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Sample records for restoration recordkeeping requirements

  1. 12 CFR 370.9 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping requirements. 370.9 Section 370.9 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY TEMPORARY LIQUIDITY GUARANTEE PROGRAM § 370.9 Recordkeeping requirements. The FDIC will establish...

  2. 29 CFR 552.110 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordkeeping requirements. 552.110 Section 552.110 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO DOMESTIC SERVICE Interpretations § 552.110 Recordkeeping...

  3. 40 CFR 63.998 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.998 Recordkeeping requirements. (a) Compliance assessment, monitoring, and compliance records—(1) Conditions of flare compliance assessment, monitoring, and compliance... be necessary to determine the conditions of flare compliance assessments performed pursuant to §...

  4. 15 CFR 806.2 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping requirements. 806.2 Section 806.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.2...

  5. 40 CFR 141.807 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 141.807 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.807 Recordkeeping... maintain aircraft water system operations and maintenance plans in accordance with FAA requirements, and...

  6. 31 CFR 128.5 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordkeeping requirements. 128.5 Section 128.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance REPORTING OF INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL AND FOREIGN-CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS AND POSITIONS General Information § 128.5...

  7. 13 CFR 108.2040 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Policies governing reporting, record retention, and recordkeeping requirements applicable to NMVC Companies may be found in subpart H of this part. NMVC Companies also must comply with all reporting, record retention, and recordkeeping requirements set forth in Circular A-110 of the Office of Management and...

  8. 40 CFR 63.788 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... day of the reporting period and whether compliance was continuous or intermittent during the reporting... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordkeeping and reporting... Recordkeeping and reporting requirements. (a) Each owner or operator of an affected source shall comply with the...

  9. 78 FR 55993 - Revisions to Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, and Proposed Confidentiality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... Recordkeeping Requirements, and Proposed Confidentiality Determinations Under the Greenhouse Gas Reporting... and Recordkeeping Requirements, and Proposed Confidentiality Determinations Under the Greenhouse Gas... the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program. In addition, the EPA is proposing confidentiality determinations...

  10. 33 CFR 151.55 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION VESSELS CARRYING OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, GARBAGE, MUNICIPAL OR COMMERCIAL WASTE... Antarctic Treaty as it Pertains to Pollution from Ships Garbage Pollution and Sewage § 151.55 Recordkeeping...) Plastic material. (ii) Floating dunnage, lining, or packing material. (iii) Ground paper products,...

  11. 22 CFR 123.26 - Recordkeeping requirement for exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirement for exemptions. 123.26 Section 123.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS... each such export. The business record should include the following information: A description of...

  12. 40 CFR 60.385 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Metallic Mineral Processing Plants § 60.385 Recordkeeping and reporting requirements. (a) The owner or... measurements of both the change in pressure of the gas stream across the scrubber and the scrubbing liquid flow... surveillance adopted by such States. In that event, affected sources within the State will be relieved of...

  13. 40 CFR 63.850 - Notification, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... as a result of excess emissions. (e) Recordkeeping. The owner or operator shall maintain files of all... operator may retain records on microfilm, on a computer, on computer disks, on magnetic tape, or on microfiche; (3) The owner or operator may report required information on paper or on a labeled computer...

  14. 42 CFR 460.204 - Financial recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Financial recordkeeping and reporting requirements...-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.204 Financial... financial statements. (c) Accepted reporting practices. Except as specified under Medicare principles...

  15. 78 FR 58544 - Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Title: OCSE-75 Tribal Child Support... accomplishments in an annual narrative report and submit the OCSE-75 report annually. Respondents: Tribal...

  16. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  17. 17 CFR 1.14 - Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for futures commission merchants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regarding sources of funding, together with a narrative discussion by management of the liquidity of the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Risk assessment recordkeeping... Related Reporting Requirements § 1.14 Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for futures...

  18. 75 FR 13699 - Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... in their place the words ``CBP Recordkeeping'' and removing the language ``the Customs Electronic... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Parts 111 and 163 RIN 1505-AC12 Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention...

  19. 50 CFR 300.183 - Permit holder reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit holder reporting and recordkeeping... Species § 300.183 Permit holder reporting and recordkeeping requirements. (a) Biweekly reports. Any person..., retained, or submitted pursuant to this subpart. A permit holder must allow NMFS or an authorized person...

  20. 40 CFR 60.697 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., capacity of carbon bed, type and working capacity of activated carbon used for carbon bed, and design..., including flow and volatile organic compound content under varying liquid level conditions (dynamic and... requirements of this paragraph. (ii) For a carbon adsorption system that does not regenerate the carbon...

  1. 40 CFR 60.635 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... addition to the requirement of § 60.486(j): Information and data used to demonstrate that a reciprocating compressor is in wet gas service to apply for the exemption in § 60.633(f) shall be recorded in a log that...

  2. 78 FR 66674 - Revisions to Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, and Proposed Confidentiality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Confidentiality Determinations Under the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Recordkeeping Requirements, and Proposed Confidentiality Determinations under the Greenhouse Gas Reporting... Requirements, and Proposed Confidentiality Determinations under the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program,'' which...

  3. 77 FR 27787 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Customs Modernization Act Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Customs Modernization... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Customs Modernization Act Record... techniques or other forms of information. Title: Customs Modernization Act Recordkeeping Requirements....

  4. 40 CFR 63.10 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... maintained on microfilm, on a computer, on computer floppy disks, on magnetic tape disks, or on microfiche... history during the 5-year recordkeeping period prior to the intended change, including performance test...

  5. 14 CFR 61.423 - What are the recordkeeping requirements for a flight instructor with a sport pilot rating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... recordkeeping requirements for a flight instructor with a sport pilot rating? (a) As a flight instructor with a... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the recordkeeping requirements for a flight instructor with a sport pilot rating? 61.423 Section 61.423 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1192 - What recordkeeping requirements must I meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recordkeeping requirements: (a) Maintain files of all information required by § 63.10(b) of the general... microfilm, on a computer, on computer disks, on magnetic tape disks, or on microfiche. (e) Report the required information on paper or on a labeled computer disk using commonly available and...

  7. 40 CFR 63.655 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sampling site description, description of sampling and analysis procedures and any modifications to... of preparation of standards, record of calibrations, raw data sheets for field sampling, raw data... convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 63.655 Reporting and recordkeeping...

  8. An exponential smoothing method application to restoring lost data on electric power technical record-keeping in industrial enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.S. Bederak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies in detail a problem of restoring single data of electric power technical record-keeping systems by means of exponential smoothing. A hypothesis of efficient finding the optimal value of smoothing constant α in the range of 0 < α < 2 is tested. Variation ranges for the mean absolute percentage error of the forecast are specified versus values of the time series variation coefficient for specific electricity consumption processes with different data spread.

  9. 40 CFR 166.50 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements for crisis exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for crisis exemption. 166.50 Section 166.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... EMERGENCY CONDITIONS Crisis Exemptions § 166.50 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements for crisis... a crisis exemption must be immediately reported to the Agency. (b) Final reports. (1) A...

  10. 40 CFR 166.32 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements for specific, quarantine, and public health exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for specific, quarantine, and public health exemptions. 166.32 Section 166.32 Protection of... AGENCIES FOR USE OF PESTICIDES UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS Specific, Quarantine, and Public Health Exemptions § 166.32 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements for specific, quarantine, and public health...

  11. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to Subpart PPP of Part 63... Subpart PPP of Part 63—Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations—Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and...

  12. 17 CFR 240.17h-1T - Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for associated persons of brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sources of funding, together with a narrative discussion by management of the liquidity of the material... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Risk assessment recordkeeping... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17h-1T Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for...

  13. 36 CFR 1222.26 - What are the general recordkeeping requirements for agency programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT CREATION AND MAINTENANCE OF FEDERAL RECORDS... series; and (e) Policies, procedures, and strategies for ensuring that records are retained long enough... recordkeeping requirements that identify: (a) The record series and systems that must be created and...

  14. 75 FR 30106 - Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Recordkeeping Requirements for Insurers Compensated Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Recordkeeping Requirements for Insurers Compensated Under the Program... extension approval by the Office of Management and Budget. The Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Office... triacomments@do.treas.gov or by mail (if hard copy, preferably an original and two copies) to: Terrorism Risk...

  15. 77 FR 33964 - Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Parts 111 and 163 RIN 1515-AD66 (Formerly RIN 1505-AC12) Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention AGENCIES: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland...

  16. 42 CFR 413.198 - Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... outpatient maintenance dialysis. 413.198 Section 413.198 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 413.198 Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis. (a) Purpose... will enable CMS to determine the costs incurred in furnishing outpatient maintenance dialysis...

  17. 78 FR 9447 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements; 8(a) Annual Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements; 8(a) Annual Update AGENCY: Small Business Administration... INFORMATION: This information collection, 8(a) Annual Update, (Form 1450) is submitted by all small businesses participating in SBA's 8(a) Business Development Program (8(a) BD Program), to annually update and report to...

  18. 77 FR 13617 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Customs Modernization Act Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Customs Modernization... concerning the Customs Modernization Act Recordkeeping Requirements. This request for comment is being made... American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act, Title VI, known as the Customs Modernization Act (Mod...

  19. 7 CFR 1437.503 - Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops. 1437.503 Section 1437.503 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS...

  20. 30 CFR 250.426 - What are the recordkeeping requirements for casing and liner pressure tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the recordkeeping requirements for casing and liner pressure tests? 250.426 Section 250.426 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil...

  1. 30 CFR 250.434 - What are the recordkeeping requirements for diverter actuations and tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the recordkeeping requirements for diverter actuations and tests? 250.434 Section 250.434 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil...

  2. 17 CFR 242.302 - Recordkeeping requirements for alternative trading systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... alternative trading systems. 242.302 Section 242.302 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... SECURITY FUTURES Regulation Ats-Alternative Trading Systems § 242.302 Recordkeeping requirements for alternative trading systems. To comply with the condition set forth in paragraph (b)(8) of § 242.301,...

  3. 78 FR 62638 - Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Title: Low Income Home Energy... calling the Administration for Children and Families, Reports Clearance Officer, Robert Sargis at...

  4. 42 CFR 417.126 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... consistent with prudent management and fiscal soundness requirements. (3) A combined financial statement for... credit. (iii) Goods, services, or facilities furnished for a monetary consideration, including management...) Requirements for combined financial statements. (1) The combined financial statements required by paragraph (b...

  5. 42 CFR 137.175 - Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to maintain a recordkeeping system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.175 Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to maintain a recordkeeping... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to maintain a...

  6. 77 FR 11623 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... restraints. The standard, which seeks to reduce whiplash injuries in rear collisions, currently requires head... manufactured on or after September 1, 2008. The owner's manual must clearly identify which seats are...

  7. 40 CFR 141.175 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 141.75(b)(1). (a) Turbidity measurements as required by § 141.173 must be reported within 10 days... includes: (1) The total number of filtered water turbidity measurements taken during the month. (2) The number and percentage of filtered water turbidity measurements taken during the month which are less...

  8. 75 FR 55629 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Behavior: 2010 Type of Request--New information collection requirement. OMB Clearance Number--None. Form... collection of information. SUMMARY: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from the public... established by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies must solicit...

  9. 77 FR 9725 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... insurance companies and rental/leasing companies comply with 49 CFR Part 544, Insurer Reporting Requirement... Anti Car Theft Act (ACTA) of 1992 (Pub. L. 102-519). NHTSA is authorized under 49 U.S.C. 33112, to... insurance companies and rental/leasing companies to provide information to NHTSA on comprehensive...

  10. 77 FR 2135 - Swap Data Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... Banks (``FHLB'') February 7, 2011 (``CL- FHLB''); (46) Global Foreign Exchange Division (``Global Forex'') February 7, 2011 (``CL-Global Forex''); (47) Green Exchange, LLC (``GreenEx'') June 3, 2011 (``CL-GreenEx... (``Global Forex'') suggested that after termination of the swap, real time access should only be required...

  11. 26 CFR 1.402A-2 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements with respect to designated Roth accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... respect to designated Roth accounts. 1.402A-2 Section 1.402A-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.402A-2 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements with respect to designated Roth... investment in the contract, i.e., the amount of unrecovered designated Roth contributions for the employee?...

  12. 16 CFR 1615.62 - Policy and interpretation relative to items in inventory or as to recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy and interpretation relative to items in inventory or as to recordkeeping requirements. 1615.62 Section 1615.62 Commercial Practices... CHILDREN'S SLEEPWEAR: SIZES 0 THROUGH 6X (FF 3-71) Interpretations and Policies § 1615.62 Policy and...

  13. 36 CFR 1222.24 - How do agencies establish recordkeeping requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... maintained for agency business through the scheduling process in part 1225 of this subchapter; (5... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT CREATION AND MAINTENANCE OF FEDERAL RECORDS Agency Recordkeeping...

  14. 40 CFR 82.24 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements for class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... facility; (vii) Dated records of the quantity (in kilograms) of raw materials and feedstock chemicals used...) Recordkeeping and reporting. Any person who produces, imports, exports, transforms, or destroys class II... total of expended and unexpended production allowances, consumption allowances, export...

  15. 36 CFR 1222.28 - What are the series level recordkeeping requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT CREATION AND MAINTENANCE OF FEDERAL RECORDS Agency Recordkeeping... responsible for maintaining the records; (d) Policies and procedures for maintaining the documentation of... and for determining the record status of working files in paper and electronic form; and (f)...

  16. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart G of... - Process Vents-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements For Maintaining a TRE Index...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Reporting Requirements For Maintaining a TRE Index Value >1.0 and. â¤4.0 4 Table 4 to Subpart G of... for Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for... TRE Index Value >1.0 and. ≤4.0 Final recovery device Parameters to be monitored a Recordkeeping...

  17. 32 CFR 644.451 - Nature of required restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Nature of required restoration. 644.451 Section 644.451 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Leaseholds and Leasehold Improvements § 644.451...

  18. 12 CFR 344.4 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping. 344.4 Section 344.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY RECORDKEEPING... accurately reflect the information required and provide an adequate basis for the audit of the...

  19. 75 FR 54940 - Agency Information Collection (IC) Activities; Revision of an Approved IC; Accident Recordkeeping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Agency Information Collection (IC) Activities; Revision of an Approved IC; Accident Recordkeeping Requirements AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA... revision of the Information Collection (IC) entitled, ``Accident Recordkeeping Requirements,''...

  20. 77 FR 47914 - Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ...) abstracted below has been forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The... collection of information described is the ``Roof Crush Resistance Phase in Reporting Requirements--Part 585... Traffic Safety Administration Title: Roof Crush Resistance Phase in Reporting Requirements--Part 585. OMB...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1211 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compression techniques, you must recommend: (i) A fluctuation limit that defines the maximum permissible deviation of a new data value from a previously generated value without requiring you to revert to...

  2. 77 FR 35199 - Swap Data Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements: Pre-Enactment and Transition Swaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Exchange Division (``Global Forex'') recommended that the requirement to report PET data should be limited..., complicating the compilation task of the SDRs. Both ISDA and Global Forex requested that the Commission...

  3. 26 CFR 1.881-4 - Recordkeeping requirements concerning conduit financing arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... identification number (if any) and country of residence of— (A) Each person that advanced money or other property...) The date and amount of— (A) Each advance of money or other property or grant of rights; and (B) Each... maintenance in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section generally does not require the original creation...

  4. 25 CFR 700.477 - Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter or an individual receiving a contract under this subpart shall comply with applicable law... grant or cooperative agreement under this subpart shall comply with applicable law including the... requirements; and (2) Federal Management Circular 74-4 5 CFR part 1310, entitled “Cost Principles Applicable to...

  5. 75 FR 14361 - Notification, Documentation, and Recordkeeping Requirements for Inspected Establishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Parts 417 and 418 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) Systems, Meat inspection, Poultry... Office that an adulterated or misbranded meat or poultry product has entered commerce; require official establishments to prepare and maintain current procedures for the recall of meat and poultry products...

  6. 78 FR 54403 - Removal of Transferred OTS Regulations Regarding Recordkeeping and Confirmation Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... minor technical nuances,\\23\\ the OTS's rule was otherwise substantively similar to the Agencies... descriptive charts. Additionally, the FDIC recognizes that some State savings associations availed themselves.... Regulatory Analysis and Procedure A. The Paperwork Reduction Act In accordance with the requirements of the...

  7. 77 FR 70150 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... Swedish Cultural Center located at 1920 Dexter Ave N., Seattle, WA. Directions to the center can be found...: Susan Hall, 907-586-7462. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The workshop will include a discussion of ] 2013... longline fleet (77 FR 59053) mandates that vessel operators who opt into the program will be required...

  8. Guide to NRC reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Compiled from requirements in Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations as codified on December 31, 1993; Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.; Shelton, B.

    1994-07-01

    This compilation includes in the first two sections the reporting and recordkeeping requirements applicable to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees and applicants and to members of the public. It includes those requirements codified in Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, on December 31, 1993. It also includes, in a separate section, any of those requirements that were superseded or discontinued between January 1992 and December 1993. Finally, the appendix lists mailing and delivery addresses for NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices mentioned in the compilation. The Office of Information Resources Management staff compiled this listing of reporting and recordkeeping requirements to briefly describe each in a single document primarily to help licensees readily identify the requirements. The compilation is not a substitute for the regulations, and is not intended to impose any new requirements or technical positions. It is part of NRC`s continuing efforts to comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 and the Office of Management and Budget regulations that mandate effective and efficient Federal information resources management programs.

  9. 32 CFR 644.453 - Major restoration cases-determining extent of restoration required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... estimate and appraisal. Any restoration case not covered by the definitions of minor restoration case in... establish the top sales price expectancy in negotiations with the landowner. (4) “9. Gross Salvage Value of... material dealers, etc., but to also give consideration to possible interest by house moving and...

  10. 78 FR 33774 - Ballast Water Management Reporting and Recordkeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    .... USCG-2012-0924] RIN 1625-AB68 Ballast Water Management Reporting and Recordkeeping AGENCY: Coast Guard... ballast water management (BWM) reporting and recordkeeping requirements. The Coast Guard will require... Ballast Water Management CFR Code of Federal Regulations COTP Coast Guard Captain of the Port...

  11. 19 CFR 191.26 - Recordkeeping for manufacturing drawback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping for manufacturing drawback. 191.26...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Manufacturing Drawback § 191.26 Recordkeeping for manufacturing drawback. (a) Direct identification manufacturing—(1) Records required. Each manufacturer...

  12. 7 CFR 2812.8 - Accountability and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accountability and recordkeeping. 2812.8 Section 2812.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF OPERATIONS... UNDER 15 U.S.C. 3710(i) § 2812.8 Accountability and recordkeeping. USDA requires that property...

  13. 7 CFR 250.54 - Recordkeeping and reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES-FOOD DISTRIBUTION DONATION OF FOODS FOR USE IN THE UNITED STATES... Service Management Companies § 250.54 Recordkeeping and reviews. (a) Recordkeeping requirements for the... foods in its contract with the food service management company: (1) The donated foods and processed...

  14. Basic Program Elements for Federal employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and related matters; Subpart I for Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    OSHA is issuing a final rule amending the Basic Program Elements to require Federal agencies to submit their occupational injury and illness recordkeeping information to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and OSHA on an annual basis. The information, which is already required to be created and maintained by Federal agencies, will be used by BLS to aggregate injury and illness information throughout the Federal government. OSHA will use the information to identify Federal establishments with high incidence rates for targeted inspection, and assist in determining the most effective safety and health training for Federal employees. The final rule also interprets several existing basic program elements in our regulations to clarify requirements applicable to Federal agencies, amends the date when Federal agencies must submit to the Secretary of Labor their annual report on occupational safety and health programs, amends the date when the Secretary of Labor must submit to the President the annual report on Federal agency safety and health, and clarifies that Federal agencies must include uncompensated volunteers when reporting and recording occupational injuries and illnesses.

  15. 5 CFR 293.103 - Recordkeeping standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 293.103 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Basic Policies on Maintenance of Personnel Records § 293.103 Recordkeeping standards. (a) The head... requirements of the Office of Personnel Management and the agency. Authority to maintain personnel records...

  16. 50 CFR 300.185 - Documentation, reporting and recordkeeping requirements for consignment documents and re-export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... flag country whose vessel caught the fish (regardless of where the fish are first landed). Re-export... requiring a BCD tag on all such bluefin tuna available for sale, must be accompanied by the appropriate...

  17. 76 FR 6567 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... the requirement, in Sec. 300.65(d)(2)(iv)(B)(1), to record the sport fishing operator business license...; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and Reporting AGENCY: National Marine... rule. SUMMARY: NMFS issues regulations to amend the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for the...

  18. 77 FR 65097 - Reimbursement to Financial Institutions for Providing Financial Records; Recordkeeping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... proceedings.\\1\\ The Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act of 1992 (Pub. L. 102-550) (Annunzio-Wylie... regarding the scope of the joint recordkeeping rule and the rule's interaction with other anti-money laundering regulations, the substantive requirements of the recordkeeping rule were codified in 31 CFR part...

  19. Functions and requirements for tank farm restoration and safe operations, Project W-314. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, R.C.

    1995-02-01

    This Functions and Requirements document (FRD) establishes the basic performance criteria for Project W-314, in accordance with the guidance outlined in the letter from R.W. Brown, RL, to President, WHC, ``Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Documentation Methodology,`` 94-PRJ-018, dated 3/18/94. The FRD replaces the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) as the project technical baseline documentation. Project W-314 will improve the reliability of safety related systems, minimize onsite health and safety hazards, and support waste retrieval and disposal activities by restoring and/or upgrading existing Tank Farm facilities and systems. The scope of Project W-314 encompasses the necessary restoration upgrades of the Tank Farms` instrumentation, ventilation, electrical distribution, and waste transfer systems.

  20. 75 FR 22070 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... requirements for the Pacific halibut guided sport fishery in International Pacific Halibut Commission...; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and Reporting AGENCY: National Marine... would revise federal requirements regarding the location and time period for submission of Alaska...

  1. Environmental Restoration Program quality system requirements for the Hanford Site. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, R.F.

    1993-11-01

    This document defines the quality system requirements for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Program at the Hanford Site. The Quality System Requirements (OSR) for the Hanford Site integrates quality assurance requirements from the US Department of Energy Orders, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), and applicable industry standards into a single source document for the development of quality systems applicable to the Environmental Restoration Program activities. This document, based on fifteen criteria and divided intro three parts, provides user organizations with the flexibility to incorporate only those criteria and parts applicable to their specific scopes of work. The requirements of this document shall be applied to activities that affect quality based on a graded approach that takes into consideration the risk inherent in, as well as the importance of, specific items, services, and activities in terms of meeting ER Program objectives and customer expectations. The individual quality systems developed in accordance with this document are intended to provide an integrated management control system that assures the conduct of ER Program activities in a manner that protects human health and the environment.

  2. Requirements for quality control of analytical data for the Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, J.

    1992-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was established for the investigation and remediation of inactive US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities that have been declared surplus in terms of their previous uses. The purpose of this document is to Specify ER requirements for quality control (QC) of analytical data. Activities throughout all phases of the investigation may affect the quality of the final data product, thus are subject to control specifications. Laboratory control is emphasized in this document, and field concerns will be addressed in a companion document Energy Systems, in its role of technical coordinator and at the request of DOE-OR, extends the application of these requirements to all participants in ER activities. Because every instance and concern may not be addressed in this document, participants are encouraged to discuss any questions with the ER Quality Assurance (QA) Office, the Analytical Environmental Support Group (AESG), or the Analytical Project Office (APO).

  3. Integration of Environmental Restoration and Decontamination and Dismantlement Requirements at the INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhns, Douglass Jack; Reese, Craig Lyle

    1999-03-01

    In 1997, the Environmental Restoration Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that it was necessary to remediate a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA) site to address the risk of subsurface petroleum contamination to human health and the environment. This cleanup project was conducted utilizing the Non-time Critical Removal Action process. Due to the close proximity (above the contaminated soil) of a number of above ground storage tanks and a building, the CERCLA project team worked closely with the D&D group to ensure all requirements for each program were met. Lessons learned and regulatory requirements will be discussed in the paper, including the factors unknown to many ER personnel regarding the steps required to be completed prior to the dismantlement of structures. The paper will summarize the background associated with the site, why the removal action was conducted, the scope of the removal action, and the results. The emphasis of the paper will discuss the integration between ER and D&D requirements and processes. In the current environment where ER and D&D activities are commingled, it is imperative that ER and D&D personnel are aware of the requirements imposed upon each program. By working together and building upon the strengths of each program, the INEEL’s 1997 removal action was a tremendous success.

  4. 78 FR 4152 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Recordkeeping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Recordkeeping Requirements for Microbiological Testing and Corrective Measures... maintain records of microbiological testing and corrective measures, in addition to existing...

  5. The minimum thickness of a multilayer porcelain restoration required for masking severe tooth discoloration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadman, Niloofar; Kandi, Saeideh Gorji; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Shoul, Maryam Azizi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although studies have shown that porcelain veneers are very efficient for treating discolored teeth, they did not address in particular the minimum thickness of a multilayer IPS e.max Press (IvoclarVivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) restoration required to mask discolored tooth. The aim of this study was to determine the minimum thickness of a multilayer porcelain restoration required for masking severe tooth discoloration. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 disk-shaped multilayer specimens were prepared from IPS e.max Press with the diameter of 13 mm and four different thicknesses (core/veneer: 0.4/0.4 mm, 0.5/0.5 mm, 0.6/0.6 mm and 0.8/0.7 mm). Two backgrounds, C4-shade body porcelain and an opaque background from the selected IPS e.max ceramic itself were fabricated to mimic a discolored or stained natural tooth structure and to determine the masking ability. After applying the resin cement layer (Panavia F2.0) with 0.01 mm thickness on each background, all specimens were measured on both background using a spectrophotometer and values of L*, a* and b* were calculated to determine the color differences (ΔE*ab). One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests of specimen average one-to-one comparison (Tukey HSD) were conducted and P ≤ 0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results: ΔE*ab of all groups were within the range of the clinically acceptable color difference (ΔE≤3.3), thus all the groups could mask the C4 background even group 1 with only 0.8 mm thickness. A trend was shown in the results as by increasing the thickness, ΔE*ab is was decreased. The mean ΔE*1*a*b between different thicknesses were statistically significant (P < 0.05) only between group 4 with groups 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, all studied thicknesses could mask the C4 background. However, the minimum thickness of a multilayer porcelain restoration (IPS e.max Press) required for masking severe tooth discoloration was 0.8 mm. PMID

  6. The minimum thickness of a multilayer porcelain restoration required for masking severe tooth discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although studies have shown that porcelain veneers are very efficient for treating discolored teeth, they did not address in particular the minimum thickness of a multilayer IPS e.max Press (IvoclarVivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein restoration required to mask discolored tooth. The aim of this study was to determine the minimum thickness of a multilayer porcelain restoration required for masking severe tooth discoloration. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 disk-shaped multilayer specimens were prepared from IPS e.max Press with the diameter of 13 mm and four different thicknesses (core/veneer: 0.4/0.4 mm, 0.5/0.5 mm, 0.6/0.6 mm and 0.8/0.7 mm. Two backgrounds, C4-shade body porcelain and an opaque background from the selected IPS e.max ceramic itself were fabricated to mimic a discolored or stained natural tooth structure and to determine the masking ability. After applying the resin cement layer (Panavia F2.0 with 0.01 mm thickness on each background, all specimens were measured on both background using a spectrophotometer and values of LFNx01, aFNx01 and bFNx01 were calculated to determine the color differences (ΔEFNx01ab. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests of specimen average one-to-one comparison (Tukey HSD were conducted and P ≤ 0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results: ΔEFNx01ab of all groups were within the range of the clinically acceptable color difference (ΔE ≤3.3, thus all the groups could mask the C4 background even group 1 with only 0.8 mm thickness. A trend was shown in the results as by increasing the thickness, ΔEFNx01ab is was decreased. The mean ΔE FNx011FNx01aFNx01b between different thicknesses were statistically significant (P < 0.05 only between group 4 with groups 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, all studied thicknesses could mask the C4 background. However, the minimum thickness of a multilayer porcelain restoration (IPS e.max Press required for masking

  7. Public perceptions of natural resource damages and the resources that require restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    The public and health professionals are interested in restoring degraded ecosystem to provide goods and services. This study examined public perceptions in coastal New York and New Jersey about who is responsible for restoration of resources, which resources should be restored, by whom, and do they know the meaning of natural resource damage assessment (NRDA). More than 98% felt that resources should be restored; more (40%) thought the government should restore them, rather than the responsible party (23%). The highest rated resources were endangered wildlife, fish, mammals, and clams/crabs. Only 2% of respondents knew what NRDA meant. These data indicate that people felt strongly that resources should be restored and varied in who should restore them, suggesting that governmental agencies must clarify the relationship between chemical discharges, resource injury, NRDA, and restoration of those resources to produce clean air and water, fish and wildlife, and recreational opportunities.

  8. Evidence Regarding Teaching and Assessment of Record-Keeping Skills in Training of Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kate J; Bearman, Margaret; Palermo, Claire

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the literature on teaching and assessing dental students' record-keeping skills prior to qualification to practice independently as a dentist. A systematic literature review was performed using Ovid MEDLINE and SCOPUS. Keywords used in the search included dental, record, audit, education, and assessment. Electronic search results were screened for publications that targeted undergraduate dental training, related to a record-keeping education intervention, and were published in English and available in full text. Six studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed, and research findings were compared across the included studies. These six articles addressed the techniques used to teach and assess record-keeping skills in a pre-qualification context. The techniques included supervisor audits, peer audits, lectures, tutorials, research assignments, case reports, record-keeping templates, and checklists of required record components. The use of record audit as part of teaching and evaluation dominated these articles; it was used as the assessment method in five of the six studies. All methods of record-keeping training in studies published to date were found effective in improving student record-keeping skills. However, there was insufficient evidence to determine whether certain methods were more effective than others.

  9. Intact brown adipose tissue thermogenesis is required for restorative sleep responses after sleep loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kapás, Levente; Szentirmai, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The article demonstrates the importance of brown fat in creating and maintaining a metabolic environment which is permissive for optimal restorative sleep after sleep loss. The authors propose that impaired brown fat function could be a common underlying cause of poor sleep and metabolic disorders.

  10. 13 CFR 108.640 - Requirement to file portfolio financing reports (SBA Form 1031).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Recordkeeping, Reporting, and Examination Requirements for NMVC Companies Reporting Requirements for Nmvc Companies § 108.640 Requirement to...

  11. 12 CFR 12.3 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping. 12.3 Section 12.3 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RECORDKEEPING AND CONFIRMATION... an adequate basis for the audit of the information. Record maintenance may include the use...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.25 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordkeeping. 1065.25 Section 1065.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General Provisions § 1065.25 Recordkeeping. The procedures in this part...

  13. 24 CFR 214.315 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... participating housing counseling agency must maintain a recordkeeping system. The system must permit HUD to... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping. 214.315 Section 214.315 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued...

  14. 75 FR 36650 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Recordkeeping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Requirements for Producers, Registrants, and Applicants of Pesticides and Pesticide Devices under Section 8 of... legal holidays. Deliveries are only accepted during the Docket Center's normal hours of operation, and... applicants for registration of pesticides and pesticide devices. Title: Recordkeeping Requirements...

  15. 20 CFR 633.309 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 633.309 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND..., consistent, and accurate; (5) Meet generally accepted accounting principles as prescribed in 41 CFR part 29-70; (6) Provide for adequate control of Federal funds and other assets; (7) Trace the funds to...

  16. 40 CFR 63.181 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... device, under the provisions of § 63.170 of this subpart. (3)(i) A list of identification numbers for... identification numbers for pressure relief devices equipped with rupture disks, under the provisions of § 63.165... 63.174 of this subpart shall be recorded: (1)(i) A list of identification numbers for equipment...

  17. 40 CFR 61.176 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring for measurement of opacity; (2) Records of emission test data and all calculations used to produce... occurrence and duration of all startups, shutdowns, and malfunctions of the copper converters; (5) All... rates for the horizontal-slotted plenum and exhaust hood for each converter operating mode...

  18. 12 CFR 27.3 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or disability income and income from part-time employment. For self-employed persons, include the... approximate current market value of the property which will secure the loan. (xvi) Applicant's or applicants... accounts, stocks and bonds, cash value of life insurance, value of real estate owned, net worth of...

  19. 40 CFR 63.829 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... material applied on product and packaging rotogravure or wide-web flexographic printing presses during each... maintain records of the total mass and organic HAP content of each material applied on product and... choosing to exclude from an affected source, a product and packaging rotogravure or wide-web...

  20. 40 CFR 63.774 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the daily averages. (iii) Hourly records of whether the flow indicator specified under § 63.771(c)(3... the key for a lock-and-key type lock has been checked out, and records of any car-seal that has broken...

  1. 40 CFR 264.1035 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon used for carbon beds, design total steam flow over the period of each complete carbon bed... of activated carbon used for carbon bed, and design carbon replacement interval based on the total... the estimated or design flow rate and organic content of each vent stream and define the...

  2. 40 CFR 265.1035 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon used for carbon beds, design total steam flow over the period of each complete carbon bed... of activated carbon used for carbon bed, and design carbon replacement interval based on the total... -include the estimated or design flow rate and organic content of each vent stream and define...

  3. 40 CFR 61.356 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... capacity of carbon beds, type and working capacity of activated carbon used for carbon beds, design total... carbon bed, type and working capacity of activated carbon used for carbon bed, and design carbon... following information for the waste stream: waste stream identification, water content, whether or not...

  4. 50 CFR 560.7 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 560.7 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE... Commission shall maintain either a complete transcript or electronic recording of the proceedings of each... transcript, an electronic recording, or a set of minutes of the proceedings. If minutes are maintained, they...

  5. 11 CFR 9407.7 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....7 Federal Elections ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE... transcript or electronic recording of the proceedings of each meeting. (b) In the case of either a meeting or... complete transcript, an electronic recording, or a set of minutes of the proceedings. If minutes are...

  6. 40 CFR 63.752 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... record the actual pressure drop across the particulate filters or the visual continuity of the water... the pressure drop as specified by the filter manufacturer, the visual continuity of the water curtain... shall record the pressure drop across the operating system once each shift during which...

  7. 9 CFR 2.35 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) The date of acquisition of each dog or cat; (5) The official USDA tag number or tattoo assigned to... sections of the Freedom of Information Act. Whenever the Administrator notifies a research facility...

  8. 40 CFR 264.1089 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operator shall record and maintain the following information: (1) A list of the individual organic peroxide... description of how the hazardous waste containing the organic peroxide compounds identified in paragraph (i)(1... hazardous waste containing the organic peroxide compounds identified in paragraph (i)(1) of this section...

  9. 40 CFR 265.1090 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... information: (1) A list of the individual organic peroxide compounds manufactured at the facility that meet... the organic peroxide compounds identified in paragraph (i)(1) of this section are managed at the... containing the organic peroxide compounds identified in paragraph (i)(1) of this section in the tanks...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1284 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... section shall not be included in any average or percent leak rate computed under this subpart. Records..., calibration checks, and zero (low-level) and high-level adjustments; (ii) Startup, shutdown, and malfunction....1274(c). (1) The actual annual average natural gas throughput (in terms of natural gas flowrate to...

  11. 40 CFR 264.1064 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment (e.g., a pump or pipeline valve). (iv) Percent-by-weight total organics in the hazardous waste... device other than a thermal vapor incinerator, catalytic vapor incinerator, flare, boiler, process heater, condenser, or carbon adsorption system, the Regional Administrator will specify the...

  12. 40 CFR 265.1064 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). (iii) Type of equipment (e.g., a pump or pipeline valve). (iv) Percent-by-weight total organics in the....1035 (c)(3)-(c)(8). (f) For a control device other than a thermal vapor incinerator, catalytic vapor incinerator, flare, boiler, process heater, condenser, or carbon adsorption system, monitoring and...

  13. 7 CFR 65.500 - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the variation in inventory and accounting documentary systems, various forms of documentation and... system (e.g., Canadian official system, Mexico official system) may also rely on the presence of an... documents and information systems; and must maintain such records for a period of 1 year from the date...

  14. Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS) is part of the Clinical Information Support System (CISS) portal framework and the initial CISS partner system. OHRS...

  15. 19 CFR 146.21 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Inventory Control and Recordkeeping System § 146.21 General requirements. (a) Systems capability. The operator shall maintain either manual or automated inventory control and recordkeeping systems or combination manual and automated systems capable of: (1) Accounting...

  16. Restoring forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Douglass F.; Oliet, Juan A.; Aronson, James

    2015-01-01

    of land requiring restoration implies the need for spatial prioritization of restoration efforts according to cost-benefit analyses that include ecological risks. To design resistant and resilient ecosystems that can adapt to emerging circumstances, an adaptive management approach is needed. Global change......, in particular, imparts a high degree of uncertainty about the future ecological and societal conditions of forest ecosystems to be restored, as well as their desired goods and services. We must also reconsider the suite of species incorporated into restoration with the aim of moving toward more stress resistant...... and competitive combinations in the longer term. Non-native species may serve an important role under some circumstances, e.g., to facilitate reintroduction of native species. Propagation and field establishment techniques must promote survival through seedling stress resistance and site preparation. An improved...

  17. 26 CFR 1.412(c)(1)-3T - Applying the minimum funding requirements to restored plans (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) restoration liability determined under paragraph (g)(3) of this section and less any unpredictable contingent... funding standard account, and all other provisions of section 412 and the regulations thereunder, are... the accrued liability of the plan on the initial post-restoration valuation date less the...

  18. Suggested Record-Keeping Procedures for DDOE Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    Sixteen different programs designed to increase energy efficiency and reduce the energy cost burden for District of Columbia residents, businesses, and non-profit organizations are currently provided by the District Department of the Environment's (DDOE's) Energy Office. In the spring of 2008, DDOE asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide assistance in its ongoing efforts to track the progress of those programs. Effective record-keeping can provide information to help managers improve their programs, be very useful in preparing quarterly reports documenting program achievements, and facilitate the performance of periodic evaluations that measure how well the various programs are achieving their objectives. The first major task in this study was to review existing documents describing DDOE's energy programs, to become familiar with the purpose and procedures of each one. The relevant documents included existing program evaluation plans, recent evaluations of DDOE's energy programs, relevant Public Service Commission orders, local regulatory filings, filings by other interested parties, and evaluation-related documents from other states. The next step was to conduct in-depth interviews with all DDOE energy program managers to obtain detailed information on each program's information needs, existing record-keeping procedures, and data collection capabilities. Those interviews were followed by discussions with DDOE evaluation staff to identify their key information requirements. Based on program goals and activities, evaluation and reporting needs, and other relevant factors revealed through the document review and in-depth interviews, we identified key items for each program on which the record-keeping effort should focus. The frequency of data collection was determined by the needs of program managers and evaluators as well as by reporting requirements. Appropriate analytical approaches to use with the data collected for each

  19. 77 FR 59318 - Removal of 30-Day Residency Requirement for Per Diem Payments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... for a higher level of care, such as a period of hospitalization. Temporary absences also arise for... programs, Nursing homes, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Travel and transportation expenses...

  20. Community Resilience: Workshops on Private Sector and Property Owner Requirements for Recovery and Restoration from a Diasaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-12-22

    This report summarizes the results of a proejct sponsored by DTRA to 1) Assess the readiness of private-sector businesses, building owners, and service providers to restore property and recover operations in the aftermath of a wide-area dispersal of anthrax; and 2) Understand what private property owners and businesses "want and need" from federal, state, and local government to support recovery and restoration from such an incident.

  1. 40 CFR 264.279 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 264.279 Recordkeeping. The owner or operator must include hazardous waste application dates and rates in...

  2. 7 CFR 926.17 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER §...

  3. Euglycemia restoration by central leptin in type 1 diabetes requires STAT3 signaling but not fast-acting neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Central leptin action is sufficient to restore euglycemia in insulinopenic type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. To examine the role of intracellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathways, we used LepRs/s mice with disrupted...

  4. 20 CFR 637.300 - Management systems, reporting and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management systems, reporting and... Standards and Procedures § 637.300 Management systems, reporting and recordkeeping. (a) The Governor shall ensure that the State's financial management system and recordkeeping system comply with subpart D...

  5. 19 CFR 19.12 - Inventory control and recordkeeping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... must be posted in the appropriate inventory category within 2 business days after the event occurs. All... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory control and recordkeeping system. 19.12... § 19.12 Inventory control and recordkeeping system. (a) Systems capability. The proprietor of a class...

  6. 40 CFR 60.35c - Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 60.35c Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines. For...

  7. 40 CFR 60.38e - Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators § 60.38e Reporting and recordkeeping...

  8. 7 CFR 761.102 - Borrower recordkeeping, reporting, and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Borrower recordkeeping, reporting, and supervision. 761.102 Section 761.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM... Credit § 761.102 Borrower recordkeeping, reporting, and supervision. (a) A borrower must...

  9. 17 CFR 32.7 - Books and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Books and recordkeeping. 32.7... COMMODITY OPTION TRANSACTIONS § 32.7 Books and recordkeeping. (a) Each person which accepts any money... least include all orders (filled, unfilled or cancelled), signature cards, books of records,...

  10. 19 CFR 146.93 - Inventory control and recordkeeping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory control and recordkeeping system. 146.93 Section 146.93 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 146.93 Inventory control and recordkeeping system. (a) Attribution. All final products removed from or...

  11. Records Continuum: An Emerging Recordkeeping Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Shiou Lin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Records Continuum, a recordkeeping theory emerging from the Australian archives and records management studies which gained international recognition in the 1990s. This paper first describes the background of the theory development. It goes on to explicate the theses of continuum theorists including the Records Continuum Diagram developed by Frank Upward. Finally, it offers some critiques on the theoretical propositions and discusses their implications on records and archival practices. [Article content in Chinese

  12. The importance of good record-keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, T; Armstrong, V; Brown, B

    When large numbers of health care staff from different professional groups are involved in the care of individual clients, the need for simple, understandable, uniform casenotes becomes paramount. This article describes how a survey of the different casenotes used by various CPN teams led to the devising of a new system. The aim was to encourage good practice and develop a standardised record-keeping system.

  13. Restoring the worn dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, R L; Ouellet, D F

    1992-01-01

    Strong dental materials and dental porcelains are providing dentists with restorative opportunities that are more conservative because they require less destruction of healthy tooth structure and yield a more esthetic result. In cases of severe wear due to attrition, abrasion, and erosion, this process can be stopped, restoring the esthetics and function by using proper techniques and materials. The case report described in this article demonstrates the conservative restoration of severe wear due to attrition and erosion. Teeth were lengthened, wear was restored, and further wear was ceased by using a combination of bonded porcelain, a heat, light, and self-cure resin system, and a new glass-ionomer restorative material. The result was a strong, durable restoration (that required no anesthesia) with high esthetics.

  14. Anesthesia Recordkeeping: Accuracy of Recall with Computerized and Manual Entry Recordkeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas Corey

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Anesthesia information management systems are rapidly gaining widespread acceptance. Aggressively promoted as an improvement to manual-entry recordkeeping systems in the areas of accuracy, quality improvement, billing and vigilance, these systems record all patient vital signs and parameters, providing a legible hard copy and…

  15. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Goal of the Laysan Island Restoration is to restore Laysan to a "Pristine" state which would require minimal monitoring and habitat for Endemic Endangered...

  16. Guiding Restoration Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    restoration of important ecosystem functions requires reintegrating landscapes or restorating the func- tional aspects of landscapes ( Risser 1992...51-64. Risser , P. G. 1992. Landscape ecology approach to ecosystem rehabilitation. Pages 37-46 in M. L. Wali (ed.), Ecosystem Rehabilitation

  17. Micro-RNA-155-mediated control of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is required for restoring adaptively tolerant CD4+ T-cell function in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyu; Vandevenne, Patricia; Hamdi, Haifa; Van Puyvelde, Merry; Zucchi, Alessandro; Bettonville, Marie; Weatherly, Kathleen; Braun, Michel Y

    2015-03-01

    T cells chronically stimulated by a persistent antigen often become dysfunctional and lose effector functions and proliferative capacity. To identify the importance of micro-RNA-155 (miR-155) in this phenomenon, we analyzed mouse miR-155-deficient CD4(+) T cells in a model where the chronic exposure to a systemic antigen led to T-cell functional unresponsiveness. We found that miR-155 was required for restoring function of T cells after programmed death receptor 1 blockade. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was identified as a specific target of miR-155 and inhibition of HO-1 activity restored the expansion and tissue migration capacity of miR-155(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, miR-155-mediated control of HO-1 expression in CD4(+) T cells was shown to sustain in vivo antigen-specific expansion and IL-2 production. Thus, our data identify HO-1 regulation as a mechanism by which miR-155 promotes T-cell-driven inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. 7 CFR 205.103 - Recordkeeping by certified operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 205.103 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Applicability § 205.103 Recordkeeping by...

  19. IMPLEMENTING AND AUDITING ELECTRONIC RECORDKEEPING SYSTEMS USED IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic recordkeeping is increasingly replacing hadwritten records in the course of "normal business." As this trend continues, it is important that organizations develop and implement electronic recordkeeping policies and procedures. This is especially true for Research and...

  20. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Batch Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins Pt. 63, Subpt. JJJ, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Group 1 Batch Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams...

  1. Voice restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgers, F.J.M.; Balm, A.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Tan, I.B.; Remacle, M.; Eckel, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical prosthetic voice restoration is the best possible option for patients to regain oral communication after total laryngectomy. It is considered to be the present "gold standard" for voice rehabilitation of laryngectomized individuals. Surgical prosthetic voice restoration, in essence, is alwa

  2. The importance of good record-keeping for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher

    Good record-keeping is a mark of the skilled and safe practitioner, yet allegations concerning shortcomings in nurses' record-keeping were the second most common category of hearing brought before the UKCC in 2000-2001. The absence of accurate records makes it difficult for practitioners to prove they provided appropriate care should they be asked to do so in a professional or legal hearing. This is particularly pertinent since litigation against health professionals is increasing rapidly. This article discusses the importance of keeping comprehensive and accurate records of patient care and decisions from the perspective of nurses, their patients and colleagues. It also discusses the elements of good record-keeping, as well as practices to avoid.

  3. Challenges of ecological restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halme, Panu; Allen, Katherine A.; Aunins, Ainars

    2013-01-01

    on Biological Diversity. Several northern countries are now taking up this challenge by restoring forest biodiversity with increasing intensity. The ecology and biodiversity of boreal forests are relatively well understood making them a good model for restoration activities in many other forest ecosystems. Here......The alarming rate of ecosystem degradation has raised the need for ecological restoration throughout different biomes and continents. North European forests may appear as one of the least vulnerable ecosystems from a global perspective, since forest cover is not rapidly decreasing and many...... ecosystem services remain at high level. However, extensive areas of northern forests are heavily exploited and have lost a major part of their biodiversity value. There is a strong requirement to restore these areas towards a more natural condition in order to meet the targets of the Convention...

  4. 77 FR 10663 - Due Date of Initial Application Requirements for State Home Construction Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ...; Alcoholism; Claims; Day care; Dental health; Drug abuse; Government contracts; Grant programs--health; Grant... health programs; Nursing homes; Philippines, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements; Veterans. Dated... approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety...

  5. 10 CFR 300.9 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 300.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE VOLUNTARY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING PROGRAM: GENERAL... possible EIA annual report of greenhouse gas emissions reported under this part, entity reports that have... corrected or improved data to EIA, together with an explanation of the significance of the change and...

  6. 46 CFR 280.7 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... operator in the following form: I hereby certify to the best of my knowledge and belief that this report is... the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). (2) If an operator desires confidential treatment of...

  7. 40 CFR 63.311 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., that no coke oven gas was vented, except through the bypass/bleeder stack flare system of a by-product... venting of coke oven gas other than through a flare system. The owner or operator shall report any venting...: (1) Statement signed by the owner or operator, certifying that a bypass/bleeder stack flare system...

  8. 75 FR 76573 - Swap Data Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ...-time bilateral nets for each currency.\\29\\ The Warehouse supports trade processing associated with... trade; minimization of time and cost by automating payment calculations and providing bilateral netting... Needs for Swap Data E. Existing Trade Repositories F. Consultations With Other U.S. Financial Regulators...

  9. 40 CFR 63.11094 - What are my recordkeeping requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... documentation file shall be kept up-to-date for each gasoline cargo tank loading at the facility. The... Certification Test—Method 27 or Periodic Railcar Bubble Leak Test Procedure. (ii) Cargo tank owner's name and... compliance with paragraph (c)(1) of this section. (2) For facilities that use a terminal automation system...

  10. 78 FR 76886 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... Clearance Officer, Curtis Rich, Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor, Washington, DC..., New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis Rich, Agency Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7030 curtis.rich@sba.gov . Abstract: Small Business...

  11. 77 FR 70525 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ..., Curtis Rich, Curtis.rich@sba.gov , Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor...: Curtis Rich, Agency Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7030. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: ``Surety Bond... Bond Guarantee Companies. Responses: 2,400. Annual Burden: 199. Curtis Rich, Management...

  12. 77 FR 38704 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    .... ADDRESSES: Address all comments concerning this notice to: Agency Clearance Officer, Curtis Rich Curtis.rich... Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis Rich, Agency Clearance.... Curtis Rich, Acting Chief, Administrative Information Branch. BILLING CODE 8025-01-P...

  13. 77 FR 59447 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ..., Curtis Rich, Curtis.rich@sba.gov , Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor...: Curtis Rich, Agency Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7030. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: ``Disaster... Respondents: Affected Disaster Areas. Responses: 2,800. Annual Burden: 239. Curtis Rich, Management...

  14. 77 FR 68881 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ..., Curtis Rich, Curtis.rich@sba.gov Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor, Washington... Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis Rich.... Description of Respondents: HUBZone eligible applicants. Responses: 6,377. Annual Burden: 10,725. Curtis...

  15. 78 FR 11263 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ..., Curtis Rich, Curtis.rich@sba.gov Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor, Washington... Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis Rich...: Participants for the Microloan program. Responses: 2,500. Annual Burden: 625. Curtis Rich, Management...

  16. 78 FR 77194 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... Clearance Officer, Curtis Rich, Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor, Washington, DC..., New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis Rich, Agency Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7030 curtis.rich@sba.gov . Abstract Small Business...

  17. 40 CFR 60.49b - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... an exceedance due to maintenance of the SO2 control system covered in paragraph 60.45b(a), the report shall identify the days on which the maintenance was performed and a description of the maintenance; (3... system or a predictive emissions monitoring system. (iii) Within 180 days of the completion of...

  18. 78 FR 68902 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... announcements in newsletters and on community listserves, and/or sign-ups at a weekly farmer's market and other... Global Positioning System coordinates and a companion device to capture an image of the driver to...

  19. 40 CFR 63.324 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... perchloroethylene purchases and a log of the following information and maintain such information on site and show it upon request for a period of 5 years: (1) The volume of perchloroethylene purchased each month by the... 18, 1994) and provide the following information: (1) The name and address of the owner or operator...

  20. 40 CFR 63.567 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., thereby bypassing the control device, and identify which valves are car-sealed opened and which valves are car-sealed closed. (g) If a vent system, or vapor collection system, containing valves that could... periods when flow bypassing the control device is indicated if flow indicators are installed under § 63...

  1. 77 FR 35473 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... measurement periods = 40,000 total surveys.) The distracted driving program focused on texting behavior will... following proposed collection of information: Title: NHTSA Distracted Driving Survey Project. Type of... conduct awareness surveys to evaluate two traffic safety programs designed to reduce distracted...

  2. 76 FR 34139 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... dialing. Interviews would be conducted both with respondents using landline phones and respondents using..., Washington, DC 20590. Mr. Block's phone number is 202-366-6401 and his email address is alan.block@dot.gov... greatest benefit, to develop new programs to decrease the likelihood of alcohol-impaired driving, and...

  3. 76 FR 58341 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ..., Ground Floor, 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., Room W12-140, Washington, DC, 20590. Hand Delivery: West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m... vehicle-based technology for detecting drivers whose blood alcohol level exceeds the limit. A national...

  4. 78 FR 25351 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ...: Advanced Crash Avoidance Technologies Consumer Research. OMB Control Number: 2127-XXXX. Form Number: None... (23 U.S.C. 101) to carry out a Congressional mandate to reduce the mounting number of deaths, injuries, and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes on the Nation's highways. In support of this...

  5. 75 FR 25033 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... input on alternative prototype features, and obtain guidance on strategies for introduction... reporting of the collected information will use generic categories rather than first names to further... the technology design; and Guide a strategy for introduction of this technology. NHTSA believes...

  6. 75 FR 32838 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... incorrect use of child restraint systems in passenger vehicles, as well as interview information from... receive information on child passenger safety and specific information regarding the locations of... collections to assess the levels of child restraint system use and misuse for children riding in passenger...

  7. 76 FR 35270 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g. permitting electronic... again in June 1996 transferring the text of the FMVSS No. 115 to part 565, without making...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1386 - Notification, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manufactured on a rotary spin manufacturing line or flame attenuation manufacturing line subject to the... explanation of the corrective actions taken, and when the cause of the exceedance was corrected. (e) Excess... semiannually if measured emissions are in excess of the applicable standard or a monitored parameter...

  9. 78 FR 71714 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    .... Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to http://www..., mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g... printing brochures is at $3,163,500. This yields a total annual financial burden of approximately...

  10. 76 FR 52383 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... consumers care more about and what information they still need to make more informed purchase and driver behavior decisions. Estimated Annual Burden: 1,333.33 hours. Number of Respondents: 4,000. NHTSA...

  11. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuuu of... - Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., the pollutant concentration or parametric signal analyzer, and the data collection and reduction... indicator operation and detection of any diversion during the hour and records of all periods when the vent stream is diverted from the control stream or the flow indicator is not operating; orii. the records of...

  12. 75 FR 24756 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Secondary Market for Section 504 First Mortgage Loan Pool Program. Frequency.... Frequency: On Occasion. SBA Form Number: 2294. Description of Respondents: Personnel that assist in the...

  13. 40 CFR 60.276a - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: (1) Facility name and address; (2) Plant representative; (3) Make and model of process, control device, and continuous monitoring equipment; (4) Flow diagram of process and emission capture equipment... at values exceeding ±15 percent of the value established under § 60.274a(c) or operation at flow...

  14. 40 CFR 60.276 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Plant representative; (3) Make and model of process, control device, and continuous monitoring equipment; (4) Flow diagram of process and emission capture equipment including other equipment or process(es... values exceeding ±15 percent of the value established under § 60.274(c) or operation at flow rates lower...

  15. 40 CFR 60.565 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the vacuum system servicing the polymerization reaction section, if an owner or operator is subject to... adsorber gases is more than 20 percent greater than the exhaust gas concentration level or reading measured... replacement, removal or addition of product recovery equipment; and (2) The results of any performance...

  16. 78 FR 26848 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... information provided. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randolph Atkins, Ph.D., Contracting Officer's Technical..., 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., W46-500, Washington, DC 20590. Dr. Atkins' phone number is 202-366-5597 and his email address is randolph.atkins@dot.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the...

  17. 75 FR 55627 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... CONTACT: Randolph Atkins, PhD, Contracting Officer's Technical Representative, Office of Behavioral Safety..., Washington, DC 20590. Dr. Atkins' phone number is 202-366-5597 and his e-mail address is...

  18. 40 CFR 82.166 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Recycling and Emissions Reduction § 82.166 Reporting... organizations shall submit to EPA within 30 days of the certification of a new model line of recycling or... under § 82.161 must keep a copy of their certificate at their place of business. (m) All...

  19. 50 CFR 300.107 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... area designated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations as Statistical Area 51 or Statistical Area 57 in the eastern and western Indian Ocean outside and north of the Convention Area shall be issued a preapproval. (2) Harvesting vessels. (i) In addition to any AMLR...

  20. 76 FR 72750 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... States Code) which mandated this information collection. The 1984 Theft Act was amended by the Anti Car... and rental/leasing companies to provide information to NHTSA on comprehensive insurance premiums... (12,950 man-hours for 25 insurance companies and 425 man-hours for 5 rental and leasing...

  1. 76 FR 72747 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... ask that the documents submitted be scanned using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) process, thus allowing the agency to search and copy certain portions of your submissions.\\2\\ \\2\\ Optical character recognition (OCR) is the process of converting an image of text, such as a scanned paper document or...

  2. 76 FR 7897 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... comments [identified by DOT Docket No. NHTSA- 2011-0018] by any of the following methods: Federal... elements are largely descriptive in nature, are intended to provide a general view of existing 9-1-1..., Research and Program Development. BILLING CODE 4910-59-P...

  3. 40 CFR 141.75 - Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mg/l) and disinfectant contact time(s) (in minutes) used for calculating the CT value(s). (iv) If... which are less than or equal to the turbidity limits specified in § 141.73 for the filtration...

  4. 75 FR 59321 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... stating the exemptions used for that vehicle and any reduction in load carrying capacity of the vehicle of... loading carrying capacity and conveying this information to the vehicle owner. Again we are assuming...

  5. 77 FR 51609 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... various BACs, and (2) determine the prevalence of drivers with the presence of various (over-the-counter... Alcohol Concentration (BAC) breath test, collection of an oral fluid specimen, and collection of a blood... fatalities in alcohol-related (.08+ BAC) crashes per 100 million vehicle miles traveled, 0.45 in 2011...

  6. 75 FR 54218 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... CFR 575--Consumer Information Regulations (sections 103 and 105) Qualitative Research. OMB Control... one type of qualitative research. This research project will consist of two (2) focus groups in...

  7. 75 FR 54217 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Information Regulations (sections 103 and 105) Qualitative Research. OMB Control Number: Not Assigned. Form..., NHTSA will conduct two types of qualitative research. One research project will consist of two (2)...

  8. 76 FR 28300 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... collection. Title: 49 CFR 575--Consumer Information Regulations (section 106) Qualitative Research--Focus.... For the first phase, NHTSA will conduct two types of qualitative research. One research project...

  9. 78 FR 72139 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... Company Loan Programs, designated as SOP 50 10 5(F). The update resulted in changes related to franchise... Program Updates notice of proposed rulemaking. (78 FR 12633). That rulemaking is still pending final... Collection: Title: SBA Express, Export Express, Small Loan Advantage, PLP- Caplines, and Pilot Loan...

  10. 76 FR 37189 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ..., including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) How to enhance the quality, utility..., or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g... NHTSA and owners, purchasers, and dealers if the manufacturer (1) learn that any vehicle or...

  11. 77 FR 11621 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... will be used on the agency's www.safercar.gov Web site, in the ``Purchasing with Safety in Mind: What... prepare and submit comments? Your comments must be written and in English. To ensure that your comments...

  12. 76 FR 52730 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7044. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: ``Personal Financial Statement''. Frequency: On Occasion. SBA Form Number: 413. Description of Respondents: Participating Lenders. Responses...), supporting statement, and other documents submitted to OMB for review may be obtained from the...

  13. 77 FR 50544 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... stations, fast food restaurants, and other types of sites frequented by children during the time in which..., fast food restaurants, and other types of sites frequented by children during the time in which the... the deaths and injuries among children in the 4 to 8 year old age group that are caused by failure...

  14. 40 CFR 745.86 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... area. (iii) If test kits were used, that the specified brand of kits was used at the specified... disposable impermeable material anchored to the building extending 10 feet beyond the perimeter of surfaces... subpart to the following persons: (i) The owner of the building; and, if different, (ii) An adult...

  15. 31 CFR 103.28 - Identification required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification required. 103.28 Section 103.28 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Reports Required To Be Made §...

  16. Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for Remedial Action at the Oak Ridge Reservation: A compendium of major environmental laws. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etnier, E.L.; McDonald, E.P.; Houlberg, L.M.

    1993-07-01

    Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARS) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was placed on the National Priorities List by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on November 21, 1989, effective December 21, 1989. As a result of this listing, DOE, EPA, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation have signed a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the environmental restoration of the ORR. Section XXI(F) of the FFA calls for the preparation of a draft listing of all ARARs as mandated by CERCLA {section}121. This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at the ORR. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Tennessee are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air and other acts, as they apply to hazardous waste cleanup, are discussed. In the absence of ARARS, CERCLA {section}121 provides for the use of nonpromulgated federal criteria, guidelines, and advisories in evaluating the human risk associated with remedial action alternatives. Such nonpromulgated standards are classified as ``to-be-considered`` (TBC) guidance. A ion of available guidance is given; summary tables fist the available federal standards and guidance information. In addition, the substantive contents of the DOE orders as they apply to remediation of radioactively contaminated sites are discussed as TBC guidance.

  17. Effective recordkeeping technologies to manage aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukelow, J.S.; Johnson, A.B. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Vora, J.P. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated the capability of current recordkeeping technology to support aging management. This paper discusses technical issues associated with potential enhancements of nuclear plant records systems--from the perspective of the lessons learned about equipment aging degradation mechanisms and associated surveillance and monitoring techniques during the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The paper considers both the specific types of technical data needed to ensure continued safe operation and the use of new technology to upgrade record systems. Specific topics discussed include: equipment reliability data needed to support the assessment of the impact of aging on the continued operation of the plant; operational history data to support the assessment of residual life of mechanical and structural components and piping; tools for the analysis and trending of equipment reliability data and operational history data; design and implementation of plant record systems that will provide a comprehensive and usable engineering design basis for the plant; proposed improvements in the data input process for the plant records system; computerization of plant records systems, including conversion of existing records into machine-readable forms.

  18. Effective recordkeeping technologies to manage aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukelow, J.S.; Johnson, A.B. Jr. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Vora, J.P. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated the capability of current recordkeeping technology to support aging management. This paper discusses technical issues associated with potential enhancements of nuclear plant records systems--from the perspective of the lessons learned about equipment aging degradation mechanisms and associated surveillance and monitoring techniques during the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The paper considers both the specific types of technical data needed to ensure continued safe operation and the use of new technology to upgrade record systems. Specific topics discussed include: equipment reliability data needed to support the assessment of the impact of aging on the continued operation of the plant; operational history data to support the assessment of residual life of mechanical and structural components and piping; tools for the analysis and trending of equipment reliability data and operational history data; design and implementation of plant record systems that will provide a comprehensive and usable engineering design basis for the plant; proposed improvements in the data input process for the plant records system; computerization of plant records systems, including conversion of existing records into machine-readable forms.

  19. 50 CFR 635.5 - Recordkeeping and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the carcass(es) separately from each other. In cases where different dealers handle the fins and the... for commercial use or export. (3) Recordkeeping. Dealers must retain at their place of business a copy... which may include such methodologies as telephone, dockside or mail surveys, mail in or phone-in reports...

  20. 47 CFR 54.619 - Audits and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.619 Audits and recordkeeping. (a) Health... Administrator or any other state or federal agency with jurisdiction. (c) Random audits. Health care...

  1. Information governance: practical implications for record-keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Christine; Sharples, Christine

    This article outlines nurses' legal and professional responsibility to adhere to good practice in keeping patients' notes up to date. It provides a description of information governance issues, including paper and electronic records. The article discusses wider issues such as the importance of good communication in record-keeping and advises on good practice in content and style.

  2. 29 CFR 4007.10 - Recordkeeping; audits; disclosure of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... order to permit PBGC to determine the effectiveness of the system or process and the reliability of information produced by the system or process. (2) Deficiencies found on audit. If, upon audit, PBGC... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordkeeping; audits; disclosure of information....

  3. 40 CFR 60.676 - Reporting and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Processing Plants § 60.676 Reporting and recordkeeping. (a) Each owner or operator seeking to...) and (f). (g) The owner or operator of any wet material processing operation that processes saturated... available. (2) For portable aggregate processing plants, the notification of the actual date of...

  4. 45 CFR 1643.5 - Recipient policies and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recipient policies and recordkeeping. 1643.5 Section 1643.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION RESTRICTION ON ASSISTED SUICIDE, EUTHANASIA, AND MERCY KILLING § 1643.5 Recipient policies and...

  5. 40 CFR 63.147 - Process wastewater provisions-recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.147 Process wastewater provisions—recordkeeping. (a) The owner or operator transferring a Group 1 wastewater stream...

  6. ramic restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  7. 75 FR 32877 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Programs Improvement Act of 2000. Section 80.61 What requirements apply... the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act, but the current regulations apply the requirement to... Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act. This would help agencies comply with statutory requirements...

  8. Environmental Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T.; Vanmarcke, H

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's programme on environmental restoration are (1) to optimize and validate models for the impact assessment from environmental, radioactive contaminations, including waste disposal or discharge; (2) to support the policy of national authorities for public health and radioactive waste management. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported.

  9. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  10. Restorative neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Robert H; Meyer, Morten; Ducray, Angélique D

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the search for therapeutic options for diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS), for which currently no effective treatment strategies are available. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of...

  11. Crown lengthening surgery: a restorative-driven periodontal procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, D F; Handelsman, M; Ravon, N A

    1999-02-01

    Improper management of the periodontal tissues during restorative procedures is a common, but often overlooked, cause of failure. When a restoration is placed, the preservation of an intact, healthy periodontium is necessary to maintain the tooth or teeth being restored. Predictable long-term restorative success requires a combination of restorative principles with the correct management of the periodontal tissues.

  12. Pollination and Restoration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kingsley W. Dixon

    2009-01-01

    Pollination services underpin sustainability of restored ecosystems. Yet, outside of agri-environments, effective restoration of pollinator services in ecological restoration has received little attention...

  13. The rice DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein is required for the assembly of the restoration of fertility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaojian; Huang, Qi; Xiao, Haijun; Zhang, Qiannan; Ni, Chenzi; Xu, Yanghong; Liu, Gai; Yang, Daichang; Zhu, Yingguo; Hu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and restoration of fertility (Rf) are widely distributed in plant species utilized by humans. RF5 and GRP162 are subunits of the restoration of fertility complex (RFC) in Hong-Lian rice. Despite the fact that the RFC is 400-500 kDa in size, the other proteins or factors in the complex still remain unknown. Here, we identified RFC subunit 3, which encodes a DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein (RFC3) that is present in all tissues but highly expressed in leaves. We established that RFC3 interacts with both RF5 and GRP162 in vitro and in vivo, and is transported into the mitochondria as a membrane protein. Furthermore, CMS RNA (atp6-orfH79) and CMS cytotoxic protein (ORFH79) accumulate when RFC3 is silenced in restorer lines. We presented the analysis with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that RFC is disrupted in the RNAi line. We concluded that RCF3 is indispensable as a scaffold protein for the assembly of the RFC complex. We unveil a new molecular player of the RFC in the Rf pathway in rice and propose the model of RFC based on these data.

  14. 50 CFR 680.5 - Recordkeeping and reporting (R&R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recordkeeping and reporting (R&R). 680.5... General § 680.5 Recordkeeping and reporting (R&R). (a) General requirements—(1) Recording and reporting... participants in the CR fisheries are responsible for complying with the following R&R...

  15. 40 CFR 761.295 - Reporting and recordkeeping of the PCB concentrations in samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting and recordkeeping of the PCB... On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB Remediation Waste and Porous Surfaces in Accordance With § 761.61(a)(6) § 761.295 Reporting and recordkeeping of the PCB concentrations in samples. (a) Report all...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1319 - PET and polystyrene affected sources-recordkeeping provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true PET and polystyrene affected sources-recordkeeping provisions. 63.1319 Section 63.1319 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 63.1319 PET and polystyrene affected sources—recordkeeping provisions. (a) Except as specified...

  17. 7 CFR 301.92-8 - Attachment and disposition of certificates and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attachment and disposition of certificates and recordkeeping. 301.92-8 Section 301.92-8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... Phytophthora Ramorum § 301.92-8 Attachment and disposition of certificates and recordkeeping. (a) A...

  18. 50 CFR 660.313 - Open access fishery-recordkeeping and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Open access fishery-recordkeeping and... West Coast Groundfish-Open Access Fisheries § 660.313 Open access fishery—recordkeeping and reporting... to open access fisheries. (b) Declaration reports for vessels using nontrawl gear....

  19. Documentation and record-keeping in pressure ulcer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanga, Edwin; Ward, Renee

    2015-05-06

    National and international guidelines recommend the use of clinical assessments and interventions to prevent pressure-related skin damage. This includes the categorisation of pressure ulcers as avoidable or unavoidable, which is challenging in clinical practice, mainly because of poor documentation and record-keeping for care delivered. Documentation and record-keeping are influenced by the individual's employing organisation, maintenance procedures for documentation and record-keeping, and local auditing processes. A transfer sticker to enable patient assessment and promote pressure ulcer documentation was designed and implemented. The transfer sticker captures the date, time and location of a pressure ulcer preventive risk assessment and the plan of care to be implemented. The increased clarity of record of care achieved by using the transfer sticker has enabled the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers resulting from poor documentation on admission or ward transfers to be reduced. The transfer sticker helps staff identify patients at risk and allows interventions to be implemented in a timely manner.

  20. Rescue of motor coordination by Purkinje cell-targeted restoration of Kv3.3 channels in Kcnc3-null mice requires Kcnc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlock, Edward C; Bose, Mitali; Pierce, Ganon; Joho, Rolf H

    2009-12-16

    The role of cerebellar Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channels in motor coordination was examined with an emphasis on the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Kv3 channel subunits encoded by Kcnc genes are distinguished by rapid activation and deactivation kinetics that support high-frequency, narrow action potential firing. Previously we reported that increased lateral deviation while ambulating and slips while traversing a narrow beam of ataxic Kcnc3-null mice were corrected by restoration of Kv3.3 channels specifically to Purkinje cells, whereas Kcnc3-mutant mice additionally lacking one Kcnc1 allele were partially rescued. Here, we report mice lacking all Kcnc1 and Kcnc3 alleles exhibit no such rescue. For Purkinje cell output to reach the rest of the brain it must be conveyed by neurons of the DCN or vestibular nuclei. As Kcnc1, but not Kcnc3, alleles are lost, mutant mice exhibit increasing gait ataxia accompanied by spike broadening and deceleration in DCN neurons, suggesting the facet of coordination rescued by Purkinje-cell-restricted Kv3.3 restoration in mice lacking just Kcnc3 is hypermetria, while gait ataxia emerges when additionally Kcnc1 alleles are lost. Thus, fast repolarization in Purkinje cells appears important for normal movement velocity, whereas DCN neurons are a prime candidate locus where fast repolarization is necessary for normal gait patterning.

  1. Rescue of Motor Coordination by Purkinje Cell-Targeted Restoration of Kv3.3 Channels in Kcnc3-Null Mice Requires Kcnc1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlock, Edward C.; Bose, Mitali; Pierce, Ganon

    2009-01-01

    The role of cerebellar Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channels in motor coordination was examined with an emphasis on the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Kv3 channel subunits encoded by Kcnc genes are distinguished by rapid activation and deactivation kinetics that support high-frequency, narrow action potential firing. Previously we reported that increased lateral deviation while ambulating and slips while traversing a narrow beam of ataxic Kcnc3-null mice were corrected by restoration of Kv3.3 channels specifically to Purkinje cells, whereas Kcnc3-mutant mice additionally lacking one Kcnc1 allele were partially rescued. Here, we report mice lacking all Kcnc1 and Kcnc3 alleles exhibit no such rescue. For Purkinje cell output to reach the rest of the brain it must be conveyed by neurons of the DCN or vestibular nuclei. As Kcnc1, but not Kcnc3, alleles are lost, mutant mice exhibit increasing gait ataxia accompanied by spike broadening and deceleration in DCN neurons, suggesting the facet of coordination rescued by Purkinje-cell-restricted Kv3.3 restoration in mice lacking just Kcnc3 is hypermetria, while gait ataxia emerges when additionally Kcnc1 alleles are lost. Thus, fast repolarization in Purkinje cells appears important for normal movement velocity, whereas DCN neurons are a prime candidate locus where fast repolarization is necessary for normal gait patterning. PMID:20016089

  2. 49 CFR 574.9 - Requirements for motor vehicle dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for motor vehicle dealers. 574.9... RECORDKEEPING § 574.9 Requirements for motor vehicle dealers. (a) Each motor vehicle dealer who sells a used motor vehicle for purposes other than resale, who leases a motor vehicle for more than 60 days, that...

  3. 7 CFR 800.25 - Required elevator and merchandising records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required elevator and merchandising records. 800.25 Section 800.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION... REGULATIONS Recordkeeping and Access to Facilities § 800.25 Required elevator and merchandising records. (a...

  4. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2002-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products.

  5. Requirements Verification Report AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System for Project W-314 Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCGREW, D.L.

    1999-09-28

    This Requirements Verification Report (RVR) for Project W-314 ''AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System'' package provides documented verification of design compliance to all the applicable Project Development Specification (PDS) requirements. Additional PDS requirements verification will be performed during the project's procurement, construction, and testing phases, and the RVR will be updated to reflect this information as appropriate.

  6. 30 CFR 874.14 - Water supply restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water supply restoration. 874.14 Section 874.14... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION GENERAL RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.14 Water supply restoration. (a) Any... supply restoration projects. For purposes of this section, “water supply restoration projects” are...

  7. Translational regulation of APOBEC3G mRNA by Vif requires its 5'UTR and contributes to restoring HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Santiago; Libre, Camille; Batisse, Julien; Mercenne, Gaëlle; Richer, Delphine; Laumond, Géraldine; Decoville, Thomas; Moog, Christiane; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2016-12-20

    The essential HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells expressing cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by decreasing their cellular level, and preventing their incorporation into virions. Unlike the Vif-induced degradation of A3G, the functional role of the inhibition of A3G translation by Vif remained unclear. Here, we show that two stem-loop structures within the 5'-untranslated region of A3G mRNA are crucial for translation inhibition by Vif in cells, and most Vif alleles neutralize A3G translation efficiently. Interestingly, K26R mutation in Vif abolishes degradation of A3G by the proteasome but has no effect at the translational level, indicating these two pathways are independent. These two mechanisms, proteasomal degradation and translational inhibition, similarly contribute to decrease the cellular level of A3G by Vif and to prevent its incorporation into virions. Importantly, inhibition of A3G translation is sufficient to partially restore viral infectivity in the absence of proteosomal degradation. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 has evolved redundant mechanisms to specifically inhibit the potent antiviral activity of A3G.

  8. 40 CFR 503.27 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... penalty of law, that the information that will be used to determine compliance with the pathogen... requirements is met) and the vector attraction reduction requirement in (insert one of the vector attraction... met. (iv) A description of how one of the vector attraction reduction requirements in § 503.33 (b)(1...

  9. 40 CFR 503.17 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....13 in the sewage sludge. (ii) The following certification statement: I certify, under penalty of law... in § 503.32(a) and the vector attraction reduction requirement in was prepared under my direction and... requirements in § 503.32(a) are met. (iv) A description of how one of the vector attraction reduction...

  10. 40 CFR 80.597 - What are the registration requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.597 What are...) Registration for motor vehicle diesel fuel. Refiners having any refinery that is subject to a sulfur...

  11. 7 CFR 4290.620 - Requirements to obtain information from Portfolio Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... development impact of the Financing; and (v) In the case of any Portfolio Concern that is not a Rural Business... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements to obtain information from Portfolio... Recordkeeping Requirements for Rbics § 4290.620 Requirements to obtain information from Portfolio Concerns. All...

  12. 24 CFR 92.508 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... accordance with § 92.209(b), including documentation of the local market conditions that led to the choice of... demonstrating that each rental housing project meets the affordability and income targeting requirements of §...

  13. Using Landscape Hierarchies To Guide Restoration Of Disturbed Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian J. Palik; Charles P. Goebel; Katherine L. Kirkman; Larry West

    2000-01-01

    Reestablishing native plant communities is an important focus of ecosystem restoration. In complex landscapes containing a diversity of ecosystem types, restoration requires a set of reference vegetation conditions for the ecosystems of concern, and a predictive model to relate plant community composition to physical variables. Restoration also requires an approach for...

  14. 12 CFR 325.104 - Capital restoration plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under section 38(e)(2) of the FDI Act. A bank that is required to submit a capital restoration plan as a... FDI Act by each company that controls the bank. (c) Review of capital restoration plans. Within 60... restoration plan that does not contain the guarantee required under section 38(e)(2) of the FDI Act, the...

  15. Use of Amphibian Communities as Indicators of Restoration Success

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) requires the use of ecological indicators to measure the success of restoration efforts. The Everglades...

  16. Identifying Challenges to Building an Evidence Base for Restoration Practice

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntshotsho, P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Global acknowledgement of ecological restoration, as an important tool to complement conservation efforts, requires an effort to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions. Evidence-based practice is purported to promote effectiveness...

  17. 7 CFR 59.20 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... report information to the Secretary under the Act and this Part shall maintain for 2 years and make available to the Secretary the following information on request: (1) The original contracts, agreements... information required to be reported under the Act and this Part. (b) Purchases of cattle and swine and sales...

  18. 15 CFR 721.2 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... trading company required to submit a declaration, report, or advance notification under parts 712 through..., plant site or trading company to prepare such declaration, report, or advance notification to determine... recognized as complete words or numbers. (iv) The system must preserve the initial image (including...

  19. 76 FR 47055 - Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... 7 CFR Part 1730 RIN 0572-AC16 Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP) AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA... maintain an Emergency Response Plan (ERP) that details how the borrower will restore its system in the... ERP requirement was not entirely new to the borrowers, as RUS had recommended similar ``plans'' in...

  20. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

  1. Guidelines for Direct Adhesive Composite Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Society Of Cariology And Endodontology, Chinese Stomatological Association Csa

    2015-01-01

    Direct adhesive composite restoration, a technique to restore tooth defects by bonding composite resin materials, has been widely used in the restoration of dental caries or other tooth defects. Retention of composite resin restoration mainly relies on bonding strength between the materials and dental tissue. The clinical outcomes rely greatly on the regulated clinical practice of dentists. In 2011, the Society of Cariology and Endodontology of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA) published the 'Practices and evaluation criteria of composite resin bonded restoration (Discussion Version)'. Since then, opinions and comments regarding the 'Discussion Version' have been widely circulated within the Society. The final version of the guideline was based on systematic reviews of scientific literature and requirements for the edit of technical guidelines, and through several rounds of discussions, revisions and supplements. The society recommends this guideline for clinicians to use in their practices, when conducting direct composite restorations.

  2. Restoration of E-cadherin Cell-Cell Junctions Requires Both Expression of E-cadherin and Suppression of ERK MAP Kinase Activation in Ras-Transformed Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwen Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin is a main component of the cell-cell adhesion junctions that play a principal role in maintaining normal breast epithelial cell morphology. Breast and other cancers that have up-regulated activity of Ras are often found to have down-regulated or mislocalized E-cadherin expression. Disruption of E-cadherin junctions and consequent gain of cell motility contribute to the process known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Enforced expression of E-cadherin or inhibition of Ras-signal transduction pathway has been shown to be effective in causing reversion of EMT in several oncogene-transformed and cancer-derived cell lines. In this study, we investigated MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and derivatives that were transformed with either activated H-Ras or N-Ras to test for the reversion of EMT by inhibition of Ras-driven signaling pathways. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase, but not PI3-kinase, Rac, or myosin light chain kinase, was able to completely restore E-cadherin cell-cell junctions and epithelial morphology in cell lines with moderate H-Ras expression. In MCF10A cells transformed by a high-level expression of activated H-Ras or N-Ras, restoration of E-cadherin junction required both the enforced reexpression of E-cadherin and suppression of MAPK kinase. Enforced expression of E-cadherin alone did not induce reversion from the mesenchymal phenotype. Our results suggest that Ras transformation has at least two independent actions to disrupt E-cadherin junctions, with effects to cause both mislocalization of E-cadherin away from the cell surface and profound decrease in the expression of E-cadherin.

  3. 78 FR 38954 - Amended Order Designating the Provider of Legal Entity Identifiers to Be Used in Recordkeeping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... accepted for data reporting under ESMA's EMIR regulations, registered entities and swap counterparties... Provider of Legal Entity Identifiers To Be Used in Recordkeeping and Swap Data Reporting Pursuant to the... COMMISSION Amended Order Designating the Provider of Legal Entity Identifiers to Be Used in Recordkeeping...

  4. Restorative dentistry for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  5. Global Ecosystem Restoration Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Miguel; Garcia, Monica; Fernandez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    The Global ecosystem restoration index (GERI) is a composite index that integrates structural and functional aspects of the ecosystem restoration process. These elements are evaluated through a window that looks into a baseline for degraded ecosystems with the objective to assess restoration...

  6. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  7. [Dental restoration materials in pediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C L

    1997-02-01

    Restorative materials in pediatric dentistry have to fulfill special requirements. They should be easy to handle and applicable in a not always dry mouth. They should potentially be adhesive in order to avoid too much mechanical preparation. They do not have to be extremely wear resistant as the dwell time of the restorations is relatively short. Glass-ionomer cements and in particular the resin modified types possess properties which make them almost ideal for the required purpose.

  8. Governing Forest Landscape Restoration: Cases from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora van Oosten

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Forest landscape restoration includes both the planning and implementation of measures to restore degraded forests within the perspective of the wider landscape. Governing forest landscape restoration requires fundamental considerations about the conceptualisation of forested landscapes and the types of restoration measures to be taken, and about who should be engaged in the governance process. A variety of governance approaches to forest landscape restoration exist, differing in both the nature of the object to be governed and the mode of governance. This paper analyses the nature and governance of restoration in three cases of forest landscape restoration in Indonesia. In each of these cases, both the original aim for restoration and the initiators of the process differ. The cases also differ in how deeply embedded they are in formal spatial planning mechanisms at the various political scales. Nonetheless, the cases show similar trends. All cases show a dynamic process of mobilising the landscape’s stakeholders, plus a flexible process of crafting institutional space for conflict management, negotiation and decision making at the landscape level. As a result, the landscape focus changed over time from reserved forests to forested mosaic lands. The cases illustrate that the governance of forest landscape restoration should not be based on strict design criteria, but rather on a flexible governance approach that stimulates the creation of novel public-private institutional arrangements at the landscape level.

  9. Refining cast implant-retained restorations by electrical discharge machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, S M; Chance, D A; Cronin, R J

    1995-03-01

    The UCLA abutment was developed to create implant-retained restorations with ideal contours, excellent esthetics, and minimal vertical space requirements for restorative materials. A major drawback of this abutment is that casting inaccuracies in the lost-wax process are difficult to control. This article describes a method of refining cast implant-retained restorations by use of electrical discharge machining.

  10. 44 CFR 206.226 - Restoration of damaged facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... funding for and require restoration of a destroyed facility at a new location when: (i) The facility is... facilities. 206.226 Section 206.226 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... § 206.226 Restoration of damaged facilities. Work to restore eligible facilities on the basis of...

  11. Restoring the incisal edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    Restorative dentistry evolves with each development of new material and innovative technique. Selection of improved restorative materials that simulate the physical properties and other characteristics of natural teeth, in combination with restorative techniques such as the proximal adaptation and incremental layering, provide the framework that ensures the optimal development of an esthetic restoration. These advanced placement techniques offer benefits such as enhanced chromatic integration, polychromatism, ideal anatomical form and function, optimal proximal contact, improved marginal integrity and longer lasting directly placed composite restorations. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a better understanding of the complex restorative challenge in achieving true harmonization of the primary parameters in esthetics (that is, color, shape and texture) represented by the replacement of a single anterior tooth. The case presented demonstrates the restoration of a Class IV fracture integrating basic adhesive principles with these placement techniques and a recently developed nanoparticle hybrid composite resin system (Premise, Kerr/Sybron, Orange, CA). The clinical presentation describes preoperative considerations, tooth preparation, development of the body layer, internal characterization with tints, development of the artificial enamel layer, shaping and contouring, and polishing of a Class IV composite restoration. The clinical significance is that anterior tooth fractures can be predictably restored using contemporary small particle hybrid composite resin systems with the aforementioned restorative techniques. These placement techniques when used with proper attention to preparation design, adhesive protocol and finishing and polishing procedures, allow the clinician to successfully restore form, function and esthetics to the single anterior tooth replacement.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW REQUIREMENTS BY MAJOR FISHES IN THE LOWER REACH OF THE YELLOW RIVER DETERMINED BY FLOW RESTORATION%基于流量恢复法的黄河下游鱼类生态需水研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晓辉; Angela Arthington; 刘昌明

    2009-01-01

    运用流量恢复(the flow restoration methodology)方法研究黄河下游鱼类生态需水,其基本思路是:首先获得所保护鱼类生态习性相关的流量信息,包括水深、流速、水量等.然后建立概念性模型,确定鱼类和特定流量组分之间的联系.在此基础上,确定流量目标,每一个流量目标被赋予一些水力指标,作为获得满足这个目标的环境流量计算的依据.运用水文学、水力学模型确定满足这些流量目标需要的水流条件,包括数量、持续时间、频率和发生时间,给出满足鱼类生长需要的生态流量.最后给出不同水资源管理情景下可接受的鱼类生态需水.%The Yellow River in China is environmentally degraded severely as a result of anthropogenic changes, most notably the regulation and extraction of surface water resources for irrigated agriculture. Environmental problems include decline of native fish, reduction in total area of riverine wetlands, water quality degradation. There is a growing awareness and understanding for the need to allocate water along a river to maintain ecological processes that provide goods and services. The government is committed to improving the environment on the Yellow River, and to ensure river health. In this paper, flow restoration method was used to calculate environmental flow for fish in the lower Yellow River. Firstly, flow-related information on selected fish in the lower Yellow River was obtained, including fish species composition, abundance and habitat use in relation to flow conditions. Then a model linking selected fish to key aspects of the flow regime was developed. This model provides a means for communicating important linkages between fish and specific flow related processes that must be maintained in order to protect those fish. Thirdly, the environmental flow objectives were identified. Fourthly, hydraulic and hydrologic models were used to determine the magnitude, duration, frequency and

  13. Technologies for lake restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut KLAPPER

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are suffering from different stress factors and need to be restored using different approaches. The eutrophication remains as the main water quality management problem for inland waters: both lakes and reservoirs. The way to curb the degradation is to stop the nutrient sources and to accelerate the restoration with help of in-lake technologies. Especially lakes with a long retention time need (eco- technological help to decrease the nutrient content in the free water. The microbial and other organic matter from sewage and other autochthonous biomasses, causes oxygen depletion, which has many adverse effects. In less developed countries big reservoirs function as sewage treatment plants. Natural aeration solves problems only partly and many pollutants tend to accumulate in the sediments. The acidification by acid rain and by pyrite oxidation has to be controlled by acid neutralizing technologies. Addition of alkaline chemicals is useful only for soft waters, and technologies for (microbial alkalinization of very acidic hardwater mining lakes are in development. The corrective measures differ from those in use for eutrophication control. The salinization and water shortage mostly occurs if more water is used than available. L. Aral, L. Tschad, the Dead Sea or L. Nasser belong to waters with most severe environmental problems on a global scale. Their hydrologic regime needs to be evaluated. The inflow of salt water at the bottom of some mining lakes adds to stability of stratification, and thus accumulation of hydrogen sulphide in the monimolimnion of the meromictic lakes. Destratification, which is the most used technology, is only restricted applicable because of the dangerous concentrations of the byproducts of biological degradation. The contamination of lakes with hazardous substances from industry and agriculture require different restoration technologies, including subhydric isolation and storage, addition of nutrients for better self

  14. Guidelines for managing the orthodontic-restorative patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokich, V G; Spear, F M

    1997-03-01

    Occasionally, patients require restorative treatment during or after orthodontic therapy. Patients with worn or abraded teeth, peg-shaped lateral incisors, fractured teeth, multiple edentulous spaces, or other restorative needs may require tooth positioning that is slightly different from a nonrestored, nonabraded, completely dentulous adolescent. Generally, orthodontists are not accustomed to dealing with patients who require restorative intervention. Should the objectives of orthodontic treatment differ for the restorative patient compared with the nonrestorative patient? How should the teeth be positioned during orthodontic therapy to facilitate specific restorations? Should teeth be restored before, during, or perhaps after orthodontics? The answers to these and other important questions are vital to the successful treatment of some orthodontic patients. This article will provide a series of eight guidelines to help the interdisciplinary team manage treatment for the orthodontic-restorative patient.

  15. Watershed Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  16. 75 FR 37242 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Under the Patient Protection and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ57 Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance..., Health care, Health insurance, Pensions, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Proposed Amendments to... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are issuing substantially similar interim final...

  17. 76 FR 60086 - Proposed Extension of the Approval of Information Collection Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... accordance with the recordkeeping requirements of Fair Labor Standards Act section 11(c), 29 U.S.C. 211(c... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Wage and... and Hour Division, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of...

  18. 78 FR 4792 - Epoxy Polymer; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... integral part of its composition the atomic elements carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. 3. The polymer does not contain as an integral part of its composition, except as impurities, any element other than those listed..., Pesticides and pests, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Dated: January 10, 2013. Lois Rossi,...

  19. 77 FR 65831 - Polymers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... polymer does contain as an integral part of its composition the atomic elements carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. 3. The polymer does not contain as an integral part of its composition, except as impurities, any..., Pesticides and pests, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Dated: October 15, 2012. Lois Rossi,...

  20. Attitudes, practice, and experience of German dentists regarding repair restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzow, Philipp; Hoffmann, Robin; Tschammler, Claudia; Kruppa, Jochen; Rödig, Tina; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a representative survey among German dentists about attitudes, practice, and experience regarding single-tooth repair restorations. An anonymous questionnaire was designed and mailed to all registered dentists in Lower Saxony (n = 6600). Twenty-eight percent were returned (n = 1852), and n = 1805 could be analyzed. Statistical analyses were done by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and ordered logistic regressions (p materials. Frequency of performing repair restorations was partially associated to dentist-related factors. The decision for repairing a restoration was dependent on several tooth- and restoration-associated variables. The main indications for repair were the partial loss of restoration or adjacent tooth structure as well as chipping and endodontic access cavities of crowns. Repair restorations were mostly done with composite using various different preconditioning techniques. Overall patients' acceptance was reported to be high. Most of the dentists considered repair restorations as permanent restoration with a moderate to high longevity. Estimated success of repair restorations depended significantly on the dentists' experiences (frequency and techniques of repair restorations). Repair restorations were often performed and were well accepted by dentists and patients, but indications for repair restorations as well as applied materials and techniques varied distinctly. Repairs of single-tooth restorations are well accepted and frequently performed, but indications, techniques, and materials require further research.

  1. Final Restoration and Mitigation Monitoring Plan for the Island Ponds Restoration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Restoration and Mitigation Monitoring Plan (RMMP) presents the approaches necessary to satisfy mitigation and monitoring requirements described in the various...

  2. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N. Del Tufo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of fluent speech in one’s native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is ‘restored’ via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one’s peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm, to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal.

  3. Implementation of the Save and Restoration application for KOMAC operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Ha; Song, Young-Gi; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    KOMAC has been operating a 100 MeV proton linear Accelerator. There are about 10,000 PVs for operating the 100 MeV proton linac. It is important to archive the operating parameters for operating beam lines and machine study. The parameters are reported manually and with screenshot. There not fixed reporting type so it is difficult to compare archived data. To improve and compensate the reporting system, a Save and Restoration application, which is based on JAVA has been implemented and connected with KOMAC Control system based on EPICS with JCA library. The operating data are saved in Save and Restoration Server in file type, and are restored to the required values using the saved files. This paper presents Implementation of the Save and Restoration application and its function. The group list is shown in restore page using reload button. The saved value of the PVs in group is shown as selecting a group which clients require and current values are appeared beside the restore value table to compare with saved data. The set restore button input the values in restore value table to each PV. The Save and Restore application save and restore the value of the PVs that clients require. The application is installed in client PC but data are archived in save and restore server in file format.

  4. Toponymic Restoration in Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Snarsky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the discussion on restoration of historical names of public spaces in Irkutsk. It also reviews different approaches to the problem that appeared in the historical science and publicism. The author says about the necessity of a strictly historical approach to the toponymic restoration.

  5. Comparison of Composite Restoration Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Katona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly presents the classification, and possible ways of application of composites. Our objective was to compare three different restoration technique in class II cavity preparations, with the aim to determine which technique is the most advantageous in practical point of view. Artificial teeth fabricated from self-curing acrylic resin were used as models. Comparison of marginal sealing was performed macroscopically via direct visual inspection and via tactile control. Two parameters were examined on esthetic evaluation, which were the anatomical shape and the optical appearance. The time required to prepare the restorations were also measured. After the evaluation of the results, the bulk-fill technique was demonstrated to require the shortest time to be performed. This was followed by the oblique (Z technique, whereas the horizontal incremental technique appeared to be the most time-consuming method. Based on the esthetic evaluation, a remarkable difference can be observed between the bulk-fill technique and the other two incremental techniques, while the mean scores for the oblique and the horizontal techniques were comparable. Based on the results of the visual inspection and instrumental examination, there were no differences in terms of marginal sealing between the three applied methods. Based on these, the use of the appropriate incremental technique can reduce the development of secondary caries and increasing the longevity of composite restorations.

  6. Academic research record-keeping: best practices for individuals, group leaders, and institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Alan A; Wilson, Kenneth; Resnik, David

    2006-01-01

    During the last half of the 20th century, social and technological changes in academic research groups have challenged traditional research record-keeping practices, making them either insufficient or obsolete. New practices have developed but standards (best practices) are still evolving. Based on the authors' review and analysis of a number of sources, they present a set of systematically compiled best practices for research record-keeping for academic research groups. These best practices were developed as an adjunct to a research project on research ethics aimed at examining the actual research record-keeping practices of active academic scientists and their impact on research misconduct inquiries. The best practices differentiate and provide separate standards for three different levels within the university: the individual researcher, the research group leader, and the department/institution. They were developed using a combination of literature reviews, surveys of university integrity officials, focus groups of active researchers, and inspection of university policies on research record-keeping. The authors believe these best practices constitute a ''snapshot'' of the current normative standards for research records within the academic research community. They are offered as ethical and practical guidelines subject to continuing evolution and not as absolute rules. They may be especially useful in training the next generation of researchers.

  7. 12 CFR 347.116 - Recordkeeping and supervision of foreign activities of insured state nonmember banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... volatility. Information should be available on sources of liquidity—cash, balances with banks, marketable... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping and supervision of foreign activities of insured state nonmember banks. 347.116 Section 347.116 Banks and Banking FEDERAL...

  8. 17 CFR 405.4 - Financial recordkeeping and reporting of currency and foreign transactions by registered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... reporting of currency and foreign transactions by registered government securities brokers and dealers. 405... reporting of currency and foreign transactions by registered government securities brokers and dealers... Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act of 1970 shall comply with the reporting, recordkeeping...

  9. Record-Keeping and Checklists for Reading and Writing. Methods for Keeping Track of Individual Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Michael

    Models of record keeping strategies for reading and writing are presented in this booklet. "Why Records Should Be Kept" discusses the importance and advantages of keeping accurate records of pupil progress; "Commercially Available Materials" lists many of the record systems available from commercial textbook publishers; "Record-Keeping for…

  10. Financial record-keeping simulation in the dental auxiliary utilization clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, E G; Waller, R R

    1975-09-01

    A financial record-keeping and billing simulation program which is part of the Dental Auxiliary Utilization (DAU) didactic and clinical experiences has been reported. Evaluation of student performance has demonstrated a satisfactory level of accomplishment. The students' performance may reflect their awareness regarding the importance of understanding the management of the financial affairs of a dental practice.

  11. 40 CFR 63.498 - Back-end process provisions-recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Back-end process provisions... Back-end process provisions—recordkeeping. (a) Each owner or operator shall maintain the records... processed in the back-end operation. (2) The type of process (solution process, emulsion process, etc.) (3...

  12. 49 CFR 220.21 - Railroad operating rules; radio communications; recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Railroad operating rules; radio communications...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS Radio and Wireless Communication Procedures § 220.21 Railroad operating rules; radio communications; recordkeeping. (a)...

  13. 78 FR 23736 - Notice of Request for Renewal of a Recordkeeping Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Notice of Request for Renewal of a Recordkeeping Burden AGENCY: Agricultural... Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. chapter 35), this notice announces the Agricultural Marketing Service's... Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service. BILLING CODE 3410-02-P...

  14. Remote sensing for restoration ecology: Application for restoring degraded, damaged, transformed, or destroyed ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Molly K; Theel, Heather J

    2017-07-01

    Restoration monitoring is generally perceived as costly and time consuming, given the assumptions of successfully restoring ecological functions and services of a particular ecosystem or habitat. Opportunities exist for remote sensing to bolster the restoration science associated with a wide variety of injured resources, including resources affected by fire, hydropower operations, chemical releases, and oil spills, among others. In the last decade, the role of remote sensing to support restoration monitoring has increased, in part due to the advent of high-resolution satellite sensors as well as other sensor technology, such as lidar. Restoration practitioners in federal agencies require monitoring standards to assess restoration performance of injured resources. This review attempts to address a technical need and provides an introductory overview of spatial data and restoration metric considerations, as well as an in-depth review of optical (e.g., spaceborne, airborne, unmanned aerial vehicles) and active (e.g., radar, lidar) sensors and examples of restoration metrics that can be measured with remotely sensed data (e.g., land cover, species or habitat type, change detection, quality, degradation, diversity, and pressures or threats). To that end, the present article helps restoration practitioners assemble information not only about essential restoration metrics but also about the evolving technological approaches that can be used to best assess them. Given the need for monitoring standards to assess restoration success of injured resources, a universal monitoring framework should include a range of remote sensing options with which to measure common restoration metrics. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:614-630. Published 2016. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2016. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Atraumatic restorative treatment in atypical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Simino Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The atraumatic restorative treatment has been widely divulged among professionals in the area of Pediatric Dentistry. This restorative technique is included in the philosophy of Minimal Intervention and is considered one of the most conservative treatments, because only the layer of infected dentin caries is removed. Moreover, the atraumatic restorative treatment has been shown to be less painful than conventional approaches, and local anesthesia is rarely required. After the removal of the infected dentin, the cavities are filled with glass ionomer cement, a material that has antimicrobial capacity, good marginal sealing and constant fluorine release and recharge. In spite of the increasing number of studies about atraumatic restorative treatment, only studies related to restorations in occlusal cavities have shown scientific evidences about the technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of atraumatic restorative treatment in cavities with 3 or more surfaces involved, by means of a clinical case report of a patient with extensive dstruction in primary teeth, who was submitted to atraumatic restorative treatment, and observe the result of the treatment after one year of clinical and radiographic control.

  16. Transforming ecosystems: When, where, and how to restore contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R; Farag, Aïda M; Cadotte, Marc W; Clements, William H; Smith, James R; Ulrich, Cheryl P; Woods, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Chemical contamination has impaired ecosystems, reducing biodiversity and the provisioning of functions and services. This has spurred a movement to restore contaminated ecosystems and develop and implement national and international regulations that require it. Nevertheless, ecological restoration remains a young and rapidly growing discipline and its intersection with toxicology is even more nascent and underdeveloped. Consequently, we provide guidance to scientists and practitioners on when, where, and how to restore contaminated ecosystems. Although restoration has many benefits, it also can be expensive, and in many cases systems can recover without human intervention. Hence, the first question we address is: "When should we restore contaminated ecosystems?" Second, we provide suggestions on what to restore-biodiversity, functions, services, all 3, or something else--and where to restore given expected changes to habitats driven by global climate change. Finally, we provide guidance on how to restore contaminated ecosystems. To do this, we analyze critical aspects of the literature dealing with the ecology of restoring contaminated ecosystems. Additionally, we review approaches for translating the science of restoration to on-the-ground actions, which includes discussions of market incentives and the finances of restoration, stakeholder outreach and governance models for ecosystem restoration, and working with contractors to implement restoration plans. By explicitly considering the mechanisms and strategies that maximize the success of the restoration of contaminated sites, we hope that our synthesis serves to increase and improve collaborations between restoration ecologists and ecotoxicologists and set a roadmap for the restoration of contaminated ecosystems. © 2015 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  17. Restoration of ailing wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswald J Schmitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide.

  18. Science of landscape restoration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Wet, Benita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades the ecological restoration of industrial land has developed into a specialist science combined with highly sophisticated management activities. A prime example of this approach is a unique partnership between the CSIR...

  19. Core competencies for hair restoration surgeons recommended by the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Carlos J; Beehner, Michael L; Cotterill, Paul C; Elliott, Vance W; Haber, Robert S; Harris, James A; Martinick, Jennifer H; Niedbalski, Robert P; Rose, Paul; Rousso, Daniel E; Shapiro, Ronald L

    2009-03-01

    Because hair restoration surgery has changed so significantly, the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) recently developed and published a Core Curriculum for Hair Restoration Surgery (CCHRS). The ISHRS organized a task force to develop training programs that would not only present the CCHRS but also provide the practical experience necessary to allow a physician to practice safe, aesthetically sound hair restoration surgery. The task force recognized early on that identification of core competencies for hair restoration surgeons was essential to guiding the development of these training experiences. This article presents the competencies that have been identified. The intent of the Core Competencies for Hair Restoration Surgery is to outline the knowledge and skills that are essential to accurately diagnose and treat hair loss, to ensure patient safety, and to optimize aesthetic results. The ISHRS hopes that all existing surgery and dermatology training programs teaching hair restoration surgery procedures will find the Core Competencies useful in developing their curriculums. The Core Competencies were developed through an organized review of the CCHRS by a team of experienced hair restoration surgeons and educators and reviewed and approved by the ISHRS Board of Governors. The diversity of these competencies demonstrate that contemporary hair restoration surgery is a specialty requiring knowledge of several medical disciplines, including genetics, endocrinology, dermatology, tissue preservation, and surgery. The International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery believes identification of these Core Competencies is an important contribution to physician education in hair restoration surgery, and physicians who demonstrate competency in these skills will satisfy patients with contemporary results in a safe environment.

  20. Image restoration scale space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Luis; Mazorra, L.; Santana, F.

    1995-09-01

    We present a study of some image resoration techniques based on partial differential equations. We study separately the denoising problem and the restoration of discontinuities. We analyze the capabilities of the differential operators to restore images. In particular, we analyze a number of models present in the literature, and we present comparative results. Finally, we present a model based in the combination of the anisotropic diffusion of Alvarez, Lions, and Morel and the shock filters of Osher and Rudin.

  1. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  2. Restoration in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Blignaut, J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available is restoration? Our human population continues to grow at an unprecedented rate, demanding ever-increasing amounts of goods and services from the natural ecosystems upon which we depend. No part of the planet has been left untouched, and many areas.... Another selection criterion was the need for historic data and a restoration history. In each of the cases the ASSET Research team collaborates with partners, that include the Working for Water programme, Flower Valley, the Ostrich Business Chamber...

  3. Prioritization of Forest Restoration Projects: Tradeoffs between Wildfire Protection, Ecological Restoration and Economic Objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Vogler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of US federal forest restoration programs on national forests is a complex process that requires balancing diverse socioecological goals with project economics. Despite both the large geographic scope and substantial investments in restoration projects, a quantitative decision support framework to locate optimal project areas and examine tradeoffs among alternative restoration strategies is lacking. We developed and demonstrated a new prioritization approach for restoration projects using optimization and the framework of production possibility frontiers. The study area was a 914,657 ha national forest in eastern Oregon, US that was identified as a national priority for restoration with the goal of increasing fire resiliency and sustaining ecosystem services. The results illustrated sharp tradeoffs among the various restoration goals due to weak spatial correlation of forest stressors and provisional ecosystem services. The sharpest tradeoffs were found in simulated projects that addressed either wildfire risk to the urban interface or wildfire hazard, highlighting the challenges associated with meeting both economic and fire protection goals. Understanding the nature of tradeoffs between restoration objectives and communicating them to forest stakeholders will allow forest managers to more effectively design and implement economically feasible restoration projects.

  4. Forest restoration, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aerts Raf

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Globally, forests cover nearly one third of the land area and they contain over 80% of terrestrial biodiversity. Both the extent and quality of forest habitat continue to decrease and the associated loss of biodiversity jeopardizes forest ecosystem functioning and the ability of forests to provide ecosystem services. In the light of the increasing population pressure, it is of major importance not only to conserve, but also to restore forest ecosystems. Ecological restoration has recently started to adopt insights from the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF perspective. Central is the focus on restoring the relation between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Here we provide an overview of important considerations related to forest restoration that can be inferred from this BEF-perspective. Restoring multiple forest functions requires multiple species. It is highly unlikely that species-poor plantations, which may be optimal for above-ground biomass production, will outperform species diverse assemblages for a combination of functions, including overall carbon storage and control over water and nutrient flows. Restoring stable forest functions also requires multiple species. In particular in the light of global climatic change scenarios, which predict more frequent extreme disturbances and climatic events, it is important to incorporate insights from the relation between biodiversity and stability of ecosystem functioning into forest restoration projects. Rather than focussing on species per se, focussing on functional diversity of tree species assemblages seems appropriate when selecting tree species for restoration. Finally, also plant genetic diversity and above - below-ground linkages should be considered during the restoration process, as these likely have prominent but until now poorly understood effects at the level of the ecosystem. The BEF-approach provides a useful framework to evaluate forest restoration in an

  5. 40 CFR 80.603 - What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for NRLM diesel fuel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for NRLM diesel fuel? 80.603 Section 80.603 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Recordkeeping and...

  6. 77 FR 53870 - Availability of a Legal Entity Identifier Meeting the Requirements of the Regulations of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... in recordkeeping and swap data reporting. Section 45.6(f)(1) provides that: When a legal entity... COMMISSION Availability of a Legal Entity Identifier Meeting the Requirements of the Regulations of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and Designation of Provider of Legal Entity Identifiers To Be Used...

  7. Ecosystem Restoration: A Manager's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    James G. Kenna; Gilpin R., Jr. Robinson; Bill Pell; Michael A. Thompson; Joe McNeel

    1999-01-01

    Elements of ecological restoration underlie much of what we think of as ecosystem management, and restoration projects on federal lands represent some of the most exciting, challenging, and convincing demonstrations of applied ecosystem management. The Society for Ecological Restoration defined restoration as "the process of reestablishing to the extent possible...

  8. Surgical crown lengthening: a periodontal and restorative interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Simran R; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening helps to provide an adequate retention form for proper tooth preparation, thus enabling dentists to create esthetically pleasing and healthy restorations. Long-term stability requires accurate diagnosis and development of a comprehensive treatment plan in each case. This sequence of events stresses the importance of communication between the restorative dentist and the periodontist. This article presents 2 cases that involve surgical crown lengthening (including mucoperiosteal flap and ostectomy) for the restoration of teeth.

  9. University students' perspectives on a physical activity record-keeping log.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patricia; Irwin, Jennifer D

    2007-04-01

    This qualitative study explored characteristics of a record-keeping log that students would find appealing and be receptive to using. A heterogeneous sample of undergraduate university students aged 18 to 25 years participated. An experienced moderator, using a semistructured interview guide, conducted 13 focus groups (N = 65). All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Inductive content analysis was conducted independently by two qualitative researchers. Measures were incorporated throughout the study to ensure data trustworthiness. Four themes illustrated students' suggestions for the log: layout, convenience, maximum distribution, and concerns. In particular, students discussed the use of a computer-based versus a paper-based log, hesitancies in using a log, and the need for: additional health information, multivenue distribution, and low to no cost. Students confirmed that a record-keeping log tailored to their needs and preferences would be attractive and appealing to students.

  10. SURVEY AND RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mileto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the technological evolution over the last two centuries, survey has experienced two main conceptual leaps: the introduction of photography as a tool for an indiscriminate register for reality, and the shift from autographic to allographic survey, phenomena which can generate a distancing effect within the restoration process. Besides, this text presents the relationship between survey in its numerous forms and technologies (manual and semi-manual to more complex ones like scanner-laser and the restoration of the building, either for establishing a diagnosis, operating or valorizating, illustrating it with examples developed by the authors, as well as the criteria to be applied when documenting a building to be restored, irrespective of the means and technology available in each case.

  11. [New direct restorative materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickel, R; Dasch, W; Janda, R; Tyas, M; Anusavice, K

    1999-04-01

    People worldwide have become increasingly aware of the potential adverse effects on the environment, of pollution control and of toxic effects of food, drugs and biomaterials. Amalgam and its potential toxic side effects (still scientifically unproven) continue to be discussed with increasing controversy by the media in some countries. Consequently, new direct restorative materials are now being explored by dentists, materials scientists and patients who are searching for the so-called 'amalgam substitute' or 'amalgam alternative'. From a critical point of view some of the new direct restorative materials are good with respect in aesthetics, but all material characteristics must be considered, such as mechanical properties, biological effects, and longterm clinical behaviour.

  12. Restoring faith in politics from deliberation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quim Brugué

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Politics is in difficulties. It is constantly blamed by people, who also require it to respond. The world is increasingly complex and diverse, and politics is needed to facilitate the continuity of a civilized community. The article defines the conceptual and operative bases of deliberative democracy, which is interpreted as the way to restore faith in politics.

  13. 75 FR 71625 - System Restoration Reliability Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 System Restoration Reliability Standards November 18, 2010... to approve Reliability Standards EOP-001-1 (Emergency Operations Planning), EOP- 005-2 (System... modifications to proposed EOP-005-2 and EOP-006-2. The proposed Reliability Standards require that...

  14. Dark diversity illuminates the dim side of restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold; Brunbjerg, Ane Kirstine; Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann

    Dark diversity consists of the species that are absent from sites where they could potentially thrive despite the fact that they are actually in the regional species pool. Successful ecological restoration requires detailed knowledge of species that are less successful in (re)colonizing restored ...

  15. The maintenance of key biodiversity attributes through ecosystem restoration operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Gray; Bruce A. Blackwell

    2008-01-01

    The requirement to manage for key biodiversity attributes in dry forest ecosystems is mandated in the Forest Practices Code Act of British Columbia. These attributes include snags, large old trees, and large organic debris. In the Squamish Forest District dry forest restoration activities center on the use of thinning operations followed by prescribed fire to restore...

  16. Clinical audit teaching in record-keeping for dental undergraduates at International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jun A; Chew, Jamie K Y; Ravindranath, Sneha; Pau, Allan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of clinical audit training on record-keeping behavior of dental students and students' perceptions of the clinical audit training. The training was delivered to Year 4 and Year 5 undergraduates at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It included a practical audit exercise on patient records. The results were presented by the undergraduates, and guidelines were framed from the recommendations proposed. Following this, an audit of Year 4 and Year 5 students' patient records before and after the audit training was carried out. A total of 100 records were audited against a predetermined set of criteria by two examiners. An email survey of the students was also conducted to explore their views of the audit training. Results showed statistically significant improvements in record-keeping following audit training. Responses to the email survey were analyzed qualitatively. Respondents reported that the audit training helped them to identify deficiencies in their record-keeping practice, increased their knowledge in record-keeping, and improved their record-keeping skills. Improvements in clinical audit teaching were also proposed.

  17. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd BenDor

    Full Text Available Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1 in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business linkages and increased household spending.

  18. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Lester, T William; Livengood, Avery; Davis, Adam; Yonavjak, Logan

    2015-01-01

    Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1) in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

  19. 40 CFR 63.491 - Batch front-end process vents-recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...)(2). (3) When using a flare to comply with § 63.487(a)(1): (i) The flare design (i.e., steam-assisted... process vents and § 63.490(e) for aggregate batch vent streams; (ii) For a boiler or process heater, a description of the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the boiler or process heater;...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1454 - What are the recordkeeping requirements under the RFS program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... chemical composition or physical properties. (xi) All commercial documents and additional information...) Results of any laboratory analysis of batch chemical composition or physical properties. (I) The EPA... an amount of money necessary to carry out the entire survey plan shall be paid to the...

  1. 30 CFR 250.450 - What are the recordkeeping requirements for BOP tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... testing and the pressure and duration of each test. For subsea BOP systems, you must also record the... facility; (d) Identify the control station and pod used during the test; (e) Identify any problems...

  2. 40 CFR 63.11519 - What are my notification, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operator; (ii) The address (physical location) of the affected source; (iii) An identification of the..., a brief characterization of the types of products (e.g., aerospace components, sports equipment, etc... spray delivery system employee training documentation records. Maintain certification that each worker...

  3. 78 FR 76721 - Removal of Transferred OTS Regulations Regarding Recordkeeping and Confirmation Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ...-supervised institution does not exercise investment discretion and the FDIC-supervised institution and the... (except collective investment funds) where the FDIC-supervised institution exercises investment discretion... certain level with the proceeds being transferred into a deposit account. (c) Collective investment fund...

  4. 78 FR 11264 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review; National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Policy, Emily Bruno Emily.Bruno@nwbc,gov or Clearance Officer, Curtis Rich, Curtis.Rich@sba.gov Small..., DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis Rich, Agency Clearance Officer, (202)...

  5. 78 FR 17743 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review; National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Officer, Curtis Rich, Curtis.rich@sba.gov Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor..., New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2870 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCES Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration... in paragraphs (c) (1) and (2) of this section. (1) The types of materials you plan to combust in your...

  7. 40 CFR 63.118 - Process vent provisions-periodic reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations... checked out, and records of any car-seal that has broken. (b) Each owner or operator using a recovery...

  8. 78 FR 10685 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements: Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... with a 60-day comment period was published on December 11, 2012 [FR Doc. 2012-29844, Vol. 77, No. 238... skidding, hydroplaning, longer stopping distances, and crashes due to flat tires and blowouts. In an...

  9. 78 FR 36632 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... reduce texting and driving. The program will be conducted at the community level in two States.... The current project would expand the distracted driving program to focus on texting behavior. This.... Title: NHTSA Distracted Driving Survey Project. Form No.: NHTSA Form 1084. Type of Review: Revision...

  10. 75 FR 76666 - Reporting, Recordkeeping, and Daily Trading Records Requirements for Swap Dealers and Major Swap...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... recommendations included Brazil, Canada (Ontario and Quebec), Dubai, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan... economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The Commission previously has established....S.C. 605(b) that the proposed rules will not have a significant economic impact on a...

  11. 77 FR 12107 - Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ..., Local, or Tribal Governments; Shippers; Maritime Related Organizations and Associations; Local Municipal Planning Organizations; Rail and Land Transportation Companies. Forms: Shipper Survey. Abstract: This three... well as its expected burden. The Federal Register Notice (76 FR 67250) with a 60-day comment...

  12. 40 CFR 63.11564 - What are my notification, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... information specified in paragraphs (b)(2)(i) through (b)(2)(v) of this section. (i) Company name and address... problems, process problems, other known causes, and other unknown causes. (vii) A summary of the...

  13. 40 CFR 60.2260 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units for Which... of materials you plan to burn in your air curtain incinerator. (b) Keep records of results of all initial and annual opacity tests onsite in either paper copy or electronic format, unless the...

  14. 40 CFR 63.10899 - What are my recordkeeping and reporting requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and time of each recorded action for a wet or dry electrostatic precipitator (including ductwork), the... precipitator. (iii) The date and time of each recorded action for a wet scrubber (including ductwork),...

  15. 77 FR 71477 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... approximately 5 minutes for the survey. Information on attitudes, awareness, knowledge, and behavior would be... being forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The ICR describes... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on or before December 31, 2012. ADDRESSES: Send comments regarding...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1430 - Process vent reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...): (i) The flare design (i.e., steam-assisted, air-assisted, or non-assisted); (ii) All visible emission...; (iv) For a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of less than 44 megawatts and... subpart; or uses ECO and requests to monitor a parameter other than those listed in §...

  17. 75 FR 53369 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... Federal Register Notice with a 60-day comment ] period was published on May 6, 2010 (75 FR 25033-25034... technologies. Affected Public: Drivers age 21 years and older will be recruited in four locations to... voluntary and anonymous. All focus groups will be conducted by a trained moderator. Estimated Total...

  18. 40 CFR 63.11624 - What are the notification, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) The name, address, phone number and e-mail address of the owner and operator; (ii) The address (physical location) of the affected source; (iii) An identification of the relevant standard (i.e., this...) Your company's name and address; (ii) A statement by a responsible official with that official's...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11603 - What are the notification, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this section. (i) The name and address of the owner or operator; (ii) The address (i.e., physical...) and (ii) of this section. (i) Your company's name and address; (ii) A statement by a responsible official with that official's name, title, phone number, e-mail address and signature, certifying the...

  20. 76 FR 33413 - Proposed Renewal Without Change; Comment Request; Nine Bank Secrecy Act Recordkeeping Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ..., and to implement anti-money laundering programs and compliance procedures.\\1\\ \\1\\ Public Law 91-508..., cashier's checks, money orders and traveler's checks. 31 CFR 1010.415 (Old Ref. 31 CFR 103.29), 31 CFR...

  1. 75 FR 20033 - Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... operations by the Armed forces of the United States in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Operation Desert Storm... of information technology. A comment to OMB is best assured of having its full effect if OMB receives...

  2. 76 FR 22833 - Swap Data Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements: Pre-Enactment and Transition Swaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    .... The Commission received a number of comments in response to each of the IFRs. Comments generally fell into one or more of several broad categories and in a number of instances were common to both IFRs. Some commenters observed that issuance of IFRs in advance of regulations further defining the...

  3. 40 CFR 82.42 - Certification, recordkeeping and public notification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Owners or lessees of recycling or recovery equipment having their places of business in Connecticut... 10007-1866. (C) Owners or lessees of recycling or recovery equipment having their places of business in... recycling or recovery equipment having their places of business in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,...

  4. 76 FR 38183 - Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Adolescent Health (OAH), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), U.S. Department of Health and... Angeles/Project AIM.. 467 1 .7 327 Oklahoma Institute of Child Advocacy/Power 360 1 .6 216 Through...

  5. 77 FR 27539 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... instrumented vehicles to collect data on the real-world driving of passenger car and truck drivers have... 60-day comment period was published on November 16, 2011 (76 FR 71122-71123). DATES: Comments must be... about their demographics, riding history, self-reported behavior, and perceptions. After completing...

  6. 75 FR 68325 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Cultural Center located at 1920 Dexter Ave., N. Seattle, WA, in the Svea Room located on the Main level. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan Hall, 907-586-7462. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The workshop... auxiliary aids should be directed to Susan Hall, 907-586-7462, at least 5 working days prior to the...

  7. 75 FR 53734 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... the CRS in the vehicle, including the type of restraint that is used, the type of installation (seat belt or LATCH), how the CRS is installed, harness use, and seat belt fit. The observer will not remove...: Charlene Doyle, NVS-431, Office of Regulatory Analysis and Evaluation, National Highway Traffic...

  8. 77 FR 55897 - Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements: Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ...: Maritime Administration (MARAD). Title: Request for Transfer of Ownership, Registry, and Flag, or Charter... foreign transfer of U.S.-flag vessels. Forms: MA-29, MA-29A, MA-29B (Note: MA-29A is used only in cases of... the sale, transfer, charter, lease, or mortgage of U.S. documented vessels to non-citizens, or...

  9. 77 FR 73736 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements: Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) How to enhance the quality... aggressive steps that are reasonably possible now, the agency is committed to continue learning about this... implementation of active tire pressure monitoring systems in MD/HD vehicles, as these systems are among the fuel...

  10. 77 FR 5628 - Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... equipment to crisis zones. Annual Estimated Burden Hours: 30 hours. Addressees: Send comments to the Office... of the proposed information collection; ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the... OMB is best assured of having its full effect if OMB receives it within 30 days of...

  11. 76 FR 30238 - Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... information from state level reporting entities that can be used to measure the progress of 9-1-1 authorities... proposed effort, NHTSA would specifically request reporting entities to voluntarily collect and annually... reporting entity, for a total of 168 hours for all entities. The respondents would not incur any...

  12. 40 CFR 82.13 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements for class I controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administrator a report describing: (i) The method by which the producer in practice measures daily quantities of..., density of the controlled substance); (iii) Internal accounting procedures for determining plant-wide... estimated percent efficiency of the production process for the controlled substance. Within 60 days of any...

  13. 17 CFR 250.26 - Financial statement and recordkeeping requirements for registered holding companies and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... maintain a subaccount to its retained earnings account which shall be periodically debited or credited with its proportionate share of undistributed retained earnings of subsidiary companies. (3) No company... proportionate share of earnings or losses or capital changes of the subsidiary company since its acquisition...

  14. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and place a copy in their files. Generators of hazardous debris excluded from the definition of... are not limited to case-by-case extensions under § 268.5, disposal in a no-migration unit under § 268.... Waste analysis data (when available) ✔ ✔ ✔ 6. Date the waste is subject to the prohibition ✔ 7....

  15. 78 FR 16840 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Testing and Recordkeeping Requirements Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ....regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert H. Squibb, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission... government is approximately $717,954. Dated: March 14, 2013. Todd A. Stevenson, Secretary, Consumer...

  16. 78 FR 40443 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request-Recordkeeping Requirements Under the Safety Standard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... received, go to http://www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert H. Squibb, Consumer... 64 hours = $1,736). Dated: July 1, 2013. Todd A. Stevenson, Secretary, Consumer Product...

  17. 26 CFR 1.170A-13 - Recordkeeping and return requirements for deductions for charitable contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... contributions of inventory and scientific equipment) there shall be taken into account only the amount claimed... transactions or statistical sampling, including a justification for using sampling and an explanation of...

  18. Factors influencing bonding fixed restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Crown displacement often occurs because the features of tooth preparations do not counteract the forces directed against restorations. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preparation designs on retention and resistance of fixed restorations. METHOD The study was performed on 64 differently sized stainless steel dies. Also, caps which were used for evaluated retention were made of stainless steel for each die. After cementing the caps on experimental dies, measuring of necessary tensile forces to separate cemented caps from dies was done. Caps, which were made of a silver-palladium alloy with a slope of 60° to the longitudinal axis formed on the occlusal surface, were used for evaluating resistance. A sudden drop in load pressure recorded by the test machine indicated failure for that cap. RESULTS A significant difference was found between the tensile force required to remove the caps from the dies with different length (p<0.05 and different taper (p<0.01. The greatest retentive strengths (2579.2 N and 2989.8 N were noticed in experimental dies with the greatest length and smallest taper. No statistically significant (p>0.05 differences were found between tensile loads for caps cemented on dies with different diameter. Although there was an apparent slight increase in resistance values for caps on dies with smaller tapers, the increase in resistance for those preparation designs was not statistically significant. There was a significant difference among the resistance values for caps on dies with different length (p<0.01 and diameter (p<0.05. CONCLUSION In the light of the results obtained, it could be reasonably concluded that retention and resistance of the restoration is in inverse proportion to convergence angle of the prepared teeth. But, at a constant convergence angle, retention and resistance increase with rising length and diameter.

  19. The perio-esthetic-restorative approach for anterior rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Nitin; Bansal, Tushika; Bhandari, Marisha; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-07-01

    Ensuring clinical success begins with a careful discussion of treatment planning, comprehensively covering all variables in simple to complex cases. Procedures including the crown lengthening surgery, furcation treatment and mucogingival therapy and tooth restoration are essential treatment regimens requiring multifaceted expertise. The interplay of periodontics and restorative dentistry is present at many fronts including the response of the gingival tissue to the restorative preparations. Dental restorations and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins, the contours of the restoration, the proximal relationships and the surface smoothness have a critical biological impact on the gingiva and the supporting periodontal tissues. The different surgical procedures used for crown lengthening are gingivectomy/gingivoplasty, apically positioned flap with or without osseous resection and orthodontic extrusion. The paper presents crown lengthening of severely mutilated teeth to increase the clinical crown height for adequate restoration.

  20. The perio-esthetic-restorative approach for anterior rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Tomar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring clinical success begins with a careful discussion of treatment planning, comprehensively covering all variables in simple to complex cases. Procedures including the crown lengthening surgery, furcation treatment and mucogingival therapy and tooth restoration are essential treatment regimens requiring multifaceted expertise. The interplay of periodontics and restorative dentistry is present at many fronts including the response of the gingival tissue to the restorative preparations. Dental restorations and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins, the contours of the restoration, the proximal relationships and the surface smoothness have a critical biological impact on the gingiva and the supporting periodontal tissues. The different surgical procedures used for crown lengthening are gingivectomy/gingivoplasty, apically positioned flap with or without osseous resection and orthodontic extrusion. The paper presents crown lengthening of severely mutilated teeth to increase the clinical crown height for adequate restoration.

  1. The perio-esthetic-restorative approach for anterior rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Nitin; Bansal, Tushika; Bhandari, Marisha; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-01-01

    Ensuring clinical success begins with a careful discussion of treatment planning, comprehensively covering all variables in simple to complex cases. Procedures including the crown lengthening surgery, furcation treatment and mucogingival therapy and tooth restoration are essential treatment regimens requiring multifaceted expertise. The interplay of periodontics and restorative dentistry is present at many fronts including the response of the gingival tissue to the restorative preparations. Dental restorations and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins, the contours of the restoration, the proximal relationships and the surface smoothness have a critical biological impact on the gingiva and the supporting periodontal tissues. The different surgical procedures used for crown lengthening are gingivectomy/gingivoplasty, apically positioned flap with or without osseous resection and orthodontic extrusion. The paper presents crown lengthening of severely mutilated teeth to increase the clinical crown height for adequate restoration. PMID:24174740

  2. [Influence of implant restoration on traditional restoration idea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H C

    2016-01-01

    Implant restoration affected the traditional restoration idea. Artificial implant restoration has a profound influence on the design of dental restoration. Implant supported prostheses have not only changed the method of oral rehabilitation, but also integrated revolutionary concept with the traditional treatment protocol. By using implants, posterior missing molars can be effectively restored and thus eliminating the disadvantages of traditional removable partial denture for Kennedy classification Ⅰ, Ⅱ partically edentulous dentition. Full edentulous arch can also be restored with implant fixed denture which provide much better oral health related quality of life compared with the traditional complete denture. It is useful to master the theory and skills of artificial implant restoration, and to provide a reference for the restoration of oral physiological function.

  3. Combination restoration in full mouth rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful restoration of the dentition requires plenty of contemporary and conventional treatment techniques and planning and attachment retained partial dentures are one such kind of treatment modality in prosthodontics. Satisfactory restoration in a patient with a partially edentulous situation can be challenging especially when unilateral or bilateral posterior segment of teeth is missing. One such treatment modality is attachment-retained cast partial dentures. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of a case with maxillary complete denture and opposing cast partial denture with precision attachment.

  4. Environmental Restoration Information Resource Management Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Restoration Information Resources Management (ER IRM) Program Plan defines program requirements, organizational structures and responsibilities, and work breakdown structure and to establish an approved baseline against which overall progress of the program as well as the effectiveness of its management will be measured. This plan will guide ER IRM Program execution and define the program`s essential elements. This plan will be routinely updated to incorporate key decisions and programmatic changes and will serve as the project baseline document. Environmental Restoration Waste Management Program intersite procedures and work instructions will be developed to facilitate the implementation of this plan.

  5. Application of Laser Irradiation for Restorative Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Amin; Sanei, Maryam; Badrian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, lasers are widely used in many fields of medicine. Also, they can be applied at many branches of dental practice such as diagnosis, preventive procedures, restorative treatments, and endodontic therapies. Procedures like caries removal, re-mineralization, and vital pulp therapy are the most noticeable effects of laser irradiation which has gained much attention among clinicians. With controlled and appropriate wavelength, they can help stimulating dentinogenesis, controlling pulpal hemorrhage, sterilization, healing of collagenic proteins, formation of a fibrous matrix, and inducing hard tissue barrier. Nevertheless, there are many controversies in literatures regarding their effects on the quality of bonded restorations. It hampered a wide application of lasers in some aspects of restorative dentistry and requirements to identify the best way to use this technology. The aim of this mini review is to explain special characteristics of laser therapy and to introduce the possible applications of laser devices for dental purposes. PMID:27990188

  6. Restoring gingival harmony around single tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reikie, D F

    1995-07-01

    One of the biggest challenges to restoring a single tooth implant in the esthetic zone of the mouth is the creation of harmonious gingival contour around the restoration. Soft- or hard-tissue deficiencies of the edentulous space are the most common obstacles to achieving gingival symmetry around the proposed restoration. Numerous gingival and osseous grafting and regeneration techniques are available but may complicate treatment by increasing the number of surgical procedures and sites necessary. This article describes a technique for treating mild-to-moderate ridge defects without the required additional surgical procedures or a surgical donor site. Soft-tissue overcontouring is provided around the healing abutment by modification of the surgical flap at second-stage implant surgery. Subsequent gingivoplasty allows establishment of anatomic gingival architecture that surrounds the single implant prosthesis.

  7. Radiopacity of restorative materials using digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzedas, Leda Maria Pescinini; Louzada, Mário Jefferson Quirino; de Oliveira Filho, Antonio Braz

    2006-04-01

    The radiopacity of esthetic restorative materials has been established as an important requirement, improving the radiographic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of six restorative materials using a direct digital image system, comparing them to the dental tissues (enamel-dentin), expressed as equivalent thickness of aluminum (millimeters of aluminum). Five specimens of each material were made. Three 2-mm thick longitudinal sections were cut from an intact extracted permanent molar tooth (including enamel and dentin). An aluminum step wedge with 9 steps was used. The samples of different materials were placed on a phosphor plate together with a tooth section, aluminum step wedge and metal code letter, and were exposed using a dental x-ray unit. Five measurements of radiographic density were obtained from each image of each item assessed (restorative material, enamel, dentin, each step of the aluminum step wedge) and the mean of these values was calculated. Radiopacity values were subsequently calculated as equivalents of aluminum thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant differences in radiopacity values among the materials (Pcomposite restorations it is important that the restorative material to be used has enough radiopacity, in order to be easily distinguished from the tooth structure in the radiographic image. Knowledge on the radiopacity of different materials helps professionals to select the most suitable material, along with other properties such as biocompatibility, adhesion and esthetic.

  8. Influence of restored koa in supporting bird communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richard J.; Paxton, Eben; Yelenik, Stephanie G.

    2017-01-01

    Deforestation of Hawaiian forests has adversely impacted native wildlife, including forest birds, bats and arthropods. Restoration activities have included reforestation with the native koa (Acacia koa), a dominant canopy tree species that is easy to propagate, has high survivorship, and has fast growth rates. We review recent research describing the ecological benefits of koa restoration on wildlife colonization/use, plant dispersal, and native plant recruitment. In general, planting monotypic koa stands can provide forest habitats for species that need them but does not automatically lead to natural regeneration of a diverse forest species assemblage and may require additional restoration activities such as outplanting of other native plants and alien grass control to achieve more natural forest systems. Although early signs of forest and wildlife recovery have been encouraging, the goals of restoration for wildlife conservation versus commercial grade harvesting require different restoration methods.

  9. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  10. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu CH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Hung Chu1, May L Mei,1 Chloe Cheung,1 Romesh P Nalliah2 1Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, such as the contemporary design of dental handpieces with advanced light-emitting diode (LED and handheld comfort, offer operative dentists better vision, illumination, and maneuverability. The use of magnifying loupes also enhances the visibility of the preparation. The advent of digital radiographic imaging has improved dental imaging and reduced radiation. The new generation of restorative materials has improved mechanical properties. Tunnel restoration can be an option to restore proximal caries if the dentist performs proper case selection and pays attention to the details of the restorative procedures. This paper describes the clinical technique of tunnel restoration and reviews the studies of tunnel restorations. Keywords: operative, practice, tunnel preparation, composite, amalgam, glass ionomer

  11. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  12. Prospective environmental restoration/ restoration up front: a concept for an incentive-based program to increase restoration planning and implementation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Ralph G; Gouguet, Ron; DeSantis, Amanda; Liu, Jenny; Ammann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a concept variously termed prospective environmental restoration, restoration up front, or restoration banking. Briefly, the concept centers on the ability of an entity, public or private, to gain durable credits for undertaking proactive restoration activities. Once obtained, these credits can be applied to an existing liability, held in the event of a future liability, or traded or sold to others that might have need for the credits. In the case of a natural resource damage claim or response action, possessing or applying the credits does not negate the need for responsible entities to clean up spills or releases of hazardous substances or oil or to address their clean-up requirements under applicable federal and state statutes. Concepts similar to prospective environmental restoration/restoration up front include wetlands mitigation banking, conservation habitat banking, and emissions trading. Much of the concept and details provided herein stem from the practice of natural resource damage assessment, although that is not the sole driver for the concept. The concept could also apply where the credits could be used to offset other environmental liabilities, for example, to provide habitat mitigation where development is being planned. The authors believe that the concept, if widely applied, could reduce the time and costs associated with restoration and perhaps lead to an increase in voluntary restoration and conservation nationally. Currently, there are no state or federal regulations or policies that directly provide for this approach.

  13. Linking plant ecology and long-term hydrology to improve wetland restoration success

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.V. Caldwell; M.J. Vepraskas; J.D. Gregory; R.W. Skaggs; R.L. Huffman

    2011-01-01

    Although millions of dollars are spent restoring wetlands, failures are common, in part because the planted vegetation cannot survive in the restored hydrology. Wetland restoration would be more successful if the hydrologic requirements of wetland plant communities were known so that the most appropriate plants could be selected for the range of projected hydrology at...

  14. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Kutkut; Osama Abu-Hammad; Robert Frazer

    2016-01-01

    Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniq...

  15. 50 CFR 80.14 - Application of Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application of Wildlife and Sport Fish...

  16. 50 CFR 80.25 - Multiyear financing under the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Program. 80.25 Section 80.25 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON...

  17. Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James M; Aronson, James; Newton, Adrian C; Pywell, Richard F; Rey-Benayas, Jose M

    2011-10-01

    Ecological restoration is becoming regarded as a major strategy for increasing the provision of ecosystem services as well as reversing biodiversity losses. Here, we show that restoration projects can be effective in enhancing both, but that conflicts can arise, especially if single services are targeted in isolation. Furthermore, recovery of biodiversity and services can be slow and incomplete. Despite this uncertainty, new methods of ecosystem service valuation are suggesting that the economic benefits of restoration can outweigh costs. Payment for Ecosystem Service schemes could therefore provide incentives for restoration, but require development to ensure biodiversity and multiple services are enhanced and the needs of different stakeholders are met. Such approaches must be implemented widely if new global restoration targets are to be achieved.

  18. Restorative surgery of combined injuries of neurovascular structures of limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Pertsov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Combined damage of neurovascular structures is complicate pathology and require repeated surgical interventions and often lead to permanent disability. Aim. To define the features of restorative surgical treatment of traumatic injuries of limbs neurovascular structures and to study the effect of regional hemodynamics on the nerve function restore. Methods and results. In 98 patients with combined trauma of the neurovascular structures microcirculation indicators were established with laser Doppler flowmetry and determine the degree of restoration of nerve function. Conclusion. Strong direct correlation between the degree of restoration of nerve function and microcirculation was detected, the correlation coefficient was +0.72 at t = 3,16 p<0,05. Careful surgical restoration of blood flow helps to improve microcirculation in the limbs, makes positive impact on the recovery of limb function.

  19. Efficient blind image restoration using discrete periodic radon transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Daniel P K; Chan, Tommy C L; Hsung, Tai-Chiu; Feng, David Dagan; Chan, Yuk-Hee

    2004-02-01

    Restoring an image from its convolution with an unknown blur function is a well-known ill-posed problem in image processing. Many approaches have been proposed to solve the problem and they have shown to have good performance in identifying the blur function and restoring the original image. However, in actual implementation, various problems incurred due to the large data size and long computational time of these approaches are undesirable even with the current computing machines. In this paper, an efficient algorithm is proposed for blind image restoration based on the discrete periodic Radon transform (DPRT). With DPRT, the original two-dimensional blind image restoration problem is converted into one-dimensional ones, which greatly reduces the memory size and computational time required. Experimental results show that the resulting approach is faster in almost an order of magnitude as compared with the traditional approach, while the quality of the restored image is similar.

  20. 12 CFR 208.34 - Recordkeeping and confirmation of certain securities transactions effected by State member banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... collective investment and reinvestment of monies contributed thereto by the bank in its capacity as trustee... customer; (2) Accounts (except collective investment funds) where the bank exercises investment discretion... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping and confirmation of certain...

  1. Reference condition approach to restoration planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, J.M.; Theiling, C.H.; Lubinski, S.J.; Smith, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Ecosystem restoration planning requires quantitative rigor to evaluate alternatives, define end states, report progress and perform environmental benefits analysis (EBA). Unfortunately, existing planning frameworks are, at best, semi-quantitative. In this paper, we: (1) describe a quantitative restoration planning approach based on a comprehensive, but simple mathematical framework that can be used to effectively apply knowledge and evaluate alternatives, (2) use the approach to derive a simple but precisely defined lexicon based on the reference condition concept and allied terms and (3) illustrate the approach with an example from the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) using hydrologic indicators. The approach supports the development of a scaleable restoration strategy that, in theory, can be expanded to ecosystem characteristics such as hydraulics, geomorphology, habitat and biodiversity. We identify three reference condition types, best achievable condition (A BAC), measured magnitude (MMi which can be determined at one or many times and places) and desired future condition (ADFC) that, when used with the mathematical framework, provide a complete system of accounts useful for goal-oriented system-level management and restoration. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame.

  3. Longevity of silicate ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    The demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of dental ceramics as a biocompatible and functionally sufficient alternative to conventional restorative materials. Silicate ceramic restorations are widely used for veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns in dentistry. Long-term data are of crucial importance to optimize clinical practice. The purpose of the present article is to summarize data of the Innsbruck ceramic evaluation up to 261 months with the focus on longevity and failure characteristics.

  4. Verification of watershed vegetation restoration policies, arid China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengqi; Li, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Verification of restoration policies that have been implemented is of significance to simultaneously reduce global environmental risks while also meeting economic development goals. This paper proposed a novel method according to the idea of multiple time scales to verify ecological restoration policies in the Shiyang River drainage basin, arid China. We integrated modern pollen transport characteristics of the entire basin and pollen records from 8 Holocene sedimentary sections, and quantitatively reconstructed the millennial-scale changes of watershed vegetation zones by defining a new pollen-precipitation index. Meanwhile, Empirical Orthogonal Function method was used to quantitatively analyze spatial and temporal variations of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index in summer (June to August) of 2000-2014. By contrasting the vegetation changes that mainly controlled by millennial-scale natural ecological evolution with that under conditions of modern ecological restoration measures, we found that vegetation changes of the entire Shiyang River drainage basin are synchronous in both two time scales, and the current ecological restoration policies met the requirements of long-term restoration objectives and showed promising early results on ecological environmental restoration. Our findings present an innovative method to verify river ecological restoration policies, and also provide the scientific basis to propose future emphasizes of ecological restoration strategies.

  5. Effects of vibration measurement error on remote sensing image restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Wei, Zhang; Zhi, Xiyang

    2016-10-01

    Satellite vibrations would lead to image motion blur. Since the vibration isolators cannot fully suppress the influence of vibrations, image restoration methods are usually adopted, and the vibration characteristics of imaging system are usually required as algorithm inputs for better restoration results, making the vibration measurement error strongly connected to the final outcome. If the measurement error surpass a certain range, the restoration may not be implemented successfully. Therefore it is important to test the applicable scope of restoration algorithms and control the vibrations within the range, on the other hand, if the algorithm is robust, then the requirements for both vibration isolator and vibration detector can be lowered and thus less financial cost is needed. In this paper, vibration-induced degradation is first analyzed, based on which the effects of measurement error on image restoration are further analyzed. The vibration-induced degradation is simulated using high resolution satellite images and then the applicable working condition of typical restoration algorithms are tested with simulation experiments accordingly. The research carried out in this paper provides a valuable reference for future satellite design which plan to implement restoration algorithms.

  6. The economics of restoration: looking back and leaping forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blignaut, James; Aronson, James; de Wit, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment in 2005 there has been a surge of interest in ecological restoration (ER) to recover biodiversity, re-establish ecosystem functioning and connectivity, and reactivate the delivery of ecosystem services. In policy spheres, there have also been repeated calls for expansion of restoration efforts. In many countries, new legislation now requires some form of restoration and/or a form of offset investment. All of this will require major increases in financial allocations toward restoration science, technology, and implementation, and much more detailed valuation techniques. The economics of restoration is a new field emerging to support these needs. Our paper here starts with an analysis of the articles and reviews published on this broad subject from 1928 to 2012, as captured in the Scopus academic search platform. Our goal is to present and summarize what has been said and done in this area to date. Next, we map out one possible way forward, illustrated by examples and based on a coherent bundle of decision parameters related to the economics of ER and, more broadly, to the restoration of natural capital. The restoration of natural capital is defined as activities that integrate investment in, and replenishment of, natural capital stocks to improve the flows of ecosystem goods and services, and the preservation of biodiversity, while enhancing all aspects of human well-being. We give special attention to system dynamic approaches and other promising tools and techniques.

  7. Restoration handbook for sagebrush steppe ecosystems with emphasis on greater sage-grouse habitat—Part 1. Concepts for understanding and applying restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, David A.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Pellant, Mike; Knick, Steven T.; Miller, Richard F.; Beck, Jeffrey L.; Doescher, Paul S.; Schupp, Eugene W.; Roundy, Bruce A.; Brunson, Mark; McIver, James D.

    2015-10-26

    Sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the United States currently occur on only about one-half of their historical land area because of changes in land use, urban growth, and degradation of land, including invasions of non-native plants. The existence of many animal species depends on the existence of sagebrush steppe habitat. The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a landscape-dependent bird that requires intact habitat and combinations of sagebrush and perennial grasses to exist. In addition, other sagebrush-obligate animals also have similar requirements and restoration of landscapes for greater sage-grouse also will benefit these animals. Once sagebrush lands are degraded, they may require restoration actions to make those lands viable habitat for supporting sagebrushobligate animals. This restoration handbook is the first in a three-part series on restoration of sagebrush ecosystems. In Part 1, we discuss concepts surrounding landscape and restoration ecology of sagebrush ecosystems and greater sage-grouse that habitat managers and restoration practitioners need to know to make informed decisions regarding where and how to restore specific areas. We will describe the plant dynamics of sagebrush steppe ecosystems and their responses to major disturbances, fire, and defoliation. We will introduce the concepts of ecosystem resilience to disturbances and resistance to invasions of annual grasses within sagebrush steppe. An introduction to soils and ecological site information will provide insights into the specific plants that can be restored in a location. Soil temperature and moisture regimes are described as a tool for determining resilience and resistance and the potential for various restoration actions. Greater sage-grouse are considered landscape birds that require large areas of intact sagebrush steppe; therefore, we describe concepts of landscape ecology that aid our decisions regarding habitat restoration. We provide a brief overview of

  8. Skjern River Restoration Counterfactual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    In 2003 the Skjern River Restoration Project in Denmark was awarded the prestigious Europa Nostra Prize for ‘conserving the European cultural heritage’ (Danish Nature Agency 2005). In this case, however, it seems that the conservation of one cultural heritage came at the expense of another cultural...... of Dissonance in Nature Restoration’, Journal of Landscape Architecture 2/2014: 58-67. Danish Nature Agency (2005), Skjern Å: Ådalens historie. De store projekter. Det nye landskab og naturen. På tur i ådalen [The Skjern River: The History of the River Delta. The Big Projects. The New Landscape and Nature...... heritage. While the meanders of the Skjern River were reconstructed according to its assumed course in 1870s, the embanked canal, which was the main feature and symbol of a comprehensive cultivation project from the 1960s, was deconstructed and reduced to incomprehensible traces of the past. Not only did...

  9. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  10. Indirect porcelain veneer technique for restoring intrinsically stained teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutbirth, S T

    1992-01-01

    Indirect porcelain veneers are often the ideal restoration for intrinsically stained teeth. This article details a step-by-step procedure for esthetically restoring discolored teeth. Porcelain laminate veneers are often indicated when teeth bleaching or direct composite bonding procedures cannot provide the desired esthetic result. Veneers are more appealing to many patients than full coverage crowns because of the more conservative tooth preparation required. If technique details are followed meticulously and cases are appropriately selected, porcelain veneers are not only durable but also promote marvelous gingival health and may be the most esthetic anterior dental restoration.

  11. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-09-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  12. Assessing the carbon benefit of saltmarsh restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin; Paterson, David; Hanley, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of carbon sequestration rates in coastal ecosystems is required to better realise their potential role in climate change mitigation. Through accurate valuation this service can be fully appreciated and perhaps help facilitate efforts to restore vulnerable ecosystems such as saltmarshes. Vegetated coastal ecosystems are suggested to account for approximately 50% of oceanic sedimentary carbon despite their 2% areal extent. Saltmarshes, conservatively estimated to store 430 ± 30 Tg C in surface sediment deposits, have experienced extensive decline in the recent past; through processes such as land use change and coastal squeeze. Saltmarsh habitats offer a range of services that benefit society and the natural world, making their conservation meaningful and beneficial. The associated costs of restoration projects could, in part, be subsidised through payment for ecosystem services, specifically Blue carbon. Additional storage is generated through the (re)vegetation of mudflat areas leading to an altered ecosystem state and function; providing similar benefits to natural saltmarsh areas. The Eden Estuary, Fife, Scotland has been a site of saltmarsh restoration since 2000; providing a temporal and spatial scale to evaluate these additional benefits. The study is being conducted to quantify the carbon benefit of restoration efforts and provide an insight into the evolution of this benefit through sites of different ages. Seasonal sediment deposition and settlement rates are measured across the estuary in: mudflat, young planted saltmarsh, old planted saltmarsh and extant high marsh areas. Carbon values being derived from loss on ignition organic content values. Samples are taken across a tidal cycle on a seasonal basis; providing data on tidal influence, vegetation condition effects and climatic factors on sedimentation and carbon sequestration rates. These data will inform on the annual characteristics of sedimentary processes in the estuary and be

  13. Archived film analysis and restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rares, A.

    2004-01-01

    The progressive degradation of current film archives poses a serious threat to the preservation of our cultural and technical heritage. Digitization and digital restoration are currently the most viable solutions for the long term preservation and high quality restoration of filmed material. They

  14. SOCIAL WELFARE AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Fox

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the links and connections between social work and restorative justice. After a brief description of social work, restorative justice and family group conferencing, I will explore some the complementary theoretical links and practice applications, critically examining the potential implications and opportunities for social work practitioners and academics in relation to practice.

  15. Archived film analysis and restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rares, A.

    2004-01-01

    The progressive degradation of current film archives poses a serious threat to the preservation of our cultural and technical heritage. Digitization and digital restoration are currently the most viable solutions for the long term preservation and high quality restoration of filmed material. They al

  16. Identification of Acceptable Restoration Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Tae Cha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, we have seen several catastrophic and cascading failures of power systems throughout the world. Power system breakup and blackouts are rare events. However, when they occur, the effects on utilities and general population can be quite severe. To prevent or reduce cascading sequences of events caused by the various reasons, KEPRI is researching ways to revolutionize innovative strategies that will significantly reduce the vulnerability of the power system and will ensure successful restoration of service to customers. This paper describes a restoration guidelines / recommendations for the KEPS simulator, which allows power system operator and planner to simulate and plan restoration events in an interactive mode. The KEPS simulator provides a list of restoration events according to the priority based on some restoration rules and list of priority loads. Further, the paper will draw on research using information from a Jeju case study.

  17. 50 CFR 80.27 - Information collection requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.27 Information... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information collection requirements. 80.27...

  18. SELECTION OF METHOD FOR RESTORATION OF PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ivanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains definitions for a process and a methodology for restoration of parts on the basis of the analysis of the known methods and their selection. Geometric parameters and operational properties that should be provided for restoration of parts have been determined in the paper. A process for selection of the required method for restoration parts has been improved and it makes it possible to synthesize an optimal process of the restoration according to a criterion of industrial resource consumption with due account of quality, productivity and security limits. A justification on measures that meet the required limits has been presented in the paper. The paper shows a direction of technical solutions that ensure complete use of residual life of repair fund parts. These solutions can be achieved through close application of all repair sizes of work-pieces with revision of their values, uniform removal of the allowance while cutting the work-pieces at optimum locating, application of coating processes only in technically justified cases, application of straightening with thermal fixing of its results or all-around compression of deformable elements. The paper proposes to limit a number of overhauls for the units together with restoration of basic and fundamental parts by two repairs for the whole period of their lifetime. Number of shaft journal building-up should be limited by one building-up operation throughout the whole life cycle of the part with the purpose to preserve its length within the prescribed limits. It has been recommended to expand an application area of volumetric plastic deformation of material in the form of thermoplastic distribution or reduction of repair work-pieces representing class of rotation bodies with holes that ensures an allowance to machine external and internal surfaces for nominal dimensions without coating. A structure of the coating material with fine inclusions of carbides or nitrides of metals and

  19. Hearing Restoration with Auditory Brainstem Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; MIYAWAKI, Satoru; KIN, Taichi; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) technology attempts to restore hearing in deaf patients caused by bilateral cochlear nerve injury through the direct stimulation of the brainstem, but many aspects of the related mechanisms remain unknown. The unresolved issues can be grouped into three topics: which patients are the best candidates; which type of electrode should be used; and how to improve restored hearing. We evaluated our experience with 11 cases of ABI placement. We found that if at least seven of eleven electrodes of the MED-EL ABI are effectively placed in a patient with no deformation of the fourth ventricle, open set sentence recognition of approximately 20% and closed set word recognition of approximately 65% can be achieved only with the ABI. Appropriate selection of patients for ABI placement can lead to good outcomes. Further investigation is required regarding patient selection criteria and methods of surgery for effective ABI placement. PMID:27464470

  20. Restoration of optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You SW

    2017-03-01

    . Many genes, such as Bcl-2, PTEN, and mTOR, are crucial in cell proliferation, axon guidance, and growth during development, and play important roles in the regeneration and extension of RGC axons. With transgenic mice and related gene regulations, robust regeneration of RGC axons has been observed after ON injury in laboratories. Although various means of experimental treatments such as cell transplantation and gene therapy have achieved significant progress in neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and restoration of the visual function after ON injury, many unresolved scientific problems still exist for their clinical applications. Therefore, we still need to overcome hurdles before developing effective therapy to treat optic neuropathy diseases in patients. Keywords: retinal ganglion cells, optic nerve injury, neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, vision restoration

  1. Employee and government access to personnel files: rights and requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J C; Ostling, P J

    1979-01-01

    A maze of record-keeping, disclosure, and privacy statutes and regulations, with accompanying case law, have created a boom in privacy law. Employers find themselves caught in this rising tide, torn between the often conflicting requirements. The issue of access to employee files--by employees, government, and unions--is one of the most difficult issues in this complicated situation. This article discusses recent developments in the field and aims to help readers thread their way through the maze of contradictions and pitfalls confronting employers.

  2. Error image aware content restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Lee, Moonsik; Jung, Byunghee

    2015-12-01

    As the resolution of TV significantly increased, content consumers have become increasingly sensitive to the subtlest defect in TV contents. This rising standard in quality demanded by consumers has posed a new challenge in today's context where the tape-based process has transitioned to the file-based process: the transition necessitated digitalizing old archives, a process which inevitably produces errors such as disordered pixel blocks, scattered white noise, or totally missing pixels. Unsurprisingly, detecting and fixing such errors require a substantial amount of time and human labor to meet the standard demanded by today's consumers. In this paper, we introduce a novel, automated error restoration algorithm which can be applied to different types of classic errors by utilizing adjacent images while preserving the undamaged parts of an error image as much as possible. We tested our method to error images detected from our quality check system in KBS(Korean Broadcasting System) video archive. We are also implementing the algorithm as a plugin of well-known NLE(Non-linear editing system), which is a familiar tool for quality control agent.

  3. 10 CFR 72.242 - Recordkeeping and reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Approval of... fabrication deficiency affects the ability of structures, systems, and components important to safety...

  4. 40 CFR 75.84 - Recordkeeping and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Information required by § 75.57(h) concerning the causes of any missing data periods and the actions taken to... records under § 75.59(a)(7); (H) Data and results of RATAs that are aborted or invalidated due to problems with the reference method or operational problems with the unit and data and results of...

  5. 40 CFR 75.73 - Recordkeeping and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 75.53 and hardcopy test data and results required by § 75.59; (F) Records of flow polynomial...)(A) through (M) shall be reported for flow RATAs at circular or rectangular stacks (or ducts) in... reported for any flow RATA run at a circular stack in which Method 2 in appendices A-1 and A-2 to part 60...

  6. AN AUDITING FRAMEWORK TO SUBSTANTIATE ELECTRONIC RECORDKEEPING PRACTICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality assurance audits of computer systems help to ensure that the end data meet the needs of the user. Increasingly complex systems require the stepwise procedures outlined below. The areas reviewed in this paper include both technical and evidentiary criteria. I...

  7. The Hip Restoration Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Allston Julius; Atilla, Halis Atil

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the rapid advancement of imaging and arthroscopic techniques about the hip joint, missed diagnoses are still common. As a deep joint and compared to the shoulder and knee joints, localization of hip symptoms is difficult. Hip pathology is not easily isolated and is often related to intra and extra-articular abnormalities. In light of these diagnostic challenges, we recommend an algorithmic approach to effectively diagnoses and treat hip pain. Methods In this review, hip pain is evaluated from diagnosis to treatment in a clear decision model. First we discuss emergency hip situations followed by the differentiation of intra and extra-articular causes of the hip pain. We differentiate the intra-articular hip as arthritic and non-arthritic and extra-articular pain as surrounding or remote tissue generated. Further, extra-articular hip pain is evaluated according to pain location. Finally we summarize the surgical treatment approach with an algorithmic diagram. Conclusion Diagnosis of hip pathology is difficult because the etiologies of pain may be various. An algorithmic approach to hip restoration from diagnosis to rehabilitation is crucial to successfully identify and manage hip pathologies. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066734

  8. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily

  9. The atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach for the management of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smales, Roger J; Yip, Hak-Kong

    2002-06-01

    There is worldwide interest in and increasing usage of the conservative atraumatic restorative treatment technique or approach for the restoration of primary and permanent teeth. However, most published data on the clinical performance of the newer, high-strength esthetic conventional glass-ionomer restorative cements marketed for the procedure have been derived from short-term studies. There have been very few reports comparing different types of restorative materials and methods of cavity preparation. In primary teeth, after 1 year, success rates have been approximately 80% to 95% for Class I and Class V single-surface restorations, 55% to 75% for Class II multisurface restorations, and 35% to 55% for Class III and Class IV restorations. In permanent teeth, after 2 to 3 years, success rates have been approximately 90% for Class I and Class V single-surface restorations, but little data have been reported for other restoration classes. Failures usually result from restoration losses, fractures, and wear. Further improvements in the design of hand instruments and in the mechanical properties of the newer glass-ionomer cements are required. Currently, use of the atraumatic restorative treatment approach should be restricted to restoration of single-surface caries lesions, especially in permanent teeth, and to sealing of occlusal fissures in selected teeth.

  10. Restoring a Tarnished Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Michael F.

    1972-01-01

    Tight money, public disenchantment with higher education, and rapidly changing degree and general education requirements now force the publishing industry and the academic community to reexamine their priorities, commitments, and practices. (Author)

  11. Governing and Delivering a Biome-Wide Restoration Initiative: The Case of Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino R. Pinto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In many human-modified tropical landscapes, biodiversity conservation and the provision of ecosystem services require large-scale restoration initiatives. Such initiatives must be able to augment the amount and the quality of remaining natural habitats. There is thus a growing need for long-term, multi-stakeholder and multi-purpose initiatives that result in multiple ecological and socioeconomic benefits at the biome scale. The Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact (AFRP is a coalition of 260+ stakeholders, including governmental agencies, private sector, NGOs and research institutions, aimed at restoring 15 million ha of degraded and deforested lands by 2050. By articulating, and then integrating common interests, this initiative has allowed different sectors of society to implement an ambitious vision and create a forum for public and private concerns regarding forest restoration. The AFRP adopts a set of governance tools so multiple actors can implement key processes to achieve long-term and visionary restoration goals. Having overcome some initial challenges, AFRP now has to incorporate underrepresented stakeholders and enhance its efforts to make forest restoration more economically viable, including cases where restoration could be less expensive and profitable. The AFRP experience has resulted in many lessons learned, which can be shared to foster similar initiatives across tropical regions.

  12. VT River Restoration Data in Lamoille County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Documented river and riparian buffer restoration projects in Lamoille County, Vermont. Restoration includes buffer plantings (trees and shrubs),...

  13. Intelligent decision support algorithm for distribution system restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Reetu; Mehfuz, Shabana; Kumar, Parmod

    2016-01-01

    Distribution system is the means of revenue for electric utility. It needs to be restored at the earliest if any feeder or complete system is tripped out due to fault or any other cause. Further, uncertainty of the loads, result in variations in the distribution network's parameters. Thus, an intelligent algorithm incorporating hybrid fuzzy-grey relation, which can take into account the uncertainties and compare the sequences is discussed to analyse and restore the distribution system. The simulation studies are carried out to show the utility of the method by ranking the restoration plans for a typical distribution system. This algorithm also meets the smart grid requirements in terms of an automated restoration plan for the partial/full blackout of network.

  14. The steps of the restoration of a building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAZAKAMADYANDOFrancescaHarimanitra,; PAOLOVINCENZOGENOVESE; BANGOURAFacinet

    2011-01-01

    Today, when we talk about restoring an old building, many people think it's a total destruction of the building in order to place a new one. Restoring a building requires a lot of information and skills: be aware that restoring an old house is that with time and patience, take the maximum time to properly analyze the building and the environment in which it is located, seeking to understand the history of the evolution of the building and its architectural language, study the environment where the building and observe the unique architectural elements, we must ensure that all transactions will be made in accordance with the logic of the building design and original materials and avoid pastiche, seek the advice of professional expertise in the subject, we must put in mind that restoration is not the alteration or change.

  15. Advanced Protection & Service Restoration for FREEDM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Urvir

    A smart electric power distribution system (FREEDM system) that incorporates DERs (Distributed Energy Resources), SSTs (Solid State Transformers - that can limit the fault current to two times of the rated current) & RSC (Reliable & Secure Communication) capabilities has been studied in this work in order to develop its appropriate protection & service restoration techniques. First, a solution is proposed that can make conventional protective devices be able to provide effective protection for FREEDM systems. Results show that although this scheme can provide required protection but it can be quite slow. Using the FREEDM system's communication capabilities, a communication assisted Overcurrent (O/C) protection scheme is proposed & results show that by using communication (blocking signals) very fast operating times are achieved thereby, mitigating the problem of conventional O/C scheme. Using the FREEDM System's DGI (Distributed Grid Intelligence) capability, an automated FLISR (Fault Location, Isolation & Service Restoration) scheme is proposed that is based on the concept of 'software agents' & uses lesser data (than conventional centralized approaches). Test results illustrated that this scheme is able to provide a global optimal system reconfiguration for service restoration.

  16. Addressing the particular recordkeeping needs of infertile Orthodox Jewish couples considering the use of donated eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2014-03-01

    Infertility counseling is a specialized field that will continue to grow in coming years as the impact of infertility and its treatment is documented more and more in terms of emotional, physical, social and life consequences. Counselors should anticipate issues that may arise in the future and assist couples in their efforts to address them. We report here on recordkeeping issues of possible future concern that should be addressed when Orthodox Jewish couples make use of donor eggs. Good medical practice values the importance of understanding the patient's individual concerns and values, including the complex psychological, sociological and cultural context in which they experience their infertility. Good counseling anticipates and addresses future problems about which patients might not currently be aware.

  17. Wetland Restoration and Sediment Removal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2008, Minnesota’s Private Lands Program and Wetland Management Districts began to compare different methods of restoring prairie pothole wetlands to see if there...

  18. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project supports restoration activities at Laysan Island. Staff and volunteers continue efforts to eradicate alien invasive species such as Indian dropseed...

  19. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project will support restoration activities at Laysan Island. Staff and volunteers continue efforts to eradicate alien invasive species such as Indian dropseed...

  20. Wetlands Restoration Definitions and Distinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological restoration is a valuable endeavor that has proven very difficult to define. The term indicates that degraded and destroyed natural wetland systems will be reestablished to sites where they once existed. But, what wetland ecosystems are we talki

  1. Basic research for environmental restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Records and record-keeping for the hospital compounding pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2007-01-01

    The United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Inc., is recognized by federal law and by most state boards of pharmacy as the official group for setting the standards for pharmaceuticals and pharmacy practice, including compounding. The standards of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 795 require that a pharmacy maintain records on a compounded preparation, including the formulation record, and a Material Safety Data Sheets file. The American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists' guidelines require that hospital pharmacy departments maintain at least four sets of records in the compounding area: (1) compounding formulas and procedures, (2) compounding logs of all compounded preparations, including batch records and sample batch labels, (3) equipment maintenance records, and (4) a record of ingredients purchased, including cerificates of analysis and Material Saftey Data Sheets. Hospital compounding records may be inspected by any of several outside organizations, including state boards of pharmacy, third-party payers, the Joint Commission on Accreditaion of Healthcare Organizations, the Drug Enforcement Agency, and attorneys. With the existing standards and guidelines in place and the importance of documentation unquestionable, a record of pharmacy activites should be maintained in a compounding pharmacy so that preparations can be replicated consistently, the history of each ingredient traced, equipment maintenance and calibration verified, and compounding procedures evaluated easily.

  3. [Pulp response to restorative materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokaat, J G

    1990-03-01

    Restorations may affect the pulp negatively, rather due to microleakage than to toxic properties of the materials used. Hyperalgesia occurs more frequently after restoration with composite resins than with amalgam, though the resins in contrast to amalgam may be bonded to the enamel margins. A number of recommendations are presented in order to minimize the marginal gap between cavity walls and amalgam and to prevent marginal fracture.

  4. ATRAUMATIC RESTORATIVE TREATMENT – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangameshwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABASTRACT: Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART was origina lly developed in field settings in African subcontinent (Tanzania by Univ ersity of Dar el Salaam in 1980s; subsequently World Health Organization (WHO promote s the use of ART especially with children. As the name indicates Atraumatic Restorat ive Treatment (ART is basically a minimally invasive procedure that involves removing of softened carious dentine using hand instruments and then restoring the cavity with an a dhesive material usually the Glass Ionomer Cement [1]. ART is based on the maximum preservation of sound tooth tissue and the minimum feeling of discomfort and pain, since there is use o f hand instruments it perhaps also reduces pain due to reduced vibrations as occurs while use o f rotary dental instruments. This technique is gaining popularity and acceptability especially in c hildren, elderly and with those individuals who have fear and anxiety about dental treatment [2 , 3]. ART requires use of very minimal portable dental equipment and was designed to use in field/community settings. It was developed for use in less developed countries of the world, where art was seen as an affordable option for patents who can’t afford to pay for more s ophisticated treatments, but with improved technique and use of improved restorative materials its use has considerable expanded to developed countries as well [4-6]. This article give s a brief overview of ART and its uses in the present scenario. KEY WORDS: ART = Atraumatic Restorative Technique, GIC = Glas s Ionomer Cement

  5. Occlusal considerations for dental implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Ranier H

    2014-01-01

    When placed, dental implants are put into an ever-changing oral environment in which teeth can continue to migrate. Yet, the implants themselves are ankylosed. This can lead to occlusal instability. Teeth may continue to erupt, leaving the implants in infraocclusion. Teeth may move mesially away from an implant, requiring modification to close an open contact point. Friction in the connection between teeth and implants can lead to intrusion of teeth and damage to the periodontal attachment apparatus. Implant occlusion with shallow incisal guidance minimizes lateral and tipping forces. Cross-arch stabilization allows the best distribution of occlusal forces. The choice of restorative materials influences long-term occlusal stability.

  6. RICHMOND CROWN - FOR RESTORATION OF BADLY MUTILATED POSTERIOR TEETH : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of badly broken endodontically treated teeth is a common problem in restorative dentistry. Such teeth often require additional support from the root canal by means of a post and core restoration. In cases where tooth structure is significantly lost full coverage restorations for posterior teeth are necessary to achieve proper tooth form and function. Badly broken teeth with minimal or no crown structure require added retention and support. The Richmond crown can be a good treatment alternative for restoration of such teeth. The Richmond crown was introduced in 1878 and incorporated a threaded tube in the canal with a screw retained crown. It was later modified to eliminate the threaded tube and was redesigned as a one piece dowel and crown. This case report shows restoration of badly mutilated posterior teeth with Richmond crown.

  7. THE RESTORATIVE CLASSROOM: Using Restorative Approaches to Foster Effective Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Martha A. BROWN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The book is divided into three sections. Part One, chapters 1-3, provides the reader with a framework for understanding relational and restorative pedagogy based on the Five Key Restorative Themes: Everyone has their own unique and equally valued perspectives Thoughts influence emotions, emotions influence actions Empathy and consideration Needs and unmet needs Collective responsibility for problem solving and decision making. (Hopkins, 2011, p.32These five themes form the basis for the rest of the book. Part Two, chapters 4-9, describes a range of restorative practices and exercises, such as mixers, circles, and community-building games, as well as the step-by-step instructions on how to implement and conduct them. Part Three, Chapter 10, succinctly discusses the whole-school approach, which is explained in greater detail in Just Schools (Hopkins, 2004. Still, Hopkins would be remiss not to emphasize the need for the whole-school adoption of restorative practices based on current school effectiveness and improvement literature, and again asserts that "developing a restorative staffroom and staff team is likely to be a pre-requisite for a successful, high-achieving school" (Hopkins, 2011, p. 225.

  8. Restoration handbook for sagebrush steppe ecosystems with emphasis on greater sage-grouse habitat—Part 3. Site level restoration decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, David A.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Pellant, Mike; Miller, Richard F.; Beck, Jeffrey L.; Doescher, Paul S.; Roundy, Bruce A.; Schupp, Eugene W.; Knick, Steven T.; Brunson, Mark; McIver, James D.

    2017-02-14

    Sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the United States currently (2016) occur on only about one-half of their historical land area because of changes in land use, urban growth, and degradation of land, including invasions of non-native plants. The existence of many animal species depends on the existence of sagebrush steppe habitat. The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) depends on large landscapes of intact habitat of sagebrush and perennial grasses for their existence. In addition, other sagebrush-obligate animals have similar requirements and restoration of landscapes for greater sage-grouse also will benefit these animals. Once sagebrush lands are degraded, they may require restoration actions to make those lands viable habitat for supporting sagebrush-obligate animals, livestock, and wild horses, and to provide ecosystem services for humans now and for future generations.When a decision is made on where restoration treatments should be applied, there are a number of site-specific decisions managers face before selecting the appropriate type of restoration. This site-level decision tool for restoration of sagebrush steppe ecosystems is organized in nine steps.Step 1 describes the process of defining site-level restoration objectives.Step 2 describes the ecological site characteristics of the restoration site. This covers soil chemistry and texture, soil moisture and temperature regimes, and the vegetation communities the site is capable of supporting.Step 3 compares the current vegetation to the plant communities associated with the site State and Transition models.Step 4 takes the manager through the process of current land uses and past disturbances that may influence restoration success.Step 5 is a brief discussion of how weather before and after treatments may impact restoration success.Step 6 addresses restoration treatment types and their potential positive and negative impacts on the ecosystem and on habitats, especially for greater sage

  9. Optimizing investments in national-scale forest landscape restoration in Uganda to maximize multiple benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourevitch, Jesse D.; Hawthorne, Peter L.; Keeler, Bonnie L.; Beatty, Craig R.; Greve, Michelle; Verdone, Michael A.

    2016-11-01

    Forest loss and degradation globally has resulted in declines in multiple ecosystem services and reduced habitat for biodiversity. Forest landscape restoration offers an opportunity to mitigate these losses, conserve biodiversity, and improve human well-being. As part of the Bonn Challenge, a global effort to restore 350 million hectares of deforested and degraded land by 2030, over 30 countries have recently made commitments to national forest landscape restoration. In order to achieve these goals, decision-makers require information on the potential benefits and costs of forest landscape restoration to efficiently target investments. In response to this need, we developed an approach using a suite of ecosystem service mapping tools and a multi-objective spatial optimization technique that enables decision-makers to estimate the potential benefits and opportunity costs of restoration, visualize tradeoffs associated with meeting multiple objectives, and prioritize where restoration could deliver the greatest benefits. We demonstrate the potential of this approach in Uganda, one of the nations committed to the Bonn Challenge. Using maps of the potential benefits and costs of restoration and efficiency frontiers for optimal restoration scenarios, we were able to communicate how ecosystem services benefits vary spatially across the country and how different weights on ecosystem services objectives can affect the allocation of restoration across Uganda. This work provides a generalizable approach to improve investments in forest landscape restoration and illuminates the tradeoffs associated with alternative restoration strategies.

  10. Minimally invasive dentistry combining orthodontic therapy and single-unit restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Edward; Rego, Juan; Rego, Nelson

    2008-06-01

    Today's restorative materials enable dental professionals to deliver predictable aesthetic enhancement, particularly for compromised teeth in the anterior region. Treating a single compromised tooth, however, requires a thorough understanding of the restorative material's optical properties, experience in its clinical performance, and awareness of therapeutic modalities that conserve sound tooth structure. In this presentation, the authors demonstrate the use of orthodontic therapy and careful treatment planning to restore a single central incisor using a minimally invasive approach.

  11. A review of ecological restoration techniques in fluvial rivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baozhu Pan; Mengzhen Xu; Jianping Yuan; Xinhua Zhang; Zhaoyin Wang; Jiao Chen; Jinyou Lu; Wenjun Yang; Zhiwei Li; Na Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Rivers play an important role in people's living and agricultural production, however, intense human activities have broken the original ecological balance, and affected structures and functions of the river ecosystem. To restore the damaged river ecosystem back to a healthy status, effective ecological restoration measures need to be implemented. The main problems that the damaged rivers face are either the locally altered hydrological processes affected by construction of hydraulic facilities, or the deterioration of water quality resulted from pollution emissions, or both. In this study, ecological restoration techniques of the rivers affected by engineering control or pollution are reviewed respec-tively. In addition, three kinds of methods, i.e. physical, chemical and biological–ecological methods are introduced in details for the rivers affected by water pollution. At present, the development of river restoration techniques shows the following trends: 1) the scale of ecological restoration is becoming larger; 2) ecological restoration measures are required to meet multiple objectives; and 3) the man-agement of water environment is changing from water quality management to aquatic ecosystem management.

  12. Restoration of primary anterior teeth: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jacob K

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the published data on restorations of primary anterior teeth. The discussion includes Class III restorations, Class V restorations, various forms of full coronal restorations, atraumatic restorative technique (ART) and recommendations for future research.

  13. Evaluating Visual and Auditory Contributions to the Cognitive Restoration Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G. Emfield

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that certain real-world environments can have a restorative effect on an individual, as expressed in changes in cognitive performance and mood. Much of this research builds on Attention Restoration Theory (ART, which suggests that environments that have certain characteristics induce cognitive restoration via variations in attentional demands. Specifically, natural environments that require little top-down processing have a positive effect on cognitive performance, while city-like environments show no effect. We characterized the cognitive restoration effect further by examining 1 whether natural visual stimuli, such as blue spaces, were more likely to provide a restorative effect over urban visual stimuli, 2 if increasing immersion with environment-related sound produces a similar or superior effect, 3 if this effect extends to other cognitive tasks, such as the functional field of view, and 4 if we could better understand this effect by providing controls beyond previous works. We had 202 participants complete a cognitive task battery, consisting of a reverse digit span task, the attention network task, and the functional field of view task prior to and immediately after a restoration period. In the restoration period, participants were assigned to one of seven conditions in which they listened to natural or urban sounds, watched images of natural or urban environments, or a combination of both. Additionally, some participants were in a control group with exposure to neither picture nor sound. While we found some indication of practice effects, there were no differential effects of restoration observed in any of our cognitive tasks, regardless of condition. We did, however, find evidence that our nature images and sounds were more relaxing than their urban counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that acute exposure to relaxing pictorial and auditory stimulus is insufficient to induce improvements in cognitive

  14. 76 FR 46149 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety; Final Rule #0;#0... Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule... Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter Education and...

  15. SOCS2 Balances Metabolic and Restorative Requirements during Liver Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzaki, Ryota; Zhao, Sophia; Valerius, M Todd; Tsugawa, Daisuke; Oya, Yuki; Ray, Kevin C; Karp, Seth J

    2016-02-12

    After significant injury, the liver must maintain homeostasis during the regenerative process. We hypothesized the existence of mechanisms to limit hepatocyte proliferation after injury to maintain metabolic and synthetic function. A screen for candidates revealed suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2), an inhibitor of growth hormone (GH) signaling, was strongly induced after partial hepatectomy. Using genetic deletion and administration of various factors we investigated the role of SOCS2 during liver regeneration. SOCS2 preserves liver function by restraining the first round of hepatocyte proliferation after partial hepatectomy by preventing increases in growth hormone receptor (GHR) via ubiquitination, suppressing GH pathway activity. At later times, SOCS2 enhances hepatocyte proliferation by modulating a decrease in serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) that allows GH release from the pituitary. SOCS2, therefore, plays a dual role in modulating the rate of hepatocyte proliferation. In particular, this is the first demonstration of an endogenous mechanism to limit hepatocyte proliferation after injury.

  16. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Hedemann

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developinggeneric methodologies for ranking restoration...... techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps:-characterisation of relevant contaminated sites -identication and characterisation of relevant restoration...... techniques -assessment of the radiological impact -development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options -formulation ofgeneric conclusions and development of a manual The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated...

  17. Decision analysis in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-12-01

    Standardization of clinical decisions in restorative dentistry should be based on the tenets of the Hippocratic Oath. Although there is wide variability in preventive and operative treatment decisions, some of these decisions may lead along parallel courses to similar, clinically ethical outcomes. However, what parameters must be considered in judging the relative magnitude of positive and negative outcomes? This paper proposes several decision-making strategies for selecting optimum treatment plans for preventive and restorative situations. The caries-risk level of patients must first be identified in a systematic way and then it must be coupled with treatment options that are consistent with the potential future caries increment. A decision-tree approach and/or the treatment-index concept can then be applied to specific clinical conditions and preventive-restorative options to derive an "expected value" for each possible outcome.

  18. Conservative preparations for cast restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingburg, H T

    1976-04-01

    Partial veneer crowns still play a role in modern restorative dentistry. They must be used in the right situation with thoughtful treatment planning, and they must be done well in accordance with certain principles. Three-quarter crowns are less retentive than full crowns, but they can be used successfully as single unit restorations and retainers for short span bridges. Retention can be enhanced by the use of proximal boxes. The M.O.D. onlay, a modified inlay with occlusal coverage, minimizes the damaging effects of stress generated by occlusal forces. There is little indication for the use of M.O.D. inlays or large two surface inlays.

  19. Role of provisional restorations in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jambai Sampathkumar Sivakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Root-canal treatment can be carried out in single visit in vital, non-infected teeth, eliminating the need for dressing and provisionalization. Many clinical cases with infected canals require dressing with antibacterial medicaments in a multivisit treatment in which effective provisionalization for different periods of time becomes mandatory. Successful root-canal treatment requires effective mechanical and chemical debridement, elimination of bacteria and pulp tissue remnants and proper canal shaping to facilitate effective obturation. Lack of satisfactory temporary restorations during endodontic therapy ranked second amongst the contributing factors in continuing pain after the commencement of treatment. This review aims to provide an overview of the materials used for provisionalization during and immediately after endodontic treatment.

  20. Irrigation to enhance native seed production for Great Basin restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton C. Shock; Erik B. G. Feibert; Nancy L. Shaw; Myrtle P. Shock; Lamont D. Saunders

    2015-01-01

    Native shrublands and their associated grasses and forbs have been disappearing from the Great Basin as a result of grazing practices, exotic weed invasions, altered fire regimes, climate change and other human impacts. Native forb seed is needed to restore these areas. The irrigation requirements for maximum seed production of four key native forb species (Eriogonum...

  1. 75 FR 70083 - Emergency Forest Restoration Program and Emergency Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... CFR Part 701 RIN 0560-AH89 Emergency Forest Restoration Program and Emergency Conservation Program... amending regulations as required by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (the 2008 Farm Bill) to... owners of nonindustrial private forest land to restore land that was damaged by a natural disaster on...

  2. Location-based restoration mechanism for multi-domain GMPLS networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manolova, Anna Vasileva; Calle, Eusibi; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose and evaluate the efficiency of a location-based restoration mechanism in a dynamic multi-domain GMPLS network. We focus on inter-domain link failures and utilize the correlation between the actual position of a failed link along the path with the applied restoration...... technique. Our results show, that without violating the strong privacy preservation requirements between domains, the proposed mechanism has improved performance in terms of successfully restored connections compared to the traditional local-to-egress and end-to-end restoration approaches. Furthermore...

  3. Bayesian image restoration, using configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, Thordis

    configurations are expressed in terms of the mean normal measure of the random set. These probabilities are used as prior probabilities in a Bayesian image restoration approach. Estimation of the remaining parameters in the model is outlined for salt and pepper noise. The inference in the model is discussed...

  4. Bayesian image restoration, using configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, Thordis Linda

    2006-01-01

    configurations are expressed in terms of the mean normal measure of the random set. These probabilities are used as prior probabilities in a Bayesian image restoration approach. Estimation of the remaining parameters in the model is outlined for the salt and pepper noise. The inference in the model is discussed...

  5. Origins of the Restoration Playhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis D.

    Contrary to the popular theory that the proscenium type of playhouse was imported from France by the Court of Charles II in 1660, the Restoration playhouse in fact developed from Elizabethan theatres and court masques. These Elizabethan theatres were the private theatres, and were generally small, rectangular, roofed structures where aristocratic…

  6. Zirconia-reinforced dental restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Chen

    2013-01-01

    The series of studies conducted in this thesis showed that there are several ways to enhance the performance of fixed restorations regarding the application of zirconia. One possible way is to change the sintering procedure of zirconia, so that the physical properties of zirconia such BFS, density o

  7. Image Restoration with New Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow-Møller, Anne Marie

    The article examines the role played by the corporate website while a company - Arla - attempted to restore an image tarnished by unethical behaviour. The company's strategy focussed on dialogue: it introduced a large number of authentic employees in their natural role as cook, dairy farmer, etc...

  8. Weed biocontrol in landscape restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed biological control programs in natural areas are often undertaken with the goal of restoring native plant communities and/or ecosystem services to a pre-invasion level. These objectives may be achieved in some areas with biological control alone; however, in other sites integration of biologica...

  9. A review on anterior teeth restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Restorations of teeth have been a need of time since very long. As the time have passed, there have been different advances in the field of restorative materials and tooth restorations. Many newer restorative materials are now available to us for the purpose of tooth restorations still some of the older materials are materials of choice for a sector of society. This article focuses on few such restorative materials and also tells us about a few patents granted in such field.

  10. Restoring Soil Quality to Mitigate Soil Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan Lal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Feeding the world population, 7.3 billion in 2015 and projected to increase to 9.5 billion by 2050, necessitates an increase in agricultural production of ~70% between 2005 and 2050. Soil degradation, characterized by decline in quality and decrease in ecosystem goods and services, is a major constraint to achieving the required increase in agricultural production. Soil is a non-renewable resource on human time scales with its vulnerability to degradation depending on complex interactions between processes, factors and causes occurring at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Among the major soil degradation processes are accelerated erosion, depletion of the soil organic carbon (SOC pool and loss in biodiversity, loss of soil fertility and elemental imbalance, acidification and salinization. Soil degradation trends can be reversed by conversion to a restorative land use and adoption of recommended management practices. The strategy is to minimize soil erosion, create positive SOC and N budgets, enhance activity and species diversity of soil biota (micro, meso, and macro, and improve structural stability and pore geometry. Improving soil quality (i.e., increasing SOC pool, improving soil structure, enhancing soil fertility can reduce risks of soil degradation (physical, chemical, biological and ecological while improving the environment. Increasing the SOC pool to above the critical level (10 to 15 g/kg is essential to set-in-motion the restorative trends. Site-specific techniques of restoring soil quality include conservation agriculture, integrated nutrient management, continuous vegetative cover such as residue mulch and cover cropping, and controlled grazing at appropriate stocking rates. The strategy is to produce “more from less” by reducing losses and increasing soil, water, and nutrient use efficiency.

  11. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.; Bohlen, C.

    1995-08-01

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  12. Incorporating food web dynamics into ecological restoration: A modeling approach for river ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmore, J. Ryan; Benjamin, Joseph R.; Newsom, Michael; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Dombroski, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Restoration is frequently aimed at the recovery of target species, but also influences the larger food web in which these species participate. Effects of restoration on this broader network of organisms can influence target species both directly and indirectly via changes in energy flow through food webs. To help incorporate these complexities into river restoration planning we constructed a model that links river food web dynamics to in-stream physical habitat and riparian vegetation conditions. We present an application of the model to the Methow River, Washington (USA), a location of on-going restoration aimed at recovering salmon. Three restoration strategies were simulated: riparian vegetation restoration, nutrient augmentation via salmon carcass addition, and side-channel reconnection. We also added populations of nonnative aquatic snails and fish to the modeled food web to explore how changes in food web structure mediate responses to restoration. Simulations suggest that side-channel reconnection may be a better strategy than carcass addition and vegetation planting for improving conditions for salmon in this river segment. However, modeled responses were strongly sensitive to changes in the structure of the food web. The addition of nonnative snails and fish modified pathways of energy through the food web, which negated restoration improvements. This finding illustrates that forecasting responses to restoration may require accounting for the structure of food webs, and that changes in this structure—as might be expected with the spread of invasive species—could compromise restoration outcomes. Unlike habitat-based approaches to restoration assessment that focus on the direct effects of physical habitat conditions on single species of interest, our approach dynamically links the success of target organisms to the success of competitors, predators, and prey. By elucidating the direct and indirect pathways by which restoration affects target species

  13. Using larval trematodes that parasitize snails to evaluate a saltmarsh restoration project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huspeni, Todd C.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) study using larval digeneans infecting the California horn snail, Cerithidea californica, to evaluate the success of an ecological restoration project at Carpinteria Salt Marsh in California, USA. Digenean trematodes are parasites with complex life cycles requiring birds and other vertebrates as final hosts. We tested two hypotheses for prevalence and species richness of larval trematodes in C. californica: (1) prior to the restoration, sites to be restored would have lower trematode prevalence and species richness relative to unimpacted control sites, and (2) that these differences would diminish after restoration. The sites to be restored were initially degraded for trematode species. They had a mean trematode prevalence (12%) and species richness (4.5 species) that were lower than control sites (28% trematode prevalence and 7 species). Despite the differences in prevalence, the proportional representation of each trematode species in the total community was similar between sites to be restored and control sites. Over the six years following restoration, trematode prevalence nearly quadrupled at restored sites (43%) while the prevalence at control sites (26%) remained unchanged. In addition, species richness at restored sites doubled (9 species), while species richness at the control sites (7.8 species) did not change. Immediately after restoration, the relative abundance of trematode species using fishes as second intermediate hosts declined while those using molluscs as second intermediate hosts increased. Trematode communities at restored and control sites gradually returned to being similar. We interpret the increase in trematode prevalence and species richness at restored sites to be a direct consequence of changes in bird use of the restored habitat. This study demonstrates a new comparative technique for assessing wetlands, and while it does not supplant biotic surveys, it informs such taxonomic lists. Most

  14. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  15. THE FINANCIAL RESTORATION OF INSURANCE COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUMINITA TULEASCA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The entire legal regulation of the insurance market is focused on the protection of the insurance policies holders, on keeping their trust in the insurance system and on the maintenance of the financial market steadiness. Noticing and solving the problems prior to the occurrence of insurers’ insolvency situation represents a fundamental aspect for the means of achieving such objective.By this survey we will analyse the financial restoration procedure of the insurance companies, Romanian legal entities, through the perspective of the whole aggregate of legal issues involved by this extremely complex and sensitive process required by the special nature of the insurance companies and by the impact of the activities carried out by these companies for the economic and social life of a state.Thus, there have been pointed out the particularities and the special nature of the insurance companies’ financial restoration as compared to the reorganization of the regular trade companies, the insurers’ means of avoiding the business failure, of avoiding the bankruptcy.

  16. Image Enhancement and Restoration by Image Inpainting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Trivedi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inpainting is the process of reconstructing lost or deteriorated part of images based on the background information. i. e .it fills the missing or damaged region in an image utilizing spatial information of its neighboring region. Inpainting algorithm have numerous applications. It is helpfully used for restoration of old films and object removal in digital photographs. The main goal of the algorithm is to modify the damaged region in an image in such a way that the inpainted region is undetectable to the ordinary observers who are not familiar with the original image. This proposed work presents image inpainting process for image enhancement and restoration by using structural, texture and exemplar techniques. This paper presents efficient algorithm that combines the advantages of these two approaches. We first note that exemplar-based texture synthesis contains the essential process required to replicate both texture and structure; the success of structure propagation, however, is highly dependent on the order in which the filling proceeds. We propose a best-first algorithm in which the confidence in the synthesized pixel values is propagated in a manner similar to the propagation of information in inpainting. The actual color values are computed using exemplar-based synthesis. Computational efficiency is achieved by a blockbased sampling process.

  17. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  18. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  19. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Thamer AlShahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  20. Record-keeping, management decisions and productivity of extensive reindeer herding on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyle A. Renecker

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Alaska's reindeer (Rangifer tarandus industry has been faced with the competitive need to increase productivity but cautioned to avoid range degradation as a result of high stocking rates. Consumer demand for lean, healthy, high quality meat has increased throughout the world and has surpassed production. For herders to tap these new domestic and off-shore markets, there will be the need for higher herd numbers and animal productivity, consistent slaughter protocol, and a focused marketing plan. In this paper, we illustrate how record-keeping can benefit reindeer herders in husbandry and management decisions that are necessary to increase animal productivity and, eventually, product quality and profits. These biological parameters were tested in a Lotus® spreadsheet model designed to predict herd growth and economics. Records of three reindeer herds on the Seward Peninsula have shown that calf production for adults has ranged from 35 to 98%. Sensitivity analysis predicted that in some herds, the model was sensitive to small changes in calf survival which could result in insufficient recruitment to maintain long-term harvest. Productivity may be ultimately related to management decisions that cull animals before productivity begins to decline.

  1. Quality evaluation of oral health record-keeping for Finnish young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminen, S E; Vehkalahti, M; Murtomaa, H; Kekki, P; Ketomäki, T M

    1998-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the quality of oral health record-keeping in public oral health care in relation to dentists' characteristics. A random computerized selection of 239 subjects, born in 1966-71 and clinically examined during 1994 in an administrative unit of the public oral health service in southern Finland, included 4-5 cases per dentist, the number of dentists being 50. Data concerning actual clinical examinations and treatment courses carried out in public dental clinics came from original oral health records. Criteria for assessment of oral health record entries were based on Finnish health legislation and detailed instructions of health authorities. The results showed that each patient's identity was available in 90% of documents. Recordings concerning continuity of comprehensive care were infrequent; a questionnaire concerning each patient's up-to-date health history was in only 26% of the oral health records. Notes concerning each patient's bite and function of the temporomandibular joint were in 37% of the records, notes about oral soft tissues were in 11%, and the check-up interval was recorded in 21%. Recording of indices on periodontal and dental status varied greatly; the community periodontal index of treatment need was found in 93% and the index of incipient lesions in 16% of the records. Female dentists and dentists younger than 37 years tended to record more information. Dentists should be encouraged to better utilize the options offered by oral health records for individual treatment schemes.

  2. A general protocol for restoration of entire river catchments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, J.A.; Frissell, C.A. [Univ. of Montana, Polson, MT (United States). Flathead Lake Biological Station; Ward, J.V. [EAWAG/ETH, Dubendorf (Switzerland). Dept. of Limnology; Liss, W.J. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife; Coutant, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Williams, R.N.; Lichatowich, J.A.

    1996-05-28

    Large catchment basins may be viewed as ecosystems with interactive natural and cultural attributes. Stream regulation severs ecological connectivity between channels and flood plains by reducing the range of natural flow and temperature variation, reduces the capacity of the ecosystem to sustain native biodiversity and bioproduction and promotes proliferation of non-native biota. However, regulated rivers regain normative attributes, which promote recovery of native biota, as distance from the dam increases and in relation to the mode of regulation. Therefore, reregulation of flow and temperature to normative pattern, coupled with elimination of pollutants and constrainment of nonnative biota, can naturally restore damaged habitats from headwaters to mouth. The expectation is rapid recovery of depressed populations of native species. The protocol requires: restoration of seasonal temperature patterns; restoration of peak flows needed to reconnect and periodically reconfigure channel and floodplain habitats; stabilization of base flows to revitalize the shallow water habitats; maximization of dam passage to allow restoration of metapopulation structure; change in the management belief system to rely on natural habitat restoration as opposed to artificial propagation, installation of artificial instream structures (river engineering) and artificial food web control; and, practice of adaptive ecosystem management.

  3. Restoration ecology: two-sex dynamics and cost minimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Molnár

    Full Text Available We model a spatially detailed, two-sex population dynamics, to study the cost of ecological restoration. We assume that cost is proportional to the number of individuals introduced into a large habitat. We treat dispersal as homogeneous diffusion in a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion system. The local population dynamics depends on sex ratio at birth, and allows mortality rates to differ between sexes. Furthermore, local density dependence induces a strong Allee effect, implying that the initial population must be sufficiently large to avert rapid extinction. We address three different initial spatial distributions for the introduced individuals; for each we minimize the associated cost, constrained by the requirement that the species must be restored throughout the habitat. First, we consider spatially inhomogeneous, unstable stationary solutions of the model's equations as plausible candidates for small restoration cost. Second, we use numerical simulations to find the smallest rectangular cluster, enclosing a spatially homogeneous population density, that minimizes the cost of assured restoration. Finally, by employing simulated annealing, we minimize restoration cost among all possible initial spatial distributions of females and males. For biased sex ratios, or for a significant between-sex difference in mortality, we find that sex-specific spatial distributions minimize the cost. But as long as the sex ratio maximizes the local equilibrium density for given mortality rates, a common homogeneous distribution for both sexes that spans a critical distance yields a similarly low cost.

  4. Efficient restoration of variable area soundtracks:

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelâali Hassaïne; Etienne Decencière; Bernard Besserer

    2009-01-01

    The restoration of motion picture films using digital image processing has been an active research field for many years. The restoration of the soundtrack however, has mainly been performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, in spite of the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. In this paper a restoration method for variable area soundtrack restoration at the image level is presented. First, a novel method is pro...

  5. Efficient restoration of variable area soundtracks:

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelâali Hassaïne; Etienne Decencière; Bernard Besserer

    2009-01-01

    The restoration of motion picture films using digital image processing has been an active research field for many years. The restoration of the soundtrack however, has mainly been performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, in spite of the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. In this paper a restoration method for variable area soundtrack restoration at the image level is presented. First, a novel method is pro...

  6. Digital color restoration of old paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, M; Pitas, I

    2000-01-01

    Physical and chemical changes can degrade the visual color appearance of old paintings. Five digital color restoration techniques, which can be used to simulate the original appearance of paintings, are presented. Although a small number of color samples is employed in the restoration procedure, simulation results indicate that good restoration quality can be attained.

  7. 5 CFR 353.301 - Restoration rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration rights. 353.301 Section 353... DUTY FROM UNIFORMED SERVICE OR COMPENSABLE INJURY Compensable Injury § 353.301 Restoration rights. (a.... Although these restoration rights are agencywide, the employee's basic entitlement is to the...

  8. Resilience and Restoration of Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Cottingham

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Lake water quality and ecosystem services are normally maintained by several feedbacks. Among these are nutrient retention and humic production by wetlands, nutrient retention and woody habitat production by riparian forests, food web structures that cha nnel phosphorus to consumers rather than phytoplankton, and biogeochemical mechanisms that inhibit phosphorus recycling from sediments. In degraded lakes, these resilience mechanisms are replaced by new ones that connect lakes to larger, regional economi c and social systems. New controls that maintain degraded lakes include runoff from agricultural and urban areas, absence of wetlands and riparian forests, and changes in lake food webs and biogeochemistry that channel phosphorus to blooms of nuisance al gae. Economic analyses show that degraded lakes are significantly less valuable than normal lakes. Because of this difference in value, the economic benefits of restoring lakes could be used to create incentives for lake restoration.

  9. UV completion without symmetry restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Endlich, Solomon; Penco, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that it is not possible to UV-complete certain low-energy effective theories with spontaneously broken space-time symmetries by embedding them into linear sigma models, that is, by adding "radial" modes and restoring the broken symmetries. When such a UV completion is not possible, one can still raise the cutoff up to arbitrarily higher energies by adding fields that transform non-linearly under the broken symmetries, that is, new Goldstone bosons. However, this (partial) UV completion does not necessarily restore any of the broken symmetries. We illustrate this point by considering a concrete example in which a combination of space-time and internal symmetries is broken down to a diagonal subgroup. Along the way, we clarify a recently proposed interpretation of inverse Higgs constraints as gauge-fixing conditions.

  10. Image Restoration with New Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow-Møller, Anne Marie

    The article examines the role played by the corporate website while a company - Arla - attempted to restore an image tarnished by unethical behaviour. The company's strategy focussed on dialogue: it introduced a large number of authentic employees in their natural role as cook, dairy farmer, etc...... their image as a faceless monopoly with a humanized, personalised version. However, it should also be questioned if, in the long run, it was the image campaign rather than the visible efforts of the company to behave with consideration that brought about the desired change. Keywords: Image restoration......., and made them available to readers as experts providing inspiration and advice, or as writers blogging about the world of company, or as responsible people answering readers' frank questions about their practices in an open forum. It is argued that the electronic platform allowed the company to substitute...

  11. TEACHING STRATEGIES IN THE MSc PROGRAME IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESTORATION ON DEGRADED LAND

    OpenAIRE

    Arraiza Bermudez-Cañete, Maria Paz; Lopez Alvarez, Jose Vicente; Santamarta, J.C.; Loras, F.; Hernández, L.E.; Neris, Joany

    2012-01-01

    UPM is a leader on landslide assessment and environmental restoration, as well as in waste management. The study of climate change and degraded land requires innovative techniques in teaching that will be analyzed and discussed in the following paper.

  12. NOAA's Coastal Protection and Restoration Division: Watershed Database and Mapping Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Protection and restoration of coastal watersheds requires the synthesis of complex environmental issues. Contaminated site remediation, dredging and disposal of...

  13. Image Restoration And Resolution Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Charles L.; Fitzgerald, Raymond M.

    1983-09-01

    We consider mathematical algorithms for the restoration of object information from finitely many measurements of the object's spectrum, with particular emphasis on the development of linear and nonlinear non-iterative methods that can incorporate prior information about object extent and shape. The linear method presented here generalizes the minimum energy bandlimited extrapolation procedure, which is the closed form limit of Gerchberg-Papoulis iteration in this case. The nonlinear method generalizes the maximum entropy method (MEM) of Burg.

  14. Articulator selection for restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, S; Shillingburg, H T; Whitsett, L D

    1976-07-01

    There are many types of articulators that can be used for making fixed restorations. While unquestionably the most accurate, the fully adjustable instrument is not feasible or necessary for many forms of simple occlusal treatment. The effects of tooth-hinge axis radius, intercondylar distance, and condylar inclination on occlusal morphology have been discussed. Guidelines have been proposed for matching the type of articulator with the extent of treatment anticipated. The use of small, nonadjustable hinge articulators is not recommended.

  15. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  16. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vert...

  17. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production Pt. 63, Subpt. PPP, Table 7 Table 7 to... Liquid flow rate or pressure drop; and pH of scrubber effluent, if an acid or base absorbent is used Minimum flow rate or pressure drop; and maximum pH if an acid absorbent is used, or minimum pH if a...

  18. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Batch Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production Pt. 63, Subpt. PPP, Table 5 Table 5 to... all instances when monitoring data are not collected—PR. d,e If a base absorbent is used, report all pH values that are below the minimum operating values. If an acid absorbent is used, report all...

  19. 33 CFR 151.2045 - What are the mandatory recordkeeping requirements for vessels equipped with ballast tanks that...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OR COMMERCIAL WASTE, AND BALLAST WATER Ballast Water Management for Control of Nonindigenous Species... following information (Note: Ballast tank is any tank or hold that carries ballast water regardless of design): (1) Vessel information. Include the— (i) Name; (ii) International Maritime Organization...

  20. 17 CFR 240.17a-23 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... other communication or indication submitted by any system participant for entry into a trading system... determines that such exemption is consistent with the public interest or the protection of investors....

  1. 40 CFR 63.117 - Process vent provisions-reporting and recordkeeping requirements for group and TRE determinations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for Process... boiler or process heater. (iv) For a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of less... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process vent provisions-reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 98.3 - What are the general monitoring, reporting, recordkeeping and verification requirements of this...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... value. ER30OC09.001 Where: CE = Calibration error (%) R = Reference value A = Flow meter response to the reference value (3) For orifice, nozzle, and venturi flow meters, the initial quality assurance consists of... error (%) R = Reference value A = Transmitter response to the reference value FS = Full-scale value...

  3. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-04-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  4. 24 CFR 3500.10 - One-day advance inspection of HUD-1 or HUD-1A settlement statement; delivery; recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false One-day advance inspection of HUD-1 or HUD-1A settlement statement; delivery; recordkeeping. 3500.10 Section 3500.10 Housing and...

  5. Materials for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2010-01-01

    Chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have become considerably more accurate, efficient, and prevalent as the technology has evolved in the past 25 years. The initial restorative material option for chairside CAD/CAM restorations was limited to ceramic blocks. Restorative material options have multiplied and now include esthetic ceramics, high-strength ceramics, and composite materials for both definitive and temporary restoration applications. This article will review current materials available for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

  6. Strategic plan for Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Information Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, P.J.; Beck, J.E.; Gephart, R.E. [and others

    1994-06-01

    This strategic plan addresses information management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Hanford Site. This Program leads the cleanup of the Hanford Site`s soil, groundwater, buried waste, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. The vision that drives this strategic plan is to ensure that quality information is available to the people who need it, when they need it, at a convenient location, in a usable form, and at an acceptable cost. Although investments are being made in managing the vast amounts of information, which include data, records and documents associated with the Hanford Site`s production history and new cleanup mission, it is widely recognized that efforts to date have not accomplished the vision. Effective information management involves more than the compilation of massive amounts of electronic and non-electronic information. It also involves integrating information management into business processes that support user`s needs and decisionmaking. Only then can information management complement and enable environmental restoration priorities and practices, help identify environmental restoration requirements, and enable communication within the Environmental Restoration Program and between the Program and its stakeholders. Successfully accomplishing the Hanford Site mission requires an integrated approach to information management that crosses organizational boundaries, streamlines existing systems, and builds new systems that support the needs of the future. This plan outlines that approach.

  7. The science and practice of river restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lane, Stuart N.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2015-08-01

    River restoration is one of the most prominent areas of applied water-resources science. From an initial focus on enhancing fish habitat or river appearance, primarily through structural modification of channel form, restoration has expanded to incorporate a wide variety of management activities designed to enhance river process and form. Restoration is conducted on headwater streams, large lowland rivers, and entire river networks in urban, agricultural, and less intensively human-altered environments. We critically examine how contemporary practitioners approach river restoration and challenges for implementing restoration, which include clearly identified objectives, holistic understanding of rivers as ecosystems, and the role of restoration as a social process. We also examine challenges for scientific understanding in river restoration. These include: how physical complexity supports biogeochemical function, stream metabolism, and stream ecosystem productivity; characterizing response curves of different river components; understanding sediment dynamics; and increasing appreciation of the importance of incorporating climate change considerations and resiliency into restoration planning. Finally, we examine changes in river restoration within the past decade, such as increasing use of stream mitigation banking; development of new tools and technologies; different types of process-based restoration; growing recognition of the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in rivers; increasing expectations of water quality improvements from restoration; and more effective communication between practitioners and river scientists.

  8. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations – An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem F. Alshiddi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, endodontically treated teeth were successfully restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations. However, the fractures that accompanied the inlay restorations were more severe and were unable to be restored.

  9. Long-term evaluation of extensive restorations in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwenhuysen, J.-P. van; D'hoore, W.D.; Carvalho, J.;

    2003-01-01

    Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry......Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry...

  10. Twelve-year survival of 2-surface composite resin and amalgam premolar restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipur, Safa; Pesun, Igor; Nowakowski, Anthony; Kim, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Composite resin and amalgam restorations are indicated for the restoration of posterior teeth. With increased esthetic demands, long-term clinical studies are required to evaluate the restorative success and reasons for failure of these materials. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the survival and reasons for failure of directly placed 2-surface composite resin restorations and directly placed 2-surface amalgam restorations on premolars placed by Canadian dental students. Using The University of Manitoba's dental management software and paper charts, all 2-surface composite resin and 2-surface amalgam restorations placed on premolars between January 1, 2002, and May 30, 2014, were included. Short-term failure (within 2 years), long-term failure, and reasons for failure were collected. A Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with an associated P value comparing composite resin to amalgam restoration curves was performed using SPSS statistical software. Over 12 years, 1695 composite resin and 1125 amalgam 2-surface premolar restorations were placed. Of these restorations, 134 composite resins (7.9%) and 66 amalgams (5.9%) failed. Short-term failures (2 years or less) consisted of 57 composite resin (4%) and 23 amalgam (2.3%) restorations. Long-term failures (greater than 2 years) consisted of 77 composite resin (4.5%) and 43 amalgam (3.8%) restorations. After 12 years of service, the survival probability of composite resin restorations was 86% and that of amalgam restorations 91.5%. The differences in composite resin and amalgam survival curves were also found to be statistically significant (P=.009 for Log-rank test). The main reasons for failure were recurrent caries and fracture of the tooth being restored. Within the limitations of this study, both composite resin and amalgam restorations had acceptable success rates and similar failure modes. Recurrent caries was still the most common reason for failure. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for

  11. Clinical evaluation of the fiber post and direct composite resin restoration for fixed single crowns on endodontically treated teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali Mohan, S.; Mahesh Gowda, E.; Shashidhar, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The restoration of an endodontically treated fractured tooth has been a challenge for restorative dentists for decades. The performance of fiber posts when used in conjunction with direct composite resin restorations have been largely unreported. This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the survival rate of endodontically treated teeth restored with adhesive bonded fiber reinforced resin posts and direct composite core with additional crown coverage. Methods Sixty patients who required endodontic treatment with post core crown were selected from outpatient department of Air Force Institute of Dental Sciences, Bangalore. Sixty-four teeth were endodontically treated and restored with fiber post and direct resin composite core restoration. Patients were evaluated immediately after restoration and reevaluated at the end of first, second and third months. After 3 months of clinical evaluation, if teeth were asymptomatic they were restored with complete coverage porcelain fused to metal restorations and evaluated immediately, and again reevaluated at the end of first, third, and sixth months. Results After 3 months of clinical evaluation, only two teeth exhibited periapical lesion with clinical symptoms and three teeth without any clinical symptoms. Five teeth exhibited slight marginal staining, three teeth showed partial loss of restoration, and two teeth exhibited complete loss of restoration with the fracture of the post. At the end of sixth month after restoration with full coverage crown, two teeth had dislodged restoration due to fracture of post and two teeth exhibited displacement of the post. Conclusion Fiber posts are the best alternative for restoration of fractured endodontically treated teeth. Fiber posts and direct composite resin core materials are strongly recommended for restoration of endodontically treated mutilated teeth among the dental establishments of Armed Forces. PMID:26288494

  12. Contribution of genetics to ecological restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijangos, Jose Luis; Pacioni, Carlo; Spencer, Peter B S; Craig, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Ecological restoration of degraded ecosystems has emerged as a critical tool in the fight to reverse and ameliorate the current loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Approaches derived from different genetic disciplines are extending the theoretical and applied frameworks on which ecological restoration is based. We performed a search of scientific articles and identified 160 articles that employed a genetic approach within a restoration context to shed light on the links between genetics and restoration. These articles were then classified on whether they examined association between genetics and fitness or the application of genetics in demographic studies, and on the way the studies informed restoration practice. Although genetic research in restoration is rapidly growing, we found that studies could make better use of the extensive toolbox developed by applied fields in genetics. Overall, 41% of reviewed studies used genetic information to evaluate or monitor restoration, and 59% provided genetic information to guide prerestoration decision-making processes. Reviewed studies suggest that restoration practitioners often overlook the importance of including genetic aspects within their restoration goals. Even though there is a genetic basis influencing the provision of ecosystem services, few studies explored this relationship. We provide a view of research gaps, future directions and challenges in the genetics of restoration.

  13. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquiz, Juan Manuel

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is affected by photon attenuation and image blurring due to Compton scatter and geometric detector response. Attenuation correction is important to increase diagnostic accuracy of cardiac SPECT. However, in attenuation-corrected scans, scattered photons from radioactivity in the liver could produce a spillover of counts into the inferior myocardial wall. In the clinical setting, blurring effects could be compensated by restoration with Wiener and Metz filters. Inconveniences of these procedures are that the Wiener filter depends upon the power spectra of the object image and noise, which are unknown, while Metz parameters have to be optimized by trial and error. This research develops an alternative restoration procedure based on a multiresolution denoising and regularization algorithm. It was hypothesized that this representation leads to a more straightforward and automatic restoration than conventional filters. The main objective of the research was the development and assessment of the multiresolution algorithm for compensating the liver spillover artifact. The multiresolution algorithm decomposes original SPECT projections into a set of sub-band frequency images. This allows a simple denoising and regularization procedure by discarding high frequency channels and performing inversion only in low and intermediate frequencies. The method was assessed in bull's eye polar maps and short- axis attenuation-corrected reconstructions of a realistic cardiac-chest phantom with a custom-made liver insert and different 99mTc liver-to-heart activity ratios. Inferior myocardial defects were simulated in some experiments. The cardiac phantom in free air was considered as the gold standard reference. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating contrast of short- axis slices and the normalized chi-square measure, defect size and mean and standard deviation of polar map counts. The performance of the multiresolution

  14. Gauging state-level and user group views of oyster reef restoration activities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Nix, Ashby; Laborde, Luke; Piazza, Bryan P.

    2012-01-01

    Successful oyster reef restoration, like many conservation challenges, requires not only biological understanding of the resource, but also stakeholder cooperation and political support. To measure perceptions of oyster reef restoration activities and priorities for future restoration along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, a survey of 1500 individuals representing 4 user groups (oyster harvesters, shrimpers, environmental organization members, professionals), across 5 states (Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) was conducted in 2011. All respondents highly supported reef restoration efforts, but there was a dichotomy in preferred restoration goals with commercial fishermen more likely to support oyster reef restoration for stock enhancement, while professionals and environmental organization members were more likely to support oyster reef restoration to enhance ecosystem services. All user groups identified enforcement, funding, and appropriate site selection as basic requirements for successful reef restoration. For management of restored oyster reefs, oyster harvesters and shrimpers were less likely to support options that restricted the use of reefs, including gear restrictions and permanent closures, but did support rotating annual reef closures, while other stakeholders were willing to consider all options, including annual reef closures and sanctuary reefs. Overall, there were clear differences in management and communication preferences across user groups, but few differences across states. Understanding these key differences in stakeholder support for, and willingness to accept specific management actions is critical in moving management and restoration forward while minimizing conflict.

  15. A decision framework for identifying models to estimate forest ecosystem services gains from restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Zachary; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Verdone, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Restoring degraded forests and agricultural lands has become a global conservation priority. A growing number of tools can quantify ecosystem service tradeoffs associated with forest restoration. This evolving “tools landscape” presents a dilemma: more tools are available, but selecting appropriate tools has become more challenging. We present a Restoration Ecosystem Service Tool Selector (RESTS) framework that describes key characteristics of 13 ecosystem service assessment tools. Analysts enter information about their decision context, services to be analyzed, and desired outputs. Tools are filtered and presented based on five evaluative criteria: scalability, cost, time requirements, handling of uncertainty, and applicability to benefit-cost analysis. RESTS uses a spreadsheet interface but a web-based interface is planned. Given the rapid evolution of ecosystem services science, RESTS provides an adaptable framework to guide forest restoration decision makers toward tools that can help quantify ecosystem services in support of restoration.

  16. Effects of Restoration Techniques on Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Florida Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris) Sandhill Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Lavoie; Mack, Michelle C; John K. Hiers; Scott Pokswinski; Analie Barnett; Louis Provencher

    2014-01-01

    Historic fire suppression and intensive forest management in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) sandhill forests has resulted in hardwood encroachment and degradation of this fire-dependent ecosystem. Active management is now required to restore native community structure and composition, but little is known about the long-term impacts of typical restoration techniques on ecosystem properties. In 1994, the Longleaf Pine Restoration Project (LPRP) was established in fire-excluded longleaf pine sa...

  17. Rubber dam may increase the survival time of dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, William; Carson, Susan J

    2017-03-01

    restorative treatments may lead to a lower failure rate of the restorations, compared with the failure rate for cotton roll usage. Further high quality research evaluating the effects of rubber dam usage on different types of restorative treatments is required.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide.

  19. Anterior makeover on fractured teeth by simple composite resin restoration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: In daily practice dentists usually treat tooth fractures with more invasive treatments such as crown, veneer and bridges which preparation require more tooth structure removal. While currently there is trend toward minimal invasive dentistry which conserves more tooth structure. This is enhanced with the vast supply of dental materials and equipment in the market, including restorative materials. Provided with these supporting materials and equipment and greater patient’s demand f...

  20. The importance of nature's invisible fabric: food web structure mediates modeled responses to river restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmore, R.; Benjamin, J.; Newsom, M.; Bountry, J.; Dombroski, D.

    2016-12-01

    Restoration is frequently aimed at the recovery of target species, but also influences the larger food web in which these species participate. Effects of restoration on this broader network of organisms can influence target species both directly and indirectly via changes in energy flow through food webs. To help incorporate these complexities into river restoration planning we constructed a food web model that links river food web dynamics to in-stream physical habitat and riparian vegetation conditions. We present an application of this model to the Methow River, Washington (USA), a location of on-going restoration aimed at recovering salmon. Three restoration strategies were simulated: riparian vegetation restoration, nutrient augmentation via salmon carcass addition, and floodplain reconnection. To explore how food web structure mediates responses to these actions, we modified the food web by adding populations of invasive aquatic snails and nonnative fish. Simulations suggest that floodplain reconnection may be a better strategy than carcass addition and vegetation planting for improving conditions for salmon in this river segment. However, modeled responses were strongly sensitive to changes in the structure of the food web. The addition of invasive snails and nonnative fishes modified pathways of energy through the food web, which negated restoration improvements. This finding illustrates that forecasting responses to restoration may require accounting for the structure of food webs, and that changes in this structure—as might be expected with the spread of invasive species—could compromise restoration outcomes. By elucidating the direct and indirect pathways by which restoration affects target species, dynamic food web models can improve restoration planning by fostering a deeper understanding of system connectedness and dynamics.

  1. Fruit fly optimization based least square support vector regression for blind image restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Rui; Li, Junshan; Yang, Yawei

    2014-11-01

    The goal of image restoration is to reconstruct the original scene from a degraded observation. It is a critical and challenging task in image processing. Classical restorations require explicit knowledge of the point spread function and a description of the noise as priors. However, it is not practical for many real image processing. The recovery processing needs to be a blind image restoration scenario. Since blind deconvolution is an ill-posed problem, many blind restoration methods need to make additional assumptions to construct restrictions. Due to the differences of PSF and noise energy, blurring images can be quite different. It is difficult to achieve a good balance between proper assumption and high restoration quality in blind deconvolution. Recently, machine learning techniques have been applied to blind image restoration. The least square support vector regression (LSSVR) has been proven to offer strong potential in estimating and forecasting issues. Therefore, this paper proposes a LSSVR-based image restoration method. However, selecting the optimal parameters for support vector machine is essential to the training result. As a novel meta-heuristic algorithm, the fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA) can be used to handle optimization problems, and has the advantages of fast convergence to the global optimal solution. In the proposed method, the training samples are created from a neighborhood in the degraded image to the central pixel in the original image. The mapping between the degraded image and the original image is learned by training LSSVR. The two parameters of LSSVR are optimized though FOA. The fitness function of FOA is calculated by the restoration error function. With the acquired mapping, the degraded image can be recovered. Experimental results show the proposed method can obtain satisfactory restoration effect. Compared with BP neural network regression, SVR method and Lucy-Richardson algorithm, it speeds up the restoration rate and

  2. Effect of splinting and interproximal contact tightness on load transfer by implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichet, David L; Yoshinobu, Diane; Caputo, Angelo A

    2002-05-01

    To circumvent the difficulty of achieving a passive framework fit, some authors have suggested that multiple adjacent implants be restored individually. This protocol requires that each unit be able to withstand mastication forces. Non-splinted restorations have numerous interproximal contacts that require adjustments prior to placement, with an unknown outcome relative to load transfer. This in vitro simulation study examined the effect of splinting and interproximal contact tightness on passivity of fit and the load transfer characteristics of implant restorations. A photoelastic model of a human partially edentulous left mandible with 3 screw-type implants (3.75 x 10 mm) was fabricated. For non-splinted restorations, individual crowns were fabricated on 3 custom-milled titanium abutments. After the units were cemented, 5 levels of interproximal contact tightness were evaluated: open, ideal (8 microm shim stock drags without tearing), light (ideal +10 microm), medium (ideal + 50 microm), and heavy (ideal + 90 microm). For splinted restorations, five 3-unit fixed partial dentures were fabricated, internally adjusted with silicone disclosing material, and cemented to the model. Changes in stress distribution under simulated non-loaded and loaded conditions (6.8 kg) were analyzed with a polariscope. In the simulated alveolar structures, non-splinted restorations with heavier interproximal contacts were associated with increased tensile stresses between implants; occlusal loads tended to concentrate around the specific loaded implant. Splinted restorations shared the occlusal loads and distributed the stresses more evenly between the implants when force was applied. The load-sharing effect was most evident on the center implant but also was seen on the terminal abutments of the splinted restorations. The results of this in vitro study suggest that excessive contact tightness between individual crowns can lead to a non-passive situation. In this experiment, splinted

  3. Restoring ecological integrity in highly regulated rivers: the role of baseline data and analytical references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Peter W; Singer, Maia S; Orr, Bruce K; Diggory, Zooey E; Church, Tamara C; Stella, J C

    2011-10-01

    The goal of restoring ecological integrity in rivers is frequently accompanied by an assumption that a comparative reference reach can be identified to represent minimally impaired conditions. However, in many regulated rivers, no credible historical, morphological or process-based reference reach exists. Resilient restoration designs should instead be framed around naturalization, using multiple analytical references derived from empirically-calibrated field- and model-based techniques to develop an integrated ecological reference condition. This requires baseline data which are rarely collected despite increasing evidence for systematic deficiencies in restoration practice. We illustrate the utility of baseline data collection in restoration planning for the highly fragmented and regulated lower Merced River, California, USA. The restoration design was developed using various baseline data surveys, monitoring, and modeling within an adaptive management framework. Baseline data assisted in transforming conceptual models of ecosystem function into specific restoration challenges, defining analytical references of the expected relationships among ecological parameters required for restoration, and specifying performance criteria for post-project monitoring and evaluation. In this way the study is an example of process-based morphological restoration designed to prompt recovery of ecosystem processes and resilience. For the Merced River, we illustrate that project-specific baseline data collection is a necessary precursor in developing performance-based restoration designs and addressing scale-related uncertainties, such as whether periodic gravel augmentation will sustain bed recovery and whether piecemeal efforts will improve ecological integrity. Given the numerous impediments to full, historical, restoration in many river systems, it seems apparent that projects of naturalization are a critical step in reducing the deleterious impacts of fragmented rivers

  4. Biological restoration: A 4/5 crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monize Ferreira Figueiredo de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most prevalent conditions in humans; the purpose of restorative dentistry is to recreate the anatomy of the affected tooth thus the use of fragments from natural teeth as an effective restorative method. A maxillary first premolar left was prepared for an inverted 4/5 crown due to involvement of the vestibular face, after prepared received an allogeneic collage with similar color and dimension. Follow-up after 12 months indicated a stable restoration. Clinically, the site was without signs of caries, migration of the fragment or marginal infiltration. Biological restoration is a viable alternative for reestablishing function and esthetics to damaged/decayed teeth and therefore, biological restoration as an alternative to other restorative options.

  5. Evaluating the process of ecological restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Nilsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a conceptual framework for evaluating the process of ecological restoration and applied it to 10 examples of restoration projects in the northern hemisphere. We identified three major phases, planning, implementation, and monitoring, in the restoration process. We found that evaluation occurred both within and between the three phases, that it included both formal and informal components, and that it often had an impact on the performance of the projects. Most evaluations were short-term and only some parts of them were properly documented. Poor or short-term evaluation of the restoration process creates a risk that inefficient methods will continue to be used, which reduces the efficiency and effectiveness of restoration. To improve the restoration process and to transfer the knowledge to future projects, we argue for more formal, sustained evaluation procedures, involving all relevant stakeholders, and increased and improved documentation and dissemination of the results.

  6. Shame and Guilt in Restorative Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    in particular, having presented the aims of restorative justice, the importance of face-to-face conferences in reaching these aims, the emotional dynamics that take place within such conferences, and the relevant parts of the empirical psychology of shame and guilt, I argue that restorative justice......In this article, I examine the relevance and desirability of shame and guilt to restorative justice conferences. I argue that a careful study of the psychology of shame and guilt reveals that both emotions possess traits that can be desirable and traits that can be undesirable for restoration. More...... practitioners have to take account of a rather more complex picture than it had hitherto been thought. Restorative conferences are not simply about "shame management," though practitioners must certainly avoid shaming and humiliation. Given the nature of shame, guilt, and restorative conferences...

  7. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by dental restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2014-06-01

    We report herein on 5 patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration (caries cutting, cavity preparation, inlay restoration). Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis was noted following dental restoration. Even though the pulp cavity and dental pulp were intact, the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis occurred caused by an apical lesion. Infection by way of the dentinal tubules was suggested to be a cause of the pathophysiology. Endoscopic sinus surgery was indicated in patients with intractable odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by the dental restoration. Cone-beam x-ray CT was useful for the accurate diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration. Physicians should thus be aware of the possibility that a tooth, which has undergone dental restoration, may cause odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

  8. Architectural restoration: different conceptions during centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The work reassumes the fundamental phases, in reference to the historical changes, of the conceptions related to the restoration and to the maintenance of the architectural works of art. It is opportune to reassume the evolution of the methods and the techniques applied to the restoration of the aforesaid manufactured articles, also in relationship to the theoretical conceptions. The explication of the routine of restoration has concerned particularly the actual applications. Close to the theory and to the routine of the restoration it has been set in evidence the development of the concept of "maintenance", understood as preliminary and complementary to the restoration itself: such concept has been express referring to the Charters of restoration from the beginning of the last century to today. It is intended, therefore, to follow a historical-critical path conceived in the different, and also complementary, phases of historical, aesthetical and technological development.

  9. The Class V lesion--aetiology and restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyas, M J

    1995-06-01

    The aetiology of non-carious cervical lesions is discussed. These have been variously described as 'abrasion', 'erosion', 'abrasion/erosion', and 'idiopathic cervical'. However, many lesions do not fit the classical appearance or location of an erosive and/or abrasive origin, and there is increasing interest in the possible role of occlusal stress in their aetiology. Non-carious cervical lesions often require restoration, and there are essentially three options using tooth-coloured materials: a restorative glass ionomer cement, a liner/base glass ionomer cement overlayed with a resin composite, or a resin composite bonded by an enamel/dentine-adhesive. The materials and techniques used in these options are discussed, indicating their advantages and disadvantages. Results of available clinical trials of these systems are given, and the link with the stress theory of cervical tooth loss is described. The preferred restorative approaches in order are: resin-modified restorative glass ionomer; resin-modified liner/base glass ionomer with a microfine resin composite overlay; enamel/dentine bonding agent with a microfine resin composite.

  10. Preventive resin restorations: practice and billing patterns of pediatric dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Bryan; McWhorter, Alton G; Kerins, Carolyn A; Seale, N Sue

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine practice patterns of pediatric dentists for preventive resin restorations (PRRs) and if they believe a code should be added to the American Dental Association's current dental terminology (CDT) for the PRR. A 16-question survey sent to 475 pediatric dentists randomly selected from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry database, addressed demographics, treatment planning, techniques in preparation and restoration, billing practices, and perceptions about the need for a CDT code for PRRs. Two hundred thirty-eight (50%) surveys were returned, revealing that 72% of respondents perform PRRs and 64% feel that a PRR code should be added to the CDT Fifty-two percent believe not having a CDT code could cause dentists to perform more invasive dentistry to comply with billing requirements that Class I restorations be in dentin. PRRs are commonly treatment planned for deep pits and fissures with questionable decoy not entering dentin. Up to 50% of respondents could be erroneously billing for PRRs. Most pediatric dentists perform preventive resin restorations in their office and believe that a code for the procedure needs to be added to the current dental terminology.

  11. Restoring a Burnt Heritage PTPN X Building in Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Ratna Darmiwati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The archipelago of Indonesia has lots of historical buildings that were built during the Dutch colonization era, which lasted for approximately 350 years.  In 2011, there were 167 colonial architectural buildings in Surabaya city [1].  Due to their importance to the city as testimony of the history of Surabaya, and are a way to develop heritage tourism in Surabaya, the city government must preserve them.  A thorough research study has been done to support the city government in restoring a heritage building called PT Perkebunan Nusantara X (PTPN X.  It is a state-owned agricultural business office located at Jalan Jembatan Merah, Surabaya, and located among other historical sites. The PTPN X building was burnt down in 2005 with a damage level of about 60%.  In order to be able to build a new one with the original design of its past European architecture and details of its historical relics, the restoration acts require intensive consultations with many people such as the PTPN X employees, academic experts from Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember (ITS and the city’s cultural heritage experts who know all about it. In this paper, the approaches and final outcome of the building restoration will be described in greater detail. Keywords: colonial architectural building; heritage building restoration; tourism and education; PTPN X.

  12. Can Viral Videos Help Beaver Restore Streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J. M.; Pollock, M. M.; Lewallen, G.; Jordan, C.; Woodruff, K.

    2015-12-01

    Have you watched YouTube lately? Did you notice the plethora of cute animal videos? Researchers, including members of our Beaver Restoration Research team, have been studying the restoration potential of beaver for decades, yet in the past few years, beaver have gained broad acclaim and some much deserved credit for restoration of aquatic systems in North America. Is it because people can now see these charismatic critters in action from the comfort of their laptops? While the newly released Beaver Restoration Guidebook attempts to answer many questions, sadly, this is not one of them. We do, however, address the use of beaver (Castor canadensis) in stream, wetland, and floodplain restoration and discuss the many positive effects of beaver on fluvial ecosystems. Our team, composed of researchers from NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, and Portland State University, has developed a scientifically rigorous, yet accessible, practitioner's guide that provides a synthesis of the best available science for using beaver to improve ecosystem functions. Divided into two broad sections -- Beaver Ecology and Beaver Restoration and Management -- the guidebook focuses on the many ways in which beaver improve habitat, primarily through the construction of dams that impound water and retain sediment. In Beaver Ecology, we open with a discussion of the general effects that beaver dams have on physical and biological processes, and we close with "Frequently Asked Questions" and "Myth Busters". In Restoration and Management, we discuss common emerging restoration techniques and methods for mitigating unwanted beaver effects, followed by case studies from pioneering practitioners who have used many of these beaver restoration techniques in the field. The lessons they have learned will help guide future restoration efforts. We have also included a comprehensive beaver ecology library of over 1400 references from scientific journals

  13. Restoration of variable density film soundtracks

    OpenAIRE

    Besserer, Bernard; Etienne, Decencière; Hassaïne, Abdelâali

    2009-01-01

    Full text available at http://www.eurasip.org/Proceedings/Eusipco/Eusipco2009/contents/papers/1569192297.pdf; International audience; The restoration of motion picture films has been an active research field for many years. The restoration of the soundtrack however has mainly been performed at the audio domain in spite of the fast that it is recorded as a continuous image on the film stock. In this paper, we propose a new restoration method for variable density soundtracks. The method first d...

  14. Prescribing Innovation within a Large-Scale Restoration Programme in Degraded Subtropical Thicket in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Mills

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Commonly cited requirements for bridging the “science‑practice divide” between practitioners and scientists include: political support, communication and experimentation. The Subtropical Thicket Restoration Programme was established in 2004 to catalyse investment in large-scale restoration of degraded subtropical thicket in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Political support has been strong, with the South African government investing more than US$8 million into the programme. Communication occurred regularly among a wide range of stakeholders, and a restoration experiment—comprising 12 treatments and ~300 plots—was established over an area of ~75,000 km2. Despite this support, communication and experimentation, many pitfalls were encountered. For example, one restoration protocol became entrenched in the programme’s public as well as private sector operations without continual scrutiny of its efficacy. This was largely because results from the large-scale restoration experiment only emerged a decade after its conceptualization. As the programme enters its second decade there is recognition that a full range of “intelligent tinkering”—from small, rapid experiments to large, long-term experiments—needs to be planned and prescribed. The new working hypothesis is that prescribed innovation will reduce costs of restoration, increase survivorship of plants, increase income streams from restored landscapes, and promote new financing mechanisms for restoration.

  15. Ecological feasibility studies in restoration decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfensperger, Kristine N; Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Seagle, Steven W

    2007-06-01

    The restoration of degraded systems is essential for maintaining the provision of valuable ecosystem services, including the maintenance of aesthetic values. However, restoration projects often fail to reach desired goals for a variety of ecologic, financial, and social reasons. Feasibility studies that evaluate whether a restoration effort should even be attempted can enhance restoration success by highlighting potential pitfalls and gaps in knowledge before the design phase of a restoration. Feasibility studies also can bring stakeholders together before a restoration project is designed to discuss potential disagreements. For these reasons, a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of restoring a tidal freshwater marsh in the Potomac River near Alexandria, Virginia. The study focused on science rather than engineering questions, and thus differed in approach from other feasibility studies that are mostly engineering driven. The authors report the framework they used to conduct a feasibility study to inform other potential restoration projects with similar goals. The seven steps of the framework encompass (1) initiation of a feasibility study, (2) compilation of existing data, (3) collection of current site information, (4) examination of case studies, (5) synthesis of information in a handbook, (6) meeting with selected stakeholders, and (7) evaluation of meeting outcomes. By conducting a feasibility study using the seven-step framework, the authors set the stage for conducting future compliance studies and enhancing the chance of a successful restoration.

  16. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  17. Clinical guidelines for indirect resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, A

    1997-06-01

    Ongoing advances in adhesive dentistry have made it possible to successfully and predictably bond tooth-supporting restorations using conservative preparation techniques. Improvements in the durability and esthetic properties of tooth-colored restorative materials have also increased the range of available treatment options. However, dentists have been slow to accept both direct and indirect posterior esthetics. This article provides a step-by-step technique for practitioners who choose to treat their patients with indirect resin esthetic restorations. It will not discuss other posterior restorative treatment techniques or materials (i.e. gold, porcelain, amalgam, bonded amalgam, or direct resin).

  18. Esthetic restoration of discolored primary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Fred S

    2005-01-01

    Restoring primary teeth can be a strenuous task for many dentists who would like to have an esthetic, easy-to-use and relatively quick restoration for children. But, the restoration of carious, fractured or discolored primary incisors gives the dentist the satisfaction of knowing that he/she has restored the smile and self-confidence of a growing child. This article describes a technique which is relatively easy and produces a beautiful outcome in a relatively short time. The author has used the technique in hundreds of children for over twenty-five years. Modifications in the technique have been made as newer materials and techniques have evolved.

  19. ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION:OUR HOPE FOR THE FUTURE?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu-gao; LI Xiu-zhen; HE Hong S; HU Yuan-man

    2004-01-01

    Ecological restoration is widely employed from tens to millions of hectares in space, and from tens of days to thousands of years in time, which forces consideration of it thoroughly. We argue that three questions are the most important among the contents relevant of ecological restoration, including why, what and how to restore degraded systems. Why to restore determines whether or not the degraded ecological systems should be restored. What to restore is the goal of ecological restoration. The explicit goal of ecological restoration is necessary to guide ecological restoration workers in pursuit of excellence and prevent restoration from being swamped by purely technological activities. And how to restore means the methods and steps we should apply. To ensure the final success of ecological restoration, restored sites should be monitored and managed for long time to determine whether the selected methods are appropriate, and can be remedy better. Only to deal with these effectively, ecological restoration would be the hope for the future.

  20. Restoring the Pacific Northwest: the art and science of ecological restoration in Cascadia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Apostol, D; Sinclair, M

    2006-01-01

    Restoring the Pacific Northwest is a handbook that brings together in a single volume a vast array of information on the science and practice of restoration in a broadly defined Pacific Northwest region...