of programmes for the prevention, detection, and management of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Such programmes must identify effective strategies and technology so that they can be adapted to the situation in each part of the world. Programmes must also be monitored and continuously improved.The guidelines discussed in this article were developed by experts brought together during workshops hosted by the VISION 2020 Latin America technical subcommittee on DR and technical support was provided by the Pan-American Asociation of Ophthalmology (PAAO. Although these guidelines have been developed for Latin America, we hope that the principles they contain will provide a good starting point for the planning of DR services in other low- and middle-income countries.

  13. Pericentral retinopathy and racial differences in hydroxychloroquine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melles, Ronald B; Marmor, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    To describe patterns of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy distinct from the classic parafoveal (bull's eye) maculopathy. Retrospective case series. Patients from a large multi-provider group practice and a smaller university referral practice diagnosed with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. Patients with widespread or "end-stage" retinopathy were excluded. Review of ophthalmic studies (fundus photography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, multifocal electroretinography, visual fields) and classification of retinopathy into 1 of 3 patterns: parafoveal (retinal changes 2°-6° from the fovea), pericentral (retinal changes ≥ 8° from the fovea), or mixed (retinal changes in both parafoveal and pericentral areas). Relative frequency of different patterns of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy and comparison of risk factors. Of 201 total patients (18% Asian) with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy, 153 (76%) had typical parafoveal changes, 24 (12%) also had a zone of pericentral damage, and 24 (12%) had pericentral retinopathy without any parafoveal damage. Pericentral retinopathy alone was seen in 50% of Asian patients but only in 2% of white patients. Patients with the pericentral pattern were taking hydroxychloroquine for a somewhat longer duration (19.5 vs. 15.0 years, P Hydroxychloroquine retinopathy does not always develop in a parafoveal (bull's eye) pattern, and a pericentral pattern of damage is especially prevalent among Asian patients. Screening practices may need to be adjusted to recognize pericentral and parafoveal hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation Retinopathy: Case report and review

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    Young Lorna

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular damage from radiation treatment is a well established phenomenon. Many factors are now known to influence the incidence of radiation retinopathy, including total dosage and daily fraction size. Patients who are diabetic, hypertensive or received previous chemotherapy are more susceptible to radiation retinopathy. Case Presentation A 55 year old male was referred from the oncology department with epiphora. His medical history included Type 2 Insulin treated Diabetes Mellitus and hypertension. One year prior to presentation he had undergone a total rhinectomy with a 4 week course of post-operative radiotherapy for an aggressive sqaumous cell carcinoma of the nose. On examination the visual acuity was noted to be 6/36 left eye and 6/9 right eye. Posterior segment examination revealed marked retinal ischaemia present in the posterior pole and macular region of both eyes. The appearance was not thought to be typical of diabetic changes, radiation retinopathy being the more likely diagnosis especially in view of his history. Over the next four months the vision in both eyes rapidly deteriorated to 3/60 left eye and 1/60 right eye. Bilateral pan retinal photocoagulation was thought to be appropriate treatment at this point. Conclusion This case highlights the importance for ophthalmologists and oncologists to be aware of the close relationship between diabetes and radiation treatment and the profound rapid impact this combination of factors may have on visual function. Radiation is being used with increasing frequency for ocular and orbital disease, because of this more cases of radiation retinopathy may become prevalent. Factors which may potentiate radiation retinopathy should be well known including, increased radiation dosage, increased fraction size, concomitant systemic vascular disease and use of chemotherapy. Counselling should be offered in all cases at risk of visual loss. As no effective treatment currently exists

  15. The provision of aids and adaptations, risk assessments, and incident reporting and recording procedures in relation to injury prevention for adults with intellectual disabilities: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, J; Jackson, A; Mantry, D; Morrison, J; Cooper, S-A

    2015-06-01

    Adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) experience a higher incidence of injury, compared with the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate the provision of aids and adaptations, residential service providers' individual risk assessments and training in these, and injury incident recording and reporting procedures, in relation to injury prevention. Interviews were conducted with a community-based cohort of adults with IDs (n = 511) who live in Greater Glasgow, Scotland, UK and their key carer (n = 446). They were asked about their aids and adaptations at home, and paid carers (n = 228) were asked about individual risk assessments, their training, and incident recording and reporting procedures. Four hundred and twelve (80.6%) of the adults with IDs had at least one aid or adaptation at home to help prevent injury. However, a proportion who might benefit, were not in receipt of them, and surprisingly few had temperature controlled hot water or a bath thermometer in place to help prevent burns/scalds, or kitchen safety equipment to prevent burns/scalds from electric kettles or irons. Fifty-four (23.7%) of the paid carers were not aware of the adult they supported having had any risk assessments, and only 142 (57.9%) had received any training on risk assessments. Considerable variation in incident recording and reporting procedures was evident. More work is needed to better understand, and more fully incorporate, best practice injury prevention measures into routine support planning for adults with IDs within a positive risk-taking and risk reduction framework. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Chen

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral (ARV drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009-2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2% of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15% in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7% in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1-4 drugs/sample. These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals.

  17. Association of Retinopathy and Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities With Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alun D; Falaschetti, Emanuela; Witt, Nicholas; Wijetunge, Sumangali; Thom, Simon A McG; Tillin, Therese; Aldington, Steve J; Chaturvedi, Nish

    2016-11-01

    Abnormalities of the retinal circulation may be associated with cerebrovascular disease. We investigated associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and (1) strokes and subclinical cerebral infarcts and (2) cerebral white matter lesions in a UK-based triethnic population-based cohort. A total of 1185 participants (age, 68.8±6.1 years; 77% men) underwent retinal imaging and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral infarcts and white matter hyperintensities were identified on magnetic resonance imaging, retinopathy was graded, and retinal vessels were measured. Higher retinopathy grade (odds ratio [OR], 1.40 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.16-1.70]), narrower arteriolar diameter (OR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]), fewer symmetrical arteriolar bifurcations (OR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75-0.95]), higher arteriolar optimality deviation (OR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.00-1.34]), and more tortuous venules (OR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.09-1.32]) were associated with strokes/infarcts and white matter hyperintensities. Associations with quantitative retinal microvascular measures were independent of retinopathy. Abnormalities of the retinal microvasculature are independently associated with stroke, cerebral infarcts, and white matter lesions. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Vision-Related Functional Burden of Diabetic Retinopathy Across Severity Levels in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jeffrey R; Doan, Quan V; Gleeson, Michelle; Haskova, Zdenka; Ramulu, Pradeep; Morse, Lawrence; Cantrell, Ronald A

    2017-09-01

    % CI, 1.29-10.05; P = .02). Those with severe NPDR or PDR did not have a statistically significant greater odds of vision-related functional burden than did those with mild or moderate NPDR (aOR, 2.70; 95% CI, 0.93-7.78; P = .07). Among US adults with diabetes, approximately half of those with severe NPDR or PDR had difficulty with at least one visual function task. Moreover, vision-related functional burden was significantly greater among those with severe NPDR or PDR than among those with no retinopathy. These data suggest the importance of preventing severe forms of DR to mitigate the vision-related functional burden among US adults with diabetes. Future studies should complement our study by assessing the association of worsening retinopathy with objectively measured functional outcomes.

  19. Development and validation of the Alzheimer's prevention beliefs measure in a multi-ethnic cohort-a behavioral theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Alon; Ganzer, Christine A; Vermeylen, Francoise; Parry, Stephen; Zhu, Jifeng; Lyons, Abigail; Isaacson, Richard; Kim, Sarang

    2017-12-01

    Understanding health beliefs and how they influence willingness will enable the development of targeted curricula that maximize public engagement in Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk reduction behaviors. Literature on behavioral theory and community input was used to develop and validate a health beliefs survey about AD risk reduction among 428 community-dwelling adults. Principal component analysis was performed to assess internal consistency. Linear regression was performed to identify key predictors of Willingness to engage in AD risk reduction behaviors. The measure as well as the individual scales (Benefits, Barriers, Severity, Susceptibility and Social Norm) were found to be internally consistent. Overall, as Benefits and Barriers scores increased, Willingness scores also increased. Those without prior AD experience or family history had lower willingness scores. Finally, we observed an interaction between age and norms, suggesting that social factors related to AD prevention may differentially affect people of different ages. The Alzheimer Prevention Beliefs Measure provides assessment of several health belief factors related to AD prevention. Age, Family History, Logistical Barriers and total Benefits are significant determinants of willingness to engage in AD risk reduction behaviors, such as seeing a doctor or making a lifestyle change. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Does Perturbation Training Prevent Falls after Discharge from Stroke Rehabilitation? A Prospective Cohort Study with Historical Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Danells, Cynthia J; Aqui, Anthony; Aryan, Raabeae; Biasin, Louis; DePaul, Vincent G; Inness, Elizabeth L

    2017-10-01

    Individuals with stroke fall frequently, and no exercise intervention has been shown to prevent falls post stroke. Perturbation-based balance training (PBT), which involves practicing reactions to instability, shows promise for preventing falls in older adults and individuals with Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to determine if PBT during inpatient stroke rehabilitation can prevent falls after discharge into the community. Individuals with subacute stroke completed PBT as part of routine inpatient rehabilitation (n = 31). Participants reported falls experienced in daily life for up to 6 months post discharge. Fall rates were compared to a matched historical control group (HIS) who did not complete PBT during inpatient rehabilitation. Five of 31 PBT participants, compared to 15 of 31 HIS participants, reported at least 1 fall. PBT participants reported 10 falls (.84 falls per person per year) whereas HIS participants reported 31 falls (2.0 falls per person per year). When controlled for follow-up duration and motor impairment, fall rates were lower in the PBT group than the HIS group (rate ratio: .36 [.15, .79]; P = .016). These findings suggest that PBT is promising for reducing falls post stroke. While this was not a randomized controlled trial, this study may provide sufficient evidence for implementing PBT in stroke rehabilitation practice. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti-VEGF therapy in the management of retinopathy of prematurity: what we learn from representative animal models of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Haibo Wang Department of Ophthalmology, John A Moran Eye Center, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Abstract: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP remains a leading cause of childhood blindness, affecting infants born prematurely. ROP is characterized by the onset of delayed physiological retinal vascular development (PRVD and followed by pathologic neovascularization into the vitreous instead of the retina, called intravitreal neovascularization (IVNV. Therefore, the therapeutic strategy for treating ROP is to promote PRVD and inhibit or prevent IVNV. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ROP. There is a growing body of studies testing the use of anti-VEGF agents as a treatment for ROP. Intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment for ROP has potential advantages compared with laser photocoagulation, the gold standard for the treatment of severe ROP; however, intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment has been associated with reactivation of ROP and suppression of systemic VEGF that may affect body growth and organ development in preterm infants. Therefore, it is important to understand the role of VEGF in PRVD and IVNV. This review includes the current knowledge of anti-VEGF treatment for ROP from animal models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR, highlighting the importance of VEGF inhibition by targeting retinal Müller cells, which inhibits IVNV and permits PRVD. The signaling events involved in mediating VEGF expression and promoting VEGF-mediated angiogenesis, including hypoxia-dependent signaling, erythropoietin/erythropoietin receptor-, oxidative stress-, beta-adrenergic receptor-, integrin-, Notch/Delta-like ligand 4- and exon guidance molecules-mediated signaling pathways, are also discussed. Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, retinopathy of prematurity, intravitreal neovascularization, oxygen-induced retinopathy model, physiological retinal vascular development

  2. Genetic variants associated with severe retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, M Elizabeth; Morrison, Margaux A; Smith, Silvia; Yanovitch, Tammy L; Young, Terri L; Colaizy, Tarah; Momany, Allison; Dagle, John; Carlo, Waldemar A; Clark, Erin A S; Page, Grier; Murray, Jeff; DeAngelis, Margaret M; Cotten, C Michael

    2014-08-12

    To determine genetic variants associated with severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in a candidate gene cohort study of US preterm infants. Preterm infants in the discovery cohort were enrolled through the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network, and those in the replication cohort were from the University of Iowa. All infants were phenotyped for ROP severity. Because of differences in the durations of enrollment between cohorts, severe ROP was defined as threshold disease in the discovery cohort and as threshold disease or type 1 ROP in the replication cohort. Whole genome amplified DNA from stored blood spot samples from the Neonatal Research Network biorepository was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate platform for candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involving angiogenic, developmental, inflammatory, and oxidative pathways. Three analyses were performed to determine significant epidemiologic variables and SNPs associated with levels of ROP severity. Analyses controlled for multiple comparisons, ancestral eigenvalues, family relatedness, and significant epidemiologic variables. Single nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with ROP severity from the discovery cohort were analyzed in the replication cohort and in meta-analysis. Eight hundred seventeen infants in the discovery cohort and 543 in the replication cohort were analyzed. Severe ROP occurred in 126 infants in the discovery and in 14 in the replication cohort. In both cohorts, ventilation days and seizure occurrence were associated with severe ROP. After controlling for significant factors and multiple comparisons, two intronic SNPs in the gene BDNF (rs7934165 and rs2049046, P large candidate gene study of infants with threshold ROP. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  3. Retinopathy secondary to radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groomer, A.E.; Gutwein, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses a case of radiotherapy-induced retinopathy following treatment of squamous cell carcinoma. Treatment of the carcinoma with external beam radiotherapy to the supraorbital region and base of the skull was followed by the onset of retinopathy. The sensory retina, as well as other central nervous system tissues, is highly resistant to radiation damage; however, the retinal vasculature is extremely sensitive to radiation damage, producing a retinopathy that is characteristic of other vascular occlusive diseases. Management is discussed

  4. A police education programme to integrate occupational safety and HIV prevention: protocol for a modified stepped-wedge study design with parallel prospective cohorts to assess behavioural outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathdee, Steffanie A; Arredondo, Jaime; Rocha, Teresita; Abramovitz, Daniela; Rolon, Maria Luisa; Patiño Mandujano, Efrain; Rangel, Maria Gudelia; Olivarria, Horcasitas Omar; Gaines, Tommi; Patterson, Thomas L; Beletsky, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Policing practices are key drivers of HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID). This paper describes the protocol for the first study to prospectively examine the impact of a police education programme (PEP) to align law enforcement and HIV prevention. PEPs incorporating HIV prevention (including harm reduction programmes like syringe exchange) have been successfully piloted in several countries but were limited to brief pre–post assessments; the impact of PEPs on policing behaviours and occupational safety is unknown. Objectives Proyecto ESCUDO (SHIELD) aims to evaluate the efficacy of the PEP on uptake of occupational safety procedures, as assessed through the incidence of needle stick injuries (NSIs) (primary outcome) and changes in knowledge of transmission, prevention and treatment of HIV and viral hepatitis; attitudes towards PWID, adverse behaviours that interfere with HIV prevention and protective behaviours (secondary outcomes). Methods/analysis ESCUDO is a hybrid type I design that simultaneously tests an intervention and an implementation strategy. Using a modified stepped-wedge design involving all active duty street-level police officers in Tijuana (N=∼1200), we will administer one 3 h PEP course to groups of 20–50 officers until the entire force is trained. NSI incidence and geocoded arrest data will be assessed from department-wide de-identified data. Of the consenting police officers, a subcohort (N=500) will be randomly sampled from each class to undergo pre-PEP and post-PEP surveys with a semiannual follow-up for 2 years to assess self-reported NSIs, attitudes and behaviour changes. The impact on PWIDs will be externally validated through a parallel cohort of Tijuana PWIDs. Ethics/dissemination Research ethics approval was obtained from the USA and Mexico. Findings will be disseminated through open access to protocol materials through the Law Enforcement and HIV Network. Trial registration number NCT02444403. PMID:26260350

  5. Retinopathy of prematurity: postmenstrual age at threshold in a transitional economy is similar to that in developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Susan Mary; Luu, Lan Ngoc; Nguyen, Tinh Xuan; Huynh, Tess; Good, William Vance

    2008-03-01

    To analyse the timing of threshold disease in infants requiring treatment for retinopathy of prematurity in a transitional economy. Retrospective, observational, cohort study. National Hospital of Paediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam. Premature infants in the Neonatal ward requiring laser treatment for threshold retinopathy of prematurity. Chronological age and postmenstrual age at treatment. From January 2002 to November 2004, 42 infants from the National Hospital of Paediatrics required laser surgery for threshold retinopathy of prematurity. The mean +/- standard deviation (SD) of birth weight was 1369 +/- 184 g (range 1000-1700); the mean +/- SD of gestation at birth was 30 +/- 1.8 weeks (range 27-34); and the mean +/- SD of postmenstrual age at which treatment occurred in these infants was 36.2 +/- 2.5 weeks (range 31.4-42). A further 58 infants were transferred from other hospitals for laser surgery between January 2004 and October 2004. The mean +/- SD of birth weight was 1325.5 +/- 237.2 g (range 800-1900); the mean +/- SD of gestation at birth was 30 +/- 1.7 weeks (range 28-35); and the mean +/- SD of postmenstrual age at which treatment was given in these infants was 36.3 +/- 2.3 weeks (range 32.71-44.3). Despite the relative maturity of the gestation of these infants compared with infants in developed countries who develop severe retinopathy of prematurity, the timing of treatment for threshold disease appears to be related to postmenstrual age.

  6. Retinopathy of prematurity: an epidemic in the making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Graham E; Gilbert, Clare; Darlow, Brian A; Zin, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    To explore the etiology, incidence and methods to prevent and treat severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is rapidly becoming a threat to the vision of babies in areas of the world where increasing numbers of premature babies are surviving. The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed published in English. The search term was "retinopathy of prematurity and premature birth". We discuss the historical perspectives, prevalence and incidence, classification and treatment methods of ROP in premature babies. Peripheral retinal ablation for eyes with severe ROP can help prevent progression to blindness and several large clinical trials have shown the effectiveness of this treatment in high risk eyes. As a greater proportion of VLBW and ELBW babies survive, the population of babies at risk increases. In various regions of the world, different identification criteria are used to determine which babies are at risk of blindness in order to provide timely diagnostic examinations and treatment as needed. Methods for preventing ROP include better ante-natal and obstetric care leading to a reduction in the rate of prematurity, the use of ante-natal corticosteroids, and better neonatal care practices. Recent developments have indicated that management of oxygen supplementation is important for the prevention of severe ROP; however, there is not yet known what oxygen saturation target should be adopted. Sepsis increases severe ROP in very preterm infants. Genetic associations and a telemedicine approach may be explored to detect ROP. Treatment of anti-VEGF therapy are potentially useful in eyes with severe ROP, but long term effects are not yet known and such treatment should be used with great caution. ROP is a potentially binding disease for premature babies which is becoming more prevalent with the development improving neonatal services in many countries in recent years. High priority should be placed on developing approaches to prevent ROP

  7. Radiation Retinopathy Associated with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; Liu; FengWen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of radiation retinopathy associated with central retinal vein occlusion.Methods: The clinical features and fundus fluorescein angiography of this case were analyzed.Results: The patient had been treated with radiotherapy for her nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and presented with sudden visual loss in the left eye. The funduscopic examination and fluorescein angiography showed the features of radiation retinopathy in both eyes, and central retinal vein occlusion in the left eye.Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy can be associated with central retinal vein occlusion in the same eye, and it seems that the endothelial cell loss caused by radiation retinopathy may lead to retinal vein occlusion.

  8. Physical activity and its correlation to diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praidou, Anna; Harris, Martin; Niakas, Dimitrios; Labiris, Georgios

    2017-02-01

    The lack of physical activity, along with obesity, smoking, hypertension and hyperglycaemia are considered as risk factors for the occurrence of diseases such as diabetes. Primary objective of the study was to investigate potential correlation between physical activity and diabetic retinopathy. Three hundred and twenty patients were included in the study: 240 patients with diabetes type 2 (80 patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, 80 patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 80 ones with proliferative diabetic retinopathy) were compared with 80 non-diabetic patients (control group). Physical activity of patients was assessed by the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ, 2002). HbA1c and BMI were also measured in diabetic patients. Group comparisons were attempted for levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Total physical activity was decreased in patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy as compared to patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and to the control group (pdiabetic retinopathy and physical activity has been demonstrated (pdiabetic retinopathy, independent of the effects of HbA1c and BMI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment effects of captopril on non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ning; ZHENG Zhi; JIN Hui-yi; XU Xun

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of diabetes.Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor is thought to play an important role in preventing and treating retinal diseases in animal models of DR.The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI,captopril) in the treatment of patients with non-proliferative DR.Methods Three hundred and seventeen type 2 diabetic patients (88.05% of participants) without or with mild to moderate non-proliferative retinopathy were randomly divided into captopril group (n=202) and placebo group (n=115).All subjects received 24-month follow-up.General clinical examinations,including blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin,as well as comprehensive standardized ophthalmic examinations were performed.Color fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to grade diabetic retinopathy and detect macular edema respectively.Results The levels of blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin in the two groups of patients remained within the normal range during the entire follow-up and no significant difference was found between the initial and last visits,suggesting that ACEI drugs play a protective role on the DR patients independent of its anti-blood pressure role.DR classification showed that 169 eyes (83.66%) remained unchanged and the DR grade of 33 eyes (16.34%) increased in captopril group,while 84 eyes (73.04%) remained unchanged and the grade of 31 eyes (26.96%) increased in placebo group (P=0.024).Captopril treatment improved macular edema in 55.45% eyes,which was significantly higher than the 37.39% improvement in placebo group (P=0.002).No significant difference was found in the visual acuity between the two groups (P=0.271).Conclusion Captopril can improve or delay the development of DR and macular edema,which can be used in the early treatment of DR patients with type 2 diabetic mellitus.

  10. Prevalence of retinopathy of prematurity in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrion JZ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Juliana Zimmermann Carrion1, João Borges Fortes Filho2, Marcia Beatriz Tartarella3, Andrea Zin4, Ignozy Dorneles Jornada Jr41Program for the Prevention of Blindness due to Retinopathy of Prematurity, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul and Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, 3Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, 4Departament of Neonatology, Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Rio de Janeiro, 5University Luterana do Brasil School of Medicine, Canoas, BrazilAbstract: The purpose of this work was to review the studies published over the last 10 years concerning the prevalence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP in Latin American countries, to determine if there was an improvement in ROP prevalence rates in that period, and to identify the inclusion criteria for patients at risk of developing ROP in the screening programs. A total of 33 studies from ten countries published between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. Prevalence of any ROP stage in the regions considered ranged from 6.6% to 82%; ROP severe enough to require treatment ranged from 1.2% to 23.8%. There was no routine screening for ROP, and there was a lack of services for treatment of the disease in many countries. Inclusion criteria for patients in the studies ranged between birth weight ≤1500 g and ≤2000 g and gestational age ≤32 and <37 weeks. Use of different inclusion criteria regarding birth weight and gestational age in several Latin American studies hindered comparative analysis of the published data. Highly restrictive selection criteria for ROP screening in relation to birth weight and gestational age should not be used throughout most Latin American countries because of their different social characteristics and variable neonatal care procedures. The studies included in this review failed to provide adequate information to determine if the prevalence of ROP

  11. Downregulated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Tapan; Kotwani, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of neurotrophin growth factor family, physiologically mediates induction of neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation, promotes neuronal growth and survival and maintains synaptic plasticity and neuronal interconnections. Unlike the central nervous system, its secretion in the peripheral nervous system occurs in an activity-dependent manner. BDNF improves neuronal mortality, growth, differentiation and maintenance. It also provides neuroprotection against several noxious stimuli, thereby preventing neuronal damage during pathologic conditions. However, in diabetic retinopathy (a neuromicrovascular disorder involving immense neuronal degeneration), BDNF fails to provide enough neuroprotection against oxidative stress-induced retinal neuronal apoptosis. This review describes the prime reasons for the downregulation of BDNF-mediated neuroprotective actions during hyperglycemia, which renders retinal neurons vulnerable to damaging stimuli, leading to diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of preventive surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms on attention, executive function, learning and memory: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joonho; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Min A; Kim, Yong Bae; Joo, Jin-Yang; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the effects of preventive surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms on attention, executive function, learning and memory. Between March 2012 and June 2013, 56 patients were recruited for this study. Fifty-one patients met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) age ≤65 years and (2) planned microsurgery or endovascular surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Exclusion criteria were as follows: (1) preoperative intelligence quotient attention), WCT (executive function) and VLT (learning and memory) scores did not change significantly between the pre- and postoperative evaluations. The ACCPT, WCT, total VLT scores (verbal learning) and delayed VLT scores (memory) did not differ significantly between patients undergoing microsurgery and those undergoing endovascular surgery. However, ACCPT, WCT and delayed VLT scores decreased postoperatively in patients with leukoaraiosis on preoperative FLAIR images (OR 9.899, p = 0.041; OR 11.421, p = 0.006; OR 2.952, p = 0.024, respectively). Preventive surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms did not affect attention, executive function, learning or memory. However, patients with leukoaraiosis on FLAIR images might be prone to deficits in attention, executive function and memory postoperatively, whereas learning might not be affected.

  13. Correlates of Mandrax use and condom beliefs in preventing sexually transmitted infections among a cohort of South African prison inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Torrance T; Gardner, Darius; Jones, Keena; Sifunda, Sibusiso; Braithwaite, Ronald; Smith, Selina E

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to identify the extent to which self-reported Mandrax use impacts condom-use beliefs amongst South African prison inmates. Participants were inmates from four prisons in the provinces of KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga. In total, 357 inmates participated in the parent study of which 121 are included in this analysis based on their self-reported use of Mandrax. The questionnaire was developed in English, translated into Zulu, and back translated into English. Age significantly predicted the use of Mandrax: younger prison inmates reported higher use. Linear regression analysis was conducted to determine whether the use of Mandrax was associated with length of incarceration and other demographic variables, as well as participants' self-reported condom use beliefs behavior. Regression results indicated that two factors operationalizing condom-use beliefs were impacted by Mandrax use: 1) it is important to use condoms every time you have sex (pcondoms work well to prevent the spread of HIV (puse. STI prevention programs among prison inmates that seek to promote safer sex behaviors among men must address attitudes to condom use, specifically consistent and correct use of latex condoms and reducing substance misuse. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Selective Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Vivax Malaria: Reduction of Malaria Incidence in an Open Cohort Study in Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Luiz Herman Soares; de Lima, Alzemar Alves; Freitag, Elci Marlei; dos Santos, Tatiana Marcondes; do Nascimento Filha, Maria Teixeira; dos Santos Júnior, Alcides Procópio Justiniano; da Silva, Josiane Mendes; Rodrigues, Aline de Freitas; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Fontes, Cor Jesus Fernandes; Pereira da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando

    2013-01-01

    In children, the Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTc), currently called Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC), was considered effective on malaria control due to the reduction of its incidence in Papua New Guinea and in some areas with seasonal malaria in Africa. However, the IPT has not been indicated because of its association with drug resistance and for hindering natural immunity development. Thus, we evaluated the alternative IPT impact on malaria incidence in three riverside communities on Madeira River, in the municipality of Porto Velho, RO. We denominate this scheme Selective Intermittent Preventive Treatment (SIPT). The SIPT consists in a weekly dose of two 150 mg chloroquine tablets for 12 weeks, for adults, and an equivalent dose for children, after complete supervised treatment for P. vivax infection. This scheme is recommend by Brazilian Health Ministry to avoid frequent relapses. The clinic parasitological and epidemiological surveillance showed a significant reduction on vivax malaria incidence. The results showed a reduction on relapses and recurrence of malaria after SIPT implementation. The SIPT can be effective on vivax malaria control in localities with high transmission risk in the Brazilian Amazon. PMID:23577276

  15. A retrospective population-based cohort study identifying target areas for prevention of acute lower respiratory infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond Peter

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI are a major cause of hospitalisation in young children. Many factors can lead to increased risk of ALRI in children and predispose a child to hospitalisation, but population attributable fractions for different risk factors and how these fractions differ between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children is unknown. This study investigates population attributable fractions of known infant and maternal risk factors for ALRI to inform prevention strategies that target high-risk groups or particular risk factors. Methods A retrospective population-based data linkage study of 245,249 singleton births in Western Australia. Population attributable fractions of known maternal and infant risk factors for hospitalisation with ALRI between 1996 and 2005 were calculated using multiple logistic regression. Results The overall ALRI hospitalisation rate was 16.1/1,000 person-years for non-Aboriginal children and 93.0/1,000 for Aboriginal children. Male gender, being born in autumn, gestational age Conclusions The population attributable fractions estimated in this study should help in guiding public health interventions to prevent ALRI. A key risk factor for all children is maternal smoking during pregnancy, and multiple previous pregnancies and autumnal births are important high-risk groups. Specific key target areas are reducing elective caesareans in non-Aboriginal women and reducing teenage pregnancies and improving access to services and living conditions for the Aboriginal population.

  16. Selective Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Vivax Malaria: Reduction of Malaria Incidence in an Open Cohort Study in Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hiroshi Katsuragawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In children, the Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTc, currently called Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC, was considered effective on malaria control due to the reduction of its incidence in Papua New Guinea and in some areas with seasonal malaria in Africa. However, the IPT has not been indicated because of its association with drug resistance and for hindering natural immunity development. Thus, we evaluated the alternative IPT impact on malaria incidence in three riverside communities on Madeira River, in the municipality of Porto Velho, RO. We denominate this scheme Selective Intermittent Preventive Treatment (SIPT. The SIPT consists in a weekly dose of two 150 mg chloroquine tablets for 12 weeks, for adults, and an equivalent dose for children, after complete supervised treatment for P. vivax infection. This scheme is recommend by Brazilian Health Ministry to avoid frequent relapses. The clinic parasitological and epidemiological surveillance showed a significant reduction on vivax malaria incidence. The results showed a reduction on relapses and recurrence of malaria after SIPT implementation. The SIPT can be effective on vivax malaria control in localities with high transmission risk in the Brazilian Amazon.

  17. Structural neurodegeneration correlates with early diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Hansen, Rasmus Søgaard; Peto, Tunde

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine differences in structural and functional neurodegenerative measurements between patients with no and early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we examined 103 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 7-field fundus photographs acquired...... with Topcon TRC-NW6S, a single, certified grader determined the presence of DR according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale. Retinal neurodegeneration was evaluated by Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and by a RETI-scan multifocal...... electroretinography (mf-ERG) system in rings 1-6. RESULTS: Median age and duration of diabetes were 63.6 and 10 years, respectively, and 46% were men. Median HbA1c was 50 mmol/mol (6.7%), and ETDRS levels were 10 (41.7%, n = 43), 20 (35.0%, n = 36), and 35 (23.3%, n = 24). The duration of diabetes increased...

  18. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progressi...

  19. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S. Alhomida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.

  20. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetesmellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin M Nentwich; Michael W Ulbig

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the mostfrequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitusand the most common cause of blindness in the workingagepopulation. In the next 15 years, the number ofpatients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected toincrease significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 millionpeople in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to besuffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people withdiabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts foran increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e. , exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema.

  1. Deregulation of ocular nucleotide homeostasis in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukovaara, Sirpa; Sandholm, Jouko; Aalto, Kristiina; Liukkonen, Janne; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Yegutkin, Gennady G

    2017-02-01

    Clear signaling roles for ATP and adenosine have been established in all tissues, including the eye. The magnitude of signaling responses is governed by networks of enzymes; however, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of purinergic signaling in the eye. By employing thin-layer chromatographic assays with 3 H-labeled substrates, this study aimed to evaluate the role of nucleotide homeostasis in the pathogenesis of vitreoretinal diseases in humans. We have identified soluble enzymes ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73, adenylate kinase-1, and nucleoside diphosphate kinase in the vitreous fluid that control active cycling between pro-inflammatory ATP and anti-inflammatory adenosine. Strikingly, patients with proliferative form of diabetic retinopathy (DR) had higher adenylate kinase activity and ATP concentration, when compared to non-proliferative DR eyes and non-diabetic controls operated for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, macular hole, and pucker. The non-parametric correlation analysis revealed positive correlations between intravitreal adenylate kinase and concentrations of ATP, ADP, and other angiogenic (angiopoietins-1 and -2), profibrotic (transforming growth factor-β1), and proteolytic (matrix metalloproteinase-9) factors but not erythropoietin and VEGF. Immunohistochemical staining of postmortem human retina additionally revealed selective expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 on the rod-and-cone-containing photoreceptor cells. Collectively, these findings provide novel insights into the regulatory mechanisms that influence purinergic signaling in diseased eye and open up new possibilities in the development of enzyme-targeted therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenylate kinase-1 circulate in human vitreous fluid. Adenylate kinase activity is high in diabetic eyes with proliferative retinopathy. Diabetic eyes display higher intravitreal ATP/ADP ratio than non-diabetic controls. Soluble adenylate

  2. HIV rapid testing in the framework of an STI prevention project on a cohort of vulnerable Italians and immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccella, Ilaria; Petrelli, Alessio; Vescio, Maria Fenicia; De Carolis, Silvia; Fazioli, Cecilia; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Rezza, Gianni

    2017-08-01

    Uptake of HIV tests is a challenging issue in vulnerable populations including immigrants, normally using standard diagnostic tools. Objectives of this study were to evaluate the acceptability of HIV rapid test; estimate the percentage of newly HIV diagnoses and evaluate knowledge, attitudes and perception (KAP) about HIV/AIDS and other STIs in a specific set of immigrants and vulnerable population in Rome (Italy). All immigrant and Italian people, aged 16-70 years, attending the infectious disease outpatient clinic of the National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty (INMP) in Rome (Italy), during the period December 2012 to December 2013 were enrolled. HIV rapid testing was provided for free and patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire evaluating KAP about HIV/STIs. All patients with risky sexual behaviours or with a recent diagnosis of STIs were invited to come back after 3-6 months and a post-counselling questionnaire was offered. Out of the total sample, 99.2% (n = 825) accepted the "rapid test" and 10 new HIV diagnoses were found (1.22%; 95% CI 0.58%-2.22%). Three hundred and eighty-five participants (47%) answered the entry questionnaire and 58 (15%) completed the follow-up. Overall, we found high knowledge about HIV/AIDS; however, lower educational level and immigrant status were associated with poor knowledge about HIV, other STIs and prevention methods. Immigrants have lower perception of sexual risk and higher prejudice than Italians. Our study showed high acceptance of rapid test in this specific vulnerable population and this allowed to identify new HIV diagnoses in unaware people. Socioeconomic inequalities observed in the KAP questionnaire suggest the need for actions to support the reduction of cultural differences in knowledge of HIV/AIDS and for policies aimed at improving access to health services and preventions programmes of marginalized populations.

  3. Effectiveness and Value of Prophylactic 5-Layer Foam Sacral Dressings to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injuries in Acute Care Hospitals: An Observational Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and value of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings to prevent hospital-acquired pressure injury rates in acute care settings. Retrospective observational cohort. We reviewed records of adult patients 18 years or older who were hospitalized at least 5 days across 38 acute care hospitals of the University Health System Consortium (UHC) and had a pressure injury as identified by Patient Safety Indicator #3 (PSI-03). All facilities are located in the United States. We collected longitudinal data pertaining to prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings purchased by hospital-quarter for 38 academic medical centers between 2010 and 2015. Longitudinal data on acute care, hospital-level patient outcomes (eg, admissions and PSI-03 and pressure injury rate) were queried through the UHC clinical database/resource manager from the Johns Hopkins Medicine portal. Data on volumes of dressings purchased per UHC hospital were merged with UHC data. Mixed-effects negative binomial regression was used to test the longitudinal association of prophylactic foam sacral dressings on pressure injury rates, adjusted for hospital case-mix and Medicare payments rules. Significant pressure injury rate reductions in US acute care hospitals between 2010 and 2015 were associated with the adoption of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings within a prevention protocol (-1.0 cases/quarter; P = .002) and changes to Medicare payment rules in 2014 (-1.13 cases/quarter; P = .035). Prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings are an effective component of a pressure injury prevention protocol. Hospitals adopting these technologies should expect good value for use of these products.

  4. Lycopene, tomato products and prostate cancer-specific mortality among men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Jacobs, Eric J; Newton, Christina C; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2016-06-15

    While dietary lycopene and tomato products have been inversely associated with prostate cancer incidence, there is limited evidence for an association between consumption of lycopene and tomato products and prostate-cancer specific mortality (PCSM). We examined the associations of prediagnosis and postdiagnosis dietary lycopene and tomato product intake with PCSM in a large prospective cohort. This analysis included men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between enrollment in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort in 1992 or 1993 and June 2011. Prediagnosis dietary data, collected at baseline, were available for 8,898 men, of whom 526 died of prostate cancer through 2012. Postdiagnosis dietary data, collected on follow-up surveys in 1999 and/or 2003, were available for 5,643 men, of whom 363 died of prostate cancer through 2012. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for PCSM. Neither prediagnosis nor postdiagnosis dietary lycopene intake was associated with PCSM (fourth vs. first quartile HR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.78-1.28; HR = 1.22, 95% CI 0.91-1.64, respectively). Similarly, neither prediagnosis nor postdiagnosis consumption of tomato products was associated with PCSM. Among men with high-risk cancers (T3-T4 or Gleason score 8-10, or nodal involvement), consistently reporting lycopene intake ≥ median on both postdiagnosis surveys was associated with lower PCSM (HR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.17-0.99, based on ten PCSM cases consistently ≥ median intake) compared to consistently reporting intake lycopene intake with PCSM among men with high-risk prostate cancers. © 2016 UICC.

  5. Effectiveness of rugby headgear in preventing soft tissue injuries to the head: a case-control and video cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S J; Lyons, R A; Evans, R; Newcombe, R G; Nash, P; McCabe, M; Palmer, S R

    2004-04-01

    To determine if headgear use by rugby players was associated with a reduced risk of head or facial laceration, abrasion, or fracture. An emergency department based case-control study in South Wales, UK, with cases being rugby players treated for superficial head and facial injuries and controls being their matched opponents during the game. A review of videos of the 41 games in the 1999 Rugby World Cup was also carried out to compare with the case-control study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to measure association between exposure (headgear wearing) and outcome (head and facial injuries). In the case-control study, 164 pairs were analysed, with headgear worn by 12.8% of cases and 21.3% of controls. Headgear use was associated with substantial but non-significant reductions in superficial head (OR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.13 to 1.19) and facial (OR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.46) injuries. The video study followed 547 players over 41 games, during which there were 47 bleeding injuries to the head. Headgear use significantly reduced the risk of bleeding head injury in forwards (OR = 0.14, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.99, p = 0.02), but not in backs. There was also a higher risk of facial injury among forwards, but this was not significant. The combined results suggest that headgear can prevent certain types of superficial head injuries in players at all levels of the game, but the evidence is strongest for superficial head injury in elite forwards. A randomised controlled trial would be the best way to study this further.

  6. SERUM MAGNESIUM, LIPID PROFILE AND GLYCATED HAEMOGLOBIN IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda Vusikala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus of long duration. Alterations in trace metals like magnesium and lipid profile was observed in diabetic retinopathy with hyperglycaemic status. AIM The study was taken up to assess the role of magnesium, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin in diabetic retinopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 80 subjects between 40-65 years were included in the study. Group 1 includes 20 age and sex matched healthy controls. Group 2 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus without retinopathy. Group 3 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus with retinopathy. RESULTS Magnesium was found to be significantly low in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Fasting and Postprandial plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels confirmed the glycaemic status of each of the groups. CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridemia was observed in diabetic retinopathy along with increased levels of glycated haemoglobin in our study.

  7. Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria | Lawan | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria. ... Background: The aim of the study is to determine the pattern of retinopathy seen in diabetic patients attending the outpatient clinic in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, ... A screening program needs to be developed to facilitate early detection and prompt treatment.

  8. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.Y. Yau (Joanne W.); S.L. Rogers (Sophie); Y. Kawasaki; E.L. Lamoureux (Ecosse); J.W. Kowalski (Jonathan); T. Bek (Toke); S.-J. Chen (Shih-Jen); J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline); A.E. Fletcher (Astrid E.); J. Grauslund (Jakob); R.C.G. Haffner; U. Hamman (Ute); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); T. Kayama (Takamasa); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S. Krishnaiah (Sannapaneni); K. Mayurasakorn (Korapat); J.P. O'Hare (Joseph); T. Orchard; M. Porta; M. Rema (Mohan); M.S. Roy (Monique); T. Sharma (Tarun); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); H. Taylor (Hugh); J.M. Tielsch (James); D. Varma (Dhiraj); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); N. Wang (Ningli); S. West (Sheila); L. Zu (Liang); M. Yasuda (Maya); X. Zhang (Xinzhi); P. Mitchell (Paul); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A pooled analysis using individual participant data from population-based studies

  9. Characteristics of patients with diabetic retinopathy in Gaborone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (GLLAMMs) to account for the non-independence of the eye diabetic retinopathy outcome at the patient level (Rabe-Hesketh et al., 2000). This model allowed for analysis of a polytomous ordinal response on a set of predictors and computed the odds ratios (OR) of having a more severe diabetic retinopathy grade compared ...

  10. Bevacizumab treatment for retinopathy of prematurity in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a growing problem in South. Africa (SA), as it is .... detected in the serum of both infants and adults after intraocular injection,[7] ... use of anti-VEGF agents to treat macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy ...

  11. Lipoprotein(a Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atherogenic lipoproteins, such as total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and triglycerides, are associated with progression of retinopathy. Aim. To evaluate the relationship between lipoprotein(a and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 145 diabetic consecutive patients (82 females, 63 males; mean age 66.8±12 years, mean duration of diabetes 9.4±6.8 years. Presence and severity of retinopathy were evaluated. Serum lipid profile, including Lp(a level, was assessed. Results. High Lp(a levels have been observed in 54 (78.3% subjects and normal levels in 13 (18.85% subjects as regards diabetic patients with retinopathy. Lp(a levels were high in 15 subjects (21.75% and normal in 63 subjects (91.35% as regards patients without retinopathy. Conclusions. Lp(a levels are increased in a significant percentage of patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy. The impact of Lp(a levels on diabetic retinopathy needs to be further investigated.

  12. Plantar fascia thickness is longitudinally associated with retinopathy and renal dysfunction: a prospective study from adolescence to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez-Aguirre, Paul Z; Craig, Maria E; Jenkins, Alicia J; Gallego, Patricia H; Cusumano, Janine; Duffin, Anthony C; Hing, Stephen; Donaghue, Kim C

    2012-03-01

    The aim was to study the longitudinal relationship between plantar fascia thickness (PFT) as a measure of tissue glycation and microvascular (MV) complications in young persons with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). We conducted a prospective longitudinal cohort study of 152 (69 male) adolescents with T1DM who underwent repeated MV complications assessments and ultrasound measurements of PFT from baseline (1997-2002) until 2008. Retinopathy was assessed by 7-field stereoscopic fundal photography and nephropathy by albumin excretion rate (AER) from three timed overnight urine specimens. Longitudinal analysis was performed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Median (interquartile range) age at baseline was 15.1 (13.4-16.8) years, and median follow-up was 8.3 (7.0-9.5) years, with 4 (3-6) visits per patient. Glycemic control improved from baseline to final visit [glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 8.5% to 8.0%, respectively; p = .004]. Prevalence of retinopathy increased from 20% to 51% (p 7.5 μg/min) increased from 26% to 29% (p = .2). A greater increase in PFT (mm/year) was associated with retinopathy at the final assessment (ΔPFT 1st vs. 2nd-4th quartiles, χ(2) = 9.87, p = .02). In multivariate GEE, greater PFT was longitudinally associated with retinopathy [odds ratio (OR) 4.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-10.3] and early renal dysfunction (OR 3.2, CI 1.3-8.0) after adjusting for gender, blood pressure standard deviation scores, HbA1c, and total cholesterol. In young people with T1DM, PFT was longitudinally associated with retinopathy and early renal dysfunction, highlighting the importance of early glycemic control and supporting the role of metabolic memory in MV complications. Measurement of PFT by ultrasound offers a noninvasive estimate of glycemic burden and tissue glycation. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Association of Maternal Preeclampsia With Infant Risk of Premature Birth and Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Julia P; Weng, Cindy; Wilkes, Jacob; Greene, Tom; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Studies report conflicting associations between preeclampsia and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). This study provides explanations for the discrepancies to clarify the relationship between preeclampsia and ROP. To evaluate the association of maternal preeclampsia and risk of ROP among infants in an unrestricted birth cohort and a restricted subcohort of preterm, very low birth weight (P-VLBW) infants. A retrospective review of 290 992 live births within the Intermountain Healthcare System in Utah from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Generalized estimating equations for logistic regressions with covariate adjustment were applied to relate ROP to preeclampsia among the full cohort and in a subcohort of P-VLBW infants born at younger than 31 weeks' gestation and weighing less than 1500 g. The occurrence of ROP was related to maternal preeclampsia in the full cohort and in a subcohort of P-VLBW infants. In the full cohort, 51% of the infants were male and the mean (SD) gestational age was 38.38 (1.87) weeks. In the P-VLBW cohort, 55% were male and the mean (SD) gestational age was 26.87 (2.40) weeks. In the full cohort, preeclampsia was associated with an increased risk of all ROP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.46; 95% CI, 2.17-2.79; P prematurity, because prematurity is an outcome of preeclampsia.

  14. The REFORM study protocol: a cohort randomised controlled trial of a multifaceted podiatry intervention for the prevention of falls in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockayne, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Corbacho Martin, Belen; Fairhurst, Caroline; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Hull, Robin; Keenan, Anne Maree; Lamb, Sarah E; Loughrey, Lorraine; McIntosh, Caroline; Menz, Hylton B; Redmond, Anthony C; Rodgers, Sara; Vernon, Wesley; Watson, Judith; Torgerson, David

    2014-12-17

    Falls and fall-related injuries are a serious cause of morbidity and cost to society. Foot problems and inappropriate footwear may increase the risk of falls; therefore podiatric interventions may play a role in reducing falls. Two Cochrane systematic reviews identified only one study of a podiatry intervention aimed to reduce falls, which was undertaken in Australia. The REFORM trial aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention in reducing falls in people aged 65 years and over in a UK and Irish setting. This multicentre, cohort randomised controlled trial will recruit 2600 participants from routine podiatry clinics in the UK and Ireland to the REFORM cohort. In order to detect a 10% point reduction in falls from 50% to 40%, with 80% power 890 participants will be randomised to receive routine podiatry care and a falls prevention leaflet or routine podiatry care, a falls prevention leaflet and a multifaceted podiatry intervention. The primary outcome is rate of falls (falls/person/time) over 12 months assessed by patient self-report falls diary. Secondary self-report outcome measures include: the proportion of single and multiple fallers and time to first fall over a 12-month period; Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International; fear of falling in the past 4 weeks; Frenchay Activities Index; fracture rate; Geriatric Depression Scale; EuroQoL-five dimensional scale 3-L; health service utilisation at 6 and 12 months. A qualitative study will examine the acceptability of the package of care to participants and podiatrists. The trial has received a favourable opinion from the East of England-Cambridge East Research Ethics Committee and Galway Research Ethics Committee. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conference presentations. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68240461 assigned 01/07/2011. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  15. Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Ziquan; Jensen, Lasse D.; Rouhi, Pegah

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced vascular responses, including angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and vascular leakage, significantly contribute to the onset, development and progression of retinopathy. However, until recently there were no appropriate animal disease models recapitulating adult retinopathy available....... In this article, we describe protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1: EGFP zebrafish are placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 d and retinal neovascularization is analyzed using confocal microscopy. It usually takes 11 d to obtain conclusive results using the hypoxia......-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish. This model provides a unique opportunity to study kinetically the development of retinopathy in adult animals using noninvasive protocols and to assess therapeutic efficacy of orally active antiangiogenic drugs....

  16. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javeria Amin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area.

  17. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Javeria; Sharif, Muhammad; Yasmin, Mussarat

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area.

  18. RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURE INFANTS AS A MAIN PROBLEM OF NEONATAL OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Rozental’

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During more than 70 years retinopathy of premature infants (previously — retrolental retinopathy has been one of the main problems in neonatology practice. This is caused firstly by the high risk of blindness development and visual disability and secondly — by the steady increase of health care allowing infants previously believed to be incurable to survive. Success in prevention of development of severe forms of this disorder nowadays depends not only on knowledge and experience of pediatric ophthalmologists. To the great extent it is associated to efforts and awareness of all levels of medical care participating in management of premature infants: from maternity hospitals, including departments of intensity care and neonatology, to out-patients clinics. According to the review of modern literature the article contains the main data on etiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, classification, clinical manifestation, diagnostics, prophylaxis and treatment of retinopathy of premature infants. The author also noted the tendencies to reveal the disease in the modern history of the Russian Federation. It is important to say, that urgency of this problem in the Russian Federation has significantly raised during the last years due to switch since the 1st January 2012 to the live birth criteria recommended by the World Health Organization.

  19. DESIGN AND DEVELOP A COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN FOR AUTOMATIC EXUDATES DETECTION FOR DIABETIC RETINOPATHY SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. SATHIYAMOORTHY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic Retinopathy is a severe and widely spread eye disease which can lead to blindness. One of the main symptoms for vision loss is Exudates and it could be prevented by applying an early screening process. In the Existing systems, a Fuzzy C-Means Clustering technique is used for detecting the exudates for analyzation. The main objective of this paper is, to improve the efficiency of the Exudates detection in diabetic retinopathy images. To do this, a three Stage – [TS] approach is introduced for detecting and extracting the exudates automatically from the retinal images for screening the Diabetic retinopathy. TS functions on the image in three levels such as Pre-processing the image, enhancing the image and detecting the Exudates accurately. After successful detection, the detected exudates are classified using GLCM method for finding the accuracy. The TS approach is experimented using MATLAB software and the performance evaluation can be proved by comparing the results with the existing approach’s result and with the hand-drawn ground truths images from the expert ophthalmologist.

  20. The Role of Microglia in Diabetic Retinopathy: Inflammation, Microvasculature Defects and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which appears in one third of all diabetic patients and is a prominent cause of vision loss. First discovered as a microvascular disease, intensive research in the field identified inflammation and neurodegeneration to be part of diabetic retinopathy. Microglia, the resident monocytes of the retina, are activated due to a complex interplay between the different cell types of the retina and diverse pathological pathways. The trigger for developing diabetic retinopathy is diabetes-induced hyperglycemia, accompanied by leukostasis and vascular leakages. Transcriptional changes in activated microglia, mediated via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) and extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways, results in release of various pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, caspases and glutamate. Activated microglia additionally increased proliferation and migration. Among other consequences, these changes in microglia severely affected retinal neurons, causing increased apoptosis and subsequent thinning of the nerve fiber layer, resulting in visual loss. New potential therapeutics need to interfere with these diabetic complications even before changes in the retina are diagnosed, to prevent neuronal apoptosis and blindness in patients. PMID:29301251

  1. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity in two of the triplets: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Bo; Dong, Yu; Song, E

    2015-02-01

    Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity is identified as a rare, rapidly progressing and severe form of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Here, we report the diagnosis and treatment of aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) in two of the triplets born at low birth weight and small gestational age. A case concerning two triplets who were born at 31 weeks' gestational age with low birth weight and reached bilateral threshold APROP was reported. The ROP of triplets A and B had the characteristic features of aggressive diseases, which were posterior location, prominence of plus disease and rapid progression. Low birth weight and small gestational age, multiple pregnancies, pregnancy-induced hypertension and older age of the mother might account for the presentations of APROP. These cases demonstrate the importance of early screening and diagnosis in APROP infants. Prompt and adequate laser photocoagulation with a large number of high-intensity closely performed spots and early retreatment could be effective and safe for preventing the progression of APROP with plus disease in zone 1 or 2 in premature triplets. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H Logie

    Full Text Available Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo (Women Taking Action For Their Health study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti.This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829.Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88% completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26, STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99, condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83, and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39 scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (p<0.05.This pilot study evaluated a PHW psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention among internally displaced women in post-earthquake Haiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific

  3. Retinopathy of prematurity screening criteria in Iran: new screening guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohipoor, Ramak; Karkhaneh, Reza; Farahani, Afsar; Ebrahimiadib, Nazanin; Modjtahedi, Bobeck; Fotouhi, Akbar; Yaseri, Mehdi; Khodabande, Alireza; Zarei, Mohammad; Imani Fuladi, Marjan; Taheri, Arash; Riazi Esfahani, Mohammad; Loewenstein, John

    2016-07-01

    To test the applicability of existing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) guidelines on Iranian patients and to develop novel ROP screening criteria in Iran. Both eyes of 1932 infants born ≤37 weeks of gestation and/or weighting ≤3000 g were included in this prospective cohort study that was conducted across nine neonatal intensive care units and a tertiary eye hospital ROP clinic. The patients were examined for ROP and the need for treatment (type 1 ROP or worse). All the patients were screened 4 weeks after birth or at 31 weeks of postmenstrual age, whichever was later. The patients were followed until retinal vascularisation was completed or the patients reached 50 weeks of gestational age (GA) without prethreshold ROP. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the best screening criteria for ROP. Screening criteria from other countries were applied to our patient data to determine their ability to appropriately detect ROP. Patients with ROP requiring treatment. The mean GA±SD and birth weight (BW)±SD of the screened patients were 32±2.7 weeks and 1713±516 g, respectively. Using criteria of GA≤32 weeks or BW ≤2000 yielded sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 26.7%, respectively, for treatment requiring ROP regardless of clinical comorbidities. Using screening recommendations of American Academy of Pediatrics would miss 25.4% of ROP and 8.4%ROP requiring treatment in our cohort. Other countries screening recommendations would result in a significant amount of missed cases of treatment requiring ROP when applied to Iran. As a result, we have proposed new guidelines for premature babies in Iran. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. The effectiveness of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination in the prevention of pediatric hospitalizations for targeted and untargeted infections: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Saulle, Rosella; Unim, Brigid; Meggiolaro, Angela; Barbato, Angelo; Mannocci, Alice; Spadea, Antonietta

    2017-08-03

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine in reducing hospitalizations for infectious disease, targeted and not targeted, as well as from respiratory diseases in children in Rome. The cohort was recomposed through record linkage of 2 archives (vaccination register and hospital discharge records. The analysis included 11,004 children. 20.9% did not receive the MMR vaccination, 49% and 30.1% received one and 2 doses. There were no hospitalizations for rubella, 2 for mumps, and 12 for measles. The vaccine was highly protective against measles and mumps hospitalizations (HR = 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03.0.34). Regarding all infectious diseases there were 414 hospitalizations, and the vaccine was protective (HR = 0.29; 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.34). Concerning respiratory diseases, there were 809 admissions (7.4%), and the vaccine was highly protective (HR: 0.18; 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.48). MMR vaccination is effective for the primary prevention of target and not targeted infectious diseases and may also limit hospitalizations for respiratory diseases.

  5. Preclinical screening for retinopathy of prematurity risk using IGF1 levels at 3 weeks post-partum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Pérez-Muñuzuri

    Full Text Available Following current recommendations for preventing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP involves screening a large number of patients. We performed a prospective study to establish a useful screening system for ROP prediction and we have determined that measuring serum levels of IGF1 at week three and the presence of sepsis have a high predictive value for the subsequent development of ROP. A total of 145 premature newborn, with birthweight <1500 g and/or <32 weeks gestational age, were enrolled. 26.9% of them showed some form of retinopathy. A significant association was found between the development of retinopathy and each of the following variables: early gestational age, low birthweight, requiring mechanical ventilation, oxygen treatment, intracranial haemorrhage, sepsis during the first three weeks, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the need for erythrocyte transfusion, erythropoietin treatment, and low levels of serum IGF1 in the third week. A multiple logistic regression analysis was used to obtain curves for the probability of developing ROP, based on the main factors linked with ROP, namely serum levels of IGF1 and presence of sepsis. Such preclinical screening has the ability to identify patients with high-risk of developing retinopathy and should lead to better prediction for ROP, while at the same time optimising the use of clinical resources, both human and material.

  6. Histone HIST1H1C/H1.2 regulates autophagy in the development of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Qing; Wan, Danyang; Sun, Yue; Wang, Lin; Chen, Hong; Liu, Chengyu; Petersen, Robert B; Li, Jianshuang; Xue, Weili; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2017-05-04

    Autophagy plays critical and complex roles in many human diseases, including diabetes and its complications. However, the role of autophagy in the development of diabetic retinopathy remains uncertain. Core histone modifications have been reported involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy, but little is known about the histone variants. Here, we observed increased autophagy and histone HIST1H1C/H1.2, an important variant of the linker histone H1, in the retinas of type 1 diabetic rodents. Overexpression of histone HIST1H1C upregulates SIRT1 and HDAC1 to maintain the deacetylation status of H4K16, leads to upregulation of ATG proteins, then promotes autophagy in cultured retinal cell line. Histone HIST1H1C overexpression also promotes inflammation and cell toxicity in vitro. Knockdown of histone HIST1H1C reduces both the basal and stresses (including high glucose)-induced autophagy, and inhibits high glucose induced inflammation and cell toxicity. Importantly, AAV-mediated histone HIST1H1C overexpression in the retinas leads to increased autophagy, inflammation, glial activation and neuron loss, similar to the pathological changes identified in the early stage of diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, knockdown of histone Hist1h1c by siRNA in the retinas of diabetic mice significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced autophagy, inflammation, glial activation and neuron loss. These results indicate that histone HIST1H1C may offer a novel therapeutic target for preventing diabetic retinopathy.

  7. Preclinical screening for retinopathy of prematurity risk using IGF1 levels at 3 weeks post-partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, Alejandro; Couce-Pico, Maria Luz; Baña-Souto, Ana; López-Suárez, Olalla; Iglesias-Deus, Alicia; Blanco-Teijeiro, José; Fernández-Lorenzo, José Ramón; Fraga-Bermúdez, José María

    2014-01-01

    Following current recommendations for preventing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) involves screening a large number of patients. We performed a prospective study to establish a useful screening system for ROP prediction and we have determined that measuring serum levels of IGF1 at week three and the presence of sepsis have a high predictive value for the subsequent development of ROP. A total of 145 premature newborn, with birthweight <1500 g and/or <32 weeks gestational age, were enrolled. 26.9% of them showed some form of retinopathy. A significant association was found between the development of retinopathy and each of the following variables: early gestational age, low birthweight, requiring mechanical ventilation, oxygen treatment, intracranial haemorrhage, sepsis during the first three weeks, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the need for erythrocyte transfusion, erythropoietin treatment, and low levels of serum IGF1 in the third week. A multiple logistic regression analysis was used to obtain curves for the probability of developing ROP, based on the main factors linked with ROP, namely serum levels of IGF1 and presence of sepsis. Such preclinical screening has the ability to identify patients with high-risk of developing retinopathy and should lead to better prediction for ROP, while at the same time optimising the use of clinical resources, both human and material.

  8. The pleiotropic effects of simvastatin on retinal microvascular endothelium has important implications for ischaemic retinopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold J Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current guidelines encourage the use of statins to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients; however the impact of these drugs on diabetic retinopathy is not well defined. Moreover, pleiotropic effects of statins on the highly specialised retinal microvascular endothelium remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of simvastatin on retinal endothelium in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs were treated with 0.01-10 microM simvastatin and a biphasic dose-related response was observed. Low concentrations enhanced microvascular repair with 0.1 microM simvastatin significantly increasing proliferation (p<0.05, and 0.01 microM simvastatin significantly promoting migration (p<0.05, sprouting (p<0.001, and tubulogenesis (p<0.001. High concentration of simvastatin (10 microM had the opposite effect, significantly inhibiting proliferation (p<0.01, migration (p<0.01, sprouting (p<0.001, and tubulogenesis (p<0.05. Furthermore, simvastatin concentrations higher than 1 microM induced cell death. The mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy was used to investigate the possible effects of simvastatin treatment on ischaemic retinopathy. Low dose simvastatin (0.2 mg/Kg promoted retinal microvascular repair in response to ischaemia by promoting intra-retinal re-vascularisation (p<0.01. By contrast, high dose simvastatin(20 mg/Kg significantly prevented re-vascularisation (p<0.01 and concomitantly increased pathological neovascularisation (p<0.01. We also demonstrated that the pro-vascular repair mechanism of simvastatin involves VEGF stimulation, Akt phosphorylation, and nitric oxide production; and the anti-vascular repair mechanism is driven by marked intracellular cholesterol depletion and related disorganisation of key intracellular structures. CONCLUSIONS: A beneficial effect of low

  9. Diabetes Prevention and Treatment Programs for Western PA - Pediatrics/Platelet Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Diabetes Education Program results for self-management decision making f. Preventing, detecting , and treating acute complications. g. Preventing...SYSTEM AT WHMC 2.4.1 Expand Image Reading Center at WHMC Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in Americans...between the ages of 20 to 74 (45-50). It has been estimated that blindness from diabetic retinopathy is preventable in at least 65% of cases, if

  10. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn; Newman, Peter A; Weaver, James; Loutfy, Mona R

    2014-01-01

    Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo) (Women Taking Action For Their Health) study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW) delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti. This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829). Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88%) completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26), STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99), condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83), and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39) scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (pHaiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific impacts of HIV prevention strategies in disaster contexts. Study results may inform HIV prevention interventions among internally displaced women in

  11. The effect of isoniazid preventive therapy on incidence of tuberculosis among HIV-infected clients under pre-ART care, Jimma, Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assebe, Lelisa Fekadu; Reda, Hailemariam Lemma; Wubeneh, Alem Desta; Lerebo, Wondwossen Terefe; Lambert, Saba Maria

    2015-04-10

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem that accounts for almost half a million human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated deaths. Provision of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is one of the public health interventions for the prevention of TB in HIV infected individuals. However, in Ethiopia, the coverage and implementation of IPT is limited. The objective of this study is to compare the incidence rate of TB, TB-free survival time and identify factors associated with development TB among HIV-infected individuals on pre-ART follow up. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from January, 2008 to February 31, 2012 in Jimma hospital. Kaplan-Meier survival plots were used to calculate the crude effect in both groups on TB-free survival probabilities and compared using the log rank test. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify predictors of TB. A total of 588 patients on pre-ART care (294 IPT and 294 non-IPT group) were followed retrospectively for a median duration of 24.1 months. The median CD4 (+) cell count was 422 cells/μl (IQR 344-589). During the follow up period, 49 individuals were diagnosed with tuberculosis, giving an overall incidence of 3.78 cases per 100 person year (PY). The incidence rate of TB was 5.06 per 100 PY in non-IPT group and 2.22 per 100 PY in IPT user group. Predictors of higher TB risk were: being on clinical WHO stage III/IV (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR = 3.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.61, 5.81); non-IPT user (AHR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.92); having CD4 (+) cell count less than 350 cells/μl (AHR = 3.16, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.92) and between 350-499 cells/μl, (AHR = 2.87; 95% CI: 1.37-6.03) and having episode of opportunistic infection (OI) in the past (AHR = 2.41, 95% CI: 1.33-4.34). IPT use was associated with fifty percent reduction in new cases of tuberculosis and probability of developing TB was higher in non-IPT group. Implementing the widespread use of IPT has the potential to

  12. An empirically derived dietary pattern associated with breast cancer risk is validated in a nested case-control cohort from a randomized primary prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Brandon H; Kimler, Bruce F; Fabian, Carol J; Carlson, Susan E

    2017-02-01

    We reported an association between cytologic atypia, a reversible biomarker of breast cancer risk, and lower omega-3/omega-6 fatty acid ratio in blood and breast tissue. Our goal was to develop and validate a dietary pattern index in this high-risk sample of U.S. women, and test its capacity to predict incidence in a nested case-control cohort of Canadian women from a randomized trial of a low-fat dietary intervention for primary prevention of breast cancer. Food intake was measured by food frequency questionnaire in the U.S. sample (n = 65) and multiple dietary recalls in the Canadian sample (n = 220 cases; 440 controls). Principal component analysis identified a dietary pattern associated with atypia. We measured differences among dietary pattern tertiles in (a) fatty acid composition in blood lipids and breast tissue in the U.S. sample, and (b) risk of breast cancer subtypes in the Canadian cohort. Registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00148057. A Modern diet was characterized as consuming more grains, dairy, and sugar and less vegetables, fish and poultry; these women had lower tissue omega-3 fatty acids and higher omega-6 and trans fatty acids. The low-fat intervention increased the likelihood of a Modern diet after randomization. A Modern diet at baseline and post-randomization was associated with estrogen-receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer risk among those at least 160 cm tall. A Traditional diet (the reciprocal of Modern) at baseline was associated with lower ER-positive (ER+) risk in the comparison group, but not the low-fat intervention group. A Modern diet (high in grains, dairy, and sugar and low in vegetables, fish, and poultry) is associated with ER- breast cancer risk among taller women. Recommending dietary fat reduction may have untoward effects on breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thickness of the retinal photoreceptor outer segment layer in healthy volunteers and in patients with diabetes mellitus without retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, or diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ozkaya

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The PROS layer at the foveal center was thinner in patients who had diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema than both the healthy volunteers and diabetic patients without retinopathy.

  14. The worldwide epidemic of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR, a major microvascular complication of diabetes, has a significant impact on the world′s health systems. Globally, the number of people with DR will grow from 126.6 million in 2010 to 191.0 million by 2030, and we estimate that the number with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR will increase from 37.3 million to 56.3 million, if prompt action is not taken. Despite growing evidence documenting the effectiveness of routine DR screening and early treatment, DR frequently leads to poor visual functioning and represents the leading cause of blindness in working-age populations. DR has been neglected in health-care research and planning in many low-income countries, where access to trained eye-care professionals and tertiary eye-care services may be inadequate. Demand for, as well as, supply of services may be a problem. Rates of compliance with diabetes medications and annual eye examinations may be low, the reasons for which are multifactorial. Innovative and comprehensive approaches are needed to reduce the risk of vision loss by prompt diagnosis and early treatment of VTDR.

  15. Purtscher's retinopathy followed by neovascular glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Masasko Kuroda,1 Akihiro Nishida,1 Masashi Kikuchi,2 Yasuo Kurimoto11Department of Ophthalmology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan; 2Kikuchi Eye Clinic, Kobe, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: We report the case of a 66-year-old Japanese man who developed neovascular glaucoma secondary to Purtscher's retinopathy following a head injury. The patient presented at our hospital with blurred vision and a visual field abnormality in his left eye 1 month after suffering from a head injury. Upon initial presentation, his best-corrected visual acuity on a decimal chart was 1.5 oculus dexter and 0.6 oculus sinister. The intraocular pressure (IOP was 12 mmHg in both eyes. Fundus examination of the left eye revealed multiple white lesions in the posterior pole. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal edema, particularly in the inner retina. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of Purtscher's retinopathy was made. One month after the initial examination, the visual acuity in the left eye deteriorated to 0.01 in decimal chart, and the IOP increased to 37 mmHg. Gonioscopy showed angle neovascularization. The patient received an intravitreal bevacizumab injection and panretinal photocoagulation. Subsequently, the IOP normalized and the angle neovascularization regressed.Keywords: blurred vision, visual field, retinal edema, head injury, head trauma

  16. Four cases of radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konari, Kenji; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Takashi

    1996-01-01

    We observed retinopathy and optic neuropathy in 4 patients after radiation for malignancies in the paranasal sinus or the brain. The dosis ranged from 56 Gy for 14 days to 64 Gy for 32 days. The interval between the termination of radiation and onset of fundus lesions ranged from 1 to 36 months, average 16.6 months. The retinopathy appeared as retinal hemorrhage, soft exudates and vitreous hemorrhage. Neovascular glaucoma developed in one eye. The optic neuropathy appeared as pallor of optic disc, disc edema or optic papillitis. Histological studies of one eye with retinopathy showed thickening of retinal capillary walls and rubeosis iridis with angle closure. (author)

  17. Four cases of radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konari, Kenji; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Takashi [Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We observed retinopathy and optic neuropathy in 4 patients after radiation for malignancies in the paranasal sinus or the brain. The dosis ranged from 56 Gy for 14 days to 64 Gy for 32 days. The interval between the termination of radiation and onset of fundus lesions ranged from 1 to 36 months, average 16.6 months. The retinopathy appeared as retinal hemorrhage, soft exudates and vitreous hemorrhage. Neovascular glaucoma developed in one eye. The optic neuropathy appeared as pallor of optic disc, disc edema or optic papillitis. Histological studies of one eye with retinopathy showed thickening of retinal capillary walls and rubeosis iridis with angle closure. (author).

  18. Radiation retinopathy following treatment of posterior nasal space carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.M.; Migdal, C.S.; Whittle, R.J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Posterior nasal space carcinoma has a high mortality and most patents are treated with radiotherapy. Radiation retinopathy was encountered in 7 out of 10 survivors included in this study. Five of the affected patients lost vision as a result of the retinopathy. One patient required laser photocoagulation and responded well to this treatment. There was a variation in the severity of the retinopathy among the patients studied despite the fact that all patients received a similar dose of radiotherapy. We suspect that previously unrecognised factors in the planning of radiotherapy fields may explain this difference. (author)

  19. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography characteristics in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Gella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the appearance of diabetic retinopathy lesions using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Materials and Methods: A total of 287 eyes of 199 subjects were included. All the subjects underwent complete ophthalmic examination including SD-OCT. Results: The appearance of various lesions of diabetic retinopathy and the retinal layers involved were reported. In subjects with macular edema the prevalence of incomplete PVD was 55.6%. Conclusion: SD-OCT brings new insights into the morphological changes of the retina in diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Diabetic retinopathy in a remote Indigenous primary healthcare population: a Central Australian diabetic retinopathy screening study in the Telehealth Eye and Associated Medical Services Network project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazionis, L; Jenkins, A; Keech, A; Ryan, C; Brown, A; Boffa, J; Bursell, S

    2018-05-01

    To determine diabetic retinopathy prevalence and severity among remote Indigenous Australians. A cross-sectional diabetic retinopathy screening study of Indigenous adults with Type 2 diabetes was conducted by locally trained non-ophthalmic retinal imagers in a remote Aboriginal community-controlled primary healthcare clinic in Central Australia and certified non-ophthalmic graders in a retinal grading centre in Melbourne, Australia. The main outcome measure was prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Among 301 participants (33% male), gradable image rates were 78.7% (n = 237) for diabetic retinopathy and 83.1% (n = 250) for diabetic macular oedema, and 77.7% (n = 234) were gradable for both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. For the gradable subset, the median (range) age was 48 (19-86) years and known diabetes duration 9.0 (0-24) years. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 47% (n = 110) and for diabetic macular oedema it was 14.4% (n = 36). In the fully gradable imaging studies, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy prevalence was 16.2% (n = 38): 14.1% (n = 33) for clinically significant macular oedema, 1.3% (n = 3) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.9% (n = 2) for both. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy had been treated in 78% of detected cases. A novel telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening service detected a higher prevalence of 'any' diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in a remote primary care setting than reported in earlier surveys among Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Whether the observed high prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was attributable to greater detection, increasing diabetic retinopathy prevalence, local factors, or a combination of these requires further investigation and, potentially, specific primary care guidelines for diabetic retinopathy management in remote Australia. Clinical Trials registration number: Australia and

  1. Sexual seroadaptation: lessons for prevention and sex research from a cohort of HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jeff McConnell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surveillance data on sexually transmitted infections (STIs and behavioral characteristics identified in studies of the risk of seroconversion are often used as to track sexual behaviors that spread HIV. However, such analyses can be confounded by "seroadaptation"--the restriction of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI, especially unprotected insertive UAI, to seroconcordant partnerships. METHODS: We utilized sexual network methodology and repeated-measures statistics to test the hypothesis that seroadaptive strategies reduce the risk of HIV transmission despite numerous partnerships and frequent UAI. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective cohort study of HIV superinfection including 168 HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM, we found extensive seroadaptation. UAI was 15.5 times more likely to occur with a positive partner than a negative one (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.1-26.4. Receptive UAI was 4.3 times more likely in seroconcordant partnerships than with negative partners (95% CI, 2.8-6.6, but insertive UAI was 13.6 times more likely with positives (95% CI, 7.2-25.6. Our estimates suggest that seroadaptation reduced HIV transmissions by 98%. CONCLUSION: Potentially effective HIV prevention strategies, such as seroadaptation, have evolved in communities of MSM before they have been recognized in research or discussed in the public health forum. Thus, to be informative, studies of HIV risk must be designed to assess seroadaptive behaviors rather than be limited to individual characteristics, unprotected intercourse, and numbers of partners. STI surveillance is not an effective indicator of trends in HIV incidence where there are strong patterns of seroadaptation.

  2. Patient factors influencing the prescribing of lipid lowering drugs for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in UK general practice: a national retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Wu

    Full Text Available Guidelines indicate eligibility for lipid lowering drugs, but it is not known to what extent GPs' follow guidelines in routine clinical practice or whether additional clinical factors systematically influence their prescribing decisions.A retrospective cohort analysis was undertaken using electronic primary care records from 421 UK general practices. At baseline (May 2008 patients were aged 30 to 74 years, free from cardiovascular disease and not taking lipid lowering drugs. The outcome was prescription of a lipid lowering drug within the next two years. The proportions of eligible and ineligible patients prescribed lipid lowering drugs were reported and multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors and prescribing.Of 365,718 patients with complete data, 13.8% (50,558 were prescribed lipid lowering drugs: 28.5% (21,101/74,137 of those eligible and 10.1% (29,457/291,581 of those ineligible. Only 41.7% (21,101/50,558 of those prescribed lipid lowering drugs were eligible. In multivariable analysis prescribing was most strongly associated with increasing age (OR for age ≥ 65 years 4.21; 95% CI 4.05-4.39; diabetes (OR 4.49; 95% CI 4.35-4.64; total cholesterol level ≥ 7 mmol/L (OR 2.20; 95% CI 2.12-2.29; and ≥ 4 blood pressure measurements in the past year (OR 4.24; 95% CI 4.06-4.42. The predictors were similar in eligible and ineligible patients.Most lipid lowering drugs for primary prevention are prescribed to ineligible patients. There is underuse of lipid lowering drugs in eligible patients.

  3. Effects of different amounts of exercise on preventing depressive symptoms in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Chen; Lu, Mei-Chun; Hu, I-Han; Wu, Wan-Chi Ida; Hu, Susan C

    2017-05-02

    To compare the effects of four different amounts of exercise for preventing depressive symptoms in community-dwelling older adults. Prospective cohort study. A nationally representative sample in Taiwan. Four waves of the survey 'Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging (TLSA)' from 1996 to 2007 were analysed. A total of 2673 older adults aged 65 years and over were recruited. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Four different types/amounts of exercise were examined including: (1) 3 times/week, 15 min/time; (2) 3 times/week, 30 min/time; (3) 6 times/week, 15 min/time; and (4) 6 times/week, 30 min/time. All exercise types were required to have at least moderate intensity. The impacts of different amounts of exercise on depressive symptoms were analysed using generalised linear mixed models. More than one-fifth of the elder individuals under consideration had depressive symptoms (CESD ≥10). About 38.6% of older adults met the lowest criteria for exercise type 1, and fewer (28.0%) met the highest criteria for type 4. Only exercise type 4 in the current survey was initially related to lower depressive symptoms (OR=0.8, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.95). However, after considering the interaction between time and changes in exercise patterns, the results showed that all persistent exercise models, even if a very low amount (3 times/week, 15 min/time), had significantly preventive effects on depressive symptoms (OR=0.56~0.67). Consistent exercise with at least 15 min per time, three times a week of moderate intensity is significantly associated with lower risk of depressive symptoms. This low amount of exercise may be easier to promote at the community and population level than other alternatives. Registry number 104040 of the Institutional Ethics Committee of Chia-Yi Christian Hospital. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  4. A needs assessment of people living with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Claudette E; Hall, Anthony B; Kok, Gerjo; Mallya, Joyse; Courtright, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Kilimanjaro Diabetic Programme was initiated in response to the needs of people living with diabetes (PWLD) to identify barriers to uptake of screening for diabetic retinopathy, to improve management of diabetes, and establish an affordable, sustainable eye screening and treatment programme for diabetic retinopathy. Intervention Mapping was used as the framework for the needs assessment. A mixed methods approach was used. Five psychometric measures, Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire, Diabetes Health Beliefs, Self-Efficacy scale, Problem Areas in Diabetes scale, and Hopkins Scale Checklist-25 and a structured interview relating to self-efficacy, addressing disclosure of living with diabetes and life-style changes were used to triangulate the quantitative findings. These were administered to 26 PWLD presenting to rural district hospitals. The interviewees demonstrated low levels of perceived stigma regarding disclosure of living with diabetes and high levels of self-efficacy in raising community awareness of diabetes, seeking on going treatment from Western medicine over traditional healers and in seeking care on sick days. Self-efficacy was high for adjusting diet, although comprehensive dietary knowledge was poor. Negative emotions expressed at diagnosis, changes in life style and altered quality of life were reflected in high levels of anxiety and depression. Low levels of stigma surrounding living with diabetes were linked to a desire to raise community awareness of diabetes, help others live with diabetes and to secure social support to access hospital services. Confusion over what constituted a healthy diet showed the importance of comprehensive, accessible diabetes education, essential to ensuring good glycaemic control, and preventing diabetic complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Low levels of self-efficacy along with high levels of anxiety and depression may have a negative impact on the uptake of screening for Diabetic Retinopathy. The findings

  5. Relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As one of the serious complications of diabetes, diabetic retinopathy(DRhas become a main eye disease which causes blindness. The occurrence and development of DR is related to many factors. The pathogenesis is complicated, and the mechanism has not been clear. Early data suggest that the occurrence and development of DR has relations with many factors such as blood sugar level, diabetes duration and the environment. Among the factors, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress is the important mechanisms of DR and has become research focus in recent years. Consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction within cells include elevation of the rate of reactive oxygen species(ROSproduction due to damage of electron transport chain proteins, mitochondrial DNA(mtDNAdamage, and loss of metabolic capacity. Clear understanding on the mechanism of mitochondrial functional change under high sugar level and oxidative stress response in the occurrence and development of DR is of great significance on prevention and cure of DR. In this article, the development of mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress of DR is reviewed.

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Using Telemedicine Tools: Pilot Study in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóra J. Eszes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Telemedicine tools can prevent blindness. We aimed to investigate the patients’ satisfaction when using such tools (fundus camera examination and the effect of demographic and socioeconomic factors on participation in screening. Methods. Pilot study involving fundus camera screening and self-administered questionnaire on participants’ experience during fundus examination (comfort, reliability, and future interest in participation, as well as demographic and socioeconomic factors was performed on 89 patients with known diabetes in Csongrád County, a southeastern region of Hungary. Results. Thirty percent of the patients had never participated in any ophthalmological screening, while 25.7% had DR of some grade based upon a standard fundus camera examination and UK-based DR grading protocol (Spectra™ software. Large majority of the patients were satisfied with the screening and found it reliable and acceptable to undertake examination under pupil dilation; 67.3% were willing to undergo nonmydriatic fundus camera examination again. There was a statistically significant relationship between economic activity, education and marital status, and future interest in participation. Discussion. Participants found digital retinal screening to be reliable and satisfactory. Telemedicine can be a strong tool, supporting eye care professionals and allowing for faster and more comfortable DR screening.

  7. Postnatal Growth and Retinopathy of Prematurity Study: Rationale, Design, and Subject Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binenbaum, Gil; Tomlinson, Lauren A

    2017-02-01

    Postnatal-growth-based predictive models demonstrate strong potential for improving the low specificity of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening. Prior studies are limited by inadequate sample size. We sought to study a sufficiently large cohort of at-risk infants to enable development of a model with highly precise estimates of sensitivity for severe ROP. The Postnatal Growth and ROP (G-ROP) Study was a multicenter retrospective cohort study of infants at 30 North American hospitals during 2006-2012. A total of 65 G-ROP-certified abstractors submitted data to a secure, web-based database. Data included ROP examination findings, treatments, complications, daily weight measurements, daily oxygen supplementation, maternal/infant demographics, medical comorbidities, surgical events, and weekly nutrition. Data quality was monitored with system validation rules, data audits, and discrepancy algorithms. Of 11,261 screened infants, 8334 were enrolled, and 2927 had insufficient data due to transfer, discharge, or death. Of the enrolled infants, 90% (7483) had a known ROP outcome and were included in the study. Median birth weight was 1070 g (range 310-3000g) and mean gestational age 28 weeks (range 22-35 weeks). Severe ROP (Early Treatment of Retinopathy type 1 or 2) developed in 931 infants (12.5%). Successful incorporation of a predictive model into ROP screening requires confidence that it will capture cases of severe ROP. This dataset provides power to estimate sensitivity with half-confidence interval width of less than 0.5%, determined by the high number of severe ROP cases. The G-ROP Study represents a large, diverse cohort of at-risk infants undergoing ROP screening. It will facilitate evaluation of growth-based algorithms to improve efficiency of ROP screening.

  8. Automated Identification of Diabetic Retinopathy Using Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargeya, Rishab; Leng, Theodore

    2017-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of preventable blindness globally. Performing retinal screening examinations on all diabetic patients is an unmet need, and there are many undiagnosed and untreated cases of DR. The objective of this study was to develop robust diagnostic technology to automate DR screening. Referral of eyes with DR to an ophthalmologist for further evaluation and treatment would aid in reducing the rate of vision loss, enabling timely and accurate diagnoses. We developed and evaluated a data-driven deep learning algorithm as a novel diagnostic tool for automated DR detection. The algorithm processed color fundus images and classified them as healthy (no retinopathy) or having DR, identifying relevant cases for medical referral. A total of 75 137 publicly available fundus images from diabetic patients were used to train and test an artificial intelligence model to differentiate healthy fundi from those with DR. A panel of retinal specialists determined the ground truth for our data set before experimentation. We also tested our model using the public MESSIDOR 2 and E-Ophtha databases for external validation. Information learned in our automated method was visualized readily through an automatically generated abnormality heatmap, highlighting subregions within each input fundus image for further clinical review. We used area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as a metric to measure the precision-recall trade-off of our algorithm, reporting associated sensitivity and specificity metrics on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Our model achieved a 0.97 AUC with a 94% and 98% sensitivity and specificity, respectively, on 5-fold cross-validation using our local data set. Testing against the independent MESSIDOR 2 and E-Ophtha databases achieved a 0.94 and 0.95 AUC score, respectively. A fully data-driven artificial intelligence-based grading algorithm can be used to screen fundus photographs obtained

  9. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) and nephropathy represent one of the ... control, hypertension, dyslipidemia, age of the patient, duration of diabetes .... thus, the presence of one is believed to predict the development of the other.

  10. Argon laser in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (Preliminary communication)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saprykin, P.I.; Simonova, K.K.; Belyaeva, M.I.

    1974-01-01

    The complications observed in the photocoagulation treatment of diabetic angiopathy and retinopathy include the following conditions: tractional retinal detachment, accelerated development of proliferating retinitis and massive hemmorrhaging into the vitreous body. (V.A.P.)

  11. Incidence, risk factors, and morphology in operating microscope light retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khwarg, S.G.; Linstone, F.A.; Daniels, S.A.; Isenberg, S.J.; Hanscom, T.A.; Geoghegan, M.; Straatsma, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of 135 consecutive cataract operations identified ten cases (7.4%) of operating microscope light retinopathy. Ophthalmoscopically, these light retinopathy lesions appeared as a focal pigment epithelial change with varying degrees of pigment clumping in the center. Fluorescein angiography accentuated the lesion by demonstrating a sharply demarcated transmission defect, occasionally with multiple satellite lesions. The shape of the lesion matched the shape of the illuminating source of the particular operating microscope used during the surgery. The most significant risk factor associated with the production of these light retinopathy lesions was prolonged operating time. Mean total operating time for the ten patients with light retinopathy was 51 minutes longer than for those without (P less than .0001). Other significant associated factors were the presence of diabetes mellitus (P less than .03), younger age (P less than .05), and the use of hydrochlorothiazide (P less than .04)

  12. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS). Population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, L.L.; Lervang, H.H.; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    Abstract Purpose: Several population based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of proliferativ retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy. Despite their importance, these studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore...... reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous era. Studies of the present diabetic population are therefore in demand. Methods: The present cross–section study included 656 type 1 and 328 type 2 diabetic subjects undergoing diabetic retinopathy screening. Crude prevalence rates...... for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, maculopathy, several specific lesions and non–ophthalmic findings were assessed together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The crude prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 5.6 % and 0.9 % for type 1...

  13. Ultra-wide-field imaging in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil; Tsui, Irena; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-10-01

    Since 1991, 7-field images captured with 30-50 degree cameras in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were the gold standard for fundus imaging to study diabetic retinopathy. Ultra-wide-field images cover significantly more area (up to 82%) of the fundus and with ocular steering can in many cases image 100% of the fundus ("panretinal"). Recent advances in image analysis of ultra-wide-field imaging allow for precise measurements of the peripheral retinal lesions. There is a growing consensus in the literature that ultra-wide-field imaging improves detection of peripheral lesions in diabetic retinopathy and leads to more accurate classification of the disease. There is discordance among studies, however, on the correlation between peripheral diabetic lesions and diabetic macular edema and optimal management strategies to treat diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods: Three patients with a normal ophthalmoscopic fundus appearance, a history of photopsia, and visual field loss compatible with AZOOR were examined using optical coherence tomography, automated perimetry...

  15. Evaluation of the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy A Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (blindness due to ruptured vessels of the retina as a side effect of diabetes), and described is a research project comparing two types of photocoagulation treatment. (DB)

  16. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old child with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative retinopathy in both eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in both eyes to clear nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage after systemic stabilization. Visual recovery was limited by the disc drag in the right eye and subfoveal exudation in the left eye. Etiopathogenesis and management of proliferative retinopathy in acute leukemias are discussed.

  17. Purtscher-like retinopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chan; Dai, Rongping; Dong, Fangtian; Wang, Qian

    2014-12-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of Purtscher-like retinopathy and its clinical implications among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Observational case series. setting: Tertiary medical center. patient population: Patients with SLE who were diagnosed with Purtscher-like retinopathy between 2002 and 2013. observation procedures: Assessment and follow-up in the ophthalmology department. main outcome measure: Visual acuity and funduscopic examination at presentation and at 6 month follow-up, with analysis of the association between Purtscher-like retinopathy and other systemic involvement of SLE and overall disease activity. Among 5688 patients with SLE evaluated, 8 cases of Purtscher-like retinopathy were diagnosed. Typical fundus abnormalities included Purtscher flecken, cotton-wool spots, retinal hemorrhages, macular edema, optic disk swelling, and a pseudo-cherry red spot. Fluorescein angiography abnormalities included areas of capillary nonperfusion corresponding to the retinal whitening, late leakage, peripapillary staining, precapillary occlusion, and slower filling of vessels. The prevalence of central nervous system lupus was significantly higher among those with Purtscher-like retinopathy (6/8) than among 240 patients randomly sampled from those without Purtscher-like retinopathy. A very high SLE Disease Activity Index (≥20) was present in all 8 patients with Purtscher-like retinopathy. All patients received corticosteroids combined with immunosuppressants. For the majority of patients, optic atrophy developed during follow-up with persistent low visual acuity. As a rare and severe ophthalmic complication of SLE, Purtscher-like retinopathy was associated with central nervous system lupus and highly active disease. Visual acuity recovery was usually poor despite prompt treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Narendran, Siddharth; Saravanan, V R; Pereira, Merlyn

    2016-01-01

    Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion.

  19. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Narendran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion.

  20. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Siddharth; Saravanan, V R; Pereira, Merlyn

    2016-06-01

    Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion.

  1. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Javeria; Sharif, Muhammad; Yasmin, Mussarat

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper,...

  2. Visual functions and disability in diabetic retinopathy patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Kaiti, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to find correlations between visual functions and visual disabilities in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 38 visually impaired diabetic retinopathy subjects at the Low Vision Clinic of B.P. Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic Studies, Kathmandu. The subjects underwent assessment of distance and near visual acuity, objective and subjective refraction, contrast sensitivity, color vision, and central a...

  3. Associations between sleep duration, sleep quality and diabetic retinopathy.

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    Nicholas Y Q Tan

    Full Text Available Abnormal durations of sleep have been associated with risk of diabetes. However, it is not clear if sleep duration is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR.In a cross-sectional study, we included 1,231 (Malay, n = 395; Indian, n = 836 adults (mean age 64.4 ± 9.0 years, 50.4% female with diabetes from the second visit of two independent population-based cohort studies (2011-15 in Singapore. Self-reported habitual sleep duration was categorized as short (<6 h, normal (6≤ h <8, and long (≥8 h. Questionnaires were administered to detect risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, excessive daytime sleepiness, and insomnia, all of which may indicate poor quality of sleep. The associations between sleep-related characteristics with moderate DR and vision-threatening DR (VTDR were analysed using logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders.Prevalence of moderate DR and VTDR in the study population were 10.5% and 6.3% respectively. The mean duration of sleep was 6.4 ± 1.5 h. Compared to normal sleep duration, both short and long sleep durations were associated with moderate DR with multivariable odds ratio (95% confidence interval of 1.73 (1.03-2.89 and 2.17 (1.28-3.66 respectively. Long sleep duration (2.37 [1.16-4.89], high risk of OSA (2.24 [1.09-4.75], and excessive daytime sleepiness (3.27 [1.02-10.30] were separately associated with VTDR.Sleep duration had a U-shaped association with moderate DR; long sleep duration, excessive daytime sleepiness and high risk of OSA were positively associated with VTDR.

  4. The effects of Fetal Surgery on Retinopathy of Prematurity Development

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    Sudha Nallasamy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Fetal surgery is selectively offered for severe or life-threatening fetal malformations. These infants are often born prematurely and are thus at risk for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. It is not known whether fetal surgery confers an increased risk of developing severe ROP relative to published rates in standard premature populations ≤37 weeks of age grouped by birth weight (<1500 grams or ≥1500 grams. Design This is a retrospective chart review. Methods We reviewed the charts of 137 patients who underwent open fetal/fetoscopic surgery from 1996–2004. Surgical indications included twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS, myelomeningocele (MMC, congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH, sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT, cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (CCAM, and twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP. Of these, 17 patients had local ROP examination data. Binomial tests were performed to assess whether rates of ROP in our fetal/fetoscopic surgery cohort were significantly different from published rates. Results There were 5 patients each with an underlying diagnosis of TTTS and MMC, 2 patients each with CDH and TRAP, and 1 patient each with SCT, CCAM, and mediastinal teratoma. The mean gestational age at surgery was 23 4 / 7 ± 2 3 / 7 weeks, mean gestational age at birth was 30 ± 2 5 / 7 weeks, and mean birth weight was 1449 ± 510 grams (610–2485. Compared to published rates of ROP and threshold ROP, our fetal surgery patients had significantly higher rates of ROP and threshold ROP in both the <1500 grams and the ≥1500 grams group (all p-values <0.05. Conclusions Fetal/fetoscopic surgery appears to significantly increase the rate of ROP and threshold ROP development. Greater numbers are needed to confirm these observations.

  5. Association analysis of nine candidate gene polymorphisms in Indian patients with type 2 diabetic retinopathy

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    Govindarajan Gowthaman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR is classically defined as a microvasculopathy that primarily affects the small blood vessels of the inner retina as a complication of diabetes mellitus (DM.It is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of a set of nine candidate genes with the development of diabetic retinopathy in a South Indian cohort who have type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods Seven candidate genes (RAGE, PEDF, AKR1B1, EPO, HTRA1, ICAM and HFE were chosen based on reported association with DR in the literature. Two more, CFH and ARMS2, were chosen based on their roles in biological pathways previously implicated in DR. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and one dinucleotide repeat polymorphism, previously reported to show association with DR or other related diseases, were genotyped in 345 DR and 356 diabetic patients without retinopathy (DNR. The genes which showed positive association in this screening set were tested further in additional sets of 100 DR and 90 DNR additional patients from the Aravind Eye Hospital. Those which showed association in the secondary screen were subjected to a combined analysis with the 100 DR and 100 DNR subjects previously recruited and genotyped through the Sankara Nethralaya Hospital, India. Genotypes were evaluated using a combination of direct sequencing, TaqMan SNP genotyping, RFLP analysis, and SNaPshot PCR assays. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze the genotype and allele frequencies. Results Among the nine loci (15 polymorphisms screened, SNP rs2070600 (G82S in the RAGE gene, showed significant association with DR (allelic P = 0.016, dominant model P = 0.012, compared to DNR. SNP rs2070600 further showed significant association with DR in the confirmation cohort (P = 0.035, dominant model P = 0.032. Combining the two cohorts gave an allelic P HTRA1, rs11200638 (G>A, showed marginal

  6. Human Genetics of Diabetic Retinopathy: Current Perspectives

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    Daniel P. K. Ng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a most severe microvascular complication which, if left unchecked, can be sight-threatening. With the global prevalence of diabetes being relentlessly projected to rise to 438 million subjects by 2030, DR will undoubtedly pose a major public health concern. Efforts to unravel the human genetics of DR have been undertaken using the candidate gene and linkage approaches, while GWAS efforts are still lacking. Aside from evidence for a few genes including aldose reductase and vascular endothelial growth factor, the genetics of DR remain poorly elucidated. Nevertheless, the promise of impactful scientific discoveries may be realized if concerted and collaborative efforts are mounted to identify the genes for DR. Harnessing new genetic technologies and resources such as the upcoming 1000 Genomes Project will help advance this field of research, and potentially lead to a rich harvest of insights into the biological mechanisms underlying this debilitating complication.

  7. Canonical Wnt signaling in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2017-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common eye complication of diabetes, and the pathogenic mechanism of DR is still under investigation. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays fundamental roles in embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt signaling regulates expression of multiple genes that control retinal development and eye organogenesis, and dysregulated Wnt signaling plays pathophysiological roles in many ocular diseases, including DR. This review highlights recent progress in studies of Wnt signaling in DR. We discuss Wnt signaling regulation in the retina and dysregulation of Wnt signaling associated with ocular diseases with an emphasis on DR. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of modulating Wnt signaling in DR. Continued studies in this field will advance our current understanding on DR and contribute to the development of new treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  9. A longitudinal cohort study of HIV 'treatment as prevention' in gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men: the Treatment with Antiretrovirals and their Impact on Positive And Negative men (TAIPAN) study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, D; Stoové, M; Carr, A; Hoy, J F; Petoumenos, K; Hellard, M; Elliot, J; Templeton, D J; Liaw, S; Wilson, D P; Grulich, A; Cooper, D A; Pedrana, A; Donovan, B; McMahon, J; Prestage, G; Holt, M; Fairley, C K; McKellar-Stewart, N; Ruth, S; Asselin, J; Keen, P; Cooper, C; Allan, B; Kaldor, J M; Guy, R

    2016-12-12

    Australia has increased coverage of antiretroviral treatment (ART) over the past decade, reaching 73% uptake in 2014. While ART reduces AIDS-related deaths, accumulating evidence suggests that it could also bolster prevention efforts by reducing the risk of HIV transmission ('treatment as prevention'). While promising, evidence of community-level impact of treatment as prevention on reducing HIV incidence among gay and bisexual men is limited. We describe a study protocol that aims to determine if scale up of testing and treatment for HIV leads to a reduction in community viraemia and, in turn, if this reduction is temporally associated with a reduction in HIV incidence among gay and bisexual men in Australia's two most populous states. Over the period 2009 to 2017, we will establish two cohorts making use of clinical and laboratory data electronically extracted retrospectively and prospectively from 73 health services and laboratories in the states of New South Wales and Victoria. The 'positive cohort' will consist of approximately 13,000 gay and bisexual men (>90% of all people living with HIV). The 'negative cohort' will consist of at least 40,000 HIV-negative gay and bisexual men (approximately half of the total population). Within the negative cohort we will use standard repeat-testing methods to calculate annual HIV incidence. Community prevalence of viraemia will be defined as the proportion of men with a viral load ≥200RNA copies/mm 3 , which will combine viral load data from the positive cohort and viraemia estimates among those with an undiagnosed HIV infection. Using regression analyses and adjusting for behavioural and demographic factors associated with infection, we will assess the temporal association between the community prevalence of viraemia and the incidence of HIV infection. Further analyses will make use of these cohorts to assess incidence and predictors of treatment initiation, repeat HIV testing, and viral suppression. This study will

  10. Early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Baez, Maria Valeria; Marquez-Gonzalez, Horacio; Barcenas-Contreras, Rodolfo; Morales Montoya, Carlos; Espinosa-Garcia, Laura Fatima

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a strategy for early detection of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2) in Quintana Roo, México. Study transversal, observational, prospective, analytical, eight primary care units from Mexican Social Security Institute in the northern delegation of the State of Quintana Roo, Mexico were included. A program for early detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adult 376,169 was designed. Were diagnosed 683 cases of type 2 diabetes, in 105 patients randomized was conducted to direct ophthalmoscopy were subjected to a secondary hospital were assigned. Will determine the degree of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema was performed. In population were 55.2% female, mean age 48+11.1 years, 23.8 % had some degree of DR, 28.0% with mild non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy 48.0 % moderate 16.0% and severe and 8.0% showed proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Those over age 30 are 2.8 times more risk of developing DR, OR= 2.8; 95%CI: 0.42-18.0, and OR= 1.7; 95%CI: 1.02-2.95 women. The implementation of programs aimed at the early detection of debilitating conditions such as diabetic retinopathy health impact beneficiaries, effective links between primary care systems and provide second level positive health outcomes for patient diseases.

  11. Is Smoking a Risk Factor for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaedt Thorlund, Mie; Borg Madsen, Mette; Green, Anders

    2013-01-01

    were asked about their smoking habits. The level of retinopathy was evaluated by ophthalmoscopy at baseline and by nine 45-degree colour field fundus photos at the follow-up. Results: In multivariate analyses there was a trend that current smokers at baseline were more likely to develop PDR......Aim: The aim was to evaluate if smoking was a risk factor for proliferative retinopathy (PDR) in a 25-year follow-up study. Methods: 201 persons from a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients were examined at baseline and again 25 years later. At both examinations the patients...... at the follow-up (odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 0.88-4.11, p = 0.10). Neither smoking status at the follow-up nor pack-years of smoking were associated with PDR. Conclusions: We found neither a beneficial nor a harmful effect of smoking on long-term incidence. Selective mortality among smokers...

  12. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

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    Saba Saleem

    Full Text Available In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI = 1.04-3.36] and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620], while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR.

  13. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098–4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  14. Anti-VEGF therapy in the management of retinopathy of prematurity: what we learn from representative animal models of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) remains a leading cause of childhood blindness, affecting infants born prematurely. ROP is characterized by the onset of delayed physiological retinal vascular development (PRVD) and followed by pathologic neovascularization into the vitreous instead of the retina, called intravitreal neovascularization (IVNV). Therefore, the therapeutic strategy for treating ROP is to promote PRVD and inhibit or prevent IVNV. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ROP. There is a growing body of studies testing the use of anti-VEGF agents as a treatment for ROP. Intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment for ROP has potential advantages compared with laser photocoagulation, the gold standard for the treatment of severe ROP; however, intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment has been associated with reactivation of ROP and suppression of systemic VEGF that may affect body growth and organ development in preterm infants. Therefore, it is important to understand the role of VEGF in PRVD and IVNV. This review includes the current knowledge of anti-VEGF treatment for ROP from animal models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), highlighting the importance of VEGF inhibition by targeting retinal Müller cells, which inhibits IVNV and permits PRVD. The signaling events involved in mediating VEGF expression and promoting VEGF-mediated angiogenesis, including hypoxia-dependent signaling, erythropoietin/erythropoietin receptor-, oxidative stress-, beta-adrenergic receptor-, integrin-, Notch/Delta-like ligand 4- and exon guidance molecules-mediated signaling pathways, are also discussed.

  15. Research progress on high altitude retinopathy and application of Traditional Chinese Medicine

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    Hai-Xiang Huang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High altitude retinopathy(HARrefers to the body which can't adapt to the hypobaric hypoxia environment at high altitude leading to retinal diseases, which typically manifested as retinal hemorrhages, optic disc edema and cotton wool spots. With the development of high altitude medicine, HAR become a hot topic of eye research in recent years. New researches show a significantly higher incidence of HAR, and HAR has a close contact with acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema and high altitude pulmonary edema. A further study in pathogenesis and prevention measures of HAR will promote the prevention of altitude sickness. Traditional Chinese Medicine has achieved good effects in the prevention of altitude sickness, but the effect and mechanism of herbs on HAR has not been reported. Through read and summarize the relevant literatures and reports, the author will give an overview of the research advances on HAR's pathogenesis and application of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

  16. Visual cycle modulation in neurovascular retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akula, James D; Hansen, Ronald M; Tzekov, Radouil; Favazza, Tara L; Vyhovsky, Tanya C; Benador, Ilan Y; Mocko, Julie A; McGee, David; Kubota, Ryo; Fulton, Anne B

    2010-08-01

    Rats with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model the pediatric retinal disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Recent findings in OIR rats imply a causal role for the rods in the ROP disease process, although only experimental manipulation of rod function can establish this role conclusively. Accordingly, a visual cycle modulator (VCM) - with no known direct effect on retinal vasculature - was administered to "50/10 model" OIR Sprague-Dawley rats to test the hypotheses that it would 1) alter rod function and 2) consequently alter vascular outcome. Four litters of pups (N=46) were studied. For two weeks, beginning on postnatal day (P) 7, the first and fourth litters were administered 6 mg kg(-1) N-retinylacetamide (the VCM) intraperitoneally; the second and third litters received vehicle (DMSO) alone. Following a longitudinal design, retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and the status of the retinal vessels was monitored using computerized fundus photograph analysis. Rod photoreceptor and post-receptor response amplitudes were significantly higher in VCM-treated than in vehicle-treated rats; deactivation of phototransduction was also significantly more rapid. Notably, the arterioles of VCM-treated rats showed significantly greater recovery from OIR. Presuming that the VCM did not directly affect the retinal vessels, a causal role for the neural retina - particularly the rod photoreceptors - in OIR was confirmed. There was no evidence of negative alteration of photoreceptor function consequent to VCM treatment. This finding implicates the rods as a possible therapeutic target in neurovascular diseases such as ROP. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydroxychloroquine Induced Retinopathy: A Case Series

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    Maryam Mobini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Occular toxicity is one of the most important complications of Hydroxychloroquine. Not any type of treatment has so far been found and recommended for this disorder. The purpose of this study was to report some characteristics of patients with Hydroxychloroquine Induced Retinopathy.    Materials and Methods: From 107 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and/or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE during 2013-14 in Sari, Iran, who were selected by a simple sampling method and were referred to hospitals for ophthalmologic examinations, 21 patients were found with HCQ induced retinopathy. The Examination for HCQ-induced maculopathy was performed through fundoscopy, perimetry or optical coherence tomography (OCT, and the physicians had their own discretion based on the examination. Although the patients were examined by different ophthalmologists, all of them were evaluated by the same device (Zeiss cirrus HD OCT4000.USA for OCT, Zeiss Humphrey Field analyzer 2i. USA for visual field, and Topcon. TRC.50Dx. Japan for angiography. Based on the collected data, the characteristics of clinical and ophthalmologic changes were reported, and the data were analysed through Independent Sample t Test and χ2.    Results: 21 patients (19 females with a mean age of 49.86 (±15.6 were evaluated during 4.95 (±4.7 years of therapy. The mean of cumulative dose was calculated to be 313.18±269.8 grams. Based on the findings, hypertension was detected in 5 (23.8% of the patients. Conclusion: In the present study, it was found that HCQ induced retinal toxicity may occur even in recommended doses or for less than 5 years. Other risk factors such as hypertension in addition to the dose or duration of toxicity could also accelerate retinal toxicity.

  18. Increased expression of MERTK is associated with a unique form of canine retinopathy.

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    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Progressive retinal degenerations are among the most common causes of blindness both in human and in dogs. Canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA resembles human retinitis pigmentosa (RP and is typically characterized by a progressive loss of rod photoreceptors followed by a loss of cone function. The disease gradually progress from the loss of night and day vision to a complete blindness. We have recently described a unique form of retinopathy characterized by the multifocal gray/brown discoloration and thinning of the retina in the Swedish Vallhund (SV breed. We aimed to identify the genetic cause by performing a genome wide association analysis in a cohort of 18 affected and 10 healthy control dogs using Illumina's canine 22k SNP array. We mapped the disease to canine chromosome 17 (p = 7.7×10(-5 and found a 6.1 Mb shared homozygous region in the affected dogs. A combined analysis of the GWAS and replication data with additional 60 dogs confirmed the association (p = 4.3×10(-8, OR = 11.2 for homozygosity. A targeted resequencing of the entire associated region in four cases and four controls with opposite risk haplotypes identified several variants in the coding region of functional candidate genes, such as a known retinopathy gene, MERTK. However, none of the identified coding variants followed a compelling case- or breed-specific segregation pattern. The expression analyses of four candidate genes in the region, MERTK, NPHP1, ANAPC1 and KRCC1, revealed specific upregulation of MERTK in the retina of the affected dogs. Collectively, these results indicate that the retinopathy is associated with overexpression of MERTK, however further investigation is needed to discover the regulatory mutation for the better understanding of the disease pathogenesis. Our study establishes a novel gain-of-function model for the MERTK biology and provides a therapy model for retinopathy MERTK inhibitors. Meanwhile, a marker-based genetic

  19. The DPP4 Inhibitor Linagliptin Protects from Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Nadine; Kolibabka, Matthias; Busch, Stephanie; Bugert, Petra; Kaiser, Ulrike; Lin, Jihong; Fleming, Thomas; Morcos, Michael; Klein, Thomas; Schlotterer, Andrea; Hammes, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, however, their influence on the retinal neurovascular unit remains unclear. Vasculo- and neuroprotective effects were assessed in experimental diabetic retinopathy and high glucose-cultivated C. elegans, respectively. In STZ-diabetic Wistar rats (diabetes duration of 24 weeks), DPP4 activity (fluorometric assay), GLP-1 (ELISA), methylglyoxal (LC-MS/MS), acellular capillaries and pericytes (quantitative retinal morphometry), SDF-1a and heme oxygenase-1 (ELISA), HMGB-1, Iba1 and Thy1.1 (immunohistochemistry), nuclei in the ganglion cell layer, GFAP (western blot), and IL-1beta, Icam1, Cxcr4, catalase and beta-actin (quantitative RT-PCR) were determined. In C. elegans, neuronal function was determined using worm tracking software. Linagliptin decreased DPP4 activity by 77% and resulted in an 11.5-fold increase in active GLP-1. Blood glucose and HbA1c were reduced by 13% and 14% and retinal methylglyoxal by 66%. The increase in acellular capillaries was diminished by 70% and linagliptin prevented the loss of pericytes and retinal ganglion cells. The rise in Iba-1 positive microglia was reduced by 73% with linagliptin. In addition, the increase in retinal Il1b expression was decreased by 65%. As a functional correlate, impairment of motility (body bending frequency) was significantly prevented in C. elegans. Our data suggest that linagliptin has a protective effect on the microvasculature of the diabetic retina, most likely due to a combination of neuroprotective and antioxidative effects of linagliptin on the neurovascular unit.

  20. The DPP4 Inhibitor Linagliptin Protects from Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy.

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    Nadine Dietrich

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4 inhibitors improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, however, their influence on the retinal neurovascular unit remains unclear.Vasculo- and neuroprotective effects were assessed in experimental diabetic retinopathy and high glucose-cultivated C. elegans, respectively. In STZ-diabetic Wistar rats (diabetes duration of 24 weeks, DPP4 activity (fluorometric assay, GLP-1 (ELISA, methylglyoxal (LC-MS/MS, acellular capillaries and pericytes (quantitative retinal morphometry, SDF-1a and heme oxygenase-1 (ELISA, HMGB-1, Iba1 and Thy1.1 (immunohistochemistry, nuclei in the ganglion cell layer, GFAP (western blot, and IL-1beta, Icam1, Cxcr4, catalase and beta-actin (quantitative RT-PCR were determined. In C. elegans, neuronal function was determined using worm tracking software.Linagliptin decreased DPP4 activity by 77% and resulted in an 11.5-fold increase in active GLP-1. Blood glucose and HbA1c were reduced by 13% and 14% and retinal methylglyoxal by 66%. The increase in acellular capillaries was diminished by 70% and linagliptin prevented the loss of pericytes and retinal ganglion cells. The rise in Iba-1 positive microglia was reduced by 73% with linagliptin. In addition, the increase in retinal Il1b expression was decreased by 65%. As a functional correlate, impairment of motility (body bending frequency was significantly prevented in C. elegans.Our data suggest that linagliptin has a protective effect on the microvasculature of the diabetic retina, most likely due to a combination of neuroprotective and antioxidative effects of linagliptin on the neurovascular unit.

  1. Evaluation the index of ophthalmic arteries in diabetic patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy using color Doppler ultrasound

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    Mohammad Ghasem Hanafi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye complication in diabetic patients that early detection of this complication is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate ophthalmic artery index in diabetic retinopathy by Doppler ultrasound. . In this cross-sectional study, 64 patients were studied in 4 groups (healthy, diabetic without retinopathy, background retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy. Resistance index (RI and Pulsatile Index (PI were assessed by color Doppler ultrasound. The obtained data were analyzed by ANOVA and chi-square test and ROC curve. RI in diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy has the highest mean (0.83 and the lowest mean was observed in healthy subjects (0.54 (P <0.001 as well as in PI, the highest rate was in diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy (1.41 and the lowest was in healthy subjects (0.92 (P <0.001. The results of our study showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and overall accuracy of RI and PI in diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy in the best cut-off points (0.645 and 1.0175 respectively were 100%.Ophthalmic artery index RI and PI was significantly increased in patients with diabetic retinopathy and the sensitivity and specificity for detection retinopathy was 100%. Color Doppler ultrasound method is more efficient for screening diabetic patients with retinopathy.

  2. Cohort Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Cohorts are the aggregate of individuals who experience the same event within the same time interval. Cohorts can be based on people born in a given year, for example in 1940 or within a span of years, e.g. born in 1940-1944. The year of birth is here the defining event for cohorts. The health di...... differs between cohorts. This article focuses on the protective and detrimental cohort effect in relation to the risk of death from apoplexy. A dummy variable method is recommended to describe the changing cohort effect over a century....

  3. 糖尿病视网膜病变的诊治%Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋静; 孙莉

    2013-01-01

    糖尿病视网膜病变(diabetic retinopathy, DR)是目前国内外主要的致盲性眼病,同时导致重大的社会经济负担。多种危险因素参与其发生和进展,早期诊断并积极治疗可以防止或延缓其进展。%Diabetic retinopathy is the main blinding eye disease at home and abroad now, which causes serious social and economic burden. Multiple risk factors involve in its development and progression. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can prevent or delay its progress.

  4. Outcomes of prevention of mother to child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 in rural Kenya--a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduati, Eunice Wambui; Hassan, Amin Shaban; Knight, Miguel Garcia; Muema, Daniel Muli; Jahangir, Margaret Nassim; Mwaringa, Shalton Lwambi; Etyang, Timothy Juma; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Urban, Britta Christina; Berkley, James Alexander

    2015-10-03

    Success in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) raises the prospect of eliminating pediatric HIV infection. To achieve global elimination, however, strategies are needed to strengthen PMTCT interventions. This study aimed to determine PMTCT outcomes and identify challenges facing its successful implementation in a rural setting in Kenya. A retrospective cohort design was used. Routine demographic and clinical data for infants and mothers enrolling for PMTCT care at a rural hospital in Kenya were analysed. Cox and logistic regression were used to determine factors associated with retention and vertical transmission respectively. Between 2006 and 2012, 1338 infants were enrolled and followed up for PMTCT care with earlier age of enrollment and improved retention observed over time. Mother to child transmission of HIV declined from 19.4 % in 2006 to 8.9 % in 2012 (non-parametric test for trend p = 0.024). From 2009 to 2012, enrolling for care after 6 months of age, adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR]: 23.3 [95 % confidence interval (CI): 8.3-65.4], presence of malnutrition ([aOR]: 2.3 [95 % CI: 1.1-5.2]) and lack of maternal use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (aOR: 6.5 [95 % CI: 1.4-29.4]) was associated with increased risk of HIV infection. Infant's older age at enrollment, malnutrition and maternal HAART status, were also associated with drop out from care. Infants who were not actively followed up were more likely to drop out from care (adjusted Hazard Ratio: 6.6 [95 % CI: 2.9-14.6]). We report a temporal increase in the proportion of infants enrolling for PMTCT care before 3 months of age, improved retention in PMTCT and a significant reduction in the proportion of infants enrolled who became HIV-infected, emphasizing the benefits of PMTCT. A simple set of risk factors at enrollment can identify mother-infant pairs most at risk of infection or drop out for targeted intervention.

  5. Optimal cutoff values of WHO-HPQ presenteeism scores by ROC analysis for preventing mental sickness absence in Japanese prospective cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Suzuki

    Full Text Available Sickness absence due to mental disease in the workplace has become a global public health problem. Previous studies report that sickness presenteeism is associated with sickness absence. We aimed to determine optimal cutoff scores for presenteeism in the screening of the future absences due to mental disease.A prospective study of 2195 Japanese employees from all areas of Japan was conducted. Presenteeism and depression were measured by the validated Japanese version of the World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (WHO-HPQ and K6 scale, respectively. Absence due to mental disease across a 2-year follow-up was surveyed using medical certificates obtained for work absence. Socioeconomic status was measured via a self-administered questionnaire. Receiver operating curve (ROC analysis was used to determine optimal cutoff scores for absolute and relative presenteeism in relation to the area under the curve (AUC, sensitivity, and specificity.The AUC values for absolute and relative presenteeism were 0.708 (95% CI, 0.618-0.797 and 0.646 (95% CI, 0.546-0.746, respectively. Optimal cutoff scores of absolute and relative presenteeism were 40 and 0.8, respectively. With multivariate adjustment, cohort participants with our proposal cutoff scores for absolute and relative presenteeism were significantly more likely to be absent due to mental disease (OR = 4.85, 95% CI: 2.20-10.73 and OR = 5.37, 95% CI: 2.42-11.93, respectively. The inclusion or exclusion of depressive symptoms (K6≥13 at baseline in the multivariate adjustment did not influence the results.Our proposed optimal cutoff scores of absolute and relative presenteeism are 40 and 0.8, respectively. Participants who scored worse than the cutoff scores for presenteeism were significantly more likely to be absent in future because of mental disease. Our findings suggest that the utility of presenteeism in the screening of sickness absence due to mental disease would

  6. Predictors of loss to follow-up among children registered in an HIV prevention mother-to-child transmission cohort study in Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Pedro Alves da Cruz; da Silva, Gerlane Alves Pontes; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fatima Pessoa Militão

    2014-11-27

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV (MTCT) is the major form of acquiring the disease among children. The loss to follow-up (LTF) of mothers and their children is a problem that affects the effectiveness of programs for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). The aim of this study is to identify risk factors associated with the LTF of HIV-exposed children in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. A retrospective cohort study was carried out with 1200 HIV-exposed children born between 2000 and 2009, registered up to the age of 2 months in a public health PMTCT program. Children were considered LTF if they did not return for scheduled visits to monitor infection status. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify risk factors for LTF. A total of 185 children (15.4%; CI: 95%: 13.4-17.4%) met the case definition of LTF before the determination of serological HIV status. Risk factors independently associated with LTF were mother-child pairs who reside in rural and remote areas (OR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.30-2.66) and mothers who use illicit drugs (OR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.08-3.0). Initiation of the PMTCT during pregnancy was a protective factor for LTF (OR 0.69; 95% CI: 0.49-0.96). The decentralization of support services for HIV-exposed children to other cities in the state seems to be crucial for the accurate monitoring of outcomes. It is also important to introduce additional measures addressing mothers who are drug users so that they remain in the program: an intensive follow-up program that actively searches for absentee mother-child pairs, support from social services and treatment for drug-dependency. The findings of this study highlight the importance of diagnosing mothers as early as possible in order to conduct a more complete follow-up period of the children. Solving the above-mentioned problems is a challenge, which must be overcome so as to improve the quality of PMTCT.

  7. Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy with Retinal Neurodegeneration on the Background of Diabetes Mellitus. Overview of Recent Medical Studies with an Assessment of the Impact on Healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muc, Rafał; Saracen, Agnieszka; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is one of the biggest healthcare and financial problems worldwide. The disease is strongly associated with microvascular and macrovascular complications, causing co-existing diseases like Diabetic Retinopathy, Diabetic Neuropathy and Diabetic Nephropathy. Annual healthcare expenditures for diabetes treatment and complications prevention cost 727 billion USD in year 2017. Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Retinal Neuropathy are closely related diseases - originating from incorrectly controlled glycemia, blood pressure and lipid levels in the course of increasing resistance of the body tissues to insulin. Irrespectively of thorough programs for Diabetes Mellitus prevention and treatment, Diabetic Retinopathy management requires targeted treatment strategies for both microvasculopathy and retinal neurodegeneration, to delay disease severity course and risk of blindness. The study and conclusions in this article are based on web-available data and officially published articles related to the diabetes mellitus and associated diseases - Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Retinal Neuropathy. The articles have been reviewed and analyzed to assess mutual relations between the discussed diseases.

  8. Metabolic factors in the development of retinopathy of juvenile-onset type I diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosla P

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-five patients of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM were investigated for the effect of various metabolic factors on retinopathy. The severity of retinopathy increased with duration and age of onset of IDDM. Degree of glycaemia (fasting blood sugar, FBS was similar in patients with or without retinopathy. All IDDM patients as a group showed severe carbohydrate intolerance with lower basal and post glucose serum immunoreactive insulin (IRI levels and serum C-peptide radioimmunoreactivity (CPR as compared to controls. The insulin secretory response was similar in no retinopathy, mild retinopathy and severe retinopathy groups. Patients with retinopathy had higher incidence of hyperlipidemia but mean serum levels of cholesterol and triglyceride were similar. This study does not suggest a direct relationship between the various metabolic factors studied and retinopathy due to IDDM

  9. Progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2010-01-01

    We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes.......We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes....

  10. PLVAP in diabetic retinopathy: A gatekeeper of angiogenesis and vascular permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiśniewska-Kruk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, approximately 4 million people worldwide experience blindness or severe vision loss caused by diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a multifactorial disease that can progress from minor changes in vascular permeability, into a proliferative retinal disorder. The increasing

  11. Pregnancy-induced sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in women with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestgaard, Marianne; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Laugesen, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the progression of diabetic retinopathy in pregnant women with diabetes offered tight glycaemic and blood pressure control.......To determine the progression of diabetic retinopathy in pregnant women with diabetes offered tight glycaemic and blood pressure control....

  12. Retinopathy of prematurity: Risk factors and variability in Canadian neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K; Shah, P S; Canning, R; Harrison, A; Lee, S K; Dow, K E

    2015-01-01

    To identify predictors of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in a large population-based cohort and to examine risk-adjusted variations across units. Retrospective analysis of Canadian Neonatal Network data on neonates with birth weight <1500 g who were screened for ROP between 2003 and 2010. Characteristics of infants with and without ROP were compared and a risk-adjusted model for severe ROP was developed. Rates of severe ROP were compared between sites. 1163 of 9187 (12.7%) infants developed severe ROP. Lower gestational age, male sex, small for gestational age, patent ductus arteriosus, late onset sepsis, more than two blood transfusions, inotrope use, and outborn status were associated with an increased risk of severe ROP. Severe ROP rates varied significantly between units. Younger, smaller and sicker male infants had higher adjusted risks of severe ROP and rates varied significantly among sites.

  13. Retinopathy of prematurity and serum level of insulin-like growth factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjac, Lidija; Bokan, Vesna

    2012-06-01

    The aim of our study was to measure and compare serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels at postmenstrual age of 33 weeks between preterm infants with and without retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). ROP occurs in two phases. Low serum levels of IGF-1 during ROP phase 1 have been found to correlate with the severity of ROP. ROP phase 2 begins around postmenstrual week 33. We conducted a prospective cohort study to measure serum IGF-1 levels in premature infants at postmenstrual age of 33 weeks. The study included all premature infants (N = 74), gestational age large controlled study with repeated measurement of IGF-1 level in the neonatal period is needed to confirm that restoration of IGF-I level occurs in ROP phase 2, i.e. that the low level of IGF-1 is only a feature of ROP phase 1.

  14. Prevalence of blindness and diabetic retinopathy in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Mansur M; Al Bdour, Muawyah D; Abu Ameerh, Mohammed A; Jadoon, Muhammed Z

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of blindness, visual impairment, diabetes, and diabetic retinopathy in north Jordan (Irbid) using the rapid assessment of avoidable blindness and diabetic retinopathy methodology. A multistage cluster random sampling technique was used to select participants for this survey. A total of 108 clusters were selected using probability proportional to size method while subjects within the clusters were selected using compact segment method. Survey teams moved from house to house in selected segments examining residents 50 years and older until 35 participants were recruited. All eligible people underwent a standardized examination protocol, which included ophthalmic examination and random blood sugar test using digital glucometers (Accu-Chek) in their homes. Diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients was assessed through dilated fundus examination. A total of 3638 out of the 3780 eligible participants were examined. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of blindness, severe visual impairment, and visual impairment with available correction were 1.33% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.73), 1.82% (95% CI 1.35-2.25), and 9.49% (95% CI 8.26-10.74), respectively, all higher in women. Untreated cataract and diabetic retinopathy were the major causes of blindness, accounting for 46.7% and 33.2% of total blindness cases, respectively. Glaucoma was the third major cause, accounting for 8.9% of cases. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 28.6% (95% CI 26.9-30.3) among the study population and higher in women. The prevalence of any retinopathy among diabetic patients was 48.4%. Cataract and diabetic retinopathy are the 2 major causes of blindness and visual impairment in northern Jordan. For both conditions, women are primarily affected, suggesting possible limitations to access to services. A diabetic retinopathy screening program needs to proactively create sex-sensitive awareness and provide easily accessible screening services with prompt treatment.

  15. Quantitative assessment of early diabetic retinopathy using fractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ning; Donaghue, Kim C; Liew, Gerald; Rogers, Sophie L; Wang, Jie Jin; Lim, Shueh-Wen; Jenkins, Alicia J; Hsu, Wynne; Li Lee, Mong; Wong, Tien Y

    2009-01-01

    Fractal analysis can quantify the geometric complexity of the retinal vascular branching pattern and may therefore offer a new method to quantify early diabetic microvascular damage. In this study, we examined the relationship between retinal fractal dimension and retinopathy in young individuals with type 1 diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 729 patients with type 1 diabetes (aged 12-20 years) who had seven-field stereoscopic retinal photographs taken of both eyes. From these photographs, retinopathy was graded according to the modified Airlie House classification, and fractal dimension was quantified using a computer-based program following a standardized protocol. In this study, 137 patients (18.8%) had diabetic retinopathy signs; of these, 105 had mild retinopathy. Median (interquartile range) retinal fractal dimension was 1.46214 (1.45023-1.47217). After adjustment for age, sex, diabetes duration, A1C, blood pressure, and total cholesterol, increasing retinal vascular fractal dimension was significantly associated with increasing odds of retinopathy (odds ratio 3.92 [95% CI 2.02-7.61] for fourth versus first quartile of fractal dimension). In multivariate analysis, each 0.01 increase in retinal vascular fractal dimension was associated with a nearly 40% increased odds of retinopathy (1.37 [1.21-1.56]). This association remained after additional adjustment for retinal vascular caliber. Greater retinal fractal dimension, representing increased geometric complexity of the retinal vasculature, is independently associated with early diabetic retinopathy signs in type 1 diabetes. Fractal analysis of fundus photographs may allow quantitative measurement of early diabetic microvascular damage.

  16. Automated detection of fundus photographic red lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Godt, Jannik; Larsen, Nicolai; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Agardh, Elisabet; Kalm, Helle; Grunkin, Michael; Owens, David R

    2003-02-01

    To compare a fundus image-analysis algorithm for automated detection of hemorrhages and microaneurysms with visual detection of retinopathy in patients with diabetes. Four hundred fundus photographs (35-mm color transparencies) were obtained in 200 eyes of 100 patients with diabetes who were randomly selected from the Welsh Community Diabetic Retinopathy Study. A gold standard reference was defined by classifying each patient as having or not having diabetic retinopathy based on overall visual grading of the digitized transparencies. A single-lesion visual grading was made independently, comprising meticulous outlining of all single lesions in all photographs and used to develop the automated red lesion detection system. A comparison of visual and automated single-lesion detection in replicating the overall visual grading was then performed. Automated red lesion detection demonstrated a specificity of 71.4% and a resulting sensitivity of 96.7% in detecting diabetic retinopathy when applied at a tentative threshold setting for use in diabetic retinopathy screening. The accuracy of 79% could be raised to 85% by adjustment of a single user-supplied parameter determining the balance between the screening priorities, for which a considerable range of options was demonstrated by the receiver-operating characteristic (area under the curve 90.3%). The agreement of automated lesion detection with overall visual grading (0.659) was comparable to the mean agreement of six ophthalmologists (0.648). Detection of diabetic retinopathy by automated detection of single fundus lesions can be achieved with a performance comparable to that of experienced ophthalmologists. The results warrant further investigation of automated fundus image analysis as a tool for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  17. Changes in serum leptin level in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jing; Cao Huiling

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the regulation of changes in serum leptin level in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods: The 120 participating subjects were of four groups: healthy controls, diabetic patients without retinopathy, patients with NPDR and patients with PDR, each group consisted of 18 males and 12 females with comparable BMI. The levels of serum leptin, IVC, insulin and blood glucose of these patients were measured and the correlation between serum leptin level and other parameters was analysed. Results: The level of serum leptin in controls, diabetic patients without retinopathy, patients with NPDR and patients with PDR were 6.91 ± 1.87 μg/L, 7,83 ±2.11 μg/L, 9.56 ± 2.43 μg/L and 11.69 ± 2.57 μg/L respectively. The patients with PDR had higher serum leptin levels than patients with NPDR (t=2.15, p < 0.05), diabetic patients without retinopathy (t = 2.71, p < 0.01), and controls (t = 3.50, p < 0.001), the patients with NPDR had higher serum leptin levels than diabetic patients without retinopathy (t = 2.23, p < 0.05) and controls (t = 2.75, p < 0.01), while the difference in serum leptin was not significant between diabetic patients without retinopathy and controls. The serum level was positively correlated to BMI (r = 0.22, p < 0.05) and FINS (r = 0.28, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Serum leptin level is elevated in patients with diabetic retinopathy and is positively correlated to the severity of the disease

  18. Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy in a Clinic Population from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Neisha M; Aguilar, Stephanie

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a preventable or treatable cause of blindness in the adult population. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Puerto Ricans is the highest among Hispanics. This study evaluated the prevalence of DR in a screening program of DM subjects in a clinic system in Puerto Rico. A retrospective cross-sectional health records study of DM patients referred by primary care physicians for dilated retinal evaluation to the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Juana Diaz Eye Institute Clinic between 2001 and 2009 was performed. All subjects underwent a complete eye evaluation including fundus photography. Photographs were graded following the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocols. A total of 411 randomly selected health records of DM subjects older than 30 years were included. The estimated prevalence of DR among all subjects is 37.7%. DR was more common in males (47.2%) than females (33.7%). The age range with higher frequency of DR is among ages 60 to 69 (34.8%) and the lowest between ages 30 and 39 (3.9%). The average number of years since initial DM diagnosis was 12.48. Probability of developing DR increases with longer duration of DM (p Puerto Ricans. Mild stage retinopathy was most prevalent and there exists an increase in probability to develop DR with duration of DM. The prevalence of DR in total population may be different than the findings presented in this paper. Comprehensive studies are needed to understand and estimate the progression and impact of DR in this population.

  19. Prevalence and Cardiovascular Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy and Maculopathy: Results from the Gutenberg Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raum, Philipp; Lamparter, Julia; Ponto, Katharina A; Peto, Tunde; Hoehn, René; Schulz, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Wild, Philipp S; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mirshahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age. The purpose of this paper is to report the prevalence and cardiovascular associations of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy (DMac) in Germany. The Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 at 74 years from the city of Mainz and the district of Mainz-Bingen. We determined the weighted prevalence of DR and DMac by assessing fundus photographs of persons with diabetes from the GHS data base. Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, known diagnosis diabetes mellitus or known diabetes medication. Furthermore, we analysed the association between DR and cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. Overall, 7.5% (1,124/15,010) of the GHS cohort had diabetes. Of these, 27.7% were unaware of their disease and thus were newly diagnosed by their participation in the GHS. The prevalence of DR and DMac was 21.7% and 2.3%, respectively among patients with diabetes. Vision-threatening disease was present in 5% of the diabetic cohort. In the multivariable analysis DR (all types) was associated with age (Odds Ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.97 [0.955-0.992]; p = 0.006) arterial hypertension (1.90 [1.190-3.044]; p = 0.0072) and vision-threatening DR with obesity (3.29 [1.504-7.206]; p = 0.0029). DR (all stages) and vision-threatening DR were associated with duration of diabetes (1.09 [1.068-1.114]; pdiabetic retinal disease in Germany [corrected].Prevalence of DR was lower in the GHS compared to East-Asian studies. Associations were found with age, arterial hypertension, obesity, and duration of diabetes mellitus.

  20. Albuminuria and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology And Molecular Genetic Study (SN-DREAMS, report 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Padmaja K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concordance of microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy (DR has been well reported in persons with type 1 diabetes; however, for type 2 diabetes, there is paucity of data especially from population-based studies. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of albuminuria (micro - and macroalbuminuria among persons with type 2 diabetes and determine its role as a risk factor for presence and severity of DR. Methods A population-based cross sectional study was conducted in cohort of 1414 subjects with type 2 diabetes from Chennai metropolis. All the subjects underwent comprehensive eye examination including 45 degrees four-field stereoscopic digital photography. DR was clinically graded using Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scales. A morning urine sample was tested for albuminuria. Subjects were considered to have microalbuminuria, if the urinary albumin excretion was between 30 and 300 mg/24 hours, and macroalbuminuria at more than 300 mg/24 hours. The statistical software used was SPSS for Windows, Chicago, IL. Student t-test for comparing continuous variables, and χ2 test, to compare proportions amongst groups were used. Results The prevalence of microalbuminuria in the study subjects was 15.9% (226/1414, and that of macroalbuminuria, 2.7% (38/1414. Individuals with macroalbuminuria in comparison to micro- or normoalbuminuria showed a greater prevalence of DR (60.5% vs. 31.0% vs. 14.1%, p Conclusions Every 6th individual in the population of type 2 diabetes is likely to have albuminuria. Subjects with microalbuminuria were around 2 times as likely to have DR as those without microalbuminuria, and this risk became almost 6 times in the presence of macroalbuminuria.

  1. Deep image mining for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quellec, Gwenolé; Charrière, Katia; Boudi, Yassine; Cochener, Béatrice; Lamard, Mathieu

    2017-07-01

    Deep learning is quickly becoming the leading methodology for medical image analysis. Given a large medical archive, where each image is associated with a diagnosis, efficient pathology detectors or classifiers can be trained with virtually no expert knowledge about the target pathologies. However, deep learning algorithms, including the popular ConvNets, are black boxes: little is known about the local patterns analyzed by ConvNets to make a decision at the image level. A solution is proposed in this paper to create heatmaps showing which pixels in images play a role in the image-level predictions. In other words, a ConvNet trained for image-level classification can be used to detect lesions as well. A generalization of the backpropagation method is proposed in order to train ConvNets that produce high-quality heatmaps. The proposed solution is applied to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening in a dataset of almost 90,000 fundus photographs from the 2015 Kaggle Diabetic Retinopathy competition and a private dataset of almost 110,000 photographs (e-ophtha). For the task of detecting referable DR, very good detection performance was achieved: A z =0.954 in Kaggle's dataset and A z =0.949 in e-ophtha. Performance was also evaluated at the image level and at the lesion level in the DiaretDB1 dataset, where four types of lesions are manually segmented: microaneurysms, hemorrhages, exudates and cotton-wool spots. For the task of detecting images containing these four lesion types, the proposed detector, which was trained to detect referable DR, outperforms recent algorithms trained to detect those lesions specifically, with pixel-level supervision. At the lesion level, the proposed detector outperforms heatmap generation algorithms for ConvNets. This detector is part of the Messidor® system for mobile eye pathology screening. Because it does not rely on expert knowledge or manual segmentation for detecting relevant patterns, the proposed solution is a promising image

  2. RETINOPATHY, GLUCOSE, AND INSULIN IN AN ELDERLY POPULATION - THE ROTTERDAM STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STOLK, RP; VINGERLING, [No Value; DEJONG, PTVM; DIELEMANS, Hubertus J.A.; HOFMAN, A; LAMBERTS, SWJ; POLS, HAP; GROBBEE, DE

    We studied the association between retinopathy and glucose metabolism in a population-based study of elderly men and women, Glucose metabolism was assessed by serum fructosamine and a nonfasting oral glucose tolerance test, and retinopathy was evaluated by fundus photography, Retinopathy was present

  3. Retinopathy in youth with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of retinopathy in 517 youth with type 2 diabetes of 2–8 years duration enrolled in the TODAY study. Retinal photographs were graded centrally for retinopathy using established standards. Retinopathy was identified in 13.7% of subjects. Prev...

  4. Ultrastructure of neurovascular changes in human diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, János; Taurone, Samanta; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Biró, Zsolt; Varsányi, Balázs; Scuderi, Gianluca; Orlando, Maria Patrizia; Turchetta, Rosaria; Micera, Alessandra; Artico, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The previous concept regarding diabetic retinopathy assigned a primary role to hyperglycemia-induced microvascular alterations, while neuronal and glial abnormalities were considered to be secondary to either ischemia or exudation. The aim of this study was to reveal the potential role of neuronal and glial cells in initial and advanced alterations of the retinopathy in human type 2 diabetes. Electron microscopy and histochemical studies were performed on 38 surgically removed human eyes (28 obtained from diabetic patients and 10 from non-diabetic patients). Morphometric analysis of basement membrane material and lipids was performed. An accumulation of metabolic by-products was found in the capillary wall with aging: this aspect was significantly more pronounced in diabetics. Müller glial cells were found to contribute to alterations of the capillary wall and to occlusion, as well as to the development of proliferative retinopathy and cystoid degeneration of the retina. Our results showed morphological evidence regarding the role of neuronal and glial cells in the pathology of diabetic retinopathy, prior and in addition to microangiopathy. These morphological findings support a neurovascular pathogenesis at the origin of diabetic retinopathy, thus the current treatment approach should be completed by neuroprotective measures.

  5. DIAGNOSIS OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY USING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Priya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is an eye disease caused by the complication of diabetes and we should detect it early for effective treatment. As diabetes progresses, the vision of a patient may start to deteriorate and lead to diabetic retinopathy. As a result, two groups were identified, namely non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR. In this paper, to diagnose diabetic retinopathy, three models like Probabilistic Neural network (PNN, Bayesian Classification and Support vector machine (SVM are described and their performances are compared. The amount of the disease spread in the retina can be identified by extracting the features of the retina. The features like blood vessels, haemmoraghes of NPDR image and exudates of PDR image are extracted from the raw images using the image processing techniques and fed to the classifier for classification. A total of 350 fundus images were used, out of which 100 were used for training and 250 images were used for testing. Experimental results show that PNN has an accuracy of 89.6 % Bayes Classifier has an accuracy of 94.4% and SVM has an accuracy of 97.6%. This infers that the SVM model outperforms all other models. Also our system is also run on 130 images available from “DIARETDB0: Evaluation Database and Methodology for Diabetic Retinopathy” and the results show that PNN has an accuracy of 87.69% Bayes Classifier has an accuracy of 90.76% and SVM has an accuracy of 95.38%.

  6. Axial Myopia and its Influence on Diabetic Retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayyab, H.; Haider, M. A.; Bukhari, S. A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between axial myopia and diabetic retinopathy. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Eye Department of Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore General Hospital, from August 2012 to February 2013. Methodology: A total of 258 participants suffering from type-2 diabetic retinopathy were included. Axial length was measured by two optometrists using contact type ultrasound biometer. Colored retinal photographs, red free retinal photographs and Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) were performed on all patients using standard fundus camera. All fundus photographs and angiograms were independently reviewed and graded by two qualified vitreoretinal fellows. Results: Out of 258 patients, 163 were males (63.2%) and 95 (36.8%) were females. Average age of patients was 56.30 +- 7.57 years. Average axial length of right and left eyes were 23.16 mm and 23.15 mm respectively. There was statistically significant negative correlation between axial length and severity of diabetic retinopathy in the right eye, (Spearman correlation = -0.511, p = 0.0001) as well as the left eye (Spearman correlation = -0.522, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: There is a protective influence of longer axial length of globe on the stage and severity of diabetic retinopathy. This study may help in modifying the screening protocol for diabetic retinopathy amongst patients of differing axial lengths. (author)

  7. Clues to duration of undiagnosed disease from retinopathy and maculopathy at diagnosis in type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John D; Zvandasara, Tafadzwa; Leese, Graham; McAlpine, Ritchie; Macewen, Caroline J; Baines, Paul S; Crombie, Iain; Morris, Andrew D

    2011-09-01

    To extrapolate, from the proportion of subjects with observable retinopathy at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in routine clinical practice, the mean duration of undiagnosed diabetes. On 1 October 1999, there were 4313 patients with type 2 diabetes in the 41 participating practices in the Tayside region (registered with one of 166 GPs). 501 (12%; 95% CI 11 to 13%) patients were selected using a pseudo-random number allocation algorithm, and practice lists checked for recently deceased, non-residents (45 exclusions). Retinopathy was graded by validated slit lamp biomicroscopy and four-field stereo photography. Date of first diagnosis of diabetes was ascertained from the regional diabetes register created using multiple source data capture. Of living Tayside resident patients, 295 from 456 invited type 2 patients (65%) were examined. 14.68% (95% CI 12.48 to 16.88%) were found to have retinopathy at diagnosis. Assuming a linear model, these data suggest that the onset of detectable retinopathy occurs 5.77 years (95% CI 4.6 to 7 years) before diagnosis. Comparison using the log rank test with survival to onset of sight threatening retinopathy/maculopathy in 291 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus also examined from the same population cohort showed the 95% CIs of length of preclinical diabetes to be between 3.0 and 9.4 years. There is accumulating evidence to question the assumption of linearity as a model of choice. The authors' understanding of a distinct glycaemic threshold for retinal change is also overly simplistic and consequently the bounds of uncertainty concerning the preclinical duration of disease are considerable.

  8. Associations Between Diabetic Retinopathy and Plasma Levels of High-sensitive C-reactive Protein or Von Willebrand Factor in Long-term Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jonas Vejvad Nørskov; Hoffmann, Stine Skovbo; Green, Anders

    2013-01-01

    .27 IU/ml (0.79-2.07 IU/ml), respectively. No or minimal DR (ETDRS-levels 10-20) was found in 16.4%, mild DR (ETDRS-level 35) in 19.4%, moderate DR (ETDRS-levels 43-47) in 11.0%, and 53.2% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) corresponding to ETDRS-level 60 or more. In an age- and sex......Purpose: To evaluate high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and von Willebrand factor as possible plasma markers of diabetic retinopathy in a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 201 type 1 diabetic patients from...... a population-based cohort from Fyn County, Denmark. Plasma levels of hs-CRP and von Willebrand factor antigen were measured and related to the level of diabetic retinopathy (DR) as evaluated by dilated nine-field 45 degree monoscopic fundus photos captured by Topcon TRC-NWS6 and graded according to the Early...

  9. Retinopathy of Prematurity; Risk Factors, Prognosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Kocabeyo¤lu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence, related risk factors, treatment and follow-up results in cases of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Material and Method: Medical records of 405 premature infants who attended our clinic between August 1999 and September 2004 were retrospectively screened. Among these patients, 379 infants were followed up in our neonatology unit and 26 were referred to us from other clinics. Indirect diode laser photocoagulation and/or cryotherapy were performed when prethreshold or threshold ROP was detected. Surgery was performed in stage IV-V ROP. Results: ROP was detected in 88 out of 405 infants (21.72%. At the first examination, stage I ROP was detected in 18 eyes (10.4%, stage II - in 67 eyes (38.72%, stage III - in 82 eyes (47.39%, and stage IV-V – in 6 eyes (3.46%. Indirect diode laser photocoagulation was applied to 34 eyes with stage II and in 47 eyes with stage III ROP. Ten eyes with threshold ROP and 4 eyes which progressed to threshold ROP were treated with cryotherapy. Scleral buckling was performed in 3 eyes that progressed to stage IV ROP. At the first examination, 2 eyes with stage IV-V ROP were treated with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV. Discussion: In our series, the most important risk factors for development and progression of ROP were found to be low birth weight, low gestational age, mechanical ventilation and multiple pregnancy. Effective screening, follow-up and appropriate treatment are important for prevention of permanent damage and unfavorable outcome in ROP. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011; 41: 128-32

  10. Radiation retinopathy as an experimental model for ischemic proliferative retinopathy and rubeosis iridis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irvine, A.R.; Wood, I.S.

    1987-01-01

    We produced radiation retinopathy in capuchin monkeys and studied them with fluorescein angiography and light and electron microscopy. The animals were followed up from ten days to 3 1/2 years after radiation in order to determine whether this could provide an experimental model for other chronic ischemic-proliferative retinopathies, such as diabetes. The first change detected after radiation was the focal loss of capillary endothelial cells and pericytes. As the areas of acellular capillaries became confluent, cotton-wool spots became visible ophthalmoscopically. These increased in number and then faded away, leaving large areas of retinal capillary perfusion. Histologic studies showed occlusion first of the deeper, smaller retinal vessels and then gradually of the larger vessels. Intraretinal neovascularization as well as apparent recanalization then developed, but no new vessels extended through the internal limiting lamina into the vitreous. Rubeosis iridis with neovascular glaucoma developed 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 years postirradiation, and vitreous aspirate demonstrated a high level of angiogenic factor

  11. Retinitis pigmentosa, pigmentary retinopathies, and neurologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M Tariq

    2006-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal diseases with phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. The pathophysiologic basis of the progressive visual loss in patients with RP is not completely understood but is felt to be due to a primary retinal photoreceptor cell degenerative process mainly affecting the rods of the peripheral retina. In most cases RP is seen in isolation (nonsyndromic), but in some other cases it may be a part of a genetic, metabolic, or neurologic syndrome or disorder. Nyctalopia, or night blindness, is the most common symptom of RP. The classic fundus appearance of RP includes retinal pigment epithelial cell changes resulting in retinal hypo- or hyperpigmentation ("salt-and-pepper"), retinal granularity, and bone spicule formation. The retinal vessels are often narrowed or attenuated and there is a waxy pallor appearance of the optic nerve head. Electroretinography will demonstrate rod and cone photoreceptor cell dysfunction and is a helpful test in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with RP. A detailed history with pedigree analysis, a complete ocular examination, and the appropriate paraclinical testing should be performed in patients complaining of visual difficulties at night or in dim light. This review discusses the clinical manifestations of RP as well as describing the various systemic diseases, with a special emphasis on neurologic diseases, associated with a pigmentary retinopathy.

  12. Treatment of threshold retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Dhanashree

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This report deals with our experience in the management of threshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. A total of 45 eyes of 23 infants were subjected to treatment of threshold ROP. 26.1% of these infants had a birth weight of >l,500 gm. The preferred modality of treatment was laser indirect photocoagulation, which was facilitated by scleral depression. Cryopexy was done in cases with nondilating pupils or medial haze and was always under general anaesthesia. Retreatment with either modality was needed in 42.2% eyes; in this the skip areas were covered. Total regression of diseases was achieved in 91.1% eyes with no sequelae. All the 4 eyes that progressed to stage 5 despite treatment had zone 1 disease. Major treatment-induced complications did not occur in this series. This study underscores the importance of routine screening of infants upto 2,000 gm birth weight for ROP and the excellent response that is achieved with laser photocoagulation in inducing regression of threshold ROP. Laser is the preferred method of treatment in view of the absence of treatment-related morbidity to the premature infants.

  13. The Neural Retina in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D.; Fulton, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a neurovascular disease that affects prematurely born infants and is known to have significant long term effects on vision. We conducted the studies described herein not only to learn more about vision but also about the pathogenesis of ROP. The coincidence of ROP onset and rapid developmental elongation of the rod photoreceptor outer segments motivated us to consider the role of the rods in this disease. We used noninvasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and retinal imaging procedures to study the function and structure of the neurosensory retina. Rod photoreceptor and post-receptor responses are significantly altered years after the preterm days during which ROP is an active disease. The alterations include persistent rod dysfunction, and evidence of compensatory remodeling of the post-receptor retina is found in ERG responses to full-field stimuli and in psychophysical thresholds that probe small retinal regions. In the central retina, both Mild and Severe ROP delay maturation of parafoveal scotopic thresholds and are associated with attenuation of cone mediated multifocal ERG responses, significant thickening of post-receptor retinal laminae, and dysmorphic cone photoreceptors. These results have implications for vision and control of eye growth and refractive development and suggest future research directions. These results also lead to a proposal for noninvasive management using light that may add to the currently invasive therapeutic armamentarium against ROP. PMID:27671171

  14. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy in the Asia-Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jacqueline; Lim, Claire Xin Ying; Wong, Tien Yin; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common complication of diabetes mellitus, is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in middle-aged and elderly in the Asia-Pacific. It has been estimated that 51% of all those with blindness due to DR globally (n = 424,400) and 56% of those with visual impairment due to DR (2.1 million) come from the Asia-Pacific. Prevalence of DR among those with diabetes ranged from 10% in India to 43% in Indonesia within the Asia-Pacific. Awareness of DR among persons with diabetes ranged from 28% to 84%. Most common modifiable risk factors for DR in the Asia-Pacific were hyperglycemia, blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and obesity. Implementation of systematic screening programs for DR and advancement in telemedicine screening methods have increased patient coverage and cost-effectiveness, though there are still numerous factors impeding screening uptake in the low-middle income regions of the Asia-Pacific. Management and treatment of DR in the Asia-Pacific is mainly limited to traditional laser retinopexy, but it is suboptimal despite new clinical approaches such as use of intravitreal anti.vascular endothelial growth factor and steroids due to limited resources. Further research and data are required to structure a more cost-effective public healthcare program and more awareness-building initiatives to increase the effectiveness of DR screening programs. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  16. Rates of progression in diabetic retinopathy during different time periods: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Klein, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviews rates of progression of diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and/or severe visual loss (SVL) and temporal trends.......This meta-analysis reviews rates of progression of diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and/or severe visual loss (SVL) and temporal trends....

  17. The Role of Retinal Imaging and Portable Screening Devices in Tele-ophthalmology Applications for Diabetic Retinopathy Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-12-01

    In the years since its introduction, retinal imaging has transformed our capability to visualize the posterior pole of the eye. Increasing practical advances in mobile technology, regular monitoring, and population screening for diabetic retinopathy management offer the opportunity for further development of cost-effective applications through remote assessment of the diabetic eye using portable retinal cameras, smart-phone-based devices and telemedicine networks. Numerous retinal imaging methods and mobile technologies in tele-ophthalmology applications have been reported for diabetic retinopathy screening and management. They provide several advantages of automation, sensitivity, specificity, portability, and miniaturization for the development of point-of-care diagnostics for eye complications in diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the role of retinal imaging and mobile technologies in tele-ophthalmology applications for diabetic retinopathy screening and management. At large, although improvements in current technology and telemedicine services are still needed, telemedicine has demonstrated to be a worthy tool to support health caregivers in the effective management and prevention of diabetes and its complications.

  18. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Adsani, Afaf M.S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes. Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes (n=165) attending the Diabetic Clinic at Al-sabah Hospital, Kuwait between October 2000 and March 2005 were screened for diabetic retinopathy. Any diabetic retinopathy was found in 40% while 20.6% had sight threatening retinopathy. Mild NPDR was present in 21.2%, moderate to severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) in 7.9%, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 3.0%. Maculopathy was present in 10.3% and 7.9 % pf patients were photocoagulated. Compared to those without retinopathy, diabetic patients with any retinopathy were significantly older (51.7+-10.3 versus 47.2+-9.5 years; p<0.005), had longer duration of diabetes (13.1+-6.3 versus 4.7 +-5.4 years; p<0.0001), higher systolic blood pressure (142.9+-23.0 versus 130.3+-20.2; p<0.0001) and poor glycemic control (Hemoglobin A1c=10.1+-2.4 versus 8.9+-2.3; p<0.005). The prevalence of hypertension and nephropathy was significantly higher in patients with any retinopathy than those without retinopathy (70.8% versus 49.5%; p<0.01 and 64.4% versus 30.8%; p<0.0001) respectively. Longer duration of diabetes and presence of nephropathy was the most significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy. Treatment with sulphonylurea or insulin, and poor glycemic control were other significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy. Longer duration of diabetes, presence of nephropathy, glycemic control and mode of treatment were the most significant independent factors of diabetic retinopathy. However, population-based study is warranted to identify the risk factors, as well as the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  19. PPAR Agonists: Potential as Therapeutics for Neovascular Retinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrihar A. Pershadsingh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The angiogenic, neovascular proliferative retinopathies, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, and age-dependent macular degeneration (AMD complicated by choroidal neovascularization (CNV, also termed exudative or “wet” AMD, are common causes of blindness. The antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs, rosiglitazone, and troglitazone are PPAR agonists with demonstrable antiproliferative, and anti-inflammatory effects, in vivo, were shown to ameliorate PDR and CNV in rodent models, implying the potential efficacy of TZDs for treating proliferative retinopathies in humans. Activation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R propagates proinflammatory and proliferative pathogenic determinants underlying PDR and CNV. The antihypertensive dual AT1-R blocker (ARB, telmisartan, recently was shown to activate PPAR and improve glucose and lipid metabolism and to clinically improve PDR and CNV in rodent models. Therefore, the TZDs and telmisartan, clinically approved antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs, respectively, may be efficacious for treating and attenuating PDR and CNV humans. Clinical trials are needed to test these possibilities.

  20. Radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Kalina, R.E.; Brower, S.A.; Mills, R.P.; Johnson, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy is sometimes beneficial, particularly for dysthyroid optic neuropathy, and is not associated with serious complications. We are aware, however, of four patients who were found to have radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Grave's ophthalmopathy. All four patients have decreased central acuity, and three of the four are legally blind in one or both eyes. Computer reconstruction of the dosimetry, based on computed tomography and beam profiles, shows that errors in dosage calculations and radiotherapy technique probably account for the radiation retinopathy in three of the four patients. Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy should be administered only by competent radiotherapists who are experienced in the treatment of this disease. Similar errors in dosage calculations and treatment techniques may account for other reports of radiation retinopathy after reportedly safe dosages

  1. Clinical Investigation of Radiation Retinopathy Fundus and Fluorescein Angiographic Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiMei; QiuGT

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:To investigate the fundus and fluorescein angiographic features in the patients with radiation retinopathy.Clinical Materials:Color fundus photography and/or fluorescein angiography from 13 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas received external beam radiation were retrospectively analyzed.Reslts:In this study,26 damaged eyes of 13 patients eveloped some degree of radiation retinopathy.The earliest and most common finding was macular microvascular changes (microaneurysms and/or telangiectasia),which was observed in 100%(26/26)of the eyes.Intraretinal hemorrhages,macular capillary nonperfusion,and macular edema were noted in 84%,50%,and 42% of the eyes,respectively.Conclusions:Radiation retinopathy is common after external beam radiation of nasopharyngeal carcinomas.The prominent changes include maular microvascular changes,intraretinal hemorrhages and macular capillary nonperfusion.

  2. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Alan D; Philip, Sam; Goatman, Keith A; Williams, Graeme J; Olson, John A; Sharp, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy

  3. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Alan D [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Philip, Sam [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Goatman, Keith A [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Williams, Graeme J [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Olson, John A [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Sharp, Peter F [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-21

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy.

  4. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS): population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Loumann; Lervang, Hans-Henrik; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Background: Several population-based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy. These studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous...... era, suggesting new studies of the present population with diabetes. Aim and methods: This cross-section study included 656 people with type 1 diabetes and 328 with type 2 diabetes. Crude prevalence rates of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, clinically significant macular oedema and several specific...... retinal lesions were assessed, together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The point prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 0.8% and 0.3% for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Equivalent prevalence rates of clinically significant...

  5. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Alan D.; Philip, Sam; Goatman, Keith A.; Williams, Graeme J.; Olson, John A.; Sharp, Peter F.

    2007-12-01

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy.

  6. AIMING FOR THE BULL'S EYE: The Cost-Utility of Screening for Hydroxychloroquine Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Andrew J; Chang, Jonathan S; Smiddy, William E

    2016-10-01

    Throughout medicine, the cost of various treatments has been increasingly studied with the result that certain management guidelines might be reevaluated in their context. Cost-utility is a term referring to the expense of preventing the loss of quality of life, quantified in dollars per quality-adjusted life year. In 2002, the American Academy of Ophthalmology published hydroxychloroquine screening recommendations which were revised in 2011. The purpose of this report is to estimate the cost-utility of these recommendations. A hypothetical care model of screening for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy was formulated. The costs of screening components were calculated using 2016 Medicare fee schedules from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The cost-utility of screening for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy with the 2011 American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines was found to vary from 33,155 to 344,172 dollars per quality-adjusted life year depending on the type and number of objective screening tests chosen, practice setting, and the duration of hydroxychloroquine use. Screening had a more favorable cost-utility when the more sensitive and specific diagnostics were used, and for patients with an increased risk of toxicity. American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines have a wide-ranging cost-utility. Prudent clinical judgment of risk stratification and tests chosen is necessary to optimize cost-utility without compromising the efficacy of screening.

  7. Diabetic retinopathy: loss of neuroretinal adaptation to the diabetic metabolic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abcouwer, Steven F.; Gardner, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) impairs vision of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, associated with vascular dysfunction and occlusion, retinal edema, hemorrhage, and inappropriate growth of new blood vessels. The recent success of biologic treatments targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) demonstrates that treating the vascular aspects in the later stages of the disease can preserve vision in many patients. It would also be highly desirable to prevent the onset of the disease or arrest its progression at a stage preceding the appearance of overt microvascular pathologies. The progression of DR is not necessarily linear but may follow a series of steps that evolve over the course of multiple years. Abundant data suggest that diabetes affects the entire neurovascular unit of the retina, with an early loss of neurovascular coupling, gradual neurodegeneration, gliosis, and neuroinflammation before observable vascular pathologies. In this article, we consider the pathology of diabetic retinopathy from the point of view that diabetes causes measurable dysfunctions in the complex integral network of cell types that produce and maintain human vision. PMID:24673341

  8. Protective Effects of Melatonin on Retinal Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation are important pathogenic factors contributing to the etiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Melatonin is an endogenous hormone that exhibits a variety of biological effects including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. The goals of this study were to determine whether melatonin could ameliorate retinal injury and to explore the potential mechanisms. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of STZ (60 mg/kg in Sprague-Dawley rats. Melatonin (10 mg kg−1 daily, i.p. was administered from the induction of diabetes and continued for up to 12 weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed and retinal samples were collected. The retina of diabetic rats showed depletion of glutathione and downregulation of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL. Melatonin significantly upregulated GCL by retaining Nrf2 in the nucleus and stimulating Akt phosphorylation. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and proteins, including interleukin 1β, TNF-α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, was inhibited by melatonin through the NF-κB pathway. At 12 weeks, melatonin prevented the significant decrease in the ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes under the diabetic condition. Our results suggest potent protective functions of melatonin in diabetic retinopathy. In addition to being a direct antioxidant, melatonin can exert receptor-mediated signaling effects to attenuate inflammation and oxidative stress of the retina.

  9. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy symptoms detection and classification using neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarrah, Mohammad A; Shatnawi, Hadeel

    2017-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) causes blindness in the working age for people with diabetes in most countries. The increasing number of people with diabetes worldwide suggests that DR will continue to be major contributors to vision loss. Early detection of retinopathy progress in individuals with diabetes is critical for preventing visual loss. Non-proliferative DR (NPDR) is an early stage of DR. Moreover, NPDR can be classified into mild, moderate and severe. This paper proposes a novel morphology-based algorithm for detecting retinal lesions and classifying each case. First, the proposed algorithm detects the three DR lesions, namely haemorrhages, microaneurysms and exudates. Second, we defined and extracted a set of features from detected lesions. The set of selected feature emulates what physicians looked for in classifying NPDR case. Finally, we designed an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier with three layers to classify NPDR to normal, mild, moderate and severe. Bayesian regularisation and resilient backpropagation algorithms are used to train ANN. The accuracy for the proposed classifiers based on Bayesian regularisation and resilient backpropagation algorithms are 96.6 and 89.9, respectively. The obtained results are compared with results of the recent published classifier. Our proposed classifier outperforms the best in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  10. Prevalence of Diabetic retinopathy in Kashmir, India -A hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Qureshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among Kashmiri population. MaterialandMethod Inacross-sectionalhospitalbasedstudy,500patientswith established diabetes who attended eye OPD at Govt Medical College Srinagar were evaluated for the presence or absence of retinopathy. Relevant clinical examination was done and the findings were recorded at one point of time. No follow-up findings of the patients were included in this study. Direct Ophthalmoscope (Heinzand slit lamp bio-microscope (Zeiss were used for examination. Statistical package for Social Sciences (SPSS was used for statistical analysis. p60 yrs of age and 49 patients (36.2% were between 40-68 yrs of age. 33 (24.5% were males and 102 (75.5% were females. 30 patients (12.8% with diabetes of = 15 yr. Mild DR was present in 67 (37.4% patients, moderate to severe DR in 46 (9.2% patients, proliferative DR in 5(1% patients and diabetic maculopathy in 17(3.4%patients. Patients who were managed with insulin, either alone or with oral hypoglycemic drugs, had more prevalence of DR. Conclusion The present study concluded that DR is highly prevalent in this part of the world and needs early detection and appropriate treatment to prevent blindness due to this condition.

  11. Predictive ability of visit-to-visit variability in HbA1c and systolic blood pressure for the development of microalbuminuria and retinopathy in people with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Toshiko; Suka, Machi; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2017-06-01

    We explored whether visit-to-visit variability in both glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) simultaneously predicted the development of microalbuminuria and retinopathy, and whether the predictive ability of these measurements changed according to mean HbA1c and SBP levels in people with type 2 diabetes. A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted on 243 type 2 diabetes patients with normoalbuminuria and 486 without retinopathy at the first visit and within 1year thereafter. The two cohorts were followed up from 1995 until 2012. Multivariate and stratified analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazard models. Microalbuminuria developed in 84 patients and retinopathy in 108. Hazard ratios (HRs) for the development of microalbuminuria associated with the coefficient of variation (CV) and variation independent of mean (VIM) of both HbA1c and SBP significantly increased. In participants with a mean SBP HbA1c were abruptly elevated and significant compared with those with a mean SBP ≥130mmHg. Visit-to-visit variability in both HbA1c and SBP simultaneously predict the development of microalbuminuria. HbA1c variability may predict the development of retinopathy when the mean SBP is normal (<130mmHg). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy Awareness among Diabetic Patients Attending COMS-TH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, P; Adhikari, H

    Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of blindness in Nepal. Objective The main objective of the study is to know the awareness of diabetic retinopathy among new cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) attending the college of medical science- teaching hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal. Method All the diabetic cases referred for ophthalmic consultation and also referred outpatient department cases from other departments to ophthalmic outpatient department was carried out. Detailed demographics of the subjects and their awareness of potential ocular problems from diabetes mellitus were noted. Result Total one hundred and thirty-one patients were enrolled during the study period from 15 November 2016 to 15 May 2017. Brahmin 39.69% and 19.08% Mongolian were the most predominant ethnical group. The predominant group of patients were housewives (41.22%) then followed by service (19.85%), business (13.74%), agriculture (12.21%), others (12.98%). Among 36.64% of the literate patients, 19.85% had passed school level, 9.92% had passed intermediate level, 88.55% were aware of Diabetic retinopathy. Among them majority 88.55% were referred by physician. Family history were present in 35.68% and fundus evaluation was done for the first time in almost half of diabetic cases (64.12%) and diabetic retinopathy was found in 32.06% of total cases in right eye and 30.53% of total cases in left eye. Conclusion Along with the awareness, routine dilated fundoscopy is mandatory for slight threating stage of retinopathy and to reduce the burden of blindness from diabetic retinopathy in Nepal.

  13. Research advances in diabetic retinopathy telescreening systems%糖尿病视网膜病变远程筛查系统的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭金娟; 黄建南; 陆丽娜; 邹海东

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy has become the main cause of the sight impairment and blindness among the adult population.Early detection of diabetic retinopathy helps to prevent and reduce the damage to eyesight.The development of diabetic retinopathy telescreening systems has been rapid.The operation modes,key technologies,economic benefits and new progression of diabetic retinopathy telescreening systems are reviewed.%目前糖尿病视网膜病变目前已成为成年人群视力损伤和致盲的主要原因,通过筛查以早期发现糖尿病视网膜病变,对防止和减轻视力损伤具有重要意义.对糖尿病视网膜病远程筛查系统的相关研究和应用也日趋成熟.本文就糖尿病视网膜病变远程筛查系统的运行模式、关键技术、经济学效益及新进展进行综述,以期为临床推广应用提供参考.

  14. The metabolic syndrome and severity of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available John J Chen,1,2,* Lucas J Wendel,1,3,* Emily S Birkholz,1 John G Vallone,4 Anne L Coleman,5,6 Fei Yu,7 Vinit B Mahajan1,3,8 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Vitreoretinal Service, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, 5Department of Ophthalmology, 6Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, 7Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 8Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: While metabolic syndrome has been strongly implicated as a risk factor for macrovascular diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease, its relationship with microvascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, has been less defined. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy.Methods: A retrospective case–control chart review at the University of Iowa ophthalmology and primary care clinics included 100 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, 100 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, 100 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, and 100 nondiabetic patients who were randomly selected. Using the International Diabetes Foundation definition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the number of components of metabolic syndrome were compared among these groups.Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes was 69.3%, which was significantly higher than that in patients without diabetes (27%; P<0.0001 (odds ratio [OR] =6.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.76–10.49; P=0.0004. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between diabetics with and without diabetic retinopathy, with rates

  15. A case of radiation retinopathy treated with panretinal photocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohde, Hisao; Ayaki, Masahiko; Fujimura, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Noriko

    1993-01-01

    A 29-year-old male developed radiation retinopathy one year and three months after 60 Gy of radiotherapy was delivered by a linear accelerator for a grade III astrocytoma. Fundus examination at the initial visit showed several dot and blot hemorrhages and cotton-wool patches. One month later, mascular edema developed due to increased capillary permeability in the left eye, while proliferative changes and preretinal hemorrhages were noted in the right eye. Since panretinal photocoagulation was effective in treating both eyes, it may be the treatment of choice for radiation retinopathy with extensive avascular areas. (author)

  16. A review on exudates detection methods for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shilpa; Karule, P T

    2018-01-01

    The presence of exudates on the retina is the most characteristic symptom of diabetic retinopathy. As exudates are among early clinical signs of DR, their detection would be an essential asset to the mass screening task and serve as an important step towards automatic grading and monitoring of the disease. Reliable identification and classification of exudates are of inherent interest in an automated diabetic retinopathy screening system. Here we review the numerous early studies that used for automatic exudates detection with the aim of providing decision support in addition to reducing the workload of an ophthalmologist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. TPL2 (Therapeutic Targeting Tumor Progression Locus-2)/ATF4 (Activating Transcription Factor-4)/SDF1α (Chemokine Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-α) Axis Suppresses Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, De-Wei; Lin, Keng-Hung; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Lee, Maw-Rong; Chen, Chung-Yu; Lee, Wen-Jane; Hung, Yi-Wen; Shen, Chin-Chang; Chung, Tsung-Ju; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Sheu, Meei-Ling

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by vasopermeability, vascular leakage, inflammation, blood-retinal barrier breakdown, capillary degeneration, and neovascularization. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes mellitus and progression retinopathy remain unclear. TPL2 (tumor progression locus 2), a serine-threonine protein kinase, exerts a pathological effect on vascular angiogenesis. This study investigated the role of N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine, a major advanced glycation end products, and the involved TPL2-related molecular signals in diabetic retinopathy using models of in vitro and in vivo and human samples. Serum N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine levels and TPL2 kinase activity were significantly increased in clinical patients and experimental animals with diabetic retinopathy. Intravitreal administration of pharmacological blocker or neutralizing antibody inhibited TPL2 and effectively suppressed the pathological characteristics of retinopathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic animal models. Intravitreal VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) neutralization also suppressed the diabetic retinopathy in diabetic animal models. Mechanistic studies in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells from streptozotocin-diabetic rats, db/db mice, and samples from patients with diabetic retinopathy revealed a positive parallel correlation between N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine and the TPL2/chemokine SDF1α (stromal cell-derived factor-α) axis that is dependent on endoplasmic reticulum stress-related molecules, especially ATF4 (activating transcription factor-4). This study demonstrates that inhibiting the N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine-induced TPL2/ATF4/SDF1α axis can effectively prevent diabetes mellitus-mediated retinal microvascular dysfunction. This signaling axis may include the therapeutic potential for other diseases involving pathological neovascularization or macular edema. © 2017

  18. The role of retinopathy distribution and other lesion types for the definition of examination intervals during screening for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ometto, Giovanni; Erlandsen, Mogens; Hunter, Andrew; Bek, Toke

    2017-06-01

    It has previously been shown that the intervals between screening examinations for diabetic retinopathy can be optimized by including individual risk factors for the development of the disease in the risk assessment. However, in some cases, the risk model calculating the screening interval may recommend a different interval than an experienced clinician. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of factors unrelated to diabetic retinopathy and the distribution of lesions for discrepancies between decisions made by the clinician and the risk model. Therefore, fundus photographs from 90 screening examinations where the recommendations of the clinician and a risk model had been discrepant were evaluated. Forty features were defined to describe the type and location of the lesions, and classification and ranking techniques were used to assess whether the features could predict the discrepancy between the grader and the risk model. Suspicion of tumours, retinal degeneration and vascular diseases other than diabetic retinopathy could explain why the clinician recommended shorter examination intervals than the model. Additionally, the regional distribution of microaneurysms/dot haemorrhages was important for defining a photograph as belonging to the group where both the clinician and the risk model had recommended a short screening interval as opposed to the other decision alternatives. Features unrelated to diabetic retinopathy and the regional distribution of retinal lesions may affect the recommendation of the examination interval during screening for diabetic retinopathy. The development of automated computerized algorithms for extracting information about the type and location of retinal lesions could be expected to further optimize examination intervals during screening for diabetic retinopathy. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fibrous membranes in diabetic retinopathy and bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattwell, David M; Stappler, Theodor; Sheridan, Carl; Heimann, Heinrich; Gibran, Syed K; Wong, David; Hiscott, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the histopathologic characteristics of bevacizumab-treated human proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) membranes with particular regard to membrane vasculature as a step toward addressing the effects of the drug on PDR membranes. Intravitreous injection of bevacizumab, an antivascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody, has recently been advocated as an adjunct in surgery for PDR. In this context, a clinically observed decrease in PDR epiretinal membrane vascularity (vascular regression) occurs from 24 hours to 48 hours after injection, but the exact mechanisms of drug action are unknown. A consecutive series of seven PDR membrane specimens that had been removed sequentially from seven bevacizumab-treated patients were studied retrospectively. The membrane specimens were examined using light microscopic methods, including immunohistochemistry. Five of the seven membranes were clinically avascular (one contained "ghost" vessels) and did not hemorrhage during excision. Of these 5 specimens, which included 1 removed 7 days after a total of 6 intravitreous injections of 1.25 mg bevacizumab, 4 contained histologically detectable capillaries (1 did not). These blood vessels were lined by endothelial cells as determined by immunohistochemistry for the endothelial markers CD31 and CD34. The two remaining membranes were clinically and histologically still vascularized despite bevacizumab treatment. All the specimens also contained smooth muscle actin-containing fibroblastic cells within the collagenous stroma. The findings do not support the concept that the clinical phenomenon of vascular regression in PDR membranes after bevacizumab injection in the vitreous is resulting from obliteration of the membrane blood vessels. Another mechanism appears to be involved in at least some patients, possibly a vasoconstrictive response. Such a mechanism might explain reversal of the effects of bevacizumab that has been reported

  20. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  1. [The evaluation of color vision and its diagnostic value in predicting the risk of diabetic retinopathy in patients with glucose metabolism disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jończyk-Skórka, Katarzyna; Kowalski, Jan

    2017-07-21

    TES was an independent risk factor that increased the risk of prediabetes almost six times (OR 5,924, 95% CI [1,169- 30,036], p = 0,032). In DM group sTES was an independent risk factor, which increased the risk of diabetes more than thirteen times (OR 13,408, 95% CI [2,324-77,345], p = 0,004). Higher values of sTES occurred in patients with retinopathy (NPDR) (p retinopathy over twenty times (OR 21,380, 95% CI [1,101 -89,241], p diabetes more than thirteen times. sTES ≥1,04 is an independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. sTES ≥1,04 increases the risk of diabetic retinopathy over twenty times. The color vision 100 Hue test can be useful in detecting glucose metabolism disorders even before the ophthalmoscopic manifestation of retinopathy. Early detection rises the possibility to prevent or delay the development of diabetes through lifestyle changes and implementation of healthy behaviors.

  2. Cohort profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollånes, Mette C; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Forthun, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design. PARTICIPANTS: MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts-the Norweg......PURPOSE: The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design. PARTICIPANTS: MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts......-the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort. MOBAND-CP includes maternal interview/questionnaire data collected during pregnancy and follow-up, plus linked information from national health registries. FINDINGS TO DATE: Initial harmonisation of data from the 2 cohorts...... has created 140 variables for children and their mothers. In the MOBAND-CP cohort, 438 children with CP have been identified through record linkage with validated national registries, providing by far the largest such sample with prospectively collected detailed pregnancy data. Several studies...

  3. Detection of Glaucoma and Its Association With Diabetic Retinopathy in a Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwani, Rita A; McGhee, Sarah M; Lai, Jimmy S M; Chan, Christina K W; Wong, David

    2016-01-01

    To determine the type of glaucoma in subjects with diabetes mellitus detected during a diabetic retinopathy screening program and to determine any association between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and glaucoma. This is a population-based prospective cross-sectional study, in which subjects with diabetes mellitus underwent screening for DR in a primary care outpatient clinic. Digital fundus photographs were taken and graded for presence/absence and severity of DR. During this grading, those fundus photographs showing increased cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) (≥0.6) were identified and these patients were referred to the specialist ophthalmology clinic for detailed examination. The presence of glaucoma was established based on CDR and abnormal visual field (VF) defects according to Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson's criteria. An elevation of intraocular pressure was not required for the diagnosis of glaucoma. The patients said to have definite glaucoma were those with vertical CDR>/=0.6, glaucomatous defects on VF examination, or retinal nerve fiber thinning if VF was unreliable. Of the 2182 subjects who underwent screening, 81 subjects (3.7%) had increased CDR and 40 subjects (1.8%) had confirmed glaucoma. Normal-tension variant of primary open-angle glaucoma was the most prevalent type (1.2%) We did not find any evidence that DR is a risk factor for glaucoma [odds ratio for DR vs. no DR=1.22 (95% confidence interval, 0.59-2.51)]. The overall prevalence of glaucoma in this diabetic population, based on finding increased cupping of optic disc in a teleretinal screening program was 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0).

  4. Early diagnosis of sub-clinical stage of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Hui Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the early diagnosis of sub-clinic stage of diabetic retinopathy.METHODS: This was cross sectional study,multifocal retina electroretinogram(mf-ERG, contrast sensitivity(CSand central retinal artery color Doppler examination were recorded from 30 cases(30 eyesmatched control subjects, 35 cases(35 eyeswith type 2 diabetes mellitus(DMwithout diabetic retinopathy(NDRand 38 cases(38 eyeswith non-prolifera tive diabetic retinopathy(NPDR. One-way ANOVA and SNK-q test were used for data analysis.RESULTS: P1 response density of NDR patients were found decrease, N1 implicit time were delayed. Which were related with the degree of retinopathy(PPPP>0.05, The differences between normal group, NDR group and NPDR group were found statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: mf-ERG and CS are sensitive indexes for early evaluation of visual function in patients with diabetes mellitus, with development of the disease, CRA blood flow also appears to decline.

  5. Petaloid-pattern pigmentary retinopathy: a novel case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Tapas Ranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Panda, Krushna Gopal; Mukherjee, Sujoy; Mohan, Neha; Agroiya, Pushpalata; Das, Taraprasad

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with an unusual petaloid-pattern pigmentary retinopathy associated with nyctalopia and reduction of vision which had been invariably static over the past 5 years. We performed a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including fundoscopy, autofluorescent imaging, electroretinography and optical coherence tomography. There were diffuse retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) washout areas with blotches of pigment distributed in the pattern of a petal with marked chorioretinal atrophy and scar at the fovea. The arterial caliber was normal. Investigations ruled out intrauterine and neonatal infection. Systemically, she was healthy with normal intellect but with 3-month delayed milestones of development. She had used valproic acid for seizure disorder (without any organic central nervous system lesion) from 2-5 years of age. Electroretinography showed extinguished scotopic responses with slight reduction in cone responses. Optical coherence tomography showed a scar with attenuated RPE-choriocapillary complex at the macula. Her clinical profile did not fully match with any previously described pigmentary retinopathies except rod-cone dystrophy and choroidal dystrophy to a certain extent. The pigmentary retinopathy reported here is a combination of a petaloid pattern of pigmentary disturbance, stationary reduction of vision, nyctalopia, normal intellect and marginal delayed milestones. In the absence of such a description in the literature we named this disorder as petaloid-pattern pigmentary retinopathy.

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy in Nnewi, Nigeria | Nwosu | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to determine the incidence and pattern of diabetic retinopathy in a clinic population of diabetics in Nnewi. All consecutive new patients seen at the Diabetic Eye Clinic, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, between March 1997 and September 1998 were examined.

  7. Factors Associated With Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy, A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a progressive sight threatening diabetic complication. The prognosis seems to be related to largely modifiable risk factors. Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify factors that could be associated with progression of DR. among adult diabetic patients attending primary health ...

  8. Sight threatening retinopathy in a child with sickle cell &beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sight threatening changes in the retina are a well-recognized complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). However they usually occur in older patients with Haemoglobin SC or Sβ+thal patterns. It is rarely found under the age of 20 years in patients who are Hb SS or Sβ<°thal. This is a report of sight threatening retinopathy in ...

  9. Bevacizumab treatment for retinopathy of prematurity in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ROP in the developing world. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a growing problem in South. Africa (SA), as it is in many parts of the developing world. The so-called 'third epidemic' of ROP is caused by a combination of high preterm birth rates, relatively good infant survival and inadequate oxygen monitoring in neonatal ...

  10. Subretinal neovascularization from the retina in radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozalis, G.T.; Schachat, A.P.; Green, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    In a 66-year-old woman with radiation retinopathy, subretinal neovascularization was present, originating from telangiectatic retinal vessels in the macular area. The patient showed no clinical or histologic evidence of age-related macular degeneration or other conditions that may have contributed to the subretinal neovascularization

  11. Prevalence and risk factors associated with retinopathy in diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic retinopathy is the fifth leading cause of blindness worldwide accounting for nearly 5% of all blindness. However, most of the prevalence and incidence data is from developed countries, with very limited information from sub-Saharan Africa. The study sought to determine the prevalence of, and factors associated ...

  12. Oxidative stress in diabetic patients with retinopathy | Kundu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known to induce oxidative stress along with deranging various metabolisms; one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic retinopathy, which is a leading cause of acquired blindness. Poor glycemic control and oxidative stress have been attributed to the development of ...

  13. Screening for retinopathy of prematurity in a provincial hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is an emerging public health problem in many middle-income countries where improved neonatal survival rates coupled with inadequate health resources have created a new epidemic. There are limited available data on the magnitude of the problem, and screening in South ...

  14. Clinical features of diabetes retinopathy in elderly patients with type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective was to estimate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of diabetes retinopathy (DR) in elderly individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Northern Chinese. Materials and Methods: 595 eligible subjects (263 men, 332 women) assisted by the community health service center in Beijing, China ...

  15. Adenosine receptors and caffeine in retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zhang, Shuya; Zhou, Rong; Lin, Zhenlang; Cai, Xiaohong; Lin, Jing; Huo, Yuqing; Liu, Xiaoling

    2017-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a major cause of childhood blindness in the world and is caused by oxygen-induced damage to the developing retinal vasculature, resulting in hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration and subsequent delayed retinal vascularization and hypoxia-induced pathological neovascularization driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway in retina. Current anti-VEGF therapy has shown some effective in a clinical trial, but is associated with the unintended effects on delayed eye growth and retinal vasculature development of preterm infants. Notably, cellular responses to hypoxia are characterized by robust increases in extracellular adenosine production and the markedly induced adenosine receptors, which provide a novel target for preferential control of pathological angiogenesis without affecting normal vascular development. Here, we review the experimental evidence in support of adenosine receptor-based therapeutic strategy for ROP, including the aberrant adenosine signaling in oxygen-induced retinopathy and the role of three adenosine receptor subtypes (A 1 R, A 2A R, A 2B R) in development and treatment of ROP using oxygen-induced retinopathy models. The clinical and initial animal evidence that implicate the therapeutic effect of caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) in treatment of ROP are highlighted. Lastly, we discussed the translational potential as well therapeutic advantage of adenosine receptor- and caffeine-based therapy for ROR and possibly other proliferative retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Does Niprisanฎ Retard the Evolution of Sickle Cell Retinopathy?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of Niprisan®, an antisickling agent, in the management of sickle cell retinopathy. Methods: The study was designed as a phase IIb double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Eighty-eight patients aged between 5 and 36 years (mean 15.3 years) were randomized into 2 treatment ...

  17. Automated detection of diabetic retinopathy lesions on ultrawidefield pseudocolour images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Jayadev, Chaitra; Nittala, Muneeswar G; Velaga, Swetha B; Ramachandra, Chaithanya A; Bhaskaranand, Malavika; Bhat, Sandeep; Solanki, Kaushal; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2018-03-01

    We examined the sensitivity and specificity of an automated algorithm for detecting referral-warranted diabetic retinopathy (DR) on Optos ultrawidefield (UWF) pseudocolour images. Patients with diabetes were recruited for UWF imaging. A total of 383 subjects (754 eyes) were enrolled. Nonproliferative DR graded to be moderate or higher on the 5-level International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy (ICDR) severity scale was considered as grounds for referral. The software automatically detected DR lesions using the previously trained classifiers and classified each image in the test set as referral-warranted or not warranted. Sensitivity, specificity and the area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) of the algorithm were computed. The automated algorithm achieved a 91.7%/90.3% sensitivity (95% CI 90.1-93.9/80.4-89.4) with a 50.0%/53.6% specificity (95% CI 31.7-72.8/36.5-71.4) for detecting referral-warranted retinopathy at the patient/eye levels, respectively; the AUROC was 0.873/0.851 (95% CI 0.819-0.922/0.804-0.894). Diabetic retinopathy (DR) lesions were detected from Optos pseudocolour UWF images using an automated algorithm. Images were classified as referral-warranted DR with a high degree of sensitivity and moderate specificity. Automated analysis of UWF images could be of value in DR screening programmes and could allow for more complete and accurate disease staging. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Photography or Ophthalmoscopy for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiden, Hendrik A. van; Moll, Annette C.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Abramoff, M.D.; Polak, Bettine C.P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.K. National Screening Committee recommended digital fundus photography as the screening method of choice for diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, concerns have been expressed about replacing ophthalmoscopy with slit-lamp biomicroscopy by digital photography. These concerns included the

  19. A predictive score for retinopathy of prematurity by using clinical risk factors and serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim Coşkun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To detect the impact of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and other risk factors for the early prediction of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP and to establish a scoring system for ROP prediction by using clinical criteria and serum IGF-1 levels. METHODS: The study was conducted with 127 preterm infants. IGF-1 levels in the 1st day of life, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th week of life was analyzed. The score was established after logistic regression analysis, considering the impact of each variable on the occurrences of any stage ROP. A validation cohort containing 107 preterm infants was included in the study and the predictive ability of ROP score was calculated. RESULTS: Birth weights (BW, gestational weeks (GW and the prevalence of breast milk consumption were lower, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC were more frequent, the duration of mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation was longer in patients with ROP (P<0.05. Initial serum IGF-1 levels tended to be lower in newborns who developed ROP. Logistic regression analysis revealed that low BW (<1250 g, presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH and formula feeding increased the risk of ROP. Afterwards, the scoring system was validated on 107 infants. The negative predictive values of a score less than 4 were 84.3%, 74.7% and 79.8% while positive predictive values were 76.3%, 65.5% and 71.6% respectively. CONCLUSION: In addition to BW <1250 g and IVH, formula consumption was detected as a risk factor for the development of ROP. Breastfeeding is important for prevention of ROP in preterm infants.

  20. MULTIMODAL IMAGING OF MOSAIC RETINOPATHY IN CARRIERS OF HEREDITARY X-LINKED RECESSIVE DISEASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, An-Lun; Wang, Jung-Pan; Tseng, Yun-Ju; Liu, Laura; Kang, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Chao, An-Ning; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Chen, Tun-Lu; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun; Wang, Nan-Kai

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the clinical features in carriers of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked ocular albinism, and choroideremia (CHM) using multimodal imaging and to assess their diagnostic value in these three mosaic retinopathies. We prospectively examined 14 carriers of 3 X-linked recessive disorders (X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked ocular albinism, and CHM). Details of abnormalities of retinal morphology were evaluated using fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. In six X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carriers, fundus appearance varied from unremarkable to the presence of tapetal-like reflex and pigmentary changes. On FAF imaging, all carriers exhibited a bright radial reflex against a dark background. By spectral domain optical coherence tomography, loss of the ellipsoid zone in the macula was observed in 3 carriers (50%). Regarding the retinal laminar architecture, 4 carriers (66.7%) showed thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a dentate appearance of the outer plexiform layer. All five X-linked ocular albinism carriers showed a characteristic mud-splatter patterned fundus, dark radial streaks against a bright background on FAF imaging, and a normal-appearing retinal structure by spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging. Two of the 3 CHM carriers (66.7%) showed a diffuse moth-eaten appearance of the fundus, and all 3 showed irregular hyper-FAF and hypo-FAF spots throughout the affected area. In the CHM carriers, the structural changes observed by spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging were variable. Our findings in an Asian cohort suggest that FAF imaging is a practical diagnostic test for differentiating X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked ocular albinism, and CHM carriers. Wide-field FAF is an easy and helpful adjunct to testing for the correct diagnosis and identification of lyonization in carriers of these three mosaic retinopathies.

  1. The CHOP postnatal weight gain, birth weight, and gestational age retinopathy of prematurity risk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binenbaum, Gil; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Quinn, Graham E; Huang, Jiayan; Dreiseitl, Stephan; Antigua, Jules; Foroughi, Negar; Abbasi, Soraya

    2012-12-01

    To develop a birth weight (BW), gestational age (GA), and postnatal-weight gain retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) prediction model in a cohort of infants meeting current screening guidelines. Multivariate logistic regression was applied retrospectively to data from infants born with BW less than 1501 g or GA of 30 weeks or less at a single Philadelphia hospital between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009. In the model, BW, GA, and daily weight gain rate were used repeatedly each week to predict risk of Early Treatment of Retinopathy of Prematurity type 1 or 2 ROP. If risk was above a cut-point level, examinations would be indicated. Of 524 infants, 20 (4%) had type 1 ROP and received laser treatment; 28 (5%) had type 2 ROP. The model (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia [CHOP]) accurately predicted all infants with type 1 ROP; missed 1 infant with type 2 ROP, who did not require laser treatment; and would have reduced the number of infants requiring examinations by 49%. Raising the cut point to miss one type 1 ROP case would have reduced the need for examinations by 79%. Using daily weight measurements to calculate weight gain rate resulted in slightly higher examination reduction than weekly measurements. The BW-GA-weight gain CHOP ROP model demonstrated accurate ROP risk assessment and a large reduction in the number of ROP examinations compared with current screening guidelines. As a simple logistic equation, it can be calculated by hand or represented as a nomogram for easy clinical use. However, larger studies are needed to achieve a highly precise estimate of sensitivity prior to clinical application.

  2. Concordance with World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) guidelines for cancer prevention and obesity-related cancer risk in the Framingham Offspring cohort (1991-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Nour; Lin, Yong; Bandera, Elisa V; Jacques, Paul F; Parekh, Niyati

    2015-02-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates associations between healthful behaviors consistent with WCRF/AICR cancer prevention guidelines and obesity-related cancer risk, as a third of cancers are estimated to be preventable. The study sample consisted of adults from the Framingham Offspring cohort (n = 2,983). From 1991 to 2008, 480 incident doctor-diagnosed obesity-related cancers were identified. Data on diet, measured by a food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measures, and self-reported physical activity, collected in 1991 was used to construct a 7-component score based on recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, foods that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, alcohol, and food preservation, processing, and preparation. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate associations between the computed score, its components, and subcomponents in relation to obesity-related cancer risk. The overall score was not associated with obesity-related cancer risk after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, energy, and preexisting conditions (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.86-1.02). When score components were evaluated separately, for every unit increment in the alcohol score, there was 29 % lower risk of obesity-related cancers (HR 0.71, 95 % CI 0.51-0.99) and 49-71 % reduced risk of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Every unit increment in the subcomponent score for non-starchy plant foods (fruits, vegetables, and legumes) among participants who consume starchy vegetables was associated with 66 % reduced risk of colorectal cancer (HR 0.44, 95 % CI 0.22-0.88). Lower alcohol consumption and a plant-based diet consistent with the cancer prevention guidelines were associated with reduced risk of obesity-related cancers in this population.

  3. Retinopathy of prematurity: the high cost of screening regional and remote infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzu-Ying; Donovan, Tim; Armfield, Nigel; Gole, Glen A

    2018-01-25

    Demand for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening is increasing for infants born at rural and regional hospitals where the service is not generally available. The health system cost for screening regional/remote infants has not been reported. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost of ROP screening at a large centralized tertiary neonatal service for infants from regional/rural hospitals. This is a retrospective study to establish the cost of transferring regional/rural infants to the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital for ROP screening over a 28-month period. A total of 131 infants were included in this study. Individual infant costs were calculated from analysis of clinical and administrative records. Economic cost of ROP screening for all transfers from regional/rural hospitals to Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. The average economic cost of ROP screening for this cohort was AUD$5110 per infant screened and the total cost was AUD$669 413. The average cost per infant screened was highest for infants from a regional centre with a population of 75 000 (AUD$14 856 per child), which was also geographically furthest from Brisbane. No infant in this cohort transferred from a regional nursery reached criteria for intervention for ROP by standard guidelines. Health system costs for ROP screening of remote infants at a centralized hospital are high. Alternative strategies using telemedicine can now be compared with centralized screening. © 2018 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  4. Progress on study of the risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Cheng Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity(ROPis an ocular disease caused by retinal ophthalmic dysplasia in premature infants, leads to strabismus, amblyopia, cataract, glaucoma, and even blindness, which seriously affects the quality of life of preterm infants. The infant blindness ratio has climbed to 6%-18%, according to figures released by the World Health Organisation. ROP is the primary cause of blindness in children of the world in recent years. But the pathogenesis of ROP is not yet clear. Gestational age, birth weight, oxygen intake, delivery mode, multiple newborns, neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, anemia, blood transfusion, sepsis, infection, hypercapnia, hyperbilirubinemia, maternal prenatal use of a drug are all the risk factors. We reviewed the risk factors and possible mechanism of ROP, in order to offer theoretical support for the study and prevention of ROP in premature infants.

  5. Non-Traditional Systemic Treatments for Diabetic Retinopathy: An
Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Rafael; Ballarini, Stefania; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ji, Linong; Haller, Hermann; Zimmet, Paul; Wong, Tien Y.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid escalation in the global prevalence diabetes, with more than 30% being afflicted with diabetic retinopathy (DR), means it is likely that associated vision-threatening conditions will also rise substantially. This means that new therapeutic approaches need to be found that go beyond the current standards of diabetic care, and which are effective in the early stages of the disease. In recent decades several new pharmacological agents have been investigated for their effectiveness in preventing the appearance and progression of DR or in reversing DR; some with limited success while others appear promising. This up-to-date critical review of non-traditional systemic treatments for DR is based on the published evidence in MEDLINE spanning 1980-December 2014. It discusses a number of therapeutic options, paying particular attention to the mechanisms of action and the clinical evidence for the use of renin-angiotensin system blockade, fenofibrate and calcium dobesilate monohydrate in DR. PMID:25989912

  6. Automatic detection of blood vessels in retinal images for diabetic retinopathy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, D Siva Sundhara; Vasuki, S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. DR is mainly caused due to the damage of retinal blood vessels in the diabetic patients. It is essential to detect and segment the retinal blood vessels for DR detection and diagnosis, which prevents earlier vision loss in diabetic patients. The computer aided automatic detection and segmentation of blood vessels through the elimination of optic disc (OD) region in retina are proposed in this paper. The OD region is segmented using anisotropic diffusion filter and subsequentially the retinal blood vessels are detected using mathematical binary morphological operations. The proposed methodology is tested on two different publicly available datasets and achieved 93.99% sensitivity, 98.37% specificity, 98.08% accuracy in DRIVE dataset and 93.6% sensitivity, 98.96% specificity, and 95.94% accuracy in STARE dataset, respectively.

  7. [Transcranial magnetotherapy for the correction of initial manifestations of diabetic retinopathy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, N V; Bolotova, N V; Kamenskikh, T G; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Kolbenev, I O; Luk'ianov, V F

    2009-01-01

    This study included 45 children at the age from 5 to 17 years with type I diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic retinopathy. All the patients showed retinal thickening at the macula and reduced amplitude of local electroretinogram suggesting compromised capillary circulation. The capillary blood flow was corrected by transcranial magnetotherapy with the use of an AMO-ATOS Ogolovie unit. The results of the treatment were evaluated from characteristics of laser Doppler flometry. A course of transcranial magnetotherapy comprising 10 daily seances resulted in a significant increase of microcirculation index, respiratory rhythm, and myogenic tone (by 1.64, 1.35, and 1.16 times respectively). In addition, morphometric and electrophysiological properties of the retina underwent positive changes. Transcranial exposure to the traveling magnetic field is recommended for the correction of intraocular microcirculation and prevention of diabetic macular oedema.

  8. Role of Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) Tertiary Centers of Excellence in Capacity-building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Padmaja Kumari; Balakrishnanan, D; Padhi, T R; Jalali, Subhadra

    2016-11-07

    Tertiary Centres of Excellence in India have been at the forefront of the efforts against Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) - associated blindness. The epidemic of blindness from ROP; however, has now spread rapidly into large parts of interiors of developing countries due to improved newborn care facilities. Due to their knowledge and experience of more than a decade, these centres of excellence, both from child care and Ophthalmology care, now need to come forward in substantial measures and need to be supported by funds and programs so that concerns of neonatal eye-health, training, screening, prevention and treatment can get integrated and embedded into newborn critical care and health programs. This will protect newborn preterm survivors from losing the potentially good vision that they are born with, reduce the rapidly rising blindness epidemic, and also protect staff from potential high-value litigations.

  9. Role of frequency doubling technology perimetry in screening of diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh Rajul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the ability of frequency-doubling technology perimetry (FDT to detect sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Method: Fifty-eight eyes of fifty-eight patients with established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus with diabetic retinopathy, fifty-five eyes of fifty-five diabetic patients without retinopathy, and forty-one eyes of forty-one normals underwent FDT and dilated stereo-biomicroscopic fundus examination. The sensitivity and specificity of FDT in identification of "sight-threatening retinopathy" (severe and very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy and clinically significant macular edema (CSME were determined. Results: For the detection of sight-threatening retinopathy, two abnormal adjacent points depressed to any level on the 20-1 screening program had a sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 97.6%. At (assuming a 10% prevalence of sight-threatening retinopathy in a diabetic clinic, two abnormal adjacent points anywhere in the field depressed to any level has a positive predictive value (PPV of 48% with a negative predictive value of 98.8%. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CSME was poor. Conclusions: The 20-1 screening program of the FDT is useful in the detection of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (PPV 48%. A normal 20-1 test rules out sight-threatening retinopathy. FDT was not useful in the detection of CSME.

  10. Combined effect of blood pressure and total cholesterol levels on long-term risks of subtypes of cardiovascular death: Evidence for Cardiovascular Prevention from Observational Cohorts in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Michihiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Asayama, Kei; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Masaru; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Iso, Hiroyasu; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Imai, Yutaka; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Okamura, Tomonori

    2015-03-01

    No large-scale, longitudinal studies have examined the combined effects of blood pressure (BP) and total cholesterol levels on long-term risks for subtypes of cardiovascular death in an Asian population. To investigate these relationships, a meta-analysis of individual participant data, which included 73 916 Japanese subjects (age, 57.7 years; men, 41.1%) from 11 cohorts, was conducted. During a mean follow-up of 15.0 years, deaths from coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and intraparenchymal hemorrhage occurred in 770, 724, and 345 cases, respectively. Cohort-stratified Cox proportional hazard models were used. After stratifying the participants by 4 systolic BP ×4 total cholesterol categories, the group with systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg with total cholesterol ≥5.7 mmol/L had the greatest risk for coronary heart disease death (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.39; Pdeath, and total cholesterol was inversely associated with intraparenchymal hemorrhage, but no significant interactions between BP and total cholesterol were observed for stroke. High BP and high total cholesterol can synergistically increase the risk for coronary heart disease death but not for stroke in the Asian population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Hydroxychloroquine retinopathy after short-term therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brandon N; Chun, Dal W

    2014-01-01

    To report an unusual case of hydroxychloroquine toxicity after short-term therapy. Observational case report. A 56-year-old woman presented to the Ophthalmology Clinic at Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) with a 6-month history of gradually decreasing vision in both eyes. The patient had been taking hydroxychloroquine for the preceding 48 months for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Examination of the posterior segment revealed bilateral "bull's eye" macular lesions. Fundus autofluorescence revealed hyperfluorescence of well-defined bull's eye lesions in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography revealed corresponding parafoveal atrophy with a loss of the retinal inner segment/outer segment junction. Humphrey visual field 10-2 white showed significant central and paracentral defects with a generalized depression. The patient was on a standard dose of 400 mg daily, which was above her ideal dose. The patient had no history of kidney or liver dysfunction. There were no known risk factors but there were several possible confounding factors. The patient was started on high-dose nabumetone, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, at the same time she was started on hydroxychloroquine. She also reported taking occasional ibuprofen. Retinal toxicity from chloroquine has been recognized for decades with later reports showing retinopathy from long-term hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) use for the treatment of antiinflammatory diseases. Hydroxychloroquine is now widely used and retinal toxicity is relatively uncommon. However, it can cause serious vision loss and is usually irreversible. The risk of hydroxychloroquine toxicity rises to nearly 1% with a total cumulative dose of 1,000 g, which is ∼5 years to 7 years of normal use. Toxicity is rare under this dose. For this reason, the American Academy of Ophthalmology has revised its recommendations such that annual screenings begin 5 years after therapy with hydroxychloroquine has begun unless there are known risk

  12. Clinical Course and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Korea

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    Jae-Seung Yun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated clinical course and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.MethodsA total of 759 patients with T2DM without DR were included from January 2001 to December 2004. Retinopathy evaluation was performed at least annually by ophthalmologists. The severity of the DR was classified into five categories according to the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scales.ResultsOf the 759 patients, 523 patients (68.9% completed the follow-up evaluation. During the follow-up period, 235 patients (44.9% developed DR, and 32 patients (13.6% progressed to severe nonproliferative DR (NPDR or proliferative DR (PDR. The mean duration of diabetes at the first diagnosis of mild NPDR, moderate NPDR, and severe NPDR or PDR were 14.8, 16.7, and 17.3 years, respectively. After adjusting multiple confounding factors, the significant risk factors for the incidence of DR risk in patients with T2DM were old age, longer duration of diabetes, higher mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and albuminuria. Even in the patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes for longer than 10 years at baseline, a decrease in HbA1c led to a significant reduction in the risk of developing DR (hazard ratio, 0.73 per 1% HbA1c decrement; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.91; P=0.005.ConclusionThis prospective cohort study demonstrates that glycemic control, diabetes duration, age, and albuminuria are important risk factors for the development of DR. More aggressive retinal screening for T2DM patients diagnosed with DR should be required in order to not miss rapid progression of DR.

  13. Comparison between Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study 7-field retinal photos and non-mydriatic, mydriatic and mydriatic steered widefield scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for assessment of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin L; Broe, Rebecca; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To compare non-mydriatic, mydriatic and steered mydriatic widefield retinal images with mydriatic 7-field Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS)-standards in grading diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: We examined 95 patients (190 eyes) with type 1 diabetes. A non...

  14. Retinopathy of Prematurity: Therapeutic Strategies Based on Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayabyab, Rowena; Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) continues to be a major preventable cause of blindness and visual handicaps globally. With improved perinatal care, improved survival of moderately preterm infants, and limited resources for oxygen delivery and monitoring, more mature preterm infants are developing severe ROP in developing countries. The pathophysiology of ROP is characterized by two phases. Phase I ROP is due to vaso-obliteration beginning immediately after birth secondary to a marked decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Phase II begins around 33 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA). During this phase, VEGF levels increase, especially if there is retinal hypoxia with increasing retinal metabolism and demand for oxygen leading to abnormal vasoproliferation. Since the original description of ROP in 1942 by Terry et al. [Am J Ophthalmol 1942;25:203-204], four epidemics of ROP have been observed. Prevention or early treatment of ROP involves careful titration of oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter (SpO2). Optimal SpO2 target remains elusive. Most of the large trials have focused on either a low SpO2 (85-89%) or a high SpO2 (91-95%) from the first day of birth to 36 weeks' PMA. Although the incidence of severe ROP and bronchopulmonary dysplasia decreased significantly, predischarge mortality was higher in these studies. Use of graded SpO2 during the 2 different phases of ROP (early, low SpO2 during phase I vs. late, high SpO2 during phase II) may be the best approach to prevent this disabling condition. Further trials should focus on this strategy. Other biological agents that are currently being studied include IGF-1 with IGF-binding protein-3 (rhIGF-1 + rhIGFBP-3) and propranolol. For advanced stages of ROP, laser ablation of avascular retina, early treatment of ROP (ETROP) protocol, intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF antibodies (e.g. bevacizumab) and vitrectomy are used to protect central vision and prevent

  15. Curcumin Alleviates Diabetic Retinopathy in Experimental Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yu, Jinqiang; Ke, Feng; Lan, Mei; Li, Dekun; Tan, Ke; Ling, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ying; Wu, Kaili; Li, Dai

    2018-03-29

    To investigate the potential protective effects of curcumin on the retina in diabetic rats. An experimental diabetic rat model was induced by a low dose of streptozotocin combined with a high-energy diet. Rats which had blood glucose levels ≥11.6 mmol/L were used as diabetic rats. The diabetic rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: diabetic rats with no treatment (DM), diabetic rats treated with 100 mg/kg curcumin (DM + Cur 100 mg/kg), and diabetic rats treated with 200 mg/kg curcumin (DM + Cur 200 mg/kg). Curcumin was orally administered daily for 16 weeks. After 16 weeks of administration, the rats were euthanized, and eyes were dissected. Retinal histology was examined, and the thickness of the retina was measured. Ultrastructural changes of retinal ganglion cells, inner layer cells, retinal capillary, and membranous disks were observed by electron microscopy. Malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and total antioxidant capacity were measured by ELISA. Expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retina tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and ELISA. Expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2 in retina tissues were determined by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. Curcumin reduced the blood glucose levels of diabetic rats and decreased diabetes-induced body weight loss. Curcumin prevented attenuation of the retina in diabetic rats and ameliorated diabetes-induced ultrastructure changes of the retina, including thinning of the retina, apoptosis of the retinal ganglion cells and inner nuclear layer cells, thickening of retinal capillary basement membrane and disturbance of photoreceptor cell membranous disks. We also found that curcumin has a strong antioxidative ability in the retina of diabetic rats. It was observed that curcumin attenuated the expression of VEGF in the retina of diabetic rats. We also discovered that curcumin had an antiapoptotic effect by upregulating the expression of Bcl-2 and downregulating

  16. SOME OF THE RISK FACTORS FOR RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Stanković – Babić

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP remains the main cause of visual impairment in preterm infants. The study was aimed to assess the impact of some of the risk factors (gestational age, body weight of children at birth, associated diseases in children, maternal age at delivery, maternal smoking during pregnancy, multiple pregnancies on the occurrence of ROP in the sample of premature infants. We statistically processed the results (Student’s t test and the χ2 test of 93 preterm infants of both sexes: 39 boys and 54 girls, examined by indirect ophthalmoscope (Haine 500, Germany in mydriasis. The examination included all premature neonates with birth weight ≤ 2000g and/or gestational age ≤37 weeks, as well as neonates >37 weeks which have associated risk factors (oxygen, ventilation, sepsis, etc. Among 93 premature infants, with normal findings on the retina there were 72 children (77.42%, while in 21 (22.58% children we found ROP. Ophthalmological findings: the first stage of ROP was found in 15.05%, the second stage of ROP in 2.15% and third stage of ROP in 5.38% of the examined children. There were no patients with an aggressive form of ROP. Children with ROP were statistically of lower gestational age - 32.10 ± 2.70 compared to children without ROP - 35.37 ± 1.72 (p<0.001. Children with ROP had at birth significant lower body weight of 1741g ± 579.19 than children without ROP - 2168.75 ± 528.58 (p<0.01. Mothers of the children with ROP were, at the time of giving birth, over 29 ± 6.09 years old compared to mothers of children without ROP who were 26.42 ± 5.75 years old (p=0.0773. The presence of other diseases was significantly more prevalent in children with ROP 52.38% vs. 2.78% (p<0.001. The number of mothers of children with ROP who smoked during their pregnacy was considerable - 57.14 % vs. 37.50% (percent of non-smoking mothers, though the difference was not statistically significant. Knowing the risk factors and their

  17. Current trends in the pharmacotherapy of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is one of the most debilitating disorders of microvasculature of the retina and one of the leading causes of vision loss among the working class worldwide. At present, intravitreal anti-inflammatory (corticosteroids and anti-angiogenesis (anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor agents are being used as wide options for the pharmacotherapy of DR and diabetic macular edema (DME. Anti-inflammatory agents (Triamcinolone acetonide and other agents have shown evidence-based clinical benefits in various randomized clinical trials for the treatment of DR and DME, and also shown improvement in best corrected visual acuity. However, direct intravitreal injections are associated with serious side-effects like cataract and elevation of Intra Ocular Pressure. Despite this, corticosteroid therapy has been effective for DR and DME, therefore current focus is on the development of novel intravitreal steroid delivery devices that release a small quantity over a prolonged period of time. In addition to corticosteroids, anti-angiogenic agents are found to be effective for the treatment of DR and DME. The most popular target of these agents is the subfamily of proteins known as VEGF, whose over-expression is believed to play a role in numerous diseases including DR and Age-related Macular Degeneration. Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin® and Ranibizumab (Lucentis® are gaining popularity as a clinical adjunct to panretinal photocoagulation in patients with proliferative DR. Moreover, Lucentis has been recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for macular edema following retinal vein occlusion. Further, systemic agents (specially, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and anti-hypertensive agents have shown beneficial results in reducing the progression of DR. In conclusion, it can be stated that for the present scenario systematic use of available pharmacotherapy as an adjunct to laser photocoagulation, which is gold

  18. Lipid control and use of lipid-regulating drugs for prevention of cardiovascular events in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients: a prospective cohort study

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    Tong Peter CY

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dyslipidaemia is an important but modifiable risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD in type 2 diabetes. Yet, the effectiveness of lipid regulating drugs in Asians is lacking. We examined the effects of lipid control and treatment with lipid regulating drugs on new onset of CVD in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods In this prospective cohort consisting of 4521 type 2 diabetic patients without history of CVD and naïve for lipid regulating treatment recruited consecutively from 1996 to 2005, 371 developed CVD after a median follow-up of 4.9 years. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to obtain the hazard ratios (HR of lipids and use of lipid regulating drugs for risk of CVD. Results The multivariate-adjusted HR (95% confidence interval of CVD in patients with high LDL-cholesterol (≥ 3.0 mmol/L was 1.36 (1.08 - 1.71, compared with lower values. Using the whole range value of HDL-cholesterol, the risk of CVD was reduced by 41% with every 1 mmol/L increase in HDL-cholesterol. Plasma triglyceride did not predict CVD. Statins use was associated with lower CVD risk [HR = 0.66 (0.50 - 0.88]. In sub-cohort analysis, statins use was associated with a HR of 0.60 (0.44 - 0.82 in patients with high LDL-cholesterol (≥ 3.0 mmol/L and 0.49 (0.28 - 0.88 in patients with low HDL-cholesterol. In patients with LDL-cholesterol Conclusions In Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, high LDL-cholesterol and low HDL-cholesterol predicted incident CVD. Overall, patients treated with statins had 40-50% risk reduction in CVD compared to non-users.

  19. Relationship between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels and retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabataş, Emrah Utku; Dinlen, Nurdan Fettah; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Dilli, Dilek; Beken, Serdar; Okumuş, Nurullah

    2017-11-01

    Aim To evaluate the relationship between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D, 25 (OH) D, levels and retinopathy of prematurity. Methods and Results Serum 25 (OH) D levels were measured in 97 very low birth weight infants, prior to vitamin D supplementation. The development of retinopathy of prematurity and its treatment requirement were evaluated. At follow-up, retinopathy of prematurity developed in 71 (73.2%) infants. Serum 25 (OH) D levels were significantly lower in infants with retinopathy of prematurity than ones without retinopathy of prematurity ( P prematurity development [OR: 1.14, 95% CI (1.02-1.27), P = 0.02]. Conclusion Lower 25 (OH) D levels in the first days of life may be related to retinopathy of prematurity development and treatment requirement in premature infants.

  20. Methotrexate treatment may prevent uveitis onset in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: experiences and subgroup analysis in a cohort with frequent methotrexate use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostik, Mikhail M; Gaidar, Ekaterina V; Hynnes, Alla Y; Dubko, Margarita F; Masalova, Vera V; Snegireva, Ludmil S; Chikova, Irina A; Isupova, Eugenia A; Nikitina, Tatiana N; Serogodskaya, Elena D; Kalashnikova, Olga V; Ravelli, Angelo; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav G

    2016-01-01

    To re-evaluate the ability of methotrexate (MTX) to prevent the onset of uveitis in Russian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The clinical charts for all consecutive patients who received a stable management for at least 2 years with or without MTX were reviewed. Patients who were given systemic medications other than MTX (except NSAID) and patients with systemic arthritis, rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, or enthesitis-related arthritis were excluded. Each patient was examined after at least a 2-year follow-up period after the first visit to establish whether uveitis had occurred. A total of 281 patients with a median disease duration of 3.8 years were included. 191 patients (68%) were treated with MTX. During the observation period, 64 patients (22.8%) developed uveitis, a median of 1.6 year after disease onset. The frequency of uveitis was lower in MTX-treated than in MTX-untreated patients (11.5% vs. 46.7%, respectively, OR=6.7 (95%CI:3.7-12.3), p=0.0000001). Survival analysis confirmed that patients treated with MTX had a lower probability of developing uveitis (HR=4.35, p=0.000001). In subgroup analysis it was shown that MTX was more preventive in boys than in girls, and in patients with JIA onset age of over 5 years compared to those with disease onset less than 5 years. The data of survival analysis of MTX prevention has shown that benefits do not depend on the number of active joints and ANA status. MTX therapy may prevent the onset of uveitis in children with JIA. Further randomised controlled trials are required to confirm our results.

  1. Prevention of disease progression by cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction: insights from the European cohort of the REVERSE (Resynchronization Reverses Remodeling in Systolic Left Ventricular Dysfunction) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daubert, Claude; Gold, Michael R; Abraham, William T

    2009-01-01

    were decreased in this patient population in New York Heart Association functional classes I or II. These observations suggest that CRT prevents the progression of disease in patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic LV dysfunction. (REsynchronization reVErses Remodeling in Systolic Left v......OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in the European cohort of patients enrolled in the REVERSE (Resynchronization Reverses Remodeling in Systolic Left Ventricular Dysfunction) trial. BACKGROUND: Previous data suggest...... that CRT slows disease progression and improves the outcomes of asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a wide QRS complex. METHODS: We randomly assigned 262 recipients of CRT pacemakers or defibrillators, with QRS > or =120 ms and LV ejection fraction...

  2. Correlation between glycemic excursion by CGMS and diabetic retinopathy among Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Li; Ji Ning; Zhu Wei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate correlation between glycemic excursion by CGMS and diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Used continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) to monitoring glycemic excursion within a day of twenty four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and inspect fundus photography, correlation was analyzed. Results: Glycemic excursion might reveal the risk for diabetic retinopathy better than HbA1c does. Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy may correlate with glycemic excursion. (authors)

  3. Diabetic Retinopathy Is Associated With Elevated Serum Asymmetric and Symmetric Dimethylarginines

    OpenAIRE

    Abhary, Sotoodeh; Kasmeridis, Nicholas; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kuot, Abraham; Whiting, Malcolm J.; Yew, Wai Ping; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Craig, Jamie E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), and l-arginine directly influence nitric oxide production. Our objective was to test whether serum ADMA, SDMA, or l-arginine levels correlate with diabetic retinopathy subtype or severity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 162 subjects with type 1 diabetes and 343 with type 2 diabetes, of whom 329 subjects had no diabetic retinopathy, 27 had nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), 101 had proliferative...

  4. Retinopathy after low dose irradiation for an intracranial tumor of the frontal lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaas, T.; Thorud, E.; Jetne, V.; Conradi, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    A 32-year-old man underwent an operation for an oligodendroglioma of the left frontal lobe. Postoperatively he was irradiated to a target dose of 54 Gy. One year later hedeveloped bilateral retinopathy quite similar to diabetic retinopathy. There were no clinical or biochemical signs of diabetes or hematological disease. The calcultated maximum dose to the retina was 11 Gy. This is to our knowledge the lowest retinal dose of ionizing radiation reported to produce retinopathy. (author)

  5. The immediate eff ect of the Same-Sex Marriage Prohibition Act on stigma, discrimination, and engagement on HIV prevention and treatment services in men who have sex with men in Nigeria: analysis of prospective data from the TRUST cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Nowak, Rebecca G; Orazulike, Ifeanyi; Keshinro, Babajide; Ake, Julie; Kennedy, Sara; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Blattner, William A; Charurat, Manhattan E; Baral, Stefan D

    2015-07-01

    In January, 2014, the Same-Sex Marriage Prohibition Act was signed into law in Nigeria, further criminalising same-sex sexual relationships. We aimed to assess the immediate effect of this prohibition act on stigma, discrimination, and engagement in HIV prevention and treatment services in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Nigeria. The TRUST cohort study uses respondent-driven sampling to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of engagement of MSM in HIV prevention and treatment services at a clinical site located with a community-based organisation trusted by the MSM community. TRUST is a prospective implementation research cohort of MSM (≥16 years) in Abuja, Nigeria. We compared HIV clinical outcomes and stigma, including fear and avoidance of health care, across baseline and quarterly visits before and after implementation of the the Same-Sex Marriage Prohibition Act. Outcomes assessed were measures of stigma and discrimination, loss to follow-up, antiretroviral therapy status, and viral load. We compared outcomes before and after the legislation with χ2 statistics, and estimated incident stigma-related events and loss to follow-up with Poisson regression. Between March 19, 2013, and Aug 7, 2014, 707 MSM participated in baseline study procedures, contributing to 756 before legislation (prelaw) and 420 after legislation (postlaw) visits. Reported history of fear of seeking health care was significantly higher in postlaw visits than in prelaw visits (n=161 [38%] vs n=187 [25%]; psex practices. The negative effects of HIV treatment and care in MSM reinforce the unintended consequences of such legislation on global goals of HIV eradication. Strategies to reach MSM less likely to engage in HIV testing and care in highly stigmatised environments are needed to reduce time to HIV diagnosis and treatment. National Institutes of Health.

  6. Demographic features and visual outcomes of patients presenting to diabetic photo-screening and treated for sight threatening retinopathy in Fiji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyaz Bhikoo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe the demographic features and visual outcomes of patients presenting to photo-screening services, and treated for sight threatening retinopathy (STR in a low resource setting, Fiji. METHODS: A retrospective review of all new patients who presented for diabetic photo-screening at the Diabetic Eye Clinic, Suva in 2010. Fundus images were graded using standardised guidelines. Patient demographics, retinopathy grading and visual acuity data were extracted from the database and analyzed. Patients that received laser therapy and still attending follow up in 2012 were examined for disease progression RESULTS: Totally 2236 patients were photo-screened, 87% (3870/4472 of images were gradable. STR was observed in 26% (988/3870 with advanced STR (proliferative retinopathy/severe maculopathy in 10% (385/3870. Of those with STR, 59% had BCVA ≥6/18, 31% with advanced STR were <6/60. Male gender [odds ratio (OR 1.59; 1.20-2.12], history of hypertension (OR 1.36; 1.03-1.80 and peripheral neuropathy (OR 1.41; 1.01-1.95 were predictive of advanced STR. In 2012, 32% (315/988 attended follow up with 69% exhibiting advanced STR compared with 53% of the same cohort in 2010. Laser photocoagulation was administered to 212 eyes (212/3870, 5% with retinopathy and maculopathy progression observed in 52% and 33% respectively. BCVA ≥6/18 was noted in 67% (143/212 of treated eyes. Improved glycaemic control (OR 46.52; 1.50-1441.90 amongst those with advanced STR was predictive of eyes that maintained good vision. CONCLUSION: In Fiji, a quarter of new patients presenting to photo-screening have STR with a third of those with advanced STR having already loss vision. Improved glycaemic control and timely treatment of patients with sight threatening complications is important in halting disease progression.