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Sample records for restraint sensor feasibility

  1. Anticipatory precrash restraint sensor feasibility study: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B.

    1995-08-01

    This report explores feasibility of an anticipatory precrash restraint sensor. The foundation principle is the anticipation mechanism found at a primitive level of biological intelligence and originally formalized by the mathematical biologist Robert Rosen. A system based on formal anticipatory principles should significantly outperform conventional technologies. It offers the prospect of high payoff in prevention of death and injury. Sensors and processes are available to provide a good, fast, and inexpensive description of the present dynamical state of the vehicle to the embedded system model in the anticipation engine. The experimental part of this study found that inexpensive radar in a real-world setting does return useful data on target dynamics. The data produced by a radar system can be converted to target dynamical information by good, fast and inexpensive signal-processing techniques. Not only is the anticipatory sensor feasible, but further development under the sponsorship of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is necessary and desirable. There are a number of possible lines of follow-on investigation. The level of effort and expected benefits of various alternatives are discussed.

  2. Feasibility of an anticipatory noncontact precrash restraint actuation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Div.

    1995-12-31

    The problem of providing an electronic warning of an impending crash to a precrash restraint system a fraction of a second before physical contact differs from more widely explored problems, such as providing several seconds of crash warning to a driver. One approach to precrash restraint sensing is to apply anticipatory system theory. This consists of nested simplified models of the system to be controlled and of the system`s environment. It requires sensory information to describe the ``current state`` of the system and the environment. The models use the sensory data to make a faster-than-real-time prediction about the near future. Anticipation theory is well founded but rarely used. A major problem is to extract real-time current-state information from inexpensive sensors. Providing current-state information to the nested models is the weakest element of the system. Therefore, sensors and real-time processing of sensor signals command the most attention in an assessment of system feasibility. This paper describes problem definition, potential ``showstoppers,`` and ways to overcome them. It includes experiments showing that inexpensive radar is a practical sensing element. It considers fast and inexpensive algorithms to extract information from sensor data.

  3. Feasibility of Magnetostrictive Sensor Inspection of Containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwun, H.

    1999-03-01

    This report describes the results of a study on the feasibility of using guided waves for long-range global inspection of containment metallic pressure boundaries (i.e., steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments) in nuclear power plants. Of particular concern in this study was the potential of the guided-wave approach for remotely inspecting the regions that are inaccessible; for example, regions where the metallic pressure boundary is backed by concrete on one or both sides. The study includes a literature review on long-range guided-wave inspection techniques, a modeling study of the behavior of guided waves in plates with different boundary conditions (e.g., freestanding and backed by concrete on one or both sides), and an experimental investigation of the feasibility of a guided-wave technique called ''magnetostrictive sensor (MsS)'' for (1) generating and detecting guided waves in plates and (2) detecting a defect over a long range. Results of the study showed (1) that it is feasible to achieve long-range global inspection of plates, including regions that are inaccessible, using low-frequency guided waves and (2) that the MsS technique is well suited for this application. Recommendations are made to further test and develop the MsS technique for practical implementation for containment inspection in nuclear power plants.

  4. Feasibility study of patient motion monitoring using tactile array sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate patient pretreatment set-up error and intra-fraction motion using the tactile array sensors (Pressure Profile Systems Inc, Los Angeles, CA) which could measure distributed pressure profiles along the contacting surface and to check a feasibility of the sensor (tactile array sensor) in the patient motion monitoring. Laser alignment and optical camera based monitoring system are very useful for reduce patient set-up error but these systems could not monitor the blind area like patient's back position. Actually after patient alignment using laser or optical monitoring system, it was assumed that there is no error in the patient's back position (pressure profile distribution). But if an error occurs in the patient's back position, it will affect the radiation therapy accuracy. In spite of optical motion monitoring or using the immobilization tool, distributed pressure profiles of patient's back position was changed during inter and intra-fraction. For more accurate patient set-up, blind area (patient's back) monitoring was necessary. We expect that the proposed method will be very useful for make up for the weakness of optical monitoring method.

  5. Feasibility of structural monitoring with vibration powered sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvin, Niell G.; Lajnef, Nizar; Elvin, Alex A.

    2006-08-01

    Wireless sensors and sensor networks are beginning to be used to monitor structures. In general, the longevity, and hence the efficacy, of these sensors are severely limited by their stored power. The ability to convert abundant ambient energy into electric power would eliminate the problem of drained electrical supply, and would allow indefinite monitoring. This paper focuses on vibration in civil engineering structures as a source of ambient energy; the key question is can sufficient energy be produced from vibrations? Earthquake, wind and traffic loads are used as realistic sources of vibration. The theoretical maximum energy levels that can be extracted from these dynamic loads are computed. The same dynamic loads are applied to a piezoelectric generator; the energy is measured experimentally and computed using a mathematical model. The collected energy levels are compared to the energy requirements of various electronic subsystems in a wireless sensor. For a 5 cm3 sensor node (the volume of a typical concrete stone), it is found that only extreme events such as earthquakes can provide sufficient energy to power wireless sensors consisting of modern electronic chips. The results show that the optimal generated electrical power increases approximately linearly with increasing sensor mass. With current technology, it would be possible to self-power a sensor node with a mass between 100 and 1000 g for a bridge under traffic load. Lowering the energy consumption of electronic components is an ongoing research effort. It is likely that, as electronics becomes more efficient in the future, it will be possible to power a wireless sensor node by harvesting vibrations from a volume generator smaller than 5 cm3.

  6. Feasibility Study on Advanced Solid-State Oxygen Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    characteristics of the Bosch Lambda-sensor, and Table 2 shows the most important requirements of the sensor and its limits of operating conditions...ZnO (solid): -83.17 kcal/mole corresponding to -3.61 eV/ZnO-molecules in lattice Lattice energy 965 kcal/mole (from the Born- Haber cycle) Specific heat...Measurements on galvanic cells involving solid electrolytes. J Electrochem Soc 104:379-387 (1957). 23. Dueker, H., et al. Ceramic aspects of the Bosch

  7. Development of a radiochemical sensor. Part I: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Facultat de Belles Arts, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Pau Gargallo 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@apolo.qui.ub.es; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-05-04

    The evolution of nuclear activities and criteria for radiation protection have led to a continuous increase in measures to monitor and control the environment and therefore in the number of determinations required for such purposes. Classical analytical procedures are time-consuming, labor-intense and generate a large amount of waste. The alternative use of sensors for such determinations has seen very limited development. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the behavior of a prototype radiochemical sensor for liquid effluents. The sensor is based on a receptor made of a plastic scintillator and is capable of continuous, on-time and accurate remote quantification of the activity of alpha, beta and beta-gamma emitters. Low-level active solutions of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co in matrices of groundwater, seawater and drinking water were quantified with prediction errors lower than 10% in most cases. The study also yields information about light generation and transmission and transductor configuration that will be useful in the design of future versions of this sensor.

  8. Use of restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restraint devices ... Restraints may be used to keep a person in proper position and prevent movement or falling during surgery or while on a stretcher. Restraints can also be used to control or prevent ...

  9. Advanced MR moisture sensor market feasibility analysis. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This paper briefly documents activities, background information, and results of marketing studies on the Magnetic Resonance Advanced Moisture Sensor (AMS). The main goals of the study are to identify industrial uses to guide development efforts, to become familiar with the industrial and magnetic resonance research capabilities/resources at the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and to develop a summary data sheet describing the AMS product for use with a broad mail survey of potential users. The studies are being performed through an alliance of Quantum Magnetics, US DOE, SwRI, The Townsend Agency, and PAI Partners. Efforts are being focused on NIR, Raman, and other optical spectroscopies as process measurement tools for onstream applications. Domestic and world markets for process analytical instrumentation, process moisture instrumentation, and nuclear magnetic resonance instrumentation are summarized. Three applications are identified as the most promising for magnetic resonance instrumentation: (1) polymer production, (2) pharmaceuticals preparation, and (3) prepared food processing. It is estimated that the process magnetic resonance market could reach $5 to $10 million annually by the end of this decade.

  10. Feasibility Study on Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor for Under-Sodium Visualization of Sodium Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young-Sang; Park, Chang-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Han; Lim, Sa-Hoe

    2008-01-15

    The reactor core and internal structures of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) can not be visually examined due to the opaque sodium. The examination of the internal structures is possible by using ultrasonics to penetrate the sodium. The under-sodium viewing technique using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the in-service inspection of the reactor internals. Immersion sensors and waveguide sensors have been utilized for the under-sodium viewing application. The immersion sensor has a precise imaging capability, but may have high temperature restrictions and an uncertain life. The waveguide sensor can operate in a hostile environment, such as liquid metal at a high temperature in the presence of high radiation. The waveguide sensor has the advantages of simplicity and reliability, but limits in its movement. A new plate-type waveguide sensor has been developed to overcome the limitations of previous waveguide sensors. And a novel ultrasonic technique has been suggested. The technique is capable of steering a radiation beam of a waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement of the waveguide sensor. The control of the radiation beam angle can be achieved by a frequency tuning method of the excitation pulse in the dispersive low frequency range of the A{sub 0} Lamb wave. A waveguide sensor assembly has been designed for the actual application of undersodium visual inspection in sodium-cooled fast reactor. The main purpose of this study is achievement of feasibility of ultrasonic waveguide sensor technology to the application of undersodium viewing. Under-water C-scan imaging test was carried out by using 10 m long waveguide sensor assembly. It was confirmed that the test target could be clearly visualized and the resolution of C-scan image could be less than 2 mm.

  11. Investigation of the feasibility of non-invasive optical sensors for the quantitative assessment of dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Cobus; Kieser, Eduard; Dellimore, Kiran; van den Heever, Dawie; Smith, Johan

    2017-10-01

    This study explores the feasibility of prospectively assessing infant dehydration using four non-invasive, optical sensors based on the quantitative and objective measurement of various clinical markers of dehydration. The sensors were investigated to objectively and unobtrusively assess the hydration state of an infant based on the quantification of capillary refill time (CRT), skin recoil time (SRT), skin temperature profile (STP) and skin tissue hydration by means of infrared spectrometry (ISP). To evaluate the performance of the sensors a clinical study was conducted on a cohort of 10 infants (aged 6-36 months) with acute gastroenteritis. High sensitivity and specificity were exhibited by the sensors, in particular the STP and SRT sensors, when combined into a fusion regression model (sensitivity: 0.90, specificity: 0.78). The SRT and STP sensors and the fusion model all outperformed the commonly used "gold standard" clinical dehydration scales including the Gorelick scale (sensitivity: 0.56, specificity: 0.56), CDS scale (sensitivity: 1.0, specificity: 0.2) and WHO scale (sensitivity: 0.13, specificity: 0.79). These results suggest that objective and quantitative assessment of infant dehydration may be possible using the sensors investigated. However, further evaluation of the sensors on a larger sample population is needed before deploying them in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Brendtke

    Full Text Available Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis--hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring.

  13. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendtke, Rico; Wiehl, Michael; Groeber, Florian; Schwarz, Thomas; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis--hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring.

  14. Mechanical restraint in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jesper; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Sestoft, Dorte Maria

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine how potential mechanical restraint preventive factors in hospitals are associated with the frequency of mechanical restraint episodes. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study employed a retrospective association design, and linear regression was used to assess the associations. FINDING...

  15. Feasibility of Fiber Bragg Grating and Long-Period Fiber Grating Sensors under Different Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Neng Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the feasibility of utilizing fiber Bragg grating (FBG and long-period fiber grating (LPFG sensors for nondestructive evaluation (NDE of infrastructures using Portland cement concretes and asphalt mixtures for temperature, strain, and liquid-level monitoring. The use of hybrid FBG and LPFG sensors is aimed at utilizing the advantages of two kinds of fiber grating to implement NDE for monitoring strains or displacements, temperatures, and water-levels of infrastructures such as bridges, pavements, or reservoirs for under different environmental conditions. Temperature fluctuation and stability tests were examined using FBG and LPFG sensors bonded on the surface of asphalt and concrete specimens. Random walk coefficient (RWC and bias stability (BS were used for the first time to indicate the stability performance of fiber grating sensors. The random walk coefficients of temperature variations between FBG (or LPFG sensor and a thermocouple were found in the range of −0.7499 °C/ to −1.3548 °C/. In addition, the bias stability for temperature variations, during the fluctuation and stability tests with FBG (or LPFG sensors were within the range of 0.01 °C/h with a 15–18 h time cluster to 0.09 °C/h with a 3–4 h time cluster. This shows that the performance of FBG or LPFG sensors is comparable with that of conventional high-resolution thermocouple sensors under rugged conditions. The strain measurement for infrastructure materials was conducted using a packaged FBG sensor bonded on the surface of an asphalt specimen under indirect tensile loading conditions. A finite element modeling (FEM was applied to compare experimental results of indirect tensile FBG strain measurements. For a comparative analysis between experiment and simulation, the FEM numerical results agreed with those from FBG strain measurements. The results of the liquid-level sensing tests show the LPFG-based sensor could discriminate five stationary liquid

  16. Detection of driver drowsiness using wearable devices: A feasibility study of the proximity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jibo; Choi, William; Yang, Yan; Lu, Junshi; Wu, Xiaohui; Peng, Kaiping

    2017-11-01

    Drowsiness is one of the major factors that cause crashes in the transportation industry. Drowsiness detection systems can alert drowsy operators and potentially reduce the risk of crashes. In this study, a Google-Glass-based drowsiness detection system was developed and validated. The proximity sensor of Google Glass was used to monitor eye blink frequency. A simulated driving study was carried out to validate the system. Driving performance and eye blinks were compared between the two states of alertness and drowsiness while driving. Drowsy drivers increased frequency of eye blinks, produced longer braking response time and increased lane deviation, compared to when they were alert. A threshold algorithm for proximity sensor can reliably detect eye blinks and proved the feasibility of using Google Glass to detect operator drowsiness. This technology provides a new platform to detect operator drowsiness and has the potential to reduce drowsiness-related crashes in driving and aviation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SSME leak detection feasibility investigation by utilization of infrared sensor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohadaee, Ahmad A.; Crawford, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation examined the potential of using state-of-the-art technology of infrared (IR) thermal imaging systems combined with computer, digital image processing and expert systems for Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) propellant path peak detection as an early warning system of imminent engine failure. A low-cost, laboratory experiment was devised and an experimental approach was established. The system was installed, checked out, and data were successfully acquired demonstrating the proof-of-concept. The conclusion from this investigation is that both numerical and experimental results indicate that the leak detection by using infrared sensor technology proved to be feasible for a rocket engine health monitoring system.

  18. Feasibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bokdam, J.; Braeckel, van, Liesbeth

    2002-01-01

    Extensive livestock farming, including hay making, seems the most feasible management strategy for open peatland. In the longer term, wilderness grazing may become more feasible. The loss of economic viability of traditional livestock farming and related haymaking may be reversed by innovation of new marketable 'Biebrza' products, 'green services', e.g. eco- and agro-tourism, and by financial subventions by the EU and the Polish Government. Large scale mechanical harvesting of hay and litter ...

  19. Feasibility of three wearable sensors for 24 hour monitoring in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Jennifer; Ehlers, Diane K; Kurka, Jonathan; Ainsworth, Barbara; Buman, Matthew

    2015-07-30

    The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of three widely used wearable sensors in research settings for 24 h monitoring of sleep, sedentary, and active behaviors in middle-aged women. Participants were 21 inactive, overweight (M Body Mass Index (BMI) = 29.27 ± 7.43) women, 30 to 64 years (M = 45.31 ± 9.67). Women were instructed to wear each sensor on the non-dominant hip (ActiGraph GT3X+), wrist (GENEActiv), or upper arm (BodyMedia SenseWear Mini) for 24 h/day and record daily wake and bed times for one week over the course of three consecutive weeks. Women received feedback about their daily physical activity and sleep behaviors. Feasibility (i.e., acceptability and demand) was measured using surveys, interviews, and wear time. Women felt the GENEActiv (94.7%) and SenseWear Mini (90.0%) were easier to wear and preferred the placement (68.4, 80% respectively) as compared to the ActiGraph (42.9, 47.6% respectively). Mean wear time on valid days was similar across sensors (ActiGraph: M = 918.8 ± 115.0 min; GENEActiv: M = 949.3 ± 86.6; SenseWear: M = 928.0 ± 101.8) and well above other studies using wake time only protocols. Informational feedback was the biggest motivator, while appearance, comfort, and inconvenience were the biggest barriers to wearing sensors. Wear time was valid on 93.9% (ActiGraph), 100 % (GENEActiv), and 95.2% (SenseWear) of eligible days. 61.9, 95.2, and 71.4% of participants had seven valid days of data for the ActiGraph, GENEActiv, and SenseWear, respectively. Twenty-four hour monitoring over seven consecutive days is a feasible approach in middle-aged women. Researchers should consider participant acceptability and demand, in addition to validity and reliability, when choosing a wearable sensor. More research is needed across populations and study designs.

  20. On the Feasibility of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks over IEEE 802.15.5 Mesh Topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Losilla, Fernando; Rodenas-Herraiz, David; Cruz-Martinez, Felipe; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe

    2016-05-05

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are a special type of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) where large amounts of multimedia data are transmitted over networks composed of low power devices. Hierarchical routing protocols typically used in WSNs for multi-path communication tend to overload nodes located within radio communication range of the data collection unit or data sink. The battery life of these nodes is therefore reduced considerably, requiring frequent battery replacement work to extend the operational life of the WSN system. In a wireless sensor network with mesh topology, any node may act as a forwarder node, thereby enabling multiple routing paths toward any other node or collection unit. In addition, mesh topologies have proven advantages, such as data transmission reliability, network robustness against node failures, and potential reduction in energy consumption. This work studies the feasibility of implementing WMSNs in mesh topologies and their limitations by means of exhaustive computer simulation experiments. To this end, a module developed for the Synchronous Energy Saving (SES) mode of the IEEE 802.15.5 mesh standard has been integrated with multimedia tools to thoroughly test video sequences encoded using H.264 in mesh networks.

  1. Feasibility Study of Micro-Wind Turbines for Powering Wireless Sensors on a Cable-Stayed Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billie F. Spencer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the feasibility of using micro-wind turbines to power wireless sensors on a cable-stayed bridge is comprehensively investigated. To this end, the wind environment around a bridge onto which a turbine is installed is examined, as is the power consumption of a wireless sensor. Feasible alternators and rotors are then carefully selected to make an effective small wind generator (known as a micro-wind turbine. Using the three specially selected micro-wind turbines, a series of experiments was conducted to find the turbine best able to generate the largest amount of power. Finally, a horizontal-axis micro-wind turbine with a six-blade rotor was combined with a wireless sensor to validate experimentally its actual power-charging capability. It is demonstrated that the micro-wind turbine can generate sufficient electricity to power a wireless sensor under moderate wind conditions.

  2. Feasibility Study of Micro-Wind Turbines for Powering Wireless Sensors on a Cable-Stayed Bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, Billie F.; Hongki Jo; Hyung-Jo Jung; Jong-Woong Park

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using micro-wind turbines to power wireless sensors on a cable-stayed bridge is comprehensively investigated. To this end, the wind environment around a bridge onto which a turbine is installed is examined, as is the power consumption of a wireless sensor. Feasible alternators and rotors are then carefully selected to make an effective small wind generator (known as a micro-wind turbine). Using the three specially selected micro-wind turbines, a series of exp...

  3. Full body restraint system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Susan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A body restraint system (30) allows the user's body (10) to be in the zero gravity neutral posture. The system (30) includes a waist restraint (32) in the form of a curved, padded unit (34) containing a retractable belt (36) coiled on a spring loaded capstan (38) with a buckle (40) extending from front (42) of the unit (34). A second belt (44) is fastened around the user's waist (16). A clasp (46) is configured to engage the buckle (40). The waist restraint (32) is positioned near foot restraints (52). The foot restraints (52) have foot platforms (59) with pads (60) of a suitable two part attaching material, such as the fasteners available from Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company under the trademark Scotchmate Duallock. A mating pad (62) of the material is provided on soles (64) of cotton net shoes (66).

  4. Feasibility analysis of an epidermal glucose sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of using an embedded time-resolved fluorescence sensor for monitoring glucose concentration. Skin is modeled as a multilayer medium with each layer having its own optical properties and fluorophore absorption coefficients, lifetimes, and quantum yields obtained from the literature. It is assumed that the two main fluorophores contributing to the fluorescence at these excitation and emission wavelengths are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)H and collagen. The intensity distributions of excitation and fluorescent light in skin are determined by solving the transient radiative transfer equation by using the modified method of characteristics. The fluorophore lifetimes are then recovered from the simulated fluorescence decays and compared with the actual lifetimes used in the simulations. Furthermore, the effect of adding Poissonian noise to the simulated decays on recovering the lifetimes was studied. For all cases, it was found that the fluorescence lifetime of NADH could not be recovered because of its negligible contribution to the overall fluorescence signal. The other lifetimes could be recovered to within 1.3% of input values. Finally, the glucose concentrations within the skin were recovered to within 13.5% of their actual values, indicating a possibility of measuring glucose concentrations by using a time-resolved fluorescence sensor.

  5. SU-D-BRA-01: Feasibility Study for Swallowing Prediction Using Pressure Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, M; Kim, T; Kim, D; Kang, S; Kim, K; Shin, D; Noh, Y; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a swallowing prediction system (SPS) using force sensing sensors and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: The SPS developed consists of force sensing sensor units, a thermoplastic mask, a signal transport device and a control PC installed with an in-house software. The SPS is designed to predict the pharyngeal stage of swallowing because it is known that internal organ movement occurs in pharyngeal stage. To detect prediction signal in the SPS, the force sensing sensor units were attached on both the submental muscle region and thyroid cartilage region of the thermoplastic mask. While the signal from the thyroid cartilage region informs the action of swallowing, the signal from the submental muscle region is utilized as a precursor for swallowing. Since the duration of swallowing is relatively short, using such precursor (or warning) signals for machine control is considered more beneficial. A volunteer study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the system. In this volunteer study, we intended to verify that the system could predict the pharyngeal stage of the swallowing. We measured time gaps between obtaining the warning signals in the SPS and starting points of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing. Results: The measured data was examined whether the time gaps were in reasonable order to be easily utilized. The mean and standard deviation values of these time gaps were 0.550 s ± 0.183 s. in 8 volunteers. Conclusion: The proposed method was able to predict the on-set of swallowing of human subjects inside the thermoplastic mask, which has never been possible with other monitoring systems such as camera-based monitoring system. With the prediction ability of swallowing incorporated into the machine control mechanism (in the future), beam delivery can be controlled to skip swallowing periods and significant dosimetric gain is expected in head & neck cancer treatments. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2015M

  6. Feasibility study of using smart aggregates as embedded acoustic emission sensors for health monitoring of concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijie; Kong, Qingzhao; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Lim, Ing; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a nondestructive evaluation technique that is capable of monitoring the damage evolution of concrete structures in real time. Conventionally, AE sensors are surface mounted on the host structures, however, the AE signals attenuate quickly due to the high attenuation properties of concrete structures. This study conducts a feasibility study of using smart aggregates (SAs), which are a type of embedded piezoceramic transducers, as embedded AE sensors for the health monitoring of concrete structures. A plain concrete beam with two surface mounted AE sensors and two embedded SAs was fabricated in laboratory and loaded under a designed three-point-bending test. The performance of embedded SAs were compared with the traditional surface mounted AE sensors in their ability to detect and evaluate the damage to the concrete structure. The results verified the feasibility of using smart aggregates as embedded AE sensors for monitoring structural damage in concrete. Potentially, the low cost smart aggregates could function as embedded AE sensors, providing great sensitivity and high reliability in applications for the structural health monitoring of concrete structures.

  7. Prehensile Foot Restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willits, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed prehensile foot restraint enables such workers as astronauts and divers to maintain fixed positions in zero gravity or in buoyancy with minimal effort. With foot restraint worker devotes attention fully to task at hand, with little concern about holding on to supporting structure. Claw near toe of shoe grips rail. Wearer uses flexible shaft, first to lock claw tightly on bar; then, when work is done, to open claw. Underwater or in space, device boosts productivity.

  8. Exploring the feasibility and acceptability of sensor monitoring of gait and falls in the homes of persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Pamela; Wagner, Joanne M; Salter, Amber; Thomas, Florian P; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2016-09-01

    Gait parameters variability and falls are problems for persons with MS and have not been adequately captured in the home. Our goal was to explore the feasibility and acceptability of monitoring of gait and falls in the homes of persons with MS over a period of 30 days. To test the feasibility of measuring gait and falls for 30days in the home of persons with MS, spatiotemporal gait parameters stride length, stride time, and gait speed were compared. A 3D infrared depth imaging system has been developed to objectively measure gait and falls in the home environment. Participants also completed a 16-foot GaitRite electronic pathway walk to validate spatiotemporal parameters of gait (gait speed (cm/s), stride length (cm), and gait cycle time(s)) during the timed 25 foot walking test (T25FWT). We also documented barriers to feasibility of installing the in-home sensors for these participants. The results of the study suggest that the Kinect sensor may be used as an alternative device to measure gait for persons with MS, depending on the desired accuracy level. Ultimately, using in-home sensors to analyze gait parameters in real time is feasible and could lead to better analysis of gait in persons with MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Economic Feasibility of Wireless Sensor Network-Based Service Provision in a Duopoly Setting with a Monopolist Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Sanchis-Cano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the feasibility of providing Wireless Sensor Network-data-based services in an Internet of Things scenario from an economical point of view. The scenario has two competing service providers with their own private sensor networks, a network operator and final users. The scenario is analyzed as two games using game theory. In the first game, sensors decide to subscribe or not to the network operator to upload the collected sensing-data, based on a utility function related to the mean service time and the price charged by the operator. In the second game, users decide to subscribe or not to the sensor-data-based service of the service providers based on a Logit discrete choice model related to the quality of the data collected and the subscription price. The sinks and users subscription stages are analyzed using population games and discrete choice models, while network operator and service providers pricing stages are analyzed using optimization and Nash equilibrium concepts respectively. The model is shown feasible from an economic point of view for all the actors if there are enough interested final users and opens the possibility of developing more efficient models with different types of services.

  10. Economic Feasibility of Wireless Sensor Network-Based Service Provision in a Duopoly Setting with a Monopolist Operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Cano, Angel; Romero, Julián; Sacoto-Cabrera, Erwin J; Guijarro, Luis

    2017-11-25

    We analyze the feasibility of providing Wireless Sensor Network-data-based services in an Internet of Things scenario from an economical point of view. The scenario has two competing service providers with their own private sensor networks, a network operator and final users. The scenario is analyzed as two games using game theory. In the first game, sensors decide to subscribe or not to the network operator to upload the collected sensing-data, based on a utility function related to the mean service time and the price charged by the operator. In the second game, users decide to subscribe or not to the sensor-data-based service of the service providers based on a Logit discrete choice model related to the quality of the data collected and the subscription price. The sinks and users subscription stages are analyzed using population games and discrete choice models, while network operator and service providers pricing stages are analyzed using optimization and Nash equilibrium concepts respectively. The model is shown feasible from an economic point of view for all the actors if there are enough interested final users and opens the possibility of developing more efficient models with different types of services.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging with planoconcave optical microresonator sensors: feasibility studies based on phantom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2017-03-01

    The planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) sensor provides high quality photoacoustic (PA) images but beam walk-off limits sensitivity and thus penetration depth to ≍1 cm. Planoconcave microresonator sensors eliminate beam walk-off enabling sensitivity to be increased by an order-of-magnitude whilst retaining the highly favourable frequency response and directional characteristics of the FP sensor. The first tomographic PA images obtained in a tissue-realistic phantom using the new sensors are described. These show that the microresonator sensors provide near identical image quality as the planar FP sensor but with significantly greater penetration depth (e.g. 2-3cm) due to their higher sensitivity. This offers the prospect of whole body small animal imaging and clinical imaging to depths previously unattainable using the FP planar sensor.

  12. Feasibility of fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov effect for detecting thermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-06-17

    In this research, we propose a novel method for detecting thermal neutrons with a fiber-optic radiation sensor using the Cerenkov effect. We fabricate a fiber-optic radiation sensor that detects thermal neutrons with a Gd-foil, a rutile crystal, and a plastic optical fiber. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation in the sensor probe of the fiber-optic radiation sensor and thermal neutron fluxes is determined using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code simulations. To evaluate the fiber-optic radiation sensor, the Cerenkov radiation generated in the fiber-optic radiation sensor by irradiation of pure thermal neutron beams is measured according to the depths of polyethylene.

  13. Component restraint system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John C.

    1983-05-24

    An object restraint system is provided with a collar for gripping the object and a plurality of struts attached to the collar and to anchor means by universal-type joints, the struts being arranged in tangential relation about the collar.

  14. Test of the Practicality and Feasibility of EDoF-Empowered Image Sensors for Long-Range Biometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsun Hsieh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For many practical applications of image sensors, how to extend the depth-of-field (DoF is an important research topic; if successfully implemented, it could be beneficial in various applications, from photography to biometrics. In this work, we want to examine the feasibility and practicability of a well-known “extended DoF” (EDoF technique, or “wavefront coding,” by building real-time long-range iris recognition and performing large-scale iris recognition. The key to the success of long-range iris recognition includes long DoF and image quality invariance toward various object distance, which is strict and harsh enough to test the practicality and feasibility of EDoF-empowered image sensors. Besides image sensor modification, we also explored the possibility of varying enrollment/testing pairs. With 512 iris images from 32 Asian people as the database, 400-mm focal length and F/6.3 optics over 3 m working distance, our results prove that a sophisticated coding design scheme plus homogeneous enrollment/testing setups can effectively overcome the blurring caused by phase modulation and omit Wiener-based restoration. In our experiments, which are based on 3328 iris images in total, the EDoF factor can achieve a result 3.71 times better than the original system without a loss of recognition accuracy.

  15. Simulation and Feasibility Study of Flow Sensor on Flexible Polymer for Healthcare Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Soumen

    2013-12-01

    Development of microfabrication technology, along with an ever-increasing demand for reliable, low-cost clinical healthcare has led to the realization of various BioMEMS devices. Present study aims at developing a flexible flow sensor on polymer substrate to monitor real-time blood flow and determine plague formation satisfying sensitivity, biocompatibility, and reliability requirements. Transient simulation of temperature and velocity profile of the thermal-anemometer-based sensor wrapped around the catheter has been studied. Initial fabrication of the sensor over polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer along with thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR) measurement and flow sensing over straight heater has also been performed. The simulation and fabrication works show promising results toward successful development of a flow sensor for effective healthcare delivery.

  16. Feasibility of approaches combining sensor and source features in brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minkyu; Hong, Jun Hee; Jun, Sung Chan

    2012-02-15

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) provides a new channel for communication between brain and computers through brain signals. Cost-effective EEG provides good temporal resolution, but its spatial resolution is poor and sensor information is blurred by inherent noise. To overcome these issues, spatial filtering and feature extraction techniques have been developed. Source imaging, transformation of sensor signals into the source space through source localizer, has gained attention as a new approach for BCI. It has been reported that the source imaging yields some improvement of BCI performance. However, there exists no thorough investigation on how source imaging information overlaps with, and is complementary to, sensor information. Information (visible information) from the source space may overlap as well as be exclusive to information from the sensor space is hypothesized. Therefore, we can extract more information from the sensor and source spaces if our hypothesis is true, thereby contributing to more accurate BCI systems. In this work, features from each space (sensor or source), and two strategies combining sensor and source features are assessed. The information distribution among the sensor, source, and combined spaces is discussed through a Venn diagram for 18 motor imagery datasets. Additional 5 motor imagery datasets from the BCI Competition III site were examined. The results showed that the addition of source information yielded about 3.8% classification improvement for 18 motor imagery datasets and showed an average accuracy of 75.56% for BCI Competition data. Our proposed approach is promising, and improved performance may be possible with better head model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Feasibility Study to Adapt the Microflown Vector Sensor for Underwater Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    In this thesis, the performance of the sensor in air at room temperature will first be evaluated. This will allow us to determine if the sensor is...was also determined. These measurements were all conducted in the anechoic chamber at NPS. B. THE TRANSFER FUNCTION 1. Method The method used to...smooth. This may be the result of reflections from the test setup or some airflow in the room . The amplitude of the transfer function from the

  18. Design of Energy Harvesting Technology: Feasibility for Low-Power Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    arranged in a Wheatstone bridge . By using high resistance strain gauges, a low supply voltage, and a very brief sample pulse, the power draw can be...sensor node and the specific application of monitoring the fatigue life of highway bridges , with a target operational life of ten years for the sensor...solar, wind, bridges , highways, transportation 1. INTRODUCTION Power requirements can often be the limiting factor in designing for a product’s

  19. Temperature Sensor Feasibility Study of Wireless Sensor Network Applications for Heating Efficiency Maintenance in High-Rise Apartment Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freliha B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cities are responsible for 60%-80% of the world’s energy use and for approximately the same percentage of greenhouse gas emissions. The existing multi-apartment buildings of multifamily housing sector are often energy inefficient, and the heating system does not ensure optimization of heat distribution of individual apartments. Heat distribution, heating system balancing, heat loss detection and calculation, individual heat energy accounting are difficult tasks to accomplish. This article deals with the temperature monitoring system designed to retrieve temperature differences necessary for overall building heat monitoring and individual apartment monitoring. The sensor testing case study process and its measurements are analysed.

  20. 42 CFR 460.114 - Restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restraints. 460.114 Section 460.114 Public Health...) Participant Rights § 460.114 Restraints. (a) The PACE organization must limit use of restraints to the least restrictive and most effective method available. The term restraint includes either a physical restraint or a...

  1. Feasibility Study of Sensor Aided Impact Acoustic Sorting of Plastic Materials from End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiu Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this feasibility research was to study a novel sensor based separation method for recycling of plastic materials from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs by using eigen-frequency response of impact acoustic emission. In this research three kinds of commonly used plastics, polypropylene (PP, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS, and styrene-maleic-anhydride (SMA sampled from end-of-life vehicles, were researched. Almost all the crushed plastic scraps had a flake structure, theoretically their impact response behaviors were determined by their diameters and thicknesses. The equivalent diameters of the scraps were characterized by fine sieving and their thicknesses were measured online by a 3D laser triangulation sensor above the conveying path. Following this the scraps were free dropped one-by-one to impact with an impact passive body on which impact acoustic emission (AE signals were generated and acquired by an acoustic pickup sensor. Thirdly, the AE signals which carried eigen-frequency response features were processed and characterized. Results demonstrated that the scraps with diameters < 8 mm were too weak for the actual devices to process; the scraps with diameter from 8–13 mm still generated quite a lot of AE signals of inadequate intensity. Finally the general characterization and recognition yields were 64.6%, 61.7%, and 63.9% of PP, ABS, and SMA in mass, respectively of tested materials.

  2. Problem definition for pre-crash sensing advanced restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This report presents the results of crash analyses that defined and prioritized target crashes for advanced restraint systems based on pre-crash sensors. These analyses targeted the driver and front-seat passenger 13 or older, traveling in light vehi...

  3. Feasibility Analysis of Improving On-Campus Learning Paths via a Depth Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Fu; Tu, Shih-Chun; Chien, Mei-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to apply a depth sensor to create a human-body-sensing context for outdoor learning paths; it is conducted by incorporating both quasi-experiment and survey to compare students' cognitive learning outcome within the context and understand students' attitudes toward the context created. The result of ANCOVA indicates that the…

  4. On the feasibility of measuring urban air pollution by wireless distributed sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltchanov, Sharon; Levy, Ilan; Etzion, Yael; Lerner, Uri; Broday, David M; Fishbain, Barak

    2015-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of air pollution on human-wellbeing requires high-resolution measurements. Standard air quality monitoring stations provide accurate pollution levels but due to their sparse distribution they cannot capture the highly resolved spatial variations within cities. Similarly, dedicated field campaigns can use tens of measurement devices and obtain highly dense spatial coverage but normally deployment has been limited to short periods of no more than few weeks. Nowadays, advances in communication and sensory technologies enable the deployment of dense grids of wireless distributed air monitoring nodes, yet their sensor ability to capture the spatiotemporal pollutant variability at the sub-neighborhood scale has never been thoroughly tested. This study reports ambient measurements of gaseous air pollutants by a network of six wireless multi-sensor miniature nodes that have been deployed in three urban sites, about 150 m apart. We demonstrate the network's capability to capture spatiotemporal concentration variations at an exceptional fine resolution but highlight the need for a frequent in-situ calibration to maintain the consistency of some sensors. Accordingly, a procedure for a field calibration is proposed and shown to improve the system's performance. Overall, our results support the compatibility of wireless distributed sensor networks for measuring urban air pollution at a sub-neighborhood spatial resolution, which suits the requirement for highly spatiotemporal resolved measurements at the breathing-height when assessing exposure to urban air pollution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A survey on the feasibility of sound classification on wireless sensor nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, Etto; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are suitable to gain context awareness for indoor environments. As sound waves form a rich source of context information, equipping the nodes with microphones can be of great benefit. The algorithms to extract features from sound waves are often highly computationally

  6. A Survey on the Feasibility of Sound Classification on Wireless Sensor Nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.I. (Etto); Havinga, J.M. (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are suitable to gain context awareness for indoorenvironments. As sound waves form a rich source of context information, equipping thenodes with microphones can be of great benefit. The algorithms to extract features fromsound waves are often highly computationally

  7. Advanced Start of Combustion Sensor Phases I and II-A: Feasibility Demonstration, Design and Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Smutzer

    2010-01-31

    Homogeneous Compressed Charge Ignition (HCCI) has elevated the need for Start of Combustion (SOC) sensors. HCCI engines have been the exciting focus of engine research recently, primarily because HCCI offers higher thermal efficiency than the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engines and significantly lower NOx and soot emissions than conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines, and could be fuel neutral. HCCI has the potential to unify all the internal combustion engine technology to achieve the high-efficiency, low-emission goal. However, these advantages do not come easy. It is well known that the problems encountered with HCCI combustion center on the difficulty of controlling the Start of Combustion. TIAX has an SOC sensor under development which has shown promise. In previous work, including a DOE-sponsored SBIR project, TIAX has developed an accelerometer-based method which was able to determine SOC within a few degrees crank angle for a range of operating conditions. A signal processing protocol allows reconstruction of the combustion pressure event signal imbedded in the background engine vibration recorded by the accelerometer. From this reconstructed pressure trace, an algorithm locates the SOC. This SOC sensor approach is nonintrusive, rugged, and is particularly robust when the pressure event is strong relative to background engine vibration (at medium to high engine load). Phase I of this project refined the previously developed technology with an engine-generic and robust algorithm. The objective of the Phase I research was to answer two fundamental questions: Can the accelerometer-based SOC sensor provide adequate SOC event capture to control an HCCI engine in a feedback loop? And, will the sensor system meet cost, durability, and software efficiency (speed) targets? Based upon the results, the answer to both questions was 'YES'. The objective of Phase II-A was to complete the parameter optimization of the SOC sensor prototype in order

  8. Feasibility study of actuators and sensors using electroactive polymers reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaratnam, Arun; Jalili, Nader

    2004-07-01

    Electro-active polymers reinforced with carbon nanotubes have attracted many researchers in the recent years. Recent activities in this area show that conducting polymers with carbon nanotubes in an electrolytic medium possess actuation and sensing properties due to the change in bond length in the carbon atoms. However, their applications are limited due to their operation in a wet medium. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of electro-active polymers with dispersed carbon nanotubes that can be used for actuation and sensing in a dry medium like air to make them viable. Different polymer composites are considered for mixing with single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes manufactured by chemical vapor deposition technique. Various dispersing techniques for aligning the carbon nanotubes like smart blending and chaotic mixing are also explored. The feasibility of actuation and sensing of these composites are verified by experimentation on several macrosystems comprised of these functional nanostructures.

  9. Detection of Prosthetic Knee Movement Phases via In-Socket Sensors: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr M. El-Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach of identifying prosthetic knee movements through pattern recognition of mechanical responses at the internal socket’s wall. A quadrilateral double socket was custom made and instrumented with two force sensing resistors (FSR attached to specific anterior and posterior sites of the socket’s wall. A second setup was established by attaching three piezoelectric sensors at the anterior distal, anterior proximal, and posterior sites. Gait cycle and locomotion movements such as stair ascent and sit to stand were adopted to characterize the validity of the technique. FSR and piezoelectric outputs were measured with reference to the knee angle during each phase. Piezoelectric sensors could identify the movement of midswing and terminal swing, pre-full standing, pull-up at gait, sit to stand, and stair ascent. In contrast, FSR could estimate the gait cycle stance and swing phases and identify the pre-full standing at sit to stand. FSR showed less variation during sit to stand and stair ascent to sensitively represent the different movement states. The study highlighted the capacity of using in-socket sensors for knee movement identification. In addition, it validated the efficacy of the system and warrants further investigation with more amputee subjects and different sockets types.

  10. A wearable textile for respiratory monitoring: Feasibility assessment and analysis of sensors position on system response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, D; Massaroni, C; Saccomandi, P; Caponero, M A; Formica, D; Schena, E

    2017-07-01

    The interest on wearable textiles to monitor vital signs is growing in the research field and clinical scenario related to the increasing demands of long-term monitoring. Despite several smart textile-based solutions have been proposed for assessing the respiratory status, only a limited number of devices allow the respiratory monitoring in a harsh environment or in different positions of the human body. In this paper, we investigated the performances of a smart textile for respiratory rate monitoring characterized by 12 fiber optic sensors (i.e., fiber Bragg grating) placed on specific landmarks for compartmental analysis of the chest wall movements during quiet breathing. We focused on the analysis of the influence of sensor position on both peak-to-peak amplitude of sensors output and accuracy of respiratory rate measurements. This analysis was performed on two participants, who wore the textile in two positions (i.e., standing and supine). Bland-Altman analysis on respiratory rate showed promising results (better than 0.3 breaths per minute). Referring to the peak-to-peak output amplitude, the abdomen compartment showed the highest excursions in both the enrolled participants and positions. Our findings open up new approaches to design and develop smart textile for respiratory rate monitoring.

  11. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF INEXPENSIVE THERMAL SENSORS AND SMALL UAS DEPLOYMENT FOR LIVING HUMAN DETECTION IN RESCUE MISSIONS APPLICATION SCENARIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Levin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant efforts are invested by rescue agencies worldwide to save human lives during natural and man-made emergency situations including those that happen in wilderness locations. These emergency situations include but not limited to: accidents with alpinists, mountainous skiers, people hiking and lost in remote areas. Sometimes in a rescue operation hundreds of first responders are involved to save a single human life. There are two critical issues where geospatial imaging can be a very useful asset in rescue operations support: 1 human detection and 2 confirming a fact that detected a human being is alive. International group of researchers from the Unites States and Poland collaborated on a pilot research project devoted to identify a feasibility of use for the human detection and alive-human state confirmation small unmanned aerial vehicles (SUAVs and inexpensive forward looking infrared (FLIR sensors. Equipment price for both research teams was below $8,000 including 3DR quadrotor UAV and Lepton longwave infrared (LWIR imager which costs around $250 (for the US team; DJI Inspire 1 UAS with commercial Tamarisc-320 thermal camera (for the Polish team. Specifically both collaborating groups performed independent experiments in the USA and Poland and shared imaging data of on the ground and airborne electro-optical and FLIR sensor imaging collected. In these experiments dead bodies were emulated by use of medical training dummies. Real humans were placed nearby as live human subjects. Electro-optical imagery was used for the research in optimal human detection algorithms. Furthermore, given the fact that a dead human body after several hours has a temperature of the surrounding environment our experiments were challenged by the SUAS data optimization, i.e., distance from SUAV to object so that the FLIR sensor is still capable to distinguish temperature differences between a dummy and a real human. Our experiments indicated feasibility of

  12. Feasibility of novel four degrees of freedom capacitive force sensor for skin interface force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Chisato

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of our study was to develop a novel capacitive force sensor that enables simultaneous measurements of yaw torque around the pressure axis and normal force and shear forces at a single point for the purpose of elucidating pressure ulcer pathogenesis and establishing criteria for selection of cushions and mattresses. Methods Two newly developed sensors (approximately 10 mm×10 mm×5 mm (10 and 20 mm×20 mm×5 mm (20 were constructed from silicone gel and four upper and lower electrodes. The upper and lower electrodes had sixteen combinations that had the function as capacitors of parallel plate type. The full scale (FS ranges of force/torque were defined as 0–1.5 N, –0.5-0.5 N and −1.5-1.5 N mm (10 and 0–8.7 N, –2.9-2.9 N and −16.8-16.8 N mm (20 in normal force, shear forces and yaw torque, respectively. The capacitances of sixteen capacitors were measured by an LCR meter (AC1V, 100 kHz when displacements corresponding to four degrees of freedom (DOF forces within FS ranges were applied to the sensor. The measurement was repeated three times in each displacement condition (10 only. Force/torque were calculated by corrected capacitance and were evaluated by comparison to theoretical values and standard normal force measured by an universal tester. Results In measurements of capacitance, the coefficient of variation was 3.23% (10. The Maximum FS errors of estimated force/torque were less than or equal to 10.1 (10 and 16.4% (20, respectively. The standard normal forces were approximately 1.5 (10 and 9.4 N (20 when pressure displacements were 3 (10 and 2 mm (20, respectively. The estimated normal forces were approximately 1.5 (10 and 8.6 N (10 in the same condition. Conclusions In this study, we developed a new four DOF force sensor for measurement of force/torque that occur between the skin and a mattress. In measurement of capacitance, the repeatability was good and it was confirmed that the sensor had

  13. Feasibility of Passive Gas Sensor Based on Whispering Gallery Modes and its RADAR Interrogation: Theoretical and Experimental Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamida HALLIL

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of gas sensors based on Titanium Dioxide (TiO2 dielectric resonator operating with whispering-gallery modes is presented. The gas or humidity adsorption modifies the TiO2 dielectric permittivity and such modification induces variation in the resonant frequencies of high-Q whispering-gallery modes in the millimeter-wave frequency range. Full-wave electromagnetic simulation indicates that the measurement of this variation allows the derivation of few pars-per-million fluctuations in gas or humidity concentration. For validation purposes very first prototypes of resonator operating with whispering-gallery modes in the millimeter-wave frequency range are micro-machined. The obtained measured performances confirm that such high-Q resonant modes are very sensitive to small variations in dielectric resonator permittivity. Moreover we validate experimentally that these small variations can be remotely detected from the RADAR interrogation of an antenna loaded by the whispering-gallery modes resonator.

  14. Feasibility assessment of a transient sound sensor based on the silicon retina architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Jorge F.

    1992-06-01

    In the Background section of the proposal I described the basic conceptual elements which underlie the Silicon Retina (SR) and those which underlie passive mammalian hearing. My original intention was to utilize the frequency discrimination capability manifested in mammalian hearing as the mechanism on which to base an acoustic analogue to the SR concept. Specifically, mammals have sophisticated frequency dependent sensors which transmit responses to discrete and well-resolved frequencies upward to higher processing levels. Each intermediate processor transmits the precise frequency information upstream. Thus one may think of acoustic frequencies as being analogous to visual positional information, since in the ray limit of optics there is a one to one correspondence between the relative locations of external objects and the retinal sensors which are stimulated at any given time. The SR mechanism was to be implemented by comparing individual frequencies with running averages over groups of nearby frequencies, eliciting a response when the intensities of these differed by a prescribed amount. The next step in the program was to remain open-minded regarding the implementation of directional acoustic arrays, with the idea pf steering an array making use of the 'alert' response created by the introduction of a non-background signal. In this way it was envisioned that the 'cocktail party effect' would be achieved.

  15. A Survey on the Feasibility of Sound Classification on Wireless Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etto L. Salomons

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are suitable to gain context awareness for indoor environments. As sound waves form a rich source of context information, equipping the nodes with microphones can be of great benefit. The algorithms to extract features from sound waves are often highly computationally intensive. This can be problematic as wireless nodes are usually restricted in resources. In order to be able to make a proper decision about which features to use, we survey how sound is used in the literature for global sound classification, age and gender classification, emotion recognition, person verification and identification and indoor and outdoor environmental sound classification. The results of the surveyed algorithms are compared with respect to accuracy and computational load. The accuracies are taken from the surveyed papers; the computational loads are determined by benchmarking the algorithms on an actual sensor node. We conclude that for indoor context awareness, the low-cost algorithms for feature extraction perform equally well as the more computationally-intensive variants. As the feature extraction still requires a large amount of processing time, we present four possible strategies to deal with this problem.

  16. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio A; Franco, Lina S; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A; Pech-Pacheco, José L; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de Los Monteros, Luz E; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcina-Rejon, Julian E

    2017-08-17

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20-200 nm gold nanoparticles using a green laser were compared to green light emitting diode (LED) light source signals and to Mie theory. The change in signal from 60 to 120 nm decreased in the order of Mie Theory > optical caustic scattering > 90° scattering. These results suggested that conjugating 60 nm gold nanoparticles and using an optical caustic system to detect plasmonic light scattering, would result in a sensitive test for detecting human antibodies in serum. Therefore, we studied the light scattering response of conjugated gold nanoparticles exposed to different concentrations of anti-protein E antibody, and a feasibility study of 10 human serum samples using dot blot and a handheld optical caustic-based sensor device. The overall agreement between detection methods suggests that the new sensor concept shows promise to detect gold nanoparticle aggregation in a homogeneous assay. Further testing and protocol optimization is needed to draw conclusions on the positive and negative predictive values for this new testing system.

  17. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio A.; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A.; Pech-Pacheco, José L.; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H.; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M.; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de los Monteros, Luz E.; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2017-01-01

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20–200 nm gold nanoparticles using a green laser were compared to green light emitting diode (LED) light source signals and to Mie theory. The change in signal from 60 to 120 nm decreased in the order of Mie Theory > optical caustic scattering > 90° scattering. These results suggested that conjugating 60 nm gold nanoparticles and using an optical caustic system to detect plasmonic light scattering, would result in a sensitive test for detecting human antibodies in serum. Therefore, we studied the light scattering response of conjugated gold nanoparticles exposed to different concentrations of anti-protein E antibody, and a feasibility study of 10 human serum samples using dot blot and a handheld optical caustic-based sensor device. The overall agreement between detection methods suggests that the new sensor concept shows promise to detect gold nanoparticle aggregation in a homogeneous assay. Further testing and protocol optimization is needed to draw conclusions on the positive and negative predictive values for this new testing system. PMID:28817080

  18. 32 CFR 636.34 - Restraint systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restraint systems. 636.34 Section 636.34 National... Restraint systems. (a) Restraint systems (seat belts) will be worn by all operators and passengers of U.S. Government vehicles on or off the installations. (b) Restraint systems will be worn by all civilian personnel...

  19. Optimized ventricular restraint therapy: adjustable restraint is superior to standard restraint in an ovine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lawrence S; Ghanta, Ravi K; Mokashi, Suyog A; Coelho-Filho, Otavio; Kwong, Raymond Y; Kwon, Michael; Guan, Jian; Liao, Ronglih; Chen, Frederick Y

    2013-03-01

    The effects of ventricular restraint level on left ventricular reverse remodeling are not known. We hypothesized that restraint level affects the degree of reverse remodeling and that restraint applied in an adjustable manner is superior to standard, nonadjustable restraint. This study was performed in 2 parts using a model of chronic heart failure in the sheep. In part I, restraint was applied at control (0 mm Hg, n = 3), low (1.5 mm Hg, n = 3), and high (3.0 mm Hg, n = 3) levels with an adjustable and measurable ventricular restraint (AMVR) device. Restraint level was not altered throughout the 2-month treatment period. Serial restraint level measurements and transthoracic echocardiography were performed. In part II, restraint was applied with the AMVR device set at 3.0 mm Hg (n = 6) and adjusted periodically to maintain that level. This was compared with restraint applied in a standard, nonadjustable manner using a mesh wrap (n = 6). All subjects were followed up for 2 months with serial magnetic resonance imaging. In part I, there was greater and earlier reverse remodeling in the high restraint group. In both groups, the rate of reverse remodeling peaked and then declined as the measured restraint level decreased with progression of reverse remodeling. In part II, adjustable restraint resulted in greater reverse remodeling than standard restraint. Left ventricular end diastolic volume decreased by 12.7% (P = .005) with adjustable restraint and by 5.7% (P = .032) with standard restraint. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 18.9% (P = .014) and 14.4% (P standard restraint, respectively. Restraint level affects the rate and degree of reverse remodeling and is an important determinant of therapy efficacy. Adjustable restraint is more effective than nonadjustable restraint in promoting reverse remodeling. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Air bag restraint device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1995-10-17

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle`s rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump. 8 figs.

  1. Air bag restraint device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.

    1995-01-01

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle's rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump.

  2. Feasibility of fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for imaging of dental cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Che Ani, Adi Izhar; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Yasin, Moh.; Apsari, Retna; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of intensity modulated fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for the imaging of dental cavity. Here, we discuss our preliminary results in the imaging of cavities on various teeth surfaces, as well as measurement of the diameter of the cavities which are represented by drilled holes on the teeth surfaces. Based on the analysis of displacement measurement, the sensitivities and linear range for the molar, canine, hybrid composite resin, and acrylic surfaces are obtained at 0.09667 mV/mm and 0.45 mm 0.775 mV/mm and 0.4 mm 0.5109 mV/mm and 0.5 mm and 0.25 mV/mm and 0.5 mm, respectively, with a good linearity of more than 99%. The results also show a clear distinction between the cavity and surrounding tooth region. The stability, simplicity of design, and low cost of fabrication make it suitable for restorative dentistry.

  3. Optimized ventricular restraint therapy: Adjustable restraint is superior to standard restraint in an ovine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lawrence S.; Ghanta, Ravi K.; Mokashi, Suyog A.; Coelho-Filho, Otavio; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Kwon, Michael; Guan, Jian; Liao, Ronglih; Chen, Frederick Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The effects of ventricular restraint level on left ventricular reverse remodeling are not known. We hypothesized that restraint level affects the degree of reverse remodeling and that restraint applied in an adjustable manner is superior to standard, nonadjustable restraint. Methods This study was performed in 2 parts using a model of chronic heart failure in the sheep. In part I, restraint was applied at control (0 mm Hg, n = 3), low (1.5 mm Hg, n = 3), and high (3.0 mm Hg, n = 3) levels with an adjustable and measurable ventricular restraint (AMVR) device. Restraint level was not altered throughout the 2-month treatment period. Serial restraint level measurements and transthoracic echocardiography were performed. In part II, restraint was applied with the AMVR device set at 3.0 mm Hg (n = 6) and adjusted periodically to maintain that level. This was compared with restraint applied in a standard, nonadjustable manner using a mesh wrap (n = 6). All subjects were followed up for 2 months with serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results In part I, there was greater and earlier reverse remodeling in the high restraint group. In both groups, the rate of reverse remodeling peaked and then declined as the measured restraint level decreased with progression of reverse remodeling. In part II, adjustable restraint resulted in greater reverse remodeling than standard restraint. Left ventricular end diastolic volume decreased by 12.7% (P = .005) with adjustable restraint and by 5.7% (P = .032) with standard restraint. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 18.9% (P = .014) and 14.4% (Prestraint, respectively. Conclusions Restraint level affects the rate and degree of reverse remodeling and is an important determinant of therapy efficacy. Adjustable restraint is more effective than nonadjustable restraint in promoting reverse remodeling. PMID:22698557

  4. Restraint and seclusion in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Khandelwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric management in India often includes the practice of restraint and seclusion of violent and difficult to control patients, both in inpatient medical facilities and in places of traditional healing. However, without any informed guidelines and regulation, these practices have flourished from necessary last resort to accepted ways of control. The upcoming draft mental health bill have now provided with a set of basic guidelines for preventing restraint. The scientific literature is also sparse on the subject from India, despite a robust body of evidence being available from the Western literature. This review, summarizes the evidence from India, looks into the causes and outcomes of restraint and seclusion and also discusses methods and stratagems that might be beneficial for reducing restraint and seclusion in the country.

  5. Child restraint device loaner programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    The child restraint device (CRD) loaner programs in Tennessee were evaluated. In-Lerviews were conducted with loaner program clients in Memphis, Chattanooga, and Knoxville. Administrators of programs in all three sites also were interviewed. The prog...

  6. Predictive Power of Different Types of Experimental Restraints in Small Molecule Docking: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Darwin Y; Meiler, Jens

    2018-01-18

    Incorporating experimental restraints is a powerful method of increasing accuracy in computational protein small molecule docking simulations. Different algorithms integrate distinct forms of biochemical data during the docking and/or scoring stages. These so-called hybrid methods make use of receptor-based information such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) restraints or small molecule-based information such as structure-activity relationships (SARs). A third class of methods directly interrogates contacts between the protein receptor and the small molecule. This work reviews the current state of using such restraints in docking simulations, evaluates their feasibility across broad systems, and identifies potential areas of algorithm development.

  7. Microgravity Workstation and Restraint Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, C.; Whitmore, M.; Mount, F.

    1999-01-01

    Confined workstations, where the operator has limited visibility and physical access to the work area, may cause prolonged periods of unnatural posture. Impacts on performance, in terms of fatigue and posture, may occur especially if the task is tedious and repetitive or requires static muscle loading. The glovebox design is a good example of the confined workstation concept. Within the scope of the 'Microgravity Workstation and Restraint Evaluation' project, funded by the NASA Headquarters Life Sciences Division, it was proposed to conduct a series of evaluations in ground, KC-135 and Shuttle environments to investigate the human factors issues concerning confined/unique workstations, such as gloveboxes, and also including crew restraint requirements. As part of the proposed integrated evaluations, two Shuttle Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSOs) were manifested; one on Space Transportation System (STS)-90 and one on STS-88. The DSO on STS-90 evaluated use of the General Purpose Workstation (GPWS). The STS-88 mission was planned to evaluate a restraint system at the Remote Manipulator System (RMS). In addition, KC- 1 35 flights were conducted to investigate user/workstation/restraint integration for long-duration microgravity use. The scope of these evaluations included workstations and restraints to be utilized in the ISS environment, but also incorporated other workstations/ restraints in an attempt to provide findings/requirements with broader applications across multiple programs (e.g., Shuttle, ISS, and future Lunar-Mars programs). In addition, a comprehensive electronic questionnaire has been prepared and is under review by the Astronaut Office which will compile crewmembers' lessons learned information concerning glovebox and restraint use following their missions. These evaluations were intended to be complementary and were coordinated with hardware developers, users (crewmembers), and researchers. This report is intended to provide a summary of the

  8. Child restraint workshop series. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    This final report describes the planning and implementing details of the Child Restraint Workshop series. A child restraint workshop was conducted in each of the : ten NHTSA regions. The purpose of the workshops was to improve the effectiveness of gr...

  9. A Feasibility Study of Sea Ice Motion and Deformation Measurements Using Multi-Sensor High-Resolution Optical Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Uk Hyun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice motion and deformation have generally been measured using low-resolution passive microwave or mid-resolution radar remote sensing datasets of daily (or few days intervals to monitor long-term trends over a wide polar area. This feasibility study presents an application of high-resolution optical images from operational satellites, which have become more available in polar regions, for sea ice motion and deformation measurements. The sea ice motion, i.e., Lagrangian vector, is measured by using a maximum cross-correlation (MCC technique and multi-temporal high-resolution images acquired on 14–15 August 2014 from multiple spaceborne sensors on board Korea Multi-Purpose Satellites (KOMPSATs with short acquisition time intervals. The sea ice motion extracted from the six image pairs of the spatial resolutions were resampled to 4 m and 15 m yields with vector length measurements of 57.7 m root mean square error (RMSE and −11.4 m bias and 60.7 m RMSE and −13.5 m bias, respectively, compared with buoy location records. The errors from both resolutions indicate more accurate measurements than from conventional sea ice motion datasets from passive microwave and radar data in ice and water mixed surface conditions. In the results of sea ice deformation caused by interaction of individual ice floes, while free drift patterns of ice floes were delineated from the 4 m spatial resolution images, the deformation was less revealing in the 15 m spatial resolution image pairs due to emphasized discretization uncertainty from coarser pixel sizes. The results demonstrate that using multi-temporal high-resolution optical satellite images enabled precise image block matching in the melting season, thus this approach could be used for expanding sea ice motion and deformation dataset, with an advantage of frequent image acquisition capability in multiple areas by means of many operational satellites.

  10. 77 FR 11625 - Child Restraint Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 571 and 572 Child Restraint Systems; Hybrid III 10-Year... Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AL10 (Formerly RIN 2127-AJ44) Child Restraint Systems AGENCY: National.... SUMMARY: This final rule amends the Federal motor vehicle safety standard for child restraint systems to...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6760 - Protective restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective restraint. 880.6760 Section 880.6760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6760 Protective restraint. (a) Identification. A protective restraint is a device, including...

  12. The use of restraints in psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Y H Moosa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Restraints are usually used for the protection of patients and others when medication and verbal therapies are insufficient to control potentially violent patients. Many fear the abuse of restraints as well as their psychological, physical and emotional consequences. In South Africa, according to the Mental Health Care Act No. 17 of 2002, the use of restraints is permissible but subject to certain regulations. Restraint may not be used any longer than is necessary to prevent serious bodily harm to the patient or others. When restraint has the desired effect of settling the patient’s behaviour to the point where control is regained, its further imposition is illegal. Restraints may be classified into three main categories: ( i environmental restraints; ( ii physical restraints; and ( iii chemical restraints. There is much debate over what types of restraint are superior. There may be differences in cost, risk of serious staff injury, requirements of staff time for monitoring and implementation, and impacts on staff and patient attitudes. It is hoped that the use of environmental and physical restraint will be rendered obsolete by advances in the field of psychiatry such psychopharmacology and the therapeutic milieu. In order to reach this goal more research needs to be done on restraint practices across a wide range of psychiatric treatment settings.

  13. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  14. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  15. Anxiety, Restraint, and Eating Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C. Peter; Polivy, Janet

    1975-01-01

    It was hypothesized that individual differences in eating behavior based on the distinction between obese and normal subjects could be demonstrated within a population of normal subjects classified as to the extent of restraint chronically exercised with respect to eating. (Editor)

  16. A week of Israeli restraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhart, T.

    2006-01-01

    In Israeli discourse, Israel is always the side exercising restraint in its conflict with the Palestinians. This was true again for the events of the past week: As the Qassam rockets were falling on the Southern Israeli town of Sderot, it was “leaked” that the Israeli Minister of Defense had

  17. Safety effects of traffic restraint.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.T.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years the effectiveness and acceptability of traffic restraint measures in residential areas has been investigated. Results of accident investigations indicate that a new layout of residential areas has a positive effect on traffic safety. Research into road safety should not be restricted

  18. Feasibility of Deploying Inhaler Sensors to Identify the Impacts of Environmental Triggers and Built Environment Factors on Asthma Short-Acting Bronchodilator Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jason G; Barrett, Meredith A; Henderson, Kelly; Humblet, Olivier; Smith, Ted; Sublett, James W; Nesbitt, LaQuandra; Hogg, Chris; Van Sickle, David; Sublett, James L

    2017-02-01

    Epidemiological asthma research has relied upon self-reported symptoms or healthcare utilization data, and used the residential address as the primary location for exposure. These data sources can be temporally limited, spatially aggregated, subjective, and burdensome for the patient to collect. First, we aimed to test the feasibility of collecting rescue inhaler use data in space-time using electronic sensors. Second, we aimed to evaluate whether these data have the potential to identify environmental triggers and built environment factors associated with rescue inhaler use and to determine whether these findings would be consistent with the existing literature. We utilized zero-truncated negative binomial models to identify triggers associated with inhaler use, and implemented three sensitivity analyses to validate our findings. Electronic sensors fitted on metered dose inhalers tracked 5,660 rescue inhaler use events in space and time for 140 participants from 13 June 2012 to 28 February 2014. We found that the inhaler sensors were feasible in passively collecting objective rescue inhaler use data. We identified several environmental triggers with a positive and significant association with inhaler use, including: AQI, PM10, weed pollen, and mold. Conversely, the spatial distribution of tree cover demonstrated a negative and significant association with inhaler use. Utilizing a sensor to capture the signal of rescue inhaler use in space-time offered a passive and objective signal of asthma activity. This approach enabled detailed analyses to identify environmental triggers and built environment factors that are associated with asthma symptoms beyond the residential address. The application of these new technologies has the potential to improve our surveillance and understanding of asthma. Citation: Su JG, Barrett MA, Henderson K, Humblet O, Smith T, Sublett JW, Nesbitt L, Hogg C, Van Sickle D, Sublett JL. 2017. Feasibility of deploying inhaler sensors to

  19. Predictors of restraint use among child occupants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Marco; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Flannagan, Carol A

    2017-11-17

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that predict restraint use and optimal restraint use among children aged 0 to 13 years. The data set is a national sample of police-reported crashes for years 2010-2014 in which type of child restraint is recorded. The data set was supplemented with demographic census data linked by driver ZIP code, as well as a score for the state child restraint law during the year of the crash relative to best practice recommendations for protecting child occupants. Analysis used linear regression techniques. The main predictor of unrestrained child occupants was the presence of an unrestrained driver. Among restrained children, children had 1.66 (95% confidence interval, 1.27, 2.17) times higher odds of using the recommended type of restraint system if the state law at the time of the crash included requirements based on best practice recommendations. Children are more likely to ride in the recommended type of child restraint when their state's child restraint law includes wording that follows best practice recommendations for child occupant protection. However, state child restraint law requirements do not influence when caregivers fail to use an occupant restraint for their child passengers.

  20. Fixed Or Controlled-Movement Foot Restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Gloria B.; Blizzard, Noah

    1992-01-01

    Foot restraint gives user three options: holds user's feet in fixed position, allows them to slide sideways, or allows them to pivot independently about axis through ball of foot, as user chooses. Selects degree of restraint to suit task at hand. Movements to enter and leave foot restraint simple and direct. Simply forces each cleat lightly into space between rails until spring force of movable rail secures it. Body movements for sliding and rotation equally straightforward. Designed for use in absence of gravitation, restraint useful on Earth, underwater or in some hazardous locations where movements restricted.

  1. Multimodal activity monitoring for home rehabilitation of geriatric fracture patients--feasibility and acceptance of sensor systems in the GAL-NATARS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschollek, Michael; Becker, Marcus; Bauer, Jürgen M; Bente, Petra; Dasenbrock, Lena; Elbers, Katharina; Hein, Andreas; Kolb, Gerald; Künemund, Harald; Lammel-Polchau, Christopher; Meis, Markus; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Hubertus; Remmers, Hartmut; Schulze, Mareike; Steen, Enno-Edzard; Thoben, Wilfried; Wang, Ju; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Haux, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Demographic change will lead to a diminishing care workforce faced with rising numbers of older persons in need of care, suggesting meaningful use of health-enabling technologies, and home monitoring in particular, to contribute to supporting both the carers and the persons in need. We present and discuss the GAL-NATARS study design along with first results regarding technical feasibility of long-term home monitoring and acceptance of different sensor modalities. Fourteen geriatric participants with mobility-impairing fractures were recruited in three geriatric clinics. Following inpatient geriatric rehabilitation, their homes were equipped with ambient sensor components for three months. Additionally, a wearable accelerometer was employed. Technical feasibility was assessed by system and component downtimes, technology acceptance by face-to-face interviews. The overall system downtime was 6%, effected by two single events, but not by software failures. Technology acceptance was rated very high by all participants at the end of the monitoring periods, and no interference with their social lives was reported. Home-monitoring technologies were well-accepted by our participants. The information content of the data still needs to be evaluated with regard to clinical outcome parameters as well as the effect on the quality of life before recommending large-scale implementations.

  2. Cholinergic Modulation of Restraint Stress Induced Neurobehavioral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of the cholinergic system in restraint stress induced neurobehavioral alterations was investigated in rodents using the hole board, elevated plus maze, the open field and the light and dark box tests. Restraint stress (3h) reduced significantly (p<0.05) the number of entries and time spent in the open arm, ...

  3. 25 CFR 11.403 - Unlawful restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unlawful restraint. 11.403 Section 11.403 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.403 Unlawful restraint. A person commits a misdemeanor if he or she...

  4. The Feasibility of a Customized, In-Home, Game-Based Stroke Exercise Program Using the Microsoft Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Proffitt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of a 6-week, game-based, in-home telerehabilitation exercise program using the Microsoft Kinect® for individuals with chronic stroke. Four participants with chronic stroke completed the intervention based on games designed with the customized Mystic Isle software. The games were tailored to each participant’s specific rehabilitation needs to facilitate the attainment of individualized goals determined through the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Likert scale questionnaires assessed the feasibility and utility of the game-based intervention. Supplementary clinical outcome data were collected. All participants played the games with moderately high enjoyment. Participant feedback helped identify barriers to use (especially, limited free time and possible improvements. An in-home, customized, virtual reality game intervention to provide rehabilitative exercises for persons with chronic stroke is practicable. However, future studies are necessary to determine the intervention’s impact on participant function, activity, and involvement.

  5. Monitoring of Structures and Mechanical Systems Using Virtual Visual Sensors for Video Analysis: Fundamental Concept and Proof of Feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schumacher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM has become a viable tool to provide owners of structures and mechanical systems with quantitative and objective data for maintenance and repair. Traditionally, discrete contact sensors such as strain gages or accelerometers have been used for SHM. However, distributed remote sensors could be advantageous since they don’t require cabling and can cover an area rather than a limited number of discrete points. Along this line we propose a novel monitoring methodology based on video analysis. By employing commercially available digital cameras combined with efficient signal processing methods we can measure and compute the fundamental frequency of vibration of structural systems. The basic concept is that small changes in the intensity value of a monitored pixel with fixed coordinates caused by the vibration of structures can be captured by employing techniques such as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT. In this paper we introduce the basic concept and mathematical theory of this proposed so-called virtual visual sensor (VVS, we present a set of initial laboratory experiments to demonstrate the accuracy of this approach, and provide a practical in-service monitoring example of an in-service bridge. Finally, we discuss further work to improve the current methodology.

  6. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Glenn J.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  7. Striving for Balance Between Caring and Restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Julie Y; Larsen, Dorte; Brødsgaard, Anne

    2017-01-01

    with 14 young adults were conducted. RESULTS: The essence of the phenomenon of having a parent with multiple sclerosis was synthesized into 'Striving for balance between caring and restraint' from two themes 'caring' and 'restraint' and eight subthemes. Participants' experiences of caring for parents...... with multiple sclerosis continued influencing their other close relationships, in which they tended to assume responsibility while concealing some of their feelings and desires. Most participants showed restraint among parents with and without multiple sclerosis, friends, and partners. CONCLUSION: It seems...

  8. Taking charge. The role of nursing administrators in removing restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, J M; Neufeld, R R; Libow, L S; Cohen, C E; Foley, W J

    1997-03-01

    The leadership and commitment of nursing administrators play a pivotal role in minimizing the use of restraints and maintaining a restraint-free environment. This article describes the role of nursing administrators in reducing the use of physical restraints as part of a 2-year, national nursing home restraint-reduction project. It reviews important information about restraint-free care the benefits of restraint-free care, and strategies to reduce the use of restraints in nursing homes, much of which is applicable to settings other than nursing homes.

  9. Mechanical Restraint - Which Interventions Prevent Episodes of Mechanical Restraint? - A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jesper; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette; Sestoft, Dorte Maria

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE:  To identify interventions preventing mechanical restraints. DESIGN AND METHODS:  Systematic review of international research papers dealing with mechanical restraint. The review combines qualitative and quantitative research in a new way, describing the quality of evidence and the effect...... of intervention. FINDINGS:  Implementation of cognitive milieu therapy, combined interventions, and patient-centered care were the three interventions most likely to reduce the number of mechanical restraints. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:  There is a lack of high-quality and effective intervention studies. This leaves...... patients and metal health professionals with uncertainty when choosing interventions in an attempt to prevent mechanical restraints....

  10. Dietary restraint and cognitive performance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Davison, Claire J; Mitchell, Gemma L

    2005-12-01

    Adults who attempt to restrict their dietary intake also tend to perform worse on a range of cognitive tasks. However, the extent to which this finding generalises to children has remained unclear. Following studies involving adults, we asked 44 girls (mean age = 10.1 years) to complete a simple reaction-time task and the Tower of London task. This group was selected from a local community school in the East Midlands (UK). Dietary restraint was measured using a version of the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire that had been adapted for use by children. Our results indicate that children with high restraint scores have longer reaction times and they also tend to perform worse on the TOL task. Other aspects of our data also suggest the dietary restraint may be correlated negatively with a measure of academic ability. We discuss reasons why restraint and performance might be related causally and we conclude that this issue warrants further scrutiny.

  11. Children restraint systems for civil aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    Child restraint systems have been developed to provide protection to children involved in automobile crashes. These systems are not yet approved for use in civil aircraft. Six typical systems were exposed to controlled impacts on a test sled to simul...

  12. Child restraint systems for civil aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    Child restraint systems have been developed to provide protection to children involved in automobile crashes. These systems are not yet approved for use in civil aircraft. Six typical systems were exposed to controlled impacts on a test sled to simul...

  13. Feasibility demonstration of a massively parallelizable optical near-field sensor for sub-wavelength defect detection and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat; Diaz, Rodolfo E

    2016-05-17

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. Full physics simulations of the photonic antenna detector element that enables this instrument, show that using conventional red laser light (in the 600 nm range) the detector magnifies the signal from an 8 nm particle by up to 1.5 orders of magnitude. The antenna is a shaped slot element in a 60 nm silver film. The ability of this detector element to resolve λ/78 objects is confirmed experimentally at radio frequencies by fabricating an artificial material structure that mimics the optical permittivity of silver scaled to 2 GHz, and "cutting" into it the slot antenna. The experimental set-up is also used to demonstrate the imaging of a patterned surface in which the critical dimensions of the pattern are λ/22 in size.

  14. International Space Station Crew Restraint Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, M.; Norris, L.; Holden, K.

    2005-01-01

    With permanent human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS), crews will be living and working in microgravity, dealing with the challenges of a weightless environment. In addition, the confined nature of the spacecraft environment results in ergonomic challenges such as limited visibility and access to the activity areas, as well as prolonged periods of unnatural postures. Without optimum restraints, crewmembers may be handicapped for performing some of the on-orbit tasks. Currently, many of the tasks on ISS are performed with the crew restrained merely by hooking their arms or toes around handrails to steady themselves. This is adequate for some tasks, but not all. There have been some reports of discomfort/calluses on the top of the toes. In addition, this type of restraint is simply insufficient for tasks that require a large degree of stability. Glovebox design is a good example of a confined workstation concept requiring stability for successful use. They are widely used in industry, university, and government laboratories, as well as in the space environment, and are known to cause postural limitations and visual restrictions. Although there are numerous guidelines pertaining to ventilation, seals, and glove attachment, most of the data have been gathered in a 1-g environment, or are from studies that were conducted prior to the early 1980 s. Little is known about how best to restrain a crewmember using a glovebox in microgravity. In 2004, The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center completed development/evaluation of several design concepts for crew restraints to meet the various needs outlined above. Restraints were designed for general purpose use, for teleoperation (Robonaut) and for use with the Life Sciences Glovebox. All design efforts followed a human factors engineering design lifecycle, beginning with identification of requirements followed by an iterative prototype/test cycle. Anthropometric

  15. Does Brief Bradycardia at the Onset of Arm-Restraint Predict Infants' Emotional Reactivity during Restraint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christin L.; Jones, Blake L.

    2011-01-01

    Using electrocardiogram data with 78 six-month-old infants, this study examined the presence or absence of brief orienting bradycardia during the onset of maternal arm-restraint and subsequent differences between infants on behavioral organization during restraint. Results showed that 45 of the infants exhibited brief episodes of bradycardia at…

  16. Restraint Safety: An Analysis of Injuries Related to Restraint of People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Don E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is little research on the safety of the various types of restraint commonly used with individuals with intellectual disabilities who exhibit severely aggressive or self-injurious behaviour. Method: This study analysed the use of restraint with 209 individuals with intellectual disabilities over a 12-month period. Results: Planned…

  17. Special Purpose Crew Restraints for Teleoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Holden, Kritina; Norris, Lena

    2004-01-01

    With permanent human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS), and long duration space missions being planned for the moon and Mars, humans will be living and working in microgravity over increasingly long periods of time. In addition to weightlessness, the confined nature of a spacecraft environment results in ergonomic challenges such as limited visibility, and access to the activity area. These challenges can result in prolonged periods of unnatural postures for the crew, ultimately causing pain, injury, and loss of productivity. Determining the right set of human factors requirements and providing an ergonomically designed environment is crucial to mission success. While a number of general purpose restraints have been used on ISS (handrails, foot loops), experience has shown that these general purpose restraints may not be optimal, or even acceptable for some tasks that have unique requirements. For example, some onboard activities require extreme stability (e.g., glovebox microsurgery), and others involve the use of arm, torso and foot movements in order to perform the task (e-g. robotic teleoperation); standard restraint systems will not work in these situations. The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (WAF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center began evaluations of crew restraints for these special situations by looking at NASAs Robonaut. Developed by the Robot Systems Technology Branch, Robonaut is a humanoid robot that can be remotely operated through a tetepresence control system by an operator. It was designed to perform work in hazardous environments (e.g., Extra Vehicular Activities). A Robonaut restraint was designed, modeled for the population, and ultimately tested onboard the KC-135 microgravity aircraft. While in microgravity, participants were asked to get in and out of the restraint from different locations, perform maximum reach exercises, and finally to teleoperate Robonaut while in the restraint. The sessions were videotaped

  18. Feasibility of real-time soil state and flux characterization for wastewater reuse using an embedded sensor network data assimilation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Che-Chuan; Margulis, Steven A.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryWastewater reuse via irrigation provides the potential for significant increases in water use efficiency; however, excessive solutes from wastewater can pollute the groundwater beneath the irrigated lands. To avoid this adverse impact and provide a mechanism for informing optimal management practices, this study develops a monitoring and modeling system to assimilate embedded sensor network measurements into a hydrologic model to provide real-time soil state and flux estimates. The feasibility of soil characterization with a data assimilation algorithm is investigated through a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) at a wastewater reuse testbed in Palmdale, California. Results show that state (i.e. soil moisture) estimation in isolation can lead to significant errors if flux estimates are a primary objective of the estimation framework and parameters are not well characterized. Overall, the OSSEs indicate that with sufficient measurement information, the system is capable of providing an accurate characterization of real-time soil state, model parameter, and flux estimates (even in the presence of biases) that could be useful in managing wastewater irrigation to avoid hazardous contamination of the underlying groundwater system.

  19. Roadside observation of child passenger restraint use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Bruce

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite legislation and research evidence supporting the use of childhood vehicle restraints, motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of injury, death and disability among Canadian children. Methods: Working in collaboration with trained car seat specialists and police officers, roadside checks were conducted to observe correct use of child restraints. Results: Of the 1323 child vehicle restraints inspected, 99.6% of the children were restrained, 91% were in the correct seat, and 48% of restraints were correctly installed. The seat/restraint types most used incorrectly used were booster seats (31% and seat belts (53%. The majority of incorrectly installed or fitted seats (55% were forward facing. Common errors in installation and fit included the seat not being secured tightly enough to the vehicle, incorrect tether strap use, the harness not being tight enough, and/or the chest clip being in the wrong place. Conclusions: The greatest proportion of incorrect seat use was among those children who transitioned to a seat belt too soon. The greatest proportion of installation and fit errors were among forward facing seats. Researchers recommend: 1 targeting parents with older children (ages 3 and above regarding transitioning too soon from forward facing seats to booster seats, and from booster seats to seat belts; 2 targeting parents with younger children regarding correct installation of rear facing and forward facing seats; 3 collaborating with police officers to review the most common errors and encourage observation at roadside checks; and 4 creating community awareness by way of roadside checks.

  20. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  1. Passive zero-gravity leg restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A passive zero or microgravity leg restraint is described which includes a central support post with a top and a bottom. Extending from the central support post are a calf pad tab, to which calf pad is attached, and a foot pad tab, to which foot tab is attached. Also extending from central support post are knee pads. When the restraint is in use the user's legs are forced between pads by a user imposed scissors action of the legs. The user's body is then supported in a zero or microgravity neutral body posture by the leg restraint. The calf pad has semi-ridig elastic padding material covering structural stiffener. The foot pad has padding material and a structural stiffener. Knee pads have s structural tube stiffener at their core.

  2. 75 FR 9613 - Draft NIJ Restraints Standard for Criminal Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... industry technical representatives, criminal justice agencies and organizations, research, development and... of Justice Programs Draft NIJ Restraints Standard for Criminal Justice AGENCY: National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, DOJ. ACTION: Notice of Draft NIJ Restraints Standard for Criminal...

  3. Child restraint workshop series. Volume 2, Ongoing and planned programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    This final report describes the planning and implementing details of the Child Restraint Workshop series. A child restraint workshop was conducted in each of the : ten NHTSA regions. The purpose of the workshops was to improve the effectiveness of gr...

  4. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  5. 49 CFR 213.110 - Gage restraint measurement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gage restraint measurement systems. 213.110... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.110 Gage restraint measurement systems. (a) A track owner may elect to implement a Gage Restraint Measurement System (GRMS...

  6. 49 CFR 575.201 - Child restraint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Child restraint performance. 575.201 Section 575... Recall Enhancement, Accountability, and Documentation Act; Consumer Information § 575.201 Child restraint... performance of child restraints. The agency makes the information developed under this rating program...

  7. 28 CFR 570.44 - Supervision and restraint requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision and restraint requirements... PROGRAMS AND RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.44 Supervision and restraint requirements... all times. Restraints may be applied to an inmate going on an escorted trip, after considering the...

  8. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coupler vertical restraint system. 179.14 Section... TANK CARS General Design Requirements § 179.14 Coupler vertical restraint system. (a) Performance... not be equipped with couplers having this vertical restraint capability. (b) Test verification. Except...

  9. 45 CFR 1310.11 - Child Restraint Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Child Restraint Systems. 1310.11 Section 1310.11... PROGRAM HEAD START TRANSPORTATION Transportation Requirements § 1310.11 Child Restraint Systems. (a... safety restraint systems. (b) ...

  10. Restraint, tendency toward overeating and ice cream consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Strien, T; Cleven, A.H.G.; Schippers, G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The examination of the prediction of grams of ice cream eaten by preload, restraint, susceptibility toward overeating, and interaction terms. METHOD: A milkshake-ice cream study on 200 females using the Restraint Scale (RS) and the restraint and disinhibition scales from the Three-Factor

  11. The use of restraints in psychiatric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-17

    Sep 17, 2009 ... and careful physical examination. The initial assessment should determine whether restraint is contraindicated or must be used with caution. 2. The core competencies of clinical staff should be continuously monitored and evaluated. These competencies to include early recognition of signs/symptoms of ...

  12. Restraint Age Forming Of Machined Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca

    1993-01-01

    Panels bent permanently without cracking. In restraint age forming, panel wrapped onto mandrel having necessary curved contour, restrained on mandrel clamps and vacuum, and heat treated. When panel released after end of heat treatment, retains contour of mandrel except for small springback. Process repeatable: panels subsequently processed under same mechanical and thermal conditions on same contour emerge with same final contour.

  13. Rollover: a methodology for restraint system development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altamore, P.F.; Ridella, S.A.; Nayef, A.

    2001-01-01

    Concern about crash conditions other than frontal and side crashes has accelerated restraint development with respect to rollover events. Previous analysis of rollover field data indicates the high probability of ejection and consequent serious injury or death to unbelted occupants. Partial ejection

  14. Restraint and Seclusion with Institutionalized Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Tony D.

    1990-01-01

    Tens of thousands of the nation's young people are placed in psychiatric and criminal justice programs annually. Within those settings, many confront an assortment of restraint and seclusionary measures. This paper discusses the population of young people exposed to such procedures and examines the implications within these settings and elsewhere.…

  15. Restraint reduction: research utilization and case study with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, P A; Christy, K; Berkebile, J; Miller, C; Farrish, A

    1999-01-01

    Although great strides have been made in restraint reduction, restraints still present a challenge for long-term care facilities. Restraint reduction is particularly difficult with cognitively impaired residents. This article presents the implementation of a research-based approach to restraint reduction and a case study with a cognitively impaired resident. Two year after implementing the research-based approach, the restraint rate had decreased 28%. The case study with the cognitively impaired resident revealed an increase in nurse contacts but a decrease in nurse time after restraint reduction. Concern for the cognitively impaired resident's safety remained an issue for the staff. Discussion includes weighing the risk/benefit ratio of restraint use and considering dignity and quality of life.

  16. [Effects of a training of power and balance on the use of mechanical restraint among in-patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Tilman; Bohnet, Ulrich; Flammer, Erich; Lüchtenberg, Dietmar; Eisele, Frank

    2009-09-01

    Patients with dementia are most frequently affected by mechanical restraint in psychiatric hospitals, most frequently due to falls. There is evidence for beneficial effects of a training of power and balance on the frequency of falls in residential homes. An adapted training of power and balance was developed by specialists of training in sports. In 2007, 159 patients with dementia were trained. The frequency and duration of mechanical restraint was compared with a control group of a different hospital (n = 217) and the patients treated in the year before (n = 164). The percentage of patients with mechanical restraint and the mean duration of restraint per admission were significantly lower than in the control group. However, only a non-significant reduction could be achieved in comparison with the patients treated in the year before without an increase of falls. A considerable reduction of the use of mechanical restraint in patients with dementia is feasible. An unequivocal association with the training could not be confirmed due to other influencing factors.

  17. A Multifunctional Joint Angle Sensor with Measurement Adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Quan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a multifunctional joint sensor with measurement adaptability for biological engineering applications, such as gait analysis, gesture recognition, etc. The adaptability is embodied in both static and dynamic environment measurements, both of body pose and in motion capture. Its multifunctional capabilities lay in its ability of simultaneous measurement of multiple degrees of freedom (MDOF with a single sensor to reduce system complexity. The basic working mode enables 2DOF spatial angle measurement over big ranges and stands out for its applications on different joints of different individuals without recalibration. The optional advanced working mode enables an additional DOF measurement for various applications. By employing corrugated tube as the main body, the sensor is also characterized as flexible and wearable with less restraints. MDOF variations are converted to linear displacements of the sensing elements. The simple reconstruction algorithm and small outputs volume are capable of providing real-time angles and long-term monitoring. The performance assessment of the built prototype is promising enough to indicate the feasibility of the sensor.

  18. Gold Mine or Minefield: Understanding Russian Law on Vertical Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Rucker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the Russian Federation represents a significant opportunity for growth, that opportunity is coupled with serious risks. As it relates to managing product distribution, Russian vertical restraint law remains significantly more restrictive than that of the U.S. and, since unless a company is fully integrated, it must manage its distribution system by way of vertical agreements, presents a large problem for businesses seeking to conduct business in Russia. While Russia has made significant steps in the right direction, the lack of consistent application of economic analysis to evaluation of vertical restraints leaves companies exposed. Further, the sometimes inconsistent application of the laws also makes it hard to predict how any particular vertical agreement would be evaluated. Neither American nor Russian antitrust laws establish a list of possible vertical restraints. Thus, there is no exhaustive guidance regarding how these restraints should be treated. U.S. antitrust laws, however, generally place all vertical restraints into one of two categories, intrabrand restraints and interbrand restraints. Intrabrand restraints are those that restrain the downstream firm’s freedom with regard to the resale of the product at issue (distribution restrictions. Interbrand restraints are those that restrict a downstream or upstream firm’s freedom to deal with competitors of the firm imposing the restraint (interbrand restrictions. It should be noted that Russian law does not make this distinction.

  19. Gold Mine or Minefield: Understanding Russian Law on Vertical Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Rucker

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available While the Russian Federation represents a significant opportunity for growth, that opportunity is coupled with serious risks. As it relates to managing product distribution, Russian vertical restraint law remains significantly more restrictive than that of the U.S. and, since unless a company is fully integrated, it must manage its distribution system by way of vertical agreements, presents a large problem for businesses seeking to conduct business in Russia. While Russia has made significant steps in the right direction, the lack of consistent application of economic analysis to evaluation of vertical restraints leaves companies exposed. Further, the sometimes inconsistent application of the laws also makes it hard to predict how any particular vertical agreement would be evaluated. Neither American nor Russian antitrust laws establish a list of possible vertical restraints. Thus, there is no exhaustive guidance regarding how these restraints should be treated. U.S. antitrust laws, however, generally place all vertical restraints into one of two categories, intrabrand restraints and interbrand restraints. Intrabrand restraints are those that restrain the downstream firm’s freedom with regard to the resale of the product at issue (distribution restrictions. Interbrand restraints are those that restrict a downstream or upstream firm’s freedom to deal with competitors of the firm imposing the restraint (interbrand restrictions. It should be noted that Russian law does not make this distinction.

  20. Loneliness, dysphoria, dietary restraint, and eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, K J; Flood, D

    1999-01-01

    The study was designed to examine Herman and Polivy's restrained eating theory (Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 84, 666-672, 1975) using two different methods: situational-experimental and dispositional-correlational. Fifty-eight female college students were administered the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory (Short Form), and the Restraint scale. Subsequently, the students were subjected to either a neutral, sad, or loneliness mood induction and then ate cookies under the pretext of participating in a taste test. Consistent with expectation, dieters tended to consume more food in the loneliness than neutral mood condition, whereas nondieters displayed the opposite pattern. A comparable pattern was found in the relation between the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and food consumption with respect to Restraint; the amount of food consumed increased as a function of loneliness for high restrained eaters, whereas the amount of food consumed decreased as a function of loneliness for low restrained eaters. There were no appreciable effects of the sad mood induction, nor prediction by dispositional depression, regarding the amount of food consumed as a function of dietary restraint. The findings were discussed with respect to the motivational role that loneliness may play in inhibiting and disinhibiting food consumption.

  1. Dietary restraint and heightened reactivity to food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Yates, Heather M; Witcomb, Gemma L

    2004-03-01

    Previously, studies have explored the relationship between dietary behavior and salivary reactivity to food. Despite this, it remains unclear which behaviors are associated with enhanced reactivity. One problem is that measures of behavior have not been compared directly. In particular, it is unclear whether elevated reactivity is associated with measures of dietary restraint or with measures of failed dietary control and a tendency to overeat. To address this problem, we compared the association between salivary reactivity and scores on the subscales of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (restraint, disinhibition, and hunger). Estimates of reactivity were derived from the difference between a baseline saliva measure and a similar measure taken in close proximity to hot pizza. Our second aim was to explore how salivary reactivity changes after a meal. Female participants (N=40) were tested before and after a lunch (cheese sandwiches). All tended to show reactivity to pizza before but not after lunch. No significant differences were associated with the disinhibition or hunger subscales. However, prelunch reactivity was significantly greater in those participants with high scores on the restraint scale. This does not appear to be related to reported levels of hunger before lunch. Rather, it may reveal an intrinsic difference between the reaction of restrained and unrestrained eaters to food.

  2. End effector with astronaut foot restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a foot restraint platform designed primarily for use by an astronaut being rigidly and permanently attached to an end effector which is suitable for attachment to the manipulator arm of a remote manipulating system is described. The foot restraint platform is attached by a brace to the end effector at a location away from the grappling interface of the end effector. The platform comprises a support plate provided with a pair of stirrups for receiving the toe portion of an astronaut's boots when standing on the platform and a pair of heel retainers in the form of raised members which are fixed to the surface of the platform and located to provide abutment surfaces for abutting engagement with the heels of the astronaut's boots when his toes are in the stirrups. The heel retainers preclude a backward sliding movement of the feet on the platform and instead require a lifting of the heels in order to extract the feet. The brace for attaching the foot restraint platform to the end effector may include a pivot or swivel joint to permit various orientations of the platform with respect to the end effector.

  3. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorholt, Wilhelm; Luci, Raymond K.

    1986-01-01

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  4. The Effect of a Restraint Reduction Program on Physical Restraint Rates in Rehabilitation Settings in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Claudia K. Y.; Chow, Susan K. Y.; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Wong, Ivan Y. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. In view of the adverse effects of using restraints, studies examining the use of restraint reduction programs (RRPs) are needed. Objectives. To investigate the effect of an RRP on the reduction of physical restraint rates in rehabilitation hospitals. Methods. A prospective quasi-experimental clinical trial was conducted. Demographic data, medical and health-related information on recruited patients from two rehabilitation hospitals, as well as facility data on restraint rates were collected. Results. The increase in the restraint rate in the control site was 4.3 times greater than that in the intervention site. Changes in the restraint mode, from continuous to intermittent, and the type of restraint used were found between the pre- and postintervention periods in both the control site and the intervention site. Discussion. Compared with that in the control site, the RRP in the intervention site helped arrest any increase in the restraint rate although it had no effect on physical restraint reduction. The shift of restraint mode from continuous to intermittent in the intervention site was one of the positive outcomes of the RRP. PMID:22110972

  5. Staff resistance to restraint reduction: identifying & overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Staci Silver

    2007-05-01

    Professional organizations, regulating agencies, and hospital administrators have taken a strong stance on restraint reduction policies. When implementing a restraint reduction initiative, it is important to identify the barriers to restraint reduction, such as concern for personal safety, lack of knowledge about and practice using alternate de-escalation skills, and fear of disrupting the therapeutic milieu by using a variety of de-escalation methods. Education aimed to reduce the use of restraints needs to do more than simply provide information. It is important to acknowledge the emotional response of the nursing staff and the culture of the current practice. A variety of educational strategies, including role-playing, and case studies will help identify attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are congruent with reducing the use of restraints. If the ultimate goal of restraint reduction is philosophical change, it will eventually lead to a new culture of practice.

  6. Psychiatric Nurses’ Perceptions about Physical Restraint; A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidooni Moghadam, Malek; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Pazargadi, Mehrnoosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of physical restraint as an intervention in the care of psychiatric patients dates back to the beginning of psychiatry. Although it is a challenging question, it is still one of the common procedures in psychiatry. Considering that very little research has been done in Iran in relation to physical restraint, this qualitative study aimed to investigate the experiences of  nurses working in psychiatric wards regarding physical restraint. Methods: This qualitative study was done on 14 nurses working in the psychiatric hospitals of Ahvaz city, southern Iran, during 2011-2012. The participants were selected by purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection, which were continued until data saturation and emergence of themes. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Four categories emerged: (1) Restraint as a multi-purpose procedure, (2) Processing of physical restraint, (3) Restraint as a challenging subject and (4) The effects of restraint on the spectrum. Each category has several different sub-categories. Conclusion: The participants described using physical restraint as one of the main strategies to control psychiatric patients, and despite having negative consequences, it is extensively used. Given the risks and challenges of using physical restraint, nursing education should find alternative methods. PMID:25349842

  7. Effects of a recovery-oriented cognitive therapy training program on inpatient staff attitudes and incidents of seclusion and restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nadine A; Grant, Paul M; Luther, Lauren; Beck, Aaron T

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of implementing a recovery-oriented cognitive therapy (CT-R) milieu training program in an urban acute psychiatric inpatient unit. Over a 1-month period, 29 staff members learned short-term CT-R strategies and techniques in an 8-h workshop. Trainees' perceptions of CT-R, beliefs about the therapeutic milieu, and attitudes about working with individuals with psychosis were evaluated both before the workshop and 6 months after the workshop had been completed. Incidents of seclusion and restraint on the unit were also tallied prior to and after the training. Results indicate that staff perceptions of CT-R and their beliefs about the therapeutic environment significantly improved, whereas staff attitudes towards individuals with psychosis remained the same. Incidents of seclusion and restraint also decreased after the training. These findings provide evidence that CT-R training is feasible and can improve the therapeutic milieu of an acute psychiatric inpatient unit.

  8. Belt restraint reduction in nursing homes: design of a quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Erik

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of physical restraints still is common practice in the nursing home care. Since physical restraints have been shown to be an ineffective and sometimes even hazardous measure, interventions are needed to reduce their usage. Several attempts have been made to reduce the use of physical restraints. Most studies used educational approaches and introduced a nurse specialist as a consultant. However, the success rate of these interventions has been inconsistent. We developed a new multi-component intervention (EXBELT comprising an educational intervention for nursing home staff in combination with a policy change (belt use is prohibited by the nursing home management, availability of a nurse specialist and nursing home manager as consultants, and availability of alternative interventions. The first aim of this study is to further develop and test the effectiveness of EXBELT on belt restraint reduction in Dutch psychogeriatric nursing homes. However, the reduction of belts should not result in an increase of other restrictive restraints (such as a chair with locked tray table or psychoactive drug use. The overall aim is an effective and feasible intervention that can be employed on a large scale in Dutch nursing homes. Methods and design Effects of EXBELT will be studied in a quasi-experimental longitudinal study design. Alongside the effect evaluation, a process evaluation will be carried out in order to further develop EXBELT. Data regarding age, gender, use of physical restraints, the number of falls and fall related injuries, psychoactive drug use, and the use of alternative interventions will be collected at baseline and after four and eight months of follow-up. Data regarding the process evaluation will be gathered in a period of eight months between baseline and the last measurement. Furthermore, changing attitudes will become an important addition to the educational part of EXBELT. Discussion A quasi

  9. The restraint bias: how the illusion of self-restraint promotes impulsive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordgren, L.F.; van Harreveld, F.; van der Pligt, J.

    2009-01-01

    Four studies examined how impulse-control beliefs—beliefs regarding one's ability to regulate visceral impulses, such as hunger, drug craving, and sexual arousal—influence the self-control process. The findings provide evidence for a restraint bias: a tendency for people to overestimate their

  10. Measuring dietary restraint status: Comparisons between the Dietary Intent Scale and the Restraint Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Boyce

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of young women’s self-reported dietary restraint status is complex. Compared to Herman and Polivy’s commonly utilized Restraint Scale (RS, Stice’s Dietary Intent Scale (DIS is less understood. Because the DIS is becoming a popular research tool, it is important to understand how this scale compares to more traditional measures of restraint. We conducted two correlational studies (Study 1 N = 110; Study 2 N = 216 to ascertain the similarities and the differences between the DIS and - as a comparison measure - the well-researched RS. We explored how the two scales were related to several body image variables (e.g., thin-ideal internalization; with a range of self-regulatory variables (e.g., dispositional self-control; with observed food intake during a taste test; and with 18-month weight change (Study 2 only. Participants were female University students and were not selected for dieting or disordered eating. Unlike RS scores, DIS scores were not significantly correlated with the majority of variables tapping into unsuccessful self-regulation. However, our data also highlighted similarities between the two restraint scales (e.g., association with 18-month weight-loss and demonstrated that not only were participants’ DIS scores un-related to unsuccessful self-regulatory variables, neither were they related to the variables tapping into successful self-regulation.

  11. Reducing Restraint With Clozapine in Involuntarily Admitted Patients With Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifteni, Petru; Szalontay, Andreea S; Teodorescu, Andreea

    In the entire world, restraint and seclusion are common interventions in psychiatric inpatient settings because of aggressive behavior. Our objective was to test for the immediate antiaggressive property of clozapine compared with other antipsychotic treatments in an enriched cohort with high rates of restraint during early hospitalization. We present a retrospective chart review in all involuntary admissions with schizophrenia during 2011-2014 in Psychiatry and Neurology Hospital, Brasov, Romania. Timing and number of restraints in addition to clinical, demographic, and treatment characteristics were extracted. Based on our earlier observation of clinical efficacy of early, fast titration of clozapine, we tested the hypothesis that clozapine treatment was associated with reduced use of restraint and with longer restraint-free periods. In 115 consecutive patients with schizophrenia (age = 39.7 ± 11.1 years; male = 59%) involuntarily admitted because of externalized (74.7%) or self-directed violence (25.2%), restraint was used in 89.6%; with a median duration of 3 hours until restraint past admission. Antipsychotics used immediately after hospitalization included haloperidol (70.4%), clozapine (11.3%), olanzapine (10.4%), and other second-generation antipsychotics (7.9%). Comparison of restraint characteristics favored immediate clozapine use with highly reduced rates of restraint (23% vs. 95.6%; P < 0.001) and significantly extended hours until restraint [(118, 24, 426 hours) vs. (3, 0.25, 48 hours); median; 25th, 75th percentile; P < 0.001] relative to the remaining cohort. These effects remained highly significant after controlling for potential moderators of restraint use in multivariate models. These retrospective data suggest an early antiaggressive effect of clozapine during the immediate use of clozapine in highly problematic patients.

  12. Restraint Use in Older Adults Receiving Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepmans, Kristien; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Paquay, Louis; Van Gansbeke, Hendrik; Milisen, Koen

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence, types, frequency, and duration of restraint use in older adults receiving home nursing care and to determine factors involved in the decision-making process for restraint use and application. Cross-sectional survey of restraint use in older adults receiving home care completed by primary care nurses. Homes of older adults receiving care from a home nursing organization in Belgium. Randomized sample of older adults receiving home care (N = 6,397; mean age 80.6; 66.8% female). For each participant, nurses completed an investigator-constructed and -validated questionnaire collecting information demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics and aspects of restraint use. A broad definition of restraint was used that includes a range of restrictive actions. Restraints were used in 24.7% of the participants, mostly on a daily basis (85%) and often for a long period (54.5%, 24 h/d). The most common reason for restraint use was safety (50.2%). Other reasons were that the individual wanted to remain at home longer, which necessitated the use of restraints (18.2%) and to provide respite for the informal caregiver (8.6%). The latter played an important role in the decision and application process. The physician was less involved in the process. In 64.5% of cases, there was no evaluation after restraint use was initiated. Use of restraints is common in older adults receiving home care nursing in Belgium. These results contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of use of restraints in home care, a situation that may be even more complex than in nursing homes and acute hospital settings. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Influence of physical restraint on the onset of experimentally induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of intermittent repeated physical restraint on the onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) was in-vestigated in this study. The study compared the onset of DM in mice dosed with streptozotocin (STZ), a DM-inducing drug, with immediate subsequent exposure to either physical restraint stress or non- exposure to the stress.

  14. 30 CFR 57.9301 - Dump site restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dump site restraints. 57.9301 Section 57.9301 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 57.9301 Dump site restraints. Berms, bumper blocks, safety hooks, or similar impeding devices shall...

  15. Use of Restraint in the Psychiatric Setting: Knowledge of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Restraint is a widely used method of controlling patient's behaviour throughout the world. However, next to nothing is known about its use in the developing countries. Aims: To assess the knowledge of medical staff of a Nigerian psychiatric hospital concerning the use of restraint. Methods: We administered a ...

  16. Restraint, Detainment, and Seclusion of Students in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, Deidra Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how the courts have addressed the restraint, detainment, and seclusion of students in public schools. The study includes an analysis of 100 court cases on the topic of restraint, detainment, and seclusion of students in public schools, which occurred in state and federal jurisdictions, from 1977 to 2012. Cases were examined…

  17. Seclusion and Restraint: Federal Updates and Advocacy Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt, Kelly; Klotz, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, allegations of abuse and death related to seclusion and restraint, media coverage of these events, subsequent federal investigations, and Congressional hearings about this topic have resulted in increased pressure on Congress to pass legislation to address the use of seclusion and restraint in the school setting.…

  18. 30 CFR 56.9301 - Dump site restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dump site restraints. 56.9301 Section 56.9301 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.9301 Dump site restraints. Berms, bumper blocks, safety hooks, or similar impeding devices shall...

  19. Dietary Restraint Moderates Genetic Risk for Binge Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Sarah E.; Burt, S. Alexandra; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt; Klump, Kelly L.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary restraint is a prospective risk factor for the development of binge eating and bulimia nervosa. Although many women engage in dietary restraint, relatively few develop binge eating. Dietary restraint may only increase susceptibility for binge eating in individuals who are at genetic risk. Specifically, dietary restraint may be a behavioral “exposure” factor that activates genetic predispositions for binge eating. We investigated this possibility in 1,678 young adolescent and adult same-sex female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study and the Michigan State University Twin Registry. Twin moderation models were used to examine whether levels of dietary restraint moderate genetic and environmental influences on binge eating. Results indicated that genetic and non-shared environmental factors for binge eating increased at higher levels of dietary restraint. Importantly, these effects were present after controlling for age, body mass index, and genetic and environmental overlap among dietary restraint and binge eating. Results suggest that dietary restraint may be most important for individuals at genetic risk for binge eating, and the combination of these factors could enhance individual differences in risk for binge eating. PMID:21171725

  20. Restraint Use in Residential Programs: Why Are Best Practices Ignored?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBel, Janice; Huckshorn, Kevin Ann; Caldwell, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Several states and providers have embarked on initiatives to reduce using restraint and seclusion in residential programs. Restraint and seclusion are associated with harm to youth and staff, significant costs, reduced quality of care, and less engagement of youth and families. Successful reduction/prevention strategies have been identified,…

  1. Continuous restraint control systems: safety improvement for various occupants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, E. van der; Jager, B. de; Veldpaus, F.; Steinbuch, M.; Nunen, E. van; Willemsen, D.

    2009-01-01

    Occupant safety can be significantly improved by continuous restraint control systems. These restraint systems adjust their configuration during the impact according to the actual operating conditions, such as occupant size, weight, occupant position, belt usage and crash severity. In this study,

  2. Child restraint system for children in cars - CREST results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, M.; Cassan, F.; Trosseille, X.

    2001-01-01

    Child restraint systems (CRS) for cars are intended to protect children in the case of a car accident. Unfortunately their effectiveness is still too low: in the range 30-50% when it would be expected to be much higher. The low effectiveness of child restraint systems can partly be explained for the

  3. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following physical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S B; Jensen, T N; Bolwig, T

    2005-01-01

    physical restraint may occur in spite of no pre-existing risk factors. Medical guidelines for the prevention of thrombosis following physical restraint are presented. Despite the absence of controlled trials of treatment effectiveness, the catastrophic outcome of DVT and PE warrants early and vigorous......OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following the use of physical restraint in a patient with a diagnosis of acute delusional psychotic disorder. METHOD: A new case report of DVT and PE associated with prolonged physical restraint is presented....... The literature on physical restraint, DVT, and PE was reviewed using a search of Medline and Psychinfo from 1966 to the present. RESULTS: Four other reported cases of DVT and PE were found in association with physically restrained patients. CONCLUSION: Risk of DVT and PE in association with immobilization during...

  4. Multipurpose Crew Restraints for Long Duration Space Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Baggerman, Susan; Ortiz, M. R.; Hua, L.; Sinnott, P.; Webb, L.

    2004-01-01

    With permanent human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS), a crew will be living and working in microgravity, interfacing with their physical environment. Without optimum restraints and mobility aids (R&MA' s), the crewmembers may be handicapped for perfonning some of the on-orbit tasks. In addition to weightlessness, the confined nature of a spacecraft environment results in ergonomic challenges such as limited visibility and access to the activity area and may cause prolonged periods of unnatural postures. Thus, determining the right set of human factors requirements and providing an ergonomically designed environment are crucial to astronauts' well-being and productivity. The purpose of this project is to develop requirements and guidelines, and conceptual designs, for an ergonomically designed multi-purpose crew restraint. In order to achieve this goal, the project would involve development of functional and human factors requirements, design concept prototype development, analytical and computer modeling evaluations of concepts, two sets of micro gravity evaluations and preparation of an implementation plan. It is anticipated that developing functional and design requirements for a multi-purpose restraint would facilitate development of ergonomically designed restraints to accommodate the off-nominal but repetitive tasks, and minimize the performance degradation due to lack of optimum setup for onboard task performance. In addition, development of an ergonomically designed restraint concept prototype would allow verification and validation of the requirements defined. To date, we have identified "unique" tasks and areas of need, determine characteristics of "ideal" restraints, and solicit ideas for restraint and mobility aid concepts. Focus group meetings with representatives from training, safety, crew, human factors, engineering, payload developers, and analog environment representatives were key to assist in the development of a restraint

  5. An editor for the generation and customization of geometry restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Nigel W; Draizen, Eli J; Adams, Paul D

    2017-02-01

    Chemical restraints for use in macromolecular structure refinement are produced by a variety of methods, including a number of programs that use chemical information to generate the required bond, angle, dihedral, chiral and planar restraints. These programs help to automate the process and therefore minimize the errors that could otherwise occur if it were performed manually. Furthermore, restraint-dictionary generation programs can incorporate chemical and other prior knowledge to provide reasonable choices of types and values. However, the use of restraints to define the geometry of a molecule is an approximation introduced with efficiency in mind. The representation of a bond as a parabolic function is a convenience and does not reflect the true variability in even the simplest of molecules. Another complicating factor is the interplay of the molecule with other parts of the macromolecular model. Finally, difficult situations arise from molecules with rare or unusual moieties that may not have their conformational space fully explored. These factors give rise to the need for an interactive editor for WYSIWYG interactions with the restraints and molecule. Restraints Editor, Especially Ligands (REEL) is a graphical user interface for simple and error-free editing along with additional features to provide greater control of the restraint dictionaries in macromolecular refinement.

  6. Psychiatric Nurses' Attitude and Practice toward Physical Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Amal Sobhy

    2017-02-01

    This study was to assess psychiatric nurses' attitude and practice toward physical restraint among mentally ill patients. A descriptive research design was used to achieve the study objective. The present study was carried out in three specialized governmental mental hospitals and two psychiatric wards in general hospital. A convenient purposive sample of 96 nurses who were working in the previously mentioned setting was included. The tool used for data collection was the Self-Administered Structured Questionnaire; it included three parts: The first comprised items concerned with demographic characteristics of the nurses, the second comprised 10 item measuring nurses' attitudes toward physical restraint, and the third was used to assess nurses' practices regarding use of physical restraint. There were insignificant differences between attitudes and practices in relation to nurses' sex, level of education, years of experience and work place. Moreover, a positive significant correlation was found between nurses' total attitude scores, and practices regarding use of physical restraint. Psychiatric nurses have positive attitude and adequate practice toward using physical restraints as an alternative management for psychiatric patients. It is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. The study recommended that it is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical Restraint of People with Intellectual Disability: A Review of Implementation Reduction and Elimination Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, James K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This review describes procedures to reduce and eliminate physical restraint of people with intellectual disability. One approach is to assess antecedent conditions associated with restraint and change them so that they no longer produce restraint-provoking behaviour. A second approach is to decrease the duration of restraint by…

  8. 42 CFR 483.358 - Orders for the use of restraint or seclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Orders for the use of restraint or seclusion. 483... FACILITIES Condition of Participation for the Use of Restraint or Seclusion in Psychiatric Residential... for the use of restraint or seclusion. (a) Orders for restraint or seclusion must be by a physician...

  9. 32 CFR 884.3 - Placing member under restraint pending delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Placing member under restraint pending delivery... member under restraint pending delivery. Continue restraint only as long as is reasonably necessary to... cause exists and whether a reasonable belief exists that restraint is necessary, the commander should...

  10. 28 CFR 552.24 - Use of four-point restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of four-point restraints. 552.24... CUSTODY Use of Force and Application of Restraints on Inmates § 552.24 Use of four-point restraints. When the Warden determines that four-point restraints are the only means available to obtain and maintain...

  11. Restraints in daily care for people with moderate intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meulen, Anne Pier S; Hermsen, Maaike A; Embregts, Petri Jcm

    2018-02-01

    Self-determination is an important factor in improving the quality of life of people with moderate intellectual disabilities. A focus on self-determination implies that restraints on the freedom of people with intellectual disabilities should be decreased. In addition, according to the Dutch Care and Coercion bill, regular restraints of freedom, such as restrictions on choice of food or whom to visit, should be discouraged. Such restraints are only allowed if there is the threat of serious harm for the clients or their surroundings. What do support staff consider as restraints on freedom and how do they justify these restraints? In this study, data were collected by semi-structured interviews. Participants and research context: Fifteen support staff working with clients with moderate intellectual disabilities were interviewed. All participants work within the same organisation for people with intellectual disabilities in the Eastern part of the Netherlands. Ethical considerations: The study was conducted according to good scientific inquiry guidelines and ethical approval was obtained from a university ethics committee. Most restraints of freedom were found to be centred around the basic elements in the life of the client, such as eating, drinking and sleeping. In justifying these restraints, support staff said that it was necessary to give clarity in what clients are supposed to do, to structure their life and to keep them from danger. In the justification of restraints of freedom two ethical viewpoints, a principle-guided approach and an ethics of care approach, are opposing one other. Here, the self-determination theory can be helpful, while it combines the autonomy of the client, relatedness to others and the client's competence. Despite the reasonable grounds support staff gave for restraining, it raises the question whether restraints of freedom are always in the interest of the client.

  12. Taser use in restraint-related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strote, Jared; Range Hutson, H

    2006-01-01

    The Taser is an electric weapon capable of releasing significant amounts of electricity in rapid pulses, causing uncontrollable muscle contraction. Use of this weapon has dramatically increased over the past decade, and it is now commonly used by law enforcement officers nationwide. Emergency medical services providers are, likewise, seeing more patients who have recently been subjected to application of a Taser. We examined the autopsy reports of patients who died after application of a Taser in an attempt to identify high-risk interactions. This is a case series of Taser-related deaths. Fatalities occurring over four years beginning in January 2001 were identified through an Internet search, and autopsy reports were requested. Reports were analyzed for patient demographics, preexisting cardiac disease, toxicology, evidence of excited delirium, restraint techniques used, and listed cause of death. Of 75 cases identified, 37 (49.3%) had autopsy reports available for review. All cases involved men, with ages ranging from 18 to 50 years. Cardiovascular disease was found in 54.1%. Illegal substance use was found on toxicology screening for 78.4%; within that group, 86.2% were found to have been using stimulants. A diagnosis of excited delirium was given for 75.7% of the cases. Use of a Taser was considered a potential or contributory cause of death in 27%. This is the largest review of Taser-related fatalities reported in the medical literature. The findings are consistent with prior studies, suggesting a high frequency of restraint-related and excited delirium-related fatalities.

  13. Pencil It in: Exploring the Feasibility of Hand-Drawn Pencil Electrochemical Sensors and Their Direct Comparison to Screen-Printed Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bernalte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We explore the fabrication, physicochemical characterisation (SEM, Raman, EDX and XPS and electrochemical application of hand-drawn pencil electrodes (PDEs upon an ultra-flexible polyester substrate; investigating the number of draws (used for their fabrication, the pencil grade utilised (HB to 9B and the electrochemical properties of an array of batches (i.e, pencil boxes. Electrochemical characterisation of the PDEs, using different batches of HB grade pencils, is undertaken using several inner- and outer-sphere redox probes and is critically compared to screen-printed electrodes (SPEs. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated for the electrochemical sensing of dopamine and acetaminophen using PDEs, which are found to exhibit competitive limits of detection (3σ upon comparison to SPEs. Nonetheless, it is important to note that a clear lack of reproducibility was demonstrated when utilising these PDEs fabricated using the HB pencils from different batches. We also explore the suitability and feasibility of a pencil-drawn reference electrode compared to screen-printed alternatives, to see if one can draw the entire sensing platform. This article reports a critical assessment of these PDEs against that of its screen-printed competitors, questioning the overall feasibility of PDEs’ implementation as a sensing platform.

  14. Restraint use in acute and critical care settings: changing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Beth

    2002-05-01

    Reduction of physical restraint use in the acute and critical care setting is a complex issue. Ethical considerations, regulatory and professional standards, legal liability concerns, healthcare team members' knowledge and attitudes, and unit culture and practice traditions must all be considered. Restraint reduction programs may use a process improvement format that engages the support of the organization's leadership. Specific interventions for restraint reduction, such as understanding the meaning of a patient's behavior, using a team approach, and involving the family can be evaluated and modified for application in the acute and critical care setting. Successful initiatives to decrease the use of restraint in this setting require an understanding of the many factors that support and oppose this practice.

  15. Child restraint use survey : LATCH use and misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    NHTSA conducted a survey from April to October 2005 to collect information about the types of restraint systems that were being used to keep children safe while riding in passenger vehicles. In particular, NHTSA was interested in whether drivers with...

  16. Restraint system usage in the traffic population. 1984 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    This report presents findings from four independent studies on occupant restraint use for various segments of the traffic population. Field observations, collected in 19 U.S. cities from January through December, 1984, are the basis for this report. ...

  17. Restraint use (seat belt and child passenger seat) survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    In Arizona, lack of restraint usage (seat belts and child passenger seats) was a contributing factor to an average of 687 fatalities per year which is nearly 60% of total fatalities. These tragic statistics could be dramatically decreased if effectiv...

  18. Restraint system usage in the traffic population. 1986 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    This report presents findings from four independent studies on occupant restraint use for various segments of the traffic population. Field observations, collected in 19 U.S. cities from January through December, 1986, are the basis for this report. ...

  19. Restraint of the Automobile in American Residential Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    Two techniques for restraining the use of the automobile have recently become popular in the United States: residential parking permit programs and traffic restraint devices. While both the these approaches are aimed at restraining the use of the aut...

  20. Restraint system usage in the traffic population. 1985 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    This report presents findings from four independen studies on occupant restraint use for various segments of the traffic population. Field observations, collected in 19 U.S. cities from January through December 1985, are the basis for this report. Th...

  1. Restraint system usage in the traffic population. 1983 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    This report presents findings from four independent studies on occupant restraint use for various segments of the traffic population. Field observations, collected in 19 U.S. cities from November, 1982 through December, 1983, are basis for this repor...

  2. Sanctions under GATT article XIX versus voluntary export restraints

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Franz Peter

    1988-01-01

    Voluntary export restraints play a substantial part in international trade today. This article compares the effects such restraints have upon certain exporting countries with the effect of sanctions applied under Article XIX of the GATT. It is shown that the microeconomic protectionism analysis used as a basis for the current debate on the reform of the GATT is unable to provide a conclusive answer as to which variant of protectionism would be preferable from the exporting economies' point of...

  3. Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas Lanthén

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine psychiatric patients’ experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients’ experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behaviour Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable.

  4. Ergonomic Evaluation of the Foot Restraint Equipment Device (FRED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Chmielewski, Cindy; Qazi, A. S.; Mount, Francis

    1999-01-01

    Within the scope of the Microgravity Workstation and Restraint Evaluation project, funded by the NASA Headquarters Life Sciences Division, evaluations were proposed to be conducted in ground, KC-135, and/or Shuttle environments to investigate the human factors engineering (HFE) issues concerning confined/unique workstations, including crew restraint requirements. As part of these evaluations, KC-135 flights were conducted to investigate user/ workstation/ restraint integration for microgravity use of the FRED with the RMS workstation. This evaluation was a pre-cursor to Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) - 904 on STS-88. On that mission, a small-statured astronaut will be using the FRED restraint while working at the Aft RMS workstation. The DSO will collect video for later posture analyses, as well as subjective data in the form of an electronic questionnaire. This report describes the current FRED KC-135 evaluations. The primary objectives were to evaluate the usability of the FRED and to verify the DSO in-flight setup. The restraint interface evaluation consisted of four basic areas of restraint use: 1) adjustability; 2) general usability and comfort; 3) usability at the RMS workstation; and 4) assembly and disassembly.

  5. Factors influencing decisions on seclusion and restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larue, C; Dumais, A; Ahern, E; Bernheim, E; Mailhot, M-P

    2009-06-01

    Seclusion with or without restraint is a measure for managing aggressive or agitated clients and promoting site security, particularly in an emergency psychiatric setting. The decision to control a potentially dangerous person's behaviour by removal or seclusion seems ethically justifiable in such a setting. However, although the decisions on these restrictive measures are based on rational needs, they are also influenced by the healthcare team's perceptions of the client and by the characteristics of the team and the environment. The purpose of this paper is to set out and categorize the factors in play in aggression- and agitation-management situations as perceived by the healthcare teams, particularly the nurses. The first part of the paper deals briefly with the settings in which control measures are applied in a province in eastern Canada and the effect of such measures on patients and healthcare teams. The second part identifies the factors involved in the management of agitation and aggression behaviour. The final part discusses the current spin-offs from this knowledge as well as promising paths for further research on the factors involved. The ultimate objective is to reduce recourse to coercive measures and enhance professional practices.

  6. Feasibility study of application of ROV-towed loop-loop EM sensor for mapping seafloor marine hydrothermal sulfide massive deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Ko, H.; Park, I.; Cho, S.; Won, I. J.; Funak, F.; Kim, H.

    2013-12-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits have gained much attention of scientific interest since 1970s. In recent years, as demand for metallic mineral resources such as copper, zinc, gold, and other rare earth material increases, together with modern enhancement of marine technology, SMS deposits become more competing and now being recognized as commercially viable mineral resources in near future. An off-shore experiment was performed with a new marine small loop electromagnetic (EM) survey system, which was developed primarily for exploration of seafloor hydrothermal deposits. The new marine system is a multi-frequency loop EM system so that it is designed to endure high pressure in deep sea up to 2000 m. To maintain altitude of the system from the seafloor in rough seafloor topography condition, the system was connected rigidly to ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle), which then tows the whole system for survey. We performed offshore tests with the new loop EM system by keeping altitude of ROV 2 m above from the seafloor at a depth of 300 m near off-shore. The ROV position and attitude while moving (pitch, roll, yaw) and CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, Depth) data are also recorded simultaneously with electromagnetic responses. Experiments showed that EM anomaly was clearly identified at the true location of metallic object, and the pattern of the EM responses matches well with the theoretical responses from a 3-D integral equation EM modeling code. With the test in offshore, we confirmed that the method of operation of the EM survey system by ROV was readily feasible, and the system could effectively be used to map actual seafloor hydrothermal deposits in the highly conductive seafloor environment.

  7. Risks Facing the Retailers and Vertical Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzagurova Nataliya, B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vertical restraints such as exclusive territories may be considered as an alternative to the compensation paid to retailers for taking the risks associated with market shocks. For the first time this approach has been put forward in (Rey and Tirole, 1986. In (Hansen and Motta, 2015 this concept has been further developed, but these authors have come a diametrically opposite result to what Rey & Tirole had reported. The goal of both papers was to compare exclusive territories and retailers’ competition from the point of view of the supplier. In (Rey and Tirole, 1986 the competition was the preferred solution, in (Hansen and Motta, 2015 - the exclusive territories. The explanation of this discrepancy proposed in (Hansen and Motta, 2015 doesn't look convincing enough. The paper proposes a new explanation based on the analysis of the attractiveness of the considered lotteries for the retailers. In (Rey and Tirole, 1986 they were ready to pay for the lottery, but in (Hansen and Motta, 2015 - pretend to get a compensation. Accordingly, in the first case the supplier prefers to allow competition between dealers, in the second - to provide exclusive territories in order to reduce the compensation to be paid to the dealer for participating in the lottery. The paper discusses that the better solution is to consider not the risks associated with market shocks, but the retailers’ risks associated with the so called «cooperative specific investments» (manufacturer can prefer another partner on ex post stage. Trying to support the retailers’ incentives to make cooperative investments, supplier voluntarily redistributes control in favor of retailers.

  8. Interventions via Social Influence for Emergent Suboptimal Restraint Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad KOBTI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although restraint use has increased primarily in developed countries, vehicle accident-related injuries and deaths continue to be a problem. Alongside lack of restraint use, studies involving suboptimal restraint use have gained recent popularity. In this study we investigate the use of social influence forinterventions to counter emerging suboptimal restraint use in groups of agents.A multi-agent simulation model is provided where dominant individuals use randomly assigned influence rates to repeatedly alter the knowledge of lessinfluential group members. Cultural influence is implemented via a cultural algorithm and used to simulate individuals affected by beliefs in the community. Objectives include investigating the emergence of patterns of restraint selection and use as well as interventions targeted at more influential agents. Results demonstrate that prominent patterns of behaviour similar to the influentialmembers of the groups do emerge. Furthermore, interventions targeted at influential group members outperform interventions targeted at a percentage of the population at large. Interventions succeed at some level both in the presence and absence of cultural influence.

  9. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMario, Edmund E.; Lawson, Charles N.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs.

  10. Effect of habituation on the susceptibility of the rat to restraint ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. S.; Martin, F.; Lambert, R.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and gravity of restraint ulcers were found to significantly diminish in rats previously exposed to brief periods of immobilization. The rats' becoming habituated to restraint conditions probably explains this phenomenon.

  11. Relations between dietary restraint, depressive symptoms, and binge eating; A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoor, S.T.P.; Stice, E.; Bekker, M.H.J.; Strien, T. van; Croon, M.A.; Heck, G.L. van

    2006-01-01

    Temporal relations between dietary restraint, depressive symptoms, and binge eating are tested through three competing models that demonstrate the relationship between future binge eating, dietary restraint and depressive symptoms. The pattern of relations and effect sizes suggest that depressive

  12. Comparative modelling by restraint-based conformational sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gore Swanand

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although comparative modelling is routinely used to produce three-dimensional models of proteins, very few automated approaches are formulated in a way that allows inclusion of restraints derived from experimental data as well as those from the structures of homologues. Furthermore, proteins are usually described as a single conformer, rather than an ensemble that represents the heterogeneity and inaccuracy of experimentally determined protein structures. Here we address these issues by exploring the application of the restraint-based conformational space search engine, RAPPER, which has previously been developed for rebuilding experimentally defined protein structures and for fitting models to electron density derived from X-ray diffraction analyses. Results A new application of RAPPER for comparative modelling uses positional restraints and knowledge-based sampling to generate models with accuracies comparable to other leading modelling tools. Knowledge-based predictions are based on geometrical features of the homologous templates and rules concerning main-chain and side-chain conformations. By directly changing the restraints derived from available templates we estimate the accuracy limits of the method in comparative modelling. Conclusion The application of RAPPER to comparative modelling provides an effective means of exploring the conformational space available to a target sequence. Enhanced methods for generating positional restraints can greatly improve structure prediction. Generation of an ensemble of solutions that are consistent with both target sequence and knowledge derived from the template structures provides a more appropriate representation of a structural prediction than a single model. By formulating homologous structural information as sets of restraints we can begin to consider how comparative models might be used to inform conformer generation from sparse experimental data.

  13. Service user perspectives on coercion and restraint in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Diana; Perry, Emma; Rae, Sarah; Good, Naomi

    2017-08-01

    Coercion remains a central aspect of many people's mental healthcare. It can include the use of legislation to restrict freedoms, the use of physical restraint, the restriction of freedom of movement and/or association, and the forced or covert administration of medication. There is good evidence that the use of such measures can traumatise service users. This article reports the findings of a survey of service users regarding their experiences of coercion and restraint and embeds this in the wider international and institutional environment.

  14. Motion sickness, body movement, and claustrophobia during passive restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugloire, Elise; Bonnet, Cédrick T; Riley, Michael A; Bardy, Benoît G; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2007-03-01

    Standing participants were passively restrained and exposed to oscillating visual motion. Thirty-nine percent of participants reported motion sickness. Despite passive restraint, participants exhibited displacements of the center of pressure, and prior to the onset of motion sickness the evolution of these displacements differed between participants who later became sick and those who did not. Claustrophobia occurred during restraint, but only among participants who became motion sick. The results are consistent with the postural instability theory of motion sickness. We discuss the possible relation between claustrophobia symptoms, postural movements and motion sickness incidence.

  15. An Analytical Particle Biogeochemical Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Evaluation of the technical and scientific feasibility of developing a model and sensor for the analytical optical determination of particle biogeochemical...

  16. 14 CFR 135.128 - Use of safety belts and child restraint systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of safety belts and child restraint systems. 135.128 Section 135.128 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF.... 213 (49 CFR 571.213)), vest- and harness-type child restraint systems, and lap held child restraints...

  17. 75 FR 68664 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Child Restraint Systems; Booster Seat Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Child Restraint... Standard 213, Child Restraint Systems. The report's title is: Booster Seat ] Effectiveness Estimates Based... standards for child restraint systems, including booster seats, manufactured for use in motor vehicles as...

  18. 49 CFR 579.25 - Reporting requirements for manufacturers of child restraint systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... restraint systems. 579.25 Section 579.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 579.25 Reporting requirements for manufacturers of child restraint systems. For each reporting period... introduction in interstate commerce, or imported child restraint systems into the United States, shall submit...

  19. 42 CFR 483.362 - Monitoring of the resident in and immediately after restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... restraint. 483.362 Section 483.362 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... CARE FACILITIES Condition of Participation for the Use of Restraint or Seclusion in Psychiatric....362 Monitoring of the resident in and immediately after restraint. (a) Clinical staff trained in the...

  20. 76 FR 16472 - Consumer Information; Program for Child Restraint Systems; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Consumer Information; Program for Child Restraint Systems... Car Assessment Program, to help caregivers find a child restraint system (``child safety seat'') that... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For non-legal issues related to the Vehicle-Child Restraint System (CRS) Fit...

  1. Use of Physical Restraints in Dutch Intensive Care Units: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, A.W. van der; Peelen, L.M.; Raijmakers, R.J.; Vroegop, R.L.; Bakker, D.F.; Tekatli, H.; Boogaard, M.H.W.A. van den; Slooter, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence indicates that harmful effects are associated with the use of physical restraint. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the use of physical restraint in intensive care units. Prevalence, adherence to protocols, and correlates of the use of physical restraint were determined.

  2. The Effects of Non-Contingent Self-Restraint on Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerth, Denise Marzullo; Progar, Patrick R.; Morales, Sabrina

    2009-01-01

    Background: Self-restraint is a pervasive phenomenon among individuals who engage in self-injurious behaviour (SIB). Materials and Methods: The present study examined the use of clothing as a socially acceptable alternative to self-restraint to reduce SIB and other topographies of self-restraint in an adolescent diagnosed with autism. Two separate…

  3. Independent Paramagnetic Restraints Through a Tagged Reporter Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R.; Munari, Francesca; Wegstroth, Melanie; Liu, Wei-Min; Ubbink, Marcellus; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Paramagnetic effects provide structure and dynamics information of biomolecules. We developed a robust method that paramagnetically lightens up high-molecular weight proteins through binding of a reporter protein that carries lanthanide tags at distinct locations. Transmission of several independent molecular alignments provides a multitude of paramagnetic restraints for proteins of unknown 3D structure. PMID:25293958

  4. Restraint stress and social defeat: What they have in common.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Simone Cristina; Canteras, Newton Sabino

    2015-07-01

    Bob Blanchard was a great inspiration for our studies on the neural basis of social defense. In the present study, we compared the hypothalamic pattern of activation between social defeat and restraint stress. As important stress situations, both defeated and immobilized animals displayed a substantial increase in Fos in the parvicellular part of the paraventricular nucleus,mostly in the region that contains the CRH neurons. In addition, socially defeated animals, but not restrained animals, recruited elements of the medial hypothalamic conspecific-responsive circuit, a region also engaged in other forms of social behavior. Of particular interest, both defeated and immobilized animals presented a robust increase in Fos expression in specific regions of the lateral hypothalamic area (i.e., juxtaparaventricular and juxtadorsomedial regions) likely to convey septo-hippocampal information encoding the environmental boundary restriction observed in both forms of stress, and in the dorsomedial part of the dorsal premammillary nucleus which seems to work as a key player for the expression of, at least, part of the behavioral responses during both restraint and social defeat. These results indicate interesting commonalities between social defeat and restraint stress, suggesting, for the first time, a septo-hippocampal–hypothalamic path likely to respond to the environmental boundary restriction that may act as common stressor component for both types of stress. Moreover, the comparison of the neural circuits mediating physical restraint and social defense revealed a possible path for encoding the entrapment component during social confrontation.

  5. Restraints in daily care for people with moderate intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, A.P.S.; Hermsen, Maaike; Embregts, P.J.C.M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Self-determination is an important factor in improving the quality of life of people with moderate intellectual disabilities. A focus on self-determination implies that restraints on the freedom of people with intellectual disabilities should be decreased. In addition, according to the

  6. Child restraint safety practices among Arab children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Epel, Orna; Magid, Avi; Bord, Shiran; Assi, Naseem; Klein, Michal; Levi, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Because the rate of injury and mortality from car crashes among Arab children is higher than among Jewish children in Israel, this study assesses the patterns of age-appropriate child restraint system (CRS) use in Arab towns in Israel. From October 2010 to September 2011, 4396 children ages 0 to 14 were observed while seated in vehicles in 9 Arab towns and villages in Israel. Among infants aged 0 to 1 year old, 31.2 percent were observed in an age-appropriate restraint, whereas among children aged 1 to 4 years, only 12.4 percent were age-appropriately restrained. Children aged 5 to 9 were observed to have the lowest levels of age-appropriate restraint use (1.3%). The variation between the various villages was large and dependent on the age of the child. The low rates of CRS use may explain to some degree the high rates of injury and mortality of Arab children in car crashes. These low rates indicate that previous interventions have not been successful in increasing restraint use in the Arab community in Israel and there is a need to plan targeted interventions specifically for this population. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Traffic Injury Prevention to view the supplemental file.

  7. Patient restrictions: are there ethical alternatives to seclusion and restraint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Raija; Välimäki, Maritta; Putkonen, Hanna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Scott, Anne; Joffe, Grigori

    2010-01-01

    The use of patient restrictions (e.g. involuntary admission, seclusion, restraint) is a complex ethical dilemma in psychiatric care. The present study explored nurses' (n = 22) and physicians' (n = 5) perceptions of what actually happens when an aggressive behaviour episode occurs on the ward and what alternatives to seclusion and restraint are actually in use as normal standard practice in acute psychiatric care. The data were collected by focus group interviews and analysed by inductive content analysis. The participants believed that the decision-making process for managing patients' aggressive behaviour contains some in-built ethical dilemmas. They thought that patients' subjective perspective received little attention. Nevertheless, the staff proposed and appeared to use a number of alternatives to minimize or replace the use of seclusion and restraint. Medical and nursing staff need to be encouraged and taught to: (1) tune in more deeply to reasons for patients' aggressive behaviour; and (2) use alternatives to seclusion and restraint in order to humanize patient care to a greater extent.

  8. Restraint stress impairs glucose homeostasis through altered insulin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the potential alteration in the level of insulin and adiponectin, as well as the expression of insulin receptors (INSR) and glucose transporter 4 GLUT-4 in chronic restraint stress rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and stress group in which the rats were ...

  9. Safety restraint systems in heavy truck rollover scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaats, P.M.A.; Coo, P.J.A. de

    2003-01-01

    Safety restraint systems have been widely applied in the passenger car industry. The heavy truck industry has followed along, integrating the seat belts in the seat system. The effectiveness of seat belts, in particular in rollover scenarios, was studied for a number of heavy truck rollover

  10. The Influence of Restraint Systems on Panel Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    2011-01-01

    When a panel is tested in uniaxial compression in a test machine, the boundary conditions are not quite the same as they would be if it were part of a complete structure. A restraint system may be used to simulate conditions found in a complete vehicle. Quantifying the quality of the restraint with only point-measurement devices can leave an inadequate characterization of the out-of-plane behavior. However, today s full-field displacement monitoring techniques allow for much more accurate views of the global panel deformation and strain, and therefore allow for a better understanding of panel behavior. In the current study, the behavior of a hat-stiffened and two rod-stiffened carbon-epoxy panels is considered. Panels were approximately 2 meters tall and 0.76 to 1.06 m wide. Unloaded edges were supported by knife edges and stiffeners were attached to a support structure at selected locations to restrain out-of-plane motion. A comparison is made between test results based on full-field measurements and analyses based on assumptions of boundary conditions of a completely rigid edge restraint and the absence of any edge restraint. Results indicate that motion at the restrained edges must be considered to obtain accurate test-analysis correlation.

  11. Restraint system usage in the traffic population. 1987 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    This study continued to monitor the use of occupant restraint systems and motorcycle/moped helmet usage in 19 U.S. cities during 1987. A total of 272,857 observations of automobile drivers indicated an overall driver safety belt usage rate of 42.3 pe...

  12. Ligamentous and capsular restraints to experimental posterior elbow joint dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutch, Søren R; Olsen, Bo S; Jensen, Steen L

    2003-01-01

    Pathological external forearm rotation (PEFR) relates to posterolateral elbow joint instability, and is considered a possible requisite step in a simple posterior elbow joint dislocation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capsuloligamentous restraint to PEFR. In all, 18 elbow joint...

  13. The relationship between restraints of trade and garden leave ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    garden leave" clause and a post-termination restraint of trade clause in employment contracts, in view of the decision in Vodacom (Pty) Ltd v Motsa 2016 3 SA 116 (LC). The Labour Court grappled with the question of whether the enforcement of ...

  14. Reward Improves Cancellation and Restraint Inhibition across Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinopoli, Katia J.; Schachar, Russell; Dennis, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory control allows for the regulation of thought and action and interacts with motivational variables, such as reward, to modify behavior adaptively as environments change. The authors examined the effects of reward on two distinct forms of inhibitory control, cancellation and restraint. Typically developing children and adolescents…

  15. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Wynn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients’ and staff’s perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward.

  16. Child restraint device use and misuse in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, nearly 87,000 children under the age of five were injured or killed in traffic crashes across the nation, with 2,336 of these injuries and fatalities occurring in Michigan. The use of child restraint devices (CRDs, also called child safety s...

  17. Decreasing Aggression Using Four-Point Restraints and Symbol Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Michael A.

    Physical aggression among institutionalized mentally retarded persons arouses great social concern. To examine the effectiveness of four-point mechanical restraints and a positive adaptive symbol program in the reduction of high frequency, high intensity aggression, three institutionalized severely mentally retarded adolescents (2 females, 1 male)…

  18. The use of restraints in psychiatric patients | Moosa | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Restraints are usually used for the protection of patients and others when medication and verbal therapies are insufficient to control potentially violent patients. ... There may be differences in cost, risk of serious staff injury, requirements of staff time for monitoring and implementation, and impacts on staff and patient attitudes.

  19. The Cost of Prior Restraint: "U. S. v. The Progressive."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloski, John; Dyer, Carolyn Stewart

    Increased litigation and rising litigation costs threaten the future of newspapers and magazines. A case study was conducted to determine the costs and effects of "United States v. 'The Progressive,'" a prior restraint case over the publication in 1979 of an article on the hydrogen bomb. "The Progressive," which operates at a…

  20. Moderation: an alternative to restraint as a mode of weight self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, S

    2012-12-01

    This study considered two types of eating and weight self-regulation, in five groups, including four types of weight controllers and one non-dieting group. New scales were developed to measure eating moderation and restraint. Moderation was largely uncorrelated with restraint in 4 groups and had a fairly strong positive relation in 1 group. The moderation scale was unrelated to the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) restraint scale and the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) rigid restraint subscale and weakly positively related to TFEQ flexible restraint. The restraint scale was strongly correlated to the DEBQ restraint scale, and to both flexible and rigid restraint subscales of the TFEQ. Across the five groups, moderation had exclusively positive relationships with attitude, behavior and emotion variables, while restraint had primarily negative relationships. The study supports moderation as a new dimension of weight self-regulation, independent of restraint. The new measures of moderation and restraint can be used together in research on the processes of change in weight management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved protection for children in forward-facing restraints during side impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilston, Lynne E; Brown, Julie; Kelly, Paul

    2005-06-01

    This study aims to determine the potential for improved child occupant protection in side impacts that can be obtained using rigid and semi-rigid anchorage systems and the addition of energy-absorbing padding in the side structures of child restraints. This study uses a comprehensive set of simulated side impacts to evaluate the potential for improved side impact protection in forward-facing child restraints. Factors investigated included methods of anchoring the restraint to the vehicle, energy-absorbing materials in the side structure of restraints, and design features of the restraints such as side wing geometry and seat belt routing. The results show clearly that completely rigid lower attachment of restraints offers the potential for great reductions in head injury risk, which anchorage systems employing a combination of a rigid anchorage bar and webbing attached to a child restraint cannot match. The addition of energy absorbing material in the side structure of restraint systems is effective when the head is fully contained within an adequately designed side wing structure. For restraints anchored by seat belts and loop style semi rigid anchorage straps, belt routing has the potential to significantly affect occupant head excursion. The results suggest that current child restraint standards and consumer testing protocols do not adequately encourage best practice design of child restraints for side impact protection.

  2. Choosing Staff Members Reduces Time in Mechanical Restraint Due to Self-Injurious Behaviour and Requesting Restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Craig C.; Lydersen, Tore; Johnson, Paul R.; Weiss, Shannon R.; Marconi, Michael R.; Cleave, Mary L.; Weber, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Using mechanical restraints to protect a person who engaged in dangerous self-injury was decreased by manipulation of an establishing operation involving the client choosing the staff person who would work with her. Materials and Methods: The client was a 28-year-old woman diagnosed with autism, bipolar disorder, static cerebral…

  3. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  4. Sensitization of restraint-induced corticosterone secretion after chronic restraint in rats: Involvement of 5-HT7 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Iglesias, Brenda B.; Mendoza-Garrido, María E.; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Noyola-Díaz, Martha; Terrón, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. We examined the effect of chronic restraint stress (CRS; 20 min/day) as compared to control (CTRL) conditions for 14 days, on: 1) restraint-induced ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) secretion in rats pretreated with vehicle or SB-656104 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist); 2) 5-HT7 receptor-like immunoreactivity (5-HT7-LI) and protein in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and adrenal glands (AG); 3) baseline levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in PVN and AG; and 4) 5-HT-like immunoreactivity (5-HT-LI) in AG and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) protein in PVN and AG. On day 15, animals were subdivided into Treatment and No treatment groups. Treatment animals received an i.p. injection of vehicle or SB-656104; No Treatment animals received no injection. Sixty min later, Treatment animals were either decapitated with no further stress (0 min) or submitted to acute restraint (10, 30, 60 or 120 min); hormone serum levels were measured. No Treatment animals were employed for the rest of measurements. CRS decreased body weight gain and increased adrenal weight. In CTRL animals, acute restraint increased ACTH and CORT secretion in a time of restraint-dependent manner; both responses were inhibited by SB-656104. Exposure to CRS abolished ACTH but magnified CORT responses to restraint as compared to CTRL conditions; SB-656104 had no effect on ACTH levels but significantly inhibited sensitized CORT responses. In CTRL animals, 5-HT7-LI was detected in magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of PVN and sparsely in adrenal cortex. Exposure to CRS decreased 5-HT7-LI and protein in the PVN, but increased 5-HT7-LI in the adrenal cortex and protein in whole AG. Higher 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels were detected in PVN and AG from CRS animals but 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio increased in AG only. Finally, whereas 5-HT-LI was sparsely observed in the adrenal cortex

  5. Restraint use in older adults in home care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepmans, Kristien; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Paquay, Louis; Milisen, Koen

    2017-11-23

    To get insight into restraint use in older adults receiving home care and, more specifically, into the definition, prevalence and types of restraint, as well as the reasons for restraint use and the people involved in the decision-making process. Systematic review. Four databases (i.e. Pubmed, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Library) were systematically searched from inception to end of April 2017. The study encompassed qualitative and quantitative research on restraint use in older adults receiving home care that reported definitions of restraint, prevalence of use, types of restraint, reasons for use or the people involved. We considered publications written in English, French, Dutch and German. One reviewer performed the search and made the initial selection based on titles and abstracts. The final selection was made by two reviewers working independently; they also assessed study quality. We used an integrated design to synthesise the findings. Eight studies were reviewed (one qualitative, seven quantitative) ranging in quality from moderate to high. The review indicated there was no single, clear definition of restraint. The prevalence of restraint use ranged from 5% to 24.7%, with various types of restraint being used. Families played an important role in the decision-making process and application of restraints; general practitioners were less involved. Specific reasons, other than safety for using restraints in home care were noted (e.g. delay to nursing home admission; to provide respite for an informal caregiver). Contrary to the current socio demographical evolutions resulting in an increasing demand of restraint use in home care, research on this subject is still scarce and recent. The limited evidence however points to the challenging complexity and specificity of home care regarding restraint use. Given these serious challenges for clinical practice, more research about restraint use in home care is urgently needed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  6. Wireless Sensor Portal Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mobitrum Corporation has demonstrated the feasibility in the Phase I of " A Wireless Sensor Portal Technology" and proposes a Phase II effort to develop a wireless...

  7. Vehicle classification using mobile sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    In this research, the feasibility of using mobile traffic sensors for binary vehicle classification on arterial roads is investigated. Features (e.g. : speed related, acceleration/deceleration related, etc.) are extracted from vehicle traces (passeng...

  8. Boosting restraint norms: a community-delivered campaign to promote booster seat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Garcia-Espana, J Felipe; Winston, Flaura K

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a theoretically grounded community-delivered marketing campaign to promote belt-positioning booster seat (BPB) use among vulnerable populations when disseminated by community members. A prospective, nonrandomized community intervention trial was conducted to evaluate the "Boosting Restraint Norms" social marketing campaign delivered by community partners in Norristown, Pennsylvania (intervention community), between October 2008 and November 2008. York, Pennsylvania, served as the comparison community. In total, 800 vehicles with 822 children aged 4 to 7 years were observed for BPB use, the primary outcome of interest, at baseline (September 2008) and at 6 months after intervention (April 2009). During the study period, a 28 percent increase in the prevalence of BPB use at 6 months was observed in the intervention community with no change in the prevalence of BPB use in the comparison community. After adjustment for child age and gender, vehicle type, driver gender, and driver level, BPB use increased from 39 to 50 percent in the intervention community. The "Boosting Restraint Norms" social marketing campaign, distributed through community organizations combined with caregiver education and a one-time free distribution of BPBs, was effective in increasing BPB use. This study demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing community organizations with established audiences to spread the "No Regrets" messaging of the campaign in the community. This study also indicates that spreading evidence-based messages in this manner may effectively change behavior in populations that are often hard to reach. Future studies are needed in which this methodology is tested in additional communities and rural settings.

  9. Understanding Mental Health Service User Experiences of Restraint Through Debriefing: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Sara; Cleverley, Kristin; Perivolaris, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine debriefing data to understand experiences before, during, and after a restraint (seclusion, chemical, and physical) event from the perspective of inpatients at a large urban mental health and addiction hospital. Method: Audits were conducted on a purposeful sample of inpatient charts containing post-restraint event inpatient debrief forms (n = 55). Qualitative data from the forms were analyzed thematically. Results: Loss of autonomy and related anger, conflict with staff and other inpatients, and unmet needs were the most common factors precipitating restraint events. Inpatients often reported that increased communication with staff could have prevented restraint. Inpatients described having had various negative emotional states and responses during restraint events, including fear and rejection. Post-restraint, inpatients often desired to leave the unit for fresh air or to engage in leisure activities. Conclusions: To our knowledge, our study is the first to use debriefing form data to explore mental health inpatients’ experiences of restraint. Inpatients view restraint negatively and do not experience it as a therapeutic intervention. Debriefing, guided by a form, is useful for understanding the inpatient’s experience of restraint, and should be used to re-establish the therapeutic relationship and to inform plans of care. In addition, individual and collective inpatient perspectives should inform alternatives to restraint. PMID:26454726

  10. Poor compliance with child safety restraint use while travelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fallon, R

    2011-02-01

    Road traffic accidents are a leading cause of death of children. It is the law that all children should be appropriately secured when traveling in vehicles. The aim of this study was to evaluate parental conformity with these regulations and to test if advice given at a Paediatric outpatient clinic could improve compliance. Two groups were assigned, an intervention group (parents given an information leaflet and a clear explanation about appropriate restraints for their children) and a non-intervention group (received no information). They were contacted again after 2 months and asked regarding compliance. A total of 394 children from 186 families were initially given the questionnaire. Nearly one third of children (29.2%) were not using any restraint while travelling rising to 35.3% on follow up. This study concluded that once off parental education made negligible difference to an already inconsistent and haphazard approach to compliance with safety regulations.

  11. Effects of child restraint system features on installation errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Flannagan, Carol A C; Ebert, Sheila M; Malik, Laura A; Green, Paul A; Reed, Matthew P

    2014-03-01

    This study examined how child restraint system (CRS) features contribute to CRS installation errors. Sixteen convertible CRS, selected to include a wide range of features, were used in volunteer testing with 32 subjects. Subjects were recruited based on their education level (high or low) and experience with installing CRS (none or experienced). Each subject was asked to perform four child restraint installations in the right-rear passenger seat of a 2006 Pontiac G6 sedan using a crash dummy as a child surrogate. Each subject installed two CRS forward-facing (FF), one with LATCH and one with the vehicle seatbelt, and two CRS rear-facing (RF), one with LATCH and one with the seatbelt. After each installation, the experimenter evaluated 42 factors for each installation, such as choice of belt routing path, tightness of installation, and harness snugness. Analyses used linear mixed models to identify CRS installation outcomes associated with CRS features. LATCH connector type, LATCH strap adjustor type, and the presence of belt lockoffs were associated with the tightness of the CRS installation. The type of harness shoulder height adjuster was associated with the rate of achieving a snug harness. Correct tether use was associated with the tether storage method. In general, subject assessments of the ease-of-use of CRS features were not highly correlated with the quality of their installation, suggesting a need for feedback with incorrect installations. The data from this study provide quantitative assessments of some CRS features that were associated with reductions in CRS installation errors. These results provide child restraint designers with design guidelines for developing easier-to-use products. Research on providing effective feedback during the child restraint installation process is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  12. STS-102 Onboard Photograph-The Payload Equipment Restraint System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In this Space Shuttle STS-102 mission image, the Payload Equipment Restraint System (PERS) Single-Strap and H-Strap are shown behind astronaut James S. Voss (left) and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev in the U.S. Laboratory. PERS is an integrated modular system of components designed to assist the crew of the International Space Station (ISS) in restraining and carrying necessary payload equipment and tools in a microgravity environment. The Operations Development Group, Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), while providing operation support to the ISS Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF), recognized the need for an on-orbit restraint system to facilitate control of lose objects, payloads, and tools. The PERS is the offspring of that need and it helps the ISS crew manage tools and rack components that would otherwise float away in the near-zero gravity environment aboard the Space Station. The system combines Kevlar straps, mesh pockets, Velcro, and a variety of cornecting devices into a portable, adjustable system. The system includes the Single Strap, the H-Strap, the Belly Pack, the Laptop Restraint Belt, and the Tool Page Case. The Single Strap and the H-Strap were flown on this mission. The PERS concept was developed by industrial design students at Auburn University and the MSFC Flight Projects Directorate.

  13. Construct Validation of the Portuguese Version of the Restraint Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AimThe main purpose of this study was to adapt the Restraint Scale (RS to Portuguese and examine its psychometric properties, specifically its construct validity.MethodIn this study, 238 normal-weight adults (82% women; Mean age = 36.6, SD = 15.0 participated in an online survey containing measures of Restraint Scale, Three Factor Eating Questionnaire, Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire, and Body Dissatisfaction and Drive for Thinness scales.ResultsExploratory factor analyses corroborated the two-factors structure found in previous studies, in particular when three items without clear factorial assignment and low correlation were excluded. A final two-factors version of the RS containing seven items presented a very good fit to the measurement model and good internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis of the 7-items RS in relation to a three-factor model of overeating, dieting and body dissatisfaction measures revealed that the RS was the only restraint measure loading in all three factors.ConclusionThis suggests that the 7-items Portuguese version of the RS has good psychometric properties and unique features that lend it appropriate to identify and study unsuccessful chronic dieters.

  14. Ultrasonic corona sensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic (above 20 kHz) corona detection techniques to detect low order (non-arcing) coronas in varying degrees of vacuum within large high vacuum test chambers, and to design, fabricate, and deliver a prototype ultrasonic corona sensor.

  15. Use of physical restraint: Nurses' knowledge, attitude, intention and practice and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Fatemeh; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Wong, Li Ping

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the knowledge, attitude, intention and practice of nurses towards physical restraint and factors influencing these variables. A literature review showed a lack of studies focused on the intention of nurses regarding physical restraint throughout the world. Considering that very little research on physical restraint use has been carried out in Malaysia, assessment of nurses' knowledge, attitude, intention and practice is necessary before developing a minimising programme in hospitals. A cross-sectional study was used. A questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, intention and practice was completed by all nurses (n = 309) in twelve wards of a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur. Moderate knowledge and attitude with strong intention to use physical restraint were found among the nurses. Less than half of nurses considered alternatives to physical restraint and most of them did not understand the reasons for the physical restraint. Nurses' academic qualification, read any information source during past year and nurses' work unit showed a significant association with nurses' knowledge. Multiple linear regression analysis found knowledge, attitude and intention were significantly associated with nurses' practice to use physical restraint. This study showed some important misunderstandings of nurses about using physical restraint and strong intention regarding using physical restraint. Findings of this study serve as a supporting reason for importance of educating nurses about the use of physical restraint. Exploring the knowledge, attitude, intention and current practice of nurses towards physical restraint is important so that an effective strategy can be formulated to minimise the use of physical restraints in hospitals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nurses' feelings and thoughts about using physical restraints on hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Huang, Hui-Tzu

    2007-03-01

    To explore nurses' feelings and thoughts about physically restraining older hospitalized patients. The use of physical restraints is still highly prevalent in hospitals; furthermore, older patients are most likely to be so restrained. Studies in acute care settings have focused mainly on nurses' knowledge, attitudes, or practice concerning physical restraints, on physical restraint reduction programmes, on nurses' perceptions about the use of physical restraints, or on elderly patients' experiences with physical restraints. To the best of our knowledge no studies have been conducted on hospital nurses' feelings and thoughts about the use of physical restraints in Taiwan. A qualitative approach was used to understand this phenomenon. Semi-structured interviews were carried out, from August 2002 to March 2003, with 12 nurses working in three hospitals. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim; content analysis was used to analyse the data. Nurses reported a variety of emotional responses regarding the use of physical restraints, including sadness, guilt, conflicts, retribution, absence of feelings, security, and pity for the restrained older people. Rationalization, sharing with colleagues, and compensating behaviours were ways that nurses used to manage their negative feelings. Most nurses had negative feelings towards the use of physical restraints. Among these nurses there was a struggle between patients' autonomy and the practice of care. However, other nurses said they had 'no feelings' or 'feeling of security' while using physical restraints. The findings of this study may contribute to filling the gaps in nursing knowledge, to improving protocols for physical restraint use in hospitals, and may also assist nurse managers to create a supportive practice environment. It is recommended that in-service training programmes should cover misconceptions regarding physical restraint use, ethical issues and how to cope with feelings while using physical

  17. Simulation of Reversible Protein–Protein Binding and Calculation of Binding Free Energies Using Perturbed Distance Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Virtually all biological processes depend on the interaction between proteins at some point. The correct prediction of biomolecular binding free-energies has many interesting applications in both basic and applied pharmaceutical research. While recent advances in the field of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have proven the feasibility of the calculation of protein–protein binding free energies, the large conformational freedom of proteins and complex free energy landscapes of binding processes make such calculations a difficult task. Moreover, convergence and reversibility of resulting free-energy values remain poorly described. In this work, an easy-to-use, yet robust approach for the calculation of standard-state protein–protein binding free energies using perturbed distance restraints is described. In the binding process the conformations of the proteins were restrained, as suggested earlier. Two approaches to avoid end-state problems upon release of the conformational restraints were compared. The method was evaluated by practical application to a small model complex of ubiquitin and the very flexible ubiquitin-binding domain of human DNA polymerase ι (UBM2). All computed free energy differences were closely monitored for convergence, and the calculated binding free energies had a mean unsigned deviation of only 1.4 or 2.5 kJ·mol–1 from experimental values. Statistical error estimates were in the order of thermal noise. We conclude that the presented method has promising potential for broad applicability to quantitatively describe protein–protein and various other kinds of complex formation. PMID:28898077

  18. Restraint stress induces and exacerbates intestinal inflammation in interleukin-10 deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Joo Sung

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of restraint stress on chronic colitis in interleukin (IL)-10 deficient (IL-10-/-) mice. METHODS: The first experiment compared the effect of restraint stress on the development of intestinal inflammation in wild-type and IL-10-/- mice. Both wild-type and IL-10-/- mice were physically restrained in a well-ventilated, 50 cm3 conical polypropylene tube for 2 h per day for three consecutive days. The second experiment was performed to assess the effect of restraint stress on exacerbation of colitis induced by piroxicam in IL-10-/- mice. The IL-10-/- mice were exposed to restraint stress for 2 h per day for 3 consecutive days, and then treated with piroxicam for 4 d at a dose of 200 ppm administered in the rodent chow. RESULTS: In the first experiment, none of the wild-type mice with or without restraint stress showed clinical and histopathological abnormality in the gut. However, IL-10-/- mice exposed to restraint stress exhibited histologically significant intestinal inflammation as compared to those without restraint stress. In the second experiment, restraint stress significantly reduced body weight and increased the severity of intestinal inflammation assessed by histopathologic grading in IL-10-/- mice. Colonic IL12p40 mRNA expression was strongly increased in mice exposed to restraint stress. CONCLUSION: This novel animal model could be useful in future study of psychological stress in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26229400

  19. Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-05-15

    Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

  20. An unexpected increase in restraint duration alters the expression of stress response habituation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Rachael R.; Spencer, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    While habituation develops to a repeated psychological stressor, manipulating certain parameters of the stress challenge experience may lead to dishabituation of the stress response. In this experiment, we investigated whether the behavioral, endocrine, and neural responses (c-fos mRNA immediate early gene expression) to a psychological stressor (restraint) differ when the duration of the stressor given on the test day violates expectations based on prior stress experience. Rats experienced 10 min of daily restraint on Days 1-4 followed by challenge with either the same duration (10 min) or a longer duration (30 min) of restraint on Day 5. Rats’ behavior was video recorded during the Day 5 restraint episode, and trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 30 min following restraint onset. Struggling behavior was manually scored as active attempts to escape the restraint device. Rats who experienced the same duration of repeated restraint showed a significant decrease of plasma corticosterone (CORT) compared to the 10 min acute restraint group (habituation). In addition, these rats showed decreased active struggling over repeated restraint trials. Conversely, the rats showed an increased CORT response (dishabituation) when they experienced a longer duration of restraint on Day 5 than they had previously. These rats showed a habituated behavioral response during the first 10 min of restraint, however struggling behavior increased once the duration of restraint exceeded the expected duration (with a peak at 12 min). This peak in struggling behavior did not occur during 30 min acute restraint, indicating that the effect was related to memory of previous restraint experience and not due to a longer duration of restraint. In contrast, these animals showed habituated c-fos mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), lateral septum (LS), and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in response to the increased stressor duration. Thus, there was dissociation between c

  1. Coping with budget restraint in a Scandinavian welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette Ljungdalh; Holm, Lotte; Lund, Thomas Bøker

    2015-01-01

    , and using left overs, expressed some kind of extra resources in comparison to the interviewees with negative experiences in the shape of e.g. more secure life circumstances, cooking skills, and a supporting social network. The qualitative study also indicated that certain similar coping strategies...... such as eating seasonal fruits and vegetables, storing and using leftovers, and cooking from filling ingredients could result in either a higher or a lower intake of fruits and vegetables in adults and children. The study concludes that food budget restraint and the consequences of it are relevant to discuss...

  2. Crew Restraint Design for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Lena; Holden, Kritina; Whitmore, Mihriban

    2006-01-01

    With permanent human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS), crews will be living and working in microgravity, dealing with the challenges of a weightless environment. In addition, the confined nature of the spacecraft environment results in ergonomic challenges such as limited visibility and access to the activity areas, as well as prolonged periods of unnatural postures. Without optimum restraints, crewmembers may be handicapped for performing some of the on-orbit tasks. Currently, many of the tasks on ISS are performed with the crew restrained merely by hooking their arms or toes around handrails to steady themselves. This is adequate for some tasks, but not all. There have been some reports of discomfort/calluses on the top of the toes. In addition, this type of restraint is simply insufficient for tasks that require a large degree of stability. Glovebox design is a good example of a confined workstation concept requiring stability for successful use. They are widely used in industry, university, and government laboratories, as well as in the space environment, and are known to cause postural limitations and visual restrictions. Although there are numerous guidelines pertaining to ventilation, seals, and glove attachment, most of the data have been gathered in a 1-g environment, or are from studies that were conducted prior to the early 1980 s. Little is known about how best to restrain a crewmember using a glovebox in microgravity. Another ISS task that requires special consideration with respect to restraints is robotic teleoperation. The Robot Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center is developing a humanoid robot astronaut, or Robonaut. It is being designed to perform extravehicular activities (EVAs) in the hazardous environment of space. An astronaut located inside the ISS will remotely operate Robonaut through a telepresence control system. Essentially, the robot mimics every move the operator makes. This requires the

  3. Palatable Foods, Stress, and Energy Stores Sculpt Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, Adrenocorticotropin, and Corticosterone Concentrations after Restraint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foster, Michelle T; Warne, James P; Ginsberg, Abigail B; Horneman, Hart F; Pecoraro, Norman C; Akana, Susan F; Dallman, Mary F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown reduced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal responses to both acute and chronic restraint stressors in rats allowed to ingest highly palatable foods (32% sucrose ± lard) prior to restraint...

  4. 75 FR 44284 - Notice of Draft NIJ Criminal Justice Restraints Selection and Application Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... is open to industry technical representatives, criminal justice agencies and organizations, research... of Justice Programs Notice of Draft NIJ Criminal Justice Restraints Selection and Application Guide... of Draft NIJ Criminal Justice Restraints Selection and Application Guide. SUMMARY: In an effort to...

  5. Weight gain, dietary restraint, and disordered eating in the freshman year of college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delinsky, Sherrie S; Wilson, G Terence

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the study were to assess whether women during the first year of college experience (1) significant weight gain; (2) a prospective relation between dietary restraint and weight gain; (3) an increase in disordered eating; and (4) a prospective relation between dietary restraint or concern about the Freshmen 15 (i.e., weight gain of 15 lbs during the freshman year of college) and disordered eating. Participants were 336 female students in their first year of college who completed questionnaire measures of Body Mass Index (BMI), eating disorder pathology, dietary restraint, body image, and self-esteem. Participants' mean weight gain was approximately 3 lbs (1.5 kg), and among those who gained weight, the mean gain was 7.32 lbs (3.3 kg). Dietary restraint in September did not predict weight change in April, but participants who lost weight reported significantly greater dietary restraint than those participants who gained weight. Eating disorder symptoms increased significantly from September to April. Dietary restraint, concern about the "Freshman 15", and self-esteem in September uniquely predicted EDE-Q Weight and Shape Concern subscale scores in April. Female students in their first year of college gain a small but significant amount of weight, and weight gain was mostly unrelated to dietary restraint. Disordered eating increases during the first year of college and, is predicted by prospective dietary restraint and concerns about weight gain.

  6. Clinical decision making on the use of physical restraint in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqian Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical restraint is a common nursing intervention in intensive care units and nurses often use it to ensure patients' safety and to prevent unexpected accidents. However, existing literature indicated that the use of physical restraint is a complex one because of inadequate rationales, the negative physical and emotional effects on patients, but the lack of perceived alternatives. This paper is aimed to interpret the clinical decision-making theories related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units in order to facilitate our understanding on the use of physical restraint and to evaluate the quality of decisions made by nurses. By reviewing the literature, intuition and heuristics are the main decision-making strategies related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units because the rapid and reflexive nature of intuition and heuristics allow nurses to have a rapid response to urgent and emergent cases. However, it is problematic if nurses simply count their decision-making on experience rather than incorporate research evidence into clinical practice because of inadequate evidence to support the use of physical restraint. Besides that, such a rapid response may lead nurses to make decisions without adequate assessment and thinking and therefore biases and errors may be generated. Therefore, despite the importance of intuition and heuristics in decision-making in acute settings on the use of physical restraint, it is recommended that nurses should incorporate research evidence with their experience to make decisions and adequate assessment before implementing physical restraint is also necessary.

  7. Suppression of Pica by Overcorrection and Physical Restraint: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Bakker, Leon W.

    1984-01-01

    Each occurrence of pica (ingestion of inedible objects) in two profoundly retarded adults was followed by either overcorrection or physical restraint. Although both procedures reduced the occurrence of pica and had a similar effect on collateral behaviors, physical restraint was clinically more effective in terms of immediate response reduction.…

  8. Dieting, Dietary Restraint, and Binge Eating Disorder among Overweight Adolescents in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Murat; Bozan, Nuray; Cigerim, Nevin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among dieting, dietary restraint, disinhibition, hunger, and binge eating among overweight adolescent girls. Participants were 743 overweight adolescent girls between 16 and 19 years of age. The mean BMI was 24.9 [+ or -] 0.8 kg/[m[superscript 2] in the low-restraint group and 25.1 [+ or…

  9. [Vision on and use of physical restraints and 'smart technology' in nursing homes in Flanders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlassara, V; Lampo, E; Degryse, B; Van Audenhove, C; Spruytte, N

    2017-04-01

    The STAFF-project investigates in what way 'smart technology' can offer an alternative for physical restraints in nursing homes. A survey is realized aimed at gaining more insight into the vision on and the use of physical restraints and 'smart technology'. Two partly overlapping structured questionnaires were developed and sent to nursing home staff in Flanders (Belgium). One hundred fifty six administrators (managers or assistant-managers) and 238 caregiving staff (nurses, nursing aids, paramedical staff and other) completed the online questionnaire. In general there is a low acceptability of physical restraint use, however, a more nuanced picture of acceptability is present depending on the specific motivation for using physical restraints and on the specific means of physical restraints. About half of the administrators say they use smart technology in the nursing home. The two main reasons for not applying (yet) smart technology are 'too high price for smart technology' and 'inadequate infrastructure of the nursing home'. All respondents underscore the importance of multiple strategies to diminish the use of physical restraints in nursing homes. Physical restraint use is a complex theme and needs a nuanced analysis and management. This study shows that there is still room for improvement in diminishing the use of physical restraints and that nursing homes in Flanders are open to use smart technology.

  10. The Use of Physical Restraint in the Care of the Mentally Ill by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of physical restraint as an intervention in the care of psychiatric patients is as old as psychiatry and remains one of the common procedures in psychiatry. Nurses play crucial roles in the application. Aim: To evaluate the practice of physical restraint by nurses in a tertiary psychiatric hospital. Methods: ...

  11. 19 CFR 159.44 - Special duties on merchandise imported under agreements in restraint of trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special duties on merchandise imported under agreements in restraint of trade. 159.44 Section 159.44 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... § 159.44 Special duties on merchandise imported under agreements in restraint of trade. Whenever it...

  12. CCBD's Position Summary on the Use of Physical Restraint Procedures in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Reece; Albrecht, Susan; Johns, Bev

    2009-01-01

    This document provides policy recommendations of the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders regarding the use of physical restraint procedures in schools. It includes (a) an introduction, (b) a declaration of principles, and (c) recommendations regarding the use of physical restraint in school settings. Explanation or elaboration of…

  13. Success and failure in the measurement of restraint : notes and data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, T

    OBJECTIVE: The clarification of the present confusion about the confounding of success and failure in the measurement of restrained eating. METHOD: Close inspection of results regarding the Restraint Scale (RS) and the restraint scales of homogeneous measures of restrained eating, for example, the

  14. The Association for Behavior Analysis International Position Statement on Restraint and Seclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Timothy R.; Hagopian, Louis P.; Bailey, Jon S.; Dorsey, Michael F.; Hanley, Gregory P.; Lennox, David; Riordan, Mary M.; Spreat, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A task force authorized by the Executive Council of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) generated the statement below concerning the techniques called "restraint" and "seclusion." Members of the task force independently reviewed the scientific literature concerning restraint and seclusion and agreed unanimously to the…

  15. Recent Changes in State Policies and Legislation Regarding Restraint or Seclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jennifer; Sugai, George

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and evaluate the extent to which recent changes to state-level policy are related to seclusion and restraint in schools and detail what components of comprehensive restraint and seclusion policy are indicated. We examined state policy documents and coded them for the presence of specific characteristics related to…

  16. CCBD's Position Summary on Physical Restraint & Seclusion Procedures in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Reece; Albrecht, Susan; Johns, Bev

    2009-01-01

    This document is a summary of policy recommendations from two longer and more detailed documents available from the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders (CCBD) regarding the use of physical restraint and seclusion procedures in schools. These recommendations include: (1) CCBD believes that physical restraint or seclusion procedures…

  17. Electroconvulsive Stimulation, but not Chronic Restraint Stress, Causes Structural Alterations in Adult Rat Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    of newly formed neurons in the hippocampal subgranular zone. Also estimated were the total number of neurons and the volume of the granule cell layer in adult rats subjected to chronic restraint stress and electroconvulsive stimulation either alone or in combination. We found that chronic restraint stress...

  18. The story behind the Dutch model: the consensual politics of wage restraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, C.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of wage restraint has a long history in the Netherlands and has been presented as the recipe for economic recovery for many years now. In times of economic (and political) crisis, wage restraint has been the standard response of the Dutch government, often in cooperation with unions and

  19. Dynamic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Gabriele

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the possibility of using dynamic sensor networks for measurements over large areas. The main idea is to replace static networks, where the allocation of the sensors is pre defined, no matter how, and then the configuration is assumed and maintained, with a dynamic network whose configuration continuously changes in order to cover the whole measure area getting the different measures of the same point within a prefixed time interval. The main advantages are the reduced number of sensors required, a faster recover from damages, the possibility of changing dynamically the area or the subareas of interest, etc. The feasibility of such solution is shown by finding, in an optimal control problem formulation context, the trajectories of each sensor and the controls for such a motion. Simulation results are reported to highlight such results.

  20. Education on physical restraint reduction in dementia care: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, A; Mosel, K; Curren, D; Prendergast, J; Harrington, A; Muir-Cochrane, E

    2013-01-01

    Dementia is a priority area for all countries as populations age and dementia prevalence increases. The use of physical restraint is a possible clinical practice for persons with dementia across settings when behaviours indicate a perceived need. Indeed, this may be the first choice in practice, occurring in part because of lack of education, safety concerns, perceived costs and staffing issues. This article reviews the literature on the issues surrounding, and use of, physical restraint for people with dementia, highlighting the rationales for use and the benefits and barriers to physical restraint. Recommendations include the importance of education and policy to reduce or eliminate physical restraint of persons with dementia to overcome identified barriers at the individual, cultural and organizational levels. An educational programme from the literature review is proposed specific to the reduction or elimination of physical restraint.

  1. PERMOL: restraint-based protein homology modeling using DYANA or CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möglich, Andreas; Weinfurtner, Daniel; Gronwald, Wolfram; Maurer, Till; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2005-05-01

    PERMOL is a new restraint-based program for homology modeling of proteins. Restraints are generated from the information contained in structures of homologous template proteins. Employing the restraints generated by PERMOL, three-dimensional structures are obtained using MD programs such as DYANA or CNS. In contrast to other programs PERMOL is mainly based on the use of dihedral angle information which is optimally suited to preserve the local secondary structure. The global arrangement of these elements is then facilitated by a small number of distance restraints. Using PERMOL homology, models of high quality are obtained. A key advantage of the proposed method is its flexibility, which allows the inclusion of data from other sources, such as experimental restraints and the use of modern molecular dynamics programs to calculate structures. The software and a detailed manual are available free of charge (http://www.biologie.uni-regensburg.de/Biophysik/Kalbitzer/permol/permol.html)

  2. Plasma cortisol levels in captive wild felines after chemical restraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira G.P.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Eight Panthera onca (Po, 13 Felis concolor (Fc, 7 Felis yagouaroundi (Fy, 7 Felis tigrina (Ft and 5 Felis pardalis (Fp specimens from São Paulo State zoos were used. All animals were restrained with darts containing 10 mg/kg ketamine and 1 mg/kg xylazine. Venous blood samples were collected as soon as possible (within 15-20 min and serum was frozen until the time for cortisol quantification. Cortisol was determined using a solid phase radioimmunoassay with an intra-assay coefficient of 8.51%. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's multiple comparisons test, and the one-sample t-test, with the level of significance set at P<0.05. Data are reported as means ± SEM. Cortisol levels differed among the captive felines: Po = 166 ± 33a, Fc = 670 ± 118b, Fy = 480 ± 83b, Ft = 237 ± 42ab, Fp = 97 ± 12a nmol/l (values followed by different superscript letters were significantly different (P<0.001. Since most of the veterinary procedures on these species involve chemical restraint, these results show the necessity of preventive measures in order to minimize the effect of restraint stress on more susceptible species

  3. Automated Design of Restraint Layer of an Inflatable Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spexarth, Gary

    2007-01-01

    A Mathcad computer program largely automates the design and analysis of the restraint layer (the primary load-bearing layer) of an inflatable vessel that consists of one or more sections having cylindrical, toroidal, and/or spherical shape(s). A restraint layer typically comprises webbing in the form of multiple straps. The design task includes choosing indexing locations along the straps, computing the load at every location in each strap, computing the resulting stretch at each location, and computing the amount of undersizing required of each strap so that, once the vessel is inflated and the straps thus stretched, the vessel can be expected to assume the desired shape. Prior to the development of this program, the design task was performed by use of a difficult-to-use spreadsheet program that required manual addition of rows and columns depending on the numbers of strap rows and columns of a given design. In contrast, this program is completely parametric and includes logic that automatically adds or deletes rows and columns as needed. With minimal input from the user, this program automatically computes indexing locations, strap lengths, undersizing requirements, and all design data required to produce detailed drawings and assembly procedures. It also generates textual comments that help the user understand the calculations.

  4. Comparison of chemical restraint techniques in ostrich (Struthio camelus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ciboto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical restraint in ostriches is usually required for short-time interventions. Thus, this study established and evaluated intravenous anesthetics formulated from commonly used drugs in order to accomplish total restraint on this species and allow painful procedures to be performed. Thirty male and female ostriches weighing from 40 to 90 kg were randomly distributed into five groups. Animals in Groups I, II and III were given acepromazine (0.25 mg/kg i.m. and those in Groups IV and V were given xylazine (1.0 mg/kg i.m.. The following drugs were administered intravenously 15 to 20 min later: Group I - propofol (4.0 mg/kg, Groups II and IV - ketamine (5.0 mg/kg and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, Groups III and V - tiletamine-zolazepam (3.0 mg/kg. All protocols have produced satisfactory results regarding total containment, muscular relaxation and maintenance of the evaluated parameters within a normal range.

  5. Torsional Restraint Problem of Steel Cold-Formed Beams Restrained By Planar Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Ivan; Melcher, Jindřich; Pešek, Ondřej

    2017-10-01

    The effect of continuous or discrete lateral and torsional restraints of metal thinwalled members along their spans can positively influence their buckling resistance and thus contribute to more economical structural design. The prevention of displacement and rotation of the cross-section results in stabilization of the member. The restraints can practically be provided e.g. by planar members of cladding supported by metal members (purlins, girts). The rate of stabilization of a member can be quantified using values of shear and rotational stiffness provided by the adjacent planar members. While the lateral restraint effected by certain shear stiffness can be often considered as sufficient, the complete torsional restraint can be safely considered in some practical cases only. Otherwise the values of the appropriate rotational stiffness provided by adjacent planar members may not be satisfactory to ensure full torsional restraint and only incomplete restraint is available. Its verification should be performed using theoretical and experimental analyses. The paper focuses on problem of steel thin-walled coldformed beams stabilized by planar members and investigates the effect of the magnitude of the rotational stiffness provided by the planar members on the resistance of the steel members. Cold-formed steel beams supporting planar members of cladding are considered. Full lateral restraint and incomplete torsional restraint are assumed. Numerical analyses performed using a finite element method software indicate considerable influence of the torsional restraint on the buckling resistance of a steel thin-walled member. Utilization of the torsional restraint in the frame of sizing of a stabilized beam can result in more efficient structural design. The paper quantifies this effect for some selected cases and summarizes results of numerical analysis.

  6. Research study on neck injury lessening with active head restraint using human body FE model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Junji

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the active head restraint system in reducing neck injury risk of car occupants in low-speed rear impacts. A human body FE model "THUMS" was used to simulate head and neck kinematics of the occupant and to evaluate loading to the neck. Joint capsule strain was calculated to predict neck injury risk as well as NIC. The validity of the model was confirmed comparing its mechanical responses to those in human subjects in the literatures. Seat FE models were also prepared representing one with a fixed head restraint and the other one with an active head restraint system. The active head restraint system was designed to move the head restraint forward and upward when the lower unit was lower unit was loaded by the pelvis. Rear impact simulations were performed assuming a triangular acceleration pulse at a delta-V of 25 km/h. The model reproduced similar head and neck motions to those measured in the human volunteer test, except for active muscular responses. The calculated joint capsule strain also showed a good match with those of PMHS tests in the literature. A rear-impact simulation was conducted using the model with the fixed head restraint. The result revealed that NIC was strongly correlated with the relative acceleration between the head and the torso and that its maximum peak appeared when the head contacted the head restraint. It was also found that joint capsule strain grew in later timing synchronizing with the relative displacement. Another simulation with the active head restraint system showed that both NIC and joint capsule strain were lowered owing to the forward and upward motion of the head restraint. A close investigation of the vertebral motion indicated that the active head restraint reduced the magnitude of shear deformation in the facet joint, which contributed to the strain growth in the fixed head restraint case. Rear-impact simulations were conducted using a human body FE model, THUMS

  7. Do organisational constraints explain the use of restraint? A comparative ethnographic study from three nursing homes in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øye, Christine; Jacobsen, Frode Fadnes; Mekki, Tone Elin

    2017-07-01

    To investigate (1) what kind of restraint is used in three nursing homes in Norway and (2) how staff use restraint under what organisational conditions. Restraint use in residents living with dementia in nursing homes is controversial, and at odds with fundamental human rights. Restraint is a matter of hindering residents' free movement and will by applying either interactional, physical, medical, surveillance or environmental restraint. Previous research has identified use of restraint related to individual resident characteristics such as agitation, aggressiveness and wandering. This model is embedded in an overall mixed-method education intervention design study called Modelling and evaluating evidence-based continuing education program in dementia care (MEDCED), applying ethnography postintervention to examine the use of restraint in 24 nursing homes in Norway. Based on restraint diversity measured in the trial, ethnographic investigation was carried out in three different nursing homes in Norway over a 10-month period to examine restraint use in relation to organisational constraints. Several forms of restraint were observed; among them, interactional restraint was used most frequently. We identified that use of restraint relates to the characteristics of individual residents, such as agitation, aggressiveness and wandering. However, restraint use should also be explained in relation to organisational conditions such as resident mix, staff culture and available human resources. A fluctuating and dynamic interplay between different individual and contextual factors determines whether restraint is used - or not in particular situations with residents living with dementia. Educational initiatives targeting staff to reduce restraint must be sensitive towards fluctuating organisational constraints. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Aceh Free Pasung: Releasing the mentally ill from physical restraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthoenis M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical restraint and confinement of the mentally ill (called pasung in Indonesia is common in Aceh. In early 2010, the local government initiated a program called Aceh Free Pasung 2010. The main goal of the program is to release the mentally ill in the province from restraint and to provide appropriate medical treatment and care. The aim of the paper is to report the findings of a preliminary investigation of the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who have been admitted to the Banda Aceh Mental Hospital as part of the Aceh Free Pasung program. Methods This is a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at the Banda Aceh Mental Hospital, where people who had been restrained or confined in the community are being admitted for psychiatric treatment and, where necessary, physical rehabilitation, as part of the Aceh Free Pasung program. Results Fifty-nine of former ex-pasung patients were examined. The majority (88.1% of the patients were male, aged 18 to 68 years. The duration of pasung varied from a few days to 20 years, with a mean duration of 4.0 years. The reasons for applying pasung are many, with concerns about dangerousness being most common. The great majority (89.8% had a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Discussion The development of a community mental health system and the introduction of a health insurance system in Aceh (together with the national health insurance scheme for the poor has enabled access to free hospital treatment for people with severe mental disorders, including those who have been in pasung. The demographic and clinical characteristics of this group of ex-pasung patients are broadly similar to those reported in previous studies. Conclusions The Aceh Free Pasung program is an important mental health and human rights initiative that can serve to inform similar efforts in other parts of Indonesia and other low and middle-income countries where restraint and confinement of the mentally

  9. Feasibility of computed tomography in awake dogs with traumatic pelvic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kichang; Heng, Hock Gan; Jeong, Jimo; Naughton, James F; Rohleder, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, general anesthesia or sedation is generally required to immobilize patients during computed tomography (CT) scanning. This may not be suitable in all patients because of risks of anesthesia. We evaluated the feasibility of pelvic CT examination in 14 awake animals with pelvic trauma. Physical restraint was applied by wrapping the patient in a towel and then taping to the CT table or by directly taping the patient to the CT table. The effect of patient positioning, cooperation on the CT table, preparation time for scanning, scanning time, frequency of repeat scans, image quality, and complications related to physical restraint were evaluated. Fractures were recorded and compared between radiography and CT. Ten of 14 dogs were scanned in lateral recumbency and four in sternal recumbency. All patients were cooperative with the exception of one that moved slightly during the scan. Both physical restraint methods were adequate for CT scanning. Patient preparation took less than 5 min while the scan time was typically less than 1 min. No repeat scans were required in any patient. The transverse CT image quality was good (10/14) or fair (4/14) for interpretation. When comparing the CT images to radiographs, more pelvic fractures were identified with CT than with radiography and a few patients were overdiagnosed based on radiographs. No complications or additional injuries associated with physical restraint were noticed. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  10. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Battaglia, M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bolla, G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Bortoletto, D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Caberera, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Carlstrom, J E [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, C. L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Da Via, C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Demarteau, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fast, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frisch, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States), et al.

    2013-10-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  11. [Therapeutic restraint management in Intensive Care Units: Phenomenological approach to nursing reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Nuevo, M; González-Gil, M T; Solís-Muñoz, M; Láiz-Díez, N; Toraño-Olivera, M J; Carrasco-Rodríguez-Rey, L F; García-González, S; Velasco-Sanz, T R; Martínez-Álvarez, A; Martin-Rivera, B E

    2016-01-01

    To identify nursing experience on physical restraint management in Critical Care Units. To analyse similarities and differences in nursing experience on physical restraint management according to the clinical context that they are involved in. A multicentre phenomenological study was carried out including 14 Critical Care Units in Madrid, classified according to physical restraint use: Common/systematic use, lacking/personalised use, and mixed use. Five focus groups (23 participants were selected following purposeful sampling) were convened, concluding in data saturation. Data analysis was focused on thematic content analysis following Colaizzi's method. Six main themes: Physical restraint meaning in Critical Care Units, safety (self-retreat vital devices), contribution factors, feelings, alternatives, and pending issues. Although some themes are common to the 3 Critical Care Unit types, discourse differences are found as regards to indication, feelings, systematic use of pain and sedation measurement tools. In order to achieve real physical restraint reduction in Critical Care Units, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of restraints use in the specific clinical context. As self-retreat vital devices emerge as central concept, some interventions proposed in other settings could not be effective, requiring alternatives for critical care patients. Discourse variations laid out in the different Critical Care Unit types could highlight key items that determine the use and different attitudes towards physical restraint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  12. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders. PMID:27609090

  13. Disparities in Age-Appropriate Child Passenger Restraint Use Among Children Aged 1 to 12 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Resnicow, Ken; Freed, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Observed racial disparities in child safety seat use have not accounted for socioeconomic factors. We hypothesized that racial differences in age-appropriate restraint use would be modified by socioeconomic status and child passenger safety information sources. METHODS: A 2-site, cross-sectional tablet-based survey of parents seeking emergency care for their 1- to 12-year-old child was conducted between October 2011 and May 2012. Parents provided self-report of child passenger safety practices, demographic characteristics, and information sources. Direct observation of restraint use was conducted in a subset of children at emergency department discharge. Age-appropriate restraint use was defined by Michigan law. RESULTS: Of the 744 eligible parents, 669 agreed to participate and 601 provided complete responses to key variables. White parents reported higher use of car seats for 1- to 3-year-olds and booster seats for 4- to 7-year-olds compared with nonwhite parents. Regardless of race, restraint use compared with nonwhite parents, controlling for education, income, information sources, and site. There was substantial agreement (82.6%, κ = 0.74) between parent report of their child’s usual restraint and the observed restraint at emergency department discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts should be directed at eliminating racial disparities in age-appropriate child passenger restraint use for children <8 years. Booster seat use, seat belt use, and rear seating represent opportunities to improve child passenger safety practices among older children. PMID:24420814

  14. Determinants of Nurses' Use of Physical Restraints in Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Jeanne; Dolan Looby, Sara E

    2017-09-01

    Physical restraints are used in intensive care units, particularly among patients at risk for self-terminating necessary treatment interventions, including endotracheal tubes and invasive catheters. Assessments conducted by intensive care unit nurses often influence the collaborative decision to initiate and discontinue restraints in critical care patients. However, little is known about factors that influence the critical thought processes of intensive care unit nurses in determining use of restraints. To describe nurses' determinants of initiation and discontinuation of restraints in surgical intensive care unit patients. Semistructured interviews were conducted to identify and describe determinants of initiation and discontinuation of physical restraints. Demographic and employment data were collected via questionnaire. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by using conventional content analysis to establish categories and identify themes. A total of 13 nurses (mean age 43 [SD, 12] years, 92% female, mean of 18 [SD, 12] years of practice as a registered nurse, 69% bachelor of science in nursing) participated in the study. Content analysis revealed 3 general categories and 8 themes that indicated the thoughtful reflection processes nurses in a surgical intensive care unit use to determine use of restraints. Top priorities were ensuring patient safety and comfort. Nurses synthesized factors including practice experience, patient-specific behaviors and risk, and patients' need for devices in determining use of restraints. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. Smoking, dietary restraint, gender, and the relative reinforcing value of snack food in a large university sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Gary S; Lumb, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the independent and interactive association between smoking, gender, dietary restraint and the relative reinforcing value of snack food in a university sample. Four hundred and three introductory psychology students completed questionnaires assessing age, gender, BMI, hunger, smoking status, nicotine dependence, dietary restraint, hedonic ratings and the relative reinforcing value of snack food and fruits and vegetables. The relative reinforcing value of snack food was determined by the number of button presses subjects would be willing to do to obtain (100g) of snack food versus 100g of fruits and vegetables. Multiple regression analyses yielded a significant three-way interaction of gender, restraint, and smoking in predicting the relative reinforcing value of snack food indicating that in female smokers, dietary restraint was inversely associated with the relative reinforcing value of snack food, whereas in male smokers, restraint was not significantly related with the reinforcing value of snacks. These findings remained significant after controlling for BMI, hunger, and hedonics, suggesting that there are gender differences in relationship between smoking, dietary restraint, and snack food reinforcement. Among female university students, smoking moderates the relationship between dietary restraint and food reinforcement whereby high-restraint female smokers appear to be at lower risk of over-consuming energy dense snack food compared to low-restraint female smokers, while high-restraint male smokers may not be at higher risk than low-restraint male smokers.

  16. Mental Health Nursing, Mechanical Restraint Measures and Patients’ Legal Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Søren; Gildberg, Frederik Alkier

    2016-01-01

    . This article presents an in-principle Danish Psychiatric Complaint Board decision concerning MR use initiated by untrained staff. The case illustrates that, judicially, weight must be put on the patient perspective on course of happenings and especially when health professional documentation is scant, patients......Abstract: Coercive mechanical restraint (MR) in psychiatry constitute the perhaps most important exception from the common health law requirement for involving patients in health care decisions and achieving their informed consent prior to treatment. Coercive measures and particularly MR constitute...... a serious collision with patient autonomy principles, pose a particular challenge to psychiatric patients’ legal rights, and put intensified demands on health professional performance. Legal rights principles require rationale for coercive measure use be thoroughly considered and rigorously documented...

  17. Chronic restraint stress upregulates erythropoiesis through glucocorticoid stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L Voorhees

    Full Text Available In response to elevated glucocorticoid levels, erythroid progenitors rapidly expand to produce large numbers of young erythrocytes. Previous work demonstrates hematopoietic changes in rodents exposed to various physical and psychological stressors, however, the effects of chronic psychological stress on erythropoiesis has not be delineated. We employed laboratory, clinical and genomic analyses of a murine model of chronic restraint stress (RST to examine the influence of psychological stress on erythropoiesis. Mice exposed to RST demonstrated markers of early erythroid expansion involving the glucocorticoid receptor. In addition, these RST-exposed mice had increased numbers of circulating reticulocytes and increased erythropoiesis in primary and secondary erythroid tissues. Mice also showed increases in erythroid progenitor populations and elevated expression of the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 in these cells. Together this work reports some of the first evidence of psychological stress affecting erythroid homeostasis through glucocorticoid stimulation.

  18. Exploring the effects of sparse restraints on protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalaparthy, Varun; Sanaboyana, Venkata Ramana; Rafalia, Hitesh; Gosavi, Shachi

    2017-12-03

    One of the main barriers to accurate computational protein structure prediction is searching the vast space of protein conformations. Distance restraints or inter-residue contacts have been used to reduce this search space, easing the discovery of the correct folded state. It has been suggested that about 1 contact for every 12 residues may be sufficient to predict structure at fold level accuracy. Here, we use coarse-grained structure-based models in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to examine this empirical prediction. We generate sparse contact maps for 15 proteins of varying sequence lengths and topologies and find that given perfect secondary-structural information, a small fraction of the native contact map (5%-10%) suffices to fold proteins to their correct native states. We also find that different sparse maps are not equivalent and we make several observations about the type of maps that are successful at such structure prediction. Long range contacts are found to encode more information than shorter range ones, especially for α and αβ-proteins. However, this distinction reduces for β-proteins. Choosing contacts that are a consensus from successful maps gives predictive sparse maps as does choosing contacts that are well spread out over the protein structure. Additionally, the folding of proteins can also be used to choose predictive sparse maps. Overall, we conclude that structure-based models can be used to understand the efficacy of structure-prediction restraints and could, in future, be tuned to include specific force-field interactions, secondary structure errors and noise in the sparse maps. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. GINGER: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Angela D. V.; Belfi, Jacopo; Ni, Wei-Tou; Beverini, Nicolo; Carelli, Giorgio; Maccioni, Enrico; Porzio, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    GINGER (Gyroscopes IN General Relativity) is a proposal for an Earth-based experiment to measure the Lense-Thirring (LT) and de Sitter effects. GINGER is based on ring lasers, which are the most sensitive inertial sensors to measure the rotation rate of the Earth. We show that two ring lasers, one at maximum signal and the other horizontal, would be the simplest configuration able to retrieve the GR effects. Here, we discuss this configuration in detail showing that it would have the capability to test LT effect at 1%, provided the accuracy of the scale factor of the instrument at the level of 1 part in 1012 is reached. In principle, one single ring laser could do the test, but the combination of the two ring lasers gives the necessary redundancy and the possibility to verify that the systematics of the lasers are sufficiently small. The discussion can be generalised to seismology and geodesy and it is possible to say that signals 10-12 orders of magnitude below the Earth rotation rate can be studied; the proposed array can be seen as the basic element of multi-axial systems, and the generalisation to three dimensions is feasible adding one or two devices and monitoring the relative angles between different ring lasers. This simple array can be used to measure with very high precision the amplitude of angular rotation rate (the length of the day, LOD), its short term variations, and the angle between the angular rotation vector and the horizontal ring laser. Finally this experiment could be useful to probe gravity at fundamental level giving indications on violations of Einstein Equivalence Principle and Lorenz Invariance and possible chiral effects in the gravitational field.

  20. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  1. CLASSIFICATION OF RESTRAINTS IN THE OPTIMIZATION PROBLEM OF A COLD-FORMED PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Łukowicz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the restraints in the optimization problem. This is an important and complicated issue because it requires taking into account a vast range of information related to the design and production. In order to describe the relations of a specific optimization problem, it is essential to adopt appropriate criteria and to collect information on all kinds of restraints, i.e. boundary conditions. The following paper verifies the various restraints and defines three subsets: design assumptions, technological limitations and standard conditions. The provided classification was made with reference to the analysis of the construction applicability of the newly patented cold-formed profile.

  2. [Physical and pharmacological restraints in geriatric and gerontology services and centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Cordero, Primitivo; López Trigo, José Antonio; Maíllo Pedraz, Herminio; Paz Rubio, José María

    2015-01-01

    Physical and pharmacological restraints are a controversial issue in the context of geriatric care due to their moral, ethical, social and legal repercussions and, despite this fact, no specific legislation exists at a national level. The use of restraints is being questioned with growing frequency, as there are studies that demonstrate that restraints do not reduce the number of falls or their consequences, but rather can increase them, cause complications, injuries and potentially fatal accidents. Restraints are not always used rationally, despite compromising a fundamental human right, that is, freedom, protected in the Constitution, as well as values and principles, such as dignity and personal self-esteem. There are centers where restraints are applied to more than 50% of patients, and in some cases without the consent of their legal representatives. On some occasions, restraints are used for attaining organizational or environmental objectives, such as complying with tight schedules, and for reducing or avoiding the supervision of patients who walk erratically and, at times, are used indefinitely. Even greater confusion exists with respect to the emerging concept of chemical or pharmacological restraints, since no conceptual framework exists based on scientific evidence, and with sufficient consensus for guiding healthcare workers. In this context, the Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología (SEGG--Spanish Geriatrics and Gerontology Society), aware of the significance and transcendence of the issue, and in an attempt to preserve and guarantee maximum freedom, dignity and self-esteem, on the one hand, and to ensure the maximum integrity and legal certainty of the persons cared for in geriatric and gerontology services and centers, on the other, decided to create an "Interdisciplinary Committee on Restraints" made up by members from different disciplines and members of SEGG Working Groups or Committees, external health care workers, groups

  3. Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauge Berring, Lene; Bonde, SM; Johansen, L

    BackgroundIn order to reduce the use of mechanical restraints, this project aimed to implement a Quiet Room in a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Previous studies has demonstrated that quiet rooms, such ascomfort rooms (Cf. Cummings, Grandfield and Coldwell, 2010) and sensory rooms......(Cf. Bjôrkdahl 2015), contributed to higher patient satisfaction and lower rates of violence, seclusion and restraints. This poster describes the preliminary results and the implementations process.AimThe study aim was to 1) reduce the use of coercive measures such as mechanical restraints, 2) redirect...... used the room between 1 and 5 times. Staff and patients report that coercive measures were avoided, however, we were not able to identify any changes within the registered use of mechanical restraints. Generally, patients experienced great benefits and reported that they appreciated the opportunity...

  4. Professionals' attitudes toward reducing restraint: the case of seclusion in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doeselaar, Marjan; Sleegers, Peter; Hutschemaekers, Giel

    2008-06-01

    Despite public opinion and policy interventions, restraint remains a common practice. This is also the case in the Netherlands, where projects aimed to reduce seclusion, have not led to a decreased use of restraint. Is this lack of effectiveness related to attitudes of the professionals? The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes of professionals working in mental health care toward restraint. A questionnaire with eight scales was constructed for measuring attitudes of professionals. Scores of 540 professionals were studied, using analysis of variance and cluster analysis and related to several personnel and organizational characteristics. The more professionals were personally involved in seclusion, the more they believed in it. Three types of professionals were identified: Transformers, Doubters and Maintainers. More than half of the psychiatrists (56%) belonged to the type of maintainers. Nurses were more divided. Professionals working in clinical settings are not really opposed to restraint. This could explain the limited effects of innovation projects.

  5. Video recording study of infants undergoing primary cheiloplasty: are arm restraints really needed?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tokioka, Kazuyuki; Park, Susam; Sugawara, Yasushi; Nakatsuka, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Arm restraints are traditionally used during the perioperative period for cleft surgery to prevent the affected infant from damaging the wound, but the benefits of this standard practice have been controversial...

  6. Occupant restraint preferences of individuals traveling in motor vehicles while seated in their wheelchairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Linda; Lutgendorf, Marlies; Manary, Miriam A

    2008-01-01

    A survey among 127 wheelchair users was conducted to characterize wheelchair occupant restraint usage patterns, restraint deficiencies, user characteristics, and essential wheelchair occupant restraint design parameters for when individuals travel in motor vehicles while seated in their wheelchairs. Survey respondents value independent travel and seem generally interested in the use of an occupant restraint system that is attached to the wheelchair frame and that can be used independently by the wheelchair user without caregiver or vehicle driver assistance. Results of the survey further indicate that despite the relatively high percentage of respondents who are attempting to travel safely (78.8%), almost half of these wheelchair users have experienced injury or compromised wheelchair balance while traveling in motor vehicles.

  7. Disclosure of Pre-Trail Investigation Data in Court when Imposing Measures of Restraint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ernestas Rimselis

    2005-01-01

    ... imposition of measures of restraint on a suspect. This problem is related to a very significant aspect of succeeding organisation of pre-trial investigation - confidentiality of present data of pre-trial investigation as well as implementation...

  8. Dieting, restraint, and disinhibition predict women's weight change over 6 y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jennifer S; Hoffman, Lesa; Birch, Leann L

    2009-07-01

    Although disinhibited eating is positively associated with higher weight in women, it is not known whether restrained eating and dieting moderate the influence of disinhibited eating on weight change. The objective was to investigate over 6 y the interactive effects of restrained and disinhibited eating and self-reported dieting to lose weight as predictors of weight gain in women. Data were collected from non-Hispanic white women (n = 163) every 2 y. Height and weight were measured in triplicate. Dietary restraint and disinhibition were assessed by using the Eating Inventory. Participants were also asked if they were "currently dieting to lose weight." Multilevel modeling was used to examine change in weight as a function of time-invariant and time-varying predictors, including dietary restraint, dietary disinhibition, and self-reported dieting. After covariates were adjusted for, growth curve models showed that within-person increases in restraint over time were associated with concurrent decreases in weight and that higher levels of restraint moderated the positive association between dietary disinhibition and weight. Women who reported dieting at study entry were heavier at study entry and gained more weight over time than did nondieters. Finally, a significant interaction between restraint, disinhibition, and dieting showed that restraint moderated the effect of disinhibition on weight differently in nondieters than in dieters. Increasing levels of dietary restraint may be beneficial in moderating weight by attenuating the positive association between disinhibition and weight in dieting women. An understanding of weight and weight change requires examination of the interactive effects of restraint, disinhibition, and dieting.

  9. Dieting, restraint, and disinhibition predict women's weight change over 6 y123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jennifer S; Hoffman, Lesa

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although disinhibited eating is positively associated with higher weight in women, it is not known whether restrained eating and dieting moderate the influence of disinhibited eating on weight change. Objective: The objective was to investigate over 6 y the interactive effects of restrained and disinhibited eating and self-reported dieting to lose weight as predictors of weight gain in women. Design: Data were collected from non-Hispanic white women (n = 163) every 2 y. Height and weight were measured in triplicate. Dietary restraint and disinhibition were assessed by using the Eating Inventory. Participants were also asked if they were “currently dieting to lose weight.” Multilevel modeling was used to examine change in weight as a function of time-invariant and time-varying predictors, including dietary restraint, dietary disinhibition, and self-reported dieting. Results: After covariates were adjusted for, growth curve models showed that within-person increases in restraint over time were associated with concurrent decreases in weight and that higher levels of restraint moderated the positive association between dietary disinhibition and weight. Women who reported dieting at study entry were heavier at study entry and gained more weight over time than did nondieters. Finally, a significant interaction between restraint, disinhibition, and dieting showed that restraint moderated the effect of disinhibition on weight differently in nondieters than in dieters. Conclusions: Increasing levels of dietary restraint may be beneficial in moderating weight by attenuating the positive association between disinhibition and weight in dieting women. An understanding of weight and weight change requires examination of the interactive effects of restraint, disinhibition, and dieting. PMID:19439461

  10. Applying sensory modulation to mental health inpatient care to reduce seclusion and restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte; Kolmos, Anne; Andersen, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical training in managing conflicts and preventing violence seldom contains sensory modulation (SM) as a method to de-escalate and prevent restraint and seclusion. Sensory-based interventions promote adaptive regulation of arousal and emotion. SM is a complementary approach...... a SM approach in mental healthcare facilities has a significant effect on the reduction of restraint and seclusion. As a part of the implementation, staff training and education in SM are crucial....

  11. 49 CFR 571.213 - Standard No. 213; Child restraint systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 572 Subpart S dummy need not meet S5.1.2 and S5.1.3. S5.1 Dynamic performance. S5.1.1Child restraint... restraint system, neither knee pivot point shall, at any time during the dynamic test, pass through a... not less than 24 square inches for systems recommended for children weighing 20 pounds or more, or 48...

  12. Interactive effects of dietary restraint and adiposity on stress-induced eating and the food choice of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmich, James N; Lambiase, Maya J; Lobarinas, Christina L; Balantekin, Katherine N

    2011-12-01

    The Individual Differences Model posits that individual differences in physiological and psychological factors explain eating behaviors in response to stress. The purpose was to determine the effects of individual differences in adiposity, dietary restraint and stress reactivity on children's energy intake and food choices. A total of 40 boys and girls, age 8-12 years, with wide ranges of dietary restraint, adiposity, and stress reactivity were measured for total energy intake and choice of energy dense 'comfort' and lower density 'healthy' foods following reading and speech stressor manipulations. When exploring the interaction of dietary restraint and stress reactivity, lower restraint/lower reactivity and lower restraint/higher reactivity were associated with reductions in energy intake (37-62 kcal) and comfort food (33-89 kcal). Higher restraint/lower reactivity was associated with consuming 86 fewer total kcal and 45 fewer kcal of comfort food. Only higher restraint/higher reactivity predicted increased energy intake (104 kcal) and comfort food (131 kcal). The interaction of dietary restraint and percentage body fat revealed that lower restraint/lower adiposity was associated with consuming 123 fewer kcal after being stressed with the entire reduction due to a decrease in comfort food. Lower restraint/higher adiposity was associated with consuming 116 kcal more after being stressed with 70% (81 kcal) of the increase in the form of comfort foods. Higher restraint/lower adiposity and higher restraint/higher adiposity were associated with smaller changes in total energy intake of 22 kcal and 1 kcal; respectively. Both restraint and adiposity moderated the effect of stress on energy intake and food choice. Children with greater adiposity may be at risk for stress-induced eating to contribute to their obesity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mixed selection. Effects of body images, dietary restraint, and persuasive messages on females' orientations towards chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Kevin; Hendry, Alana; Stritzke, Werner G K

    2013-01-01

    Many women experience ambivalent reactions to chocolate: craving it but also wary of its impact on weight and health. Chocolate advertisements often use thin ideal models and previous research indicates that this exacerbates ambivalence. This experiment compared attitudes to, and consumption of, chocolate following exposure to images containing thin or overweight models together with written messages that were either positive or negative about eating chocolate. Participants (all female) were categorised as either low- or high-restraint. Approach, avoidance and guilt motives towards chocolate were measured and the participants had an opportunity to consume chocolate. Exposure to thin ideal models led to higher approach motives and this effect was most marked among the high restraint participants. Avoidance and guilt scores did not vary as a function of model size or message, but there were clear differences between the restraint groups, with the high restraint participants scoring substantially higher than low restraint participants on both of these measures. When the participants were provided with an opportunity to eat some chocolate, those with high restraint who had been exposed to the thin models consumed the most. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rappertk: a versatile engine for discrete restraint-based conformational sampling of macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmali Anjum M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macromolecular structures are modeled by conformational optimization within experimental and knowledge-based restraints. Discrete restraint-based sampling generates high-quality structures within these restraints and facilitates further refinement in a continuous all-atom energy landscape. This approach has been used successfully for protein loop modeling, comparative modeling and electron density fitting in X-ray crystallography. Results Here we present a software toolkit (Rappertk which generalizes discrete restraint-based sampling for use in structural biology. Modular design and multi-layered architecture enables Rappertk to sample conformations of any macromolecule at many levels of detail and within a variety of experimental restraints. Performance against a Cα-tracing benchmark shows that the efficiency has not suffered despite the overhead required by this flexibility. We demonstrate the toolkit's capabilities by building high-quality β-sheets and by introducing restraint-driven sampling. RNA sampling is demonstrated by rebuilding a protein-RNA interface. Ability to construct arbitrary ligands is used in sampling protein-ligand interfaces within electron density. Finally, secondary structure and shape information derived from EM are combined to generate multiple conformations of a protein consistent with the observed density. Conclusion Through its modular design and ease of use, Rappertk enables exploration of a wide variety of interesting avenues in structural biology. This toolkit, with illustrative examples, is freely available to academic users from http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/~swanand/mysite/rtk/index.html.

  15. Rappertk: a versatile engine for discrete restraint-based conformational sampling of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Swanand P; Karmali, Anjum M; Blundell, Tom L

    2007-03-21

    Macromolecular structures are modeled by conformational optimization within experimental and knowledge-based restraints. Discrete restraint-based sampling generates high-quality structures within these restraints and facilitates further refinement in a continuous all-atom energy landscape. This approach has been used successfully for protein loop modeling, comparative modeling and electron density fitting in X-ray crystallography. Here we present a software toolkit (Rappertk) which generalizes discrete restraint-based sampling for use in structural biology. Modular design and multi-layered architecture enables Rappertk to sample conformations of any macromolecule at many levels of detail and within a variety of experimental restraints. Performance against a Calpha-tracing benchmark shows that the efficiency has not suffered despite the overhead required by this flexibility. We demonstrate the toolkit's capabilities by building high-quality beta-sheets and by introducing restraint-driven sampling. RNA sampling is demonstrated by rebuilding a protein-RNA interface. Ability to construct arbitrary ligands is used in sampling protein-ligand interfaces within electron density. Finally, secondary structure and shape information derived from EM are combined to generate multiple conformations of a protein consistent with the observed density. Through its modular design and ease of use, Rappertk enables exploration of a wide variety of interesting avenues in structural biology. This toolkit, with illustrative examples, is freely available to academic users from http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/~swanand/mysite/rtk/index.html.

  16. Knot-So-Fast: a learning plan to minimize patient restraint in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Kielb, Cathy

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, new legislation in Ontario, the Patient Restraint Minimization Act, mandated that all hospitals develop a policy to minimize the use of restraints. Since restraining patients was a common practice in our intensive care unit (ICU), a practice change was necessary. To do this, a learning plan was created to share key information pertaining to the Act that would support humane and dignified care for our critically ill patients. Change was accomplished through a survey of nursing staff to establish learning needs, the development of a learning plan titled "Knot-So-Fast", and the creation of a tool titled the "Restraint Decision Wheel" to support staff in making restraint decisions quickly and appropriately. To measure the effect of our Knot-So-Fast learning plan, the staff was resurveyed one year later. Results showed there was a statistically significant decrease in restraint use in our ICU. The learning plan and tools developed have been found to be adaptable to other hospital units and are provided. This article includes the educational content and methods used in our ICU to effect a change in restraint practice. Tools, such as a nursing survey and a decision wheel, developed to enhance learning are also included.

  17. Effects of chronic restraint stress on body weight, food intake, and hypothalamic gene expressions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Joo Yeon; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Soo

    2013-12-01

    Stress affects body weight and food intake, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We evaluated the changes in body weight and food intake of ICR male mice subjected to daily 2 hours restraint stress for 15 days. Hypothalamic gene expression profiling was analyzed by cDNA microarray. Daily body weight and food intake measurements revealed that both parameters decreased rapidly after initiating daily restraint stress. Body weights of stressed mice then remained significantly lower than the control body weights, even though food intake slowly recovered to 90% of the control intake at the end of the experiment. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that chronic restraint stress affects the expression of hypothalamic genes possibly related to body weight control. Since decreases of daily food intake and body weight were remarkable in days 1 to 4 of restraint, we examined the expression of food intake-related genes in the hypothalamus. During these periods, the expressions of ghrelin and pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA were significantly changed in mice undergoing restraint stress. Moreover, daily serum corticosterone levels gradually increased, while leptin levels significantly decreased. The present study demonstrates that restraint stress affects body weight and food intake by initially modifying canonical food intake-related genes and then later modifying other genes involved in energy metabolism. These genetic changes appear to be mediated, at least in part, by corticosterone.

  18. Methodology of estimating restraint use in children: roadside observation or parking lot interview survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, Anne; Rothman, Linda; Slater, Morgan; Kolga, Carol; Hussein, Abdul; Boase, Paul; Howard, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    To compare the differences in Canadian national estimates of correct child restraint use obtained using the standard roadside observation method compared to a detailed parking lot interview. A multi-stage stratified survey design was used to conduct roadside observational and interview data collection at 182 randomly selected sites across Canada. For each site, a roadside intersection location and a parking lot location were used for the roadside observational survey and the interview respectively. Weighted estimates of correct restraint use from both locations were compared. Estimates of correct restraint use were significantly higher for all children under the age of 9 in the parking lot sample. The largest discrepancy between the two samples was in booster seat aged children (ages 4-8) where 29.1% versus 67.8% of children were observed to be correctly restrained using the roadside and the parking lot methodology respectively. There was a 67% participation refusal rate in the parking lot survey. There are specific advantages and limitations to both survey designs. The purpose of the data collection must be considered when selecting the methodology. Parking lot surveys provide richer data regarding restraint use/misuse. Estimates of correct restraint use must be approached with caution due to the effect of consent bias resulting in over inflation of estimates. Roadside observation is adequate and appropriate for providing national estimates of correct restraint use. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Bonnema; D. Moser; J. Riedesel; K. Kooda; K. Liekhus; K. Rebish; S. Poling

    1998-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT)rule. Four practicable offgas treatment processes were identified, which, if installed, would enable the WERF to meet the anticipated MACT emission limits for dioxins and furans (D/F), hydrochloric acid (HCI), and mercury (Hg). Due to the three-year time restraint for MACT compliance, any technology chosen for the upgrade must be performed within the general plant project funding limit of $5 M. The option selected consists of a partial-quench evaporative cooler with dry sorbent injection for HCI removal followed by a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed for Hg control. The planning cost estimate for implementing the option is $4.17 M (with 24% contingency). The total estimated cost includes capital costs, design and construction costs, and project management costs. Capital costs include the purchase of a new offgas evaporative cooler, a dry sorbent injection system with reagent storage, a new fabric filter baghouse, a fixed carbon bed absorber, and two offgas induced draft exhaust fans. It is estimated that 21 months will be required to complete the recommended modification to the WERF. The partial-quench cooler is designed to rapidly cool the offgas exiting the secondary combustion chamber to minimize D/F formation. Dry sorbent injection of an alkali reagent into the offgas is recommended. The alkali reacts with the HCI to form a salt, which is captured with the fly ash in the baghouse. A design HCI removal efficiency of 97.2% allows for the feeding 20 lbs/hr of chlorine to the WERF incinerator. The sorbent feed rate can be adjusted to achieve the desired HCI removal efficiency. A fixed bed of sulfur-impregnated carbon was conservatively sized for a total Hg removal capacity when

  20. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  1. The impact of restraint reduction meetings on the use of restrictive physical interventions in English residential services for children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, R; Leitch, S

    2015-07-01

    The aim was to examine the impact of post restraint reduction meetings upon the frequency and restrictiveness of restraint use in English children's residential services. Attention has been drawn to the misuse, overuse and safety of some techniques used to physically restrain children in residential services. Successful interventions to reduce restraints have been reported, mostly from the USA. Demonstrate a significant overall reduction in both, frequency and restrictiveness of restraints; the greatest percentage decrease in the most restrictive floor restraints. Whilst five services reduced both frequency and restrictiveness, five services showed some increases in frequency and/or restrictiveness of restraints employed. Restraint reduction is most effectively reduced through employing multiple strategies and that post restraint reduction meetings maybe one useful component. Organisations seeking to promote restraint reduction meetings need to allocate sufficient priority and resources to support these. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dietary restraint and telomere length in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Amy; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Epel, Elissa

    2008-10-01

    Leukocyte telomere shortening can serve as a biomarker of aging, as telomere length (TL) can decline with age and shortening is positively associated with morbidity and mortality. It is therefore important to identify psychological and behavioral factors linked to accelerated telomere shortening. Stress and poorer metabolic health (greater adiposity, insulin resistance, and cortisol) correlate with shorter telomeres. Self-reported dietary restraint (DR), defined as chronic preoccupation with weight and attempts at restricting food intake, is linked to greater perceived stress, cortisol, and weight gain, when assessed in community studies (versus in weight loss programs). To test for an association between DR and TL in healthy women across a range of ages. We examined whether DR is linked to TL in two samples, one of premenopausal women (aged 20-50 years;N = 36) and one of postmenopausal women (aged 53-69 years; N = 20). In both samples, higher levels of DR were associated with shorter leukocyte TL, independent of body mass index, smoking, and age. Chronic DR, as assessed by self-report (i.e. not caloric restriction), may be a risk factor for premature telomere shortening. Potential mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Dietary restraint and US devaluation predict evaluative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Higgs, Suzanne; Mitchell, Gemma L

    2005-08-07

    Previous research has indicated that flavor-flavor learning is impaired in restrained eaters. In Experiment 1 we sought to extend this finding using a larger sample and a more comprehensive assessment of dietary behavior. Participants (N=90, including 30 current dieters) sampled three novel flavors (CSs), each on 10 separate occasions, in a randomized order. Each flavor was paired with chocolate (US) either 10%, 50%, or 90% of the time. We then assessed liking for the three CSs and asked participants to complete the DEBQ-restraint and TFEQ-disinhibition sub-scales. After these CS-US parings, restrained eaters tended to prefer the 10% paired flavor whereas unrestrained eaters tended to prefer the 90% paired flavor. Differential CS liking was not evident in dieters and it was not predicted by disinhibition. Using a similar methodology, in Experiment 2 (N=76) we assessed evaluative change following picture-sweet pairings. Relative to the other CSs, the restrained eaters reported a greater increase in their liking for the 10% paired CS and the unrestrained eaters reported a greater increase in their liking for the 90% paired CS. We also discovered that evaluative change is related to the level of US devaluation that takes place during conditioning. Evidence that a sweet US can bring about a decrease in liking has not been reported previously. One interpretation is that negative beliefs and attitudes can contaminate the representation of the US during training.

  4. Effect of repeated restraint stress on memory in different tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Gamaro

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of repeated stress applied to female rats on memory evaluated by three behavioral tasks: two-way shuttle avoidance, inhibitory avoidance and habituation to an open field. Repeated stress had different effects on rat behavior when different tasks were considered. In the two-way active avoidance test the stressed animals presented memory of the task, but their memory scores were impaired when compared to all other groups. In the habituation to the open field, only the control group showed a significant difference in the number of rearings between training and testing sessions, which is interpreted as an adequate memory of the task. In the handled and chronically stressed animals, on the other hand, no memory was observed, suggesting that even a very mild repeated stress would be enough to alter habituation to this task. The performance in the inhibitory avoidance task presented no significant differences between groups. The findings suggest that repeated restraint stress might induce cognitive impairments that are dependent on the task and on stress intensity.

  5. Sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjea, Supriyo; Thurston, J.; Kininmonth, S.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the details of a sensor network that is currently being deployed at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The sensor network allows scientists to retrieve sensor data that has a high spatial and temporal resolution. We give an overview of the energy-efficient data aggregation

  6. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built

  7. State and trait positive and negative affectivity in relation to restraint intention and binge eating among adults with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E; Mason, Tyler B; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2018-01-01

    Restraint and binge eating are cognitive and behavioral processes that are particularly important in the context of obesity. While extensive research has focused on negative affect (NA) in relation to binge eating, it is unclear whether affective valence (i.e., positive versus negative) and stability (i.e., state versus trait) differentially predict binge eating and restraint among individuals with obesity. Distinguishing between valence and stability helps elucidate under which affective contexts, and among which individuals, restraint and binge eating are likely to occur. Therefore, the present study examined relationships between trait and state levels of NA and positive affect (PA), binge eating, and restraint intention among 50 adults with obesity (BMI ≥ 30). Participants completed baseline assessments followed by a two-week ecological momentary assessment (EMA) protocol. Structural equation modeling assessed a trait model of person-level measures of affect in relation to overall levels of binge eating and restraint intention, while general estimating equations (GEEs) assessed state models examining relationships between momentary affect and subsequent binge eating and restraint. The trait model indicated higher overall NA was related to more binge eating episodes, but was unrelated to overall restraint intention. Higher overall PA was related to higher overall restraint intention, but was unrelated to binge eating. State models indicated momentary NA was associated with a greater likelihood of subsequent binge eating and lower restraint intention. Momentary PA was unrelated to subsequent binge eating or restraint intention. Together, findings demonstrate important distinctions between the valence and stability of affect in relationship to binge eating and restraint intention among individuals with obesity. While NA is a more salient predictor of binge eating than PA, both overall PA and momentary NA are predictors of restraint intention. Published by

  8. Use of physical restraint in hospital patients: A descriptive study in a tertiary hospital in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiana Z. Kalula

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of physical restraint in patient management is a common and emotive issue, and has legal and ethical dimensions.Objective: To document the prevalence of physical restraint use, patient characteristics associated with physical restraint use, and nurses’ and doctors’ knowledge and perceptions towards the practice.Methods: A cross-sectional study of 572 patients, of whom 132 were physically restrained, was conducted in acute wards of a tertiary hospital. Data were collected on the 132 physically restrained patients. Fifty-nine doctors and 159 nurses completed a specially constructed questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were derived and expressed as numbers and percentages.Results: Prevalence of restraint use was 23% (132/572. The distribution in acute wards was: medical 54.5%; surgical 44.7%; maternity 0.8%; psychiatry none. Mean age (SD of the restrained patients was 49 years (20.5; 53.8% were male. The commonest types of restraints used were bed rails 93% and wrist belts 12%. Restraints were used largely to protect medical devices and as protection from harm. Less than 15% of the nurses reported having received training and 36% of the doctors reported having received some guidance on the use of restraints. Only a minority of nurses and doctors knew of a hospital policy on restraint use. Documentation on the prescription and indication for the use of restraint was poor.Conclusion: Prevalence of restraint use is high and poorly coordinated. A policy on the use of restraint and comprehensive guidelines should be developed to guide health care practitioners in the management of patients where restraint cannot be avoided.

  9. De-escalation techniques used, and reasons for seclusion and restraint, in a forensic psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivalainen, Satu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Louheranta, Olavi; Putkonen, Anu; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Tiihonen, Jari

    2017-10-01

    In Finland, the Mental Health Act determines the legal basis for seclusion and restraint. Restrictive measures are implemented to manage challenging situations and should be used as a last resort in psychiatric inpatient care. In the present study, we examined the reasons for seclusion and restraint, as well as whether any de-escalation techniques were used to help patients calm down. Seclusion and restraint files from a 4-year period (1 June 2009-31 May 2013) were retrospectively investigated and analysed by content analysis. Descriptive statistics were calculated. A total of 144 episodes of seclusion and restraint were included to analyse the reasons for seclusion and restraint, and 113 episodes were analysed to examine unsuccessful de-escalation techniques. The most commonly-used techniques were one-to-one interaction with a patient (n = 74, 65.5% of n = 113) and administration of extra medication (n = 37, 32.7% of n = 113). The reasons for seclusion and restraint were threatening harmful behaviour (n = 51, 35.4% of n = 144), direct harmful behaviour (n = 43, 29.9%), indirect harmful behaviour (n = 42, 29.1%), and other behaviours (n = 8, 5.6%). In general, the same de-escalation techniques were used with most patients. Most episodes of seclusion or restraint were due to threats of violence or direct violence. Individual means of self-regulation and patient guidance on these techniques are needed. Additionally, staff should be educated on a diverse range of de-escalation techniques. Future studies should focus on examining de-escalation techniques for the prevention of seclusion. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. Physical restraint use among nursing home residents: A comparison of two data collection methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voyer Philippe

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the issues surrounding physical restraint use, it is important to have a method of measurement as valid and reliable as possible. We determined the sensitivity and specificity of physical restraint use a reported by nursing staff and b reviewed from medical and nursing records in nursing home settings, by comparing these methods with direct observation. Methods We sampled eight care units in skilled nursing homes, seven care units in nursing homes and one long-term care unit in a hospital, from eight facilities which included 28 nurses and 377 residents. Physical restraint use was assessed the day following three periods of direct observation by two different means: interview with one or several members of the regular nursing staff, and review of medical and nursing records. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated according to 2-by-2 contingency tables. Differences between the methods were assessed using the phi coefficient. Other information collected included: demographic characteristics, disruptive behaviors, body alignment problems, cognitive and functional skills. Results Compared to direct observation (gold standard, reported restraint use by nursing staff yielded a sensitivity of 87.4% at a specificity of 93.7% (phi = 0.84. When data was reviewed from subjects' medical and nursing records, sensitivity was reduced to 74.8%, and specificity to 86.3% (phi = 0.54. Justifications for restraint use including risk for falls, agitation, body alignment problems and aggressiveness were associated with the use of physical restraints. Conclusions The interview of nursing staff and the review of medical and nursing records are both valid and reliable techniques for measuring physical restraint use among nursing home residents. Higher sensitivity and specificity values were achieved when nursing staff was interviewed as compared to reviewing medical records. This study suggests that the interview of nursing

  11. Restraint stress alters immune parameters and induces oxidative stress in the mouse uterus during embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guanhui; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2014-12-01

    The influence of stress on embryo implantation is not well understood. Prior studies have focused on later gestational stages and the long-term impact of stress on immune function. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of restraint stress on the immune parameters and the oxidative states of the uterus during implantation. In this study, pregnant CD1 mice were subjected to restraint stress (4 h/d) on embryonic day 1 (E1) and sacrificed on E3, E5, and E7. Maternal plasma corticosterone (CORT) secretion and implantation sites in the uterus were examined. The uterine (excluding embryos) homogenate and uterine lymphocytes were collected to examine oxidative stress states and associated immune parameters. The results demonstrated that restraint stress increased maternal plasma CORT secretion and reduced the number of implantation sites by 15.3% on E5 and by 26.1% on E7. Moreover, restraint stress decreased the density of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in the endometrium by 22.1-47.9% and increased the density of mast cells in the myometrium by 55.6-76.9%. Restraint stress remarkably decreased the CD3(+)CD4(+) T/CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell ratio (by 26.2-28.9%) and attenuated uterine lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of cytokines. In addition, restraint stress threatened the intracellular equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants, resulting in decreased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) (32.2% and 45.7%), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (15.5% and 26.1%), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) (18.4% and 18.2%) activities and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) (34.4% and 43.0%) contents on E5 and E7. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that restraint stress causes abnormal implantation and negatively impacts immune parameters in association with oxidative stress in mice.

  12. Child restraint system misuse and/or inappropriate use in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Sjaanie; Charlton, Judith L

    2009-06-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are one of the leading causes of child death and acquired disability. Child restraint systems (CRS) for vehicles are designed to provide specialized protection for child occupants in the event of a crash. However, the effectiveness of a CRS is critically dependent on: correct installation of the CRS in the vehicle, the correct harnessing of the child in the CRS, and use of an appropriate CRS. The current study aimed to investigate the incidence misuse and/or inappropriate use of CRS through a CRS inspection program in the Australian states of New South Wales (NSW), Victoria (VIC), Queensland (QLD), South Australia (SA), Western Australia (WA), and Tasmania (TAS). Participants were recruited through an advertisement for free CRS inspections displayed at childcare centers, kindergartens, community centers, hospitals, and child expos. At each inspection, the CRS fitting specialist inspected and reported to the owner of the CRS on the installation of the child restraint(s) and/or system(s) and any fitting faults and/or concerns with the fitting and/or use if the child restraint(s) and or system(s). The following results are based on the inspection of 1386 vehicles, in which there were 1995 restraints. Of all the restraints inspected, the majority (79%) were reported as having at least one instance of misuse. The most common forms of misuse included harness strap errors such as the straps being adjusted, faulty, twisted, and/or incorrectly positioned (38%); seat belt errors such as the seatbelt being incorrectly routed, twisted, and/or incorrectly adjusted (32%); missing or incorrect fitting of gated buckle/locking clip (23%); the need for a missing sash guide (8%); tether errors such as the tether being incorrectly routed and/or adjusted (7%); inappropriate use of a CRS for the size of the child (6%); anchor errors such as the anchor was fitted incorrectly or not the correct type (5%); and the H Harness(1) being used incorrectly (5%). In addition

  13. Influence of dosage and chemical restraints on feline excretory urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajadi, R A; Adetunji, A; Omoerah, V O; Okoh, J U

    2006-12-01

    Three series of trials involving 10 domestic short-haired cats were carried out to determine the influence of dosage of contrast media or type of chemical restraint on feline excretory urography. The 1st series (group A) involved 5 cats sedated with 2.0 mg/kg intramuscular (i.m) injection of 2% xylazine and receiving 800 mg/kg of 76 % meglumine diatrizoate (urografin). The 2nd series (group B) involved another 5 cats sedated with 2.0 mg/kg (i.m) injection of 2% xylazine and receiving 1200 mg/kg of 76% urografin. The 3rd series (group C) involved the repeat urography of the group B cats but sedated with 15 mg/kg (i.m) injection of 5% ketamine hydrochloride. Ventrodorsal radiographs were obtained immediately, 5, 15 and 40 minutes after the injection of 76% urografin. Scores were assigned to nephrographic opacification as described in the literature. The heart rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures of the cats were also determined before sedation, after sedation, immediately after the injection of 76% urografin and at 15-minute intervals over a period of 60 minutes. In this study, there were significant differences (P 0.05) in heart rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures between the 3 groups of cats. It was therefore concluded that increasing the dosage of urografin above 800 mg/kg in cats does not provide additional beneficial effects on the nephrograms produced. Xylazine sedation was observed to produce better nephrographic opacification, however, with delayed nephrographic fading compared to ketamine sedation.

  14. Restraint stress intensifies interstitial K+ accumulation during severe hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eSchnell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress affects neuronal networks by inducing dendritic retraction, modifying neuronal excitability and plasticity, and modulating glial cells. To elucidate the functional consequences of chronic stress for the hippocampal network, we submitted adult rats to daily restraint stress for three weeks (6 h/day. In acute hippocampal tissue slices of stressed rats, basal synaptic function and short-term plasticity at Schaffer collateral/CA1 neuron synapses were unchanged while long-term potentiation was markedly impaired. The spatiotemporal propagation pattern of hypoxia-induced spreading depression episodes was indistinguishable among control and stress slices. However, the duration of the extracellular direct current (DC potential shift was shortened after stress. Moreover, K+ fluxes early during hypoxia were more intense, and the postsynaptic recoveries of interstitial K+ levels and synaptic function were slower. Morphometric analysis of immunohistochemically stained sections suggested hippocampal shrinkage in stressed rats, and the number of cells that are immunoreactive for GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased in the CA1 subfield indicating activation of astrocytes. Western blots showed a marked downregulation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir4.1 in stressed rats. Yet, resting membrane potentials, input resistance and K+-induced inward currents in CA1 astrocytes were indistinguishable from controls. These data indicate an intensified interstitial K+ accumulation during hypoxia in the hippocampus of chronically stressed rats which seems to arise from a reduced interstitial volume fraction rather than impaired glial K+ buffering. One may speculate that chronic stress aggravates hypoxia-induced pathophysiological processes in the hippocampal network and that this has implications for the ischemic brain.

  15. Smart sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refer to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. In a broad sense, they include any sensor systems covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum: this paper deals specifically with a new class of smart sensors in infrared spectral bands whose developments started some years ago, when it was recognized that the rapid advances of "very large scale integration" (VLSI) processor technology and mosaic infrared detector array technology could be combined to develop new generations of infrared smart sensor systems with much improved performance. So, sophisticated signal processing operations have been developed for these new systems by integrating microcomputers and other VLSI signal processors within or next to the sensor arrays on the same focal plane avoiding complex computing located far away from the sensors. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduce inside the sensor some of the basic function of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, dishomogenity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements of these new focal plane processors are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the processing techniques for only the front end of the focal plane processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation threshold.

  16. Chemical restraint in routine clinical practice: a report from a general hospital psychiatric ward in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papamichael Georgios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of studies regarding chemical restraint in routine clinical psychiatric practice. There may be wide variations between different settings and countries. Methods A retrospective study on chemical restraint was performed in the 11-bed psychiatric ward of the General Hospital of Arta, in northwestern Greece. All admissions over a 2-year-period (from March 2008 to March 2010 were examined. Results Chemical restraint was applied in 33 cases (10.5% of total admissions. From a total of 82 injections, 22 involved a benzodiazepine and/or levomepromazine, whereas 60 injections involved an antipsychotic agent, almost exclusively haloperidol (96.7% of cases, usually in combination with a benzodiazepine (61.7% of cases. In 36.4% of cases the patient was further subjected to restraint or seclusion. Conclusions In our unit, clinicians prefer the combined antipsychotic/benzodiazepine regimen for the management of patients' acute agitation and violent behaviour. Conventional antipsychotics are administrated almost exclusively and in a significant proportion of cases further coercive measures are applied. Studies on the practice of chemical restraint should be regularly performed in clinical settings.

  17. The validity of the transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural model of eating disorders in predicting dietary restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoiles, Kimberley J; Egan, Sarah J; Kane, Robert T

    2012-04-01

    The study examined the validity of the transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural theory of eating disorders. The aim was to determine if the maintaining mechanisms of clinical perfectionism, core low self esteem, mood intolerance and interpersonal difficulties have a direct impact on dietary restraint or an indirect impact via eating, shape and weight concerns. The model was tested in a community sample of 224 females recruited via the internet. The structural equation model provided a good fit for the data. The relationship between maintaining mechanisms and dietary restraint was due to maintaining mechanisms impacting indirectly on dietary restraint via eating disorder psychopathology. The results lend support for the validity of the transdiagnostic model of eating disorders as the maintaining mechanisms lead to restraint via the core psychopathology of eating concerns, weight concerns and shape concerns. The findings suggest the four maintaining mechanisms alone are not enough to lead to dietary restraint, the core psychopathology of eating disorders needs to be present, which supports the predictions of the theory. These results help establish the validity of the transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural theory of eating disorders. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical simulation of a child restraint system in an aircraft crash-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oggero, E; Pipino, M; Deweese, R; Mugnai, A; Aljundi, B; Pagnacco, G

    2000-01-01

    Studies conducted at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute have shown that when used in aircraft, automotive child restraint devices do not always provide the level of safety desired. Various factors that contribute to poor performance, such as seat belt anchor location, cushion stiffness, and child restraint device design features, were evaluated by a dynamic impact test program. To efficiently continue the research, a computer model was developed using MADYMO. Results of two of the impact tests were used to validate the model. Both test configurations utilized a typical commercial transport airplane passenger seat and a popular automotive child restraint device. These tests were considered representative of the extremes of child restraint device and occupant kinematics due to variance in seat belt anchor location. Details are presented of the test parameters and geometry, as well as cushion and restraint system properties. Test and modelling results for these two impact conditions are summarized and compared. Parametric studies were then conducted that used the model to investigate the effect of cushion stiffness, belt anchor spacing, and initial belt tension.

  19. Factors affecting tether use and correct use in child restraint installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermakian, Jessica S; Klinich, Kathleen D; Orton, Nichole R; Flannagan, Carol A C; Manary, Miriam A; Malik, Laura A; Narayanaswamy, Prabha

    2014-12-01

    Field studies show that top tethers go unused in half of forward-facing child restraint installations. In this study, parent volunteers were asked to use the Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH) to install child restraints in several vehicles to identify tether anchor characteristics that are associated with tether use. Thirty-seven volunteers were assigned to four groups. Each group tested two forward-facing child restraints in four of 16 vehicle models. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of tether use and correct use. Subjects used the tether in 89% of the 294 forward-facing child restraint installations and attached the tether correctly in 57% of the installations. Tethers were more likely to be used when the anchor was located on the rear deck as typically found in sedans compared with the seatback, floor, or roof. Tethers were less likely to be attached correctly when there was potentially confusing hardware present. No vehicle tether hardware characteristics or vehicle manual directions were associated specifically with correct tether routing and head restraint position. This study provides laboratory evidence that specific vehicle features are associated with tether use and correct use. Modifications to vehicles that make tether anchors easier to find and identify likely will result in increases in tether use and correct use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The capsular ligaments provide more hip rotational restraint than the acetabular labrum and the ligamentum teres

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Arkel, R. J.; Amis, A. A.; Cobb, J. P.; Jeffers, J. R. T.

    2015-01-01

    In this in vitro study of the hip joint we examined which soft tissues act as primary and secondary passive rotational restraints when the hip joint is functionally loaded. A total of nine cadaveric left hips were mounted in a testing rig that allowed the application of forces, torques and rotations in all six degrees of freedom. The hip was rotated throughout a complete range of movement (ROM) and the contributions of the iliofemoral (medial and lateral arms), pubofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments and the ligamentum teres to rotational restraint was determined by resecting a ligament and measuring the reduced torque required to achieve the same angular position as before resection. The contribution from the acetabular labrum was also measured. Each of the capsular ligaments acted as the primary hip rotation restraint somewhere within the complete ROM, and the ligamentum teres acted as a secondary restraint in high flexion, adduction and external rotation. The iliofemoral lateral arm and the ischiofemoral ligaments were primary restraints in two-thirds of the positions tested. Appreciation of the importance of these structures in preventing excessive hip rotation and subsequent impingement/instability may be relevant for surgeons undertaking both hip joint preserving surgery and hip arthroplasty. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015; 97-B:484–91. PMID:25820886

  1. Chronic restraint or variable stresses differently affect the behavior, corticosterone secretion and body weight in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Marcelo T; Cruz, Fabio C; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2007-01-30

    Organisms are constantly subjected to stressful stimuli that affect numerous physiological processes and activate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, increasing the release of glucocorticoids. Exposure to chronic stress is known to alter basic mechanisms of the stress response. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effect of two different stress paradigms (chronic restraint or variable stress) on behavioral and corticosterone release to a subsequent exposure to stressors. Considering that the HPA axis might respond differently when it is challenged with a novel or a familiar stressor we investigated the changes in the corticosterone levels following the exposure to two stressors: restraint (familiar stress) or forced novelty (novel stress). The changes in the behavioral response were evaluated by measuring the locomotor response to a novel environment. In addition, we examined changes in body, adrenals, and thymus weights in response to the chronic paradigms. Our results showed that exposure to chronic variable stress increased basal plasma corticosterone levels and that both, chronic restraint and variable stresses, promote higher corticosterone levels in response to a novel environment, but not to a challenge restraint stress, as compared to the control (non-stressed) group. Exposure to chronic restraint leads to increased novelty-induced locomotor activity. Furthermore, only the exposure to variable stress reduced body weights. In conclusion, the present results provide additional evidence on how chronic stress affects the organism physiology and point to the importance of the chronic paradigm and challenge stress on the behavioral and hormonal adaptations induced by chronic stress.

  2. Dietary restraint and impulsivity modulate neural responses to food in adolescents with obesity and healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Ardelt-Gattinger, Elisabeth; Paulmichl, Katharina; Weghuber, Daniel; Blechert, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Despite alarming prevalence rates, surprisingly little is known about neural mechanisms underlying eating behavior in juveniles with obesity. To simulate reactivity to modern food environments, event-related potentials (ERP) to appetizing food images (relative to control images) were recorded in adolescents with obesity and healthy adolescents. Thirty-four adolescents with obesity (patients) and 24 matched healthy control adolescents watched and rated standardized food and object images during ERP recording. Personality (impulsivity) and eating styles (trait craving and dietary restraint) were assessed as potential moderators. Food relative to object images triggered larger early (P100) and late (P300) ERPs. More impulsive individuals had considerably larger food-specific P100 amplitudes in both groups. Controls with higher restraint scores showed reduced food-specific P300 amplitudes and subjective palatability ratings whereas patients with higher restraint scores showed increased P300 and palatability ratings. This first ERP study in adolescents with obesity and controls revealed impulsivity as a general risk factor in the current obesogenic environment by increasing food-cue salience. Dietary restraint showed paradoxical effects in patients, making them more vulnerable to visual food-cues. Salutogenic therapeutic approaches that deemphasize strict dietary restraint and foster healthy food choice might reduce such paradoxical effects. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  3. Real time control of restraint systems in frontal crashes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griotto, G.; Lemmen, P.P.M.; Eijnden, E.A.C. van den; Leijsen, A.C.P. van; Schie, C. van; Cooper, J.

    2007-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the targets for fatality reduction in car accidents set by Governments in Europe, USA and Japan can only be met by using advanced technologies that will include a broad range of sensors to monitor the crash likelihood and severity, vehicle condition, occupant type and

  4. Environmental exposure tracking sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Teresa; Everhart, Joel; McFerran, Jace

    2009-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) has developed environmental exposure tracking (EET) sensors using shape memory polymer (SMP) to monitor the degradation of perishable items, such as munitions, medicines or foods, by measuring the cumulative exposure to temperature and moisture. SMPs are polymers whose qualities have been altered to give them dynamic shape "memory" properties. Under thermal or moisture stimuli, SMP exhibits a radical change from a rigid thermoset to a highly flexible, elastic state. The dynamic response of the SMP can be tailored to match the degradation profile of the perishable item. SMP-based EET sensors require no digital memory or internal power supply and provide the capability of inexpensive, long-term life cycle monitoring thermal and moisture exposure over time. In a Phase I and II SBIR effort with the Navy, CRG demonstrated the feasibility of SMP-based EET sensor with two material systems. These material systems required different activation stimuli, heat or water vapor pressure. CRG developed the ability to tailor these materials to customize the dynamic response to match various degradation profiles of munitions. CRG optimized and characterized the SMP formulations and sensor design configuration to develop a suite of data from which any degradation profile can be met. CRG's EET sensors are capable of monitoring temperatures from -30 °C to 260 °C. The prototypes monitor cumulative thermal exposure and provide real-time information in a visually readable or a remotely interrogated version. CRG is currently scaling up the manufacture of the sensors for munitions reliability applications with the Navy.

  5. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  6. 14-plex Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotongan, Victoria Hazel [Native Village of Unalakleet

    2013-06-21

    The Native Village of Unalakleet project was a feasibility study for a retrofit of a “tribally owned” three story, 14 apartment complex located in Unalakleet, Alaska. The program objective and overall goal was to create a plan for retrofitting to include current appraised value and comparable costs of new construction to determine genuine feasibility as low-income multi-family housing for tribal members.

  7. A Capacity-Restraint Transit Assignment Model When a Predetermination Method Indicates the Invalidity of Time Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical independence of time of every two adjacent bus links plays a crucial role in deciding the feasibility of using many mathematical models to analyze urban transit networks. Traditional research generally ignores the time independence that acts as the ground of their models. Assumption is usually made that time independence of every two adjacent links is sound. This is, however, actually groundless and probably causes problematic conclusions reached by corresponding models. Many transit assignment models such as multinomial probit-based models lose their effects when the time independence is not valid. In this paper, a simple method to predetermine the time independence is proposed. Based on the predetermination method, a modified capacity-restraint transit assignment method aimed at engineering practice is put forward and tested through a small contrived network and a case study in Nanjing city, China, respectively. It is found that the slope of regression equation between the mean and standard deviation of normal distribution acts as the indicator of time independence at the same time. Besides, our modified assignment method performs better than the traditional one with more reasonable results while keeping the property of simplicity well.

  8. Ethical considerations for evaluating the issue of physical restraint in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    This article examines some of the ethical issues associated with the use of physical restraint in psychiatry and neurology. It offers no specific answers to individual operational problems, but a methodological matrix is proposed as an aid to experts in the various settings in which decisions are taken. The subject is addressed mainly by considering two sources: reference documents published by eminent organisations, and the theoretical framework of ethical values (or principles). A number of analytical criteria arising from these sources are then identified and proposed. The proposed criteria can be applied in cases for which the legitimate use of restraint may be an option, bearing in mind that restraint is an extremely serious affront to human dignity and is widely held to be of no therapeutic value. Its abuse is illegitimate in both ethical and legal terms.

  9. Geometrically Nonlinear Transient Response of Laminated Plates with Nonlinear Elastic Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaochong Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dynamic behavior of laminated plates with nonlinear elastic restraints, a varied constraint force model and a systematic numerical procedure are presented in this work. Several kinds of typical relationships of force-displacement for spring are established to simulate the nonlinear elastic restraints. In addition, considering the restraining moments of flexible pads, the pads are modeled by translational and rotational springs. The displacement- dependent constraint forces are added to the right-hand side of equations of motion and treated as additional applied loads. These loads can be explicitly defined, via an independent set of nonlinear load functions. The time histories of transverse displacements at typical points of the laminated plate are obtained through the transient analysis. Numerical examples show that the present method can effectively treat the geometrically nonlinear transient response of plates with nonlinear elastic restraints.

  10. Greater hunger and less restraint predict weight loss success with phentermine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Elizabeth A; Mcnair, Bryan; Bechtell, Jamie L; Ferland, Annie; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Phentermine is thought to cause weight loss through a reduction in hunger. It was hypothesized that higher hunger ratings would predict greater weight loss with phentermine. This is an observational pilot study in which all subjects were treated with phentermine for 8 weeks and appetite and eating behaviors were measured at baseline and week 8. Outcomes were compared in subjects with ≥5% vs. hunger (P = 0.017), desire to eat (P =0.003), and prospective food consumption (0.006) and lower baseline cognitive restraint (P = 0.01). In addition, higher baseline home prospective food consumption (P = 0.002) and lower baseline cognitive restraint (P hunger and less restraint are more likely to achieve significant weight loss with phentermine. This information can be used clinically to determine who might benefit most from phentermine treatment. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  11. [Mechanical restraints in the elderly: technical proposals and recommendations for use in the social environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Delgado, Joan

    2013-01-01

    There is some confusion in the national gerontological literature in the use of terms that refer to mechanical restraints. There is a lack of dialogue as regards ethical conflicts that suggest their use, as well as a significant generalization of the claims against, and the absence of positive references despite its high prevalence as shown by some authors. This paper presents some technical proposals on the definition, the use of terms, and the use of mechanical restraints in the social environment, such as putting the ethical dialogue to arguments based on the prevalence, define them in terms of their intent, agree on a classification of the different restraint methods, identify the types and levels of risk, and intervene specifically in accordance with these proposals. Finally, recommendations are added with regards to risks, the decision process, prescription and the withdrawal process. Copyright © 2012 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of body movement restraint on cardiac response to auditory stimulation in sleeping infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, A; Rebuffat, E; Sottiaux, M

    1992-12-01

    When exposed to an unfamiliar and sudden noise, infant rodents may show an abrupt bradycardia, as part of a "fear-paralysis response". The response is enhanced by body movements restraint. To investigate if this reaction is seen in humans, 15 normal infants with a median age of 12 weeks were studied polygraphically. They were exposed to a 100-dB (A) white noise, while sleeping in REM sleep. Each infant was studied in both "unrestrained" and "restrained" conditions. Restraint of body movement was obtained by means of sand bags and tightly-binding bed sheets. During movement restraint, the infants had a significantly greater and earlier decrease in heart rate compared with during the unrestrained condition. No infant had a minimal heart rate less than 95 beats/min. The present observation raises questions about the possible unfavorable effects of tightly wrapped bed sheets around sleeping infants.

  13. How Farm Animals React and Perceive Stressful Situations Such As Handling, Restraint, and Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temple Grandin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An animal that has been carefully acclimated to handling may willingly re-enter a restrainer. Another animal may have an intense agitated behavioral reaction or refuse to re-enter the handling facility. Physiological measures of stress such as cortisol may be very low in the animal that re-enters willingly and higher in animals that actively resist restraint. Carefully acclimating young animals to handling and restraint can help improve both productivity and welfare by reducing fear stress. Some of the topics covered in this review are: How an animal perceives handling and restraint, the detrimental effects of a sudden novel event, descriptions of temperament and aversion tests and the importance of good stockmanship.

  14. Proposal to place a supplementary order for LHC cryodipole end restraints

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    This document concerns a proposal to place a supplementary order for LHC cryodipole end restraints. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the placing of a supplementary order with STAINLESS METALCRAFT (GB) for the supply of 125 additional end restraints for an amount not exceeding 215 500 pounds sterling (492 797 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, bringing the total order value to an amount not exceeding 534 996 pounds sterling (1 223 407 Swiss francs), not subject to revision with an option for up to 80 extra transport end restraints for an amount of 137 920 pounds sterling (315 390 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The rate of exchange used is that stipulated in the tender. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: GB - 100%.

  15. The effects of sex and hormonal status on restraint-stress-induced working memory impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Avis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restraint stress has been shown to elicit numerous effects on hippocampal function and neuronal morphology, as well as to induce dendritic remodeling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. However, the effects of acute restraint stress on PFC cognitive function have not been investigated, despite substantial evidence that the PFC malfunctions in many stress-related disorders. Methods The present study examined the effects of restraint stress on PFC function in both male rats and cycling female rats in either the proestrus (high estrogen or estrus (low estrogen phase of the estrus cycle. Animals were restrained for 60 or 120 minutes and then tested on spatial delayed alternation, a PFC-mediated task. Performance after stress was compared to performance on a different day under no-stress conditions, and analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Sixty minutes of restraint impaired only females in proestrus, while 120 minutes of restraint produced significant impairments in all animals. Increases in task completion times did not affect performance. Conclusion These results demonstrate an interaction between hormonal status and cognitive response to stress in female rats, with high estrogen levels being associated with amplified sensitivity to stress. This effect has been previously observed after administration of a pharmacological stressor (the benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142, and results from both studies may be relevant to the increased prevalence of stress-related disorders, such as major depressive disorder, in cycling women. Overall, the results show that restraint stress has important effects on the cognitive functions of the PFC, and that hormonal influences in the PFC are an important area for future research.

  16. Improving Working Conditions for Astronauts: An Electronic Personal Restraint System for Use in Microgravity Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Tait

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While in microgravity, astronauts are preoccupied with physical restraint, which takes attention away from the maintenance task or scientific experiment at hand. This may directly lead to safety concerns and increased time for extravehicular activity, as well as potentially inhibit or corrupt data collection. A primary concern is the time it takes to manipulate the current restraint system. The portable foot restraint currently in use by NASA employs a series of pins in order to engage the system or release in an emergency. This requires considerable time for the user to detach, and there is an increased risk of entanglement. If restraint operating time could be reduced by 50%, the astronaut’s assigned experiment time could be increased an average of 100 minutes per mission. Another problem identified by NASA included the inability of the current system to release the user upon failure. Research and design was conducted following the Six-Sigma DMEDI project architecture, and a new form of restraint to replace the existing system was proposed. The research team first studied the customer requirements and relevant standards set by NASA, and with this information they began drafting designs for a solution. This project utilized electromagnetism to restrain a user in microgravity. The proposed system was capable of being manipulated quickly, failing in a manner that released the user, and being electronically controlled. This active electronic control was a new concept in restraint systems, as it enabled an astronaut to effectively “walk” along a surface while remaining restrained to it. With the design prototype and a limited budget, a rudimentary test assembly was built by the team, and most of NASA’s specifications were met. With recommendations from NASA, the research team concluded by developing potential material and design solutions that can be explored in the future by Purdue University or other parties.

  17. Contextual influences on nurses' decision-making in cases of physical restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Casterlé, Bernadette Dierckx; Goethals, Sabine; Gastmans, Chris

    2015-09-01

    In order to fully understand nurses' ethical decision-making in cases of physical restraint in acute older people care, contextual influences on the process of decision-making should be clarified. What is the influence of context on nurses' decision-making process in cases of physical restraint, and what is the impact of context on the prioritizing of ethical values when making a decision on physical restraint? A qualitative descriptive study inspired by the Grounded Theory approach was carried out. In total, 21 in-depth interviews were carried out with nurses working on acute geriatric wards in Flanders, Belgium. The research protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medicine, Leuven. Relationships with nursing colleagues and the patient's family form an inter-personal network. Nurses also point to the importance of the procedural-legal context as expressed in an institutional ethics policy and procedures, or through legal requirements concerning physical restraint. Furthermore, the architectural structure of a ward, the availability of materials and alternatives for restraint use can be decisive in nurses' decision-making. All interviewed nurses highlighted the unquestionable role of the practical context of care. Context can have a guiding, supportive, or decisive role in decision-making concerning the application of physical restraint. The discussion focuses on the role of the inter-personal network of nurses on the process of decision-making. An institutional ethics policy and a value-supportive care environment can support nurses in their challenge to take ethically sound decisions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Using restraint with nursing home residents: a qualitative study of nursing staff perceptions and decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantikainen, V; Käppeli, S

    2000-11-01

    The study reported in this paper applied a qualitative and interpretative approach to nursing staff perceptions of the use of restraint with elderly nursing home residents, and into nurses' decision-making on restraint use. The data were collected using unstructured interviews with a purposive sample of 20 trained and untrained nursing staff from two Swiss nursing homes. Data analysis was based on Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Three main themes were extracted from the data: (1) understanding the term restraint, (2) situations in which the decision to apply restraint is considered justified and (3) situations in which nursing staff are uncertain about the use of restraint. The underlying bases with respect to decision-making were: understanding restraint, the rights and responsibilities of both residents and staff, and the duties of staff. Staff members were ambiguous in their understanding of restraint and they showed positive as well as confused attitudes towards its use. Their behaviour was defensive and protective rather than challenging. Further research is required on what is meant by safety in care of the elderly nursing today. In nursing practice, as far as issues of restraint are concerned, greater attention should be devoted to the relationship between elderly residents' self-determination and responsibility for their actions.

  19. Dietary restraint in college women : Fear of an imperfect fat self is stronger than hope of a perfect thin self

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalley, Simon E.; Toffanin, Paolo; Pollet, Thomas V.

    We predicted that the perceived likelihood of acquiring a hoped-for thin self would mediate perfectionistic strivings on dietary restraint, and that the perceived likelihood of acquiring a feared fat self would mediate perfectionistic concerns on dietary restraint. We also predicted that the

  20. Restraint factors and partial coefficients for crack risk analyses of early age concrete structures:diagrams and tables

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This report contains all background data for the Doctoral Thesis 2003:19 "Restraint Factors and Partial Coefficients for Crack Risk Analyses of Early Age Concrete Structures" by Martin Nilsson. This report contains all background data for the Doctoral Thesis 2003:19 "Restraint Factors and Partial Coefficients for Crack Risk Analyses of Early Age Concrete Structures" by Martin Nilsson.

  1. RECOORD: a recalculated coordinate database of 500+ proteins from the PDB using restraints from the BioMagResBank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederveen, Aart J.; Doreleijers, Jurgen F.; Vranken, Wim; Miller, Zachary; Spronk, Chris A. E. M.; Nabuurs, Sander B.; Güntert, Peter; Livny, Miron; Markley, John L.; Nilges, Michael; Ulrich, Eldon L.; Kaptein, Robert; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2005-01-01

    State-of-the-art methods based on CNS and CYANA were used to recalculate the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structures of 500+ proteins for which coordinates and NMR restraints are available from the Protein Data Bank. Curated restraints were obtained from the BioMagResBank FRED database.

  2. Analysis of Heart Rate and Self-Injury with and without Restraint in an Individual with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennett, Heather; Hagopian, Louis P.; Beaulieu, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The relation between self-injury and heart rate was analyzed for an individual who appeared anxious while engaging in self-injury. The analysis involved manipulating the presence or absence of restraint while simultaneously measuring heart rate. The following findings were obtained and replicated: (a) when some form of restraint was applied, heart…

  3. Effect of maternal restraint stress during gestation on temporal lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroendocrine and immune responses of progeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of gestational dam restraint stress on progeny immune and neuroendocrine temporal hormone responses to lipopoly-saccharide (LPS) challenge was assessed. Maternal stress (5-min snout snare restraint stress during days 84 to 112 of gestation) increased (P < 0.05) the magnitude of tumor necr...

  4. Reducing and Eliminating Restraint of People with Developmental Disabilities and Severe Behavior Disorders: An Overview of Recent Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Don E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the most recent research (1999-2009) on restraint reduction and elimination efforts in the literature and also examines the characteristics of restraint along with the risks and benefits. Some earlier papers were included in this review because of their importance to the topic. The results of this literature…

  5. Variation Found in Rates of Restraint and Seclusion among Students with a Disability. Paper 206. National Issue Brief No. 67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Douglas J.; Mattingly, Marybeth; Connelly, Vincent J.

    2013-01-01

    The restraint and seclusion of individuals--practices usually associated with highly restrictive environments--are extreme responses to student behavior used in some public schools. In this brief, authors Douglas Gagnon, Marybeth Mattingly, and Vincent Connelly report that restraint and seclusion are used much more frequently on students with a…

  6. Dietary restraint in college women: Fear of an imperfect fat self is stronger than hope of a perfect thin self

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalley, S.E.; Toffanin, P.; Pollet, T.V.

    2012-01-01

    We predicted that the perceived likelihood of acquiring a hoped-for thin self would mediate perfectionistic strivings on dietary restraint, and that the perceived likelihood of acquiring a feared fat self would mediate perfectionistic concerns on dietary restraint. We also predicted that the

  7. Exploring perspectives on restraint during medical procedures in paediatric care: a qualitative interview study with nurses and physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Edel Jannecke; Pedersen, Reidar; Moen, Anne; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to explore nurses’ and physicians’ perspectives on and reasoning about the use of restraint during medical procedures on newly admitted preschoolers in somatic hospital care. We analysed qualitative data from individual interviews with a video recall session at the end with seven physicians and eight nurses. They had earlier participated in video recorded peripheral vein cannulations on preschool children. The data were collected between May 2012 and May 2013 at a paediatric hospital unit in Norway. The analysis resulted in three main themes: (1) disparate views on the concept of restraint and restraint use (2), ways to limit the use of physical restraint and its negative consequences, and (3) experience with the role of parents and their influence on restraint. Perspectives from both healthcare professions were represented in all the main themes and had many similarities. The results of this study may facilitate more informed and reflective discussions of restraint and contribute to higher awareness of restraint in clinical practice. Lack of guidance and scientific attention to restraint combined with conflicting interests and values among healthcare providers may result in insecurity, individual dogmatism, and a lack of shared discussions, language, and terminology. PMID:28889788

  8. "A Very Fine Line": Parents' Experiences of Using Restraint with Their Adult Son/Daughter with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elford, Helen; Beail, Nigel; Clarke, Zara

    2010-01-01

    Background: Restraint is sometimes used on people with intellectual disabilities who display challenging behaviours, and may be justifiable as a last resort to prevent harm. A substantial proportion of such people are cared for within the family home. The aim of this paper is to explore parents' experiences of using restraint with their…

  9. Preventing the Use of Restraint and Seclusion with Young Children: "The Role of Effective, Positive Practices". Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Glen; Ostryn, Cheryl; Fox, Lise

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major concerns expressed regarding the use of restraint and seclusion to control the behavior of children with disabilities and/or challenging behavior. In May of 2009, for example, the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) released findings regarding a number of cases in which seclusion and restraint were…

  10. The effects of public reporting on physical restraints and antipsychotic use in nursing home residents with severe cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Brauner, Daniel J; Shega, Joseph; Werner, Rachel M

    2014-03-01

    To assess whether reductions in physical restraint use associated with quality reporting may have had the unintended consequence of increasing antipsychotic use in nursing home (NH) residents with severe cognitive impairment. Retrospective analysis of NH clinical assessment data from 1999 to 2008 comparing NHs subject to public reporting of physical restraints with nonreporting NHs. Medicare- and Medicaid-certified NHs in the United States. Observations (N = 3.9 million) on 809,645 residents with severe cognitive impairment in 4,258 NHs in six states. Public reporting of physical restraint use rates. Use of physical restraints and antipsychotic medications. Physical restraint use declined significantly from 1999 to 2008 in NH residents with severe cognitive impairment. The decline was larger in NHs that were subject to reporting of restraints than in those that were not (-8.3 vs -3.3 percentage points, P < .001). Correspondingly, antipsychotic use in the same residents increased more in NHs that were subject to public reporting (4.5 vs 2.9 percentage points, P < .001). Approximately 36% of the increase in antipsychotic use may be attributable to public reporting of physical restraints. This analysis suggests that public reporting of physical restraint use had the unintended consequence of increasing use of antipsychotics in NH residents with severe cognitive impairment. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Exploring perspectives on restraint during medical procedures in paediatric care: a qualitative interview study with nurses and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Edel Jannecke; Pedersen, Reidar; Moen, Anne; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and physicians' perspectives on and reasoning about the use of restraint during medical procedures on newly admitted preschoolers in somatic hospital care. We analysed qualitative data from individual interviews with a video recall session at the end with seven physicians and eight nurses. They had earlier participated in video recorded peripheral vein cannulations on preschool children. The data were collected between May 2012 and May 2013 at a paediatric hospital unit in Norway. The analysis resulted in three main themes: (1) disparate views on the concept of restraint and restraint use (2), ways to limit the use of physical restraint and its negative consequences, and (3) experience with the role of parents and their influence on restraint. Perspectives from both healthcare professions were represented in all the main themes and had many similarities. The results of this study may facilitate more informed and reflective discussions of restraint and contribute to higher awareness of restraint in clinical practice. Lack of guidance and scientific attention to restraint combined with conflicting interests and values among healthcare providers may result in insecurity, individual dogmatism, and a lack of shared discussions, language, and terminology.

  12. Influence of dosage and chemical restraints on feline excretory urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Ajadi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Three series of trials involving 10 domestic short-haired cats were carried out to determine the influence of dosage of contrast media or type of chemical restraint on feline excretory urography. The 1st series (group A involved 5 cats sedated with 2.0 mg/kg intramuscular (i.m injection of 2 % xylazine and receiving 800 mg/kg of 76 % meglumine diatrizoate (urografin. The 2nd series (group B involved another 5 cats sedated with 2.0 mg/kg (i.m injection of 2 % xylazine and receiving 1200 mg/kg of 76% urografin. The 3rd series (group C involved the repeat urography of the group B cats but sedated with 15 mg/kg (i.m injection of 5% ketamine hydrochloride. Ventrodorsal radiographs were obtained immediately, 5, 15 and 40 minutes after the injection of 76 % urografin. Scores were assigned to nephrographic opacification as described in the literature. The heart rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures of the cats were also determined before sedation, after sedation, immediately after the injection of 76 % urografin and at 15-minute intervals over a period of 60 minutes. In this study, there were significant differences (P < 0.05 in the nephrographic opacification scores between the group A and group B cats at times 0 and 40 minutes post-administration of urografin. Group A cats had good initial nephrographic opacification which faded later while the nephrographic opacification of group B cats progressively increased. Similarly, nephrographic opacification was significantly (P < 0.05 higher in the xylazine-sedated cats (groups A and B than the ketamine-sedated cats (group C. However, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05 in heart rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures between the 3 groups of cats. It was therefore concluded that increasing the dosage of urografin above 800 mg/kg in cats does not provide additional beneficial effects on the nephrograms produced. Xylazine sedation was observed to produce better nephrographic

  13. Protein Loop Closure Using Orientational Restraints from NMR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Chittaranjan; Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    Protein loops often play important roles in biological functions such as binding, recognition, catalytic activities and allosteric regulation. Modeling loops that are biophysically sensible is crucial to determining the functional specificity of a protein. A variety of algorithms ranging from robotics-inspired inverse kinematics methods to fragmentbased homology modeling techniques have been developed to predict protein loops. However, determining the 3D structures of loops using global orientational restraints on internuclear vectors, such as those obtained from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data in solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, has not been well studied. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm that determines the protein loop conformations using a minimal amount of RDC data. Our algorithm exploits the interplay between the sphero-conics derived from RDCs and the protein kinematics, and formulates the loop structure determination problem as a system of low-degree polynomial equations that can be solved exactly and in closed form. The roots of these polynomial equations, which encode the candidate conformations, are searched systematically, using efficient and provable pruning strategies that triage the vast majority of conformations, to enumerate or prune all possible loop conformations consistent with the data. Our algorithm guarantees completeness by ensuring that a possible loop conformation consistent with the data is never missed. This data-driven algorithm provides a way to assess the structural quality from experimental data with minimal modeling assumptions. We applied our algorithm to compute the loops of human ubiquitin, the FF Domain 2 of human transcription elongation factor CA150 (FF2), the DNA damage inducible protein I (DinI) and the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G (GB3) from experimental RDC data. A comparison of our results versus those obtained by using traditional structure determination protocols on the

  14. Compatibility or restraint? The effects of sexual timing on marriage relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Dean M; Carroll, Jason S; Willoughby, Brian J

    2010-12-01

    Very little is known about the influence of sexual timing on relationship outcomes. Is it better to test sexual compatibility as early as possible or show sexual restraint so that other areas of the relationship can develop? In this study, we explore this question with a sample of 2035 married individuals by examining how soon they became sexually involved as a couple and how this timing is related to their current sexual quality, relationship communication, and relationship satisfaction and perceived stability. Both structural equation and group comparison analyses demonstrated that sexual restraint was associated with better relationship outcomes, even when controlling for education, the number of sexual partners, religiosity, and relationship length.

  15. Use of psychotropic medication among inpatients during focused efforts in prevention of coercion and restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Mikkel; Høgh, Lene; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    and reduced life expectancy. The aim of this study is therefore to quantify the use of psychotropic medication when implementing interventions to reduce coercion and restraint. Methods: Cohort study on patients in risk of agitation and coercion in a psychiatric ward operating without physical restraint....... Prescription history is collected from patients admitted with diagnosis of organic mental disorders, substance abuse, psychotic disorders, mania, bipolar affective disease and personality disorders (ICD-10: F0x, F1x, F2x, F30-31, F60) and compared with prescription history of similar patients admitted before...

  16. The impact of new legislation on child restraint system (CRS) misuse and inappropriate use in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, S; Charlton, J L; Rudin-Brown, C M

    2013-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the incidence of child restraint system (CRS) misuse and/or inappropriate use of CRS through an Australian CRS inspection program conducted by CRS fitting specialists between October 2004 and October 2011 and to determine whether CRS misuse and/or inappropriate use of CRS changed following new Australian legislation regarding CRS and motor vehicle restraint use for children aged 7 years and under. Participants were recruited through an advertisement for free CRS inspections displayed at childcare centers, kindergartens, community centers, hospitals, and child expos. At each inspection, a CRS fitting specialist inspected each child in their CRS while in their vehicle and reported to the owner of the CRS on the installation of the child restraint(s) and/or system(s) and any fitting faults and/or concerns with the fitting and/or use of the child restraint(s) and or system(s). Results are based on the inspection of 2674 CRS. Of all of the CRS inspected, the majority (79%) were reported as having at least one instance of misuse and/or inappropriate use. The most common forms of CRS misuse and/or inappropriate use observed were harness strap errors (twisted, poorly adjusted, and/or incorrectly positioned, 41%), seat belt errors (incorrectly routed, twisted, and/or incorrectly adjusted, 32%), and a missing or incorrect fitting of the gated buckle/locking clip (24%). Significant differences were found across the proportion of CRS misuse and/or inappropriate use across restraint types (infant restraint/forward-facing CRS/convertible [birth to 18 kg] CRS/convertible [8-26 kg] CRS/boosters [booster seat/cushion/booster with harness combination]), χ(2)(4) = 147.852, P .5. Based on the findings of the current study, it was concluded that, despite the introduction of new, definitive CRS legislation, CRS misuse and/or inappropriate use remains widespread in Australia. The findings highlight the need for CRS education and legislation that

  17. Knowledge and application of correct car seat head restraint usage among chiropractic college interns: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John Am; Burke, Jeanmarie; Gavencak, John; Panwar, Pervinder

    2005-03-01

    Cervical spine injuries sustained in rear-end crashes cost at least $7 billion in insurance claims annually in the United States alone. When positioned correctly, head restraint systems have been proven effective in reducing the risk of whiplash associated disorders. Chiropractors should be knowledgeable about the correct use of head restraint systems to educate their patients and thereby prevent or minimize such injuries. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of correct positioning of car seat head restraints among the interns at our institution. The secondary objective was to determine the same chiropractic interns' knowledge of the correct positioning of car seat head restraints. It was hypothesized that 100 percent of interns would have their head restraint correctly positioned within an acceptable range and that all interns would possess the knowledge to instruct patients in the correct positioning of head restraints. Cross-sectional study of a convenient sample of 30 chiropractic interns from one institution. Interns driving into the parking lot of our health center were asked to volunteer to have measurements taken and to complete a survey. Vertical and horizontal positions of the head restraint were measured using a beam compass. A survey was administered to determine knowledge of correct head restraint position. The results were recorded, entered into a spreadsheet, and analyzed. 13.3 percent of subjects knew the recommended vertical distance and only 20 percent of subjects knew the recommended horizontal distance. Chi Square analyses substantiated that the majority of subjects were unaware of guidelines set forth by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for the correct positioning of the head restraint (chi(2) (vertical) = 16.13, chi(2) (horizontal) = 10.80, p .05). Interestingly, the 13.3 percent of the subjects who were aware of the vertical plane recommendations did not correctly position their own

  18. Seclusion and restraint in psychiatry: patients' experiences and practical suggestions on how to improve practices and use alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Raija; Joffe, Grigori; Putkonen, Hanna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hane, Kimmo; Holi, Matti; Välimäki, Maritta

    2012-01-01

    This study explored psychiatric inpatients' experiences of, and their suggestions for, improvement of seclusion/restraint, and alternatives to their use in Finland. The data were collected by focused interviews (n= 30) and were analyzed with inductive content analysis. Patients' perspectives received insufficient attention during seclusion/restraint processes. Improvements (e.g., humane treatment) and alternatives (e.g., empathetic patient-staff interaction) to seclusion/restraint, as suggested by the patients, focused on essential parts of nursing practice but have not been largely adopted. Patients' basic needs have to be met, and patient-staff interaction has to also continue during seclusion/restraint. Providing patients with meaningful activities, planning beforehand, documenting the patients' wishes, and making patient-staff agreements reduce the need for restrictions and offer alternatives for seclusion/restraint. Service users must be involved in all practical development. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Restraint-free wearable sensing clothes using a hetero-core optic fiber for measurements of arm motion and walking action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2007-04-01

    In recent years, unrestrained monitoring human posture and action is a field of increasing interest in the welfare of the elderly and the sport-biomechanics. The scope is this study is that we develop a wearable sensing clothes, which can detect entire body posture and motion using a hetero-core optic fiber sensor. This newly developed sensor can offers several advantages such as the simplicity of structure and fabrication, the stable single mode based operation, the temperature independent property, and the precise loss controllability on given macro bending. These properties are suitable for implementing unrestrained wearable clothes. In this paper, for monitoring flexion of joint without the disturbance of the rucks in the clothes, we proposed and fabricated the improved module structured in the joint ranging 0-90 degree. Additionally, in order to reduce the number of transmission line to be added due to monitoring the whole body posture and motion, we tested that two hetero-core sensors which are tandem placed in a single transmission line have been discriminated by the temporal differential of the optical loss. As a result, we have successfully demonstrated that the wearable sensing clothes could monitor arm motion and human walking without restraint to human daily behavior.

  20. Aptamer Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Marrazza, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    In the last years, great progress has been accomplished in the development of aptamer sensors with different transducers. In order to improve the sensitivity of these biosensors, several methodologies have been employed. In this Special Issue, the state of art and the future trends in the field of aptamer sensors have been explored.

  1. Soldier sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossives, Dean P.

    2010-04-01

    A new sensor system, whose functionality is not reliant on mass spectrometric or ionization methods, is combined with a substrate technology which allows for separately optimized control circuits and standardized advanced sensors in a simple packaging methodology to foster an entirely new generation of modular optical sensors. These sensors will be based on biologic and chromic compounds. The compounds will utilize reversible reaction chemistry to enable self cleaning. The detector's operation is based on simple changes in absorbance, reflectance, color, or other optical properties. The time to saturation of the sensor will determine the relative concentration in the air. A detection scheme based on these properties will function in high background levels and also be able to pick up low level concentrations as well.

  2. Pathogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Irudayaraj

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensors for detecting foodborne pathogens has been motivated by the need to produce safe foods and to provide better healthcare. However, in the more recent times, these needs have been expanded to encompass issues relating to biosecurity, detection of plant and soil pathogens, microbial communities, and the environment. The range of technologies that currently flood the sensor market encompass PCR and microarray-based methods, an assortment of optical sensors (including bioluminescence and fluorescence, in addition to biosensor-based approaches that include piezoelectric, potentiometric, amperometric, and conductometric sensors to name a few. More recently, nanosensors have come into limelight, as a more sensitive and portable alternative, with some commercial success. However, key issues affecting the sensor community is the lack of standardization of the testing protocols and portability, among other desirable elements, which include timeliness, cost-effectiveness, user-friendliness, sensitivity and specificity. [...

  3. MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR PROGESTERONE’S PROTECTION AGAINST LORDOSIS-INHIBITING EFFECTS OF RESTRAINT I. ROLE OF PROGESTERONE RECEPTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassell, James; Miryala, Chandra Suma Johnson; Hiegel, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    Progestins and antiprogestins are widely used therapeutic agents in humans. In many cases, these are indicated for the treatment of reproductive activites. However, progesterone has widespread physiological effects including a reduction of the response to stress. We have reported that 5 min of restraint reduced lordosis behavior of ovariectomized rats hormonally primed with estradiol benzoate. When ovariectomized rats received both estradiol benzoate and progesterone priming, restraint had minimal effects on lordosis. Progesterone influences behavior through classical intracellular progesterone receptor-mediated nuclear events as well as extranuclear events. How these multiple events contribute to the response to stress are unclear. The current project was designed to initiate examination of the mechanisms responsible for progesterone’s ability to protect against the effects of the restraint. In the first experiment, ovariectomized rats, primed with 10 µg estradiol benzoate, received 500 µg progesterone 4 hr, 1 hr, or 30 min before restraint. When progesterone was injected 4 hr before restraint, progesterone eliminated the effects of restraint. In contrast, progesterone 30 min before restraint offered no protection. Effects of progesterone 1 hr before restraint were equivocal allowing the suggestion that less than 4 hr of progesterone priming might be sufficient. In the second experiment, the synthetic progestin, medroxyprogesterone, was shown to mimic effects of progesterone in preventing effects of restraint. Finally, the progesterone receptor antagonist, RU486, attenuated progesterone’s protection against restraint. These findings offer evidence that ligand-activated progesterone receptor mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of lordosis behavior in the presence of mild stress. PMID:21635894

  4. Feasible mathematics II

    CERN Document Server

    Remmel, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    Perspicuity is part of proof. If the process by means of which I get a result were not surveyable, I might indeed make a note that this number is what comes out - but what fact is this supposed to confirm for me? I don't know 'what is supposed to come out' . . . . 1 -L. Wittgenstein A feasible computation uses small resources on an abstract computa­ tion device, such as a 'lUring machine or boolean circuit. Feasible math­ ematics concerns the study of feasible computations, using combinatorics and logic, as well as the study of feasibly presented mathematical structures such as groups, algebras, and so on. This volume contains contributions to feasible mathematics in three areas: computational complexity theory, proof theory and algebra, with substantial overlap between different fields. In computational complexity theory, the polynomial time hierarchy is characterized without the introduction of runtime bounds by the closure of certain initial functions under safe composition, predicative recursion on nota...

  5. Feasibility Study of Thin Film Thermocouple Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, thermopile detectors, generators, and refrigerators based on bulk materials have been used to measure temperature, generate power for spacecraft, and cool sensors for scientific investigations. New potential uses of small, low-power, thin film thermopiles are in the area of microelectromechanical systems since power requirements decrease as electrical and mechanical machines shrink in size. In this research activity, thin film thermopile devices are fabricated utilizing radio frequency sputter coating and photoresist lift-off techniques. Electrical characterizations are performed on two designs in order to investigate the feasibility of generating small amounts of power, utilizing any available waste heat as the energy source.

  6. Piezoceramic Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, Valeriy

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the latest and complete information about various types of piezosensors. A sensor is a converter of the measured physical size to an electric signal. Piezoelectric transducers and sensors are based on piezoelectric effects. They have proven to be versatile tools for the measurement of various processes. They are used for quality assurance, process control and for research and development in many different industries. In each area of application specific requirements to the parameters of transducers and sensors are developed. This book presents the fundamentals, technical des

  7. Executive-level reviews of seclusion and restraint promote interdisciplinary collaboration and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Diane E; de Nesnera, Alexander; Souther, Justin W

    2009-08-01

    Elimination of seclusion and restraint requires support at all levels of an organization, especially from leaders who visibly champion and communicate their vision. Nurses, physicians, educators, and administrators at New Hampshire Hospital, an acute psychiatric inpatient facility, have established a standard meeting time and place for an executive-level review of every episode of seclusion and restraint. The standing meeting demonstrates the organization's commitment to caring for both patients and staff. The daily meetings foster a spirit of interdisciplinary collaboration, where direct care staff have the opportunity to tell their stories and share their ideas and concerns in an environment that is caring, supportive, and devoid of criticism or blame. Narrative descriptions of emergency interventions, including what was learned from debriefings with patients and staff involved, provide data about factors that may contribute to the use of seclusion or restraint. This forum provides visible administrative and clinical support that promotes creative thinking, collaborative problem solving, and the exploration of new ideas recommended by those directly involved in providing patient care. It has fostered exploration and development of strategies that have minimized episodes of aggressive behavior as well as seclusion and restraint.

  8. Reduction of Restraint of People with Intellectual Disabilities: An Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Don E.; Grossett, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    We used an organizational behavior management (OBM) approach to increase behavior intervention plans and decrease the use of mechanical restraint. First, recipients were tracked as a member of the priority group if they engaged in frequent self-injurious behavior or physical aggression toward others and/or if they had been placed in mechanical…

  9. The Validity of Dietary Restraint Scales: Comment on Stice et al. (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Strien, Tatjana; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; van Staveren, Wija; Herman, C. Peter

    2006-01-01

    In 4 empirical studies, E. Stice, M. Fisher, and M. R. Lowe (see record 2004-11653-006) calculated the correlations between some widely used dietary restraint scales and food intake. Failing to find substantial negative correlations, they concluded that these scales were invalid. The current article challenges this conclusion. For one thing, there…

  10. Console video games, postural activity, and motion sickness during passive restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hui; Pan, Wu-Wen; Chen, Fu-Chen; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    We examined the influence of passive restraint on postural activity and motion sickness in individuals who actively controlled a potentially nauseogenic visual motion stimulus (a driving video game). Twenty-four adults (20.09 ± 1.56 years; 167.80 ± 7.94 cm; 59.02 ± 9.18 kg) were recruited as participants. Using elastic bands, standing participants were passively restrained at the head, shoulders, hips, and knees. During restraint, participants played (i.e., controlled) a driving video game (a motorcycle race), for 50 min. During game play, we recorded the movement of the head and torso, using a magnetic tracking system. Following game play, participants answered a forced choice, yes/no question about whether they were motion sick, and were assigned to sick and well groups on this basis. In addition, before and after game play, participants completed the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire, which provided numerical ratings of the severity of individual symptoms. Five of 24 participants (20.83 %) reported motion sickness. Participants moved despite being passively restrained. Both the magnitude and the temporal dynamics of movement differed between the sick and well groups. The results show that passive restraint of the body can reduce motion sickness when the nauseogenic visual stimulus is under participants' active control and confirm that motion sickness is preceded by distinct patterns of postural activity even during passive restraint.

  11. The validity of dietary restraint scales: Comment on Stice et al.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, van T.; Engels, R.; Staveren, van W.A.; Herman, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    In 4 empirical studies, E. Stice, M. Fisher, and M. R. Lowe (2004) calculated the correlations between some widely used dietary restraint scales and food intake. Failing to find substantial negative correlations, they concluded that these scales were invalid. The current article challenges this

  12. Program Fidelity Measures Associated With an Effective Child Restraint Program: Buckle-Up Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Lisa; Simpson, Judy M.; Brown, Julie; Bilston, Lynne E.; Fegan, Maureen; Cosgrove, Louise; Stevenson, Mark; Ivers, Rebecca Q.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify the program fidelity factors associated with successful implementation of the Buckle-Up Safely program, targeting correct use of age-appropriate child car restraints. Methods. In 2010, we conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial of 830 families with children attending preschools and long day care centers in South West Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Families received the Buckle-Up Safely program in the intervention arm of the study (13 services). Independent observers assessed the type of restraint and whether it was used correctly. Results. This detailed process evaluation showed that the multifaceted program was implemented with high fidelity. Program protocols were adhered to and messaging was consistently delivered. Results from multilevel and logistic regression analyses show that age-appropriate restraint use was associated with attendance at a parent information session hosted at the center (adjusted odd ratio [AOR] = 3.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61, 8.29) and adversely affected by the child being aged 2 to 3 years (AOR = 0.14; 95% CI = 0.07, 0.30) or being from a family with more than 2 children (AOR = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.17, 0.67). Conclusions. Findings highlight the importance of parents receiving hands-on education regarding the proper use of age-appropriate child restraints. PMID:25602901

  13. The New Aztecs: Ritual and Restraint in Contemporary Western Military Operations (Advancing Strategic Thought Series)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    itself. With the arrival of the Middle Ages came some re- turn to ritual and restraint. The church was at the heart of efforts to restrain warfare...process, which continued in Byzantine fashion throughout the bombing. There were constant con- cerns about treachery within the Alliance, including the

  14. Restraint of Statehood and the Quality of Governance by Multinational Companies in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenke, Jana; Börzel, Tanja A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores to what extent the quality of governance by MNC in areas of limited statehood depends on the limitation, and, more importantly, on the restraint of statehood. The control over the monopoly of force and a minimum of state capacity to set and enforce rules are only one condition

  15. A smart base restraint for wind turbines to mitigate undesired effects due to structural vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterino, N.; Georgakis, Christos T.; Spizzuoco, M.

    2016-01-01

    . This smart restraint is made of a central smooth hinge, elastic springs and SA magnetorheological dampers driven by a control algorithm properly designed for the specific application. A commercial 105 m tall wind turbine has been assumed as a case study. Several numerical simulations have been performed...

  16. Issues to Consider in the Use of Physical Restraint and Time-Out Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carl R.

    The author discusses the legal and administrative concerns, best professional practices concerns, and political concerns related to the use of physical restraint and time out procedures with seriously behaviorally disordered children. Among the points made are that the courts may consider such approaches to be cruel and unusual; that direct…

  17. The Pattern of Physical Restraints applied to the Mentally-ill in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnostic groups found among the patients included Bipolar Affective Disorder current episode manic with psychotic symptoms (30%), Delirium (25%), Schizophrenia (20%), Acute polymorphic psychotic disorder without symptoms of schizophrenia (20%) and Dementia (5%). The reason for the use of restraints was ...

  18. 14 CFR 91.107 - Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child restraint systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child restraint systems. 91.107 Section 91.107 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules General § 91.107 Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child...

  19. Effects of the chronic restraint stress induced depression on reward-related learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pan; Wang, Kezhu; Lu, Cong; Dong, Liming; Chen, Yixi; Wang, Qiong; Shi, Zhe; Yang, Yanyan; Chen, Shanguang; Liu, Xinmin

    2017-03-15

    Chronic mild or unpredictability stress produces a persistent depressive-like state. The main symptoms of depression include weight loss, despair, anhedonia, diminished motivation and mild cognition impairment, which could influence the ability of reward-related learning. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic restraint stress on the performance of reward-related learning of rats. We used the exposure of repeated restraint stress (6h/day, for 28days) to induce depression-like behavior in rats. Then designed tasks including Pavlovian conditioning (magazine head entries), acquisition and maintenance of instrumental conditioning (lever pressing) and goal directed learning (higher fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement) to study the effects of chronic restraint stress. The results indicated that chronic restraint stress influenced rats in those aspects including the acquisition of a Pavlovian stimulus-outcome (S-O) association, the formation and maintenance of action-outcome (A-O) causal relation and the ability of learning in higher fixed ratio schedule. In conclusion, depression could influence the performances in reward-related learning obviously and the series of instrumental learning tasks may have potential as a method to evaluate cognitive changes in depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 28 CFR 552.26 - Medical attention in use of force and application of restraints incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical attention in use of force and application of restraints incidents. 552.26 Section 552.26 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS... identify physical or mental problems. When mental health staff or qualified health personnel determine that...

  1. Examination of a Model of Multiple Sociocultural Influences on Adolescent Girls' Body Dissatisfaction and Dietary Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkley, Tracy L.; Wertheim, Eleanor H.; Paxton, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the perceived role of sociocultural agents (peers, parents, and media) in influencing body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint in adolescent girls. While current body size strongly predicted ideal body size and dissatisfaction, perceived influence of sociocultural agents also had a direct relationship with body ideal and…

  2. CHILD CASUALTIES BEFORE AND AFTER ENACTMENT OF CHILD RESTRAINT SEATS (CRS LEGISLATION IN JAPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. IWASE

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Road Traffic Law Article 17-3-4 of April 2000 specifies the compulsory requirement for child safety seats in Japan. The objectives of this preliminary evaluation were to measure the effectiveness, benefits and usage of safety seats for child passengers aged 0–5 years by analyzing the child casualty data for the period of 1991–2002. Two statistical methods were used to quantify time trends (interrupted time series analysis, population based casualty rates estimations of changes in child casualty incidence after implementation of compulsory child restraint seats law. Despite overall increases in the use of child restraint seats (as observed by different national surveys, casualties (fatalities and injuries among restrained children have increased. Given that exposure to crash environments is increasing, traffic safety advocates need to be aware of the importance of child restraints as a means of reducing the likelihood of injury. It is necessary to implement an extensive community-based child safety seat campaign to disseminate the information on appropriate restraint use. Further prevention of motor vehicle occupant injuries to children will require the combined approaches of education, incentives for safe human behavior, legislation/enforcement, and environmental changes.

  3. 49 CFR 571.225 - Standard No. 225; Child restraint anchorage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... child restraint anchorage system installed at a front designated seating position. (e) A vehicle with a... anchor attaching bars of the SFAD 2 are replaced by spacers that end flush with the back surface of the... touching the rear top edge of the vehicle seat back, (2) Is fitted at one end with suitable hardware for...

  4. Nuclear reactor support and seismic restraint with in-vessel core retention cooling features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Tyler A.; Edwards, Michael J.

    2018-01-23

    A nuclear reactor including a lateral seismic restraint with a vertically oriented pin attached to the lower vessel head and a mating pin socket attached to the floor. Thermally insulating materials are disposed alongside the exterior surface of a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel including at least the lower vessel head.

  5. 28 CFR 552.22 - Principles governing the use of force and application of restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Principles governing the use of force and application of restraints. (a) Staff ordinarily shall first attempt... inmate. (c) Staff shall use only that amount of force necessary to gain control of the inmate. Situations... determined necessary, and after staff have gained control of the inmate, the Warden or designee is to be...

  6. Changing the Definition of Education. On Kant's Educational Paradox between Freedom and Restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffar, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Ever since Kant asked: "How am I to develop the sense of freedom in spite of the restraint?" in his lecture on education, the tension between necessary educational influence and unacceptable restriction of the child's individual development and freedom has been considered an educational paradox. Many have suggested solutions to the…

  7. Client Factors as Predictors of Restraint and Seclusion in People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheirs, Jan G. M.; Blok, Jan B.; Tolhoek, Myrte A.; El Aouat, Fadoua; Glimmerveen, Johanna C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To gain more insight into the antecedent factors of restraint in institutionalised people with intellectual disability (ID), the role played by several demographic and psychological client variables was investigated. Methods: The data of 475 people (age range 12-95 years) who were residents in a Dutch institution for people with ID…

  8. Investigating the Impact of School Administrator's on the Frequency of Physical Restraint in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Richard; Larwin, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of a physical restraint is to control the behavior of a student. It can involve physically holding a person immobile against his or her will to using chemical or mechanical devices to control a person. This study was designed to contribute to the paucity of existing research literature in regards to a school administrator's impact on…

  9. Restraint Procedures and Challenging Behaviours in Intellectual Disability: An Analysis of Causative Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Boisjoli, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual disability often evince challenging behaviours. Efforts have been underway for some time to develop prosocial or positive skill acquisition treatments to address challenging behaviours. However, physical/mechanical and chemical restraint is still commonly used in many clinical and community settings. Such…

  10. Pasung: Physical restraint and confinement of the mentally ill in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diatri Hervita

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical restraint and confinement (pasung by families of people with mental illness is known to occur in many parts of the world but has attracted limited investigation. This preliminary observational study was carried out on Samosir Island in Sumatra, Indonesia, to investigate the nature of such restraint and confinement, the clinical characteristics of people restrained, and the reasons given by families and communities for applying such restraint. Methods The research method was cross-sectional observational research in a natural setting, carried out during a six-month period of working as the only psychiatrist in a remote district. Results Fifteen cases of pasung, approximately even numbers of males and females and almost all with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were identified. Duration of restraint ranged from two to 21 years. Discussion and Conclusion The provision of basic community mental health services, where there were none before, enabled the majority of the people who had been restrained to receive psychiatric treatment and to be released from pasung.

  11. Restraint system use in 19 U.S. cities 1989 annual report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    This study continued to monitor the use of occupant restraint systems and motorcycle/moped helmet use in 19 U.S. cities during 1989. A total of 69,232 observations of automobile drivers indicated an overall driver safety belt use rate of 46.3 percent...

  12. Identification of safety belt restraint usage characteristics related to four- to thirteen-year-olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Involvement in road traffic crashes as vehicle occupants is a leading cause of death and serious injury among children. The : objective of this study was to investigate child safety restraint-use characteristics and crash-severity factors in order to...

  13. Restraint and Cancellation: Multiple Inhibition Deficits in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachar, Russell; Logan, Gordon D.; Robaey, Philippe; Chen, Shirley; Ickowicz, Abel; Barr, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    We used variations of the stop signal task to study two components of motor response inhibition--the ability to withhold a strong response tendency (restraint) and the ability to cancel an ongoing action (cancellation)--in children with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and in non-ADHD controls of similar age (ages…

  14. Shortened constraint-induced movement therapy in subacute stroke - no effect of using a restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogårdh, Christina; Vestling, Monika; Sjölund, Bengt H

    2009-01-01

    , no statistically significant differences between the groups were found in any measures at any point in time. CONCLUSION: In this study, no effect of using a restraint in patients with subacute stroke was found. Thus, this component in the constraint-induced therapy concept seems to be of minor importance...

  15. A Descriptive Study of the Use of Restraint and Seclusion in a Special Education School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, V. Susan; Parsons, Aaron E.; Church, Robin P.; Beetar, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The literature regarding the use of restraint and seclusion in schools is scant, perhaps due to the controversial nature of the topic. With few exceptions, schools have not published policies or data regarding these procedures even when doing so would further the discussion about standards for staff training, student safety, and…

  16. Restraint system use in 19 U.S. cities. 1991 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This study continued to monitor the use of occupant restraint systems and motorcycle/moped helmet use in 19 U.S. cities during 1991. A total of 256,907 observations of automobile drivers indicated an overall driver safety belt use rate of 51.1%. The ...

  17. Promoting Inclusion through Evidence-Based Alternatives to Restraint and Seclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trader, Barbara; Stonemeier, Jennifer; Berg, Tricia; Knowles, Christen; Massar, Michelle; Monzalve, Manuel; Pinkelman, Sarah; Nese, Rhonda; Ruppert, Traci; Horner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The use of restraint and seclusion in schools has been identified repeatedly as an approach that is overused, misused, and potentially dangerous. In this article, we emphasize the importance of an approach to supporting students with significant problem behavior that focuses on prevention, evidence-based intervention procedures, heightened levels…

  18. Depressed Affect and Dietary Restraint in Adolescent Boys’ and Girls’ Eating in the Absence of Hunger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Nichole R.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Pickworth, Courtney K.; Grygorenko, Mariya V.; Radin, Rachel M.; Vannucci, Anna; Shank, Lisa M.; Brady, Sheila M.; Courville, Amber B.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Data suggest that depressed affect and dietary restraint are related to disinhibited eating patterns in children and adults. Yet, experimental research has not determined to what extent depressed affect acutely affects eating in the absence of physiological hunger (EAH) in adolescents. In the current between-subjects experimental study, we measured EAH in 182 adolescent (13-17y) girls (65%) and boys as ad libitum palatable snack food intake after youth ate to satiety from a buffet meal. Just prior to EAH, participants were randomly assigned to view either a sad or neutral film clip. Dietary restraint was measured with the Eating Disorder Examination. Adolescents who viewed the sad film clip reported small but significant increases in state depressed affect relative to adolescents who viewed the neutral film clip (p girls, but not boys (p girls’ propensity to report restrained eating is associated with their greater disinhibited eating in the laboratory. Additional experimental research, perhaps utilizing a more potent laboratory stressor and manipulating both affective state and dietary restraint, is required to elucidate how state affect may interact with dietary restraint to influence EAH during adolescence. PMID:25936291

  19. Depressed affect and dietary restraint in adolescent boys' and girls' eating in the absence of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Nichole R; Shomaker, Lauren B; Pickworth, Courtney K; Grygorenko, Mariya V; Radin, Rachel M; Vannucci, Anna; Shank, Lisa M; Brady, Sheila M; Courville, Amber B; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Data suggest that depressed affect and dietary restraint are related to disinhibited eating patterns in children and adults. Yet, experimental research has not determined to what extent depressed affect acutely affects eating in the absence of physiological hunger (EAH) in adolescents. In the current between-subjects experimental study, we measured EAH in 182 adolescent (13-17 y) girls (65%) and boys as ad libitum palatable snack food intake after youth ate to satiety from a buffet meal. Just prior to EAH, participants were randomly assigned to view either a sad or neutral film clip. Dietary restraint was measured with the Eating Disorder Examination. Adolescents who viewed the sad film clip reported small but significant increases in state depressed affect relative to adolescents who viewed the neutral film clip (p girls, but not boys (p girls' propensity to report restrained eating is associated with their greater disinhibited eating in the laboratory. Additional experimental research, perhaps utilizing a more potent laboratory stressor and manipulating both affective state and dietary restraint, is required to elucidate how state affect may interact with dietary restraint to influence EAH during adolescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determinants of the acquisition and usage of automobile child restraint devices: a survey among duth parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, Marcel E.; Kok, Gerjo; Verbeek, Jan

    1992-01-01

    On behalf of the Dutch Road Safety Association a survey of the use of child restraint devices (CRDs) in The Netherlands was conducted. In a population of 420 parents of children younger than 5 years old, 95% possessed at least one CRD, while 83% of the owners always, or most of the time, used a CRD

  1. EFFECT OF PHYSICAL RESTRAINT ON THE LIMITS OF THERMOREGULATION IN TELEMETERED RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical restraint of rodents is needed for nose-only exposure to airborne toxicants and is also used as a means ofpsychological stress. Hyperthermia is often observed in restrained rats, presumably as a result of impairments in heat dissipation. However, such a hyperthermic resp...

  2. [Multisensory environmental intervention (snoezelen) as a preventive alternative to seclusion and restraint in closed psychiatric wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, Alexander; Volpo, Sarit; Paran, Rachel; Zislin, J; Drumer, Dov; Raskin, Sergey; Katz, Gregory; Shlafman, Michael; Gaber, Amran; Durst, Rimona

    2007-01-01

    Seclusion and restraint, unfortunately, still remain a routine practice in closed psychiatric wards worldwide and in Israel. These practices often lead to distress, traumatized patients, and further increase the negative view and stigmatization of psychiatric treatment and, most especially, psychiatric hospitalization. Multisensory environmental intervention, Snoezelen, combines sensory integration theory with a client-oriented approach. Snoezelen treatment calms and relaxes agitative patients giving them a feeling of dignity, initiative and freedom of choice. The Snoezelen room is a high-tech, multisensory environment that includes music, light of fiber optic strands, calming image projections, vibrations of bubbles tubes, and soothing smells. After 30 to 40 minutes of exposure to Snoezelen, agitative patients in our closed ward reported substantial reduction of their distress level and, outwardly, appeared less agitated and displayed less aggressive and hostile behavior. Foremost, since the beginning of the multisensory environmental interventions in the closed wards, a statistically significant reduction in the number of restraints and seclusions has occurred in the closed male section in comparison to the closed female section, where snoezelen has not been administered (P Snoezelen is an innovative and preventative alternative to seclusion and restraint in closed psychiatric settings. It produces a calming effect on agitative patients, reduces the length of time and number of seclusions and restraints, and diminishes the stigma against psychiatric treatment and hospitalization.

  3. The Relationship between Seclusion and Restraint Use and Childhood Abuse among Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Joseph H.; Springer, Justin; Beck, Niels C.; Menditto, Anthony; Coleman, James

    2011-01-01

    Seclusion and restraint (S/R) is a controversial topic in the field of psychiatry, due in part to the high rates of childhood physical and sexual abuse found among psychiatric inpatients. The trauma-informed care perspective suggests that the use of S/R with previously abused inpatients may result in retraumatization due to mental associations…

  4. Biomarkers of hippocampal gene expression in a mouse restraint chronic stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaldi, Massimo; Ricciardelli, Eugenia; Pasqualini, Lorenza; Sannino, Giuseppina; Soverchia, Laura; Ruggeri, Barbara; Falcinelli, Silvia; Renzi, Alessandra; Ludka, Colleen; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Hardiman, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Acute stress provides many beneficial effects whereas chronic stress contributes to a variety of human health issues including anxiety, depression, gastrointestinal problems, cardiac disease, sleep disorders and obesity. The goal of this work was to identify, using a rodent model, hippocampal gene signatures associated with prolonged chronic stress representing candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for early diagnosis and pharmacological intervention for stress induced disease. Mice underwent 'restraint stress' over 7 consecutive days and hippocampal gene-expression changes were analyzed at 3, 12 and 24 h following the final restraint treatment. Data indicated that mice exposed to chronic restraint stress exhibit a differential gene-expression profile compared with non-stressed controls. The greatest differences were observed 12 and 24 h following the final stress test. Our study indicated that Gpr88, Ttr, Gh and Tac1 mRNAs were modulated in mice exposed to chronic restraint stress. These transcripts represent a panel of biomarkers and druggable targets for further analysis in the context of chronic stress associated disease in humans.

  5. Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chato, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Tension in Microgravity Modeled Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, jets must be contained by surface tension forces. Recent NASA experiments in microgravity (Tank Pressure Control Experiment, TPCE, and Vented Tank Pressure Experiment, VTRE) resulted in a wealth of data about jet behavior in microgravity. VTRE was surprising in that, although it contained a complex geometry of baffles and vanes, the limit on liquid inflow was the emergence of a liquid jet from the top of the vane structure. Clearly understanding the restraint of liquid jets by surface tension is key to managing fluids in low gravity. To model this phenomenon, we need a numerical method that can track the fluid motion and the surface tension forces. The fluid motion is modeled with the Navier-Stokes equation formulated for low-speed incompressible flows. The quantities of velocity and pressure are placed on a staggered grid, with velocity being tracked at cell faces and pressure at cell centers. The free surface is tracked via the introduction of a color function that tracks liquid as 1/2 and gas as -1/2. A phase model developed by Jacqmin is used. This model converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly. Previous attempts at this formulation have been criticized for smearing the interface. However, by sharpening the phase

  6. Protecting children: a survey of caregivers’ knowledge of Georgia’s child restraint laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl Strasser

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sheryl Strasser1, Laurie Whorton2, Amanda J Walpole3, Sarah Beddington11Institute of Public Health, Partnership for Urban Health Research, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2WellStar Corporate and Community Health, Marietta, GA, USA; 3Cobb and Douglas Public Health, Marietta, GA, USAIntroduction: The leading cause of injury and death among children in the United States is motor vehicle crashes. Even though restraint laws are in place and public awareness campaigns and educational interventions have increased, many children are still improperly restrained or not restrained at all. When correctly used, child restraints significantly reduce risk of injury or death.Methods: The purpose of the study was to elicit caregiver baseline knowledge of car seat installation and regulation before receiving car seat education from certified technicians at Inspection Station events. Inspection Station is a program whereby staff assists parents in correctly positioning car seats in participants’ vehicles. Over an 8-week period, Safe Kids Cobb County Car Seat Technicians distributed a 16-item survey, with 10 knowledge-based questions and six demographic questions to Inspection Station participants. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were conducted to assess relationships between participant age, ethnicity, and gender with overall knowledge scores. Regression analysis was run to determine the association between participant education level and total child restraint knowledge.Results: One hundred sixty-nine surveys were completed. Participant knowledge of vehicular child restraint ranged from 0% to 90% on all items. Only 29.6% of caregivers understood the proper tightness of the harness system. Less than half of the caregivers (43.8% were aware of the Georgia law requiring children aged 6 years and younger to be in some type of child restraint. Only 43.2% of caregivers surveyed knew that children need to ride in a rear-facing child restraint until 1

  7. Protecting children: a survey of caregivers’ knowledge of Georgia’s child restraint laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Sheryl; Whorton, Laurie; Walpole, Amanda J; Beddington, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The leading cause of injury and death among children in the United States is motor vehicle crashes. Even though restraint laws are in place and public awareness campaigns and educational interventions have increased, many children are still improperly restrained or not restrained at all. When correctly used, child restraints significantly reduce risk of injury or death. Methods The purpose of the study was to elicit caregiver baseline knowledge of car seat installation and regulation before receiving car seat education from certified technicians at Inspection Station events. Inspection Station is a program whereby staff assists parents in correctly positioning car seats in participants’ vehicles. Over an 8-week period, Safe Kids Cobb County Car Seat Technicians distributed a 16-item survey, with 10 knowledge-based questions and six demographic questions to Inspection Station participants. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were conducted to assess relationships between participant age, ethnicity, and gender with overall knowledge scores. Regression analysis was run to determine the association between participant education level and total child restraint knowledge. Results One hundred sixty-nine surveys were completed. Participant knowledge of vehicular child restraint ranged from 0% to 90% on all items. Only 29.6% of caregivers understood the proper tightness of the harness system. Less than half of the caregivers (43.8%) were aware of the Georgia law requiring children aged 6 years and younger to be in some type of child restraint. Only 43.2% of caregivers surveyed knew that children need to ride in a rear-facing child restraint until 1 year of age and 20 pounds. No significant correlations between participant knowledge and age were found. Statistically significant associations were found between total knowledge scores and education level, ethnicity, and gender. Discussion The results from this study describe baseline knowledge among a sample of

  8. Knowledge, attitude and practice of intensive care unit nurses about physical restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Mohammad; Aloush, Sami; Al-Awamreh, Khitam

    2017-09-01

    Physical restraint is mainly used in intensive care units (ICUs) to prevent delirious or agitated patients from removing tubes and lines connected to them. However, inappropriate use of physical restraint could have many detrimental physical effects on the patient, such as nerve damage, asphyxiation or even death. The aim of the study is to investigate nurses' knowledge, attitude and practice of physical restraint in ICUs in Jordanian hospitals, about which little is known. A descriptive and cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 400 nurses working in three public hospitals and one university-affiliated hospital from different geographical regions in Jordan was selected. An Arabic version of the Physical Restraint Questionnaire (PRQ) was used to collect the data. A total of 300 completed questionnaires were returned, with a response rate of 75%. Of the total sample, 51% were males, 65.7% were from public hospitals and 80.3% held a bachelor's degree. The mean score in the knowledge section was 9.7 (SD =1.7) out of 15; in the attitude section, it was 24.7 (SD = 4.8) out of 33; and in the practice section, it was 30.9 (SD = 3.5) out of 42. Nurses who reported previous related education scored higher on the knowledge section (mean = 10.7; SD = 1.4) than nurses who reported no previous related education (mean = 9.1; SD = 1.6; p attitude and practice. The study demonstrated some lack of knowledge and unsafe practices regarding physical restraint in ICUs in Jordan. It suggests improving nurses' knowledge, attitude and practices through in-service education on best practice for physical restraint, developing policies/guidelines and providing adequate staff and equipment to maintain patient safety and prevent complications. Conducting education programmes on physical restraint for ICU nurses and providing other preventive strategies are important in improving nurses' knowledge, attitude and practice. © 2017 British Association

  9. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors and System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I demonstrated the technical feasibility of creating surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors that respond rapidly (under 0.5 second) and reversibly...

  10. Multipurpose Electric Potential Sensor for Spacecraft Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The original goal of Phase I was to study the feasibility of developing an electric sensor that can be used for as many NASA sensing applications as possible. During...

  11. NIST in Space: Better Remote Sensors for Better Science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Innovative Research Grant activity conducts engineering analysis to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of applyi?ng a breakthrough remote sensor...

  12. Restraint stress increases serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala via activation of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Bing; Feng, Na; Renner, Kenneth; Forster, Gina

    2008-07-30

    Decreases in serotonergic activity in the central nucleus of the amygdala reduce responses to stressors, suggesting an important role for serotonin in this region of the amygdala in stress reactivity. However, it is not known whether exposure to stressors actually increases serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala. The current experiment tested the hypothesis that restraint stress increases extracellular serotonin within the central nucleus of the amygdala and adjacent medial amygdala using in vivo microdialysis in awake male rats during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle. Serotonin release in the central nucleus increased immediately in response to restraint stress. In contrast, there was no change in serotonin release within the adjacent medial amygdala during or following restraint. Since corticotropin-releasing factor is an important mediator of both responses to stressors and serotonergic activity, subsequent experiments tested the hypothesis that central nucleus serotonergic response to restraint stress is mediated by central corticotropin-releasing factor receptors. Administration of the corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist d-Phe-CRF (icv, 10 microg/5 microl) prior to restraint stress suppressed restraint-induced serotonin release in the central nucleus. The results suggest that restraint stress rapidly and selectively increases serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala by the activation of central corticotropin-releasing factor receptors. Furthermore, the results imply that corticotropin-releasing factor mediated serotonergic activity in central nucleus of the amygdala may be an important component of a stress response.

  13. The relationship between dietary intake and energy availability, eating attitudes and cognitive restraint in students enrolled in undergraduate nutrition degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocks, Tetyana; Pelly, Fiona; Slater, Gary; Martin, Lisa Anne

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this research was to explore the relationship of total energy and macronutrient intake, energy balance and energy availability to eating attitudes and cognitive restraint in students enrolled in undergraduate nutrition degrees. Energy and micronutrient intake was assessed in 63 students (n = 50 nutrition, and n = 13 occupation therapy degrees; n = 51 females, n = 12 males) using three 24-h dietary recalls. Energy requirements were calculated based on measured resting metabolic rate, estimated exercise energy expenditure, and dietary induced thermogenesis. Body composition was assessed using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Eating attitudes and cognitive restraint were measured using previously validated tools. Eighteen percent of nutrition students were classified as having low energy availability (energy balance. Eating attitudes and cognitive restraint were not associated with total energy or macronutrient intake. However, female nutrition students with high cognitive restraint had greater exercise energy expenditure and thus lower energy availability than those with low cognitive restraint (371 (302) kcal d(-1) compared to 145 (206) kcal d(-1), P eating attitudes and cognitive restraint negatively correlated with energy availability (rs = -0.37, P = 0.02 and rs = -0.51, P eating attitudes and cognitive restraint may be controlling their energy balance through exercise, as opposed to restricting food intake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contributions of mindful eating, intuitive eating, and restraint to BMI, disordered eating, and meal consumption in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lisa M; Reilly, Erin E; Schaumberg, Katherine; Dmochowski, Sasha; Anderson, Drew A

    2016-03-01

    Mindful eating and intuitive eating are promoted as means to circumvent potentially maladaptive dietary restraint while maintaining a healthy weight. Although theoretically related, no studies have examined the correlations between intuitive eating, mindful eating, and restraint in the same sample. This study sought to examine these constructs and their correlations with body mass index (BMI), eating-disordered behaviors, and meal consumption in a college sample. Participants (N = 125) completed a laboratory taste-test meal and measures of each eating-related construct using the EDDS, IES, MEQ, and TFEQ-Restraint Subscale. Mindful eating, intuitive eating, and restraint were not strongly correlated. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that restraint and intuitive eating accounted for significant variance in disordered eating and BMI. Elevated restraint was associated with increased BMI and disordered eating; elevated intuitive eating was associated with decreased BMI and disordered eating. Mindful eating did not correlate with any outcome variables. Follow-up analyses suggested that specific intuitive eating subscales accounted for unique variance in the relation between intuitive eating and disordered eating. Intuitive eating was the only construct that was significantly associated with meal consumption. Intuitive eating and restraint appear to be only weakly correlated, and each is differentially associated with meal consumption. Mindful eating does not appear to relate to outcome variables.

  15. Are paediatric oncology nurses acknowledging the effects of restraint? A review of the current policy and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Ken; Clarke, Dave

    2011-12-01

    The literature pertaining to restraint of children for procedures and administration of medication continues to indicate this is a widespread phenomenon and that nurses caring for children often fail to consider effects of this. This paper reviews the current literature and policy surrounding the practice of paediatric restraint within oncology nursing. A review of research and policy identified three significant themes relating to restraint: effects of restraint on the family, professional considerations; ethical and legal implications. This paper through an analysis of the literature and policy demonstrates that paediatric restraint is a contentious issue in children's oncology nursing and that while essential in many cases, requires careful consideration. Alternatives to restraint should always be considered to minimise the effect upon child and family. A number of key issues are highlighted in this paper which would be useful. Most importantly the notion of children's rights, negotiation and partnership with children and their families and the nurses responsibility in relation to the law and the Nursing and Midwifery Council. Professional bodies such as the Royal College of Nursing have attempted to offer guidance in this area; the key message is that restraint should always be the last option; it is our opinion that often it is the first. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Role of Alpha-1 and Alpha-2 Adrenoceptors in Restraint Stress-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimei; Jia, Li; Zhao, Zengming; Peng, Shuangqing; Lei, Linsheng

    2014-01-01

    Acute stress affects cellular integrity in many tissues including the liver, but its underlying mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential involvement of catecholamines and adrenoceptors in the regulation of acute restraint stress-induced liver injury. Restraint was achieved by placing mice in restraint tubes. Mice were treated with either an α-l antagonist, prazosin, an α-2 antagonist, yohimbine, a β-l antagonist, betaxolol, a β-2 antagonist, ICI 118551, or a central and peripheral catecholamine depleting agent, reserpine, and followed by restraint stress. Assessment of liver injury (serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) , hepatic total GSH, GSSG and GSH/GSSG ratio) , histopathology and of apoptosis, by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) assay and western blotting, was performed. Three hours of restraint stress resulted in liver injury, as indexed by elevated serum transaminase levels, decreased hepatic total GSH levels and GSH/GSSG ratio, increased hepatic GSSG levels as well as enhanced hepatocytes apoptosis. Either reserpine or prazosin or yohimbine was found to attenuate liver injury. Furthermore, prazosin and yohimbine protected against restraint-induced hepatocytes apoptosis through attenuating the activation of caspases-9 and -3 and reducing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These results suggest that α-1 and α-2 adrenoceptors mediate restraint-induced liver oxidative injury through caspase-9 and Bcl-2 family of apoptotic regulatory proteins. PMID:24682087

  17. Greater Physiological and Behavioral Effects of Interrupted Stress Pattern Compared to Daily Restraint Stress in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hetzel, Andrea; Shah, Bijal; Atchley, Derek; Blume, Shannon R.; Padival, Mallika A.; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2014-01-01

    Repeated stress can trigger a range of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety. The propensity to develop abnormal behaviors after repeated stress is related to the severity, frequency and number of stressors. However, the pattern of stress exposure may contribute to the impact of stress. In addition, the anxiogenic nature of repeated stress exposure can be moderated by the degree of coping that occurs, and can be reflected in homotypic habituation to the repeated stress. However, expectations are not clear when a pattern of stress presentation is utilized that diminishes habituation. The purpose of these experiments is to test whether interrupted stress exposure decreases homotypic habituation and leads to greater effects on anxiety-like behavior in adult male rats. We found that repeated interrupted restraint stress resulted in less overall homotypic habituation compared to repeated daily restraint stress. This was demonstrated by greater production of fecal boli and greater corticosterone response to restraint. Furthermore, interrupted restraint stress resulted in a lower body weight and greater adrenal gland weight than daily restraint stress, and greater anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Control experiments demonstrated that these effects of the interrupted pattern could not be explained by differences in the total number of stress exposures, differences in the total number of days that the stress periods encompased, nor could it be explained as a result of only the stress exposures after an interruption from stress. These experiments demonstrate that the pattern of stress exposure is a significant determinant of the effects of repeated stress, and that interrupted stress exposure that decreases habituation can have larger effects than a greater number of daily stress exposures. Differences in the pattern of stress exposure are therefore an important factor to consider when predicting the severity of the effects of repeated stress on

  18. Vibrissa Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Docket No. 300119 1 of 11 VIBRISSA SENSOR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by...REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention provides a...vibrissa in two dimensions. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION [0010] Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a sensor capable of

  19. Forensic mental health clinician's experiences with and assessment of alliance regarding the patient's readiness to be released from mechanical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lea Deichmann; Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bech, Per

    2018-01-01

    One of the main reasons for prolonged duration of mechanical restraint is patient behaviour in relation to the clinician-patient alliance. This article reports on the forensic mental health clinicians experiences of the clinician-patient alliance during mechanical restraint, and their assessment...... of parameters of alliance regarding the patient's readiness to be released from restraint. We used a qualitative, descriptive approach and conducted focus group interviews with nurses, nurse assistants and social and healthcare assistants. The results show that a pre-established personal clinician...

  20. All-plastic fiber-based pressure sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar; Lwin, Richard; Leon-Saval, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present a feasibility study and a prototype of an all-plastic fiber-based pressure sensor. The sensor is based on long period gratings inscribed for the first time to the best of our knowledge by a CO2 laser in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microstructured fibers and coupled to a pod...

  1. Agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running exercise effectively prevent anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment in restraint stressed rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarawut Lapmanee; Jantarima Charoenphandhu; Jarinthorn Teerapornpuntakit; Nateetip Krishnamra; Narattaphol Charoenphandhu

    2017-01-01

    ...-like behaviors in stressed rats. But whether they are able to prevent deleterious consequences of restraint stress in rats, such as anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment that occur afterward, was not known...

  2. A new default restraint library for the protein backbone in Phenix: a conformation-dependent geometry goes mainstream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Nigel W; Tronrud, Dale E; Adams, Paul D; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Chemical restraints are a fundamental part of crystallographic protein structure refinement. In response to mounting evidence that conventional restraints have shortcomings, it has previously been documented that using backbone restraints that depend on the protein backbone conformation helps to address these shortcomings and improves the performance of refinements [Moriarty et al. (2014), FEBS J. 281, 4061-4071]. It is important that these improvements be made available to all in the protein crystallography community. Toward this end, a change in the default geometry library used by Phenix is described here. Tests are presented showing that this change will not generate increased numbers of outliers during validation, or deposition in the Protein Data Bank, during the transition period in which some validation tools still use the conventional restraint libraries.

  3. Surveillance technology: an alternative to physical restraints? A qualitative study among professionals working in nursing homes for people with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Francke, A.L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Working with surveillance technology as an alternative to traditional restraints creates obvious differences in the way care is organised. It is not clear whether professional caregivers find working with surveillance technology useful and workable and whether surveillance technology is

  4. Evaluation of New York state's mandatory occupant restraint law : fatalities and injuries among motor vehicle occupants covered by the law

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    The report focuses on the ultimate measure of the effectiveness of New York State's Mandatory Occupant Restraint Law: reductions in fatalities and serious injuries among vehicle occupants. All front seat occupants and children under the age of ten, r...

  5. Interactive effects of dietary restraint and adiposity on stress-induced eating and the food choice of children

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Individual Differences Model posits that individual differences in physiological and psychological factors explain eating behaviors in response to stress. The purpose was to determine the effects of individual differences in adiposity, dietary restraint and stress reactivity on children's energy...

  6. Monitoring electromagnetic tracking error using redundant sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Vinyas; Bibic, Eden; Lasso, Andras; Holden, Matthew S.; Vaughan, Thomas; Baum, Zachary; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: The intraoperative measurement of tracking error is crucial to ensure the reliability of electromagnetically navigated procedures. For intraoperative use, methods need to be quick to set up, easy to interpret, and not interfere with the ongoing procedure. Our goal was to evaluate the feasibility of using redundant electromagnetic sensors to alert users to tracking error in a navigated intervention setup. METHODS: Electromagnetic sensors were fixed to a rigid frame around a region of interest and on surgical tools. A software module was designed to detect tracking error by comparing real-time measurements of the differences between inter-sensor distances and angles to baseline measurements. Once these measurements were collected, a linear support vector machine-based classifier was used to predict tracking errors from redundant sensor readings. RESULTS: Measuring the deviation in the reported inter-sensor distance and angle between the needle and cautery served as a valid indicator for electromagnetic tracking error. The highest classification accuracy, 86%, was achieved based on readings from the cautery when the two sensors on the cautery were close together. The specificity of this classifier was 93% and the sensitivity was 82%. CONCLUSION: Placing redundant electromagnetic sensors in a workspace seems to be feasible for the intraoperative detection of electromagnetic tracking error in controlled environments. Further testing should be performed to optimize the measurement error threshold used for classification in the support vector machine, and improve the sensitivity of our method before application in real procedures.

  7. A Micro-Fabricated Force Sensor Using an All Thin Film Piezoelectric Active Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwoo Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to measure pressure and force is essential in biomedical applications such as minimally invasive surgery (MIS and palpation for detecting cancer cysts. Here, we report a force sensor for measuring a shear and normal force by combining an arrayed piezoelectric sensors layer with a precut glass top plate connected by four stress concentrating legs. We designed and fabricated a thin film piezoelectric force sensor and proposed an enhanced sensing tool to be used for analyzing gentle touches without the external voltage source used in FET sensors. Both the linear sensor response from 3 kPa to 30 kPa and the exact signal responses from the moving direction illustrate the strong feasibility of the described thin film miniaturized piezoelectric force sensor.

  8. Oxysterol Restraint of Cholesterol Synthesis Prevents AIM2 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Eric V; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Russell, David W; Cyster, Jason G

    2017-11-16

    Type I interferon restrains interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-driven inflammation in macrophages by upregulating cholesterol-25-hydroxylase (Ch25h) and repressing SREBP transcription factors. However, the molecular links between lipid metabolism and IL-1β production remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) by macrophages is required to prevent inflammasome activation by the DNA sensor protein absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). We find that in response to bacterial infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, macrophages upregulate Ch25h to maintain repression of SREBP2 activation and cholesterol synthesis. Increasing macrophage cholesterol content is sufficient to trigger IL-1β release in a crystal-independent but AIM2-dependent manner. Ch25h deficiency results in cholesterol-dependent reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and release of mitochondrial DNA into the cytosol. AIM2 deficiency rescues the increased inflammasome activity observed in Ch25h -/- . Therefore, activated macrophages utilize 25-HC in an anti-inflammatory circuit that maintains mitochondrial integrity and prevents spurious AIM2 inflammasome activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Secure Wireless Sensor Networks: Problems and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Hu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available As sensor networks edge closer towards wide-spread deployment, security issues become a central concern. So far, the main research focus has been on making sensor networks feasible and useful, and less emphasis was placed on security. This paper analyzes security challenges in wireless sensor networks and summarizes key issues that should be solved for achieving the ad hoc security. It gives an overview of the current state of solutions on such key issues as secure routing, prevention of denial-of-service and key management service. We also present some secure methods to achieve security in wireless sensor networks. Finally we present our integrated approach to securing sensor networks.

  10. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  11. Development of steady state magnetic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Shigemitsu; Nakayama, Takahide [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nagashima, Akira; Kasai, Satoshi

    1998-12-01

    A prototype of new mechanical sensor based on the steady state electromagnetic force (J x B force) measurement has been developed and tested. The mechanical force sensor is a new type of the magnetic sensor which is available for frequencies smaller than 0.1 Hz. The prototype of the mechanical sensor has been examined, and the following results were obtained; (1) A signal was proportional to simulated force in the load cell tests. (2) A signal drift concerning the temperature was reproducible over the range of the ITER environment. (3) A signal was proportional to the magnetic field in the steady state magnetic field measurement tests. (4) A load cell linearity error did not increase significantly after irradiation of 7.2 x 10{sup 6} Gy. These results indicate that the mechanical sensor will provide the practical feasibility in the long time magnetic field measurement. (author)

  12. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities - Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shao-Huan; Lu, Li-Chin; Lan, Shou-Jen; Chen, Jong-Chen; Wu, Wen-Jun; Chang, Shen-Peng; Lin, Long-Yau

    2017-08-01

    "Physical restraint" formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education) group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p < 0.001) compared to the control group. Meta-regression revealed the period of post education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002); instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: -0.07, p < 0.001; β: -0.04, p = 0.056). The educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  13. The Use of Postoperative Restraints in Children after Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate Repair: A Preliminary Report

    OpenAIRE

    Huth, Jennifer; Petersen, J. Dayne; Lehman, James A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study examines whether the use of elbow restraints after cleft lip/palate repair has a relationship to postoperative complications. Methods. A comparative descriptive design was used to study a convenience sample of children undergoing repair of cleft lip/palate at Akron Children’s Hospital with Institutional Review Board approval. The children were randomized into intervention or control groups with use of elbow restraints considered the intervention. The study consists of two ...

  14. Feasibility studies and technological innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Frede Kloster; Lund, Henrik; Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    2004-01-01

    The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives.......The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives....

  15. Appearance investment mediates the association between fear of negative evaluation and dietary restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Felicia M; Jarry, Josée L; Kong, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether appearance investment explains the association between fear of negative evaluation and dietary restraint. Data were collected from 305 undergraduate female participants in an online survey. Mediation analyses were conducted using Preacher and Hayes (2008) Indirect Mediation macro. Results showed that both components of appearance investment that is, holding appearance as central to self-definition and the tendency to engage in appearance management behaviours, mediate the association between fear of negative evaluation and dietary restraint. The Baron and Kenny (1986) method further showed that holding appearance as central to self-definition fully mediates this association but that engagement in appearance management behaviours only partially mediates it. These results suggest that appearance investment could prompt women to diet to try to lose weight to fend off feared negative evaluation from others. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. What makes dietary restraint problematic? Development and validation of the Inflexible Eating Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Cristiana; Ferreira, Cláudia; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Trindade, I A; Martinho, A

    2017-07-01

    This study presents the Inflexible Eating Questionnaire (IEQ), which measures the inflexible adherence to subjective eating rules. The scale's structure and psychometric properties were examined in distinct samples from the general population comprising both men and women. IEQ presented an 11-item one-dimensional structure, revealed high internal consistency, construct and temporal stability, and discriminated eating psychopathology cases from non-cases. The IEQ presented significant associations with dietary restraint, eating psychopathology, body image inflexibility, general psychopathology symptoms, and decreased intuitive eating. IEQ was a significant moderator on the association between dietary restraint and eating psychopathology symptoms. Findings suggested that the IEQ is a valid and useful instrument with potential implications for research on psychological inflexibility in disordered eating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Use of restraint in psychiatry: Feelings of caregivers and ethical perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivarch, J; Cano, N

    2013-09-01

    The return of restraint in psychiatry raises many ethical issues for caregivers. However their experience is little explored in literature. Our objective was to study the feelings of caregivers facing restraint with regard to an ethical perspective and to identify areas for improvement. Between November 2011 and February 2012 a descriptive cross-sectional epidemiological study was performed in two psychiatric emergency services and two closed units in which doctors and nurses were individually interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires. Five topics were explored: indications and contexts, impact on the patient, caregiver-patient relationship, perspective on the practice and feelings of caregivers on which we insist particularly. Results were presented in tables with percentages and possibly diagrams. The notable responses of caregivers were also cited. Twenty nurses and nine psychiatrists, mostly female, were recruited. They all had participated in experiments of restraint. The self-aggressiveness, the aggressiveness against other persons and agitation were the most frequent indications. In the patients, caregivers identified misunderstanding (79.3%) and anger (75.9%). The majority of nurses (75%) felt that there was an improvement in the caregiver-patient relationship after the episode of restraint compared to what it had been in the moments preceding this measure. The emotional experience of caregivers was rich, intense and predominantly negative type of frustration (35% of nurses; 66.7% of doctors), anger (30 and 33.3%) and lack of feeling (35 and 44.4%). The feelings of doctors and nurses were not completely similar. For caregivers it was "a difficult but necessary experience" (82.75%), "an act of care and safety" (68.9%). All psychiatrists and almost half of the nurses (45%) said they did not feel the same when they used seclusion. In their opinion, seclusion entailed a less painful experience because of its therapeutic properties. More than half of the

  18. Assessment of molecular structure using frame-independent orientational restraints derived from residual dipolar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Protein Engineering Network Centers of Excellence and Departments of Medical Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2000-11-15

    Residual dipolar couplings measured in weakly aligning liquid-crystalline solvent contain valuable information on the structure of biomolecules in solution. Here we demonstrate that dipolar couplings (DCs) can be used to derive a comprehensive set of pairwise angular restraints that do not depend on the orientation of the alignment tensor principal axes. These restraints can be used to assess the agreement between a trial protein structure and a set of experimental dipolar couplings by means of a graphic representation termed a 'DC consistency map'. Importantly, these maps can be used to recognize structural elements consistent with the experimental DC data and to identify structural parameters that require further refinement, which could prove important for the success of DC-based structure calculations. This approach is illustrated for the 42 kDa maltodextrin-binding protein.

  19. Suspension restraint - Induced hypokinesia and antiorthostasis as a simulation of weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Deavers, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Muscle, renal, fluid and electrolyte responses were measured in suspended rats; the hind limbs are non-load bearing and the front limbs can be used for feeding and grooming. Hind limb hypokinesia reverses after removal from the suspension harness. This suspension system is adjustable for a head-down tilt to produce antiorthostatic responses which are also reversible. Responses to hypokinesia or antiorthostatic hypokinesia for up to 14 days were measured, e.g., muscle atrophy: soleus greater than gastrocnemius equals plantaris greater than extensor digitorum longus, kaliuresis, and increased excretion of urea, NH3, and 3 methylhistidine. Muscle protein loss, a response to a reduction in RNA, is also reversible. A head-down tilt for 7-14 days results in diuresis and natriuresis. These changes are reversed within 24 hours after removal from the restraint harness. Physiological effects of suspension restraint can be used to simulate and predict responses to microgravity exposure.

  20. Differential effects of repeated restraint stress on pulsatile lutenizing hormone secretion in female Fischer, Lewis and Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X F; Edward, J; Mitchell, J C; Shao, B; Bowes, J E; Coen, C W; Lightman, S L; O'Byrne, K T

    2004-07-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and can suppress pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, resulting in reproductive dysfunction. The histocompatible inbred Fischer and Lewis rat strains exhibit marked phenotypic differences in the activity of the HPA axis, the former being more reactive. Using Fischer, Lewis and Wistar rats, we assessed effects of repeated restraint stress on pulsatile LH secretion. Adult rats were ovariectomized and fitted with cardiac catheters. Blood samples were collected at 5-min intervals for 3-5 h for detection of LH. Less frequent samples were collected for corticosterone measurement. After 2 h, rats were restrained for 60 min. The same regimen was repeated four times at 6-day intervals. The mean peak corticosterone levels achieved during the first restraint in Fischer rats were significantly higher than those in Lewis and Wistar rats. By the time of the fourth episode of restraint, there had been some adaptation of the corticosterone response in the Fischer, but not in the Lewis or Wistar rats. LH pulses were interrupted during the 1st restraint in all experimental groups, although only Fischer rats showed suppression of LH pulses during the subsequent 2-h postrestraint period. During the fourth restraint, LH pulse frequency was still reduced in Wistar, but not in Fischer and Lewis rats, both of which showed a complete habituation. These results suggest that differential control mechanisms underlie the response of the HPA and HPG axes to repeated restraint stress.

  1. Nursing staff members' intentions to use physical restraints with older people: testing the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, P; Mendelsson, G

    2001-09-01

    To examine nursing staff members' attitudes, subjective norms, moral obligations and intentions to use physical restraints, using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA). During the last two decades an extensive body of research has examined nurses' attitudes as one of the main factors affecting the decision to use or not to use physical restraints with older persons. However, no studies have examined empirically the antecedents to nurses' intentions to use physical restraints within a theoretically based framework. A correlational design was used with 303 nursing staff members from an 800-bed elder care hospital in central Israel. Participants completed a questionnaire including questions based on the TRA as well as socio-demographic and professional characteristics. Regression analyses found attitudes, subjective norms and moral considerations to be significantly associated to intention to use physical restraints with older people. The TRA explained 48% of the variance in nurses' intentions. The TRA proved to be a useful framework for examining nurses' intentions to use physical restraints. Nurses' attitudes, beliefs and expectations of significant others should be examined before implementing educational programmes regarding the use of physical restraints.

  2. Social Appearance Anxiety and Dietary Restraint as Mediators between Perfectionism and Binge Eating: A Six Month Three Wave Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosof, Leigh C.; Levinson, Cheri A.

    2016-01-01

    Binge eating is related to perfectionism and restrained eating. However, the mechanisms underlying these relationships are not well understood. It is possible that social anxiety, specifically social appearance anxiety (i.e., the fear of overall appearance evaluation), influences the relationship between binge eating, perfectionism, and dietary restraint. In the current study (N = 300 women), we tested the relationship between dietary restraint, social appearance anxiety, concern over mistakes (a component of perfectionism), and binge eating in prospective data (three time points: at baseline, at two month, and at six month follow up). We found that social appearance anxiety, dietary restraint, and concern over mistakes each predicted binge eating at baseline. Only social appearance anxiety prospectively predicted binge eating when accounting for all variables. Further, in the tested model, social appearance anxiety mediated the relationship between concern over mistakes and binge eating across six months. On the contrary, dietary restraint did not mediate the relationship between concern over mistakes and binge eating in the tested model. The finding that social appearance anxiety served as a mediator between concern over mistakes and binge eating, but that dietary restraint did not, implies that social appearance anxiety may be a more salient prospective predictor of binge eating than dietary restraint. Intervening on social appearance anxiety may be important in the treatment and prevention of binge eating. PMID:27742237

  3. Seat Integrated and Conventional Restraints: A Study of Crash Injury/Fatality Rates in Rollovers

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanaban, Jeya; Burnett, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This study used police-reported motor vehicle crash data from eleven states to determine ejection, fatality, and fatal/serious injury risks for belted drivers in vehicles with conventional seatbelts compared to belted drivers in vehicles with seat integrated restraint systems (SIRS). Risks were compared for 11,159 belted drivers involved in single- or multiple-vehicle rollover crashes. Simple driver ejection (partial and complete), fatality, and injury rates were derived, and logistic regress...

  4. Environmental Enrichment Blunts Ethanol Consumption after Restraint Stress in C57BL/6 Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Marianno

    Full Text Available Elevated alcohol intake after abstinence is a key feature of the addiction process. Some studies have shown that environmental enrichment (EE affects ethanol intake and other reinforcing effects. However, different EE protocols may vary in their ability to influence alcohol consumption and stress-induced intake. The present study evaluated whether short (3 h or continuous (24 h EE protocols affect ethanol consumption after periods of withdrawal. Mice were challenged with stressful stimuli (24 h isolation and restraint stress to evaluate the effects of stress on drinking. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a two-bottle choice drinking-in-the-dark paradigm for 15 days (20% ethanol and water, 2 h/day, acquisition phase. Control mice were housed under standard conditions (SC. In the first experiment, one group of mice was housed under EE conditions 24 h/day (EE24h. In the second experiment, the exposure to EE was reduced to 3 h/day (EE3h. After the acquisition phase, the animals were deprived of ethanol for 6 days, followed by 2 h ethanol access once a week. Animals were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM during ethanol withdrawal. During the last 2 weeks, the mice were exposed to 24 h ethanol access. A 1-h restraint stress test was performed immediately before the last ethanol exposure. EE24h but not EE3h increased anxiety-like behavior during withdrawal compared to controls. Neither EE24h nor EE3h affected ethanol consumption during the 2 h weekly exposure periods. However, EE24h and EE3h mice that were exposed to acute restraint stress consumed less ethanol than controls during a 24 h ethanol access. These results showed that EE reduces alcohol intake after an acute restraint stress.

  5. Housing in Pyramid Counteracts Neuroendocrine and Oxidative Stress Caused by Chronic Restraint in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Surekha Bhat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  6. Stigma and Management on People with Severe Mental Disorders with “Pasung” (Physical restraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weny Lestari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available background: Mental disorders remain serious mental health problems in Indonesia. In 2007 there were 0,46 percent of the total population in Indonesia had high risk of schizophrenia. There are many people with severe mental disorders who do not receive medical treatment or dropped out from medical treatment and then put in physical restraint. Methods:The analysis was based on previous study on the elimination program for physical restraints in 2011. The methods were by collecting news, research results and reviews about stigma and management on people with severe mental disorders. results showed that suspect mental disorders people who had physical restraints by their families was the last alternative of mental disorders management after all medical treatment seek by the families. But the families and communities unknowing early detection and post-treatment management at the Mental Health Hospital causes the patient did not treated properly. People with mental disorders frequently also stigmatized on their neighbourhood. The stigma attached to the patient them selves and their families. Health and socio-cultural’s consequences of stigma in people with mental disorders were as not treated optimally, dropout from the treatment, had physical restraint and incorrect understanding about people with mental disorders. conclutions:The conclusions are that it needs to socialize about early detection of mental disorders sympton to community to prevent delays on early phase treatment that could be cured. Besides empowering people is needed to improve knowledge about mental disorders and emotional disturbance at certain levels in order to avoid the stigma against people with mental disorders.

  7. Maternal restraint and external eating behaviour are associated with formula use or shorter breastfeeding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A

    2014-05-01

    Maternal eating behaviour (e.g. restraint, disinhibition) has been associated with maternal child-feeding style (e.g. pressure to eat, restricting intake, monitoring) for children over the age of two years. In particular, mothers high in restraint are significantly more likely to restrict and monitor their child's intake of food. Research has not however examined the impact of maternal eating behaviour upon earlier infant feeding. A controlling maternal child-feeding style has been linked with shorter breastfeeding duration and earlier introduction of solid foods but the relationship between infant milk feeding and maternal eating behaviour has not been explored despite links between maternal weight, body image and breastfeeding duration. The aim of the current study was to explore associations between maternal restraint, emotional and external eating and breastfeeding initiation and duration. Seven hundred and fifty-six mothers with an infant aged 6-12months completed a copy of the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire and reported breastfeeding duration and formula use up to six months postpartum. Mothers high in restraint and external eating were significantly more likely to formula feed from birth, to breastfeed for a shorter duration and to introduce formula milk sooner than those lower in these behaviours. Moreover these behaviours were associated with reporting greater control during milk feeding by feeding to a mother-led rather than baby-led routine. Maternal eating behaviour may therefore affect breastfeeding initiation and continuation and is an important element for discussion for those working to support new mothers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Fiscal Restraint and Social Expenditure: Israel's Experience in the 1980s

    OpenAIRE

    Yaakov Kop

    1989-01-01

    The development of Israel's government social expenditures during the economic stabilization period of the mid-1980s is analyzed, with specific reference to the changing needs for such expenditure arising from demographic changes. The results reveal a real cut in direct services. The implicit strategy relied, for some two to three years, on restraint of total expenditures on direct services in real terms, with real erosion in services arising from growth in the size of beneficiary groups.

  9. Social influence on temptation: perceived descriptive norms, temptation and restraint, and problem drinking among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Dipali Venkataraman; Neighbors, Clayton

    2013-12-01

    Temptation and restraint have long been associated with problematic drinking. Among college students, social norms are one of the strongest predictors of problematic drinking. To date, no studies have examined the association between temptation and restraint and perceived descriptive norms on drinking and alcohol-related problems among college students. The purpose of this study was to examine whether perceived descriptive norms moderated the relationship between temptation and restraint and drinking outcomes among college students. Participants were 1095 college students from a large, public, culturally-diverse, southern university who completed an online survey about drinking behaviors and related attitudes. Drinks per week and alcohol-related problems were examined as a function of perceived descriptive norms, Cognitive Emotional Preoccupation (CEP) (temptation), and Cognitive Behavioral Control (CBC) (restraint). Additionally, drinking outcomes were examined as a function of the two-way interactions between CEP and perceived descriptive norms and CBC and perceived descriptive norms. Results indicated that CEP and perceived descriptive norms were associated with drinking outcomes. CBC was not associated with drinking outcomes. Additionally, perceived descriptive norms moderated the association between CEP and drinks per week and CEP and alcohol-related problems. There was a positive association between CEP and drinks per week and CEP and alcohol-related problems, especially for those higher on perceived descriptive norms. College students who are very tempted to drink may drink more heavily and experience alcohol-related problems more frequently if they have greater perceptions that the typical student at their university/college drinks a lot. © 2013.

  10. Has Child Restraint System Use Increased among Parents of Children in Shantou, China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqian Lei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine parents’ use of child restraint systems (CRS, and determine if parents’ knowledge of, attitude toward, and use behavior of child restraint systems have improved following enactment of child restraint use laws in other cities. Design: Observations and a cross-sectional survey of drivers transporting children 17 years and under were conducted at the gate of the schools and parking lots of hospitals in Shantou. Observers recorded the seating location of child passengers, the type of restraint, and appropriate use of CRS and safety belts based on the observation. Knowledge of and attitudes towards use of CRS were reported by the driver following observation. Results: Approximately 6.6% of passengers aged 0–12 were in CRS; rate of forward-facing CRS in children aged 3–5 (9.9% was higher than rear-facing CRS for children aged 0–2 (1.1% and booster seat use among children aged 6–12 (0.1%. Children younger than four years old (OR = 3.395, 95% CI = 2.125–5.424, drivers having a college or higher lever education (OR = 2.908, 95% CI = 1.878–4.500 and drivers wearing seatbelt (OR = 3.194, 95% CI = 1.605–6.356 had greater odds of CRS use. Over half (56.6% of parents might or would use CRS if they could rent CRSs with fees. Conclusions: The rate of CRS is still low in Shantou. Comprehensive public education programs supported by legislation might be an effective way to improve child passenger safety. Renting CRSs to parents could be a new approach to encourage use.

  11. Depressed Affect and Dietary Restraint in Adolescent Boys’ and Girls’ Eating in the Absence of Hunger

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Nichole R.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Pickworth, Courtney K.; Grygorenko, Mariya V.; Radin, Rachel M.; Vannucci, Anna; Shank, Lisa M.; Brady, Sheila M; Courville, Amber B.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    Data suggest that depressed affect and dietary restraint are related to disinhibited eating patterns in children and adults. Yet, experimental research has not determined to what extent depressed affect acutely affects eating in the absence of physiological hunger (EAH) in adolescents. In the current between-subjects experimental study, we measured EAH in 182 adolescent (13-17y) girls (65%) and boys as ad libitum palatable snack food intake after youth ate to satiety from a buffet meal. Just ...

  12. Association between weight and risk of crash-related injuries for children in child restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonfrillo, Mark R; Elliott, Michael R; Flannagan, Carol A; Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-12-01

    To determine the association between weight and the risk of injury in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) for children 1 through 8 years of age who were using child restraints. This was a cross-sectional study of children 1 to 8 years of age in MVCs, in which cases from the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System were used. Abbreviated Injury Scale scores of ≥2 indicated clinically significant injuries. The National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System study sample included 650 children 1 to 5 years of age in forward-facing child restraints who weighed 20 to 65 lb and 344 children 3 to 8 years of age in belt-positioning booster seats who weighed 30 to 100 lb. With adjustment for seating position, type of vehicle, direction of impact, crash severity, and vehicle model year, there was no association between absolute weight and clinically significant injuries in either age group (odds ratio: 1.17 [95% confidence interval: 0.96-1.42] for children 1-5 years of age in forward-facing child restraints and 1.22 [95% confidence interval: 0.96-1.55] for children 3-8 years of age in belt-positioning booster seats). The risk of clinically significant injuries was not associated with weight across a broad weight range in this sample of children in MVCs who were using child restraint systems. Parents should continue to restrain their children according to current recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

  13. Compact water depth sensor with LPFG using the photoelastic effect and heat-shrinkable tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takama, Shinya; Kudomi, Takamasa; Ohashi, Masaharu; Miyoshi, Yuji

    2011-12-01

    We propose a compact water depth sensor with a long period fiber grating (LPFG) using a heat-shrinkable tube. The pressure property of the LPFG is investigated experimentally to confirm the feasibility of the water depth sensor. Moreover, the water depth in the 2m long water-filled pipe is successfully estimated by the proposed water sensors.

  14. Specifications and design criteria for innovative corrosion monitoring and (downhole) sensor systems, including sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Kermen. E.

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the corrosion monitoring and corrosion sensor systems, for use in CO2 storage wells, including a sensitivity analysis. The feasibility for using new sensors to measure well integrity based on electrochemical principles is investigated. The use of corrosion sensors in CO2

  15. Vervet monkeys solve a multiplayer "forbidden circle game" by queuing to learn restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruteau, Cécile; van Damme, Eric; Noë, Ronald

    2013-04-22

    In social dilemmas, the ability of individuals to coordinate their actions is crucial to reach group optima. Unless exacted by power or force, coordination in humans relies on a common understanding of the problem, which is greatly facilitated by communication. The lack of means of consultation about the nature of the problem and how to solve it may explain why multiagent coordination in nonhuman vertebrates has commonly been observed only when multiple individuals react instantaneously to a single stimulus, either natural or experimentally simulated, for example a predator, a prey, or a neighboring group. Here we report how vervet monkeys solved an experimentally induced coordination problem. In each of three groups, we trained a low-ranking female, the "provider," to open a container holding a large amount of food, which the providers only opened when all individuals dominant to them ("dominants") stayed outside an imaginary "forbidden circle" around it. Without any human guidance, the dominants learned restraint one by one, in hierarchical order from high to low. Once all dominants showed restraint immediately at the start of the trial, the providers opened the container almost instantly, saving all individuals opportunity costs due to lost foraging time. Solving this game required trial-and-error learning based on individual feedback from the provider to each dominant, and all dominants being patient enough to wait outside the circle while others learned restraint. Communication, social learning, and policing by high-ranking animals played no perceptible role. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Protective effect of apple polyphenols against stress-provoked influenza viral infection in restraint mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Rong; Wang, Min; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Chen, Bang-Tian; Lu, Chun-Ni; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Chen, Jian-Xin; Kurihara, Hiroshi

    2011-04-27

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of apple polyphenol extract (APE) against influenza virus in mice loaded with restraint stress. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint of APE was recorded, and the percentage composition of polyphenols was determined as 81.7%. Our results showed that restraint stress significantly promoted the mortality and duration of complications of mice infected with the H1N1 virus. However, oral administration of APE (100 and 200 mg/kg) improved the survival rates and prolonged living time of stressed mice infected with influenza virus in a dose-dependent manner. APE was further found to significantly improve the number of immunocytes, ratio of CD4 helper cells, secretion of IL-2, and capabilities of natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity (LU10/spleen) in spleens of restraint-stressed mice. In addition, APE also significantly decreased the level of lipid peroxidation and increased oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) in splenocytes. These results indicated that the protective effects of APE on mice infected with influenza virus were related to the alleviation of stress-induced impairment of immune functions and its antioxidant property might contribute to the immune recovery.

  17. Evaluation of Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and Multi-Purpose Crew Restraint Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2005-01-01

    Within the scope of the Multi-purpose Crew Restraints for Long Duration Spaceflights project, funded by Code U, it was proposed to conduct a series of evaluations on the ground and on the KC-135 to investigate the human factors issues concerning confined/unique workstations, such as the design of crew restraints. The usability of multiple crew restraints was evaluated for use with the Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and for performing general purpose tasks. The purpose of the KC-135 microgravity evaluation was to: (1) to investigate the usability and effectiveness of the concepts developed, (2) to gather recommendations for further development of the concepts, and (3) to verify the validity of the existing requirements. Some designs had already been tested during a March KC-135 evaluation, and testing revealed the need for modifications/enhancements. This flight was designed to test the new iterations, as well as some new concepts. This flight also involved higher fidelity tasks in the LSG, and the addition of load cells on the gloveports.

  18. Myricetin Attenuates Depressant-Like Behavior in Mice Subjected to Repeated Restraint Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zegang Ma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has shown that oxidative stress may be implicated in chronic stress-induced depression. Several flavonoids with anti-oxidative effects have been proved to be anti-depressive. Myricetin is a well-defined flavonoid with the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and neuroprotective properties. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible effects of chronic administration of myricetin on depressant-like behaviors in mice subjected to repeated restraint (4 h/day for 21 days. Our results showed that myricetin administration specifically reduced the immobility time in mice exposed to chronic stress, as tested in both forced swimming test and tail suspension test. Myricetin treatment improved activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX in the hippocampus of stressed mice. In addition, myricetin treatment decreased plasma corticosterone levels of those mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. The effects of myricetin on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in hippocampus were also investigated. The results revealed that myricetin normalized the decreased BDNF levels in mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. These findings provided more evidence that chronic administration of myricetin improves helpless behaviors. The protective effects of myricetin might be partially mediated by an influence on BDNF levels and might be attributed to myricetin-mediated anti-oxidative stress in the hippocampus.

  19. Exposure to acute restraint stress reinstates nicotine-induced place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Rodrigo M; Cruz, Fabio C; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2009-02-01

    Tobacco addiction is associated with high rates of relapse to drug use even after prolonged periods of abstinence. Relapse can occur upon reexposure to the drug of abuse, exposure to stress or to stimuli associated with drug consumption. The reinstatement of conditioning place preference (CPP) provides a simple and easy approach to investigate the mechanisms for drug relapse. We evaluated whether exposure to restraint stress could reinstate nicotine-induced CPP 1 or 15 days after its extinction. Nicotine produced place preference to the compartment paired with its injections during conditioning (0.16 mg/kg, subcutaneous; four drug sessions). Once established, nicotine CPP was extinguished by alternate exposure to each compartment after a saline injection (four exposures to each compartment). After this extinction phase, the reinstatement of place conditioning was investigated. For this purpose, rats were exposed to 30-min restraint stress 1 or 15 days after the extinction test, then immediately tested for reinstatement of CPP. Our results show that exposure to restraint stress reinstated CPP 1 and 15 days after extinction. Our study indicates for the first time that the vulnerability to stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine CPP is long-lasting, corroborating clinical studies showing that stress is positively associated with relapse to tobacco use even after a long period of nicotine withdrawal.

  20. Social isolation alters central nervous system monoamine content in prairie voles following acute restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Neal; Anderson, Eden M; Moenk, Deirdre; Trahanas, Diane; Matuszewich, Leslie; Grippo, Angela J

    2018-04-01

    Animal models have shown that social isolation and other forms of social stress lead to depressive- and anxiety-relevant behaviors, as well as neuroendocrine and physiological dysfunction. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of prior social isolation on neurotransmitter content following acute restraint in prairie voles. Animals were either paired with a same-sex sibling or isolated for 4 weeks. Plasma adrenal hormones and ex vivo tissue concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites were measured following an acute restraint stressor in all animals. Isolated prairie voles displayed significantly increased circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, as well as elevated serotonin and dopamine levels in the hypothalamus, and potentially decreased levels of serotonin in the frontal cortex. However, no group differences in monoamine levels were observed in the hippocampus or raphe. The results suggest that social stress may bias monoamine neurotransmission and stress hormone function to subsequent acute stressors, such as restraint. These findings improve our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the consequences of social stress.

  1. Repeated restraint stress increases basolateral amygdala neuronal activity in an age-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is a precipitating factor for affective disorders such as depression and anxiety. This is associated with the effects of chronic stress on the amygdala. Adolescents may be more vulnerable to the effects of chronic stress, which may be related to its impact on amygdala function. However, the stress-induced changes in amygdala neuronal activity, and the age-dependent impact of chronic stress on amygdala neuronal activity have not been studied in depth. In this study, we investigated how repeated restraint impacts basolateral amygdala (BLA) projection neuron activity in both adolescent and adult rats. Using in vivo extracellular recordings from anesthetized rats, we found that repeated restraint increased the number of spontaneously firing neurons in the BLA of adolescent rats, but did not significantly increase the firing rate. In contrast, repeated restraint increased the firing rate of BLA neurons in adult rats, but did not change the number of spontaneously firing neurons. This is the first direct evidence of how stress differently impacts amygdala physiology in adolescent and adult rats. These findings may shed light on the mechanism by which chronic stress may age-dependently precipitate psychiatric disorders. PMID:22986163

  2. Restraint stress enhances arterial thrombosis in vivo--role of the sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stämpfli, Simon F; Camici, Giovanni G; Keller, Stephan; Rozenberg, Izabela; Arras, Margarete; Schuler, Beat; Gassmann, Max; Garcia, Irene; Lüscher, Thomas F; Tanner, Felix C

    2014-01-01

    Stress is known to correlate with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this correlation are not known. This study was designed to assess the effect of experimental stress on arterial thrombus formation, the key event in acute myocardial infarction. Mice exposed to 20 h of restraint stress displayed an increased arterial prothrombotic potential as assessed by photochemical injury-induced time to thrombotic occlusion. This increase was prevented by chemical sympathectomy performed through 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Blood-born tissue factor (TF) activity was enhanced by stress and this increase could be prevented by 6-OHDA treatment. Vessel wall TF, platelet count, platelet aggregation, coagulation times (PT, aPTT), fibrinolytic system (t-PA and PAI-1) and tail bleeding time remained unaltered. Telemetric analysis revealed only minor hemodynamic changes throughout the stress protocol. Plasma catecholamines remained unaffected after restraint stress. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plasma levels were unchanged and inhibition of TNF-α had no effect on stress-enhanced thrombosis. These results indicate that restraint stress enhances arterial thrombosis via the sympathetic nervous system. Blood-borne TF contributes, at least in part, to the observed effect whereas vessel wall TF, platelets, circulating coagulation factors, fibrinolysis and inflammation do not appear to play a role. These findings shed new light on the understanding of stress-induced cardiovascular events.

  3. Optical fibre microwire sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, G.; Belal, Mohammad; Jung, Y.; Song, Z.; Xu, F.; Newson, T.P.; Richardson, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews sensing applications of optical fibre microwires and nanowires. In addition to the usual benefits of sensors based on optical fibres, these sensors are extremely compact and have fast response speeds. In this review sensors will be grouped in three categories according to their morphology: linear sensors, resonant sensors and tip sensors. While linear and resonant sensors mainly exploit the fraction of power propagating outside the microwire physical boundary, tip sensors t...

  4. Ripeness sensor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 [times] 10[sup 12] BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on [sup 1]H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on [sup 1]H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  5. Consumers' and their supporters' perspectives on barriers and strategies to reducing seclusion and restraint in mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Lisa M; Roper, Catherine E; Hamilton, Bridget E; Tellez, Juan José; McSherry, Bernadette M

    2016-01-01

    Objective This paper examines the perspectives of consumers and their supporters regarding the use of seclusion and restraint in mental health settings. Methods Five focus groups for consumers and five focus groups for supporters were conducted in four Australian cities and in one rural location. The 66 participants were asked about strategies to reduce or eliminate the use of seclusion and restraint in mental health settings. Results All participants supported the reduction of the use of seclusion and restraint. Barriers to reducing these practices related to the environment, the effects of drug and alcohol issues, lack of a human rights focus and poor recognition of trauma, stigma and discrimination. Strategies for reducing or eliminating seclusion and restraint included workforce development, environmental and cultural changes. Conclusions Participants clearly identified that the status quo needs to change and conveyed urgency for action. Participants suggested that the involvement of supporters and a range of consumer roles are integral to reducing the use of seclusion and restraint. The findings support the current policy emphasis of working towards the elimination of these practices. What is known about the topic? Mental health policies across many jurisdictions support the reduction and elimination of restraint and seclusion. Evidence suggests those subjected to restraint and seclusion largely experience a range of harmful consequences. No studies focus on the views of supporters of consumers regarding the reduction and elimination of seclusion and restraint, whereas the views of consumers appear in a minority of international studies. What does this paper add? The research enabled an opportunity to hear from people who have been personally affected by and/or have lived experience of these coercive practices. Participants identified local reforms that can uphold the human rights of consumers. They suggested practices to increase accountability, peer support

  6. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  7. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  8. Pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  9. Testosterone depletion increases the susceptibility of brain tissue to oxidative damage in a restraint stress mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seung-Wan; Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Kim, Dong-Woon; Ahn, Yo-Chan; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    Among sex hormones, estrogen is particularly well known to act as neuroprotective agent. Unlike estrogen, testosterone has not been well investigated in regard to its effects on the brain, especially under psychological stress. To investigate the role of testosterone in oxidative brain injuries under psychological stress, we adapted an orchiectomy and restraint stress model. BALB/c mice were subjected to either an orchiectomy or sham operation. After allowing 15 days for recovery, mice were re-divided into four groups according to exposure of restraint stress: sham, sham plus stress, orchiectomy, and orchiectomy plus stress. Serum testosterone was undetectable in orchiectomized groups and restraint-induced stress significantly reduced testosterone levels in sham plus stress group. The serum levels of corticosterone and adrenaline were notably elevated by restraint stress, and these elevated hormones were markedly augmented by orchiectomy. Two oxidative stressors and biomarkers for lipid and protein peroxidation were significantly increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus by restraint stress, while the reverse pattern was observed in antioxidant enzymes. These results were supported by histopathological findings, with 4-hydroxynonenal staining for oxidative injury and Fluoro-Jade B staining showing the degenerating neurons. The aforementioned patterns of oxidative injury were accelerated by orchiectomy. These findings strongly suggest the conclusion that testosterone exerts a protective effect against oxidative brain damage, especially under stressed conditions. Unlike estrogen, the effects of testosterone on the brain have not been thoroughly investigated. In order to investigate the role of testosterone in oxidative brain injuries under psychological stress, we adapted an orchiectomy and restraint stress model. Orchiectomy markedly augmented the restraint stress-induced elevation of serum corticosterone and adrenaline levels as well as oxidative alterations

  10. Integrated fiber optic structural health sensors for inflatable space habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, Osgar John; Garg, Naman; Castellucci, Matthew A.

    2017-04-01

    Inflatable space habitats offer many advantages for future space missions; however, the long term integrity of these flexible structures is a major concern in harsh space environments. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of these structures is essential to ensure safe operation, provide early warnings of damage, and measure structural changes over long periods of time. To address this problem, the authors have integrated distributed fiber optic strain sensors to measure loading and to identify the occurrence and location of damage in the straps and webbing used in the structural restraint layer. The fiber optic sensors employed use Rayleigh backscatter combined with optical frequency domain reflectometry to enable measurement of strain every 0.65 mm (0.026 inches) along the sensor. The Kevlar woven straps that were tested exhibited large permanent deformation during initial cycling and continued to exhibit hysteresis thereafter, but there was a consistent linear relationship between the sensor's measurement and the actual strain applied. Damage was intentionally applied to a tensioned strap, and the distributed strain measurement clearly identified a change in the strain profile centered on the location of the damage. This change in structural health was identified at a loading that was less than half of the ultimate loading that caused a structural failure. This sensing technique will be used to enable integrated SHM sensors to detect loading and damage in future inflatable space habitat structures.

  11. Using Open Geographic Data to Generate Natural Language Descriptions for Hydrological Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Molina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Providing descriptions of isolated sensors and sensor networks in natural language, understandable by the general public, is useful to help users find relevant sensors and analyze sensor data. In this paper, we discuss the feasibility of using geographic knowledge from public databases available on the Web (such as OpenStreetMap, Geonames, or DBpedia to automatically construct such descriptions. We present a general method that uses such information to generate sensor descriptions in natural language. The results of the evaluation of our method in a hydrologic national sensor network showed that this approach is feasible and capable of generating adequate sensor descriptions with a lower development effort compared to other approaches. In the paper we also analyze certain problems that we found in public databases (e.g., heterogeneity, non-standard use of labels, or rigid search methods and their impact in the generation of sensor descriptions.

  12. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  13. Investigation of the feasibility of deep microborehole drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesen, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cohen, J.H. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology, microelectronics, and telemetry technology make it feasible to produce miniature wellbore logging tools and instrumentation. Microboreholes are proposed for subterranean telemetry installations, exploration, reservoir definition, and reservoir monitoring this assumes that very small diameter bores can be produced for significantly lower cost using very small rigs. A microborehole production concept based on small diameter hydraulic or pneumatic powered mechanical drilling, assemblies deployed on coiled tubing is introduced. The concept is evaluated using, basic mechanics and hydraulics, published theories on rock drilling, and commercial simulations. Small commercial drill bits and hydraulic motors were selected for laboratory scale demonstrations. The feasibility of drilling deep, directional, one to two-inch diameter microboreholes has not been challenged by the results to date. Shallow field testing of prototype systems is needed to continue the feasibility investigation.

  14. Sedation and physiologic response to manual restraint after intranasal administration of midazolam in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Lahner, Lesanna L; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; Sladky, Kurt K

    2012-09-01

    Administration of intranasal midazolam (2 mg/kg) was evaluated for sedation and effects on cloacal temperature, respiratory rate, and heart rate in manually restrained Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). Adult parrots (n=9) were administered either midazolam (2 mg/kg) or an equal volume of saline solution intranasally before a 15-minute manual restraint in a complete crossover study. Respiratory rate and sedation scores were recorded before and during capture and during and after 15 minutes of manual restraint. Heart rate and cloacal temperature were recorded during manual restraint. After restraint, the parrots received intranasal flumazenil (0.05 mg/kg) or an equal volume of saline solution, and the recovery time was recorded. In those birds that received midazolam, sedation was observed within 3 minutes of administration, and vocalization, flight, and defense responses were significantly reduced during capture. During manual restraint, the mean rate of cloacal temperature increase was significantly slower and remained significantly lower in birds that received midazolam compared with controls. Mean respiratory rates were significantly lower for up to 12 minutes in parrots that received midazolam compared with those receiving saline solution. Flumazenil antagonized the effects of midazolam within 10 minutes. No overt clinical adverse effects to intranasal midazolam and flumazenil administration were observed. Further studies on the safety of intranasal midazolam and flumazenil in this species are warranted.

  15. Behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of the exposure to chronic restraint or variable stress in early adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fábio C; Marin, Marcelo T; Leão, Rodrigo M; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2012-02-01

    Stress events during adolescence may contribute to the expression or exacerbation of physical and behavioral disorders. However, little attention has been given to the physiological and behavioral changes promoted by stress during this period of ontogeny. In the present study we investigated, in adolescent male rats, the effects of repeated exposure to restraint or variable stress on: (a) locomotor activity and corticosterone levels after exposure to a novel environment; (b) corticosterone levels in response to the exposure to restraint stress; and (c) changes in body, thymus and adrenal weights. The results demonstrated that repeated exposure to restraint or variable stress reduced the locomotor response, but did not affect corticosterone secretion, in response to a novel environment. Moreover, both chronic stress procedures did not change corticosterone secretion in response to acute restraint stress. Furthermore, our results showed that repeated restraint, but not variable stress, produced a decrease in body weight along the stress exposure. Finally, we observed that the exposure to variable stress reduced the thymus relative weight. Taken together our results suggest that behavioral and physiological changes induced by exposure to chronic stress during adolescence depend on the stress regimen. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Restraint training for awake functional brain scanning of rodents can cause long-lasting changes in pain and stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lucie A.; Bauer, Lucy C.; Pitcher, Mark H.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the increased interest in longitudinal brain imaging of awake rodents, it is important to understand both the short-term and long-term effects of restraint on sensory and emotional processing in the brain. To understand the effects of repeated restraint on pain behaviors and stress responses, we modeled a restraint protocol similar to those used to habituate rodents for magnetic resonance imaging scanning, and studied sensory sensitivity and stress hormone responses over 5 days. To uncover lasting effects of training, we also looked at responses to the formalin pain test 2 weeks later. We found that while restraint causes acute increases in the stress hormone corticosterone, it can also cause lasting reductions in nociceptive behavior in the formalin test, coupled with heightened corticosterone levels and increased activation of the “nociceptive” central nucleus of the amygdala, as seen by Fos protein expression. These results suggest that short-term repeated restraint, similar to that used to habituate rats for awake functional brain scanning, could potentially cause long-lasting changes in physiological and brain responses to pain stimuli that are stress-related, and therefore could potentially confound the functional activation patterns seen in awake rodents in response to pain stimuli. PMID:27058679

  17. Effective applied moment in circumferential through-wall cracked pipes for leak-before-break evaluation considering pipe restraint effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeji; Hwang, Il-Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Jin, E-mail: yjoh2@kepco-enc.com [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Inc., Gimcheon 39660 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Effective applied moment at pipe cracked section considering the pipe restraint effect. • Verification of the proposed evaluation methods using finite element analyses. • Applicability for distributed external load of the proposed methods. - Abstract: In the leak-before-break (LBB) design of nuclear power plants, crack opening displacement (COD) is an essential element for determining the length of the leakage size crack. Recent researches regarding the evaluation of COD have indicated that the current practice of the LBB evaluation without consideration of the pressure induced bending (PIB) restraint overestimates COD, which in turn gives non-conservative results. Under a free-ended boundary condition, however, the applied moment at cracked section also can be overestimated, which has conservative effects on LBB evaluation. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate pipe restraint effects on the applied moment as well as on COD to keep the constancy. In this paper, an evaluation method for the effect of the PIB restraint on COD and an effective applied moment (=crack driving force) at cracked section was developed. Both the linear elastic and elastic–plastic behaviors of the crack were considered. By comparing the behaviors with 3-D finite element analysis results from earlier studies, it was confirmed that the proposed methods make accurate estimations of the PIB restraint effect on COD. Next, the applicability of the proposed method to other types of external loading conditions was examined.

  18. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  19. Buckle up safely: a cluster randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a pre-school based program to increase appropriate use of child restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Kate

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Road traffic crashes for car occupants are a leading cause of death and serious injury in children from high and middle income countries globally. Correct use of appropriate child restraints can significantly reduce death and serious injury but there is a need for well powered trials to examine effectiveness of programs to increase optimal child restraint practices. The aim of this trial is to examine the effectiveness of a comprehensive intervention to increase the use of appropriate child restraints, and decrease incorrect use of child restraints in pre-school aged children traveling in cars. Methods and Design A cluster randomised controlled trial will be conducted, involving 28 pre-school or childcare centres in low income areas of Sydney, Australia, over one calendar year. The intervention is an educational program involving an in-service for centre staff, distribution of educational materials to parents, a parent workshop demonstrating restraint use, subsidised restraints for parents in need, and vouchers for a free restraint checking service. Blinded assessors will observe restraint use at all centres at the end of the calendar year. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis; the primary analysis will compare the proportion of each of the two outcome measures (use of appropriate restraints, and incorrect use of restraints at each centre between intervention and control groups. Detailed process evaluation will be conducted, including examination of implementation and utilisation of various elements of the program by both centres and families. Discussion This assessor blinded cluster randomised trial is powered to provide credible evidence about the efficacy of an education and distribution program in a pre-school setting to increase appropriate use, and decrease incorrect use of child restraints. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000612213.

  20. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Buechel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/ stress hormone/ allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation, and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 mo. and aged (21 mo. male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress groups (n = 9-12/ group. We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the three hour restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 hours after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  1. Striving for balance between caring and restraint: young adults' experiences with parental multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Julie Y; Larsen, Dorte; Brødsgaard, Anne

    2017-05-01

    To explore and describe how young adults between 18-25 years of age experienced growing up with a parent with multiple sclerosis and how these experiences continue to influence their daily lives. Chronic parental illness is occurring in about 10% of families worldwide, but little is known about how the children experience growing up with a parent with multiple sclerosis during their childhood and into young adulthood. We chose a qualitative design using a phenomenological approach based on Giorgi. Exploratory and open-ended interviews with 14 young adults were conducted. The essence of the phenomenon of having a parent with multiple sclerosis was synthesized into 'Striving for balance between caring and restraint' from two themes 'caring' and 'restraint' and eight subthemes. Participants' experiences of caring for parents with multiple sclerosis continued influencing their other close relationships, in which they tended to assume responsibility while concealing some of their feelings and desires. Most participants showed restraint among parents with and without multiple sclerosis, friends and partners. It seems that one of the greatest challenges of having a parent with multiple sclerosis is achieving a balance between caring for others and asserting one's own desires. Healthcare professionals can support the family by encouraging family members to participate in consultations and to assist the parents in providing information about multiple sclerosis and its symptoms to the children. Parents might need assistance in applying for help with domestic chores or referrals to support groups for their children or other family members. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effects of upgraded child restraint law designed to increase booster seat use in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kainan; Bauer, Michael J; Hardman, Susan

    2010-09-01

    The goal was to examine the association between the New York State (NYS) upgraded child restraint law (UCRL) implemented in 2005 and the traffic injury rate among 4- to 6-year-old children in New York State. A before/after comparison study of population-based, traffic injury rates for 4- to 6-year-old children, using 0- to 3-year-old children as a comparison group, was performed. The effects of UCRL on injury rates among 0- to 3-year-old and 4- to 6-year-old motor vehicle passengers were estimated by using monthly injury count data from the NYS Department of Motor Vehicles Accident Information System. Children 4 to 6 years of age experienced an 18% reduction in traffic injury rate (adjusted rate ratio [aRR]: 0.82 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79-0.85]) after UCRL implementation, whereas the injury rate for children 0 to 3 years of age, who were not directly affected by the UCRL, did not change appreciably (aRR: 0.95 [95% CI: 0.90-0.99]). In Poisson regression analysis, the aRR for injury for 4- to 6-year-old children was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.92-1.22]) with adjustment for monthly child restraint use rates, which reveals that the significant reduction in the injury rate among 4- to 6-year-old children was mainly attributable to the 72% increase in the child restraint use rate after UCRL implementation (from 29% before UCRL implementation to 50% after implementation). This is the first study comparing traffic injury rates for booster seat-aged children before and after implementation of the booster seat law in a single state.

  3. Systematic evaluation of CS-Rosetta for membrane protein structure prediction with sparse NOE restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Katrin; Fisette, Olivier; Braun, Tatjana; Lange, Oliver F; Hummer, Gerhard; Schäfer, Lars V

    2017-05-01

    We critically test and validate the CS-Rosetta methodology for de novo structure prediction of α-helical membrane proteins (MPs) from NMR data, such as chemical shifts and NOE distance restraints. By systematically reducing the number and types of NOE restraints, we focus on determining the regime in which MP structures can be reliably predicted and pinpoint the boundaries of the approach. Five MPs of known structure were used as test systems, phototaxis sensory rhodopsin II (pSRII), a subdomain of pSRII, disulfide binding protein B (DsbB), microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1), and translocator protein (TSPO). For pSRII and DsbB, where NMR and X-ray structures are available, resolution-adapted structural recombination (RASREC) CS-Rosetta yields structures that are as close to the X-ray structure as the published NMR structures if all available NMR data are used to guide structure prediction. For mPGES-1 and Bacillus cereus TSPO, where only X-ray crystal structures are available, highly accurate structures are obtained using simulated NMR data. One main advantage of RASREC CS-Rosetta is its robustness with respect to even a drastic reduction of the number of NOEs. Close-to-native structures were obtained with one randomly picked long-range NOEs for every 14, 31, 38, and 8 residues for full-length pSRII, the pSRII subdomain, TSPO, and DsbB, respectively, in addition to using chemical shifts. For mPGES-1, atomically accurate structures could be predicted even from chemical shifts alone. Our results show that atomic level accuracy for helical membrane proteins is achievable with CS-Rosetta using very sparse NOE restraint sets to guide structure prediction. Proteins 2017; 85:812-826. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Interaction between repeated restraint stress and concomitant midazolam administration on sweet food ingestion in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira P.P.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotional changes can influence feeding behavior. Previous studies have shown that chronically stressed animals present increased ingestion of sweet food, an effect reversed by a single dose of diazepam administered before testing the animals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the response of animals chronically treated with midazolam and/or submitted to repeated restraint stress upon the ingestion of sweet food. Male adult Wistar rats were divided into two groups: controls and exposed to restraint 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 40 days. Both groups were subdivided into two other groups treated or not with midazolam (0.06 mg/ml in their drinking water during the 40-day treatment. The animals were placed in a lighted area in the presence of 10 pellets of sweet food (Froot loops®. The number of ingested pellets was measured during a period of 3 min, in the presence or absence of fasting. The group chronically treated with midazolam alone presented increased ingestion when compared to control animals (control group: 2.0 ± 0.44 pellets and midazolam group: 3.60 ± 0.57 pellets. The group submitted to restraint stress presented an increased ingestion compared to controls (control group: 2.0 ± 0.44 pellets and stressed group: 4.18 ± 0.58 pellets. Chronically administered midazolam reduced the ingestion in stressed animals (stressed/water group: 4.18 ± 0.58 pellets; stressed/midazolam group: 3.2 ± 0.49 pellets. Thus, repeated stress increases appetite for sweet food independently of hunger and chronic administration of midazolam can decrease this behavioral effect.

  5. Hospital-based program to increase child safety restraint use among birthing mothers in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a hospital-based educational program to increase child safety restraint knowledge and use among birthing mothers. METHODS: A prospective experimental and control study was performed in the Obstetrics department of hospitals. A total of 216 new birthing mothers from two hospitals (114 from intervention hospital and 102 from comparison hospital were recruited and enrolled in the study. Intervention mothers received a height chart, an 8-minute video and a folded pamphlet regarding child safety restraint use during their hospital stay after giving birth. Evaluation data on the child safety seat (CSS awareness, attitudes, and use were collected among both groups before and after the intervention. An additional phone interview was conducted among the intervention mothers two months after discharge. RESULTS: No significant differences existed between groups when comparing demographics. Over 90% of the intervention mothers found the educational intervention to be helpful to some extent. A significantly higher percentage of mothers in the intervention than the comparison group reported that CSS are necessary and are the safest seating practice. Nearly 20% of the intervention mothers actually purchased CSS for their babies after the intervention. While in both the intervention and comparison group, over 80% of mothers identified the ages of two through five as needing CSS, fewer than 50% of both groups identified infants as needing CSS, even after the intervention. CONCLUSION: The results indicated that child safety restraint education implemented in hospitals helps increase birthing mothers' overall knowledge and use of CSS. Further efforts are needed to address specific age-related needs to promote car seats use among infants.

  6. Hospital-based program to increase child safety restraint use among birthing mothers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun; Yang, Jingzhen; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Chen, Kangwen; Liu, Xiangxiang; Li, Liping

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate a hospital-based educational program to increase child safety restraint knowledge and use among birthing mothers. A prospective experimental and control study was performed in the Obstetrics department of hospitals. A total of 216 new birthing mothers from two hospitals (114 from intervention hospital and 102 from comparison hospital) were recruited and enrolled in the study. Intervention mothers received a height chart, an 8-minute video and a folded pamphlet regarding child safety restraint use during their hospital stay after giving birth. Evaluation data on the child safety seat (CSS) awareness, attitudes, and use were collected among both groups before and after the intervention. An additional phone interview was conducted among the intervention mothers two months after discharge. No significant differences existed between groups when comparing demographics. Over 90% of the intervention mothers found the educational intervention to be helpful to some extent. A significantly higher percentage of mothers in the intervention than the comparison group reported that CSS are necessary and are the safest seating practice. Nearly 20% of the intervention mothers actually purchased CSS for their babies after the intervention. While in both the intervention and comparison group, over 80% of mothers identified the ages of two through five as needing CSS, fewer than 50% of both groups identified infants as needing CSS, even after the intervention. The results indicated that child safety restraint education implemented in hospitals helps increase birthing mothers' overall knowledge and use of CSS. Further efforts are needed to address specific age-related needs to promote car seats use among infants.

  7. Effects of acupuncture on behavioral, cardiovascular and hormonal responses in restraint-stressed Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a well-known entity and may be defined as a threat to the homeostasis of a being. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of acupuncture on the physiological responses induced by restraint stress. Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic technique which is used in the treatment and prevention of diseases. Its proposed mechanisms of action are based on the principle of homeostasis. Adult male Wistar EPM-1 rats were divided into four groups: group I (N = 12, unrestrained rats with cannulas previously implanted into their femoral arteries for blood pressure and heart rate measurements; group II (N = 12, rats that were also cannulated and were submitted to 60-min immobilization; group III (N = 12, same as group II but with acupuncture needles implanted at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 during the immobilization period; group IV (N = 14, same as group III but with needles implanted at points not related to acupuncture (non-acupoints. During the 60-min immobilization period animals were assessed for stress-related behaviors, heart rate, blood pressure and plasma corticosterone, noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Group III animals showed a significant reduction (60% on average, P<0.02 in restraint-induced behaviors when compared to groups II and IV. Data from cardiovascular and hormonal assessments indicated no differences between group III and group II and IV animals, but tended to be lower (50% reduction on average in group I animals. We hypothesize that acupuncture at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 has an anxiolytic effect on restraint-induced stress that is not due to a sedative action

  8. A restraint molecular dynamics and simulated annealing approach for protein homology modeling utilizing mean angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Till

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed the program PERMOL for semi-automated homology modeling of proteins. It is based on restrained molecular dynamics using a simulated annealing protocol in torsion angle space. As main restraints defining the optimal local geometry of the structure weighted mean dihedral angles and their standard deviations are used which are calculated with an algorithm described earlier by Döker et al. (1999, BBRC, 257, 348–350. The overall long-range contacts are established via a small number of distance restraints between atoms involved in hydrogen bonds and backbone atoms of conserved residues. Employing the restraints generated by PERMOL three-dimensional structures are obtained using standard molecular dynamics programs such as DYANA or CNS. Results To test this modeling approach it has been used for predicting the structure of the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein HPr from E. coli and the structure of the human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (Ppar γ. The divergence between the modeled HPr and the previously determined X-ray structure was comparable to the divergence between the X-ray structure and the published NMR structure. The modeled structure of Ppar γ was also very close to the previously solved X-ray structure with an RMSD of 0.262 nm for the backbone atoms. Conclusion In summary, we present a new method for homology modeling capable of producing high-quality structure models. An advantage of the method is that it can be used in combination with incomplete NMR data to obtain reasonable structure models in accordance with the experimental data.

  9. Reducing and/or minimising physical restraint in a high care, rural aged care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Lynette

    2007-12-01

    Background  This report takes you through a journey of implementing evidence-based best practice guidelines in relation to physical restraint in an aged care facility. It describes the processes involved in making changes to an existing system, introducing evidence-based guidelines and collaboratively achieving compliance with best practice. The project formed part of a combined initiative between the Joanna Briggs Institute and the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing, called the Aged Care Clinical Fellowship Program. The Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System, an online audit-based tool that includes an action research process Getting Research Into Practice was used to facilitate audit data collection and analysis. This report demonstrates that effective clinical leadership and evidence-based research, combined with a strategy of audit, feedback and re-audit, can become an effective change agent to improve clinical practice in residential aged care facilities. Aims/objectives  The aims of this project were to increase staff knowledge and awareness of restraints, improve practices in restraint assessment and usage, reduce or minimise the amount and type of restraints used and ensure the least restrictive device possible was utilised in a rural aged care facility. Methods  A system of audit, feedback and re-audit was performed using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System software. This was completed in a series of stages over a period of 6 months. The first stage was to apply defining characteristics to each of the evidence-based audit criteria to determine compliance. A team of staff was set up to assist with the project. An initial audit was conducted, followed by a situational analysis of the findings. From this an action plan for improvement using Getting Research Into Practice was developed. The action plan was then implemented and the criteria re-audited and reviewed

  10. Reputational concerns, not altruism, motivate restraint when gambling with other people's money

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodi B. Arfer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available People may behave prosocially not only because they value the welfare of others, but also to protect their own reputation. We examined the separate roles of altruism and reputational concerns in moral-hazard gambling tasks, which allowed subjects to gamble with a partner's money. In Study 1, subjects who were told that their partner would see their choices were more prosocial. In Study 2, subjects were more prosocial to a single partner when their choices were transparent than when their choices were attributed to a third party. We conclude that reputational concerns are a key restraint on selfish exploitation under moral hazard.

  11. Effect of Fluoxetine on the Hippocampus of Wistar Albino Rats in Cold Restraint Stress Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Saikarthik; Raghunath, Gunapriya; Ilango, Saraswathi; Vijayakumar, J; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2017-06-01

    Stress has been known to be a potential modulator of learning and memory. Long term stress can lead to depression. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor group of drug used in the treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of Fluoxetine on cold restraint induced stress in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. A total of 18 male wistar albino rats were divided randomly into three groups (n=6). Group 1 was the control group which were kept in normal laboratory conditions. Group 2 was the negative control group which were given cold restraint stress for period of four weeks. Group 3 was the experimental group, where the animals were pretreated with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg for a period of one week followed by cold restraint stress for 30 minutes and cotreated with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg for a period of four weeks. The whole study was done for a period of five weeks followed by behavioural studies and subsequently sacrificed with removal of brain for various histological, Immunohistochemical (IHC), neurochemical and antioxidant analysis. The values were expressed as Mean±SEM. One-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparisons test was used for the comparison of means. A probability of 0.05 and less was taken as statistically significant using Prism Graphpad software version 6.01. The results show there was significant improvement in the Morris water maze test after treatment with fluoxetine in Group 2. Similar results were also noted in the levels of neurotransmitters and antioxidant levels in brain and also in the number of cells counted in IHC and histological studies by H&E when Group 3 was compared with Group 2. The treatment reversed the damage in Group 2 which was comparable with the control group. The results revealed that administration of fluoxetine 10 mg/kg given orally has a potential antistressor effect by improving the neurogenic and neuroprotective effect on the cold restraint stress induced

  12. Cinnamon modulates biochemical alterations in rats loaded with acute restraint stress

    OpenAIRE

    Khataibeh, Moayad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate pretreatment efficacy of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) on blood glucose level as well as oxidative changes at the liver level. Following acute restraint stress, the experimental animals (n = 6) were randomly assigned into four groups, i.e., non-stressed control, stress control and treatment groups (cinnamon decoction 10%, 3 and 6 ml/kg, p.o, for 7 days). Anti-stress effect of cinnamon was studied by estimation of blood glucose level, liver...

  13. First-line managers: scope of responsibility in a time of fiscal restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acorn, S; Crawford, M

    1996-01-01

    Fiscal restraint and government cost control have contributed to the downsizing and restructuring of Canadian health care organizations. As key players in the hospital sector, the role and responsibilities of first-line nurse managers have been significantly affected by these changes. This paper presents data from a survey of 200 first-line nurse managers in British Columbia which investigated the current scope of the first-line manager's role, the number of hierarchical levels within nursing departments, and views on managerial union membership.

  14. Investigation of Child Restraint System (CRS) Compatibility in the Vehicle Seat Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Julie A; Bolte, John H; Agnew, Amanda M

    2015-01-01

    Child restraint system (CRS) misuse is common and can have serious consequences to child safety. Physical incompatibilities between CRS and vehicles can complicate the installation process and may worsen CRS misuse rates. This study aims to identify the most common sources of incompatibility between representative groups of CRS and vehicles. Detailed dimensional data were collected from 59 currently marketed CRS and 61 late model vehicles. Key dimensions were compared across all 3,599 theoretical CRS/vehicle combinations and the most common predicted incompatibilities were determined. A subset of 34 physical installations was analyzed to validate the results. Only 58.2% of rear-facing (RF) CRS/vehicle combinations were predicted to have proper agreement between the vehicle's seat pan angle and the CRS manufacturers' required base angle. The width of the base of the CRS was predicted to fit snugly between the vehicle's seat pan bolsters in 63.3% of RF CRS/vehicle combinations and 62.2% of forward-facing (FF) CRS/vehicle combinations. FF CRS were predicted to be free of interaction with the vehicle's head restraint in 66.4% of combinations. Roughly 90.0% of RF CRS/vehicle combinations were predicted to have enough horizontal clearance space to set the front seat in the middle its fore/aft slider track. Compatibility rates were above 98% regarding the length of the CRS base compared to the length of the vehicle seat pan and the ability of the top tether to reach the tether anchor. Validation studies revealed that the predictions of RF CRS base angle range vs. seat pan angle compatibility were accurate within 6%, and head restraint interference and front row clearance incompatibilities may be more common than the dimensional analysis approach has predicted. The results of this study indicate that RF CRS base angles and front row clearance space, as well as FF CRS head restraint interference, are frequent compatibility concerns. These results enable manufacturers

  15. Mars Science Laboratory Differential Restraint: The Devil is in the Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The Differential Restraint, a mechanism used on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover to maintain symmetry of the mobility system during the launch, cruise, and entry descent and landing phases of the MSL mission, completed nearly three full design cycles before a finalized successful design was achieved. This paper address the lessons learned through these design cycles, including three major design elements that can easily be overlooked during the design process, including, tolerance stack contribution to load path, the possibility of Martian dirt as a failure mode, and the effects of material properties at temperature extremes.

  16. Reputational concerns, not altruism, motivate restraint when gambling with other people's money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfer, Kodi B; Bixter, Michael T; Luhmann, Christian C

    2015-01-01

    People may behave prosocially not only because they value the welfare of others, but also to protect their own reputation. We examined the separate roles of altruism and reputational concerns in moral-hazard gambling tasks, which allowed subjects to gamble with a partner's money. In Study 1, subjects who were told that their partner would see their choices were more prosocial. In Study 2, subjects were more prosocial to a single partner when their choices were transparent than when their choices were attributed to a third party. We conclude that reputational concerns are a key restraint on selfish exploitation under moral hazard.

  17. Restraint feeds stress: The relationship between eating disorder symptoms, stress generation, and the interpersonal theory of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Dorian; Smith, April; Bodell, Lindsay

    2014-12-01

    Integrating research on stress generation and the interpersonal theory of suicide we examined whether eating disorder symptoms are related to stress generation and whether negative life events (stressors) contribute to feelings of burdensomeness and low belongingness. At two time points (approximately 1month apart), participants (n=186; 75% female) completed questionnaires measuring eating disorder symptoms, negative life events, burdensomeness, and belongingness. Regression analyses indicated that while controlling for depression, anxiety, and baseline frequency of negative events, dietary restraint significantly predicted negative events at follow-up. Dietary restraint indirectly influenced higher levels of perceived burdensomeness and low belongingness through its influence on negative events. Thus, dietary restraint may contribute to stress generation, and in turn exacerbate feelings of burdensomeness and low belongingness, two important constructs of the interpersonal theory of suicide. Greater understanding of these factors could lead to more effective and targeted suicide interventions for individuals who restrict food intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Repeated restraint stress enhances cue-elicited conditioned freezing and impairs acquisition of extinction in an age-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2013-01-01

    Affective disorders are believed to involve dysfunction within the amygdala, a key structure for processing emotional information. Chronic stress may contribute to affective disorders such as depression and anxiety via its effects on the amygdala. Previous research has shown that chronic stress increases amygdala neuronal activity in an age-dependent manner. However, whether these distinct changes in amgydala neuronal activity are accompanied by age-dependent changes in amygdala-dependent affective behavior is unclear. In this study, we investigated how chronic stress impacts amgydala-dependent auditory fear conditioning in adolescent and adult rats in a repeated restraint model. We found that repeated restraint enhanced conditioned freezing in both adolescent and adult rats. But repeated restraint led to impaired acquisition of fear extinction only in adolescent rats. Along with previous findings, these results suggest that chronic stress may precipitate affective disorders via differential mechanisms, with different outcomes at different ages. PMID:23538069

  19. Sensors for Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-07-15

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on "Sensors for Entertainment", developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored.

  20. Do emotion regulation difficulties when upset influence the association between dietary restraint and weight gain among college students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Tyler K; Forbush, Kelsie T; Hagan, Kelsey E; Chapa, Danielle A N

    2017-07-01

    Obesity is a significant public health concern that affects more than one-fifth of adolescents aged 12-19 in the United States. Theoretical models suggest that prolonged dietary restraint leads to binge-eating behaviors, which in turn increases individuals' risk for weight gain or obesity. Results from the literature indicate a potential role for negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly when distressed) as a mediating variable that explains the link between dietary restraint and binge-eating episodes. The current study tested short-term, prospective longitudinal associations among dietary restraint, binge eating, negative urgency, and weight gain among college students - a population at increased risk for the development of overweight and obesity. We hypothesized that dietary restraint and weight gain would be mediated by negative urgency and binge eating, but only among participants with overweight and obesity. College students (N = 227) completed the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory, UPPS-P Impulsivity Scale, and self-reported weight and height to calculate body mass index. Results showed that the association between dietary restraint and weight gain was mediated by negative urgency and binge eating, but only among participants with overweight and obesity. Our findings indicated that negative urgency might represent a mechanism that explains why dietary restraint leads to future binge-eating episodes and weight gain among college students with overweight and obesity. Results suggest that future treatment and prevention programs for overweight and obesity may benefit from incorporating strategies to improve emotion regulation as a way to reduce binge eating and to prevent additional weight gain among 'at-risk' populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary restraint and body mass change. A 3-year follow up study in a representative Dutch sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Strien, Tatjana; Herman, C Peter; Verheijden, Marieke W

    2014-05-01

    To determine in a representative Dutch sample the association of dietary restraint, Concern for Dieting, and Weight Fluctuation with subsequent change in body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) in addition to possible moderator effects of sex, level of education, age category, ethnicity, overweight level and physical activity. In a longitudinal study in a representative Dutch sample consisting of 675 participants (331 females, 344 males), dietary restraint (including Concern for Dieting and Weight Fluctuation) was assessed with the Restraint Scale at baseline, and also self-reported weight and height. Three years later, weight and height were also assessed. Dietary restraint was significantly associated with an increase in BMI after three years (B=.272, p=001). Inspection of the significant moderator effect of sex (B=-.387, p=.012) indicated that dietary restraint was significantly associated with increases in BMI only in females. There was no main effect for Concern for Dieting (p=.091). There was a moderator effect of sex on the association between Concern for Dieting and BMI change (B=-.424; p=.002): initial concern for dieting was positively associated with subsequent body mass gain only in women. Weight Fluctuation was significantly associated with an increase in BMI after three years (B=.162, p=008) and sex did not moderate this association. There were no moderator effects for level of education, age category, ethnicity, overweight level and physical activity. Dietary restraint and Concern for Dieting are associated with increases in BMI only in females. Weight Fluctuation is associated with increases in BMI in both males and females. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute restraint stress decreases c-fos immunoreactivity in hilar mossy cells of the adult dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Jillian N.; Duffy, Áine M.

    2017-01-01

    Although a great deal of information is available about the circuitry of the mossy cells (MCs) of the dentate gyrus (DG) hilus, their activity in vivo is not clear. The immediate early gene c-fos can be used to gain insight into the activity of MCs in vivo, because c-fos protein expression reflects increased neuronal activity. In prior work, it was identified that control rats that were perfusion-fixed after removal from their home cage exhibited c-fos immunoreactivity (ir) in the DG in a spatially stereotyped pattern: ventral MCs and dorsal granule cells (GCs) expressed c-fos protein (Duffy et al., Hippocampus 23:649–655, 2013). In this study, we hypothesized that restraint stress would alter c-fos-ir, because MCs express glucocorticoid type 2 receptors and the DG is considered to be involved in behaviors related to stress or anxiety. We show that acute restraint using a transparent nose cone for just 10 min led to reduced c-fos-ir in ventral MCs compared to control rats. In these comparisons, c-fos-ir was evaluated 30 min after the 10 min-long period of restraint, and if evaluation was later than 30 min c-fos-ir was no longer suppressed. Granule cells (GCs) also showed suppressed c-fos-ir after acute restraint, but it was different than MCs, because the suppression persisted for over 30 min after the restraint. We conclude that c-fos protein expression is rapidly and transiently reduced in ventral hilar MCs after a brief period of restraint, and suppressed longer in dorsal GCs. PMID:28190104

  3. Dorsal and ventral hippocampus modulate autonomic responses but not behavioral consequences associated to acute restraint stress in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    América A Scopinho

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has suggested that the dorsal (DH and the ventral (VH poles of the hippocampus are structurally, molecularly and functionally different regions. While the DH is preferentially involved in the modulation of spatial learning and memory, the VH modulates defensive behaviors related to anxiety. Acute restraint is an unavoidable stress situation that evokes marked and sustained autonomic changes, which are characterized by elevated blood pressure (BP, intense heart rate (HR increases, skeletal muscle vasodilatation and cutaneous vasoconstriction, which are accompanied by a rapid skin temperature drop followed by body temperature increases. In addition to those autonomic responses, animals submitted to restraint also present behavioral changes, such as reduced exploration of the open arms of an elevated plus-maze (EPM, an anxiogenic-like effect. In the present work, we report a comparison between the effects of pharmacological inhibition of DH and VH neurotransmission on autonomic and behavioral responses evoked by acute restraint stress in rats. Bilateral microinjection of the unspecific synaptic blocker cobalt chloride (CoCl2, 1mM into the DH or VH attenuated BP and HR responses, as well as the decrease in the skin temperature, elicited by restraint stress exposure. Moreover, DH or VH inhibition before restraint did not change the delayed increased anxiety behavior observed 24 h later in the EPM. The present results demonstrate for the first time that both DH and VH mediate stress-induced autonomic responses to restraint but they are not involved in the modulation of the delayed emotional consequences elicited by such stress.

  4. Exacerbation of brain pathology after partial restraint in hypertensive rats following SiO₂ nanoparticles exposure at high ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari S; Muresanu, Dafin F; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2013-10-01

    This investigation examines the possibility that exposure to silica dust of hypertensive individuals may exacerbate brain pathology and sensory motor dysfunction at high environmental temperature. Hypertension was produced in rats (200-250 g) by two-kidney one clip (2K1C) method, and in these animals, SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs; 50 to 60 nm) were administered at 50 mg/kg, i.p. daily for 1 week. On the 8th day, these rats were subjected to partial restraint in a Perspex box for 4 h either at room temperature (21 °C) or at 33 °C in a biological oxygen demand incubator (wind velocity, 2.6 cm/s; relative humidity, 65 to 67 %). In these animals, behavioral functions, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and radioiodine (([131]-)Iodine), brain water content and neuronal injuries were determined. Hypertensive rats subjected to 4 h restraint at room temperature did not exhibit BBB dysfunction, brain edema, neural injury, or alterations in rotarod or inclined plane angle performances. However, when these hypertensive rats were subjected to restraint at 33 °C, breakdown of the cortical BBB (EBA, +38 %; radioiodine, +56 %), brain water (+0.88 %), neuronal damages (+18 %), and behavioral impairment were exacerbated. Interestingly, SiO2 exposure to these rats further exacerbated BBB breakdown (EBA, 280 %; radioiodine, 350 %), brain edema (4 %), and neural injury (30 %) after identical restraint depending on the ambient temperature. SiO2 treatment also induced brain pathology and alteration in behavioral functions in normotensive rats after restraint at high temperature. These observations clearly show that hypertension significantly enhances restraint-induced brain pathology, and behavioral anomalies particularly at high ambient temperature and SiO2 intoxication further exacerbated these brain pathologies and cognitive dysfunctions.

  5. Predictors of Self-Injurious Behavior and Self-Restraint in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Towards a Hypothesis of Impaired Behavioral Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Caroline; Davies, Louise; Oliver, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Self-injury is common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however few studies have investigated correlates of self-injury or the putative associations with self-restraint. Questionnaire data on self-injury, self-restraint, health conditions, overactivity/impulsivity and repetitive/restricted behavior were collected on 208 children and 216 adults…

  6. Restraint ulcers in the rat. 1: Influence on ulcer frequency of fasting and of environmental temperature associated with immobilization of varying durations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchel, L.; Gallaire, D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the production of experimental ulcers in rats are described. Two experimental conditions were found to regularly provoke the appearance of gastric ulcers in a high percentage of rats: (1) two-and-a-half hour restraint, proceeded by a 24 hour fast; and (2) one-and-a-half hour restraint with lowering of the environmental temperature while fasting.

  7. Tests of the Aversive Summation Hypothesis in Rats: Effects of Restraint Stress on Consummatory Successive Negative Contrast and Extinction in the Barnes Maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Leonardo A.; Prado-Rivera, Mayerli A.; Cardenas-Poveda, D. Carolina; McLinden, Kristina A.; Glueck, Amanda C.; Gutierrez, German; Lamprea, Marisol R.; Papini, Mauricio R.

    2013-01-01

    The present research explored the effects of restraint stress on two situations involving incentive downshift: consummatory successive negative contrast (cSNC) and extinction of escape behavior in the Barnes maze. First, Experiment 1 confirmed that the restraint stress procedure used in these experiments increased levels of circulating…

  8. Administration of exogenous acylated ghrelin or rikkunshito, an endogenous ghrelin enhancer, improves the decrease in postprandial gastric motility in an acute restraint stress mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, M; Saegusa, Y; Sadakane, C; Yamada, C; Nakagawa, K; Okubo, N; Ohnishi, S; Hattori, T; Sakamoto, N; Takeda, H

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical or psychological stress causes functional disorders in the upper gastrointestinal tract. This study aims to elucidate the ameliorating effect of exogenous acylated ghrelin or rikkunshito, a Kampo medicine which acts as a ghrelin enhancer, on gastric dysfunction during acute restraint stress in mice. Methods Fasted and postprandial motor function of the gastric antrum was wirelessly measured using a strain gauge force transducer and solid gastric emptying was detected in mice exposed to restraint stress. Plasma corticosterone and ghrelin levels were also measured. To clarify the role of ghrelin on gastrointestinal dysfunction in mice exposed to stress, exogenous acylated ghrelin or rikkunshito was administered, then the mice were subjected to restraint stress. Key Results Mice exposed to restraint stress for 60 min exhibited delayed gastric emptying and increased plasma corticosterone levels. Gastric motility was decreased in mice exposed to restraint stress in both fasting and postprandial states. Restraint stress did not cause any change in plasma acylated ghrelin levels, but it significantly increased the plasma des-acyl ghrelin levels. Administration of acylated ghrelin or rikkunshito improved the restraint stress-induced delayed gastric emptying and decreased antral motility. Ameliorating effects of rikkunshito on stress-induced gastric dysfunction were abolished by simultaneous administration of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Conclusions & Inferences Plasma acylated/des-acyl ghrelin imbalance was observed in acute restraint stress. Supplementation of exogenous acylated ghrelin or enhancement of endogenous ghrelin signaling may be useful in the treatment of decreased gastric function caused by stress. PMID:24684160

  9. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels during manual restraint in chicks from a high and low feather pecking line of laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, M.; Beuving, G.; Ruesink, W.; Blokhuis, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Neurosympathetic and adrenal responsivity to manual restraint was studied in two White Leghorn chicken lines which differ in their tendency to feather peek. Blood samples were taken from freely moving cannulated birds during resting conditions and during manual restraint (placing the bird on its

  10. The Effects of an Action Plan, Staff Training, Management Support and Monitoring on Restraint Use and Costs of Work-Related Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dignity and respect are at the foundation of good care and effective treatment planning and are guiding service principles. The use of physical restraints is contrary to treatment with dignity and respect. Because of the numerous risks to clients and employees associated with the use of physical restraints, an innovative plan was…

  11. Wireless sensor platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Pooran C.; Killough, Stephen M.; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2017-08-08

    A wireless sensor platform and methods of manufacture are provided. The platform involves providing a plurality of wireless sensors, where each of the sensors is fabricated on flexible substrates using printing techniques and low temperature curing. Each of the sensors can include planar sensor elements and planar antennas defined using the printing and curing. Further, each of the sensors can include a communications system configured to encode the data from the sensors into a spread spectrum code sequence that is transmitted to a central computer(s) for use in monitoring an area associated with the sensors.

  12. Investigation of sleep–wake rhythm in non-human primates without restraint during data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Akiyoshi; Sakai, Keita; Maki, Takehiro; Mizuno, Yuri; Niimi, Kimie; Oda, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Eiki

    2016-01-01

    To understand sleep mechanisms and develop treatments for sleep disorders, investigations using animal models are essential. The sleep architecture of rodents differs from that of diurnal mammals including humans and non-human primates. Sleep studies have been conducted in non-human primates; however, these sleep assessments were performed on animals placed in a restraint chair connected via the umbilical area to the recording apparatus. To avoid restraints, cables, and other stressful apparatuses and manipulations, telemetry systems have been developed. In the present study, sleep recordings in unrestrained cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) and common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) were conducted to characterize normal sleep. For the analysis of sleep–wake rhythms in cynomolgus monkeys, telemetry electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and electrooculography (EOG) signals were used. For the analysis of sleep–wake rhythms in marmosets, telemetry EEG and EOG signals were used. Both monkey species showed monophasic sleep patterns during the dark phase. Although non-rapid eye movement (NREM) deep sleep showed higher levels at the beginning of the dark phase in cynomolgus monkeys, NREM deep sleep rarely occurred during the dark phase in marmosets. Our results indicate that the use of telemetry in non-human primate models is useful for sleep studies, and that the different NREM deep sleep activities between cynomolgus monkeys and common marmoset monkeys are useful to examine sleep functions. PMID:27760892

  13. Assessing the limits of restraint-based 3D modeling of genomes and genomic domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussart, Marie; Serra, François; Baù, Davide; Junier, Ivan; Serrano, Luís; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Restraint-based modeling of genomes has been recently explored with the advent of Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C-based) experiments. We previously developed a reconstruction method to resolve the 3D architecture of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes using 3C-based data. These models were congruent with fluorescent imaging validation. However, the limits of such methods have not systematically been assessed. Here we propose the first evaluation of a mean-field restraint-based reconstruction of genomes by considering diverse chromosome architectures and different levels of data noise and structural variability. The results show that: first, current scoring functions for 3D reconstruction correlate with the accuracy of the models; second, reconstructed models are robust to noise but sensitive to structural variability; third, the local structure organization of genomes, such as Topologically Associating Domains, results in more accurate models; fourth, to a certain extent, the models capture the intrinsic structural variability in the input matrices and fifth, the accuracy of the models can be a priori predicted by analyzing the properties of the interaction matrices. In summary, our work provides a systematic analysis of the limitations of a mean-field restrain-based method, which could be taken into consideration in further development of methods as well as their applications. PMID:25800747

  14. Cinnamon modulates biochemical alterations in rats loaded with acute restraint stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moayad Khataibeh

    2016-09-01

    Following acute restraint stress, the experimental animals (n = 6 were randomly assigned into four groups, i.e., non-stressed control, stress control and treatment groups (cinnamon decoction 10%, 3 and 6 ml/kg, p.o, for 7 days. Anti-stress effect of cinnamon was studied by estimation of blood glucose level, liver marker enzymes; aspartate amino transferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and lactate dehydrogenase, liver reduced glutathione (GSH and liver antioxidant enzymes; super oxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, catalase (CAT and glutathione reductase (GR. Acute restraint stress was evidenced by reduction of blood glucose level and liver GSH and elevation of liver marker enzymes in serum. In addition, antioxidant enzymes were drastically inhibited in liver homogenate of stress control rats. Pre-treatment with cinnamon decoction 10%, (3 ml/kg and 6 ml/kg, p.o, for 7 days avoided the changes observed in stress control rats. This study substantiates that cinnamon is effective in minimizing stress responses thereby beneficial in stress therapy.

  15. Dietary restraint and subjective well-being in university students in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda, Horacio; Sepúlveda, José; Orellana, Ligia; Etchebarne, Soledad; Lobos, Germán; Mora, Marcos; Denegri, Marianela; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-08-01

    To characterize university students typologies according to chronic food restriction, satisfaction with life and food consumption. A questionnaire was applied on a non-probability sample of 369 male and female students from five Chilean universities. The questionnaire included: Revised Restraint Scale (RRS), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL) and the Health-related Quality of Life Index. The survey included food and drink consumption habits, weight and approximate height and sociodemographic variables. Two factors in the RRS were detected by exploratory factor analysis: Preoccupation with Diet (PD) and Weight fluctuations (WF). A confirmatory factor analysis validated the bifactor structure of the RRS with an acceptable adjustment kindness. The cluster analysis allowed a distinction of four typologies with a significant variation in PD, WF, SWLS and SWFL scoring, number of days with mental health problems, frequency of alcoholic drinks consumption, restraint on the consumption of certain foods, drinks and spices, consumption frequency of fruit out of the main meals and types. Typologies did not differ on their body mass index. Both, students preoccupied with diet and those who are not, experience higher levels of satisfaction with life and with food. Lower levels of global life satisfaction and satisfaction with food are related with the fluctuations in weight. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. The central effect of biological Amines on immunosuppressive effect of restraint stress in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeraati F

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of some histaminergic agents were evaluated on stress- induced immunosuppression in immunized nale rats. In rat immunized with sheep red blood cells ( SRBCs. Restraint stress (RS prevented the booster-induced rise in anti-SRBC antibody titre and cell immunity response. Intracerebroventicular (I.C>V injection of histamine (150 µg/rat induced a similar effect with RS. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine (50 µg/rat reduced the inhibitory effect of Ras on immune function. Also histamine could inhibit the effect of RS on immune function. Also histamine could inhibitory the effect of chlorpheniramine when injected simultaneously. Pretreatment with ranidine (10 µg/rat had not a significant effect. Serotonin (3 µg/rat and dopamine (0.2 µg/rat could reverse the effects of chlorpheniromine when injected with chlorpheniramine (P<0.05. Epinephrine (0.2 µg/rat had not a significant effect. The results indicate that histamine mediates the immunosuppression of restraint stress by influencing the histamine H1 receptor in the brain and this effects of histamine may be modulated by serotoninergic and dopaminergic system.

  17. Early ventricular restraint after myocardial infarction: extent of the wrap determines the outcome of remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yoshiharu; Gorman, Joseph H; Moainie, Sina L; Jackson, Benjamin M; Parish, Landi M; Plappert, Theodore; Zeeshan, Ahmad; St John-Sutton, Martin G; Gorman, Robert C

    2005-03-01

    Early infarct expansion initiates adverse remodeling, leads to left ventricular dilatation and portends a poor long-term outcome. Early mechanical prevention of infarct expansion has been proposed as a method to improve remodeling, but the extent of ventricular restraint necessary to optimize the salutary effect is not known. We tested the hypothesis that left ventricular restraint (wrap) is superior to infarct stiffening (patch). Infarction of 20% to 25% of the left ventricle was induced by coronary ligation in 69 sheep. Infarcts were either anteroapical (n = 33) or posterobasal (n = 36). Animals with each infarct received either no treatment (anteroapical, n = 26; posterobasal, n = 17), infarct stiffening with a localized Marlex mesh patch (posterobasal, n = 9) or left ventricular wrapping with Merseline mesh (anteroapical, n = 7; posterobasal, n = 10). End-systolic volume, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic muscle to cavity area ratio, left ventricular sphericity, ejection fraction, and degree of mitral regurgitation as determined by quantitative echocardiography were assessed before infarction and at 2, 5, and 8 weeks after infarction to evaluate the extent of left ventricular remodeling. Control animals in both groups experienced adverse remodeling. Anteroapical infarct animals developed large left ventricular aneurysms and the posterobasal infarct animals developed severe mitral regurgitation. Early infarct stiffening did not significantly improve any aspect of remodeling due to the posterobasal infarct. Early left ventricular wrapping significantly improved remodeling after both types of infarctions. Early left ventricular wrapping attenuates infarct expansion and has a salutary effect on remodeling. Simple infarct stiffening alone is not effective.

  18. Reduction of Seclusion and Restraint in an Inpatient Psychiatric Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Ellen W; Woolley, Stephen; Szarek, Bonnie L; Mucha, Theodore F; Dutka, Olga; Schwartz, Harold I; Wisniowski, Jeff; Goethe, John W

    2017-03-01

    The authors describe a quality and safety initiative designed to decrease seclusion/restraint (S/R) and present the results of a pilot study that evaluated the effectiveness of this program. The study sample consisted of consecutive admissions to a 120-bed psychiatric service after the intervention was implemented (October 2010-September 2012, n = 8029). Analyses compared S/R incidence and duration in the study sample to baseline (consecutive admissions during the year prior to introduction of the intervention, October 2008-September 2009, n = 3884). The study intervention, which used evidence-based therapeutic practices for reducing violence/aggression, included routine use of the Brøset Violence Checklist, mandated staff education in crisis intervention and trauma informed care, increased frequency of physician reassessment of need for S/R, formal administrative review of S/R events and environmental enhancements (e.g., comfort rooms to support sensory modulation). Statistically significant associations were found between the intervention and a decrease in both the number of seclusions (p < 0.01) and the duration of seclusion per admission (p < 0.001). These preliminary results support the conclusion that this intervention was effective in reducing use of seclusion. Further study is needed to determine if these prevention strategies are generalizable, the degree to which each component of the intervention contributes to improve outcome, and if continuation of the intervention will further reduce restraint use.

  19. Dietary restraint, life satisfaction and self-discrepancy by gender in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize dieting and non-dieting university students by gender, based on their satisfaction with life and their food-related life, self-discrepancy, food behavior and health-related aspects. A non-probabilistic sample of 305 students from five Chilean state universities responded a questionnaire that included the Revised Restraint Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, the Satisfaction with Food-related Life Scale, the Health-related Quality of Life Index, the Nutrition Interest Scale and the Self-Discrepancy Index. Socio-demographic characteristics, food behavior, and approximate weight and height were also enquired. Chronic dieters and non-dieters were distinguished according to the median score of the Revised Restraint Scale. 51.1% of women and 55.5% of men classified as chronic dieters, sharing characteristics such as nutrition concern, mental health problems, higher body mass index, and physical and economic self-discrepancy. Women dieters reported lower life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life, more health problems and health-related restriction of food, while men dieters showed higher social and emotional self-discrepancy.

  20. St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) diminishes cognitive impairment caused by the chronic restraint stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimiuk, Emil; Walesiuk, Anna; Braszko, Jan J

    2005-03-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) may counteract stress-induced memory impairment. Object recognition test and Morris water maze were used to determine whether administration of H. perforatum (350 mg kg(-1) for 21 days), standardized to 0.3% hypericin content, protects against non-spatial and/or spatial memory impairments due to chronic restraint stress (2h daily for 21 days). A group of rats administered the exogenous corticosterone at the dose of 5 mg kg(-1) daily for 21 days, yielding its similar plasma levels as these observed in stress was run in parallel. In the first experiment all rats were tested for recognition memory in the object recognition test. On the following day, the animals were tested in open field and elevated "plus" maze to control for the contribution of respectively, motor and emotional effects of our treatments to the memory tests. In the second experiment, new group of stressed animals was tested for spatial memory in the water maze. We observed that H. perforatum prevented the deleterious effects of both chronic restraint stress and long-term corticosterone on learning and memory as measured in both, the object recognition and the water maze tests. The herb not only prevented stress- and corticosterone-induced memory impairments, but it significantly improved recognition memory (pstress memory disorders.