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Sample records for restaurants local information

  1. Information about Restaurants

    2007-01-01

    Please note that Restaurant 1 will NOT be closed during the weekend of 5th-6th May as previously announced but will be closed Friday 11th May from 15.00 until Sunday 13th May inclusive. Restaurant 2 will be open on Friday 11th May until 20.00 and on Saturday 12th and Sunday 13th April from 9.00 20.00. Hot meals will be served from 12.00 - 14.00 and from 18.00 - 19.30. See http://cern.ch/restaurant2 for more information. Restaurant 2 will be closed on Thursday 17 th May and Friday 18th May for the Ascension bank holiday. Restaurant 1 will remain open for the whole of that weekend (Thursday 17th Sunday 20th May).

  2. Information regarding restaurants 1 and 2

    2007-01-01

    Please note that Restaurant 1 will be closed during the Easter weekend from Friday 6th April until Monday 9th April inclusive. Restaurant 2 will remain open during this period. See http://resto2.web.cern.ch/resto2/Events/easter2007.html for more information. Restaurant 1 will also be closed for technical reasons during the weekend of 5th-6th May. Restaurant 2 will be open on Saturday 5th May from 8.00-20.00 and on Sunday 6th May from 9.00-20.00. Hot meals will be served on both days from 12.00-14.00 and from 18.00-19.30. See http://resto2.web.cern.ch/resto2/Events/5-6May2007.html for more information. Thank you for your understanding.

  3. Research of the Localization of Restaurant Service Robot

    Yu Qing-xiao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper designs a restaurant service robot which could be applicable to providing basic service, such as ordering, fetching and sending food, settlement and so on, for the customers in the robot restaurant. In this study, both three landmarks positioning and landmark-based localization algorithms are proposed to localize the mobile robot with rough precision in the restaurant. And Optical Character Recognition (OCR technology is used to distinguish the unique table number of different landmarks. When the high localization precision must be granted around the pantry table, the RFID-based localization algorithm is proposed to localize the mobile robot. Various experiments show that the proposed algorithms could estimate the robot pose reasonably well and could accurately evaluate the localization performance. Finally, the proposed service robot could realize real-time self-localization in the restaurant.

  4. Research of the Localization of Restaurant Service Robot

    Yu Qing-xiao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper designs a restaurant service robot which could be applicable to providing basic service, such as ordering, fetching and sending food, settlement and so on, for the customers in the robot restaurant. In this study, both three landmarks positioning and landmark-based localization algorithms are proposed to localize the mobile robot with rough precision in the restaurant. And Optical Character Recognition (OCR technology is used to distinguish the unique table number of different landmarks. When the high localization precision must be granted around the pantry table, the RFID-based localization algorithm is proposed to localize the mobile robot.Various experiments show that the proposed algorithms could estimate the robot pose reasonably well and could accurately evaluate the localization performance. Finally, the proposed service robot could realize real-time self-localization in the restaurant.

  5. Administrative Information Systems Design Beautiful Restaurant Tour

    Risman Risman; Drs. Soetirto Sadikin. M.A

    1999-01-01

    Satisfactory service is the key to business done wonderful tourist restaurants. One ofthe restaurant management efforts to meet these demands is to build informationsystems that can handle sales, handling of inventory until the purchase of rawmaterials, so the restaurant will be increasing productivity.To meet these needs, the author conducted the analysis and design of administrativeinformation system that handles its restaurant sales, purchasing, accounts payable andinventory handling. The ...

  6. The energy content of restaurant foods without stated calorie information.

    Urban, Lorien E; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Gary, Christine E; Fierstein, Jamie L; Equi, Ashley; Kussmaul, Carolyn; Dallal, Gerard E; Roberts, Susan B

    2013-07-22

    National recommendations for the prevention and treatment of obesity emphasize reducing energy intake through self-monitoring food consumption. However, little information is available on the energy content of foods offered by nonchain restaurants, which account for approximately 50% of restaurant locations in the United States. To measure the energy content of foods from independent and small-chain restaurants that do not provide stated information on energy content. We used bomb calorimetry to determine the dietary energy content of the 42 most frequently purchased meals from the 9 most common restaurant categories. Independent and small-chain restaurants were randomly selected, and 157 individual meals were analyzed. Area within 15 miles of downtown Boston. A random sample of independent and small-chain restaurants. Dietary energy. All meal categories provided excessive dietary energy. The mean energy content of individual meals was 1327 (95% CI, 1248-1406) kcal, equivalent to 66% of typical daily energy requirements. We found a significant effect of food category on meal energy (P ≤ .05), and 7.6% of meals provided more than 100% of typical daily energy requirements. Within-meal variability was large (average SD, 271 kcal), and we found no significant effect of restaurant establishment or size. In addition, meal energy content averaged 49% greater than those of popular meals from the largest national chain restaurants (P restaurants have been criticized for offering meals with excess dietary energy. This study finds that independent and small-chain restaurants, which provide no nutrition information, also provide excessive dietary energy in amounts apparently greater than popular meals from chain restaurants or information in national food databases. A national requirement for accurate calorie labeling in all restaurants may discourage menus offering unhealthy portions and would allow consumers to make informed choices about ordering meals that promote weight

  7. 75 FR 68361 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu...

    2010-11-05

    ...] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu and... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Restaurant Menu and Vending Machine Labeling... restaurants and similar retail food establishments (SRFE) with 20 or more locations doing business under the...

  8. Social media behavior of local restaurants and their customers.

    Drs Erik Hekman; Marieke Welle Donker Kuijer

    2013-01-01

    In this study we analyze a large dataset of Facebook activities of local restaurants in Amsterdam, Houston, London and New York. Doing so gives broad insights in their Facebook usage and the communication patterns between them and their costumers. The dataset is quite rich and the presented

  9. Restaurering

    Bock, Lars Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    Kompendiet, der pt. kun foreligger som digital fil på Arkitektskolens hjemmeside, omhandler fagdiciplinen restaurering, sådan som forfatteren ser denne i arkitektfaget. Kompendiet belyser fagdisciplinens omfang, indhold og de forskellige teoretiske og metodiske tilgange, der er til fagområdet...... restaurering. Kompendiet mangler stadig nogle væsentlige kapitler og vil blive færdigskrevet på et senere tidspunkt...

  10. Facebook usage by local restaurants: A large scale survey

    Drs Erik Hekman; Marieke Welledonker-Kuijer

    2012-01-01

    Social media are rapidly becoming a viable way of service marketing and customer engagement in the hospitality industry. Facebook, for instance, allows restaurants to publish information, multimedia content and engage with their customers e.g., to answer questions or learn about their preferences.

  11. Restaurant information system model and implementation

    Dzenkauskas, Paulinas

    2006-01-01

    The recent stabilization of the Internet is now driving easy aspect of life into an Internet presence and the accompanying e-commerce solutions. In the coming years, the Internet will see growth in numbers unlike the world has ever seen. E-commerce has built itself with this in mind and is making every effort it can to seize the strongest position possible. The idea of e-restaurant extends the restaurant to the web and therefore to the home of customers. It provides the basic services, suc...

  12. Availability, Location, and Format of Nutrition Information in Fast-food Chain Restaurants in Ontario, Canada.

    Hobin, Erin; Lebenbaum, Michael; Rosella, Laura; Hammond, David

    2015-03-01

    To assess the availability, location, and format of nutrition information in fast-food chain restaurants in Ontario. Nutrition information in restaurants was assessed using an adapted version of the Nutrition Environment Measures Study for Restaurants (NEMS-R). Two raters independently visited 50 restaurants, 5 outlets of each of the top-10 fast-food chain restaurants in Canada. The locations of the restaurants were randomly selected within the Waterloo, Wellington, and Peel regions in Ontario, Canada. Descriptive results are presented for the proportion of restaurants presenting nutrition information by location (e.g., brochure), format (e.g., use of symbols), and then by type of restaurant (e.g., quick take-away, full-service). Overall, 96.0% (n = 48) of the restaurants had at least some nutrition information available in the restaurant. However, no restaurant listed calorie information for all items on menu boards or menus, and only 14.0% (n = 7) of the restaurants posted calorie information and 26.0% (n = 13) of restaurants posted other nutrients (e.g., total fat) for at least some items on menus boards or menus. The majority of the fast-food chain restaurants included in our study provided at least some nutrition information in restaurants; however, very few restaurants made nutrition information readily available for consumers on menu boards and menus.

  13. Analyzing Factors to Improve Service Quality of Local Specialties Restaurants: A Comparison with Fast Food Restaurants in Southern Vietnam

    Lai Wang Wang; Thanh Tuyen Tran

    2014-01-01

    The top fast food restaurant brands like KFC and MacDonald?s have gone global and demonstrated their successful business strategies through providing quick-service and convenience for customers. Meanwhile, local specialty food has recently emerged as a phenomenon attracting customers? attention on traditional value of ethnic food culture. The purpose of this study is to conduct a regional survey in Vietnamese restaurant companies to identify some key factors that make customers interested in ...

  14. 75 FR 67978 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu...

    2010-11-04

    ...] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu Labeling... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Restaurant Menu Labeling: Registration for Small... restaurants and similar retail food establishments (SRFE) with 20 or more locations, as well as operators of...

  15. Are ethnic restaurants a solution to dine out for the young local population?

    BALTESCU Codruta Adina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic restaurants are a component of a tourist destination offer. Through their profile, the menus, ambiance and environment, ethnic restaurants are targeting mainly the visitors. This article analyses to what extent these restaurants can attract local population, and especially, young population. In this respect it was conducted a quantitative marketing research among students of the Faculty of Economic Sciences and Business Administration from Brasov. The conclusions obtained highlight which are the attraction elements and features which determine young people to eat in an ethnic restaurant, in their place of residence or at a holiday destination.

  16. Predictors of total calories purchased at fast-food restaurants: restaurant characteristics, calorie awareness, and use of calorie information.

    Brissette, Ian; Lowenfels, Ann; Noble, Corina; Spicer, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    To examine purchase patterns at fast-food restaurants and their relation to restaurant characteristics, customer characteristics, and use of calorie information. Cross-sectional survey. Fast-food restaurants in New York State. Adult fast-food restaurant customers (n = 1,094). Restaurant characteristics (fast-food chain type, presence of calorie labels, and poverty of location), participant characteristics (demographics, calorie knowledge, awareness, and use), and customer purchasing patterns (ordering low-calorie or no beverage, small or no fries, or restaurant and customer characteristics, fast-food chain customer age, sex, calorie use, and calorie awareness were independently associated with total calories purchased (all P < .05; model R2 = .19). When 3 purchasing patterns were added to the model, calorie use (P = .005), but not calorie awareness, remained associated with total calories purchased. The 3 purchase patterns collectively accounted for the majority of variance in calorie totals (Δ model R2 = .40). Promoting use of calorie information, purchase strategies, and calorie awareness represents complementary ways to support lower-calorie choices at fast-food chains. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational Noise Exposure of Employees at Locally-Owned Restaurants in a College Town

    Green, Deirdre R.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2015-01-01

    While many restaurant employees work in loud environments, in both dining and food preparation areas, little is known about worker exposures to noise. The risk of hearing loss to millions of food service workers around the country is unknown. This study evaluated full-shift noise exposure to workers at six locally-owned restaurants to examine risk factors associated with noise exposures during the day shift. Participants included cooks, counter attendants, bartenders, and waiters at full-serv...

  18. Mobile Restaurant Information System Integrating Reservation Navigating and Parking Management

    Chih-Yao Lo,; Chun-Ta Lin,; Chia-Lung Tsai

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, with the pace of technological development, people have become more and more demanding in terms of quality of life. At the same time the restaurant industry has become one of the largest industries in the world. To follow international trends and development in the restaurant business in Taiwan, various types of theme restaurants and cafes have emerged. Needless to saycompetition is intense. In such an environment, raising service quality and management performance are the fo...

  19. Eating Well While Dining Out: Collaborating with Local Restaurants to Promote Heart Healthy Menu Items

    Thayer, Linden M.; Pimentel, Daniela C.; Smith, Janice C.; Garcia, Beverly A.; Lee Sylvester, Laura; Kelly, Tammy; Johnston, Larry F.; Ammerman, Alice S.; Keyserling, Thomas C.

    2017-01-01

    Background As Americans commonly consume restaurant foods with poor dietary quality, effective interventions are needed to improve food choices at restaurants. Purpose To design and evaluate a restaurant-based intervention to help customers select and restaurants promote heart healthy menu items with healthful fats and high quality carbohydrates. Methods The intervention included table tents outlining 10 heart healthy eating tips, coupons promoting healthy menu items, an information brochure, and link to study website. Pre and post intervention surveys were completed by restaurant managers and customers completed a brief “intercept” survey. Results Managers (n = 10) reported the table tents and coupons were well received, and several noted improved personal nutrition knowledge. Overall, 4214 coupons were distributed with 1244 (30%) redeemed. Of 300 customers surveyed, 126 (42%) noticed the table tents and of these, 115 (91%) considered the nutrition information helpful, 42 (33%) indicated the information influenced menu items purchased, and 91 (72%) reported the information will influence what they order in the future. Discussion The intervention was well-received by restaurant managers and positively influenced menu item selection by many customers. Translation to Health Education Practice Further research is needed to assess effective strategies for scaling up and sustaining this intervention approach. PMID:28947925

  20. Availability of point-of-purchase nutrition information at a fast-food restaurant.

    Wootan, Margo G; Osborn, Melissa; Malloy, Claudia J

    2006-12-01

    Given the link between eating out, poor diets, and obesity, we assessed the availability of point-of-purchase nutrition information at the largest fast-food restaurant in the U.S., McDonald's. In August 2004, we visited 29 of 33 (88%) of the McDonald's outlets in Washington, DC and visually inspected the premises, as well as asked cashiers or restaurant managers whether they had nutrition information available in the restaurant. In Washington, DC, 59% of McDonald's outlets provided in-store nutrition information for the majority of their standard menu items. In 62% of the restaurants, it was necessary to ask two or more employees in order to obtain a copy of that information. We found that even at the largest chain restaurant in the country, nutrition information at the point of decision-making is often difficult to find or completely absent.

  1. Restaurant menu labeling: impact of nutrition information on entree sales and patron attitudes.

    Albright, C L; Flora, J A; Fortmann, S P

    1990-01-01

    This study examined changes in sales of low fat/low cholesterol foods targeted in a restaurant menu labeling program. Sales of labeled items were tracked before and after the program was introduced, and a subsample of patrons were surveyed for information on visibility and comprehension of the menu labels. Two of the four restaurants had significant increases in the sales of targeted foods following labeling. Comparisons between patrons dining in restaurants which had an increase in sales (I--increase restaurants) to those dining in restaurants which had no overall shift in sales (NI--no increase restaurants) revealed no differences in patron awareness or comprehension of the menu labels. There were age and gender differences between I and NI restaurants, with I restaurants having proportionally more males, and a younger clientele. Taste was the primary reason given by patrons for their entree choice, regardless of whether or not it was labeled. In all four restaurants women and older patrons were more aware of the program and more responsive to its recommendations. These findings suggest that environmental strategies may be an effective method of encouraging dietary changes in the general population, but patron characteristics such as age and gender may influence receptivity to this type of intervention. Future studies aimed at developing effective point of purchase education programs should evaluate these patron characteristics and include more powerful behavior change strategies.

  2. An observational study of consumers' accessing of nutrition information in chain restaurants.

    Roberto, Christina A; Agnew, Henry; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-05-01

    In this observational study, we determined how frequently consumers accessed on-premises nutrition information provided at chain restaurants. The number of patrons entering and accessing nutrition information was recorded at 8 locations that were part of 4 major restaurant chains (McDonald's, Burger King, Starbucks, and Au Bon Pain). Only 6 (0.1%) of 4311 patrons accessed on-premises nutrition information before purchasing food. This very small percentage suggests that such information should be more prominently displayed, such as on restaurant menu boards, to help customers make informed decisions.

  3. An Observational Study of Consumers’ Accessing of Nutrition Information in Chain Restaurants

    Agnew, Henry; Brownell, Kelly D.

    2009-01-01

    In this observational study, we determined how frequently consumers accessed on-premises nutrition information provided at chain restaurants. The number of patrons entering and accessing nutrition information was recorded at 8 locations that were part of 4 major restaurant chains (McDonald's, Burger King, Starbucks, and Au Bon Pain). Only 6 (0.1%) of 4311 patrons accessed on-premises nutrition information before purchasing food. This very small percentage suggests that such information should be more prominently displayed, such as on restaurant menu boards, to help customers make informed decisions. PMID:19299679

  4. Occupational Noise Exposure of Employees at Locally-Owned Restaurants in a College Town.

    Green, Deirdre R; Anthony, T Renée

    2015-01-01

    While many restaurant employees work in loud environments, in both dining and food preparation areas, little is known about worker exposures to noise. The risk of hearing loss to millions of food service workers around the country is unknown. This study evaluated full-shift noise exposure to workers at six locally-owned restaurants to examine risk factors associated with noise exposures during the day shift. Participants included cooks, counter attendants, bartenders, and waiters at full-service restaurants with bar service and at limited-service restaurants that provided counter service only. Assessments were made on weekdays and weekends, both during the summer and the fall (with a local university in session) to examine whether the time of week or year affects noise exposures to this population in a college town. In addition, the relationships between noise exposures and the type of restaurant and job classification were assessed. One-hundred eighty full-shift time-weighted average (TWA) exposures were assessed, using both Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) criteria. No TWA measurements exceeded the 90 dBA OSHA 8 hr permissible exposure limit, although six projected TWAs exceeded the 85 dBA OSHA hearing conservation action limit. Using NIOSH criteria, TWAs ranged from 69-90 dBA with a mean of 80 dBA (SD = 4 dBA). Nearly 8% (14) of the exposures exceeded the NIOSH 8-hr 85 dBA. Full-shift exposures were larger for all workers in full-service restaurants (p restaurant type. The fall semester (p = 0.003) and weekend (p = 0.048) exposures were louder than summer and weekdays. Multiple linear regression analysis suggested that the combination of restaurant type, job classification, and season had a significant effect on restaurant worker noise exposures (p restaurant type, job classification, time of week, and season significantly affected the noise exposures for day

  5. A voluntary nutrition labeling program in restaurants: Consumer awareness, use of nutrition information, and food selection

    Christine M. White

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Health Check (HC was a voluntary nutrition labeling program developed by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada as a guide to help consumers choose healthy foods. Items meeting nutrient criteria were identified with a HC symbol. This study examined the impact of the program on differences in consumer awareness and use of nutritional information in restaurants. Exit surveys were conducted with 1126 patrons outside four HC and four comparison restaurants in Ontario, Canada (2013. Surveys assessed participant noticing of nutrition information, influence of nutrition information on menu selection, and nutrient intake. Significantly more patrons at HC restaurants noticed nutrition information than at comparison restaurants (34.2% vs. 28.1%; OR = 1.39; p = 0.019; however, only 5% of HC restaurant patrons recalled seeing the HC symbol. HC restaurant patrons were more likely to say that their order was influenced by nutrition information (10.9% vs. 4.5%; OR = 2.96, p < 0.001; and consumed less saturated fat and carbohydrates, and more protein and fibre (p < 0.05. Approximately 15% of HC restaurant patrons ordered HC approved items; however, only 1% ordered a HC item and mentioned seeing the symbol in the restaurant in an unprompted recall task, and only 4% ordered a HC item and reported seeing the symbol on the item when asked directly. The HC program was associated with greater levels of noticing and influence of nutrition information, and more favourable nutrient intake; however, awareness of the HC program was very low and differences most likely reflect the type of restaurants that “self-selected” into the program.

  6. A voluntary nutrition labeling program in restaurants: Consumer awareness, use of nutrition information, and food selection.

    White, Christine M; Lillico, Heather G; Vanderlee, Lana; Hammond, David

    2016-12-01

    Health Check (HC) was a voluntary nutrition labeling program developed by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada as a guide to help consumers choose healthy foods. Items meeting nutrient criteria were identified with a HC symbol. This study examined the impact of the program on differences in consumer awareness and use of nutritional information in restaurants. Exit surveys were conducted with 1126 patrons outside four HC and four comparison restaurants in Ontario, Canada (2013). Surveys assessed participant noticing of nutrition information, influence of nutrition information on menu selection, and nutrient intake. Significantly more patrons at HC restaurants noticed nutrition information than at comparison restaurants (34.2% vs. 28.1%; OR = 1.39; p = 0.019); however, only 5% of HC restaurant patrons recalled seeing the HC symbol. HC restaurant patrons were more likely to say that their order was influenced by nutrition information (10.9% vs. 4.5%; OR = 2.96, p restaurant patrons ordered HC approved items; however, only 1% ordered a HC item and mentioned seeing the symbol in the restaurant in an unprompted recall task, and only 4% ordered a HC item and reported seeing the symbol on the item when asked directly. The HC program was associated with greater levels of noticing and influence of nutrition information, and more favourable nutrient intake; however, awareness of the HC program was very low and differences most likely reflect the type of restaurants that "self-selected" into the program.

  7. INNOVATION AND INFORMATION TECHNOLGY: The role of Mobile application Inducing Innovations in Restaurant Businesses

    Khadka, Ganesh Bahadur

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a part of investigation to explain the relationship between information technology and innovation. MORSA ,Mobile Optimized Restaurant Service Application, was developed as a means of information technology by upgrading with new features comparing with currently existing online application service for restaurant businesses. With the help of MORSA,this research was conducted by examining its potentiaily to explain the relationship with different types of innovations. Moreover, di...

  8. Use of calorie information at fast-food and chain restaurants among US adults, 2009.

    Wethington, Holly; Maynard, Leah M; Haltiwanger, Christine; Blanck, Heidi M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine reading and use of calorie information at fast-food/chain restaurants. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on a sample of 4363 US adults using the 2009 HealthStyles survey. The outcome variable was reading calorie information when available while ordering at fast-food/chain restaurants. Among those who go to fast-food/chain restaurants, we conducted multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between sociodemographic variables and reading calorie information when available. Among those who report reading calorie information when available, we assessed the proportion using calorie information. Among those who reported eating at fast-food/chain restaurants, 36.4% reported reading calorie information when available. Reading calorie information was not related to race/ethnicity, income or education. Compared with men, women had higher odds [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.1] of reading calorie information when available while those who frequented fast-food/chain restaurants ≥3 times/week (aOR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.8) had lower odds compared with those going Health 2013. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Availability of and ease of access to calorie information on restaurant websites.

    Gary G Bennett

    Full Text Available Offering calories on restaurant websites might be particularly important for consumer meal planning, but the availability of and ease of accessing this information are unknown.We assessed websites for the top 100 U.S. chain restaurants to determine the availability of and ease of access to calorie information as well as website design characteristics. We also examined potential predictors of calorie availability and ease of access.Eighty-two percent of restaurants provided calorie information on their websites; 25% presented calories on a mobile-formatted website. On average, calories could be accessed in 2.35±0.99 clicks. About half of sites (51.2% linked to calorie information via the homepage. Fewer than half had a separate section identifying healthful options (46.3%, or utilized interactive meal planning tools (35.4%. Quick service/fast casual, larger restaurants, and those with less expensive entrées and lower revenue were more likely to make calorie information available. There were no predictors of ease of access.Calorie information is both available and largely accessible on the websites of America's leading restaurants. It is unclear whether consumer behavior is affected by the variability in the presentation of calorie information.

  10. Availability of and ease of access to calorie information on restaurant websites.

    Bennett, Gary G; Steinberg, Dori M; Lanpher, Michele G; Askew, Sandy; Lane, Ilana B; Levine, Erica L; Goodman, Melody S; Foley, Perry B

    2013-01-01

    Offering calories on restaurant websites might be particularly important for consumer meal planning, but the availability of and ease of accessing this information are unknown. We assessed websites for the top 100 U.S. chain restaurants to determine the availability of and ease of access to calorie information as well as website design characteristics. We also examined potential predictors of calorie availability and ease of access. Eighty-two percent of restaurants provided calorie information on their websites; 25% presented calories on a mobile-formatted website. On average, calories could be accessed in 2.35±0.99 clicks. About half of sites (51.2%) linked to calorie information via the homepage. Fewer than half had a separate section identifying healthful options (46.3%), or utilized interactive meal planning tools (35.4%). Quick service/fast casual, larger restaurants, and those with less expensive entrées and lower revenue were more likely to make calorie information available. There were no predictors of ease of access. Calorie information is both available and largely accessible on the websites of America's leading restaurants. It is unclear whether consumer behavior is affected by the variability in the presentation of calorie information.

  11. The influence of recipe modification and nutritional information on restaurant food acceptance and macronutrient intakes.

    Stubenitsky, K; Aaron, J; Catt, S; Mela, D

    2000-06-01

    To examine the influences of nutritional information and consumer characteristics on meal quality expectations, food selection and subsequent macronutrient intakes of consumers offered a reduced-fat option in a restaurant. A target, full-fat (FF) main restaurant meal option was developed in a version substantially reduced in fat and energy (RF). Restaurant patrons were randomly placed into one of four treatment groups varying in provision of menu information about the target dish, and the actual version of that dish served (if ordered). A full-fat blind (FFB) control group was given no nutritional information in the menu and was served the FF version. The other three groups were all served the modified RF version: (i) reduced-fat blind (RFB), who were given no nutritional information; (ii) reduced-fat informed (RFI), who were given nutritional information; and (iii) reduced-fat informed with details (RFID), who were given the same nutritional information plus recipe modification details. Subjects rated their expected and actual liking, the pleasantness of taste, texture and appearance of the dish, how well the dish matched their expectations, and the likelihood of purchase again. Additional measures included the other dish selections, sociodemographic and attitudinal information. A silver service (training) restaurant. Members of the public (n = 279) consuming meals in the restaurant. The presence of nutritional information on the menu did not significantly increase subsequent intakes of energy and fat from the rest of the meal, and did not significantly influence sensory expectations or post-meal acceptance measures (which also did not differ between the FF and RF versions). Consumer characteristics relating to fat reduction attitudes and behaviours were significantly related to the selection of different dishes. Provision of RF alternatives in a restaurant can have significant positive dietary benefits. Menu nutritional information did not affect measures of meal

  12. Eating Well While Dining Out: Collaborating with Local Restaurants to Promote Heart Healthy Menu Items

    Thayer, Linden M.; Pimentel, Daniela C.; Smith, Janice C.; Garcia, Beverly A.; Sylvester, Laura Lee; Kelly, Tammy; Johnston, Larry F.; Ammerman, Alice S.; Keyserling, Thomas C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Because Americans commonly consume restaurant foods with poor dietary quality, effective interventions are needed to improve food choices at restaurants. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a restaurant-based intervention to help customers select and restaurants promote heart healthy menu items with healthful…

  13. Fast food restaurant locations according to socioeconomic disadvantage, urban–regional locality, and schools within Victoria, Australia

    Lukar E. Thornton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Features of the built environment provide opportunities to engage in both healthy and unhealthy behaviours. Access to a high number of fast food restaurants may encourage greater consumption of fast food products. The distribution of fast food restaurants at a state-level has not previously been reported in Australia. Using the location of 537 fast food restaurants from four major chains (McDonald׳s, KFC, Hungry Jacks, and Red Rooster, this study examined fast food restaurant locations across the state of Victoria relative to area-level disadvantage, urban–regional locality (classified as Major Cities, Inner Regional, or Outer Regional, and around schools. Findings revealed greater locational access to fast food restaurants in more socioeconomically disadvantaged areas (compared to areas with lower levels of disadvantage, nearby to secondary schools (compared to primary schools, and nearby to primary and secondary schools within the most disadvantaged areas of the major city region (compared to primary and secondary schools in areas with lower levels of disadvantage. Adjusted models showed no significant difference in location according to urban–regional locality. Knowledge of the distribution of fast food restaurants in Australia will assist local authorities to target potential policy mechanisms, such as planning regulations, where they are most needed. Keywords: Australia, Fast food, Socioeconomic inequalities, Urbanicity, Schools, Land-use planning

  14. Fast food restaurant locations according to socioeconomic disadvantage, urban-regional locality, and schools within Victoria, Australia.

    Thornton, Lukar E; Lamb, Karen E; Ball, Kylie

    2016-12-01

    Features of the built environment provide opportunities to engage in both healthy and unhealthy behaviours. Access to a high number of fast food restaurants may encourage greater consumption of fast food products. The distribution of fast food restaurants at a state-level has not previously been reported in Australia. Using the location of 537 fast food restaurants from four major chains (McDonald׳s, KFC, Hungry Jacks, and Red Rooster), this study examined fast food restaurant locations across the state of Victoria relative to area-level disadvantage, urban-regional locality (classified as Major Cities, Inner Regional, or Outer Regional), and around schools. Findings revealed greater locational access to fast food restaurants in more socioeconomically disadvantaged areas (compared to areas with lower levels of disadvantage), nearby to secondary schools (compared to primary schools), and nearby to primary and secondary schools within the most disadvantaged areas of the major city region (compared to primary and secondary schools in areas with lower levels of disadvantage). Adjusted models showed no significant difference in location according to urban-regional locality. Knowledge of the distribution of fast food restaurants in Australia will assist local authorities to target potential policy mechanisms, such as planning regulations, where they are most needed.

  15. Approaches, techniques, and information technology systems in the restaurants and foodservice industry: a qualitative study in sales forecasting.

    Green, Yvette N. J.; Weaver, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of the approaches, techniques, and information technology systems utilized for restaurant sales forecasting in the full-service restaurant segment. Companies were examined using a qualitative research methods design and long interviews to gather information on approaches, techniques, and technology systems utilized in the sales forecasting process. The results of the interviews were presented along with ensuing discussion.

  16. Attacking the Obesity Epidemic: The Potential Health Benefits of Providing Nutrition Information in Restaurants

    Burton, Scot; Creyer, Elizabeth H.; Kees, Jeremy; Huggins, Kyle

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. Requiring restaurants to present nutrition information on menus is under consideration as a potential way to slow the increasing prevalence of obesity. Using a survey methodology, we examined how accurately consumers estimate the nutrient content of typical restaurant meals. Based on these results, we then conducted an experiment to address how the provision of nutrition information on menus influences purchase intentions and reported preferences. Methods. For both the survey and experiment, data were analyzed using analysis of variance techniques. Results. Survey results showed that levels of calories, fat, and saturated fat in less-healthful restaurant items were significantly underestimated by consumers. Actual fat and saturated fat levels were twice consumers’ estimates and calories approached 2 times more than what consumers expected. In the subsequent experiment, for items for which levels of calories, fat, and saturated fat substantially exceeded consumers’ expectations, the provision of nutrition information had a significant influence on product attitude, purchase intention, and choice. Conclusions. Most consumers are unaware of the high levels of calories, fat, saturated fat, and sodium found in many menu items. Provision of nutrition information on restaurant menus could potentially have a positive impact on public health by reducing the consumption of less-healthful foods. PMID:16873758

  17. Message frame and self-efficacy influence the persuasiveness of nutrition information in a fast-food restaurant

    Riet, J.P. van 't; Werrij, M.Q.; Nieuwkamp, R.; Vries, H. de; Ruiter, R.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the persuasiveness of gain- and loss-framed information recommending healthier choices in fast-food restaurants. Visitors of two fast-food restaurants (N = 235) filled in a questionnaire concerning their fast food choices and received gain-or loss-framed nutrition

  18. College Students' Intentions to Use Calorie Information on a Restaurant Menu: Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Stran, Kimberly A.; Knol, Linda L.; Severt, Kimberly; Lawrence, Jeannine C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity continues to be an epidemic in the United States and is associated with multiple chronic diseases. Greater numbers of people eat in restaurants and select high calorie foods. Labeling laws require calorie information on menus in some restaurants. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of intention to…

  19. Consumer attitudes toward information displayed at food buffets in commercial restaurants

    Tatiana Barbieri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the attitude of consumers towards information about dishes in a commercial restaurant. This research was conducted from January to April 2009 in a restaurant in the city of Santa Maria (RS, Brazil. Food information including the name of the dish, ingredients, health benefits and warnings, and calorie value was displayed. After providing this nutritional information, a questionnaire was applied to 300 consumers at the restaurant to observe their attitudes towards the food information. It was found that 10.57% of the respondents reported allergy or intolerance to some kinds of food and that 10.98% of the respondents reported having diseases that require moderate consumption and/or total restriction on the consumption of those foods. However, 84.96% of the respondents did not restrict consumption of any food, even though those foods may have posed a risk to their health, and 58.54% of the respondents consumed some food due to the potential benefits to their health. With regard to the respondents' level of satisfaction concerning the food information provided, 72.76% considered the information provided as very good. The respondents had a tendency to change their behavior towards consumption after having access to information about the dishes displayed.

  20. Who reports noticing and using calorie information posted on fast food restaurant menus?

    Breck, Andrew; Cantor, Jonathan; Martinez, Olivia; Elbel, Brian

    2014-10-01

    Identify consumer characteristics that predict seeing and using calorie information on fast food menu boards. Two separate data collection methods were used in Philadelphia during June 2010, several weeks after calorie labeling legislation went into effect: (1) point-of-purchase survey and receipt collection conducted outside fast food restaurants (N = 669) and (2) a random digit dial telephone survey (N = 702). Logistic regressions were used to predict the odds of reporting seeing, and of reporting seeing and being influenced by posted calorie information. Approximately 35.1% of point-of-purchase and 65.7% of telephone survey respondents reported seeing posted calorie information, 11.8% and 41.7%, respectively, reported that the labels influenced their purchasing decisions, and 8.4% and 17% reported they were influenced in a healthful direction. BMI, education, income, gender, consumer preferences, restaurant chain, and frequency of visiting fast food restaurants were associated with heterogeneity in the likelihood of reporting seeing and reporting seeing and using calorie labels. Demographic characteristics and consumer preferences are important determinants in the use of posted calorie information. Future work should consider the types of consumers this information is intended for, and how to effectively reach them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Healthier Children's Meals in Restaurants: An Exploratory Study to Inform Approaches That Are Acceptable Across Stakeholders.

    Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Folta, Sara C; Glenn, Meaghan E; Jones-Mueller, Anita; Lynskey, Vanessa M; Patel, Anjali A; Tse, Lisa L; Lopez, Nanette V

    2017-04-01

    Assess parents', children's, and restaurant executives' perspectives on children's meals in restaurants. Cross-sectional. Parents and children completed predominantly quantitative surveys at 4 quick- and full-service restaurant locations. Telephone interviews were conducted with executives representing additional restaurants. Parents (n = 59) and their first- through fourth-grade children (n = 58); executives (n = 4). Parent/child perspectives on child meal selection and toy incentives in restaurants; executives' views on kids' meals and barriers to supplying healthier kids' meals. Frequencies, thematic analysis. A total of 63% of children ordered from children's menus, 8% of whom ordered healthier kids' meals. Half of parents reported that children determined their own orders. Taste was the most common reason for children's meal choices. Most (76%) children reported visiting the restaurant previously; 64% of them placed their usual order. Parents' views on toy incentives were mixed. Themes from executive interviews highlighted factors driving children's menu offerings, including children's habits and preferences and the need to use preexisting pantry items. Executives described menu changes as driven by profitability, consumer demand, regulation, and corporate social responsibility. Findings can inform the development of restaurant interventions that are effective in promoting healthier eating and are acceptable to parents, children, and restaurant personnel. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  2. The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior

    Zhu, Jiaqi

    2013-01-01

    Zhu, Jiaqi. M.S., Purdue University, December 2013. The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior. Major Professors: Barbara A. Almanza, Carl A. Behnke. Obesity is a major public health threat. It not only creates challenges for those who are obese and overweight, but also brings an economic burden to the whole society. One important contributing factor for obesity is food eaten away from home, which accounts for more than 40% of Ameri...

  3. Refinement and User Acceptance Test of Accounting Information System for Restaurants SMEs

    Lana Sularto

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to improve accounting information system (AIS) application specially built for restaurants small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that have been developed and tested to the user, as well as demonstrate the feasibility of the applications that have been enhanced when viewed in terms of functionality, performance, and usability. Enhanced AIS is the result of system development that have been developed, that requires three years to complete all the stages involving 179 restau...

  4. Availability and accessibility of healthier options and nutrition information at New Zealand fast food restaurants.

    Chand, Ashmita; Eyles, Helen; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the availability of healthier options and nutrition information at major New Zealand fast food chains. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken at 24 fast food stores (two from each of 12 major chains) using on-site visits, telephone calls, and website searches. Of available products, only 234/1126 (21%) were healthier options. Healthier options were generally cheaper and lower in energy, total fat, saturated fat, sugar, and sodium per serve than their regular counterparts. Regular options were commonly high in sugar or sodium per serve (mean sugar content of beverages=56 g (11 teaspoons) and sodium content of burgers and pasta=1095 mg and 1172 mg, respectively). Nutrition information was available at 11/12 (92%) restaurant chains (range=0% at Tank Juice to 99% at Domino's Pizza). However, nutrition in the New Zealand fast food restaurant setting. Implications of these findings for policy and food industry include: consideration of mandatory menu labelling, increasing the percentage of healthier options available, and improving the nutrient content of regular options at New Zealand fast food restaurants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Business Plan: Elpis Restaurant

    Tran, Luu Quoc Phong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this Bachelor’s thesis is to create a business plan for starting up a restaurant in European – Asian style in Helsinki. While the restaurants are in European or Asian style separately, this restaurant will be unique with dishes which are based on local traditional dishes, traditional Asian dishes and mixture between them as well as creation of new dishes. This business plan is created to minimize the risk when starting up a restaurant. The plan will not only help the restaur...

  6. Use of calorie information at fast food and chain restaurants among US youth aged 9-18 years, 2010.

    Wethington, H; Maynard, L M; Blanck, H M

    2013-09-01

    To examine whether youth use calorie information when it is available at fast food/chain restaurants and what factors are associated with using this information to make their food selection. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on a sample of 721 youth (9-18 years) using the 2010 YouthStyles and HealthStyles surveys. The outcome measure was reported use of calorie information at fast food/chain restaurants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the associations between sociodemographic variables and the use of calorie information at fast food/chain restaurants. Of those who visited fast food/chain restaurants, 42.4% reported using calorie information at least sometimes. Girls were more likely than boys (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.5) and youth who were obese were more likely than those at a healthy weight (aOR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.04-2.9) to use calorie information, and youth eating at a fast food/chain restaurant twice a week or more versus once a week or less were half as likely to report using calorie information (aOR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.4-0.8). Public health education efforts can benefit from research to determine how to increase usage among youth so that their food choices are appropriate for their caloric needs.

  7. A risk-based restaurant inspection system in Los Angeles County.

    Buchholz, U; Run, G; Kool, J L; Fielding, J; Mascola, L

    2002-02-01

    The majority of local health departments perform routine restaurant inspections. In Los Angeles County (LAC), California, approximately $10 million/year is spent on restaurant inspections. However, data are limited as to whether or not certain characteristics of restaurants make them more likely to be associated with foodborne incident reports. We used data from the LAC Environmental Health Management Information System (EHMIS), which records the results of all routine restaurant inspections as well as data regarding all consumer-generated foodborne incidents that led to a special restaurant inspection by a sanitarian (investigated foodborne incidents [IFBIs]). We analyzed a cohort of 10,267 restaurants inspected from 1 July 1997 to 15 November 1997. We defined a "case restaurant" as any restaurant with a routine inspection from 1 July 1997 to 15 November 1997 and a subsequent IFBI from 1 July 1997 to 30 June 1998. Noncase restaurants did not have an IFBI from I July 1997 to 30 June 1998. We looked for specific characteristics of restaurants that might be associated with the restaurant subsequently having an IFBI, including the size of restaurant (assessed by number of seats), any previous IFBIs, the overall inspection score, and a set of 38 violation codes. We identified 158 case restaurants and 10,109 noncase restaurants. In univariate analysis, middle-sized restaurants (61 to 150 seats; n = 1,681) were 2.8 times (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0 to 4.0) and large restaurants (>150 seats; n = 621) were 4.6 times (95% CI = 3.0 to 7.0) more likely than small restaurants (restaurants. In addition, the likelihood of a restaurant becoming a case restaurant increased as the number of IFBIs in the prior year increased (chi2 for linear trend, P value = 0.0005). Other factors significantly associated with the occurrence of an IFBI included a lower overall inspection score, the incorrect storage of food, the reuse of food, the lack of employee hand washing, the lack of

  8. The effect of providing nutritional information about fast-food restaurant menus on parents' meal choices for their children

    Ahn, Jae-Young; Park, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Kiwon; Kwon, Sooyoun; Kim, Soyeong; Yang, Jihye; Song, Kyung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES To encourage healthier food choices for children in fast-food restaurants, many initiatives have been proposed. This study aimed to examine the effect of disclosing nutritional information on parents' meal choices for their children at fast-food restaurants in South Korea. SUBJECTS/METHODS An online experimental survey using a menu board was conducted with 242 parents of children aged 2-12 years who dined with them at fast-food restaurants at least once a month. Participants were classified into two groups: the low-calorie group (n = 41) who chose at least one of the lowest calorie meals in each menu category, and the high-calorie group (n = 201) who did not. The attributes including perceived empowerment, use of provided nutritional information, and perceived difficulties were compared between the two groups. RESULTS The low-calorie group perceived significantly higher empowerment with the nutritional information provided than did the high-calorie group (P = 0.020). Additionally, the low-calorie group was more interested in nutrition labeling (P nutritional value of menus when selecting restaurants for their children more than did the high-calorie group (P = 0.017). The low-calorie group used the nutritional information provided when choosing meals for their children significantly more than did the high-calorie group (P nutritional information provided (P = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that improving the empowerment of parents using nutritional information could be a strategy for promoting healthier parental food choices for their children at fast-food restaurants. PMID:26634057

  9. Adding sodium information to casual dining restaurant menus: Beneficial or detrimental for consumers?

    Byrd, Karen; Almanza, Barbara; Ghiselli, Richard F; Behnke, Carl; Eicher-Miller, Heather A

    2018-06-01

    High sodium levels in restaurant food have prompted Philadelphia and New York City to require inclusion of sodium content in addition to calories on menus to "nudge" consumers toward lower sodium foods. However, taste perceptions may impact the effectiveness of this intervention. An online survey tested whether sodium and calorie menu nutrition information (MNI) influenced consumer choices from a casual dining restaurant menu, accounting for consumers' intuition about taste of food relative to sodium, calories, and healthiness. Consumer choices were assessed based on calorie and sodium content of the menu items they selected. Participants were randomized to a menu with (1) calorie MNI only, (2) calorie plus numeric sodium MNI, (3) calorie MNI plus a sodium warning symbol for foods with 2300 mg of sodium or more, or (4) no MNI. Calorie plus numeric sodium MNI was associated with selection of meals lower in sodium compared to meals from the calorie MNI only menu or no MNI menu, but only for consumers with a taste intuition that (relatively) lower sodium, lower calorie, healthy foods were tasty. Consumers with the opposite taste intuition *(foods with these characteristics are not tasty) ordered meals higher in sodium. Inclusion of the sodium warning symbol did not result in a significantly different meal sodium content compared to the other menu conditions, regardless of taste intuition. However, differing levels of taste intuition alone, without consideration of MNI, was associated with ordering meals of significantly different calorie content. Overall, findings suggest adding calorie plus numeric sodium MNI may lead to beneficial outcomes (i.e., selecting meals lower in sodium) for some consumers and detrimental outcomes (i.e., selecting meals higher in sodium) for others, depending on their taste intuition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Restaurant closures

    Novae Restauration

    2012-01-01

    Christmas Restaurant closures Please note that the Restaurant 1 and Restaurant 3 will be closed from Friday, 21 December at 5 p.m. to Sunday, 6 January, inclusive. They will reopen on Monday, 7 January 2013.   Restaurant 2 closure for renovation To meet greater demand and to modernize its infrastructure, Restaurant 2 will be closed from Monday, 17 December. On Monday, 14 January 2013, Sophie Vuetaz’s team will welcome you to a renovated self-service area on the 1st floor. The selections on the ground floor will also be expanded to include pasta and pizza, as well as snacks to eat in or take away. To ensure a continuity of service, we suggest you take your break at Restaurant 1 or Restaurant 3 (Prévessin).

  11. Energy Contents of Frequently Ordered Restaurant Meals and Comparison with Human Energy Requirements and US Department of Agriculture Database Information: A Multisite Randomized Study

    Urban, Lorien E.; Weber, Judith L.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Schichtl, Rachel L.; Verstraete, Sofia; Lowery, Nina S.; Das, Sai Krupa; Schleicher, Molly M.; Rogers, Gail; Economos, Christina; Masters, William A.; Roberts, Susan B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Excess energy intake from meals consumed away from home is implicated as a major contributor to obesity, and ~50% of US restaurants are individual or small-chain (non–chain) establishments that do not provide nutrition information. Objective To measure the energy content of frequently ordered meals in non–chain restaurants in three US locations, and compare with the energy content of meals from large-chain restaurants, energy requirements, and food database information. Design A multisite random-sampling protocol was used to measure the energy contents of the most frequently ordered meals from the most popular cuisines in non–chain restaurants, together with equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants. Setting Meals were obtained from restaurants in San Francisco, CA; Boston, MA; and Little Rock, AR, between 2011 and 2014. Main outcome measures Meal energy content determined by bomb calorimetry. Statistical analysis performed Regional and cuisine differences were assessed using a mixed model with restaurant nested within region×cuisine as the random factor. Paired t tests were used to evaluate differences between non–chain and chain meals, human energy requirements, and food database values. Results Meals from non–chain restaurants contained 1,205±465 kcal/meal, amounts that were not significantly different from equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants (+5.1%; P=0.41). There was a significant effect of cuisine on non–chain meal energy, and three of the four most popular cuisines (American, Italian, and Chinese) had the highest mean energy (1,495 kcal/meal). Ninety-two percent of meals exceeded typical energy requirements for a single eating occasion. Conclusions Non–chain restaurants lacking nutrition information serve amounts of energy that are typically far in excess of human energy requirements for single eating occasions, and are equivalent to amounts served by the large-chain restaurants that have previously been criticized

  12. Energy Contents of Frequently Ordered Restaurant Meals and Comparison with Human Energy Requirements and U.S. Department of Agriculture Database Information: A Multisite Randomized Study.

    Urban, Lorien E; Weber, Judith L; Heyman, Melvin B; Schichtl, Rachel L; Verstraete, Sofia; Lowery, Nina S; Das, Sai Krupa; Schleicher, Molly M; Rogers, Gail; Economos, Christina; Masters, William A; Roberts, Susan B

    2016-04-01

    Excess energy intake from meals consumed away from home is implicated as a major contributor to obesity, and ∼50% of US restaurants are individual or small-chain (non-chain) establishments that do not provide nutrition information. To measure the energy content of frequently ordered meals in non-chain restaurants in three US locations, and compare with the energy content of meals from large-chain restaurants, energy requirements, and food database information. A multisite random-sampling protocol was used to measure the energy contents of the most frequently ordered meals from the most popular cuisines in non-chain restaurants, together with equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants. Meals were obtained from restaurants in San Francisco, CA; Boston, MA; and Little Rock, AR, between 2011 and 2014. Meal energy content determined by bomb calorimetry. Regional and cuisine differences were assessed using a mixed model with restaurant nested within region×cuisine as the random factor. Paired t tests were used to evaluate differences between non-chain and chain meals, human energy requirements, and food database values. Meals from non-chain restaurants contained 1,205±465 kcal/meal, amounts that were not significantly different from equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants (+5.1%; P=0.41). There was a significant effect of cuisine on non-chain meal energy, and three of the four most popular cuisines (American, Italian, and Chinese) had the highest mean energy (1,495 kcal/meal). Ninety-two percent of meals exceeded typical energy requirements for a single eating occasion. Non-chain restaurants lacking nutrition information serve amounts of energy that are typically far in excess of human energy requirements for single eating occasions, and are equivalent to amounts served by the large-chain restaurants that have previously been criticized for providing excess energy. Restaurants in general, rather than specific categories of restaurant, expose patrons to

  13. The impact of a new McDonald's restaurant on eating behaviours and perceptions of local residents: A natural experiment using repeated cross-sectional data.

    Thornton, Lukar E; Ball, Kylie; Lamb, Karen E; McCann, Jennifer; Parker, Kate; Crawford, David A

    2016-05-01

    Neighbourhood food environments are posited as an important determinant of eating behaviours; however causality is difficult to establish based on existing studies. Using a natural experiment study design (incorporating repeated cross-sectional data), we tested whether the development of a new McDonald's restaurant increased the frequency of consumption of McDonald's products amongst local residents in the suburbs of Tecoma (site of a new McDonald's restaurant development) and Monbulk (control site) in Victoria, Australia. Across both sites, the reported frequency of McDonald's consumption did not change during the follow-up surveys. In the context explored, the development of a new McDonald's restaurant has not resulted in an increased consumption of McDonald's products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. North Carolina Chefs Who Cultivate Restaurant Gardens: A Population with a Hunger for Extension Information

    Sommerfeld, Kelsie; Bruce, Jackie; Jayaratne, Jay; Chapman, Ben; Gunter, Chris

    2016-01-01

    As part of a larger study designed to explore the gardening practices and educational needs of North Carolina chefs who cultivate restaurant gardens, the chefs' desired areas of knowledge and preferences for delivery of educational material were identified. As a result, a plan for North Carolina Cooperative Extension to use in developing…

  15. Correlates of Reported Use and Perceived Helpfulness of Calorie Information in Restaurants Among U.S. Adults.

    Oh, April; Nguyen, Anh Bao; Patrick, Heather

    2016-03-01

    This study reports correlates in reported use and helpfulness of calorie information, when available, in restaurants on a national scale in the United States for demographic behavioral and health-related conditions. This study is a secondary data analysis of the 2013 National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey data. United States. Adults (n = 3407). Menu labeling use and helpfulness; behavior change attempts; reported fruit, vegetable, and soda consumption; weight status; and chronic health conditions. Trends were identified in weighted logistic and linear regression models. U.S. adults who intended to lose weight (odds ratio [OR] = 5.01 [95% confidence interval 2.96, 8.46]), increase fruit (OR = 1.10 [.66, 1.84]) or vegetable consumption (OR = 2.25 [1.32, 3.83]), or reduce soda consumption (OR = 1.67 [1.11, 2.51]) were more likely to report using menu-labeling information when available. More women reported calorie information was helpful when ordering (p restaurants. Following publication of final rules for federal menu-labeling legislation and implementation, further surveillance of public response to this information may inform message framing and educational interventions to promote use of calorie information on menu boards. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Exploratory Analysis of Fast-Food Chain Restaurant Menus Before and After Implementation of Local Calorie-Labeling Policies, 2005–2011

    Namba, Alexa; Leonberg, Beth L.; Wootan, Margo G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Since 2008, several states and municipalities have implemented regulations requiring provision of nutrition information at chain restaurants to address obesity. Although early research into the effect of such labels on consumer decisions has shown mixed results, little information exists on the restaurant industry’s response to labeling. The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate the effect of menu labeling on fast-food menu offerings over 7 years, from 2005 through 2011. Methods Menus from 5 fast-food chains that had outlets in jurisdictions subject to menu-labeling laws (cases) were compared with menus from 4 fast-food chains operating in jurisdictions not requiring labeling (controls). A trend analysis assessed whether case restaurants improved the healthfulness of their menus relative to the control restaurants. Results Although the overall prevalence of “healthier” food options remained low, a noteworthy increase was seen after 2008 in locations with menu-labeling laws relative to those without such laws. Healthier food options increased from 13% to 20% at case locations while remaining static at 8% at control locations (test for difference in the trend, P = .02). Since 2005, the average calories for an à la carte entrée remained moderately high (approximately 450 kilocalories), with less than 25% of all entrées and sides qualifying as healthier and no clear systematic differences in the trend between chain restaurants in case versus control areas (P ≥ .50). Conclusion These findings suggest that menu labeling has thus far not affected the average nutritional content of fast-food menu items, but it may motivate restaurants to increase the availability of healthier options. PMID:23786908

  17. Exploratory analysis of fast-food chain restaurant menus before and after implementation of local calorie-labeling policies, 2005-2011.

    Namba, Alexa; Auchincloss, Amy; Leonberg, Beth L; Wootan, Margo G

    2013-06-20

    Since 2008, several states and municipalities have implemented regulations requiring provision of nutrition information at chain restaurants to address obesity. Although early research into the effect of such labels on consumer decisions has shown mixed results, little information exists on the restaurant industry's response to labeling. The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate the effect of menu labeling on fast-food menu offerings over 7 years, from 2005 through 2011. Menus from 5 fast-food chains that had outlets in jurisdictions subject to menu-labeling laws (cases) were compared with menus from 4 fast-food chains operating in jurisdictions not requiring labeling (controls). A trend analysis assessed whether case restaurants improved the healthfulness of their menus relative to the control restaurants. Although the overall prevalence of "healthier" food options remained low, a noteworthy increase was seen after 2008 in locations with menu-labeling laws relative to those without such laws. Healthier food options increased from 13% to 20% at case locations while remaining static at 8% at control locations (test for difference in the trend, P = .02). Since 2005, the average calories for an à la carte entrée remained moderately high (approximately 450 kilocalories), with less than 25% of all entrées and sides qualifying as healthier and no clear systematic differences in the trend between chain restaurants in case versus control areas (P ≥ .50). These findings suggest that menu labeling has thus far not affected the average nutritional content of fast-food menu items, but it may motivate restaurants to increase the availability of healthier options.

  18. Half-size me? How calorie and price information influence ordering on restaurant menus with both half and full entrée portion sizes.

    Haws, Kelly L; Liu, Peggy J

    2016-02-01

    Many restaurants are increasingly required to display calorie information on their menus. We present a study examining how consumers' food choices are affected by the presence of calorie information on restaurant menus. However, unlike prior research on this topic, we focus on the effect of calorie information on food choices made from a menu that contains both full size portions and half size portions of entrées. This different focus is important because many restaurants increasingly provide more than one portion size option per entrée. Additionally, we examine whether the impact of calorie information differs depending on whether full portions are cheaper per unit than half portions (non-linear pricing) or whether they have a similar per unit price (linear pricing). We find that when linear pricing is used, calorie information leads people to order fewer calories. This decrease occurs as people switch from unhealthy full sized portions to healthy full sized portions, not to unhealthy half sized portions. In contrast, when non-linear pricing is used, calorie information has no impact on calories selected. Considering the impact of calorie information on consumers' choices from menus with more than one entrée portion size option is increasingly important given restaurant and legislative trends, and the present research demonstrates that calorie information and pricing scheme may interact to affect choices from such menus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutrition Labeling and Portion Size Information on Children's Menus in Fast-Food and Table-Service Chain Restaurants in London, UK

    Reeves, Sue; Wake, Yvonne; Zick, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate meals, price, nutritional content, and nutrition and portion size information available on children's menus in fast-food and table-service chain restaurants in London, since the United Kingdom does not currently require such information but may be initiating a voluntary guideline. Methods: Children's menus were assessed…

  20. A Vocabulary Analysis of the Restaurant Menus

    MIHUT Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The present paper explores the genre of restaurant menus by analyzing existing online lists of breakfast, lunch and dinner options. It shows that a menu is a reflection of the restaurant itself and its vocabulary, whether formal, casual or playful, matches the restaurant concept, location or theme. In addition to providing the food and drink items, menus can also be used to offer other information to the customers. The restaurant menu vocabulary describes the owner/chef's philosophy about foo...

  1. Barriers and facilitators of consumer use of nutrition labels at sit-down restaurant chains.

    Auchincloss, Amy H; Young, Candace; Davis, Andrea L; Wasson, Sara; Chilton, Mariana; Karamanian, Vanesa

    2013-12-01

    Numerous localities have mandated that chain restaurants post nutrition information at the point of purchase. However, some studies suggest that consumers are not highly responsive to menu labelling. The present qualitative study explored influences on full-service restaurant customers’ noticing and using menu labelling. Five focus groups were conducted with thirty-six consumers. A semi-structured script elicited barriers and facilitators to using nutrition information by showing excerpts of real menus from full-service chain restaurants. Participants were recruited from a full-service restaurant chain in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, in September 2011. Focus group participants were mostly female, African American, with incomes restaurants: nutrition knowledge, menu design and display, and normative attitudes and behaviours. Barriers to using labels were low prior knowledge of nutrition; displaying nutrition information using codes; low expectations of the nutritional quality of restaurant food; and restaurant discounts, promotions and social influences that overwhelmed interest in nutrition and reinforced disinterest in nutrition. Facilitators were higher prior knowledge of recommended daily intake; spending time reading the menu; having strong prior interest in nutrition/healthy eating; and being with people who reinforced dietary priorities. Menu labelling use may increase if consumers learn a few key recommended dietary reference values, understand basic energy intake/expenditure scenarios and if chain restaurants present nutrition information in a user-friendly way and promote healthier items.

  2. Energy contents of frequently ordered restaurant meals and comparison with human energy requirements and US Department of Agriculture database information: a multisite randomized study

    BACKGROUND: Excess energy intake from meals consumed away from home is implicated as a major contributor to obesity, and ~50% of US restaurants are individual or small-chain (non-chain) establishments that do not provide nutrition information. OBJECTIVE: To measure the energy content of frequently o...

  3. Neighborhood Disparities in the Restaurant Food Environment.

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Espino, Jennifer Valdivia; Meinen, Amy; Escaron, Anne L; Roubal, Anne; Nieto, Javier; Malecki, Kristen

    2016-11-01

    Restaurant meals account for a significant portion of the American diet. Investigating disparities in the restaurant food environment can inform targeted interventions to increase opportunities for healthy eating among those who need them most. To examine neighborhood disparities in restaurant density and the nutrition environment within restaurants among a statewide sample of Wisconsin households. Households (N = 259) were selected from the 2009-2010 Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), a population-based survey of Wisconsin adults. Restaurants in the household neighborhood were enumerated and audited using the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey for Restaurants (NEMS-R). Neighborhoods were defined as a 2- and 5-mile street-distance buffer around households in urban and non-urban areas, respectively. Adjusted linear regression models identified independent associations between sociodemographic household characteristics and neighborhood restaurant density and nutrition environment scores. On average, each neighborhood contained approximately 26 restaurants. On average, restaurants obtained 36.1% of the total nutrition environment points. After adjusting for household characteristics, higher restaurant density was associated with both younger and older household average age (P restaurant food environment in Wisconsin neighborhoods varies by age, race, and urbanicity, but offers ample room for improvement across socioeconomic groups and urbanicity levels. Future research must identify policy and environmental interventions to promote healthy eating in all restaurants, especially in young and/or rural neighborhoods in Wisconsin.

  4. Case study of restaurant successfully designed, constructed, and operated for excellent dining acoustics

    Bollard, Paul; Des Jardins, Stephen

    2005-09-01

    Prior to the construction of La Provence Restaurant in Roseville, California in 2004, the owner, Stephen Des Jardins, traveled with his cook, architect, and engineer to the Provence Region of France to study the cuisine, architecture, and acoustics of the local restaurants. This information was incorporated into the design, construction, and operation of his restaurant, with acoustical design assistance provided by the author, Paul Bollard. The result of the owner's painstaking attention to detail is a restaurant which has received very positive reviews for its architecture, quality of food, service, and acoustic ambience. This paper documents the measures included in the construction of the restaurant to ensure that the building acoustics enhance the dining experience, rather than detract from it. Photographs of acoustic treatments are included, as are reverberation time (RT60) test results and ambient noise level measurement results.

  5. Work at Restaurant No. 1

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    Concerning the replacement of the flooring in the free-flow level of Restaurant No. 1, we would like to inform you that access to the restaurant from the Main Building will be closed between 31 January and 6 February. During this period, access to the restaurant will be through the south entrance, opposite Building 40 (see map); paper cups and plates will be used, and the opening hours for lunch will be extended from 11.00 am. to 3 pm in order to guarantee service to the users. Thank you for your understanding and cooperation. GS/SE Group

  6. The Analysis of Restaurant Industry In Kuopio Region

    Tang, Yuanjia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract “Hunger breeds discontentment”, people are the basis of a country and food is paramount necessity for people. With the rapid development of restaurant industry, nowadays restaurants already spread all over the world The objective of the thesis was to collect information from existed restaurants and forecast the restaurant industry developing trend in the future. The thesis was also prepared for the new entrepreneurs who want to open new restaurants in Kuopio. Before they open...

  7. The Use of Market Feasibility Studies in the Restaurant Industry for Small and Medium-sized Restaurants

    Kolster, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The goals of this thesis are to provide the reader with new information about market feasibility studies in the restaurant industry and to design a market feasibility template for the international restaurant industry which can be used for small and medium-sized restaurants before entering the market. The objectives are to define the ideal factors of a market feasibility study for the international restaurant industry, to learn and become an expert in feasibility studies for the restaurant i...

  8. Restaurant menu labeling use among adults--17 states, 2012.

    Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee; Pan, Liping; Maynard, Leah; Kumar, Gayathri; Park, Sohyun

    2014-07-11

    Many persons underestimate the calories in restaurant foods. Increased attention has been given to menu labeling (ML) as a way to provide consumers with point-of-purchase information that can help them reduce calorie intake and make healthier dietary choices. In 2010, a federal law was passed requiring restaurants with 20 or more establishments to display calorie information on menus and menu boards.* The regulations to implement this federal law have not been finalized, but some states and local jurisdictions have implemented their own ML policies, and many restaurants have already begun providing ML. To assess fast food and chain restaurant ML use by state and by demographic subgroup, CDC examined self-reported ML use by adults in 17 states that used the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Menu Labeling optional module in the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. Based on approximately 97% of adult BRFSS respondents who noticed ML information at restaurants, the estimated overall proportion of ML users in the 17 states was 57.3% (range = 48.7% in Montana to 61.3% in New York). The prevalence of ML use was higher among women than men for all states; the patterns varied by age group and race/ethnicity across states. States and public health professionals can use these findings to track the use of ML and to develop targeted interventions to increase awareness and use of ML among nonusers.

  9. Three Renowned Turkish Restaurant

    2000-01-01

    Taha Toros Arşivi, Dosya No: 112-Lokantalar İstanbul Kalkınma Ajansı (TR10/14/YEN/0033) İstanbul Development Agency (TR10/14/YEN/0033) Beyti Meat Restaurant, Divan Restaurant, Park Şamdan Beyti Meat Restaurant Divan Restaurant Park Şamdan

  10. State preemption of local smoke-free laws in government work sites, private work sites, and restaurants - United States, 2005-2009.

    2010-02-05

    Smoke-free policies (i.e., policies that completely eliminate smoking in indoor workplaces and public places) result in health benefits, including preventing heart attacks. Preemptive legislation at the state level prohibits localities from enacting laws that vary from state law or are more stringent. A Healthy People 2010 objective (27-19) is to eliminate state laws that preempt stronger local tobacco control laws. A 2005 CDC review found that little progress was being made toward reducing the number of state laws preempting local smoking restrictions in three indoor settings: government work sites, private-sector work sites, and restaurants. These three settings were selected for analysis because they are settings that often are addressed by state and local smoking restrictions and because they are major settings where nonsmoking workers and patrons are exposed to secondhand smoke. This report updates the previous analysis and summarizes changes that occurred from December 31, 2004, to December 31, 2009, in state laws that preempt local smoke-free laws for the same three settings. During that period, the number of states preempting local smoking restrictions in at least one of these three settings decreased from 19 to 12. In contrast with the 2005 findings, this decrease indicates progress toward achieving the goal of eliminating state laws preempting local smoking restrictions. Further progress could result in additional reductions in secondhand smoke exposure.

  11. From Menu to Mouth: Opportunities for Sodium Reduction in Restaurants

    Gunn, Janelle Peralez

    2014-01-01

    Restaurant foods can be a substantial source of sodium in the American diet. According to the Institute of Medicine, the significant contribution made by restaurants and food service menu items to Americans’ sodium intake warrants targeted attention. Public health practitioners are uniquely poised to support sodium-reduction efforts in restaurants and help drive demand for lower-sodium products through communication and collaboration with restaurant and food service professionals and through incentives for restaurants. This article discusses the role of the public health practitioner in restaurant sodium reduction and highlights select strategies that have been taken by state and local jurisdictions to support this effort. PMID:24456646

  12. Emergence of distributed coordination in the Kolkata Paise Restaurant problem with finite information

    Ghosh, Diptesh; Chakrabarti, Anindya S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we study a large-scale distributed coordination problem and propose efficient adaptive strategies to solve the problem. The basic problem is to allocate finite number of resources to individual agents in the absence of a central planner such that there is as little congestion as possible and the fraction of unutilized resources is reduced as far as possible. In the absence of a central planner and global information, agents can employ adaptive strategies that uses only a finite knowledge about the competitors. In this paper, we show that a combination of finite information sets and reinforcement learning can increase the utilization fraction of resources substantially.

  13. Nutritional And Health Information Released To Consumers By Commercial Fast Food And Full Service Restaurants [informações Nutricionais E De Saúde Disponibilizadas Aos Consumidores Por Restaurantes Comerciais, Tipo Fast Food E Full Service

    Maestro V.; Salay E.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify and characterize nutritional and health information made available in commercial restaurants in the city of Campinas, SP, Brazil. Pre-tested questionnaires were used to interview twenty managers of fast food and ninety-four of full service restaurants, between October and December of 2005, located in the five administrative regions of Campinas. After collecting the information, a databank was created using Microsoft Excel software. The chi-squa...

  14. Economic effect of restaurant smoking restrictions on restaurant business in Massachusetts, 1992 to 1998.

    Bartosch, William J; Pope, G C

    2002-06-01

    To determine if restaurant business declines or improves after the implementation of restrictive restaurant smoking policies. Analysis used a pre/post-quasi-experimental design that compared town meals tax receipts before and after the imposition of highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies in adopting versus non-adopting communities. The effect of restaurant smoking policies was estimated using a fixed effects regression model, entering a panel of 84 months of data for the 239 towns in the study. A separate model estimated the effect of restaurant smoking policies on establishments that served alcohol. Change in the trend in meals tax revenue (adjusted for population) following the implementation of highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies. The local adoption of restrictive restaurant smoking policies did not lead to a measurable deviation from the strong positive trend in revenue between 1992 and 1998 that restaurants in Massachusetts experienced. Controlling for other less restrictive restaurant smoking policies did not change this finding. Similar results were found for only those establishments that served alcoholic beverages. Highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies do not have a significant effect on a community's level of meal receipts, indicating that claims of community wide restaurant business decline under such policies are unwarranted.

  15. Attitudes towards passive smoking at restaurants and effects of the provision of information: A comparison between smokers and non-smokers via a web survey.

    Yoshikawa, Reiko; Igarashi, Ataru; Goto, Rei; Suwa, Kiyomi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our objectives were to conduct a web-based survey using adult participants to investigate 1) differences in attitudes towards smoking in the presence of non-smokers between smokers and non-smokers and 2) the potential impact of knowledge regarding the harmful effects of smoking and secondhand smoke (SHS) on smoker behavior in a restaurant.Method Japanese smokers and non-smokers aged 20 to 69 were separately sampled and both groups were randomly allocated to either a knowledge group or a control group. The participants were asked to complete an online questionnaire to capture their attitudes and how they think they would behave in a restaurant where it was not clear whether smoking is prohibited or not. Data were analyzed using a t-test for numerical variables and a χ 2 test for categorical variables. Logistic regression analysis was also conducted to elucidate the factors influencing the smoking behavior near non-smokers.Results Overall, 2,157 participants were surveyed (smokers, n=1,084; non-smokers, n=1,073). Among smokers who intended to smoke in the restaurant, 24.8% answered that they would ask for permission from nearby persons before lighting up. However, only 2.8% of non-smokers had ever actually been asked for such permission. The percentage of smokers who would smoke in the restaurant was significantly lower in the knowledge group (16.4%) than the control group (22.8%). The most common reason for refraining from smoking was a lack of an ashtray on the table in both groups. Among the non-smokers, 37.4% of the knowledge group and 27.6% of the control group answered that they did not like nearby smoking. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that smoking in restaurants was significantly associated with nicotine dependence, household income, pregnancy, smoking place in the home, age, and SHS knowledge.Conclusion This study suggested that most non-smokers do not inform smokers that they do not like nearby smoking. It was also

  16. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  17. Helping consumers make more healthful food choices: consumer views on modifying food labels and providing point-of-purchase nutrition information at quick-service restaurants.

    Lando, Amy M; Labiner-Wolfe, Judith

    2007-01-01

    To understand consumer (1) interest in nutrition information on food labels and quick-service restaurant menu boards and (2) reactions to modifying this information to help highlight calories and more healthful choices. Eight consumer focus groups, using a guide and stimuli. Focus group discussions in 4 US cities. A total of 68 consumers, with 7 to 10 per focus group. Authors prepared detailed summaries of discussions based on observation. Video recordings and transcripts were used to cross-check summaries. Data were systematically reviewed, synthesized, and analyzed. Consumer views on alternative presentations of nutrition information on packaged food items and quick-service restaurant menu boards. Participants (1) were interested in having nutrition information available, but would not use it at every eating occasion; (2) thought that food products typically consumed at 1 eating occasion should be labeled as a single serving; and (3) indicated that an icon on labels and menu boards that signaled more healthful options could be helpful. Findings provide a basis for the development of more systematic studies to better understand whether alternative presentations of nutrition information would help consumers.

  18. The effect of incidental information on consumer behavior: an illustration with the choice of a meal in a restaurant

    Ardiccioni Renzo; Jacob Céline; Guéguen Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Some studies have shown that figurative cues, presented in the environment of somebody, led to affect his/her later behaviour. This effect was applied to consumer behavior. In a restaurant various figurative objects related to the sea (a boat or a sailor's picture, a napkin with a boat and poetry related to the sea) or not (control condition) were present in the environment. Results show that figurative cues related to the sea increased the consumption of fish dishes.

  19. Management of Chinese restaurant

    Cui , Longbo

    2009-01-01

    With Chinese economy developing rapidly, the Chinese restaurant is under the spotlight, but the management of Chinese restaurant is weak at the moment, especially on the service management, which is an important part of service management in the Chinese restaurant. On the other hand, the managers of Chinese restaurant should pay more attention on the service management for instance brand, service innovation. Service management is core and essential concept for every service company recently, ...

  20. Transformational and transactional leadership and problem solving in restaurant industry

    Huhtala, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The study tries to give information on the leadership behavior of restaurant managers in their problem solving. The results of the study were collected by evaluating three restaurant managers by interviewing them. The restaurant managers’ answers were compared to transformational and transactional leadership model and the aspects of it. Their problem solving skills were evaluated by the help of a rational and creative problem solving model. The study showed that restaurant managers have both ...

  1. Restaurants closed over Christmas

    2011-01-01

    The restaurants will be closed during the Christmas holiday period : please note that all three CERN Restaurants will be closed from 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 December until Wednesday, 4 January inclusive. The Restaurants will reopen on Thursday, 5 January 2012.

  2. Dual Nation : Is the restaurant suited for franchise?

    Gudmundsson, Erik; Jönsson, Marcus; Björnberg, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    Problem Dual Nation is a local restaurant and pub located in the centre of Helsingborg. The seven year old business has grown fast and established itself as a successful restaurant in the city. After a initial growth period, the restaurant has now reached a point where a change in its structure, strategy or system must be performed in order to witness renewed growth. A popular business system for expanding restaurants is the concept of franchise. Is the restau-rant suitable for such an expans...

  3. Information and Communication Technology Clusters, Local Firm ...

    Information and Communication Technology Clusters, Local Firm Performance, and Employment Generation. As countries steadily increase the share and value of knowledge, information, and services in their economies, governments have been crafting policies to attract foreign investment and establish large ...

  4. Searching LOGIN, the Local Government Information Network.

    Jack, Robert F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a computer-based information retrieval and electronic messaging system produced by Control Data Corporation now being used by government agencies and other organizations. Background of Local Government Information Network (LOGIN), database structure, types of LOGIN units, searching LOGIN (intersect, display, and list commands), and how…

  5. Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes.

    Condrasky, Marge; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Flood, Julie E; Rolls, Barbara J

    2007-08-01

    The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76% of chefs thought that they served "regular" portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.

  6. Restaurant Selection in Dublin

    Cullen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to investigate the selection process used by consumers when choosing a restaurant to dine. This study examined literature on consumer behaviour, restaurant selection, and decision-making, underpinning the contention that service quality is linked to the consumer’s selection of a restaurant. It supports the utility theories that consumers buy bundles of attributes that simultaneously combined represent a certain level of service quality at a certain p...

  7. Development of restaurant serviceology based on the methodology of general theory of service

    Glushchenko V.; Glushchenko I.; Katz S.; Olshevskaya K.; Pryazhnikova A.; Stashkova E.

    2018-01-01

    The positions of restaurant service (service in restaurant business — restaurantology) are formed as a scientific basis for designing a business and assessing the quality of services in restaurant business, developing the service sector in restaurant business, exploring and forming theoretical bases for the development of economy and management in the restaurant business in the globalization of the market for such a kind of services, development of service and information technologies and com...

  8. ELECTRONIC ACCOUNTING INFORMATION IN LOCAL PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

    Rodica Gabriela Blidişel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major changes in information technologies characterize the current period through which humanity creates the conditions shift from information society to the knowledge. In this context of the changing of the public administration through the implementation of ITC and the reform that lead to the new public management, our paper wants to see the development of E-governance in Romanian local public administration and the influence of the main financial indicators on e-governance elements. Countries adopt e-governance in ways that reinforce traditional bureaucratic structures, cultures and links from administration to citizens and politics, in some cases making these traditional forms more responsive. The paper studies the accounting information disclosed on the internet sites of public sector entities. The research use an empirical approach to test impact of the quality of accounting information on e-financial reporting in public sector. The research use a quantitative methodology, based on surveys and author's observations. The methods chosen in this paper are reliable for this empirical study that tries to identify at a national level the problems that could improve the financial information disclosed by the public sector. The paper aims to measure the financial performance in local public administration and the main indicators of e-governance. The main objective of the paper is to make a model that demonstrates the impact of the local public administration financial performance on the e-governance. Due to the fact that the main problem of the Romanian local public administration is the lack of performance tools that could improve the e-governance, the research wants use an empirical approach to test the impact of the financial performance on the local public administration on e-governance. The research use a quantitative methodology, based on surveys and author's observations.

  9. Protecting information on local area networks

    Schweitzer, James A

    1988-01-01

    Protecting Information on Local Area Networks presents the various types of networks and explains why they are being expanded at such a rapid pace. This book considers how management can gain control of the valuable network-services information resources generally available.Organized into three parts encompassing seven chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various networks and their operations. This text then discusses the appropriate management actions to ensure some control over the use of networks and the business information resource. Other chapters consider the management rat

  10. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  11. SUCCESS FACTORS OF A CHINESE RESTAURANT

    Xu, Peipei

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The thesis serves two main purposes. First, it aims to find out the factors that make the Chinese restaurant Dragon Sheng succeed. Second, its objective is to know customers’ satisfaction of Dragon Sheng. The comprehensive literature review traces the management in restaurant, brand building, service design, and customer relationship development. The primary data was collected through qualitative research method and personal interview were applied to collect information about...

  12. The information paradox and the locality bound

    Giddings, Steven B.; Lippert, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Hawking's argument for information loss in black hole evaporation rests on the assumption of independent Hilbert spaces for the interior and exterior of a black hole. We argue that such independence cannot be established without incorporating strong gravitational effects that undermine locality and invalidate the use of quantum field theory in a semiclassical background geometry. These considerations should also play a role in a deeper understanding of horizon complementarity

  13. Nutrition-labeling regulation impacts on restaurant environments.

    Saelens, Brian E; Chan, Nadine L; Krieger, James; Nelson, Young; Boles, Myde; Colburn, Trina A; Glanz, Karen; Ta, Myduc L; Bruemmer, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    Recent attempts to improve the healthfulness of away-from-home eating include regulations requiring restaurants to post nutrition information. The impact of such regulations on restaurant environments is unknown. To examine changes in restaurant environments from before to after nutrition-labeling regulation in a newly regulated county versus a nonregulated county. Using the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey-Restaurant version audit, environments within the same quick-service chain restaurants were evaluated in King County (regulated) before and 6 and 18 months after regulation enforcement and in Multnomah County (nonregulated) restaurants over a 6-month period. Data were collected in 2008-2010 and analyses conducted in 2011. Overall availability of healthy options and facilitation of healthy eating did not increase differentially in King County versus Multnomah County restaurants aside from the substantial increase in onsite nutrition information posting in King County restaurants required by the new regulation. Barriers to healthful eating decreased in King County relative to Multnomah County restaurants, particularly in food-oriented establishments. King County restaurants demonstrated modest increases in signage that promotes healthy eating, although the frequency of such promotion remained low, and the availability of reduced portions decreased in these restaurants. The healthfulness of children's menus improved modestly over time, but not differentially by county. A restaurant nutrition-labeling regulation was accompanied by some, but not uniform, improvements in other aspects of restaurant environments in the regulated compared to the nonregulated county. Additional opportunities exist for improving the healthfulness of away-from-home eating beyond menu labeling. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Restaurant closures during holiday period

    2015-01-01

    CERN restaurant opening times on Friday, 1 May: Restaurant No. 1 will be opened from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. Restaurants No. 2 and No. 3 will be closed.   CERN restaurant opening times during the Ascension weekend: Restaurant No. 1 will be open from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. on Thursday, 14 and Friday 15 May. Restaurant No. 2 will be closed on Thursday, 14 May and open on Friday, 15 May until 3.30 p.m. (no table service). Restaurant No. 3 will be closed.   CERN restaurant opening times on Whit Monday, 25 May: Restaurant No. 1 will be open from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. Restaurants No. 2 and No. 3 will be closed.

  15. Comparing nutrition environments in bodegas and fast food restaurants

    Neckerman, Kathryn M.; Lovasi, Laszlo; Yousefzadeh, Paulette; Sheehan, Daniel; Milinkovic, Karla; Baecker, Aileen; Bader, Michael D. M.; Weiss, Christopher; Lovasi, Gina S.; Rundle, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Many small grocery stores or “bodegas” sell prepared or ready-to-eat items, filling a similar niche in the food environment as fast food restaurants. However, little comparative information is available about the nutrition environments of bodegas and fast food outlets. This study compared the nutrition environments of bodegas and national chain fast food restaurants using a common audit instrument, the Nutrition Environment Measures Study in Restaurants (NEMS-R) protocol. The analytic sample ...

  16. Restaurant closures: summer 2014

    2014-01-01

    Restaurant 2 Table service/brasserie: closed from Monday 28 July to Friday 12 September (open upon reservation for groups of 20+)   Snack bars Bldg. 54: closed from Monday 7 July to Friday 12 September (self-service Nespresso machine available) Bldg. 40: closed every day at 4.30 p.m instead of 5 p.m. from Monday 7 July to Friday 12 September   Jeûne Genevois Restaurant 2, Restaurant 3, Bldg. 6, Bldg. 13, Bldg. 30 and Bldg. 54 will all be closed 11 and 12 September 2014 Bldg. 40 and Restaurant 1 will remain open

  17. Special restaurant opening times

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    1-EASTER Restaurant No. 1 (Novae) will be closed from Friday, 21 March to Monday, 24 March inclusive and will re-open at 7.00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25 March. Restaurant No. 2 (DSR) will remain open during the four days in question (the opening hours can be consulted at: http://resto2.web.cern.ch/resto2/Events/easter2008.html 2-ASCENSION Restaurant No. 2 (DSR) will be closed from Thursday, 1st May to Friday, 2 May. Restaurant No. 2 (Novae) will remain open during the two days in question (from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. on the Thursday and from 7.00 till midnight, as usual, on the Friday).

  18. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  19. RESTAURANT No. 1

    2002-01-01

    Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant no. 1 from Monday, February 4 to Sunday, March 3, 2002 : from Monday to Friday 07h00 - 23h00 Saturday / Sunday 08h00 - 21h00 Hot meals will be served between 11h30 and 14h00, then from 18h00 to 19h30. Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  20. Restaurant challenge offers healthful meal options and builds diabetes awareness.

    Blair, Angela M; Drass, Janice A; Stone, Marylou; Rhoades, Deborah; Baldwin, Susan A; Russ, Kelsey M

    2011-01-01

    The Frederick Restaurant Challenge is an innovative project based on a collaborative effort among community organizations and partners designed to offer delicious healthful meal options at local restaurants during the month of November for American Diabetes Month. Local restaurants were challenged to participate and submitted recipes for healthful meals to the Frederick County Diabetes Coalition for review by registered dietitians. Diners voted on meals to determine the challenge winner(s), and were eligible to win prizes as well. Publicity prior to and during the month was effective in creating positive news about healthful meals when eating out, raised awareness about diabetes, and provided restaurants with desirable advertising opportunities. Feedback from restaurants and diners was overwhelmingly positive. The purpose of this article is to describe this successful low-budget project to encourage its replication in local communities. The Frederick Restaurant Challenge proved to be a very successful, innovative, low-budget project that met its intended goals: to develop healthful meal options for people with diabetes (or for anyone wishing to eat healthier); to demonstrate that healthful food can taste delicious; and to encourage restaurants to continue offering healthful options on their menus beyond the challenge month. Community interventions such as the Frederick Restaurant Challenge offer unique and important strategies for affecting change and raising awareness not only for people with diabetes but also for the entire community.

  1. Impacts of social media in restaurant businesses : A case study of restaurants based on Oulu region

    Timilsina, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Social media’s acceptance rate has been increasing day by day. All kinds of business are adopting social media as crucial tool for implementing business and marketing strategies. This research is done to highlight the impacts of social media in restaurants of Oulu based restaurants. The main objective of this thesis is to examine the impacts social media has in business and how social media is influencing business activities. Furthermore, this research provides a brief information of soci...

  2. Kajian Pustaka Mengenai Restaurant Atmosphere

    Adeline Agoes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Restaurant is one of the businesses that support tourism development. Restaurants nowadays don’t only provide food, but also the service and atmosphere to their customers. The purpose of this study is to discover theaspects defining restaurant atmosphere and the implications of restaurant atmosphere to other particular aspects related to restaurant business. This article is written based on a study conducted through a literature review. Through the examination, it is found that the atmosphere of a restaurant is one important aspect and can be considered as a competitive advantage as well as one of the determinants of customer satisfaction.

  3. Restaurants With Calories Displayed On Menus Had Lower Calorie Counts Compared To Restaurants Without Such Labels.

    Bleich, Sara N; Wolfson, Julia A; Jarlenski, Marian P; Block, Jason P

    2015-11-01

    Beginning in December 2016, calorie labeling on menus will be mandatory for US chain restaurants and many other establishments that serve food, such as ice cream shops and movie theaters. But before the federal mandate kicks in, several large chain restaurants have begun to voluntarily display information about the calories in the items on their menus. This increased transparency may be associated with lower overall calorie content of offered items. This study used data for the period 2012-14 from the MenuStat project, a data set of menu items at sixty-six of the largest US restaurant chains. We compared differences in calorie counts of food items between restaurants that voluntarily implemented national menu labeling and those that did not. We found that the mean per item calorie content in all years was lower for restaurants that voluntarily posted information about calories (the differences were 139 calories in 2012, 136 in 2013, and 139 in 2014). New menu items introduced in 2013 and 2014 showed a similar pattern. Calorie labeling may have important effects on the food served in restaurants by compelling the introduction of lower-calorie items. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. Restaurants With Calories Displayed On Menus Had Lower Calorie Counts Compared To Restaurants Without Such Labels

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.; Jarlenski, Marian P.; Block, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in December 2016, calorie labeling on menus will be mandatory for US chain restaurants and many other establishments that serve food, such as ice cream shops and movie theaters. But before the federal mandate kicks in, several large chain restaurants have begun to voluntarily display information about the calories in the items on their menus. This increased transparency may be associated with lower overall calorie content of offered items. This study used data for the period 2012–14 from the MenuStat project, a data set of menu items at sixty-six of the largest US restaurant chains. We compared differences in calorie counts of food items between restaurants that voluntarily implemented national menu labeling and those that did not. We found that the mean per item calorie content in all years was lower for restaurants that voluntarily posted information about calories (the differences were 139 calories in 2012, 136 in 2013, and 139 in 2014). New menu items introduced in 2013 and 2014 showed a similar pattern. Calorie labeling may have important effects on the food served in restaurants by compelling the introduction of lower-calorie items. PMID:26526245

  5. Summer Restaurant opening times

    2015-01-01

    Restaurant No. 1: Open as usual in July and August. Open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois).   Restaurant No. 2: Open as usual in July and August. Closed on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois) and Friday, 11 September. The Brasserie (table service) will be closed from Monday, 4 August to Friday, 11 September.   Restaurant No. 3: Open as usual in July and August, but closed on Saturday, 1 August; Saturday, 15 August; Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois); and Friday, 11 September.   Snack bar in Building 54: Closed from Monday, 4 August to Friday, 11 September.   Snack bars in Buildings 13, 30 and 6: Closed on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois) and Friday, 11 September.

  6. The Customer is Always Right, Right?A Look at How Yelp Has Taken Hold of the Boston Restaurant Industry

    Rachel DeSimone

    2015-01-01

    The Internet and mobile availability has changed the restaurant review game. Local Boston chefs and restaurant managers reflect on the pros and cons of such outlets, like Yelp, on their businesses and menus.

  7. The Customer is Always Right, Right?A Look at How Yelp Has Taken Hold of the Boston Restaurant Industry

    Rachel DeSimone

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet and mobile availability has changed the restaurant review game. Local Boston chefs and restaurant managers reflect on the pros and cons of such outlets, like Yelp, on their businesses and menus.

  8. Ananda Restaurant Wine List 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementing t...

  9. Ananda Restaurant Value Menu 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementing t...

  10. Ananda Restaurant Lunch Menu 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementing t...

  11. Pembangunan Model Restaurant Management System

    Fredy Jingga; Natalia Limantara

    2014-01-01

    Model design for Restaurant Management System aims to help in restaurant business process, where Restaurant Management System (RMS) help the waitress and chef could interact each other without paper limitation.  This Restaurant Management System Model develop using Agile Methodology and developed based on PHP Programming Langguage. The database management system is using MySQL. This web-based application model will enable the waitress and the chef to interact in realtime, from the time they a...

  12. Change in trans fatty acid content of fast-food purchases associated with New York City's restaurant regulation: a pre-post study.

    Angell, Sonia Y; Cobb, Laura K; Curtis, Christine J; Konty, Kevin J; Silver, Lynn D

    2012-07-17

    Dietary trans fat increases risk for coronary heart disease. In 2006, New York City (NYC) passed the first regulation in the United States restricting trans fat use in restaurants. To assess the effect of the NYC regulation on the trans and saturated fat content of fast-food purchases. Cross-sectional study that included purchase receipts matched to available nutritional information and brief surveys of adult lunchtime restaurant customers conducted in 2007 and 2009, before and after implementation of the regulation. 168 randomly selected NYC restaurant locations of 11 fast-food chains. Adult restaurant customers interviewed in 2007 and 2009. Change in mean grams of trans fat, saturated fat, trans plus saturated fat, and trans fat per 1000 kcal per purchase, overall and by chain type. The final sample included 6969 purchases in 2007 and 7885 purchases in 2009. Overall, mean trans fat per purchase decreased by 2.4 g (95% CI, -2.8 to -2.0 g; P restaurant was located was not associated with changes. Fast-food restaurants that were included may not be representative of all NYC restaurants. The introduction of a local restaurant regulation was associated with a substantial and statistically significant decrease in the trans fat content of purchases at fast-food chains, without a commensurate increase in saturated fat. Restaurant patrons from high- and low-poverty neighborhoods benefited equally. However, federal regulation will be necessary to fully eliminate population exposure to industrial trans fat sources. City of New York and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Eating Research program.

  13. Location-based social networking media for restaurant promotion and food review using mobile application

    Luhur H.S.; Widjaja N.D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is focusing on the development of a mobile application for searching restaurants and promotions with location based and social networking features. The main function of the application is to search restaurant information. Other functions are also available in this application such as add restaurant, add promotion, add photo, add food review, and other features including social networking features. The restaurant and promotion searching application will be developed under Android pl...

  14. Developing and Implementing "Waupaca Eating Smart": A Restaurant and Supermarket Intervention to Promote Healthy Eating Through Changes in the Food Environment.

    Escaron, Anne L; Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Riggall, Ann Josie; Meinen, Amy; Hall, Beverly; Nieto, F Javier; Nitzke, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Restaurants and food stores are suitable settings for healthy eating interventions. A community-academic partnership developed and implemented "Waupaca Eating Smart" (WES), a healthy eating program in restaurants and supermarkets of a rural, Midwest community. Previous interventions targeted either restaurants or small food stores nearly all in urban areas. Intervention design and implementation is rarely documented, making replication difficult for interested researchers and communities. In this article, we report the activities we undertook to develop and implement WES. Working with a local nutrition and activity coalition, we used evidence-based strategies guided by the social ecological model and social marketing principles to inform the content of WES. Formative assessment included a review of the literature, statewide key informant interviews and focus groups with restaurant and food store operators and patrons, a local community survey, and interviews with prospective WES businesses. WES was implemented in seven restaurants and two supermarkets and evaluated for feasibility and acceptance using surveys and direct observation of WES implementation. Prior to this intervention, only one of seven restaurants had three or more meals that met WES nutrition criteria. By the end of the program, 38 meals were labeled and promoted to restaurant customers, and the team had staffed four side salad taste tests for supermarket customers. Four and 10 months after intervention launch, the majority of the program's strategies were observed in participating outlets, suggesting that these program's strategies are feasible and can be sustained. Operators reported strong satisfaction overall. A combined restaurant- and supermarket-based healthy eating intervention is feasible and positively valued in rural communities. Further research is needed to better understand how to foster sustainability of these interventions and their impact on customer food choices. © 2015 Society for

  15. Occupational Programs for the Restaurant/Hotel Business

    Hoenninger, Ronald W.; Riegel, Carl D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development of a Hotel and Restaurant Management Program, designed to provide career training, develop educational opportunities, and provide a forum through which the continuing education needs of the local hospitality industry could be assessed and evaluated. (TP)

  16. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant.

  17. 78 FR 20277 - Safety Zones & Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in Captain of the Port Long...

    2013-04-04

    .... Regulatory History and Information The Coast Guard promulgated safety zones and special local regulations for... first week of July. Location: Waters of the Connetquot River off Snapper Inn Restaurant, Oakdale, NY in...: Waters of Patchogue Bay off ``Lombardi's On the Bay'' restaurant, Patchogue, NY in approximate position...

  18. Contraceptive security, information flow, and local adaptations ...

    Methodology : Morocco was selected for the case study. The researchers had ready access to key informants and information about the Logistics Management Information System. Because the study had time and resource constraints, research included desktop reviews and interview, rather than data collection in the field.

  19. The Analysis of Service Quality, Innovation, and Corporate Image on Customer Loyalty of Ragey Von Von Restaurant

    Mongdong, Meidy Angel

    2015-01-01

    People always get hungry so they need food and people find themselves hungry with no time to cook, so they eat out. That€™s why booming the restaurant industry. The restaurant business in North Sulawesi especially in Tomohon have been growing rapidly, particulary minahasa restaurant that selling typical local food Tomohon or Manado because the majority is Christian people therefore many restaurant selling Minahasa food. Service quality, innovation and corporate image is very supportive of cus...

  20. Renovation work at Restaurant 1

    2006-01-01

    Due to the age of the present kitchen and freeflow installations in Restaurant 1, essential renovation work is due to be carried out. The work is scheduled to last from September 2006 to May 2007. Work on the self-service area of the restaurant will commence in November. Every effort will be made to minimise the inconvenience caused to users of the restaurant and we thank you in advance for your co-operation during this period.

  1. Renovation works at Restaurant 1

    2006-01-01

    Due to the age of the present kitchen and freeflow installations in Restaurant 1, essential renovations are due to be carried out. The planned period for this project is September 2006 to May 2007. Work on the self-service area of the restaurant will commence in November. Every effort will be made to minimise the inconvenience caused to users of the restaurant and we thank you in advance for your co-operation during this period.

  2. Assessment of the quality seen in a restaurant typical theme

    Francisco Alves Pinheiro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To ensure the satisfaction of external customers it is necessary to know their needs. In this perspective, these work objectives assess the perception of quality by the customer outside of a restaurant located in the a restaurant typical theme located in the square of food “Bodódromo” the city of Petrolina/Pe. For both this was a case study, using the model servqual, Parasuraman et al (1985, for removal of information. The results indicated a need for improvement in the services provided by the restaurant.

  3. Strategic plans for designing information systems under local government

    Raman Nair, R.

    1998-01-01

    In decentralized administration local bodies are concerned with various administrative, educational and development issues. So in local government the planning for use of technology have started to recognize the value of information. This study attempts to evolve technical guidelines for building up an information system under local government that has to provide networking services by connecting various offices and institutions like Block Panchayat Office, Village Panchayat Office, District...

  4. Amuse Restaurant Menus 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  5. Rasam Indian Restaurant: Menu

    Rasam Indian Restaurant

    2013-01-01

    Rasam Indian Restaurant is located in the Glasthule, a suburb of Dublin and opened in 2003. The objective is to serve high quality, authentic Indian cuisine. "We blend, roast and grind our own spices daily to provide a flavour that is unique to Rasam. Cooking Indian food is founded upon long held family traditions. The secret is in the varying elements of heat and spices, the tandoor clay oven is a hugely important fixture in our kitchen. Marinated meats are lowered into the oven on long m...

  6. Measuring transferring similarity via local information

    Yin, Likang; Deng, Yong

    2018-05-01

    Recommender systems have developed along with the web science, and how to measure the similarity between users is crucial for processing collaborative filtering recommendation. Many efficient models have been proposed (i.g., the Pearson coefficient) to measure the direct correlation. However, the direct correlation measures are greatly affected by the sparsity of dataset. In other words, the direct correlation measures would present an inauthentic similarity if two users have a very few commonly selected objects. Transferring similarity overcomes this drawback by considering their common neighbors (i.e., the intermediates). Yet, the transferring similarity also has its drawback since it can only provide the interval of similarity. To break the limitations, we propose the Belief Transferring Similarity (BTS) model. The contributions of BTS model are: (1) BTS model addresses the issue of the sparsity of dataset by considering the high-order similarity. (2) BTS model transforms uncertain interval to a certain state based on fuzzy systems theory. (3) BTS model is able to combine the transferring similarity of different intermediates using information fusion method. Finally, we compare BTS models with nine different link prediction methods in nine different networks, and we also illustrate the convergence property and efficiency of the BTS model.

  7. Lack of Healthy Food Options on Children’s Menus of Restaurants in the Health-Disparate Dan River Region of Virginia and North Carolina, 2013

    Olive, Nicole C.; Waters, Clarice N.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; You, Wen; Zoellner, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Interest has increased in understanding the types and healthfulness of restaurant foods for children, particularly in disadvantaged areas. The purpose of this community-based participatory research study was to describe the quality of restaurant food offered to children in a health-disparate region in Virginia and North Carolina and to determine if the availability of healthy foods differed by location (rural, urban) or by the predominant race (black, white, mixed race) of an area’s population. Methods Restaurants offering a children’s menu in the 3 counties in Virginia and North Carolina that make up the Dan River Region were identified by using state health department records. Research assistants reviewed menus using the Children’s Menu Assessment (CMA), a tool consisting of 29 scored items (possible score range, −4 to 21). Scores were calculated for each restaurant. We obtained information on the predominant race of the population at the block group level for all counties from 2010 US Census data. Results For the 137 restaurants studied, mean CMA scores were low (mean, 1.6; standard deviation [SD], 2.7), ranging from −4 to 9 of 21 possible points. Scores were lowest for restaurants in the predominantly black block groups (mean, 0.2; SD, 0.4) and significantly different from the scores for restaurants in the predominantly white (mean, 1.4; SD, 1.6) and mixed-race block groups (mean, 2.6; SD, 2.4) (F = 4.3; P < .05). Conclusion Children’s menus available in the Dan River Region lack healthy food options, particularly in predominantly black block groups. These study findings can contribute to regional efforts in policy development or environmental interventions for children’s food quality by the community-based participatory research partnership and help local stakeholders to determine possible strategies and solutions for improving local food options for children. PMID:25811495

  8. Activities Using a Restaurant Theme.

    Modlin, Ruth

    Designed for use with elementary students, 44 activities using a restaurant theme integrate creative thinking and decision-making skills with language arts, mathematics, and art. The activities, which can be used independently by the students, deal with types of restaurants, names and themes, floor plans, interior and exterior design, house…

  9. RESTAURANT No. 2 'New Look'

    2003-01-01

    The Restaurant Supervisory Committee (CSR) would like to thank the concession-holder for having seen to it that the restaurant and cafétéria will shortly take on a 'new look'. To mark the inuaguration, a little surprise has been prepared for the clientèle at lunch-time on Friday, February 21, 2003. CSR, tel. 77551.

  10. Consumer Estimation of Recommended and Actual Calories at Fast Food Restaurants

    Elbel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Recently, localities across the United States have passed laws requiring the mandatory labeling of calories in all chain restaurants, including fast food restaurants. This policy is set to be implemented at the federal level. Early studies have found these policies to be at best minimally effective in altering food choice at a population level. This paper uses receipt and survey data collected from consumers outside fast food restaurants in low-income communities in New York City (NYC) (which...

  11. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday 29 March and Monday 1st April 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP, bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance, bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday 30-31 March. They will reopen on Tuesday 2 April at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR, bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday 28 March, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning. Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  12. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEKEND

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2001-01-01

    As Friday 13 and Monday 16 April 2001 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP, bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Générale de Restauration, bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 April. They will reopen on Tuesday 17 April at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR, bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday 12 April, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no 1, which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.

  13. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday, March 29 and Monday, April 1st, 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, March 30 - 31. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 2 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday, March 28, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.   Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  14. The restaurant syndromes.

    Settipane, G A

    1987-01-01

    The Restaurant syndromes can be caused by five major factors: food allergens, sulfites, monosodium glutamate (MSG), tartrazine, and scombroidosis (and other seafood poisoning). A history of atopy and ingestion of known food allergens such as peanuts, egg, fish, and walnuts, together with positive results of skin tests or RAST to these foods, will favor a diagnosis of food allergy. Allergic reactions to peanuts have produced fatalities in minutes through an IgE mediated reaction. An extremely rapid onset (minutes) of symptoms consisting of flushing, bronchospasm and hypotension is consistent with a sulfite reaction. Burning, pressure, and tightness or numbness in the face, neck, and upper chest following ingestion of Chinese food favors a diagnosis of adverse reaction to MSG. Also, development of late onset bronchospasm (up to 14 hours) may be related to MSG reactions. Bronchospasm and urticaria in a patient with a history of aspirin intolerance suggests tartrazine sensitivity. If everyone ingesting a fish meal develops flushing, urticaria, pruritus, gastrointestinal complaints, or bronchospasm, this implies scombroidosis, ciguatera, or other seafood poisoning. Finally, severe headache or hypertension can result from ingestion of naturally occurring amines, such as tyramine (cheese, red wine) and phenylethylamine (chocolate). A double-blind oral challenge test may be the only way of confirming the diagnosis for most of the etiological factors of the Restaurant syndromes. The treatment of choice for acute reaction is epinephrine followed by antihistamine. Proper labeling and avoidance of these ingredients in sensitive individuals are the best preventive measures.

  15. Breakdown of local information processing may underlie isoflurane anesthesia effects.

    Wollstadt, Patricia; Sellers, Kristin K; Rudelt, Lucas; Priesemann, Viola; Hutt, Axel; Fröhlich, Flavio; Wibral, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The disruption of coupling between brain areas has been suggested as the mechanism underlying loss of consciousness in anesthesia. This hypothesis has been tested previously by measuring the information transfer between brain areas, and by taking reduced information transfer as a proxy for decoupling. Yet, information transfer is a function of the amount of information available in the information source-such that transfer decreases even for unchanged coupling when less source information is available. Therefore, we reconsidered past interpretations of reduced information transfer as a sign of decoupling, and asked whether impaired local information processing leads to a loss of information transfer. An important prediction of this alternative hypothesis is that changes in locally available information (signal entropy) should be at least as pronounced as changes in information transfer. We tested this prediction by recording local field potentials in two ferrets after administration of isoflurane in concentrations of 0.0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. We found strong decreases in the source entropy under isoflurane in area V1 and the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-as predicted by our alternative hypothesis. The decrease in source entropy was stronger in PFC compared to V1. Information transfer between V1 and PFC was reduced bidirectionally, but with a stronger decrease from PFC to V1. This links the stronger decrease in information transfer to the stronger decrease in source entropy-suggesting reduced source entropy reduces information transfer. This conclusion fits the observation that the synaptic targets of isoflurane are located in local cortical circuits rather than on the synapses formed by interareal axonal projections. Thus, changes in information transfer under isoflurane seem to be a consequence of changes in local processing more than of decoupling between brain areas. We suggest that source entropy changes must be considered whenever interpreting changes in information

  16. Interactive effects of reward sensitivity and residential fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption.

    Paquet, Catherine; Daniel, Mark; Knäuper, Bärbel; Gauvin, Lise; Kestens, Yan; Dubé, Laurette

    2010-03-01

    Local fast-food environments have been increasingly linked to obesity and related outcomes. Individuals who are more sensitive to reward-related cues might be more responsive to such environments. This study aimed to assess the moderating role of sensitivity to reward on the relation between residential fast-food restaurant exposure and fast-food consumption. Four hundred fifteen individuals (49.6% men; mean age: 34.7 y) were sampled from 7 Montreal census tracts stratified by socioeconomic status and French/English language. The frequency of fast-food restaurant visits in the previous week was self-reported. Sensitivity to reward was self-reported by using the Behavioral Activation System (BAS) scale. Fast-food restaurant exposure within 500 m of the participants' residence was determined by using a Geographic Information System. Main and interactive effects of the BAS and fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption were tested with logistic regression models that accounted for clustering of observations and participants' age, sex, education, and household income. Regression results showed a significant interaction between BAS and fast-food restaurant exposure (P food restaurant exposure and consumption was positive for the highest tertile (odds ratio: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.20, 1.84; P < 0.001) but null for the intermediate (odds ratio: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.80, 1.34; P = 0.81) and lowest (odds ratio: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.51, 1.37; P = 0.49) tertiles. Reward-sensitive individuals may be more responsive to unhealthful cues in their immediate environment.

  17. Elements of experience in a restaurant. Case: Restaurant Havis

    Lindholm, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to find out what kind of elements of experience can be found in a Finnish fish and seafood restaurant and what elements the customers find important. The thesis also attempts to examine the service delivery process and the importance of different touchpoints in the service delivery. The thesis goes through culinary trends and if these have a deep affect on visitors of the restaurant. The focus is put on three aspects of the restaurant, which are the food, the atmosph...

  18. Extracting local information from crowds through betting markets

    Weijs, Steven

    2015-04-01

    In this research, a set-up is considered in which users can bet against a forecasting agency to challenge their probabilistic forecasts. From an information theory standpoint, a reward structure is considered that either provides the forecasting agency with better information, paying the successful providers of information for their winning bets, or funds excellent forecasting agencies through users that think they know better. Especially for local forecasts, the approach may help to diagnose model biases and to identify local predictive information that can be incorporated in the models. The challenges and opportunities for implementing such a system in practice are also discussed.

  19. Local Information as a Resource in Distributed Quantum Systems

    Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Paweł; Horodecki, Ryszard; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Sende, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2003-03-01

    A new paradigm for distributed quantum systems where information is a valuable resource is developed. After finding a unique measure for information, we construct a scheme for its manipulation in analogy with entanglement theory. In this scheme, instead of maximally entangled states, two parties distill local states. We show that, surprisingly, the main tools of entanglement theory are general enough to work in this opposite scheme. Up to plausible assumptions, we show that the amount of information that must be lost during the protocol of concentration of local information can be expressed as the relative entropy distance from some special set of states.

  20. Mandating nutrient menu labeling in restaurants: potential public health benefits.

    Stran, Kimberly A; Turner, Lori W; Knol, Linda

    2013-03-01

    Many Americans have replaced home-cooked meals with fast food and restaurants meals. This contributes to increased incidences of overweight and obesity. Implementing policies that require restaurants to disclose nutrition information has the potential to improve nutrition knowledge and food behaviors. The purpose of this paper was to examine the potential health benefits of nutrient menu labeling in restaurants, the progress of this legislation and to provide results regarding the implementation of these policies. Data sources were obtained from a search of multiple databases including PubMed, Science Direct, Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar. Study inclusion criteria were publication in the past ten years, obesity prevention, and utilization of nutrition labeling on menus in restaurants. The initial policies to provide consumers with nutrition information in restaurant settings began at the state levels in 2006. These laws demonstrated success, other states followed, and a national law was passed and is being implemented. Mandating nutrient menu disclosure has the potential to influence a large number of people; this legislation has the opportunity to impact Americans who dine at a fast food or chain restaurant. Given the growing obesity epidemic, continued research is necessary to gauge the effectiveness of this new law and its effects on the health status of the American people.

  1. My Home Is My Stage: Restaurant Experiences in Two Estonian Lifestyle Enterprises

    Ester Võsu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses recent developments in the home-based lifestyle business featuring the example of two cases: Tammuri farm restaurant near Otepää in South Estonia, and home restaurant MerMer in Kolga-Aabla in North Estonia. We study the restaurants from a Goffmanian performance perspective, focusing on the lifestyle entrepreneur's viewpoint of creating a restaurant experience in their homes. Accordingly, the home and its surroundings are considered a setting in which food has an important role as a performance medium and multiple roles are enacted by a single entrepreneur as a performer. Freshness, quality and locality of food, homeliness and personalised service are used for creating a special home restaurant meal experience. The two cases also shed light on the dynamics of the concepts of home and lifestyle entrepreneurship in contemporary Estonia, challenging the understanding of restaurant cuisine and home cooking as oppositional practices of food preparation and consumption.

  2. My Home Is My Stage: Restaurant Experiences in Two Estonian Lifestyle Enterprises

    Ester Võsu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses recent developments in the home-based lifestyle business featuring the example of two cases: Tammuri farm restaurant near Otepää in South Estonia, and home restaurant MerMer in Kolga-Aabla in North Estonia. We study the restaurants from a Goffmanian performance perspective, focusing on the lifestyle entrepreneur's viewpoint of creating a restaurant experience in their homes. Accordingly, the home and its surroundings are considered a setting in which food has an important role as a performance medium and multiple roles are enacted by a single entrepreneur as a performer. Freshness, quality and locality of food, homeliness and personalised service are used for creating a special home restaurant meal experience. The two cases also shed light on the dynamics of the concepts of home and lifestyle entrepreneurship in contemporary Estonia, challenging the understanding of restaurant cuisine and home cooking as oppositional practices of food preparation and consumption.

  3. The Strategic Measures towards a Sustainable Competitive Advantage of the Restaurant Industry in Malaysia

    Yip, Poh Yoke

    2008-01-01

    The Food and Beverage (F&B) industry is a necessity industry to all nations in the world. The development of the restaurant have been increasing tremendously every year. The growth is clearly seen with many unique restaurants caming into existence as compared with a few decades ago. The reason are due to the low barrier of entry and low investment to establish restaurants have caused an increase in the number of restaurants both local and international offering a diverse variety of food into ...

  4. Local competence building and public information in European nuclear territories

    Martell, Meritxell; Vila D'Abadal, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Opinion polls and case study analysis show that there is a strong public demand for more participation in decision-making processes relating to the environment and nuclear issues specifically (IGNA, 2007; EC DG TREN 2008). In this regard, the implementation of transparency and participation at local level in municipalities hosting nuclear facilities is being claimed by local representatives over Europe. The pilot project 'Local Competence Building and Public Information in European Nuclear Territories' (2007-2008) was promoted by the Group of European Municipalities with Nuclear Facilities (GMF) and partly financed by the Directorate General for Energy and Transport (DG TREN). The project aims at supporting the European Commission (EC) in the process of harmonising national practices in the field of governance in nuclear territories. The objectives of this pilot project were two-fold: firstly, to identify local good practices at European level with regards to governance in the nuclear field and, secondly, to provide a methodological framework to recommend good practices and establish a set of indicators. The results of the project are briefly explained under the five dimensions of local governance on nuclear matters: access to environmental information, participation, access to justice, competence building and local development. Firstly, access to information on nuclear issues is broadly acknowledged by local representatives to be of relevant importance in increasing public knowledge on nuclear issues, especially on nuclear safety and radiation protection. Secondly, most local representatives feel that the current participatory level on nuclear issues in municipalities is too low and they would appreciate a greater involvement of local communities in decision-making processes on nuclear issues through local commissions or other mechanisms. Thirdly, according to local authorities, access to justice should be provided not only for the public but also for themselves

  5. WASTE MANAGEMENT IN A SCHOOL RESTAURANT

    Bianca Peruchin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the amount of waste generated and its proper final destination is one of the greatest environmental issues. The higher education institutions are an important source of waste due to its diversity of teaching, researching and extension activities undertaken by academic world. The university restaurant supplies meals to the university community and ends up generating a kind of waste similar to the domestic waste, but in a bigger amount. The aim of this study was to investigate the gravimetric composition of the waste generated in the school restaurant of a higher-education institution in southern Brazil and provide a diagnostic of the current waste management. The data were obtained through a characterization process of the solid waste generated in one week; an interview with the responsible managers and direct observation of the local structure. It was found non-existence of a Management Plan for Solid Waste, as well as a lack of practices relative to its management. The waste segregation is impaired due the lack of specific and labeled bins, besides the overworked employees. Along the experimental period it were characterized 547,068 Kg of solid waste, in which more than 80% were organic waste. The paper concludes that the organic waste could be treated by composting. It is recommended the formulation and implementation of an integrated management plan for solid waste in order to provide adequate infrastructure for waste management in the school restaurant.

  6. Informações nutricionais e de saúde disponibilizadas aos consumidores por restaurantes comerciais, tipo fast food e full service Nutritional and health information released to consumers by commercial fast food and full service restaurants

    Vanessa Maestro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo principal deste estudo foi identificar e caracterizar o oferecimento de informação nutricional e de saúde em restaurantes comerciais do município de Campinas-SP. Com a utilização de questionários previamente testados, foram entrevistados, entre outubro e dezembro de 2005, 20 gerentes de restaurantes do tipo fast food e 94 do tipo full service, localizados nas cinco regiões de Campinas. Após a coleta das informações, foi construído um banco de dados utilizando o software Excel. Para o tratamento estatístico, utilizou-se o teste do qui-quadrado e o teste T de Student. O software estatístico utilizado nas análises foi o MINITAB versão 14.2. Entre os principais resultados, destaca-se que 25,4% dos restaurantes fazem uso de informação nutricional e/ou de saúde. O tipo de informação nutricional mais empregado é a "declaração de nutrientes", com relevância para a informação do valor energético e de macronutrientes de alguns pratos. A fonte mais citada para a disposição da informação nutricional foi o cardápio, com 48,3% das citações. A freqüência de oferecimento dessas informações é significativamente maior entre as redes de fast food do que entre os restaurantes full service. Aponta-se a necessidade de se estudar formas de regulamentação dessas informações pelo poder público.The main objective of this study was to identify and characterize nutritional and health information made available in commercial restaurants in the city of Campinas, SP, Brazil. Pre-tested questionnaires were used to interview twenty managers of fast food and ninety-four of full service restaurants, between October and December of 2005, located in the five administrative regions of Campinas. After collecting the information, a databank was created using Microsoft Excel software. The chi-square and t Student tests and the statistical software MINITAB version 14.2 were used for the statistical treatment of the data. Among the

  7. Qualia could arise from information processing in local cortical networks.

    Orpwood, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Re-entrant feedback, either within sensory cortex or arising from prefrontal areas, has been strongly linked to the emergence of consciousness, both in theoretical and experimental work. This idea, together with evidence for local micro-consciousness, suggests the generation of qualia could in some way result from local network activity under re-entrant activation. This paper explores the possibility by examining the processing of information by local cortical networks. It highlights the difference between the information structure (how the information is physically embodied), and the information message (what the information is about). It focuses on the network's ability to recognize information structures amongst its inputs under conditions of extensive local feedback, and to then assign information messages to those structures. It is shown that if the re-entrant feedback enables the network to achieve an attractor state, then the message assigned in any given pass of information through the network is a representation of the message assigned in the previous pass-through of information. Based on this ability the paper argues that as information is repeatedly cycled through the network, the information message that is assigned evolves from a recognition of what the input structure is, to what it is like, to how it appears, to how it seems. It could enable individual networks to be the site of qualia generation. The paper goes on to show networks in cortical layers 2/3 and 5a have the connectivity required for the behavior proposed, and reviews some evidence for a link between such local cortical cyclic activity and conscious percepts. It concludes with some predictions based on the theory discussed.

  8. Corn content of French fry oil from national chain vs. small business restaurants

    Jahren, A. Hope; Schubert, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Several issues, ranging from sustainability to health, may interest the consumers in the corn content of their food. However, because restaurants are excluded from the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990, national chain restaurants provide nonspecific ingredient information and small businesses supply none. We measured the carbon isotope composition of fry oil in French fries purchased from 68 (67%) of the 101 national chain fast food restaurants on Oahu (i.e., McDonald’s, Burger Kin...

  9. Provision of Information to Rural Communities in Bama Local ...

    Provision of Information to Rural Communities in Bama Local Government Area of Borno State, Nigeria. Y Aliyu, E Camble ... findings of the study showed that rural people in the Soye district have identifiable information needs mainly in the areas of agriculture, health, government programmes and small scale industries.

  10. Mainstreaming African Local Content in the Information Society: The ...

    The global transition to the information and knowledge society requires that every country contribute its local content to the burgeoning global information infrastructure. African states and the African continent as a whole have much to offer in form of indigenous knowledge and scholarly research. However, it has been very ...

  11. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    Xiang, Ju; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Li, Jian-Ming; Hu, Ke; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein–protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods. (paper: interdisciplinary statistical mechanics)

  12. Pembangunan Model Restaurant Management System

    Fredy Jingga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Model design for Restaurant Management System aims to help in restaurant business process, where Restaurant Management System (RMS help the waitress and chef could interact each other without paper limitation.  This Restaurant Management System Model develop using Agile Methodology and developed based on PHP Programming Langguage. The database management system is using MySQL. This web-based application model will enable the waitress and the chef to interact in realtime, from the time they accept the customer order until the chef could know what to cook and checklist for the waitress wheter the order is fullfill or not, until the cahsier that will calculate the bill and the payment that they accep from the customer.

  13. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    2003-01-01

    As Friday, April 18 and Monday, April 21, 2003 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (AVENANCE : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, April 19 - 20. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 22 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday, April 17, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.

  14. RocKeTeria restaurant

    2000-01-01

    When StenniSphere at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., opened in May 2000, it introduced the RocKeTeria, a new 1960s-style, space-themed restaurant located in the newly expanded visitor center. The restaurant, operated by the owners of Mary's Drive Inn of Biloxi, features an extensive collection of space-related photos from that era, as well as a full menu of home-style cooking.

  15. Nuclear waste information in supplements of local newspapers

    Ryhaenen, Veijo

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The utility Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is conducting site investigations in Finland to select a final disposal site for spent nuclear fuel. Site selection studies, including deep drillings and other field investigations, have been carried out in different parts of the country since 1987. Now there are three areas in which detailed studies are continued. The programme aims at site selection in the year 2000. Before the construction of the final disposal facility can be started around the year 2010 a precondition in the Finnish legislation is that the council of the local municipality accepts the facility. Hence, an essential task is to distribute information of the studies and of the principles of final disposal to the local decision-makers and public. Information work has an important role already now in order to make people familiar with the long-term project and to build confidence on the safety of final disposal. TVO's information programme includes several types of actions to different target groups, such as press conferences, contact group meetings, open houses, exhibitions, lectures to different groups, visits to the drilling sites and to the existing nuclear waste facilities as well as use of various written material. In January 1994 a new method was applied in the distribution of TVO's written information directly to local public. Four-page supplements were prepared to the local newspapers to inform public of the stage of the site investigations and other topical issues. After that, new supplements have been published in six months intervals. Own supplements have been made for different municipalities in which the candidate areas are situated. The form of the supplement is same as that of the newspaper. As a matter of fact, TVO's information forms a special advertising section in a single issue of a newspaper. The topics handled in the supplements are for example present status of the local bedrock studies, other topical information of TVO

  16. Consumer response to Healthy Choice® nutrition labelling in an a la carte restaurant setting : A matter of willpower or being empowered

    Gallicano, R.; Blomme, R.J.; Rheede, van A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with this information will make healthier menu choices (Mills & Thomas, 2008). Limited research has been performed in a restaurant

  17. Comparing nutrition environments in bodegas and fast-food restaurants.

    Neckerman, Kathryn M; Lovasi, Laszlo; Yousefzadeh, Paulette; Sheehan, Daniel; Milinkovic, Karla; Baecker, Aileen; Bader, Michael D M; Weiss, Christopher; Lovasi, Gina S; Rundle, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Many small grocery stores or "bodegas" sell prepared or ready-to-eat items, filling a niche in the food environment similar to fast-food restaurants. However, little comparative information is available about the nutrition environments of bodegas and fast-food outlets. This study compared the nutrition environments of bodegas and national chain fast-food restaurants using a common audit instrument, the Nutrition Environment Measures Study in Restaurants (NEMS-R) protocol. The analytic sample included 109 bodegas and 107 fast-food restaurants located in New York City neighborhoods in the upper third and lower third of the census tract poverty rate distribution. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated in 102 food outlets, including 31 from the analytic sample and 71 from a supplementary convenience sample. The analysis compared scores on individual NEMS-R items, a total summary score, and subscores indicating healthy food availability, nutrition information, promotions of healthy or unhealthy eating, and price incentives for healthy eating, using t tests and χ(2) statistics to evaluate differences by outlet type and neighborhood poverty. Fast-food restaurants were more likely to provide nutrition information, and bodegas scored higher on healthy food availability, promotions, and pricing. Bodegas and fast-food restaurants had similar NEMS-R total scores (bodegas 13.09, fast food 14.31; P=0.22). NEMS-R total scores were higher (indicating healthier environments) in low- than high-poverty neighborhoods among both bodegas (14.79 vs 11.54; P=0.01) and fast-food restaurants (16.27 vs 11.60; Pnutrition environments in the two types of food outlets. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Locally decodable codes and private information retrieval schemes

    Yekhanin, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    Locally decodable codes (LDCs) are codes that simultaneously provide efficient random access retrieval and high noise resilience by allowing reliable reconstruction of an arbitrary bit of a message by looking at only a small number of randomly chosen codeword bits. Local decodability comes with a certain loss in terms of efficiency - specifically, locally decodable codes require longer codeword lengths than their classical counterparts. Private information retrieval (PIR) schemes are cryptographic protocols designed to safeguard the privacy of database users. They allow clients to retrieve rec

  19. Comparison of the nutrient content of children's menu items at US restaurant chains, 2010-2014.

    Deierlein, Andrea L; Peat, Kay; Claudio, Luz

    2015-08-15

    To determine changes in the nutritional content of children's menu items at U.S. restaurant chains between 2010 and 2014. The sample consisted of 13 sit down and 16 fast-food restaurant chains ranked within the top 50 US chains in 2009. Nutritional information was accessed in June-July 2010 and 2014. Descriptive statistics were calculated for nutrient content of main dishes and side dishes, as well as for those items that were added, removed, or unchanged during the study period. Nutrient content of main dishes did not change significantly between 2010 and 2014. Approximately one-third of main dishes at fast-food restaurant chains and half of main dishes at sit down restaurant chains exceeded the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommended levels for sodium, fat, and saturated fat in 2014. Improvements in nutrient content were observed for side dishes. At sit down restaurant chains, added side dishes contained over 50% less calories, fat, saturated fat, and sodium, and were more likely to contain fruits/vegetables compared to removed sides (p restaurant chains contained less saturated fat (p restaurant industry and policy makers to improve the nutritional content of children's menu items at restaurant chains to align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Additional efforts are necessary to help parents and children make informed choices when ordering at restaurant chains.

  20. Teollisuuden Voima Oy - Industrial Power Company Ltd. Local information activity

    Engros, Taina

    1989-01-01

    There are two nuclear power producers in Finland - the state-owned power company Imatran Voima Oy which operates two 440 MW Soviet-made PWR units in southern Finland, east of Helsinki and the Teollisuuden Voima Oy - Industrial Power Company Ltd, or TVO, owned by Finnish industrial companies. TVO operates two 710 MW ABB ATOM BWR units producing about one fifth of the country's electricity consumption. Operating experiences are extremely good from all Finnish nuclear power plants. The Finns' attitude towards nuclear power has changed into a positive direction in recent times. This can probably be noted as an international trend now that the Chernobyl accident is becoming an incident of the past. The Finnish citizens and politicians are facing two questions; first, what is their attitude towards nuclear power as a source of energy, in other words, do they approve of the plants currently in operation. The second question is how they stand on the building of new plants. It is probably another universal phenomenon that the attitudes of people living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants are less critical than the attitudes of those living farther away. This does not, by any means, result in local information activity being easier or less important than nationwide information activity. On the contrary, local decision-makers, local media and inhabitants are those who can, and through whom we can, influence also wider circles. The Nuclear Energy Act, which became effective in Finland last year, defines that the final decision on whether nuclear power plants can be built inside a municipality, is made at local level. As far as TVO is concerned one factor making local information activity easier is the small size of the locality. The difficulty TVO has to face is the people's suspicion of information activity. All information is considered propaganda, regardless of its form, and only negative news are considered information. Also, a large proportion of people are passive

  1. Teollisuuden Voima Oy - Industrial Power Company Ltd. Local information activity

    Engros, Taina [Department of Information, TVO, Olkiluoto FIN-27160 (Finland)

    1989-07-01

    There are two nuclear power producers in Finland - the state-owned power company Imatran Voima Oy which operates two 440 MW Soviet-made PWR units in southern Finland, east of Helsinki and the Teollisuuden Voima Oy - Industrial Power Company Ltd, or TVO, owned by Finnish industrial companies. TVO operates two 710 MW ABB ATOM BWR units producing about one fifth of the country's electricity consumption. Operating experiences are extremely good from all Finnish nuclear power plants. The Finns' attitude towards nuclear power has changed into a positive direction in recent times. This can probably be noted as an international trend now that the Chernobyl accident is becoming an incident of the past. The Finnish citizens and politicians are facing two questions; first, what is their attitude towards nuclear power as a source of energy, in other words, do they approve of the plants currently in operation. The second question is how they stand on the building of new plants. It is probably another universal phenomenon that the attitudes of people living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants are less critical than the attitudes of those living farther away. This does not, by any means, result in local information activity being easier or less important than nationwide information activity. On the contrary, local decision-makers, local media and inhabitants are those who can, and through whom we can, influence also wider circles. The Nuclear Energy Act, which became effective in Finland last year, defines that the final decision on whether nuclear power plants can be built inside a municipality, is made at local level. As far as TVO is concerned one factor making local information activity easier is the small size of the locality. The difficulty TVO has to face is the people's suspicion of information activity. All information is considered propaganda, regardless of its form, and only negative news are considered information. Also, a large proportion of people are passive

  2. Managing and reallocating inventory across two markets with local information

    Spiliotopoulou, E.

    2018-01-01

    Consider a firm that controls inventory centrally for two separate markets that are managed by regional managers having local demand information. The central planner provides a dedicated inventory level to each market, to ensure a minimum service level, but can reallocate inventory once associated

  3. Improving the software fault localization process through testability information

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, A.; Abreu, R.; Gross, H.; Van Gemund, A.

    2010-01-01

    When failures occur during software testing, automated software fault localization helps to diagnose their root causes and identify the defective components of a program to support debugging. Diagnosis is carried out by selecting test cases in such way that their pass or fail information will narrow

  4. Absolute and relative densities of fast-food versus other restaurants in relation to weight status: Does restaurant mix matter?

    Polsky, Jane Y; Moineddin, Rahim; Dunn, James R; Glazier, Richard H; Booth, Gillian L

    2016-01-01

    Given the continuing epidemic of obesity, policymakers are increasingly looking for levers within the local retail food environment as a means of promoting healthy weights. To examine the independent and joint associations of absolute and relative densities of restaurants near home with weight status in a large, urban, population-based sample of adults. We studied 10,199 adults living in one of four cities in southern Ontario, Canada, who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey (cycles 2005, 2007/08, 2009/10). Multivariate models assessed the association of weight status (obesity and body mass index) with absolute densities (numbers) of fast-food, full-service and other restaurants, and the relative density (proportion) of fast-food restaurants (FFR) relative to all restaurants within ~10-minute walk of residential areas. Higher numbers of restaurants of any type were inversely related to excess weight, even in models adjusting for a range of individual covariates and area deprivation. However, these associations were no longer significant after accounting for higher walkability of areas with high volumes of restaurants. In contrast, there was a direct relationship between the proportion of FFR relative to all restaurants and excess weight, particularly in areas with high volumes of FFR (e.g., odds ratio for obesity=2.55 in areas with 5+ FFR, 95% confidence interval: 1.55-4.17, across the interquartile range). Policies aiming to promote healthy weights that target the volume of certain retail food outlets in residential settings may be more effective if they also consider the relative share of outlets serving more and less healthful foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Local information at Tihange N.P.P

    Rosseel, R.

    1989-01-01

    In our democratic countries, fair acceptance by the public of the various stages in the implementation of a nuclear programme is a condition sine qua non for its success. In this respect, the public opinion of the local community always plays a major role and could become crucial in particular circumstances when, for instance, a new site is created or an accident occurs. Therefore, local information should be given priority and be perceived as a key factor in any communication strategy. However, mere information is not enough. Information is like grain it can only germinate in a well prepared soil. In other words, the fair and positive perception of any information or message relies not only on its quality but equally on the credibility of the source (utility, nuclear lobby, etc... and the reservoir of goodwill It has been able to create within society. The purpose of this paper is to relate the successful actions observed at Tihange N.P.P. This plant is located near the town of Huy along the river Meuse in Southern Belgium. Its total capacity amounts to 2,790 MW. The three PWR were commissioned respectively in 1975, 1983 and 1985. There is good evidence to believe that the Tihange nuclear power plant is presently well integrated in its socioeconomic environment. The plant's management lives in a climate of positive 'peaceful coexistence' with the local authorities, the last demonstration against the plant dates back to some 10 years ago and very little criticism, if any, is heard from the local community. Possibly the most convincing evidence of this relaxed atmosphere is that none of the candidates put forward by environmentalist parties were elected in the latest general and municipal elections at Huy. Dual policy aimed to promoting congenial neighbourly behaviour and giving priority to local information has undoubtedly significantly contributed to this result

  6. Restaurant Food Allergy Practices - Six Selected Sites, United States, 2014.

    Radke, Taylor J; Brown, Laura G; Faw, Brenda; Hedeen, Nicole; Matis, Bailey; Perez, Priscela; Viveiros, Brendalee; Ripley, Danny

    2017-04-21

    Food allergies affect an estimated 15 million persons in the United States (1), and are responsible for approximately 30,000 emergency department visits and 150-200 deaths each year (2). Nearly half of reported fatal food allergy reactions over a 13-year period were caused by food from a restaurant or other food service establishment (3). To ascertain the prevalence of food allergy training, training topics, and practices related to food allergies, CDC's Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net), a collaborative forum of federal agencies and state and local health departments with six sites, interviewed personnel at 278 restaurants. Fewer than half of the 277 restaurant managers (44.4%), 211 food workers (40.8%), and 156 servers (33.3%) interviewed reported receiving food allergy training. Among those who reported receiving training, topics commonly included the major food allergens and what to do if a customer has a food allergy. Although most restaurants had ingredient lists for at least some menu items, few had separate equipment or areas designated for the preparation of allergen-free food. Restaurants can reduce the risk for allergic reactions among patrons by providing food allergy training for personnel and ingredient lists for all menu items and by dedicating equipment and areas specifically for preparing allergen-free food.

  7. Enabling Controlling Complex Networks with Local Topological Information.

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xiao, Gaoxi; Tang, Pei; Wen, Changyun; Hu, Wuhua; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping; Stanley, H Eugene

    2018-03-15

    Complex networks characterize the nature of internal/external interactions in real-world systems including social, economic, biological, ecological, and technological networks. Two issues keep as obstacles to fulfilling control of large-scale networks: structural controllability which describes the ability to guide a dynamical system from any initial state to any desired final state in finite time, with a suitable choice of inputs; and optimal control, which is a typical control approach to minimize the cost for driving the network to a predefined state with a given number of control inputs. For large complex networks without global information of network topology, both problems remain essentially open. Here we combine graph theory and control theory for tackling the two problems in one go, using only local network topology information. For the structural controllability problem, a distributed local-game matching method is proposed, where every node plays a simple Bayesian game with local information and local interactions with adjacent nodes, ensuring a suboptimal solution at a linear complexity. Starring from any structural controllability solution, a minimizing longest control path method can efficiently reach a good solution for the optimal control in large networks. Our results provide solutions for distributed complex network control and demonstrate a way to link the structural controllability and optimal control together.

  8. Local Climate Experts: The Influence of Local TV Weather Information on Climate Change Perceptions.

    Bloodhart, Brittany; Maibach, Edward; Myers, Teresa; Zhao, Xiaoquan

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who identify changes in their local climate are also more likely to report that they have personally experienced global climate change. One way that people may come to recognize that their local climate is changing is through information provided by local TV weather forecasters. Using random digit dialing, 2,000 adult local TV news viewers in Virginia were surveyed to determine whether routine exposure to local TV weather forecasts influences their perceptions of extreme weather in Virginia, and their perceptions about climate change more generally. Results indicate that paying attention to TV weather forecasts is associated with beliefs that extreme weather is becoming more frequent in Virginia, which in turn is associated with stronger beliefs and concerns about climate change. These associations were strongest for individuals who trust their local TV weathercaster as a source of information about climate change, and for those who identify as politically conservative or moderate. The findings add support to the literature suggesting that TV weathercasters can play an important role in educating the public about climate change.

  9. Local Climate Experts: The Influence of Local TV Weather Information on Climate Change Perceptions

    Bloodhart, Brittany; Maibach, Edward; Myers, Teresa; Zhao, Xiaoquan

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who identify changes in their local climate are also more likely to report that they have personally experienced global climate change. One way that people may come to recognize that their local climate is changing is through information provided by local TV weather forecasters. Using random digit dialing, 2,000 adult local TV news viewers in Virginia were surveyed to determine whether routine exposure to local TV weather forecasts influences their perceptions of extreme weather in Virginia, and their perceptions about climate change more generally. Results indicate that paying attention to TV weather forecasts is associated with beliefs that extreme weather is becoming more frequent in Virginia, which in turn is associated with stronger beliefs and concerns about climate change. These associations were strongest for individuals who trust their local TV weathercaster as a source of information about climate change, and for those who identify as politically conservative or moderate. The findings add support to the literature suggesting that TV weathercasters can play an important role in educating the public about climate change. PMID:26551357

  10. Ananda Restaurant A La Carte Menu 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementin...

  11. Restaurant Management System Over Private Network

    Amanat Dhillon; Shreya Tuli

    2017-01-01

    Restaurant Management System over Private Network is an automated business environment which allows restaurants to reduce operational costs increase efficiency of business improve customer satisfaction cut down labour costs decrease order processing time and provide better Quality-of-ServiceQ-S. This system manages a digital menu allowing the customers to place orders easily. Authentication fields for employees enable better administration of the restaurant. The whole restaurant is integrated...

  12. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: WHITSUNTIDE WEEKEND

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Whitsuntide weekend are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATE RESTAURANT No. Opening times Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) and the KIOSK will be closed on 7, 8 and 9 June.

  13. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEKEND

    2003-01-01

    As Friday, April 18 and Monday, April 21, 2003 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (AVENANCE : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, April 19 - 20. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 22 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30.

  14. Mutually exclusive aspects of information carried by physical systems: Complementarity between local and nonlocal information

    Oppenheim, Jonathan; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Ryszard; Horodecki, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    Complex physical systems contain information which, under some well-defined processes can differentiate between local and nonlocal information. Both these fundamental aspects of information are defined operationally. Local information is locally accessible and allows one to perform processes, such as physical work, while nonlocal information allows one to perform processes such as teleportation. It is shown that these two kinds of information are complementary in the sense that two parties can either gain access to the nonlocal information or to the local information but not both. This complementarity has a form similar to that expressed by entropic uncertainty relations. For pure states, the entanglement plays the role of Planck's constant. We also find another class of complementarity relations which applies to operators and is induced when two parties can only perform local operations and communicate classical (LOCC). In particular, observables such as the parity and phase of two qubits commute but under LOCC, they are complementary observables. It is also found this complementarity is pure in the sense that it can be ''decoupled'' from the uncertainty principle. It is suggested that these complementarities represent an essential extension of Bohr's complementarity to complex (distributed) systems which are entangled

  15. Green Computing in Local Governments and Information Technology Companies

    Badar Agung Nugroho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Green computing is a study and practice of designing, manufacturing, using, and disposing of information and communication devices efficiently and effectively with minimum impact on the environment. If the green computing concept was implemented, it will help the agencies or companies to reduce energy and capital cost from their IT infrastructure. The goal from this research is to explore the current condition about the efforts from local governments and IT companies at West Java to implement the green computing concept at their working environment. The primary data were collected by using focus group discussion by inviting the local governments and IT companies representatives who responsible to manage their IT infrastructure. And then, the secondary data were collected by doing brief observation in order to see the real effort of green computing implementation at each institution. The result shows that there are many different perspectives and efforts of green computing implementation between local governments and IT companies.

  16. What's Cooking at the Restaurant School

    Binzen, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Describes the operation and program of the Restaurant School in Philadelphia, which in a one-year course of formal instruction and on-the-job training teaches students how to own and operate small restaurants and invests in the restaurants of some of its graduates. (JT)

  17. UOC Restaurant : gestió integral d'un restaurant

    Vidal Andrade, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Desenvolupament d'una aplicació amb Microsoft.net per la gestió d'un restaurant i de la seva plana web. Desarrollo de una aplicación con Microsoft.net para la gestión de un restaurante y de su página web.

  18. The effects of Cosmopolitanism and Tradition on the Evaluation and Intentions of the Users of Fast Food Restaurants

    Srdjan Sapic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In terms of modern life, consumers have an increasing number of options when it comes to choosing a restaurant when they do not wish to eat at their homes. Fast food restaurants represent one of those options. In addition to domestic fast food restaurants, the development of global restaurant chains is also noticeable. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that affect the evaluations of products and services and the intentions of users in terms of using the services of fast food restaurants. In relation to that, it is important to analyze the factor of cosmopolitanism and tradition. Cosmopolitanism, as the willingness of people to cooperate with other cultures and tradition, and tradition, as a reflection of respect for the customs and ideas that are imposed on individuals by their culture or religion, affect consumers’ intentions and their willingness to use the services of foreign fast food restaurants. In accordance with that, the purpose of this research study is to determine if and how cosmopolitanism and tradition affect the evaluations of products and services and consumers’ intention concerning foreign restaurant chains and domestic fast food restaurants of both the local and the family types. The results of the conducted empirical research show that cosmopolitanism positively affects the evaluations of the products and services of foreign restaurants and that tradition positively affects the evaluations of the products and services of domestic fast food restaurants.

  19. Restaurants and hotels expenditure in Polish households of the elderly

    Piekut Marlena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The age of household members is an important factor for expenditures. The aim of the study is to investigate the level of expenditure on restaurants and hotels incurred in Polish households of the elderly in 2004-2013 and to identify the factors affecting such expenditures. The source of information used in the study was the household budget survey of the Central Statistical Office of Poland. The main methods used in this study were variance analysis and regression analysis. Restaurants and hotels expenditure increases every year together with their share in total household expenditure. The most important factors affecting the restaurants and hotels spending in Polish households of the elderly are: income per capita and the level of education of the head of the family. The study on consumption determinants at different groups leads to better understanding of consumer behavior circumstances and thereby ensuring a good quality of life for the people of the elderly.

  20. Restaurant closure for the Jeûne genevois

    2007-01-01

    Restaurant 1 will be closed on Thursday 6th September (Jeûne Genevois) as well as Friday 7th, Saturday 8th and Sunday 9th September for technical reasons. During this time, Restaurant 2 will be open at the following times: –\tThursday 6th September: 9:00 – 20:00 –\tFriday 7th September: 8:00 – 20:00 –\tSaturday 8th and Sunday 9th September: 9:00–20:00 Hot meals will be served on all 4 days from 12:00 to 14:00 and from 18:00 to 19:30. For more information please see http://cern.ch/restaurant2 Thank you for your understanding.

  1. What's on the menu? A review of the energy and nutritional content of US chain restaurant menus.

    Wu, Helen W; Sturm, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to (i) describe the availability of nutrition information in major chain restaurants, (ii) document the energy and nutrient levels of menu items, (iii) evaluate relationships with restaurant characteristics, menu labelling and trans fat laws, and nutrition information accessibility, and (iv) compare energy and nutrient levels against industry-sponsored and government-issued nutrition criteria. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analysis of the energy, total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, carbohydrate and protein levels of 29 531 regular and 1392 children's menu items [corrected]. Energy and nutrition information provided on restaurant websites or upon request, and secondary databases on restaurant characteristics. The top 400 US chain restaurants by sales, based on the 2009 list of the Restaurants & Institutions magazine. Complete nutrition information was reported for 245 (61 %) restaurants. Appetizers had more energy, fat and sodium than all other item types. Children's menu specialty beverages had more fat, saturated fat and carbohydrates than comparable regular menu beverages. The majority of main entrées fell below one-third of the US Department of Agriculture's estimated daily energy needs, but as few as 3 % were also within limits for sodium, fat and saturated fat. Main entrées had significantly more energy, fat and saturated fat in family-style restaurants than in fast-food restaurants. Restaurants that made nutrition information easily accessible on websites had significantly lower energy, fat and sodium contents across menu offerings than those providing information only upon request. The paper provides a comprehensive view of chain restaurant menu nutrition prior to nationwide labelling laws. It offers baseline data to evaluate how restaurants respond after laws are implemented.

  2. Restaurant No. 1 fully renovated

    2007-01-01

    The Restaurant No. 1 team. After several months of patience and goodwill on the part of our clients, we are delighted to announce that the major renovation work which began in September 2006 has now been completed. From 21 May 2007 we look forward to welcoming you to a completely renovated restaurant area designed with you in mind. The restaurant team wishes to thank all its clients for their patience and loyalty. Particular attention has been paid in the new design to creating a spacious serving area and providing a wider choice of dishes. The new restaurant area has been designed as an open-plan space to enable you to view all the dishes before making your selection and to move around freely from one food access point to another. It comprises user-friendly areas that fully comply with hygiene standards. From now on you will be able to pick and choose to your heart's content. We invite you to try out wok cooking or some other speciality. Or select a pizza or a plate of pasta with a choice of two sauces fr...

  3. Sustainable restaurants: A research agenda

    Research in Hospitality Management is co-published by NISC (Pty) Ltd and Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. Copyright © The ... discussed several concepts for sustainable restaurants. Teng, .... using the MOA model in a case study they are performing into .... We propose a research strategy for three fields of research.

  4. Learning to classify wakes from local sensory information

    Alsalman, Mohamad; Colvert, Brendan; Kanso, Eva; Kanso Team

    2017-11-01

    Aquatic organisms exhibit remarkable abilities to sense local flow signals contained in their fluid environment and to surmise the origins of these flows. For example, fish can discern the information contained in various flow structures and utilize this information for obstacle avoidance and prey tracking. Flow structures created by flapping and swimming bodies are well characterized in the fluid dynamics literature; however, such characterization relies on classical methods that use an external observer to reconstruct global flow fields. The reconstructed flows, or wakes, are then classified according to the unsteady vortex patterns. Here, we propose a new approach for wake identification: we classify the wakes resulting from a flapping airfoil by applying machine learning algorithms to local flow information. In particular, we simulate the wakes of an oscillating airfoil in an incoming flow, extract the downstream vorticity information, and train a classifier to learn the different flow structures and classify new ones. This data-driven approach provides a promising framework for underwater navigation and detection in application to autonomous bio-inspired vehicles.

  5. Everyday Information Needs and Information Seeking Habits in the Countryside: a Study of a Local Community

    Gorazd Vodeb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose: The research attempts to provide an insight into the information world of the Slovenian countryside. It presents the first results of an exploratory study of information needs, information seeking habits and types of information sources.Methodology/approach: Brenda Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology was used as the theoretical basis for this research. 25 open structured interviews with inhabitants of a local community were conducted based on purposive sampling. Interview recordings were transcribed, summarised and analysed using the qualitative content analysis approach.Results: The analysis results in recognizing the types of gaps in the context of an individual, economic activities and in the context of a local community. Gap categories are described with regard to questions or problems and the ways of solving them. There are 20 categories describing gaps in the context of an individual, 17 categories which present economic activities – and 6 categories which pertain to a local community. Findings about information needs and the ways of seeking information stress the key role of information sources in farming and prevalence of interpersonal exchange of information and experts' opinion in the context of individual problem solving.Research limitation: The generalisation of results is not possible due to the sample size.Originality/practical implications: The findings contribute to understanding of information needs and ways of information seeking in the Slovenian countryside.

  6. Franchising, Ownership, and Experience: A Study of Pizza Restaurant Survival

    Arturs Kalnins; Kyle J. Mayer

    2004-01-01

    We hypothesize that retail and service business units will enjoy reduced failure rates if affiliated with experienced multiunit owners and franchisors. Experience of individual owners and franchisees should result in knowledge that is tacit and idiosyncratic and thus primarily of value locally. Because franchisors typically codify knowledge gained from experience, we argue that units should benefit from both local and distant experience of their franchisor. Using Texan pizza restaurant failur...

  7. Utilization of Live Localized Weather Information for Sustainable Agriculture

    Anderson, J.; Usher, J.

    2010-09-01

    Authors: Jim Anderson VP, Global Network and Business Development WeatherBug® Professional Jeremy Usher Managing Director, Europe WeatherBug® Professional Localized, real-time weather information is vital for day-to-day agronomic management of all crops. The challenge for agriculture is twofold in that local and timely weather data is not often available for producers and farmers, and it is not integrated into decision-support tools they require. Many of the traditional sources of weather information are not sufficient for agricultural applications because of the long distances between weather stations, meaning the data is not always applicable for on-farm decision making processes. The second constraint with traditional weather information is the timeliness of the data. Most delivery systems are designed on a one-hour time step, whereas many decisions in agriculture are based on minute-by-minute weather conditions. This is especially true for decisions surrounding chemical and fertilizer application and frost events. This presentation will outline how the creation of an agricultural mesonet (weather network) can enable producers and farmers with live, local weather information from weather stations installed in farm/field locations. The live weather information collected from each weather station is integrated into a web-enabled decision support tool, supporting numerous on-farm agronomic activities such as pest management, or dealing with heavy rainfall and frost events. Agronomic models can be used to assess the potential of disease pressure, enhance the farmer's abilities to time pesticide applications, or assess conditions contributing to yield and quality fluctuations. Farmers and industry stakeholders may also view quality-assured historical weather variables at any location. This serves as a record-management tool for viewing previously uncharted agronomic weather events in graph or table form. This set of weather tools is unique and provides a

  8. Restauration contemporaine, restauration de l’Art contemporain

    Anne van Grevenstein-Kruse

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available MVB : Vous avez été l’instigatrice et la directrice d’un établissement réputé dans le monde de la conservation-restauration, le Stichting Restauratie Atelier Limburg (SRAL. Voudriez-vous nous le présenter ?AVG : Le SRAL est un institut d’études et de recherches subsidié par le gouvernement provincial du Limbourg aux Pays-Bas.  Il s’est fixé pour but l’aide à la préservation de l’héritage culturel des Pays-Bas, et propose un ensemble de services liés à la conservation-restauration, de même qu...

  9. Restauration et non-restauration en art contemporain,

    Catherine Defeyt

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La conservation-restauration se doit d’être en phase avec la production artistique contemporaine, qu’il s’agisse des matériaux utilisés ou des idées véhiculées. Au risque d’ébranler certains principes adaptés aux œuvres dites classiques, des questions de fond émanant du caractère ontologique et polymorphique de l’art contemporain méritent d’être débattues. A ce titre,  les actes des journées d’études, Du refus de l’impossibilité de la restauration, Ecole supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Tours, 14...

  10. Mapping social-ecological vulnerability to inform local decision making.

    Thiault, Lauric; Marshall, Paul; Gelcich, Stefan; Collin, Antoine; Chlous, Frédérique; Claudet, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    An overarching challenge of natural resource management and biodiversity conservation is that relationships between people and nature are difficult to integrate into tools that can effectively guide decision making. Social-ecological vulnerability offers a valuable framework for identifying and understanding important social-ecological linkages, and the implications of dependencies and other feedback loops in the system. Unfortunately, its implementation at local scales has hitherto been limited due at least in part to the lack of operational tools for spatial representation of social-ecological vulnerability. We developed a method to map social-ecological vulnerability based on information on human-nature dependencies and ecosystem services at local scales. We applied our method to the small-scale fishery of Moorea, French Polynesia, by combining spatially explicit indicators of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity of both the resource (i.e., vulnerability of reef fish assemblages to fishing) and resource users (i.e., vulnerability of fishing households to the loss of fishing opportunity). Our results revealed that both social and ecological vulnerabilities varied considerably through space and highlighted areas where sources of vulnerability were high for both social and ecological subsystems (i.e., social-ecological vulnerability hotspots) and thus of high priority for management intervention. Our approach can be used to inform decisions about where biodiversity conservation strategies are likely to be more effective and how social impacts from policy decisions can be minimized. It provides a new perspective on human-nature linkages that can help guide sustainability management at local scales; delivers insights distinct from those provided by emphasis on a single vulnerability component (e.g., exposure); and demonstrates the feasibility and value of operationalizing the social-ecological vulnerability framework for policy, planning, and participatory

  11. Innovation in Swedish Restaurant Franchises

    Loikkanen, Jenny; Mazura, Jekaterina; Schrader, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Background – The franchising industry in Sweden has experienced a vast growth in the recent years, and it makes up a significant part of the Swedish economy. The restaurant industry accounts for a large amount of the Swedish franchises. Due to the dynamic business environment today, companies need to increasingly strive for improvement in order to sustain their competitive advantage and to enhance their performance. Innovation may be required, and franchises are no exceptions. However, due to...

  12. Restaurant 2 goes Cordon Bleu

    2007-01-01

    The Domaine de Chouilly. Who said fine cuisine was too expensive? For a whole week between the 19th and 23rd February you will have the opportunity to enjoy gastronomic delights a short walk away from your office for only 17 CHF. The Chef and his colleagues from the famous Chateauvieux restaurant at the Domaine de Chouilly will be coming to Restaurant No. 2 to prepare a different gastronomic delight each day and will bring with them their own ingredients, equipment and even their own crockery! The list of fare is mouthwatering: Limousin lamb filet au gratin served with two-olive tapenade, and filet of char served with dill and candied lemon are just two of the delicious dishes on the week's menu. Restaurant No. 2 has rustled up another innovation: at the beginning of March it will be starting a pasta serving area on the ground floor called 'The Olivetto Corner'. 'The Corner is designed for customers who don't have much time and for those who like their pasta al dente,' explains Jean-Marie Fornerod, who mana...

  13. Contraceptive security, information flow, and local adaptations: family planning Morocco.

    Chandani, Y; Breton, G

    2001-12-01

    Many developing countries increasingly recognize and acknowledge family planning as a critical part of socio-economic development. However, with few health dollars to go around, countries tend to provide essential drugs for curative care, rather than for family planning products. Donors have historically provided free contraceptives for family planning services. Whether products are donated or purchased by the country, a successful family planning program depends on an uninterrupted supply of products, beginning with the manufacturer and ending with the customer. Any break in the supply chain may cause a family planning program to fail. A well-functioning logistics system can manage the supply chain and ensure that the customers have the products they need, when they need them. Morocco was selected for the case study. The researchers had ready access to key informants and information about the Logistics Management Information System. Because the study had time and resource constraints, research included desktop reviews and interview, rather than data collection in the field. The case study showed that even in a challenging environment an LMIS can be successfully deployed and fully supported by the users. It is critical to customize the system to a country-specific situation to ensure buy-in for the implementation. Significant external support funding and technical expertise are critical components to ensure the initial success of the system. Nonetheless, evidence from the case study shows that, after a system has been implemented, the benefits may not ensure its institutionalization. Other support, including local funding and technical expertise, is required.

  14. A Systematic Review of Calorie Labeling and Modified Calorie Labeling Interventions: Impact on Consumer and Restaurant Behavior.

    Bleich, Sara N; Economos, Christina D; Spiker, Marie L; Vercammen, Kelsey A; VanEpps, Eric M; Block, Jason P; Elbel, Brian; Story, Mary; Roberto, Christina A

    2017-12-01

    Evidence on the effects of restaurant calorie labeling on consumer and restaurant behavior is mixed. This paper examined: (1) consumer responses to calorie information alone or compared to modified calorie information and (2) changes in restaurant offerings following or in advance of menu labeling implementation. Searches were conducted in PubMed, Web of Science, Policy File, and PAIS International to identify restaurant calorie labeling studies through October 1, 2016, that measured calories ordered, consumed, or available for purchase on restaurant menus. The reference lists of calorie labeling articles were also searched. Fifty-three studies were included: 18 in real-world restaurants, 9 in cafeterias, and 21 in laboratory or simulation settings. Five examined restaurant offerings. Because of a lack of well-powered studies with strong designs, the degree to which menu labeling encourages lower-calorie purchases and whether that translates to a healthier population are unclear. Although there is limited evidence that menu labeling affects calories purchased at fast-food restaurants, some evidence demonstrates that it lowers calories purchased at certain types of restaurants and in cafeteria settings. The limited data on modified calorie labels find that such labels can encourage lower-calorie purchases but may not differ in effects relative to calorie labels alone. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  15. A systematic review of calorie labeling and modified calorie labeling interventions: Impact on consumer and restaurant behavior

    Bleich, Sara N.; Economos, Christina D.; Spiker, Marie L.; Vercammen, Kelsey; VanEpps, Eric M.; Block, Jason P.; Elbel, Brian; Story, Mary; Roberto, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Evidence on the effects of restaurant calorie labeling on consumer and restaurant behavior is mixed. This paper examined: 1) consumer responses to calorie information alone or compared to modified calorie information, and 2) changes in restaurant offerings following or in advance of menu labeling implementation. Methods We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Policy File and PAIS International to identify restaurant calorie labeling studies through October 1, 2016, that measured calories ordered, consumed, or available for purchase on restaurant menus. We also searched reference lists of calorie labeling articles. Results Fifty-three studies were included: 18 in real-world restaurants, 9 in cafeterias, and 21 in laboratory or simulation settings. Five examined restaurant offerings. Conclusion Due to a lack of well-powered studies with strong designs, the degree to which menu labeling encourages lower calorie purchases and whether that translates to a healthier population is unclear. Although there is limited evidence that menu labeling affects calories purchased at fast-food restaurants, some evidence demonstrates that it lowers calories purchased at certain types of restaurants and in cafeteria settings. The limited data on modified calorie labels find that such labels can encourage lower-calorie purchases, but may not differ in effects relative to calorie labels alone. PMID:29045080

  16. Predicted Impact of the Food and Drug Administration's Menu-Labeling Regulations on Restaurants in 4 New Jersey Cities.

    Gruner, Jessie; DeWeese, Robin S; Lorts, Cori; Yedidia, Michael J; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam

    2018-02-01

    To determine the proportion of restaurants that will be required to post calorie information under the Food and Drug Administration's menu-labeling regulations in 4 New Jersey cities. We classified geocoded 2014 data on 1753 restaurant outlets in accordance with the Food and Drug Administration's guidelines, which will require restaurants with 20 or more locations nationwide to post calorie information. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the association between menu-labeling requirements and census tract characteristics. Only 17.6% of restaurants will be affected by menu labeling; restaurants in higher-income tracts have higher odds than do restaurants in lower-income tracts (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55; P = .02). Restaurants in non-Hispanic Black (OR = 1.62; P = .02) and mixed race/ethnicity (OR = 1.44; P = .05) tracts have higher odds than do restaurants in non-Hispanic White tracts of being affected. Additional strategies are needed to help consumers make healthy choices at restaurants not affected by the menu-labeling law. These findings have implications for designing implementation strategies for the law and for evaluating its impact.

  17. Valorisation of menu labelling at fast food restaurants: exploring consumer perceptions

    Luis Miguel Cunha; Ana Pinto de Moura; Rui Costa Lima; Ana Frias

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate Portuguese consumers' interestfor the provision of nutrition information at fast food restaurants and reactionsto alternative presentations of this information. Four focus groups, with 5 to8 consumers, were conducted in which participants were asked to look at threemock fast food restaurant menus that varied with respect to whether calorieinformation was provided and whether small portions and salads were available.Participants also discussed about fast ...

  18. Local versus nonlocal information in quantum-information theory: Formalism and phenomena

    Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Ryszard; Synak-Radtke, Barbara; Horodecki, Pawel; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2005-01-01

    In spite of many results in quantum information theory, the complex nature of compound systems is far from clear. In general the information is a mixture of local and nonlocal ('quantum') information. It is important from both pragmatic and theoretical points of view to know the relationships between the two components. To make this point more clear, we develop and investigate the quantum-information processing paradigm in which parties sharing a multipartite state distill local information. The amount of information which is lost because the parties must use a classical communication channel is the deficit. This scheme can be viewed as complementary to the notion of distilling entanglement. After reviewing the paradigm in detail, we show that the upper bound for the deficit is given by the relative entropy distance to so-called pseudoclassically correlated states; the lower bound is the relative entropy of entanglement. This implies, in particular, that any entangled state is informationally nonlocal - i.e., has nonzero deficit. We also apply the paradigm to defining the thermodynamical cost of erasing entanglement. We show the cost is bounded from below by relative entropy of entanglement. We demonstrate the existence of several other nonlocal phenomena which can be found using the paradigm of local information. For example, we prove the existence of a form of nonlocality without entanglement and with distinguishability. We analyze the deficit for several classes of multipartite pure states and obtain that in contrast to the GHZ state, the Aharonov state is extremely nonlocal. We also show that there do not exist states for which the deficit is strictly equal to the whole informational content (bound local information). We discuss the relation of the paradigm with measures of classical correlations introduced earlier. It is also proved that in the one-way scenario, the deficit is additive for Bell diagonal states. We then discuss complementary features of

  19. Spatial Information in local society's cultural conservation and research

    Jang, J.-J.; Liao, H.-M.; Fan, I.-C.

    2015-09-01

    Western parade, called " raojing " , the main spirit is passing through of these ranges in the process, to reach the people within bless range, many scholars and academic experts's folk research are dependent on such spatial information. 2012, GIS center applied WebGIS and GPS to gather raojing activities spatial information in cooperation with multi-units, aggregated seven sessions, 22 days, 442 temples had pass through . The atlas also published named "Atlas of the 2012 Religious Processions in the Tainan Region" in 2014. we also applied national cultural resources data form relevant government authorities, through the metadata design and data processing(geocoding), established cultural geospatial and thematic information ,such as 800 monuments, 1,100 historic buildings and 4,300 old trees data. In recent years, based on CRGIS technology and operational concepts, different domain experts or local culture-ahistory research worker/team had to cooperate with us to establish local or thematic material and cultural resources. As in collaboration with local culture-history research worker in Kinmen County in 2012, build Kinmen intangible cultural assets - Wind Lion God ,set metadata and build 122 wind lion god `s attribute data and maps through field survey, it is worth mention such fieldwork data integrity is more than the official registration data form Kinmen National Park, the number of is wind lion god more than 40; in 2013,we were in cooperation with academic experts to establish property data and map of the theatre during the Japanese colonial era in Taiwan, a total of 170 theatres ; we were in cooperation with Japanese scholars, used his 44 detaile field survey data of sugar refineries during the Japanese colonial era in Taiwan ,to produce a sugar refineries distribution map and extend to a thematic web(http://map.net.tw/) [The Cultural Heritage Maps of Taiwan Suger Factories in a Century]site according to CRGIS independent cultural concept. Deployment and operation

  20. Restaurant Management System Over Private Network

    Amanat Dhillon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Restaurant Management System over Private Network is an automated business environment which allows restaurants to reduce operational costs increase efficiency of business improve customer satisfaction cut down labour costs decrease order processing time and provide better Quality-of-ServiceQ-S. This system manages a digital menu allowing the customers to place orders easily. Authentication fields for employees enable better administration of the restaurant. The whole restaurant is integrated into one private network thereby improving security and eliminating the need for a constant internet connection.

  1. I saw the sign: the new federal menu-labeling law and lessons from local experience.

    Banker, Michelle I

    2010-01-01

    Following the lead of several state and local governments, Congress recently imposed menu-labeling requirements on chain restaurants as part of the federal health care reform bill signed into law in March 2010. Section 4205 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires restaurant chains with 20 or more locations nationwide to display calorie information for standard menu items on menus, menu boards, and drive-thru displays. This paper examines the new federal law in light of existing state and local regulations and considers the arguments for and against mandatory calorie labeling at restaurants as a federal tool for preventing obesity. Specifically, this paper examines the provisions of the new federal law, highlights how it differs from the municipal and state menu-labeling laws already in effect, reviews early studies of the effectiveness of these state and local laws, and considers the propriety of requiring restaurants to disclose calorie information on menus by discussing arguments for and against menu labeling generally and calorie labeling in particular. This paper finds that based on initial studies of state and local menu-labeling regulations, the efficacy of compulsory menu labeling as a tool to combat obesity remains uncertain. Finally, this paper raises practical considerations associated with the new federal law, including implementation issues, potential collateral effects of the law, a survey of legal challenges that may arise, and a discussion of the Food and Drug Administration's competence to enforce a menu-labeling requirement against restaurants.

  2. Critical Success Factors for Franchised Restaurants Entering the Kenyan Market

    Lucy Gikonyo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In today’s globalized world, businesses look to expand to have a global presence. Restaurant businesses have expanded internationally using franchising. This study sought to determine the critical success factors (CSFs of a franchised restaurant system entering the Kenyan market from the franchisors’ perspective. It sought to establish how franchisors define, identify, and evaluate success. This study provides a theoretical framework that helps to understand the background of why organizations seek to expand using franchising method and consequently the CSFs of franchised restaurants entering the Kenyan market. The study used qualitative methodology with the use of in-depth interviews for collecting data. The results yielded CSFs from the franchisors’ perspective. As revealed by the study, the CSFs include brand power/concept, competitive environment, government policies, distance management, cultural appeal, excellent selection of franchisees, good site/location selection, good relationship with the franchisees, and proper contract management. These findings can be used by restaurant franchises that seek to establish successful businesses in the Kenyan market and other similar regional markets. The Africa franchise partners may also find some useful information from this article as they seek to set up the Franchise Association of Kenya. Other franchise businesses may also benefit from some aspects of the study.

  3. Preventing intentional food contamination: a survey to assess restaurant preparedness.

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Kanwat, C P; Qu, Haiyan; Smith, Lillian U; Patterson, Nathaniel J; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    In the age of preparedness, public health agencies are concerned with intentional acts of food contamination in restaurants, in addition to food safety. Food safety consists of applying standard norms of practice and infrastructure, which, if violated, cause food-borne illness. In contrast, food defense requires an institutionalized mindset of informed alertness to unusual variations from the norms, combined with preemptive practices best suited to each restaurant. Therefore, while food safety lends itself to regulation to ensure standard practices, food defense is best served by advisory guidelines for autonomous application, preserving the restaurant industry's core values of hospitality and customer service. To address this challenge, public health agencies need survey tools that can yield action-relevant data on the knowledge and practice gaps in food defense preparedness and on educational messages and support services to be developed for maximum impact potential. This article presents a mail survey instrument, developed using qualitative research to ensure content and face validity. Instrument development involved drafting the survey on the basis of expert consultations, validating its content by using focus groups (representing all restaurant categories and geographic regions), and ensuring face validity through cognitive interviews. The resulting survey remains sensitive to the hospitality industry while encompassing all vulnerable points.

  4. [To smoke or not to smoke, in restaurants, hotels, and bars].

    López-Antuñano, Francisco Javier; Tovar-Guzmán, Victor José

    2002-01-01

    A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify relevant references, to review the information on adverse effects of tobacco smoking and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Occupational exposure to ETS causes significant damages to food industry workers. High levels of mutagenic substances have been demonstrated in restaurant air as well as in the urine samples from those workers. Exposition to 3-aminophenyl, a hemoglobin-associated carcinogen. The best way to protect these workers is the reduction of tobacco smoking in restaurants, hotels, bars and taverns. In restaurant workers, ETS attributable risk for lung cancer is evident.

  5. Sodium monitoring in commercially processed and restaurant foods.

    Ahuja, Jaspreet K C; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Haytowitz, David B; Wasswa-Kintu, Shirley; Nickle, Melissa; Showell, Bethany; Thomas, Robin; Roseland, Janet; Williams, Juhi; Khan, Mona; Nguyen, Quynhanh; Hoy, Kathy; Martin, Carrie; Rhodes, Donna; Moshfegh, Alanna; Gillespie, Cathleen; Gunn, Janelle; Merritt, Robert; Cogswell, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Most sodium in the US diet comes from commercially processed and restaurant foods. Sodium reduction in these foods is key to several recent public health efforts. The objective was to provide an overview of a program led by the USDA, in partnership with other government agencies, to monitor sodium contents in commercially processed and restaurant foods in the United States. We also present comparisons of nutrients generated under the program to older data. We track ∼125 commercially processed and restaurant food items ("sentinel foods") annually using information from food manufacturers and periodically by nationwide sampling and laboratory analyses. In addition, we monitor >1100 other commercially processed and restaurant food items, termed "priority-2 foods" (P2Fs) biennially by using information from food manufacturers. These foods serve as indicators for assessing changes in the sodium content of commercially processed and restaurant foods in the United States. We sampled all sentinel foods nationwide and reviewed all P2Fs in 2010-2013 to determine baseline sodium concentrations. We updated sodium values for 73 sentinel foods and 551 P2Fs in the USDA's National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (releases 23-26). Sodium values changed by at least 10% for 43 of the sentinel foods, which, for 31 foods, including commonly consumed foods such as bread, tomato catsup, and potato chips, the newer sodium values were lower. Changes in the concentrations of related nutrients (total and saturated fat, total sugar, potassium, or dietary fiber) that were recommended by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans for reduced or increased consumption accompanied sodium reduction. The results of sodium reduction efforts, based on resampling of the sentinel foods or re-review of P2Fs, will become available beginning in 2015. This monitoring program tracks sodium reduction efforts, improves food composition databases, and strengthens national nutrition monitoring. © 2015

  6. 76 FR 35934 - In the Matter of: SHC Corp. (f/k/a Victormaxx Technologies, Inc.), Shells Seafood Restaurants...

    2011-06-20

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] In the Matter of: SHC Corp. (f/k/a Victormaxx Technologies, Inc.), Shells Seafood Restaurants, Inc., SI Restructuring, Inc. (f/k/a Schlotzsky's, Inc.), SLS... a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Shells Seafood Restaurants...

  7. Relationships among grocery nutrition label users and consumers' attitudes and behavior toward restaurant menu labeling.

    Roseman, Mary G; Mathe-Soulek, Kimberly; Higgins, Joseph A

    2013-12-01

    In the United States (US), based on the 2010 Affordable Care Act, restaurant chains and similar retail food establishments with 20 or more locations are required to begin implementing calorie information on their menus. As enacting of the law begins, it is important to understand its potential for improving consumers' healthful behaviors. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore relationships among users of grocery nutrition labels and attitudes toward restaurant menu labeling, along with the caloric content of their restaurant menu selection. Study participants were surveyed and then provided identical mock restaurant menus with or without calories. Results found that participants who used grocery nutrition labels and believed they would make healthy menu selections with nutrition labels on restaurant menus made healthier menu selections, regardless of whether the menu displayed calories or not. Consumers' nutrition knowledge and behaviors gained from using grocery nutrition labels and consumers' desire for restaurants to provide nutrition menu labels have a positive effect on their choosing healthful restaurant menu items. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Health department inspection criteria more likely to be associated with outbreak restaurants in Minnesota.

    Petran, Ruth L; White, Bruce W; Hedberg, Craig W

    2012-11-01

    Millions of routine restaurant inspections are performed each year in the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that a majority of foodborne illness outbreaks occur in restaurant settings. In an attempt to relate the data collected during inspections in Minnesota to illness likelihood, data from routine inspections conducted at outbreak restaurants were compared with data from routine inspections conducted at nonoutbreak restaurants. The goal was to identify differences in recorded violations. Significantly more violations were recorded at restaurants that had outbreaks. The majority of these violations were related to contamination in the facility and environment and to food handling procedures. Relative risks also were calculated for violations significantly more likely to occur at locations that had outbreaks of norovirus infection, Clostridium perfringens infection or toxin-type illness, and Salmonella infection. These three pathogens are estimated to cause the majority of foodborne illnesses in the United States. Meta-analysis of composited data for the three pathogens revealed 11 violations significantly more likely (α restaurants than during inspections at nonoutbreak restaurants. Application of this information permits assessment of health department inspection data in a consistent fashion. This approach can help identify criteria more likely to be associated with outbreak locations and allow operators to focus on interventions that will have the most significant impact in higher risk establishments.

  9. Climate Local Information over the Mediterranean to Respond User Needs

    Ruti, P.

    2012-12-01

    CLIM-RUN aims at developing a protocol for applying new methodologies and improved modeling and downscaling tools for the provision of adequate climate information at regional to local scale that is relevant to and usable by different sectors of society (policymakers, industry, cities, etc.). Differently from current approaches, CLIM-RUN will develop a bottom-up protocol directly involving stakeholders early in the process with the aim of identifying well defined needs at the regional to local scale. The improved modeling and downscaling tools will then be used to optimally respond to these specific needs. The protocol is assessed by application to relevant case studies involving interdependent sectors, primarily tourism and energy, and natural hazards (wild fires) for representative target areas (mountainous regions, coastal areas, islands). The region of interest for the project is the Greater Mediterranean area, which is particularly important for two reasons. First, the Mediterranean is a recognized climate change hot-spot, i.e. a region particularly sensitive and vulnerable to global warming. Second, while a number of countries in Central and Northern Europe have already in place well developed climate service networks (e.g. the United Kingdom and Germany), no such network is available in the Mediterranean. CLIM-RUN is thus also intended to provide the seed for the formation of a Mediterranean basin-side climate service network which would eventually converge into a pan-European network. The general time horizon of interest for the project is the future period 2010-2050, a time horizon that encompasses the contributions of both inter-decadal variability and greenhouse-forced climate change. In particular, this time horizon places CLIM-RUN within the context of a new emerging area of research, that of decadal prediction, which will provide a strong potential for novel research.

  10. Amuse Restaurant Lunch Menu 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  11. Amuse Restaurant Wine List 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  12. Amuse Restaurant Set Lunch 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  13. Amuse Restaurant Spring Menu 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  14. Educating restaurant owners and cooks to lower their own sodium intake is a potential strategy for reducing the sodium contents of restaurant foods: a small-scale pilot study in South Korea.

    Park, Sohyun; Lee, Heeseung; Seo, Dong-Il; Oh, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Taik Gun; Choi, Bo Youl

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a sodium reduction program at local restaurants through nutrition education and examination of the health of restaurant owners and cooks. The study was a single-arm pilot intervention using a pre-post design in one business district with densely populated restaurants in Seoul, South Korea. The intervention focused on improving nutrition behaviors and psychosocial factors through education, health examination, and counseling of restaurant personnel. Forty-eight restaurant owners and cooks completed the baseline survey and participated in the intervention. Forty participants completed the post-intervention survey. The overweight and obesity prevalences were 25.6% and 39.5%, respectively, and 74.4% of participants had elevated blood pressure. After health examination, counseling, and nutrition education, several nutrition behaviors related to sodium intake showed improvement. In addition, those who consumed less salt in their baseline diet (measured with urine dipsticks) were more likely to agree that providing healthy foods to their customers is necessary. This study demonstrated the potential to reduce the sodium contents of restaurant foods by improving restaurant owners' and cooks' psychological factors and their own health behaviors. This small pilot study demonstrated that working with restaurant owners and cooks to improve their own health and sodium intake may have an effect on participation in restaurant-based sodium reduction initiatives. Future intervention studies with a larger sample size and comparison group can focus on improving the health and perceptions of restaurant personnel in order to increase the feasibility and efficacy of restaurant-based sodium reduction programs and policies.

  15. Marketing nutrition in restaurants: a survey of current practices and attitudes.

    Sneed, J; Burkhalter, J P

    1991-04-01

    This study sought to determine attitudes toward nutrition, nutrition marketing practices, the relationship between attitudes toward nutrition and nutrition marketing practices, and nutrition training practices in restaurants. A written questionnaire was mailed to 200 research and development (R & D) directors in restaurant companies included in Restaurants & Institutions' list of top 400 foodservice organizations ranked by sales. Seventy (35%) responded. Most R & D directors did not think they were responsible for improving the health of their consumers. A positive relationship existed between attitudes toward nutrition and nutrition marketing practices (P = .013). Forty-four reported that they marketed nutrition and planned to add nutritious menu items in the future. Forty-six reported that nutritious meal options represented 0 to 10% of total sales. Nutrition information was provided to consumers by 27 restaurant companies but such information often had to be requested. The American Heart Association was a popular source of nutrition and menu-planning information. Twelve companies employed a registered dietitian, and 14 used registered dietitians as consultants. Nutrition-related training for restaurant employees was limited. These findings indicate that dietitians have opportunities to market their skills in developing nutritious menu items and providing staff training. Also, dietitians should encourage consumers (especially those with special dietary needs) to let restaurant managers know their menu and nutrition information needs.

  16. Promoting Influenza Vaccination to Restaurant Employees.

    Graves, Meredith C; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A; Hammerback, Kristen; Parrish, Amanda T; Ahmed, Faruque; Zhou, Chuan; Allen, Claire L

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate an evidence-based workplace approach to increasing adult influenza vaccination levels applied in the restaurant setting We implemented an intervention and conducted a pre/post analysis to determine effect on vaccination. Eleven Seattle-area restaurants. Restaurants with 25+ employees speaking English or Spanish and over 18 years. Restaurants received influenza vaccination promotion materials, assistance arranging on-site vaccination events, and free influenza vaccinations for employees. Pre/post employee surveys of vaccination status with direct observation and employer interviews to evaluate implementation. We conducted descriptive analysis of employee survey data and performed qualitative analysis of implementation data. To assess intervention effect, we used a mixed-effects logistic regression model with a restaurant-specific random effect. Vaccination levels increased from 26% to 46% (adjusted odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.69, 3.22), with 428 employees surveyed preintervention, 305 surveyed postintervention, and response rates of 73% and 55%, respectively. The intervention was effective across subgroups, but there were restaurant-level differences. An access-based workplace intervention can increase influenza vaccination levels in restaurant employees, but restaurant-level factors may influence success. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  17. Consumentenonderzoek in het Restaurant van de Toekomst

    Wijk, de R.A.; Gorselink, M.; Steenbekkers, L.P.A.; Wabeke, M.; Thomasson, T.

    2010-01-01

    Miljoenen mensen lunchen dagelijks op hun werk. Over bijvoorbeeld motieven bij de keuze van maaltijdcomponenten, de invloed van de inrichting van het restaurant of variaties in het assortiment op dit keuzegedrag is weinig tot niets bekend. In het Restaurant van de Toekomst doet de Consumer Science

  18. Survey of restaurants regarding smoking policies.

    Williams, Alcia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Knight, Susan; Hiller, Marc; Pelletier, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The New Hampshire Indoor Smoking Act was implemented in 1994 to protect the public's health by regulating smoking in enclosed places. A survey was conducted of New Hampshire restaurants to determine smoking policies, to determine restaurant characteristics associated with smoking policies, and to evaluate compliance with the Indoor Smoking Act. A list of New Hampshire restaurants was obtained from a marketing firm. Establishments were selected randomly until 400 had completed a 22-question telephone survey. Forty-four percent of restaurants permitted smoking. Characteristics positively associated with permitting smoking were being a non-fast-food restaurant, selling alcohol, selling tobacco, and having greater than the median number of seats. Of restaurants permitting smoking, 96.1% had a designated smoking area, 87.0% had a ventilation system to minimize secondhand smoke, 83.6% had a physical barrier between smoking and nonsmoking areas, and 53.1% exhibited signs marking the smoking area. Forty percent of restaurants permitting smoking met all four requirements of the Indoor Smoking Act. Smoking policies differ, by type of restaurant. Compliance with the Indoor Smoking Act is low.

  19. Sodium levels in Canadian fast-food and sit-down restaurants.

    Scourboutakos, Mary J; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2013-01-31

    To evaluate the sodium levels in Canadian restaurant and fast-food chain menu items. Nutrition information was collected from the websites of major sit-down (n=20) and fast-food (n=65) restaurants across Canada in 2010 and a database was constructed. Four thousand and forty-four meal items, baked goods, side dishes and children's items were analyzed. Sodium levels were compared to the recommended adequate intake level (AI), tolerable upper intake level (UL) and the US National Sodium Reduction Initiative (NSRI) targets. On average, individual sit-down restaurant menu items contained 1455 mg sodium/serving (or 97% of the AI level of 1500 mg/day). Forty percent of all sit-down restaurant items exceeded the AI for sodium and more than 22% of sit-down restaurant stir fry entrées, sandwiches/wraps, ribs, and pasta entrées with meat/seafood exceeded the daily UL for sodium (2300 mg). Fast-food restaurant meal items contained, on average, 1011 mg sodium (68% of the daily AI), while side dishes (from sit-down and fast-food restaurants) contained 736 mg (49%). Children's meal items contained, on average, 790 mg/serving (66% of the sodium AI for children of 1200 mg/day); a small number of children's items exceeded the children's daily UL. On average, 52% of establishments exceeded the 2012 NSRI density targets and 69% exceeded the 2014 targets. The sodium content in Canadian restaurant foods is alarmingly high. A population-wide sodium reduction strategy needs to address the high levels of sodium in restaurant foods.

  20. The role of tax audit as a component of restaurants` financial state audit

    T.M. Omelianchuk; B.V. Kostyk

    2015-01-01

    The necessity of tax audit in the process of audit the financial state the enterprises of restaurant economy arises through accumulation in the balance sheet information about the state of fiscal discipline in such forms like the debt on payment taxes, fees and other payments to the budget. In connection with the widespread scientific pluralism views, the purpose of the article is an analysis the role of the tax audit of the company in restaurant facilities today. Dialectical method of ...

  1. The Impact of the Iowa Franchise Law on Restaurant Franchisor Expansion Strategy,

    1997-06-18

    the federal and state level to attempt to prevent franchisor abuses. The 1992 Iowa Franchise Law has been called the most controversial and restrictive...its 1995 Amendments on restaurant franchisor expansion strategy, litigation with franchisees, and operational changes. The study sought information...from US restaurant franchisors who may have been impacted by the law. The research instrument consisted of a self-administered questionnaire, which was

  2. Official CERN holidays | Restaurant opening hours

    2013-01-01

    Please note that the CERN Restaurants will have the following opening hours during the upcoming holidays: Restaurant #1 will be open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Wednesday 1 May, Thursday 9 May (Ascension Thursday) and Monday 20 May (Pentecost) - on Friday 10 May the restaurant will be open at the usual times. Restaurant #2 will be closed over the 3 official CERN holidays, but will be open on Friday 10 May at the usual times (brasserie will be closed). Restaurant #3 will be closed over the 3 official CERN holidays, as well as Friday 10 May.

  3. Making Restaurant No. 1 greener

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    The extension of a section of the terrace of Restaurant No. 1, which was part of the infrastructure consolidation programme that began in April 2009, will be completed at the end of this year. The new terrace will have an area of 1770 m² (compared with 1650 m²  today) and will stretch the length of the restaurant extension.   The new building is a striking example of the use of renewable energies, comprising high-performance photovoltaic panels with an innovative sealing system integrated in the roof that cope particularly well with low amounts of sun. The electric cables and connections of each module are hidden and integrated in the roof, giving it a uniform appearance. The roof comprises two rows of 12 modules, each measuring 11.6 m². Their total annual energy production capacity is around 14 MWh. By comparison, the building's estimated annual energy consumption is 98 MWh, depending on the conditions of use.

  4. Noise in restaurants: levels and mathematical model.

    To, Wai Ming; Chung, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (L(eq,1-h)) was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  5. Noise in restaurants: Levels and mathematical model

    Wai Ming To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (Leq,1-h was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  6. Smart use of data, information and communication: the INFORM-ed Best Local Practice Project--Grafton Base Hospital.

    Lloyd, Sheree; Collie, Jean; McInnes, Alastair; King, Kevin; Lollback, Alison; Garland, Angie

    This paper describes current progress for an information management project in a medium-sized rural hospital after the first four months of the one-year project. In particular, the article examines some of the project outcomes to date as these relate to the National Hospitals and Health Reform recommendations for the smart use of data, information and communication. The paper identifies a number of important challenges and issues that have been addressed by the project and proposes that the project findings may be used to inform similar projects in other settings. These findings relate to clinician requirements for reports, investment in human resources, development, and time for information management activities. An understanding of data collected, information systems, and presentation of clinician data are also important. The benefits of information sharing in assisting quality improvement activities are particularly relevant but, more importantly, they can engage and involve clinicians in the use of information. The importance of local data, information, and knowledge is described. Finally, issues for the health information management profession, such as working collegially and sharing knowledge and expertise, are outlined.

  7. Fourteen-year trends in sodium content of menu offerings at eight leading fast-food restaurants in the USA.

    Rudelt, Amanda; French, Simone; Harnack, Lisa

    2014-08-01

    To examine changes in the Na content of lunch/dinner menu offerings at eight of the leading fast-food restaurants in the USA between 1997/1998 and 2009/2010. Menu offerings and nutrient composition information for the menu items were obtained from archival versions of the University of Minnesota Nutrition Coordinating Center (NCC) Food and Nutrient Database. Nutrient composition information for lunch/dinner menu items sold by the fast-food restaurants included in the present study was updated in the database biannually. Menus were analysed for changes in mean Na content of all menu offerings (except beverages) and specific categories of menu items among all restaurants and for each individual restaurant. Lunch/dinner food menu of eight leading US fast-food restaurants. Between 1997/1998 and 2009/2010 the mean Na content of menu offerings across the eight restaurants increased by 23·4 %. Examining specific food categories, mean Na content of entrées by increased 17·2 % and that of condiments increased by 26·1 %. Only side dishes showed a decrease of 6·6 %. None of the restaurants examined had a decrease in Na across the lunch/dinner menu offerings over the 14 years examined. Results suggest that over the time period studied there has been no meaningful reduction in the Na content of lunch/dinner menu offerings at the leading fast-food restaurants examined in the present study.

  8. Restauration et non-restauration en art contemporain 2,

    Catherine Defeyt

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available La diversification autant que la profusion des matériaux et techniques mis en œuvre dans le champ de la création artistique actuelle implique le collectage d’une documentation tout aussi riche et diversifiée de la part des responsables de collection.  Documenter l’art contemporain, c’est précisément sur ce thème que s’est clôturé le 5 juin 2008,le cycle des journées d’étude organisé par la section conservation-restauration des œuvres sculptées de l’École supérieure des beaux-arts de Tours (Es...

  9. Restaurant volatility and the Iowa City, Iowa, smoke-free restaurant ordinance.

    Sheffer, Megan A; Squier, Christopher A; Gilmore, Gary D

    2013-01-01

    To determine the economic impact of the Iowa City, Iowa, smoke-free restaurant ordinance (IC-SFRO) using an immediate and novel approach. In this retrospective study, food permit licensure served as the measure to assess the IC-SFRO impact. The Iowa City experience provided an excellent experimental setting, as the ordinance was enacted March 1, 2002, and repealed May 7, 2003, because of preemption. The city of Coralville served as a natural control, as it is contiguous to Iowa City, has similar population demographics, and has never enacted a smoke-free restaurant ordinance. Food permit licensure data for all Iowa City and Coralville restaurants were obtained from the Johnson County Health Department. Differences in restaurant volatility were assessed using Fisher's exact probability test. The number of restaurants increased in both Iowa City and Coralville throughout the ordinance period. The ratio of the total number of restaurants in Iowa City to the total number of restaurants in the Iowa City-Coralville metropolitan area remained stable. The proportion of restaurants for each city did not differ significantly during the preordinance, ordinance, and postordinance periods. The IC-SFRO did not adversely impact the restaurant industry in terms of restaurant closures. The Iowa legislature was urged to draft evidence-based legislation, such as amending preemption of the IC-SFRO, to protect and promote the health of its communities.

  10. Location-based social networking media for restaurant promotion and food review using mobile application

    Luhur, H. S.; Widjaja, N. D.

    2014-03-01

    This paper is focusing on the development of a mobile application for searching restaurants and promotions with location based and social networking features. The main function of the application is to search restaurant information. Other functions are also available in this application such as add restaurant, add promotion, add photo, add food review, and other features including social networking features. The restaurant and promotion searching application will be developed under Android platform. Upon completion of this paper, heuristic evaluation and usability testing have been conducted. The result of both testing shows that the application is highly usable. Even though there are some usability problems discovered, the problems can be eliminated immediately by implementing the recommendations from the expert evaluators and the users as the testers of the application. Further improvement made to the application will ensure that the application can really be beneficial for the users of the application.

  11. Location-based social networking media for restaurant promotion and food review using mobile application

    Luhur H.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focusing on the development of a mobile application for searching restaurants and promotions with location based and social networking features. The main function of the application is to search restaurant information. Other functions are also available in this application such as add restaurant, add promotion, add photo, add food review, and other features including social networking features. The restaurant and promotion searching application will be developed under Android platform. Upon completion of this paper, heuristic evaluation and usability testing have been conducted. The result of both testing shows that the application is highly usable. Even though there are some usability problems discovered, the problems can be eliminated immediately by implementing the recommendations from the expert evaluators and the users as the testers of the application. Further improvement made to the application will ensure that the application can really be beneficial for the users of the application.

  12. Energy conservation awareness and practice in restaurants of Hennepin County, Minnesota.

    Brondum, Jack; Palchick, Susan

    2012-12-01

    Greenhouse gases result mainly from the combustion of fossil fuels in energy use. Restaurants use large amounts of energy in their operation but systematically gathered information about such use is lacking. Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department surveyed owners of licensed restaurants to assess their energy use and awareness of energy conservation measures. Of 434 owners surveyed, 276 (63.6%) returned completed surveys. Responses indicated that large pluralities or majorities of restaurant owners often were aware of energy-efficient methods of operation and the means to achieve greater efficiency but used such means much less frequently. For example, 57% of respondents were familiar with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star program, but only 33% of this group actually used Energy Star appliances. Given the gap between awareness and practice, opportunities for consultation and outreach to restaurant owners about energy-efficient business operation are manifold.

  13. Seashell specialties and food handling in Slovene Istria restaurants

    Tamara POKLAR VATOVEC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to evaluate the offer of seashell specialties in Slovene Istria restaurants, and to assess food safety knowledge (gained through formal and informal education as well as to assess the behaviour of food handlers in preparing shell dishes. A self-administered questionnaire was designed that included four sections: a demographic section, a general section, a restaurant menu offer, and a food safety section related to preparation of seashell specialties. Seashell specialties were offered in 41 restaurants, of which the employed food handlers 24 attended formal education and 17 informal education. Seashells specialties and seashell menus are commonly part of the culinary and gastronomic specialties along the Slovene coast, with the most frequently offered main dish being “Blue Mussels alla Busara”. Results the questionnaire indicated poor food safety knowledge and poor behaviour regardless of the (informal education of those who prepared the dishes. We propose that formal education for catering workers preparing shell dishes should be much more emphasized.

  14. Concept of restaurant reservations information system

    Štok, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In our home place we have only one inn. It's occupied mostly from Italian guests. Times are changing and buying power of Italians has declining since world financial collapse. Some fellow villagers has got an idea to rent some rooms for tourists. Inn is popular choice among guests, because is in walking distance of rooms. There is a problem with knowledge of languages, with that in mind owner of inn decided to contact me and explain the problem. There is need to create some sort of Android ap...

  15. Customer Awareness and Behavior Intention Towards the Use of Halal Logo on Restaurants

    Sabainah Bachok

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The trend of eating out leads the food service industry to the needs of managing customers and making sure that all their needs and preferences can be fulfilled. The certification and recognition of establishment also becomes the in thing in hospitality industry, which includes the certification of halal, HACCP, and ISO. Establishment with certification is useful as a marketing strategy to attract more customers. This study discusses the level of customer awareness of towards the halal logo used in some restaurants which is carried out to give evidence to restaurant operators regarding the importance of attaching the genuine halal logo in their restaurant. From the findings, it is showed that customers are do aware of the use of halal logo on restaurants. It is also a factor in choosing a restaurant. It is concluded that halal logo is one of the main factors for customers in choosing restaurants which in return can be a main strategy to attract and retain more customers in the future, not only for the local customer but also to foreigners.

  16. Electronic Document Imaging and Optical Storage Systems for Local Governments: An Introduction. Local Government Records Technical Information Series. Number 21.

    Schwartz, Stanley F.

    This publication introduces electronic document imaging systems and provides guidance for local governments in New York in deciding whether such systems should be adopted for their own records and information management purposes. It advises local governments on how to develop plans for using such technology by discussing its advantages and…

  17. Enquête de satisfaction des restaurants

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Comité de surveillance des restaurants L’Association du personnel est représentée dans plusieurs comités dont le Comité de surveillance des restaurants (CSR) qui a pour mandat : de donner son avis sur toute question relative à la politique générale de l’Organisation en matière de restauration sur le site, y compris en ce qui concerne les termes et l’attribution des contrats d’exploitation des restaurants ; de définir dans le cadre des contrats d’exploitation des restaurants, les prestations correspondant aux besoins et, dans la mesure du possible, aux désirs du personnel ; de surveiller les prestations des restaurants, y compris en ce qui concerne la qualité et la préparation des produits ; de négocier avec les concessionnaires des restaurants au sujet des tarifs et de surveill...

  18. "Tired of watching customers walk out the door because of the smoke": a content analysis of media coverage of voluntarily smokefree restaurants and bars.

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Offen, Naphtali; Yerger, Valerie; Forsyth, Susan; Malone, Ruth E

    2015-08-08

    News media are key sources of information regarding tobacco issues, and help set the tobacco control policy agenda. We examined US news coverage of voluntarily smokefree restaurants and bars in locales without mandatory policies to understand how such initiatives are perceived. We searched three online media databases (Access World News, Lexis Nexis, and Proquest) for all news items, including opinion pieces, published from 1995 to 2011. We coded retrieved items quantitatively, analyzing the volume, type, provenance, prominence, and content of news coverage. We found 986 news items, most published in local newspapers. News items conveyed unambiguous support for voluntarily smokefree establishments, regardless of venue. Mandatory policies were also frequently mentioned, and portrayed positively or neutrally. Restaurant items were more likely to mention health-related benefits of going smokefree, with bar items more likely to mention business-related benefits. Voluntary smokefree rules in bars and restaurants are regarded by news media as reasonable responses to health and business-based concerns about worker and customer exposure to secondhand smoke. As efforts continue to enact comprehensive smokefree policies to protect all in such venues, the media are likely to be supportive partners in the advocacy process, helping to generate public and policymaker support.

  19. ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES IN RESTAURANT BUSINESS

    Ivica Batinić

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern restaurant business, as part of a catering business, offers a variety of meals and beverages in restaurants and various related facilities. Promotional activities play a very important role in managing a restaurant and related facilities, because any serious restaurant facility must take all the necessary and effective measures in order to maintain regular guests and approach potential new guests. In this paper, I will write about conceptualizing restaurant business and elementary business systems in restaurant business. In a separate part, I will write about conceptualizing promotions and promotional activities as important factors in achieving better and more efficient communication of restaurants with regular and potential guests.

  20. Annual closure of the CERN restaurants

    2014-01-01

    On Friday, 19 December 2014: Restaurant 1 will close at 4 p.m. and the newspaper kiosk at 2.30 p.m. The ‘Grab & Go’ stand will not open at all that day. Restaurant 2 and the snack-bars in Buildings 13, 40 and 30 will close at 3 p.m. and the snack-bars in Buildings 6 and 54 at 11 a.m. Restaurant 3 will close at 4 p.m. and the coffee bars in Buildings 864 and 865 at noon. All outlets will open again at the usual times on Monday, 5 January 2015.

  1. RESTAURANT Nr 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2003-01-01

    OPENING TIMES in JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant nr. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday, January 5 to Sunday February 29, 2004: Kiosquefrom Monday to Friday07:30 - 17:00 hrs Restaurant from Monday to FridaySaturday / Sunday 07:00 - 23:00 hrs08:00 - 21:00 hrs Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00 hrs, then from 18:00 to 19:30 hrs. Restaurant Supervisory Committee

  2. >RESTAURANT Nr 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2004-01-01

    Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant nr. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday, January 5 to Sunday February 29, 2004: - Kiosque from Monday to Friday 07:30 - 17:00 hrs - Restaurant from Monday to Friday Saturday / Sunday 07:00 - 23:00 hrs08:00 - 21:00 hrs Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00 hrs, then from 18:00 to 19:30 hrs. Restaurant Supervisory Committee

  3. Calorie labeling, fast food purchasing and restaurant visits.

    Elbel, Brian; Mijanovich, Tod; Dixon, L Beth; Abrams, Courtney; Weitzman, Beth; Kersh, Rogan; Auchincloss, Amy H; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is a pressing public health problem without proven population-wide solutions. Researchers sought to determine whether a city-mandated policy requiring calorie labeling at fast food restaurants was associated with consumer awareness of labels, calories purchased and fast food restaurant visits. Difference-in-differences design, with data collected from consumers outside fast food restaurants and via a random digit dial telephone survey, before (December 2009) and after (June 2010) labeling in Philadelphia (which implemented mandatory labeling) and Baltimore (matched comparison city). Measures included: self-reported use of calorie information, calories purchased determined via fast food receipts, and self-reported weekly fast-food visits. The consumer sample was predominantly Black (71%), and high school educated (62%). Postlabeling, 38% of Philadelphia consumers noticed the calorie labels for a 33% point (P < 0.001) increase relative to Baltimore. Calories purchased and number of fast food visits did not change in either city over time. While some consumers report noticing and using calorie information, no population level changes were noted in calories purchased or fast food visits. Other controlled studies are needed to examine the longer term impact of labeling as it becomes national law. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  4. FOOD SECURITY, NUTRITION AND SUSTAINABILITY AT RESTAURANT UNIVERSITY

    Thainara Araujo Franklin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthy eating is one of the factors that may influence the establishment of the health of an individual and the health quality of food consumed. Faced with the daily rush, with long days of activities, a large number of the population uses University restaurants for food. Thus, these sites should pay attention to the variables involved in the process of food production through the use of safe food and adequate nutrition for consumers. For this reason, knowledge of food security and sustainable development condition are relevant for discussion and information about employee training for food handling and conservation of these. Thus, the sanitary conditions and knowledge of restaurant employees on this topic were collected through a questionnaire composed of 18 questions containing information on sociodemographic, food security, nutrition and sustainability. We used the Packcage The Statistical Software for Social Sciences for Windows (SPSS version 21.0 for tabulation and analysis of data. It was found that most employees responded correctly to questions relating to hygiene and sanitary practices and have knowledge about the sustainable development of the restaurant.

  5. Calorie Labeling in Chain Restaurants and Body Weight: Evidence from New York.

    Restrepo, Brandon J

    2017-10-01

    This study analyzes the impact of local mandatory calorie labeling laws implemented by New York jurisdictions on body weight. The analysis indicates that on average the point-of-purchase provision of calorie information on chain restaurant menus reduced body mass index (BMI) by 1.5% and lowered the risk of obesity by 12%. Quantile regression results indicate that calorie labeling has similar impacts across the BMI distribution. An analysis of heterogeneity suggests that calorie labeling has a larger impact on the body weight of lower income individuals, especially lower income minorities. The estimated impacts of calorie labeling on physical activity, smoking, and the consumption of alcoholic beverages, fruits, and vegetables are small in magnitude, which suggests that other margins of adjustment drive the body-weight impacts estimated here. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Economic effect of restaurant smoking restrictions on restaurant business in Massachusetts, 1992 to 1998

    Bartosch, W; Pope, G

    2002-01-01

    Design: Analysis used a pre/post-quasi-experimental design that compared town meals tax receipts before and after the imposition of highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies in adopting versus non-adopting communities. The effect of restaurant smoking policies was estimated using a fixed effects regression model, entering a panel of 84 months of data for the 239 towns in the study. A separate model estimated the effect of restaurant smoking policies on establishments that served alcohol.

  7. Are fast food restaurants an environmental risk factor for obesity?

    Jeffery, Robert W; Baxter, Judy; McGuire, Maureen; Linde, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective Eating at "fast food" restaurants has increased and is linked to obesity. This study examined whether living or working near "fast food" restaurants is associated with body weight. Methods A telephone survey of 1033 Minnesota residents assessed body height and weight, frequency of eating at restaurants, and work and home addresses. Proximity of home and work to restaurants was assessed by Global Index System (GIS) methodology. Results Eating at "fast food" restaurants was p...

  8. Visual attention spreads broadly but selects information locally.

    Shioiri, Satoshi; Honjyo, Hajime; Kashiwase, Yoshiyuki; Matsumiya, Kazumichi; Kuriki, Ichiro

    2016-10-19

    Visual attention spreads over a range around the focus as the spotlight metaphor describes. Spatial spread of attentional enhancement and local selection/inhibition are crucial factors determining the profile of the spatial attention. Enhancement and ignorance/suppression are opposite effects of attention, and appeared to be mutually exclusive. Yet, no unified view of the factors has been provided despite their necessity for understanding the functions of spatial attention. This report provides electroencephalographic and behavioral evidence for the attentional spread at an early stage and selection/inhibition at a later stage of visual processing. Steady state visual evoked potential showed broad spatial tuning whereas the P3 component of the event related potential showed local selection or inhibition of the adjacent areas. Based on these results, we propose a two-stage model of spatial attention with broad spread at an early stage and local selection at a later stage.

  9. Trends in Nutrient Content of Children's Menu Items in U.S. Chain Restaurants.

    Moran, Alyssa J; Block, Jason P; Goshev, Simo G; Bleich, Sara N; Roberto, Christina A

    2017-03-01

    Restaurant food is widely consumed by children and is associated with poor diet quality. Although many restaurants have made voluntary commitments to improve the nutritional quality of children's menus, it is unclear whether this has led to meaningful changes. Nutrients in children's menu items (n=4,016) from 45 chain restaurants were extracted from the nutrition information database MenuStat. Bootstrapped mixed linear models estimated changes in mean calories, saturated fat, and sodium in children's menu items between 2012 and 2013, 2014, and 2015. Changes in nutrient content of these items over time were compared among restaurants participating in the Kids LiveWell initiative and non-participating restaurants. Types of available children's beverages were also examined. Data were analyzed in 2016. There was a significant increase in mean beverage calories from 2012 to 2013 (6, 95% CI=0.8, 10.6) and from 2012 to 2014 (11, 95% CI=3.7, 18.3), but no change between 2012 and 2015, and no differences in nutrient content of other items over time. Restaurants participating in Kids LiveWell reduced entrée calories between 2012 and 2013 (-24, 95% CI= -40.4, -7.2) and between 2012 and 2014 (-40, 95% CI= -68.1, -11.4) and increased side dish calories between 2012 and 2015 (49, 95% CI=4.6, 92.7) versus non-participating restaurants. Sugar-sweetened beverages consistently constituted 80% of children's beverages, with soda declining and flavored milks increasing between 2012 and 2015. Results suggest little progress toward improving nutrition in children's menu items. Efforts are needed to engage restaurants in offering healthful children's meals. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Trends in Nutrient Content of Children's Menu Items in U.S. Chain Restaurants

    Moran, Alyssa J.; Block, Jason P.; Goshev, Simo G.; Bleich, Sara N.; Roberto, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Restaurant food is widely consumed by children and is associated with poor diet quality. Although many restaurants have made voluntary commitments to improve the nutritional quality of children's menus, it is unclear whether this has led to meaningful changes. Methods Nutrients in children's menu items (n=4,016) from 45 chain restaurants were extracted from the nutrition information database MenuStat. Bootstrapped mixed linear models estimated changes in mean calories, saturated fat, and sodium in children's menu items between 2012 and 2013, 2014, and 2015. Changes in nutrient content of these items over time were compared among restaurants participating in the Kids LiveWell initiative and non-participating restaurants. Types of available children's beverages were also examined. Data were analyzed in 2016. Results There was a significant increase in mean beverage calories from 2012 to 2013 (6, 95% CI=0.8, 10.6) and from 2012 to 2014 (11, 95% CI=3.7, 18.3), but no change between 2012 and 2015, and no differences in nutrient content of other items over time. Restaurants participating in Kids LiveWell reduced entrée calories between 2012 and 2013 (−24, 95% CI= −40.4, −7.2) and between 2012 and 2014 (−40, 95% CI= −68.1, −11.4) and increased side dish calories between 2012 and 2015 (49, 95% CI=4.6, 92.7) versus non-participating restaurants. Sugar-sweetened beverages consistently constituted 80% of children's beverages, with soda declining and flavored milks increasing between 2012 and 2015. Conclusions Results suggest little progress toward improving nutrition in children's menu items. Efforts are needed to engage restaurants in offering healthful children's meals. PMID:28089130

  11. The role of tax audit as a component of restaurants` financial state audit

    T.M. Omelianchuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of tax audit in the process of audit the financial state the enterprises of restaurant economy arises through accumulation in the balance sheet information about the state of fiscal discipline in such forms like the debt on payment taxes, fees and other payments to the budget. In connection with the widespread scientific pluralism views, the purpose of the article is an analysis the role of the tax audit of the company in restaurant facilities today. Dialectical method of cognition of the essence of the tax audit and methods of comparison, generalization, systematization and synthesis of the study of the peculiarities of tax audit of the company in restaurant facilities were used for achievement the purpose of research. Discovered the features of realization the tax audit оn the company of the restaurant facilities. Studied the state the market development of the external audit of taxes and tax audit in Ukraine. Have been identified the features of the system of taxation of business entities in the restaurant industry. The scope of results’ application are the participants’ assessment of the financial state and fiscal capacity of the enterprise restaurant economy.

  12. A Cluster Randomized Trial to Promote Healthy Menu Items for Children: The Kids' Choice Restaurant Program.

    Ayala, Guadalupe X; Castro, Iana A; Pickrel, Julie L; Lin, Shih-Fan; Williams, Christine B; Madanat, Hala; Jun, Hee-Jin; Zive, Michelle

    2017-12-01

    Evidence indicates that restaurant-based interventions have the potential to promote healthier purchasing and improve the nutrients consumed. This study adds to this body of research by reporting the results of a trial focused on promoting the sale of healthy child menu items in independently owned restaurants. Eight pair-matched restaurants that met the eligibility criteria were randomized to a menu-only versus a menu-plus intervention condition. Both of the conditions implemented new healthy child menu items and received support for implementation for eight weeks. The menu-plus condition also conducted a marketing campaign involving employee trainings and promotional materials. Process evaluation data captured intervention implementation. Sales of new and existing child menu items were tracked for 16 weeks. Results indicated that the interventions were implemented with moderate to high fidelity depending on the component. Sales of new healthy child menu items occurred immediately, but decreased during the post-intervention period in both conditions. Sales of existing child menu items demonstrated a time by condition effect with restaurants in the menu-plus condition observing significant decreases and menu-only restaurants observing significant increases in sales of existing child menu items. Additional efforts are needed to inform sustainable methods for improving access to healthy foods and beverages in restaurants.

  13. A Cluster Randomized Trial to Promote Healthy Menu Items for Children: The Kids’ Choice Restaurant Program

    Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Castro, Iana A.; Pickrel, Julie L.; Lin, Shih-Fan; Williams, Christine B.; Madanat, Hala; Jun, Hee-Jin; Zive, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Evidence indicates that restaurant-based interventions have the potential to promote healthier purchasing and improve the nutrients consumed. This study adds to this body of research by reporting the results of a trial focused on promoting the sale of healthy child menu items in independently owned restaurants. Eight pair-matched restaurants that met the eligibility criteria were randomized to a menu-only versus a menu-plus intervention condition. Both of the conditions implemented new healthy child menu items and received support for implementation for eight weeks. The menu-plus condition also conducted a marketing campaign involving employee trainings and promotional materials. Process evaluation data captured intervention implementation. Sales of new and existing child menu items were tracked for 16 weeks. Results indicated that the interventions were implemented with moderate to high fidelity depending on the component. Sales of new healthy child menu items occurred immediately, but decreased during the post-intervention period in both conditions. Sales of existing child menu items demonstrated a time by condition effect with restaurants in the menu-plus condition observing significant decreases and menu-only restaurants observing significant increases in sales of existing child menu items. Additional efforts are needed to inform sustainable methods for improving access to healthy foods and beverages in restaurants. PMID:29194392

  14. A Cluster Randomized Trial to Promote Healthy Menu Items for Children: The Kids’ Choice Restaurant Program

    Guadalupe X. Ayala

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that restaurant-based interventions have the potential to promote healthier purchasing and improve the nutrients consumed. This study adds to this body of research by reporting the results of a trial focused on promoting the sale of healthy child menu items in independently owned restaurants. Eight pair-matched restaurants that met the eligibility criteria were randomized to a menu-only versus a menu-plus intervention condition. Both of the conditions implemented new healthy child menu items and received support for implementation for eight weeks. The menu-plus condition also conducted a marketing campaign involving employee trainings and promotional materials. Process evaluation data captured intervention implementation. Sales of new and existing child menu items were tracked for 16 weeks. Results indicated that the interventions were implemented with moderate to high fidelity depending on the component. Sales of new healthy child menu items occurred immediately, but decreased during the post-intervention period in both conditions. Sales of existing child menu items demonstrated a time by condition effect with restaurants in the menu-plus condition observing significant decreases and menu-only restaurants observing significant increases in sales of existing child menu items. Additional efforts are needed to inform sustainable methods for improving access to healthy foods and beverages in restaurants.

  15. Nutrition labeling and value size pricing at fast-food restaurants: a consumer perspective.

    O'Dougherty, Maureen; Harnack, Lisa J; French, Simone A; Story, Mary; Oakes, J Michael; Jeffery, Robert W

    2006-01-01

    This pilot study examined nutrition-related attitudes that may affect food choices at fast-food restaurants, including consumer attitudes toward nutrition labeling of fast foods and elimination of value size pricing. A convenience sample of 79 fast-food restaurant patrons aged 16 and above (78.5% white, 55% female, mean age 41.2 [17.1]) selected meals from fast-food restaurant menus that varied as to whether nutrition information was provided and value pricing included and completed a survey and interview on nutrition-related attitudes. Only 57.9% of participants rated nutrition as important when buying fast food. Almost two thirds (62%) supported a law requiring nutrition labeling on restaurant menus. One third (34%) supported a law requiring restaurants to offer lower prices on smaller instead of bigger-sized portions. This convenience sample of fast-food patrons supported nutrition labels on menus. More research is needed with larger samples on whether point-of-purchase nutrition labeling at fast-food restaurants raises perceived importance of nutrition when eating out.

  16. Correlates of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Purchased for Children at Fast-Food Restaurants.

    Cantor, Jonathan; Breck, Andrew; Elbel, Brian

    2016-11-01

    To determine consumer and fast-food purchase characteristics associated with the purchase of a sugar-sweetened beverage, as well as calories and grams of sugar, for children at a fast-food restaurant. We completed cross-sectional analyses of fast-food restaurant receipts and point-of-purchase surveys (n = 483) collected during 2013 and 2014 in New York City and Newark and Jersey City, New Jersey. Caregivers purchased beverages for half of all children in our sample. Approximately 60% of these beverages were sugar-sweetened beverages. Fast-food meals with sugar-sweetened beverages had, on average, 179 more calories than meals with non-sugar-sweetened beverages. Being an adolescent or male, having a caregiver with a high school degree or less, having a caregiver who saw the posted calorie information, ordering a combination meal, and eating the meal in the restaurant were associated with ordering a sugar-sweetened beverage. Purchases that included a combination meal or were consumed in the restaurant included more beverage grams of sugar and calories. Characteristics of fast-food purchases appear to have the largest and most important association to beverage calories for children at fast-food restaurants. Targeting fast-food restaurants, particularly combination meals, may improve childhood obesity rates.

  17. Children inhibit global information when the forest is dense and local information when the forest is sparse.

    Krakowski, Claire-Sara; Borst, Grégoire; Vidal, Julie; Houdé, Olivier; Poirel, Nicolas

    2018-09-01

    Visual environments are composed of global shapes and local details that compete for attentional resources. In adults, the global level is processed more rapidly than the local level, and global information must be inhibited in order to process local information when the local information and global information are in conflict. Compared with adults, children present less of a bias toward global visual information and appear to be more sensitive to the density of local elements that constitute the global level. The current study aimed, for the first time, to investigate the key role of inhibition during global/local processing in children. By including two different conditions of global saliency during a negative priming procedure, the results showed that when the global level was salient (dense hierarchical figures), 7-year-old children and adults needed to inhibit the global level to process the local information. However, when the global level was less salient (sparse hierarchical figures), only children needed to inhibit the local level to process the global information. These results confirm a weaker global bias and the greater impact of saliency in children than in adults. Moreover, the results indicate that, regardless of age, inhibition of the most salient hierarchical level is systematically required to select the less salient but more relevant level. These findings have important implications for future research in this area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Going Smokefree Matters - Bars and Restaurants Infographic

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Going Smokefree Matters – Bars and Restaurants Infographic which outlines key facts related to the effects of secondhand smoke exposure in bars and...

  19. Going Smokefree Matters - Bars and Restaurants Infographic

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Going Smokefree Matters – Bars and Restaurants Infographic which outlines key facts related to the effects of secondhand smoke exposure in bars and...

  20. Reported Influences on Restaurant-Type Food Selection Decision Making in a Grocery Store Chain.

    Bachman, Jessica Lynne; Arigo, Danielle

    2018-06-01

    To examine food decision-making priorities for restaurant-type foods at grocery stores and determine whether adding calorie information, as required by federal menu labeling laws, affected decision-making priorities. Natural experiment: intervention and control groups with baseline and follow-up. Regional grocery store chain with 9 locations. Participants (n = 393; mean age, 54.8 ± 15.1 years) were primarily women (71%) and Caucasian (95%). Data were collected before and after calorie information was added to restaurant-type foods at 4 intervention locations. Primary influencers of food selection decision making for restaurant-type foods and frequency of use of nutrition information. Quantitative analysis examined the top 3 influencers of food selections and chi-square goodness of fit test determined whether the calorie labeling intervention changed food decision-making priorities. Qualitative data were used to describe responses. Taste, cost, and convenience were the most frequently reported influencers of restaurant-type food selections; 20% of participants rated calories as influential. Calorie labeling did not affect food selection decision making; 16% of participants in intervention stores noticed calorie labels. Qualitative explanations confirmed these findings. Menu labeling laws increase access to calorie information; however, use of this information is limited. Additional interventions are needed to encourage healthier restaurant-type food selections in grocery stores. Copyright © 2018 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficient Information Access for Location-Based Services in Mobile Environments

    Lee, Chi Keung

    2009-01-01

    The demand for pervasive access of location-related information (e.g., local traffic, restaurant locations, navigation maps, weather conditions, pollution index, etc.) fosters a tremendous application base of "Location Based Services (LBSs)". Without loss of generality, we model location-related information as "spatial objects" and the accesses…

  2. Collaboration in informal settlements: tackling flooding with a local ...

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... In most developing countries, solid waste management is a significant challenge, ... Home · Resources · Stories ... Adaptation programs must be implemented with general local economic development programs. Collaborative governance and integrated management can help to effectively address the ...

  3. Profit by conserving energy in your restaurant

    1981-01-01

    This manual is aimed at the Canadian restaurant sector with a view of promoting sound energy conservation practices. Monitoring is recommended to identify energy consumption and measure results of a conservation effects. These efforts can be done with respect to selection, operation, and maintenance of restaurant equipment used in food preparation, HVAC systems, refrigeration, water heating, and lighting. Overall building design and planning of new installations are also considered. 27 figs.

  4. Application for Suggesting Restaurants Using Clustering Algorithms

    Iulia Alexandra IANCU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present an application whose purpose is to make suggestions of restaurants to users. The application uses as input the descriptions of restaurants, reviews, user reviews available on the specialized Internet sites and blogs. In the application there are used processing techniques of natural language implemented using parsers, clustering algorithms and techniques for data collection from the Internet through web crawlers.

  5. Reingeniería del restaurant clarita

    Gómez Briones, Pedro; Fernández Ruiz, Víctor

    2010-01-01

    This work is based on the concepts used for administrative, financial and service reengineering applied to Restaurant Clarita; which has remained in the business of catering sector for over 30 years, located in the city of Guayaquil, experiencing a gradually growth, based on the quality of the products, as well as the personalized attention of his owner. Restaurant Clarita offers its customers, prepared meals, such as soups, mashed potatoes, meat, beans, pork chop rice, as well...

  6. Service orientation of the restaurant employees

    Gagić, Snježana; Vuković-Jovičić, Ana; Petrović, Marko D.

    2017-01-01

    The service orientation program developed for restaurant employees can be a competitive advantage for a restaurant operation. Service orientation has been characterized as the disposition of employees to be helpful, thoughtful, considerate, and co-operative towards customers. Customer-oriented behaviors include: helping customers; helping customers to assess their needs; offering service that will satisfy those needs; describing services accurately; avoiding deceptive manipulations; and avoid...

  7. Wine Price Markup in California Restaurants

    Amspacher, William

    2011-01-01

    The study quantifies the relationship between retail wine price and restaurant mark-up. Ordinary Least Squares regressions were run to estimate how restaurant mark-up responded to retail price. Separate regressions were run for white wine, red wine, and both red and white combined. Both slope and intercept coefficients for each of these regressions were highly significant and indicated the expected inverse relationship between retail price and mark-up.

  8. Intergovernmental Information Highways for Local Police Organizations: A Case Study

    Vidal, Denise Helena

    2013-01-01

    A lack of communication, information sharing, and a centralized and unified intelligence repository to gather, maintain, and analyze intelligence information before the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks limited the ability of U.S. law enforcement to share intelligence. The problem addressed in this case study was the lack of multiagency…

  9. Restaurant menu labelling: Is it worth adding sodium to the label?

    Scourboutakos, Mary J; Corey, Paul N; Mendoza, Julio; Henson, Spencer J; L'Abbe, Mary R

    2014-07-31

    Several provincial and federal bills have recommended various forms of menu labelling that would require information beyond just calories; however, the additional benefit of including sodium information is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether sodium information on menus helps consumers make lower-sodium choices and to understand what other factors influence the effect of menu labelling on consumers' meal choices. A total of 3,080 Canadian consumers completed an online survey that included a repeated measures experiment in which consumers were asked to select what they would typically order from four mock-restaurant menus. Subsequently, consumers were randomly allocated to see one of three menu-labelling treatments (calories; calories and sodium; or calories, sodium and serving size) and were given the option to change their order. There was a significant difference in the proportion of consumers who changed their order, varying from 17% to 30%, depending on the restaurant type. After participants had seen menu labelling, sodium levels decreased in all treatments (p<0.0001). However, in three of the four restaurant types, consumers who saw calorie and sodium information ordered meals with significantly less sodium than consumers who saw only calorie information (p<0.01). Consumers who saw sodium labelling decreased the sodium level of their meal by an average of 171-384 mg, depending on the restaurant. In the subset of consumers who saw sodium information and chose to change their order, sodium levels decreased by an average of 681-1,360 mg, depending on the restaurant. Sex, intent to lose weight and the amount of calories ordered at baseline were the most important predictors of who used menu labelling. Eighty percent of survey panelists wanted to see nutrition information when dining out. Including sodium information alongside calorie information may result in a larger decrease in the amount of sodium ordered by restaurant-goers.

  10. Designing an energy-efficient quick service restaurant

    Young, R.; Spata, A.J.; Turnbull, P.; Allen, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    Food service operators typically focus on controlling labor and food costs in order to increase profits. Energy, which typically represents 2% to 6% of the total cost to operate, is often a lower priority due to the complexity of food service operations and the lack of practical information. However, in an increasing competitive market, operators are actively seeking opportunities to further reduce overhead, and energy represents a good candidate. This paper presents an overview of the design and application of energy-efficient technologies to a quick service restaurant (QSR) and the resulting energy savings. Included in the discussion are the relevance of energy efficiency in a QSR, the criteria for choosing appropriate energy-efficient technologies, the replication of results to other restaurants, and the performance of the individual energy-saving technologies. Three different techniques were used to estimate energy savings of the energy-efficient technologies, with results in the range of 12% to 18% savings in overall annual restaurant energy costs.

  11. Sodium in Store and Restaurant Food Environments - Guam, 2015.

    Jackson, Sandra L; VanFrank, Brenna K; Lundeen, Elizabeth; Uncangco, Alyssa; Alam, Lawrence; King, Sallyann M Coleman; Cogswell, Mary E

    2016-05-27

    Compared with the United States overall, Guam has higher mortality rates from cardiovascular disease and stroke (1). Excess sodium intake can increase blood pressure and risk for cardiovascular disease (2,3). To determine the availability and promotion of lower-sodium options in the nutrition environment, the Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) conducted an assessment in September 2015 using previously validated tools adapted to include sodium measures. Stores (N = 114) and restaurants (N = 63) were randomly sampled by region (north, central, and south). Data from 100 stores and 62 restaurants were analyzed and weighted to account for the sampling design. Across the nine product types assessed, lower-sodium products were offered less frequently than regular-sodium products (prestaurants engaged in promotion practices such as posting sodium information (3%) or identifying lower-sodium entrées (1%). Improving the availability and promotion of lower-sodium foods in stores and restaurants could help support healthier eating in Guam.

  12. Impulsive, Disinhibited Behavior—Dining in a Restaurant

    Ronald C. Hamdy MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dining in a restaurant with a loved one who has dementia can be an ordeal, especially if the expectations of the caregiver do not match those of the patient and the restaurant environment is not suitable for patients with dementia. The size of the dining area, lighting, background music or noise, décor of the room, number of customers, variety of the items on the menu, number of plates and cutlery on the table, in addition to flowers, candles, and other decorations on the table are all potent distractors. There are so many stimuli; the patient can be overwhelmed with information overload and not able to focus on the main purpose of the event: have dinner and especially enjoy the other person’s company. In this case scenario, we present a 62-year-old man diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD. His daughter “invited” him to have dinner with her at a very fancy restaurant to celebrate her promotion at work. Unfortunately, whereas the evening started very well, it had a catastrophic ending. We discuss what went wrong in the patient/daughter interaction and how the catastrophic ending could have been avoided or averted.

  13. Salud Tiene Sabor: a model for healthier restaurants in a Latino community.

    Nevarez, Carmen R; Lafleur, Mariah S; Schwarte, Liz U; Rodin, Beth; de Silva, Pri; Samuels, Sarah E

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has risen nationally in recent decades, and is exceptionally high in low-income communities of color such as South Los Angeles CA. Independently owned restaurants participating in the Salud Tiene Sabor program at ethnic foods marketplace Mercado La Paloma in South Los Angeles are responding to the childhood obesity crisis by posting calories for menu items and providing nutrition information to patrons. To evaluate whether menu labeling and nutrition information at point of purchase have an influence on availability of healthy food options, patron awareness of calorie information, and restaurant owners' support of the program. A case-study design using mixed methods included restaurant owner and stakeholder interviews, patron surveys, and environmental assessments. Data were collected using originally designed tools, and analyzed in 2009-2011. Healthy eating options were available at the Mercado La Paloma; restaurant owners and the larger community supported the Salud Tiene Sabor program; 33% of patrons reported calorie information-influenced purchase decisions. Owners of independent restaurants have an important role in improving access to healthy foods in low-income, Latino communities. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Parents' meal choices for their children at fast food and family restaurants with different menu labeling presentations.

    Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Youngmi

    2018-06-01

    This study examined the effect of nutrition labeling formats on parents' food choices for their children at different restaurant types. An online survey was conducted with 1,980 parents of children aged 3-12 years. Participants were randomly assigned to fast food or family restaurant scenarios, and one of four menu stimuli conditions: no labeling, low-calorie symbol (symbol), numeric value (numeric), and both low-calorie symbol and numeric value (symbol + numeric). Participants selected menu items for their children. Menu choices and total calories were compared by nutrition labeling formats in each type of the restaurant. Low-calorie item selections were scored and a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted for an interaction effect between restaurant and labeling type. In the fast food restaurant group, parents presented with low-calorie symbols selected the lowest calorie items more often than those not presented with the format. Parents in the symbol + numeric condition selected significantly fewer calories (653 kcal) than those in the no labeling (677 kcal) or numeric conditions (674 kcal) ( P = 0.006). In the family restaurant group, no significant difference were observed among different labeling conditions. A significant interaction between restaurant and labeling type on low-calorie selection score (F = 6.03, P restaurant type to jointly affect parents' food choices for their children. The provision of easily interpretable nutritional information format at fast food restaurants may encourage healthier food choices of parents for their children; however, the effects were negligible at family restaurants.

  15. Customer responses to mandatory menu labeling at full-service restaurants.

    Auchincloss, Amy H; Mallya, Giridhar G; Leonberg, Beth L; Ricchezza, Andrew; Glanz, Karen; Schwarz, Donald F

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, Philadelphia enacted a menu-labeling law requiring full-service restaurant chains to list values for calories, sodium, fat, and carbohydrates for each item on all printed menus. The goal of the study was to determine whether purchase decisions at full-service restaurants varied depending on the presence of labeling. In August 2011, this cross-sectional study collected 648 customer surveys and transaction receipts at seven restaurant outlets of one large full-service restaurant chain. Two outlets had menu labeling (case sites); five outlets did not (control sites). Outcomes included differences in calories and nutrients purchased and customers' reported use of nutrition information when ordering. Data were analyzed in 2012. Mean age was 37 years; 60% were female; 50% were black/African-American and reported incomes ≥$60,000. Customers purchased food with approximately 1600 kcal (food plus beverage, 1800 kcal); 3200 mg sodium; and 35 g saturated fat. After adjustment for confounders, customers at labeled restaurants purchased food with 151 fewer kilocalories (95% CI=-270, -33); 224 mg less sodium (95% CI=-457, +8); and 3.7 g less saturated fat (95% CI=-7.4, -0.1) compared to customers at unlabeled restaurants (or 155 less kilocalories from food plus beverage, 95% CI=-284, -27). Those reporting that nutrition information affected their order purchased 400 fewer food calories, 370 mg less sodium, and 10 g less saturated fat. Mandatory menu labeling was associated with better food choices among a segment of the public dining at full-service restaurants. Consumer education on the availability and use of nutrition information may extend the impact of menu labeling. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine Published by American Journal of Preventive Medicine All rights reserved.

  16. What menu changes do restaurants make after joining a voluntary restaurant recognition program?

    Gase, Lauren N; Kaur, Mandip; Dunning, Lauren; Montes, Christine; Kuo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Programs that recognize restaurants for offering healthful options have emerged as a popular strategy to address the obesity epidemic; however, program fidelity and business responses to such programs are rarely assessed. This study sought to examine how retail restaurants in Los Angeles County chose to comply with participation criteria required by the Choose Health LA Restaurants initiative in the region; the program recognizes restaurants for offering reduced-size portions and healthy children's meals. Menus of all restaurants that joined within 1 year of program launch (n = 17 restaurant brands) were assessed for changes. Nine of the 17 brands made changes to their menus to meet participation criteria for reduced-size portions while 8 of the 10 restaurant brands that offered children's menus made changes to improve the healthfulness of children's meals. Results of this comparative assessment lend support to restaurant compliance with program criteria and menu improvements, even though they are voluntary, representing an important step toward implementing this strategy in the retail environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Localized corrosion information using high resolution measurement devices

    Ambat, Rajan

    2005-01-01

    High performance demand for several engineering alloys and components, and miniaturization of electronics and development of MEMS requires better understanding of local corrosion characteristics frequently down to µm scale. This is because in metallic materials corrosion is a sensitive function...... in conjunction with microstructural analysis, using advanced microscopic tools, becomes very important. Corrosion of microelectronics circuits and MEMs is also a recent problem, which demands measurement resolution down to few microns as the components are extremely small, and measurement needs to be carried out...

  18. Obstacles to nutrition labeling in restaurants.

    Almanza, B A; Nelson, D; Chai, S

    1997-02-01

    This study determined the major obstacles that foodservices face regarding nutrition labeling. Survey questionnaire was conducted in May 1994. In addition to demographic questions, the directors were asked questions addressing willingness, current practices, and perceived obstacles related to nutrition labeling. Sixty-eight research and development directors of the largest foodservice corporations as shown in Restaurants & Institutions magazine's list of the top 400 largest foodservices (July 1993). P tests were used to determine significance within a group for the number of foodservices that were currently using nutrition labeling, perceived impact of nutrition labeling on sales, and perceived responsibility to add nutrition labels. Regression analysis was used to determine the importance of factors on willingness to label. Response rate was 45.3%. Most companies were neutral about their willingness to use nutrition labeling. Two thirds of the respondents were not currently using nutrition labels. Only one third thought that it was the foodservice's responsibility to provide such information. Several companies perceived that nutrition labeling would have a potentially negative effect on annual sales volume. Major obstacles were identified as menu or personnel related, rather than cost related. Menu-related obstacles included too many menu variations, limited space on the menu for labeling, and loss of flexibility in changing the menu. Personnel-related obstacles included difficulty in training employees to implement nutrition labeling, and not enough time for foodservice personnel to implement nutrition labeling. Numerous opportunities will be created for dietetics professionals in helping foodservices overcome these menu- or personnel-related obstacles.

  19. Food Allergy Knowledge and Attitudes of Restaurant Managers and Staff: An EHS-Net Study.

    Radke, Taylor J; Brown, Laura G; Hoover, E Rickamer; Faw, Brenda V; Reimann, David; Wong, Melissa R; Nicholas, David; Barkley, Jonathan; Ripley, Danny

    2016-09-01

    Dining outside of the home can be difficult for persons with food allergies who must rely on restaurant staff to properly prepare allergen-free meals. The purpose of this study was to understand and identify factors associated with food allergy knowledge and attitudes among restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. This study was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net), a collaborative forum of federal, state, and local environmental health specialists working to understand the environmental factors associated with food safety issues. EHS-Net personnel collected data from 278 randomly selected restaurants through interviews with restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. Results indicated that managers, food workers, and servers were generally knowledgeable and had positive attitudes about accommodating customers' food allergies. However, we identified important gaps, such as more than 10% of managers and staff believed that a person with a food allergy can safely consume a small amount of that allergen. Managers and staff also had lower confidence in their restaurant's ability to properly respond to a food allergy emergency. The knowledge and attitudes of all groups were higher at restaurants that had a specific person to answer food allergy questions and requests or a plan for answering questions from food allergic customers. However, food allergy training was not associated with knowledge in any of the groups but was associated with manager and server attitudes. Based on these findings, we encourage restaurants to be proactive by training staff about food allergies and creating plans and procedures to reduce the risk of a customer having a food allergic reaction.

  20. Nutritional adequacy of meals from an independent catering facility versus chain restaurants for young adults.

    Nikolaou, Charoula Konstantia; Hankey, Catherine Ruth; Lean, Michael Ernest John

    2017-03-01

    Eating out of home has been associated with the increasing prevalence of obesity. While some chain restaurants provide nutritional information for their products, smaller independent catering facilities may not provide such information. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional adequacy of meals provided to young adults at an independent catering facility and compare them with meals provided by chain restaurants. Meals were analysed in 2014 in the UK in relation of nutrient provision to targets for macro- and micro-nutrients. One-way ANOVA was performed to compare menus between the restaurants included in the analyses. 2056 meal combinations were analysed, 210 from the student accommodation and 1,846 from five largest national chain restaurants. Mean (SD) nutritional content was: student accommodation: 1193(269)kcal, fat 52.0(22)g, saturated fat 24.5(14.5)g, protein 42.4(28.5)g, carbohydrate 117.0(30)g; chain restaurants: 922(160)kcal, fat 40.0(9.7)g, saturated fat 14.5(5.8)g, protein 31.2(6.5)g, carbohydrate 104.2(16.6)g. Meals from the student accommodation presented significantly more calories than the meals in all five chain restaurants ( p = 0.0015). Meal provision in the student accommodation was in excess of energy requirements and higher than the meals offered in chain restaurants. Regulating or setting nutritional standards for all places that provide food is essential as current food provision may favour unwanted weight gain and diet-related diseases.

  1. Integrating information systems : linking global business goals to local database applications

    Dignum, F.P.M.; Houben, G.J.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to design modern information systems that offer an integrated access to the data and knowledge that is available in local applications. By integrating the local data management activities into one transparent information distribution process, modern organizations

  2. Local investment in renewable energies; Investissement local dans les energies renouvelables - depliant d'information

    NONE

    2003-11-01

    Although the vast majority of renewable energies projects are established by commercial developers, some of them are financed by ''ordinary citizens'' pooling together through different schemes. This is particularly frequent in Denmark and Germany, possibly a key reason for the continuous and so successful growth of various renewable energies sources in these countries. This guideline aims to define the term of local investment and provides examples of development and recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  3. Healthier side dishes at restaurants: an analysis of children's perspectives, menu content, and energy impacts.

    Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Dawes, Franciel; Sliwa, Sarah; Dolan, Peter R; Nelson, Miriam E; Washburn, Kyle; Economos, Christina D

    2014-07-04

    Children consume restaurant-prepared foods at high rates, suggesting that interventions and policies targeting consumption of these foods have the potential to improve diet quality and attenuate excess energy intake. One approach to encouraging healthier dietary intake in restaurants is to offer fruits and vegetables (FV) as side dishes, as opposed to traditional, energy-dense accompaniments like French fries. The aims of the current study were to examine: children's views about healthier side dishes at restaurants; current side dish offerings on children's menus at leading restaurants; and potential energy reductions when substituting FV side dishes in place of French fries. To investigate children's attitudes, a survey was administered to a nationally representative sample of U.S. 8- to 18-year-olds (n = 1178). To examine current side dish offerings, children's menus from leading quick service (QSR; n = 10) and full service restaurant chains (FSR; n = 10) were analyzed. Energy reductions that could result from substituting commonly-offered FV side dishes for French fries were estimated using nutrition information corresponding to the children's menu items. Two-thirds of children reported that they would not feel negatively about receiving FV sides instead of French fries with kids' meals. Liking/taste was the most common reason that children gave to explain their attitudes about FV side dishes. Nearly all restaurants offered at least 1 FV side dish option, but at most restaurants (60% of QSR; 70% of FSR), FV sides were never served by default. Substituting FV side dishes for French fries yielded an average estimated energy reduction of at least 170 calories. Results highlight some healthy trends in the restaurant context, including the majority of children reporting non-negative attitudes about FV side dishes and the consistent availability of FV side dish options at leading QSR and FSR. Yet the minority of restaurants offer these FV sides by default

  4. Consumer underestimation of sodium in fast food restaurant meals: Results from a cross-sectional observational study.

    Moran, Alyssa J; Ramirez, Maricelle; Block, Jason P

    2017-06-01

    Restaurants are key venues for reducing sodium intake in the U.S. but little is known about consumer perceptions of sodium in restaurant foods. This study quantifies the difference between estimated and actual sodium content of restaurant meals and examines predictors of underestimation in adult and adolescent diners at fast food restaurants. In 2013 and 2014, meal receipts and questionnaires were collected from adults and adolescents dining at six restaurant chains in four New England cities. The sample included 993 adults surveyed during 229 dinnertime visits to 44 restaurants and 794 adolescents surveyed during 298 visits to 49 restaurants after school or at lunchtime. Diners were asked to estimate the amount of sodium (mg) in the meal they had just purchased. Sodium estimates were compared with actual sodium in the meal, calculated by matching all items that the respondent purchased for personal consumption to sodium information on chain restaurant websites. Mean (SD) actual sodium (mg) content of meals was 1292 (970) for adults and 1128 (891) for adolescents. One-quarter of diners (176 (23%) adults, 155 (25%) adolescents) were unable or unwilling to provide estimates of the sodium content of their meals. Of those who provided estimates, 90% of adults and 88% of adolescents underestimated sodium in their meals, with adults underestimating sodium by a mean (SD) of 1013 mg (1,055) and adolescents underestimating by 876 mg (1,021). Respondents underestimated sodium content more for meals with greater sodium content. Education about sodium at point-of-purchase, such as provision of sodium information on restaurant menu boards, may help correct consumer underestimation, particularly for meals of high sodium content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Fast-Casual Conundrum: Fast-Casual Restaurant Entrées Are Higher in Calories than Fast Food.

    Schoffman, Danielle E; Davidson, Charis R; Hales, Sarah B; Crimarco, Anthony E; Dahl, Alicia A; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M

    2016-10-01

    Frequently eating fast food has been associated with consuming a diet high in calories, and there is a public perception that fast-casual restaurants (eg, Chipotle) are healthier than traditional fast food (eg, McDonald's). However, research has not examined whether fast-food entrées and fast-casual entrées differ in calorie content. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the caloric content of entrées at fast-food restaurants differed from that found at fast-casual restaurants. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of secondary data. Calorie information from 2014 for lunch and dinner entrées for fast-food and fast-casual restaurants was downloaded from the MenuStat database. Mean calories per entrée between fast-food restaurants and fast-casual restaurants and the proportion of restaurant entrées that fell into different calorie ranges were assessed. A t test was conducted to test the hypothesis that there was no difference between the average calories per entrée at fast-food and fast-casual restaurants. To examine the difference in distribution of entrées in different calorie ranges between fast-food and fast-casual restaurants, χ(2) tests were used. There were 34 fast-food and 28 fast-casual restaurants included in the analysis (n=3,193 entrées). Fast-casual entrées had significantly more calories per entrée (760±301 kcal) than fast-food entrées (561±268; Prestaurants to determine whether the energy content or nutrient density of full meals (ie, entrées with sides and drinks) differs between fast-casual restaurants and fast-food restaurants. Calorie-conscious consumers should consider the calorie content of entrée items before purchase, regardless of restaurant type. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Communication from the Restaurants 1 and 2

    2006-01-01

    Please note that due to the renovation work taking place in Restaurant 1, the 'free-flow' area will be moved to a temporary position at the far end of the restaurant from Thursday 30th November. A marquee will be erected in front of the restaurant to provide an additional seating area during this time. Please also note that Restaurant 1 will be closed from Friday 1st December at 15:00 until the morning of 3rd December. Restaurant 2 will remain open during this period with the following opening times: Friday 1st December: hot meals available from 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00; Saturday 2nd December: Opening time 8:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00; Sunday 3rd December: Opening time 9:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. For further details please see http://cern.ch/resto2/DSR/Welcome.html

  7. Limited restaurant service over the Easter weekend

    2005-01-01

    As Friday, 25 March and Monday, 28 March 2005 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday, 26 March and Sunday, 27 March. They will re-open on Tuesday, 29 March. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 12.00 p.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. They will be served at the self-service restaurant on the first floor on Friday and at the cafeteria on the ground floor on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. On Thursday, March 24, all three restaurants will operate according to their usual opening times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 9 p.m. instead of 1 a.m.

  8. Limited restaurant service over the Easter weekend

    2005-01-01

    As Friday, 25 March and Monday, 28 March 2005 are CERN holidays, restaurants No. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and No. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday, 26 March and Sunday, 27 March. They will re-open on Tuesday, 29 March at 7.00 a.m. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant No. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 12.00 p.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. They will be served at the self-service restaurant on the first floor on Friday and at the cafeteria on the ground floor on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. On Thursday, March 24, all three restaurants will operate according to their usual opening times except for restaurant No. 1, which will close at 9 p.m. instead of 1 a.m.

  9. Communication from the Restaurants 1 and 2

    2006-01-01

    Please note that due to the renovation work taking place in Restaurant 1, the 'free-flow' area will be moved to a temporary location at the far end of the restaurant from Thursday 30th November. A marquee will be erected in front of the restaurant to provide an additional seating area during this time. Please also note that Restaurant 1 will be closed from Friday 1st December at 15:00 until the morning of 3rd December. Restaurant 2 will remain open during this period with the following opening times: Friday 1st December: hot meals available from 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. Saturday 2nd December: Opening time 8:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. Sunday 3rd December: Opening time 9:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. For further details please see http://cern.ch/resto2/DSR/Welcome.html

  10. The Restaurant Manager/Headwaiter--A Professional Profile. Food and Beverage Service Level 2 Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    This report profiles the activities and responsibilities of senior restaurant personnel (managers and headwaiters) in three industry sectors--hotels, upmarket restaurants, and popular/fast food outlets--in Ireland. It was commissioned by the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board in order to gather information that could be used for…

  11. The weight of unfinished plate: A survey based characterization of restaurant food waste in Chinese cities.

    Wang, Ling-En; Liu, Gang; Liu, Xiaojie; Liu, Yao; Gao, Jun; Zhou, Bin; Gao, Si; Cheng, Shengkui

    2017-08-01

    Consumer food waste has attracted increasing public, academic, and political attention in recent years, due to its adverse resource, environmental, and socioeconomic impacts. The scales and patterns of consumer food waste, especially in developing countries, however, remain poorly understood, which may hinder the global effort of reducing food waste. In this study, based on a direct weighing method and a survey of 3557 tables in 195 restaurants in four case cities, we investigated the amount and patterns of restaurant food waste in China in 2015. Food waste per capita per meal in the four cities was 93g, consisting mainly of vegetables (29%), rice (14%), aquatic products (11%), wheat (10%), and pork (8%). This equals to approximately 11kg/cap/year and is not far from that of western countries, although per capita GDP of China is still much lower. We found also that food waste per capita per meal varies considerably by cities (Chengdu and Lhasa higher than Shanghai and Beijing), consumer groups (tourists higher than local residents), restaurant categories (more waste in larger restaurants), and purposes of meals (friends gathering and business banquet higher than working meal and private dining). Our pilot study provides a first, to our best knowledge, empirically determined scales and patterns of restaurant food waste in Chinese cities, and could help set targeted interventions and benchmark national food waste reduction targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Restaurant industry preparedness against intentional food contamination: results of a South Carolina survey.

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Kanwat, C P; Smith, Lillian U; Li, Yi-Jhen; Sros, Lekhena; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Food safety and food defense are both responsibilities of public health agencies. Food safety practices within restaurants are regulated by state and local public health laws based on the US Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code. However, little is known about preemptive practices against intentional food-borne outbreaks within restaurants. The researchers administered a survey to a 50 percent random sample of South Carolina's restaurants, a state that relies heavily on tourism and the restaurant industry for its economic well-being. The survey received a response rate of 15 percent. The food defense practice items fall under three functional categories: employee management and training practices; vendor and delivery-related practices; and physical facilities and operational security practices. This study presents the results, classified by geographic region. Findings indicate some key areas of vulnerability that need attention to protect the public from mass food outbreaks due to intentional contamination. Of concern, there is much variation in practices by geographic region. On the basis of the survey, recommendations are made to improve restaurant preparedness against food-borne outbreaks from terrorism and malevolent contamination.

  13. Poor nutrition on the menu: children's meals at America's top chain restaurants.

    Batada, Ameena; Bruening, Meg; Marchlewicz, Elizabeth H; Story, Mary; Wootan, Margo G

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the nutritional quality of children's meals at chain restaurants, because children obtain about a third of their daily calories from away-from-home foods and studies show that restaurant foods are often higher in calories and lower in nutritional value than foods prepared at home. We assessed the nutritional quality of children's meals at the 50 largest U.S. restaurant chains by visiting each chain's web site or calling the company. Eighteen of the chains did not have children's meals and 10 did not provide adequate nutrition information to be included in the study. The nutritional quality of each meal combination was evaluated against a set of nutrition standards based on key nutrition recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Of the 22 restaurants that had children's menus and available nutrition information, 99% of 1662 children's meal combinations were of poor nutritional quality. Restaurants should support healthier choices for children by reformulating existing menu items and adding new healthier items, posting calories on menus, and setting nutrition standards for marketing to children.

  14. Using practical ergonomic evaluations in the restaurant industry to enhance safety and comfort: a case study.

    Gentzler, Marc D; Smither, Janan A

    2012-01-01

    Restaurant employees must deal with loud noise, busy environments, difficult customers, heavy, awkward, sharp, and hot objects, repetitive motions, and stress on various joints, all of which can lead to fatigue, sudden accidents, and longterm musculoskeletal injury. The goal of this case study was to assess the risk of injuries and accidents from conducting various tasks in the restaurant, specifically carrying/lifting, table management, and polishing silverware. The nine participants were servers at a local country club restaurant. Physical workload was measured by a scale of physical exertion. Cognitive workload was assessed, as well as cumulative trauma disorder risk. Overall results show that there is sufficient risk in some of the tasks to warrant concern. Specific results are discussed, as well as recommendations for improved safety.

  15. Connected or informed?: Local Twitter networking in a London neighbourhood

    John Bingham-Hall

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks whether geographically localised, or ‘hyperlocal’, uses of Twitter succeed in creating peer-to-peer neighbourhood networks or simply act as broadcast media at a reduced scale. Literature drawn from the smart cities discourse and from a UK research project into hyperlocal media, respectively, take on these two opposing interpretations. Evidence gathered in the case study presented here is consistent with the latter, and on this basis we criticise the notion that hyperlocal social media can be seen as a community in itself. We demonstrate this by creating a network map of Twitter followers of a popular hyperlocal blog in Brockley, southeast London. We describe various attributes of this network including its average degree and clustering coefficient to suggest that a small and highly connected cluster of visible local entities such as businesses form a clique at the centre of this network, with individual residents following these but not one another. We then plot the locations of these entities and demonstrate that sub-communities in the network are formed due to close geographical proximity between smaller sets of businesses. These observations are illustrated with qualitative evidence from interviews with users who suggest instead that rather than being connected to one another they benefit from what has been described as ‘neighbourhood storytelling’. Despite the limitations of working with Twitter data, we propose that this multi-modal approach offers a valuable way to investigate the experience of using social media as a communication tool in urban neighbourhoods.

  16. Local health care initiatives--ERISA preemption of State Health Care Reform-Health Insurance-Fair Share Act. Golden Gate Restaurant Association v. City and County of San Francisco, 512 F.3d 1112 (9th Cir. 2008).

    2009-01-01

    A state or local ordinance is not preempted by ERISA if it does not bind plan administrators to structure plans in a certain way or mandate that they provide specific benefits to employees. A local law could be preempted if it contains specific provisions relating to ERISA, or the operation of the law itself depends upon ERISA.

  17. Government quality bases in the field of restaurant economy

    Naumenko, M.; Vanichev, V.

    2010-01-01

    In the article is considered question of quality management as one of backer-ups competitiveness of enterprises of restaurant business and the problems of quality of grant of services restaurant economies are reflected.

  18. Restaurant eating in nonpurge binge-eating women.

    Timmerman, Gayle M

    2006-11-01

    This study describes restaurant-eating behaviors for nonpurge binge-eating women in comparison to dieters. Restaurant-eating behaviors were determined from a content analysis of 14-day food diaries using a convenience sample of 71 women who reported binging without purging and 46 dieters without a recent binge history. Comparing bingers to dieters, there were no significant differences in frequency of eating out, dessert consumption at restaurants, or fast food eating. Bingers more often perceived restaurant eating to be uncontrolled and excessive. Both bingers and dieters consumed significantly more calories (226-253 kcal) and fat (10.4-16.0 gm) on restaurant days. Extra calories consumed on restaurant-eating days may contribute to weight gain over time, especially with frequent restaurant eating. Restaurants may present a high-risk food environment for bingers and dieters, contributing to loss of control and excess consumption.

  19. Marketing strategies and profitability analysis of restaurants in ...

    Marketing strategies and profitability analysis of restaurants in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. ... Abstract. The study examined the marketing strategies and profitability of restaurants in Sokoto metropolis. ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  20. Annual closure of the CERN restaurants

    2015-01-01

      Restaurant No. 1 will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 18 December 2015. The newspaper kiosk will close at 2.30 p.m. The ‘Grab & Go’ stand will not open at all that day.   Restaurant No. 2 and the snack-bars in Buildings 6, 13, 30 and 40 will close at 3 p.m. on Friday, 18 December 2015. The snack-bar in Building 54 will close at 10.30 a.m.   Restaurant No. 3 will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 18 December 2015. The coffee bar in Building 864 will close at 10.30 a.m. and the one in Building 865 at 10.45 a.m. All outlets will open again at the usual times on Monday, 4 January 2015.

  1. Organisational ecology in the Danish restaurant sector

    Hjalager, Anne Mette

    2000-01-01

    The article demonstrates the high rates of organisational turmoil in the restaurant sector. The intensity of natural selection depends mainly on the age and size of the enterprise. Affiliation with other enterprises increases the chances of survival, but only if there is a substantial number...... of units co-operating in a group. Surprisingly, the level of staff competence and managerial capacity - measured in quantitative terms - cannot explain the level of success or failure in the restaurant business to any significant degree. Organisational ecology, which constitutes the theoretical...... and methodological base of this article, is a promising research approach to tourism issues. The article, which focuses on explanations for the occurrence of life events in the restaurant sector, calls for more careful policy considerations than are often the case. In particular, human-resource- and labour...

  2. Provision of information by local governments using the Internet: case studies in Japan

    Yoshio Arai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Internet is an effective medium that has great potential for the low-cost provision of information from local government. This paper discusses the relationship between geographic conditions and local government policy for the use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs, via case studies of official websites operated by local governments in Japan. This paper explores three main issues. First, the process of the diffusion of local government websites in Japan is analyzed. Second, the diversity of website content presented by local governments is assessed. Finally, the effects of national policy on Internet utilization by local governments is discussed. The following results are based on data collected by a questionnaire survey and an analysis of websites for local governments in selected areas of Japan. The diffusion of official websites for local governments began in the mid-1990s and was largely complete by 2000. In the early stages of this diffusion process, many websites aimed to transmit information to audiences outside of the municipality. In the later stages, however, larger cities established official websites and a greater proportion of websites were internally oriented. The content of these sites targeted the multiple needs of the local residents in terms of public services. Although the Japanese Government established a positive policy with the aim of improving ICT utilization by both local and national government, the national policy had only a minor effect on official local government websites.

  3. Strengthening capacity for local evidence to inform local responders to HIV in a remote Solomon Island health service

    David MacLaren

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Documenting specific knowledge and attitudes about HIV in the culturally diverse nation of Solomon Islands is essential to inform locally targeted public health responses. As part of a large capacity-strengthening project at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in East Kwaio, Solomon Islands, researchers, using a ‘learn-by-doing’ process, worked with participants in public health research methods. Methods: Overall, 43 people attended research capacity building workshops in 2011; eight joined the HIV study group. A cross-sectional survey including semi-structured interviews on HIV was conducted by the group. In February 2014, a hospital administrator was interviewed about how the 2011 study informed local HIV responses. Results: Of the 53 survey participants, 64% self-assessed as having little or no HIV knowledge, but 90% knew HIV could be transmitted between men and women during sex. Less than 50% knew HIV could be transmitted between two men having sex, 45% thought HIV could be transmitted by mosquitoes and 55% agreed condoms help protect from HIV. Most participants reported negative attitudes towards people with HIV. Three years later the health administrator reported ad hoc responses to HIV because of low HIV prevalence, increasing noncommunicable diseases, staff turnover and resource shortages. Discussion: This HIV study was used to strengthen research skills in local health professionals and community members in Solomon Islands. It showed that community members require accurate information about HIV transmission and that entrenched stigma is an issue. Although results provided local evidence for local response, ongoing health system challenges and little local HIV transmission meant HIV services remain rudimentary.

  4. Using population segmentation to inform local obesity strategy in England.

    Wills, Jane; Crichton, Nicola; Lorenc, Ava; Kelly, Muireann

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the views of obese people and how best to meet their needs. Amongst London boroughs Barking and Dagenham has the highest prevalence of adult obesity at 28.7%; the lowest level of healthy eating and of physical activity; and is the 22nd most deprived area of England. The study aimed to gain insight into the attitudes, motivations and priorities of people who are obese or overweight to inform the social marketing of an obesity strategy. Two hundred and ten obese or overweight adults were recruited through visual identification in public thoroughfares to attempt to recruit those seldom seen in primary care. One hundred and eighty-one street-intercept and 52 in-depth interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis was followed by psychographic segmentation. Eleven population segments were identified based on their readiness to change, the value accorded to tackling obesity, identified enabling factors and barriers to weight management and perceived self-efficacy. This population showed considerable variation in its readiness to change and perceived control over obesity but considerable similarity in the exchange value they attributed to tackling their obesity. Even within a relatively homogenous socio-demographic community, there needs to be a range of interventions and messages tailored for different population segments that vary in their readiness to change and confidence about tackling obesity. The dominant emphasis of policy and practice on the health consequences of obesity does not reflect the priorities of this obese population for whom the exchange value of addressing obesity was daily functioning especially in relation to family life. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Local and nonlocal information in a traffic network: how important is the horizon?

    Petri, G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in distributed sensor network technology have changed the landscape of traffic optimization in which small, mobile devices are able to sense local information and communicate in real time with one another. Naive optimization algorithms that operate solely on the local or global level are inherently flawed, as global optimization requires every local sensor to communicate with a centralized base-station, creating prohibitive bandwidth, robustness, and security concerns, while local optimization methods are limited by a near information horizon as they are unable to propagate or react to information beyond their immediate vicinity. This paper investigates an intermediate approach where individual sensors are able to propagate congestion information over a variable distance that is determined in real-time. This strategy consistently out-performs a naive strategy where every car simply takes the shortest path to its destination, but does worse than a simpler optimization algorithm that only incorporates local information. This is most likely because the intermediate solution directs cars along the same alternate path when attempting to free a congested area, thus creating new congestion along the detour. The results suggest that local information might set an upper bound on performance in models of cascading in- formation. Further work is required to confirm this observation and develop an algorithm able to join both local and global information to effectively diffuse traffic around congestion. (author)

  6. TO IMPROVE QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROCESS : Case: Aiya Restaurant Chain

    Nguyen Thi, Tram Anh

    2012-01-01

    The commissioner of this thesis was Aiya Restaurant Chain, a newly opened yet well known restaurant chain in Vietnam. The core idea of this restaurant is to provide its customers with high quality and hygienic street-side foods. However, the current food quality control process in Aiya is incomplete and leaves space for many defects. Food quality has always been the crucial issue to all restaurants. Yet to Aiya, it is considered even more important, because the quality of food relates directl...

  7. Successful foundation for concept entirety and marketing: Case Restaurant Fregatti

    Mäenpää, Janina; Brandt, Annina

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is produced in co-operation with Restaurant Fregatti, which is going through a concept change process. Objectives for this thesis was to found out key aspects in creating successful concept, define steps for the change process and what kind of a role marketing plays in the concept change process. Restaurant Fregatti is a family owned restaurant which was established 1998. Fregatti is a part of Finncrespo Oy, which owns two additional restaurants, but it is not a chain restauran...

  8. The Application of Activity-based Costing (ABC) and Job Order Costing (JOC) at Wisata Bahari Restaurant Manado

    Pangemanan, Sifrid; Ramintang, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    ABC is used to determine more accurate product costs by tracing activities required, especially for the purpose of decision making. ABC can show to management about the high cost of low-volume products. Smokie Crab and Grilled Squid from Wisata Bahari Restaurant, Manado, are the sample. The purpose of this research is make more accurate calculation of the cost, which can provide information on the cost of production is more clear for owner of Wisata Bahari Restaurant Manado, so as to obtain ...

  9. 10% discount at Novae restaurants for students

    2016-01-01

    A 10% discount will be granted for students dining in restaurants 1 and 2 (on the Meyrin site) during the summer from 15 June 2016 to 15 September 2016.   A special badge will be issued by the respective secretariats if the student fulfils the following criteria:  Is under 25 years old; Is in possession of a student card issued by a University or college; Has a CERN contract > 1 month (Users, Summer Students, Trainees, etc). This badge and the CERN access card will have to be shown at the Novae restaurants in order to benefit from this discount.

  10. RESTAURANT No. 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2005-01-01

    Opening times in January - February 2005 Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant no. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday 3 January to Sunday 27 February 2005: Kiosque from Monday to Friday 07:30 - 17:00 Restaurant from Monday to Friday 07:00 - 23:00 Saturday / Sunday 08:00 - 21:00 Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00, then from 18:00 to 19:30.

  11. RESTAURANT No. 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2004-01-01

    Opening times in January - February 2005 Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant no. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday 3 January to Sunday 27 February 2005: Kiosque from Monday to Friday 07:30 - 17:00 Restaurant from Monday to Friday 07:00 - 23:00 Saturday / Sunday 08:00 - 21:00 Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00, then from 18:00 to 19:30.

  12. The Use of Information by Policymakers at the Local Community Level.

    Florio, Evelyn; DeMartini, Joseph R.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of decision making focuses on a study that was conducted to examine how policymakers at the local community level use social science information in making decisions. The use of social science information and other information sources in two communities examining health care issues is described. (Contains 18 references.) (LRW)

  13. 21 CFR 101.10 - Nutrition labeling of restaurant foods.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of restaurant foods. 101.10... restaurant foods. Nutrition labeling in accordance with § 101.9 shall be provided upon request for any restaurant food or meal for which a nutrient content claim (as defined in § 101.13 or in subpart D of this...

  14. Restaurant Dining: Seven Tips for Staying Gluten Free

    GiG Education Bulletin Restaurant Dining: Seven Tips for Staying Gluten-Free Updated May 2014 Tips for Dining Away from Home 1. Selection of ... a number of factors, including the type of restaurant you choose. • Be careful in restaurants where language ...

  15. 27 CFR 31.42 - Restaurants serving liquors with meals.

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restaurants serving... Part Certain Organizations, Agencies, and Persons § 31.42 Restaurants serving liquors with meals. Proprietors of restaurants and other persons who serve liquors with meals to paying customers, even if no...

  16. Are fast food restaurants an environmental risk factor for obesity?

    Linde Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Eating at "fast food" restaurants has increased and is linked to obesity. This study examined whether living or working near "fast food" restaurants is associated with body weight. Methods A telephone survey of 1033 Minnesota residents assessed body height and weight, frequency of eating at restaurants, and work and home addresses. Proximity of home and work to restaurants was assessed by Global Index System (GIS methodology. Results Eating at "fast food" restaurants was positively associated with having children, a high fat diet and Body Mass Index (BMI. It was negatively associated with vegetable consumption and physical activity. Proximity of "fast food" restaurants to home or work was not associated with eating at "fast food" restaurants or with BMI. Proximity of "non-fast food" restaurants was not associated with BMI, but was associated with frequency of eating at those restaurants. Conclusion Failure to find relationships between proximity to "fast food" restaurants and obesity may be due to methodological weaknesses, e.g. the operational definition of "fast food" or "proximity", or homogeneity of restaurant proximity. Alternatively, the proliferation of "fast food" restaurants may not be a strong unique cause of obesity.

  17. Development and Reliability Testing of a Fast-Food Restaurant Observation Form.

    Rimkus, Leah; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Powell, Lisa M; Zenk, Shannon N; Quinn, Christopher M; Barker, Dianne C; Pugach, Oksana; Resnick, Elissa A; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    To develop a reliable observational data collection instrument to measure characteristics of the fast-food restaurant environment likely to influence consumer behaviors, including product availability, pricing, and promotion. The study used observational data collection. Restaurants were in the Chicago Metropolitan Statistical Area. A total of 131 chain fast-food restaurant outlets were included. Interrater reliability was measured for product availability, pricing, and promotion measures on a fast-food restaurant observational data collection instrument. Analysis was done with Cohen's κ coefficient and proportion of overall agreement for categorical variables and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables. Interrater reliability, as measured by average κ coefficient, was .79 for menu characteristics, .84 for kids' menu characteristics, .92 for food availability and sizes, .85 for beverage availability and sizes, .78 for measures on the availability of nutrition information,.75 for characteristics of exterior advertisements, and .62 and .90 for exterior and interior characteristics measures, respectively. For continuous measures, average ICC was .88 for food pricing measures, .83 for beverage prices, and .65 for counts of exterior advertisements. Over 85% of measures demonstrated substantial or almost perfect agreement. Although some measures required revision or protocol clarification, results from this study suggest that the instrument may be used to reliably measure the fast-food restaurant environment.

  18. Changes in Georgia restaurant and bar smoking policies from 2006 to 2012.

    Chandora, Rachna D; Whitney, Carrie F; Weaver, Scott R; Eriksen, Michael P

    2015-05-14

    The purpose of this study is to examine the change in smoking policy status among Georgia restaurants and bars from 2006 to 2012 and to identify restaurant and bar characteristics that are associated with allowing smoking. Data were obtained from similar cross-sectional indoor air surveys conducted in 2006 and 2012 in Georgia. Both surveys were designed to gather information about restaurant and bar smoking policies. Weighted χ(2) analyses were performed to identify changes in smoking policy status and other variables from 2006 to 2012. Weighted logistic regression analysis was used to test for significant associations between an establishment's smoking policy and other characteristics. The percentage of restaurants and bars in Georgia that allowed smoking nearly doubled, from 9.1% in 2006 to 17.6% in 2012. The analyses also showed a significant increase in the percentage of establishments that allow smoking when minors are present. Having a liquor license was a significant predictor of allowing smoking. The Smokefree Air Act was enacted in 2005 to protect the health and welfare of Georgia citizens, but study results suggest that policy makers should reevaluate the law and consider strengthening it to make restaurants and bars 100% smokefree without exemptions.

  19. The effect of restaurant attributes on customers' expectations and experiences in formal full service restaurants in Port Elizabeth, South Africa

    O Mhlanga; Z Hattingh; HJ Moolman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of restaurant attributes on customers’ expectations and experiences in formal full service restaurants. The attributes included in this research were food, service and ambience as independent variables and expectations and experiences as dependent variables. The aims were to: (a) assess restaurant attributes that are important for customers’ expectations and experiences, (b) to determine which restaurant attributes had...

  20. IN A “GREEN” RESTAURANT, WHAT MAKES THE CUSTOM ERS SATISFIED? THE RESTAURANT ATTRIBUTES OF TRIP ADVISOR REVIEWERS

    TÜVER, Ilgaz Feray; GÜZEL, Berrin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the restaurant attributes of green restaurants that make customers satisfied and dissatisfied. After the sustainability and green movement in food sector has gained importance, green restaurants have emerged. In this study, the main attributes that created satisfaction in a green restaurant are the food, atmosphere and the location, while food, price and the staff are the dissatisfaction creating attributes. However, none of the themes are related to sustain...

  1. Is Nonsmoking Dangerous to the Health of Restaurants? The Effect of California's Indoor Smoking Ban on Restaurant Revenues

    Stolzenberg, Lisa; D'Alessio, Stewart J.

    2007-01-01

    The state of California passed the Smoke-Free Workplace Act on January 1, 1995. This legislation effectively banned indoor smoking in all public and private workplaces including restaurants. Many restaurant owners, especially owners of restaurants that served alcohol, opposed the ban for fear that their businesses would be affected adversely…

  2. Promoting the selection of healthy food through menu item description in a family-style restaurant.

    Colby, J J; Elder, J P; Peterson, G; Knisley, P M; Carleton, R A

    1987-01-01

    We describe an attempt to influence the selection of menu items in a family-style restaurant. Three different messages, varying in content and emphasis, were used to promote one food special each intervention day. One message emphasized that the specials were particularly healthful, being relatively low in fat, sodium, and cholesterol. A second message stressed flavor and added that the choice was healthful. A third, nonspecific message made no mention of taste or health factors, but simply noted that there was a daily special. Results indicated that restaurant patrons selected healthful specials when the message noted that the choice was healthful but emphasized flavor. Patrons were apparently more open to information about the palatability of the food than its healthfulness per se. These results have implications for point-of-purchase health promotion efforts in general, especially those involving food-labeling programs in restaurants and grocery stores.

  3. Restaurants in the Neighborhood, Eating Away from Home and BMI in China

    Tian, Xu; Zhong, Li; von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan; Tu, Huakang; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between environmental risk factors, eating away from home, and increasing BMI of Chinese adults. Methods Participants were selected from the recent four waves (2004, 2006, 2009, and 2011) of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). 10633 participants, including 5084 men and 5549 women, were used in the analysis. 24-h dietary recall data for three consecutive days with information on the time and place of consumption were collected. Nearby restaurants were measured by the number of fast food outlets, indoor restaurants, and food stands in the neighborhood. Random effects multivariable regression was used to assess associations between these variables. Results People living in neighborhoods with large numbers of indoor restaurants are more likely to eat away from home (prestaurants is recommended in China. PMID:27959893

  4. Locally Generated Information and Referral Services in Indian Libraries. Guide 8: Generating Information in Indian Libraries.

    Townley, Charles T.

    Libraries and information centers are rapidly becoming an integral part of American Indian live. A primary concern of Indian people is the availability of dependable information on those issues and programs which directly affect their day to day lives. As the community information agency, the library plays a key role in improving access to local…

  5. Restaurant Role-Play in Psychology

    Borya, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Research methods is perceived as a technical and difficult topic by some students. Using role-play to teach it can make it more accessible, meaningful and engaging. Role-playing the familiar roles of customer and waiting staff at a restaurant and discussing the variables that may affect the size of tips can help students to learn some of the key…

  6. Making Texas Restaurants Healthier for Children

    Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Professor of Nutrition at Texas State University, discusses her study which details the success of a community-based program in Texas aimed at combatting childhood obesity by improving children’s menus in restaurants.

  7. A much needed makeover for Restaurant 3

    CERN Bulletin

    Inaugurated on 23 November, the newly renovated restaurant room and bar area in Prévessin is already welcoming 50% more CERNois than it used to before the construction. A preliminary project has also been submitted to Management for the construction of a new building designed to become the new nerve-centre of the Prévessin site.   The newly renovated bar area in Restaurant 3 (Prévessin site). The restaurant and bar area on the Prévessin site had not seen much renovation work until this year when, in just a few months, the whole area received a complete makeover. The new installations are in conformity with hygiene and safety rules for food products and are more welcoming for customers. “In the past, the restaurant used to serve an average of 400 visitors at lunchtime but this number had dwindled to about 200 in more recent times”, says Cristiana Colloca(GS-SEM), project leader of the renovation work. “The new room is more ...

  8. Restaurant innovativeness: A case study of Vojvodina

    Snježana Gagić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is of vital importance to continuously work on the improvement and identification of significant factors to ensure and sustain the desired level of quality. The paper aims to analyze the innovativeness level of restaurants in Vojvodina in view of the fact that it keeps their portfolio competitive and thereby achieves a long-term competitive advantage. The innovativeness level was defined on the basis of the instrument designed for measuring innovation in the field of products and services, marketing, processes and socially responsible behavior. In order to determine the level of innovativeness, it was necessary to first determine the percentage of innovativeness based on the number of innovations introduced by the restaurants in all of the four study areas. The results show that a significant number of restaurants pays attention to innovations in order to become more appealing to guests and increase their profitability. On the other hand, more than half of the observed restaurants have a very low or low degree of innovation, which indicates that we still do not pay enough attention to innovations and advancement of their business implementation.

  9. RESTAURANT NO 3 - BUILDING 866 (PREVESSIN)

    Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants

    1999-01-01

    Closure on Monday, November 1st, 1999Restaurant No. 3 will be closed for maintenance throughout the day on Monday, November 1st, 1999. The bar will remain open however so that drinks, sandwiches and snacks remain available. The decentralised cafeterias (bldgs. 864, 865 and 892) will also continue to operate as usual. The restaurant will resume normal service on Tuesday, November 2nd, 1999 but with slightly modified opening times (see below). Meal serving timesAs from Tuesday, November 2nd, 1999, lunches will be served between 11h30 and 13h45, instead of 14h00 as in the past. This change, requested by the concession-holder in view of the fact that demand between13h45 and 14h00 is practically non-existent, has been accepted by the Restaurant Supervisory Committee after consultation with the authorities of SL Division.We thank you for your collaboration and trust that no inconvenience will be suffered.Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  10. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEK-END

    2004-01-01

    As Friday April 9 and Monday April 12 2004 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday and Sunday, April 10 - 11. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 13 at 7 a.m. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. On Thursday, April 8, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 9 p.m. instead of 1 a.m.

  11. Restaurant Training Recipe At Triton College

    Quagliano, Joseph

    1974-01-01

    The successful restaurant training program at Triton College (Illinois) involves a broadly based, two-year curriculum offering practical training in nearly all the areas associated with a comprehensive food operation--management, food preparation, menu planning, nutrition, personnel vending, dining room service, and cost control. (Author/EA)

  12. Food Allergy Knowledge and Attitudes of Restaurant Managers and Staff: An EHS-Net Study

    Radke, Taylor J.; Brown, Laura G.; Hoover, E. Rickamer; Faw, Brenda V.; Reimann, David; Wong, Melissa R.; Nicholas, David; Barkley, Jonathan; Ripley, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Dining outside of the home can be difficult for persons with food allergies who must rely on restaurant staff to properly prepare allergen-free meals. The purpose of this study was to understand and identify factors associated with food allergy knowledge and attitudes among restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. This study was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net), a collaborative forum of federal, state, and local environmental health specialists working to understand the environmental factors associated with food safety issues. EHS-Net personnel collected data from 278 randomly selected restaurants through interviews with restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. Results indicated that managers, food workers, and servers were generally knowledgeable and had positive attitudes about accommodating customers’ food allergies. However, we identified important gaps, such as more than 10% of managers and staff believed that a person with a food allergy can safely consume a small amount of that allergen. Managers and staff also had lower confidence in their restaurant’s ability to properly respond to a food allergy emergency. The knowledge and attitudes of all groups were higher at restaurants that had a specific person to answer food allergy questions and requests or a plan for answering questions from food allergic customers. However, food allergy training was not associated with knowledge in any of the groups but was associated with manager and server attitudes. Based on these findings, we encourage restaurants to be proactive by training staff about food allergies and creating plans and procedures to reduce the risk of a customer having a food allergic reaction. PMID:28221943

  13. Energy Content of U.S. Fast-Food Restaurant Offerings 14-Year Trends

    Bauer, Katherine W.; Hearst, Mary O.; Earnest, Alicia A.; French, Simone A.; Oakes, J. Michael; Harnack, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Within the past decade there has been increasing attention to the role of fast food in the American diet, including a rise in legislative and media-based efforts that address the healthfulness of fast food. However, no studies have been undertaken to evaluate changes in the energy content of fast-food chain restaurant menu items during this period. Purpose To examine changes in the energy content of lunch/dinner menu offerings at eight of the leading fast-food chain restaurants in the U.S. between 1997/1998 and 2009/2010. Methods Menu offerings and nutrient composition information were obtained from archival versions of the University of Minnesota Nutrition Coordinating Center Food and Nutrient Database. Nutrient composition information for items was updated biannually. Changes in median energy content of all lunch/dinner menu offerings and specific categories of menu items among all restaurants and for individual restaurants were examined. Data were collected between 1997 and 2010 and analysis was conducted in 2011. Results Spanning 1997/1998 and 2009/2010, the number of lunch/dinner menu items offered by the restaurants in the study increased by 53%. Across all menu items, the median energy content remained relatively stable over the study period. Examining specific food categories, the median energy content of desserts and condiments increased, the energy content of side items decreased, and energy content of entrees and drinks remained level. Conclusions While large increases in the number of menu items were observed, there have been few changes in the energy content of menu offerings at the leading fast-food chain restaurants examined in this study. PMID:23079171

  14. Energy content of U.S. fast-food restaurant offerings: 14-year trends.

    Bauer, Katherine W; Hearst, Mary O; Earnest, Alicia A; French, Simone A; Oakes, J Michael; Harnack, Lisa J

    2012-11-01

    Within the past decade, there has been increasing attention to the role of fast food in the American diet, including a rise in legislative and media-based efforts that address the healthfulness of fast food. However, no studies have been undertaken to evaluate changes in the energy content of fast-food chain restaurant menu items during this period. To examine changes in the energy content of lunch/dinner menu offerings at eight of the leading fast-food chain restaurants in the U.S. between 1997-1998 and 2009-2010. Menu offerings and nutrient composition information were obtained from archival versions of the University of Minnesota Nutrition Coordinating Center Food and Nutrient Database. Nutrient composition information for items was updated biannually. Changes in median energy content of all lunch/dinner menu offerings and specific categories of menu items among all restaurants and for individual restaurants were examined. Data were collected between 1997 and 2010 and analysis was conducted in 2011. Spanning 1997-1998 and 2009-2010, the number of lunch/dinner menu items offered by the restaurants in the study increased by 53%. Across all menu items, the median energy content remained relatively stable over the study period. Examining specific food categories, the median energy content of desserts and condiments increased, the energy content of side items decreased, and energy content of entrées and drinks remained level. Although large increases in the number of menu items were observed, there have been few changes in the energy content of menu offerings at the leading fast-food chain restaurants examined in this study. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Indonesian consumers' perception of tempe in a restaurant setting traditional and modern tempe version in traditional and innovative dishes

    Fibri, Dwi Larasatie Nur; Frøst, Michael Bom

    by introducing local bean tempe in fine dining. The objective of this research was to study how different raw materials, dishes and gastronomic style affect the perception and appreciation of the food. A restaurant experiment (n=208) was carried out. Three different types of tempe (local soybean tempe, imported...

  16. Maternal Feeding Goals and Restaurant Menu Choices for Young Children.

    Domoff, Sarah E; Kiefner-Burmeister, Allison; Hoffmann, Debra A; Musher-Eizenman, Dara

    2015-08-01

    Childhood obesity remains a major public health issue. One recent effort to improve the obesogenic environment is mandating that restaurants provide calorie and other nutritional content on menus. Little is known about whether maternal feeding for young children is influenced by calorie disclosure on menus. This study examined (1) whether maternal feeding goals associate with mothers' food selections for their young children and (2) whether mothers change entrée and side selections for their children when calories/fat grams are listed on menus. One-hundred seventy mothers of children ages of 3-6 years participated in an online survey. Most participants identified as white (76.5%), with a mean BMI of 25.68 (standard deviation=5.94). Mothers were presented two menus (one with and one without calorie/fat information). The goal of feeding for the child's familiarity with the food was significantly associated with mothers' selection of original side dish and entrées, with greater endorsement of this goal associated with choosing high-calorie/-fat sides and entrées. Feeding for natural content was associated with mothers' selection of original entrée, with greater endorsement of this goal associated with choosing low-calorie/-fat entrées. Significantly fewer mothers chose a higher-calorie entrée when there was menu labeling. Maternal feeding goals are associated with mothers' selection of entrée and side dishes on restaurant menus. Results from this study suggest that menu labeling of calories and fat grams may influence entrée choices by mothers. Targeting mothers' feeding goals and labeling restaurant menus may improve the diets of young children.

  17. Menu labeling regulations and calories purchased at chain restaurants.

    Krieger, James W; Chan, Nadine L; Saelens, Brian E; Ta, Myduc L; Solet, David; Fleming, David W

    2013-06-01

    The federal menu labeling law will require chain restaurants to post caloric information on menus, but the impact of labeling is uncertain. The goal of the current study was to examine the effect of menu labeling on calories purchased, and secondarily, to assess self-reported awareness and use of labels. Single-community pre-post-post cross-sectional study. Data were collected in 2008-2010 and analyzed in 2011-2012. 50 sites from 10 chain restaurants in King County, Washington, selected through stratified, two-stage cluster random sampling. A total of 7325 customers participated. Eligibility criteria were: being an English speaker, aged ≥ 14 years, and having an itemized receipt. The study population was 59% male, 76% white non-Hispanic, and 53% agedmenu boards was implemented. Mean number of calories purchased. No significant changes occurred between baseline and 4-6 months postregulation. Mean calories per purchase decreased from 908.5 to 870.4 at 18 months post-implementation (38 kcal, 95% CI=-76.9, 0.8, p=0.06) in food chains and from 154.3 to 132.1 (22 kcal, 95% CI=-35.8, -8.5, p=0.002) in coffee chains. Calories decreased in taco and coffee chains, but not in burger and sandwich establishments. They decreased more among women than men in coffee chains. Awareness of labels increased from 18.8% to 61.7% in food chains and from 4.4% to 30.0% in coffee chains (both pmenu labeling in some restaurant chains and among women but not men. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Strange bedfellows: the history of collaboration between the Massachusetts Restaurant Association and the tobacco industry.

    Ritch, W A; Begay, M E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This article examines the historical relationship between the tobacco industry and the Massachusetts Restaurant Association, a nonprofit trade association aligned with the food and beverage industry. METHODS: The study analyzed data from Web-based tobacco industry documents, public relations materials, news articles, testimony from public hearings, requests for injunctions, court decisions, economic impact studies, handbooks, and private correspondence. RESULTS: Tobacco industry documents that became public after various state lawsuits reveal that a long history of collaboration exists between the Massachusetts Restaurant Association and the tobacco industry. For more than 20 years, their joint efforts have focused primarily on the battle to defeat state and local laws that would restrict smoking in public places, particularly in beverage and food service establishments. The resources of the tobacco industry, combined with the association's grassroots mobilization of its membership, have fueled their opposition to many state and local smoke-free restaurant, bar, and workplace laws in Massachusetts. CONCLUSIONS: The universal opposition of the Massachusetts Restaurant Association to smoking bans in food and beverage establishments is a reflection of its historic relationship with the tobacco industry. PMID:11291372

  19. Strange bedfellows: the history of collaboration between the Massachusetts Restaurant Association and the tobacco industry.

    Ritch, W A; Begay, M E

    2001-04-01

    This article examines the historical relationship between the tobacco industry and the Massachusetts Restaurant Association, a nonprofit trade association aligned with the food and beverage industry. The study analyzed data from Web-based tobacco industry documents, public relations materials, news articles, testimony from public hearings, requests for injunctions, court decisions, economic impact studies, handbooks, and private correspondence. Tobacco industry documents that became public after various state lawsuits reveal that a long history of collaboration exists between the Massachusetts Restaurant Association and the tobacco industry. For more than 20 years, their joint efforts have focused primarily on the battle to defeat state and local laws that would restrict smoking in public places, particularly in beverage and food service establishments. The resources of the tobacco industry, combined with the association's grassroots mobilization of its membership, have fueled their opposition to many state and local smoke-free restaurant, bar, and workplace laws in Massachusetts. The universal opposition of the Massachusetts Restaurant Association to smoking bans in food and beverage establishments is a reflection of its historic relationship with the tobacco industry.

  20. Calorie Changes in Large Chain Restaurants

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.; Jarlenski, Marian P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Large chain restaurants reduced the number of calories in newly introduced menu items in 2013 by about 60 calories (or 12%) relative to 2012. This paper describes trends in calories available in large U.S. chain restaurants to understand whether previously documented patterns persist. Methods Data (a census of items for included restaurants) were obtained from the MenuStat project. This analysis included 66 of the 100 largest U.S. restaurants that are available in all three 3 of the data (2012–2014; N=23,066 items). Generalized linear models were used to examine: (1) per-item calorie changes from 2012 to 2014 among items on the menu in all years; and (2) mean calories in new items in 2013 and 2014 compared with items on the menu in 2012 only. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Overall, calories in newly introduced menu items declined by 71 (or 15%) from 2012 to 2013 (p=0.001) and by 69 (or 14%) from 2012 to 2014 (p=0.03). These declines were concentrated mainly in new main course items (85 fewer calories in 2013 and 55 fewer calories in 2014; p=0.01). Although average calories in newly introduced menu items are declining, they are higher than items common to the menu in all 3 years. No differences in mean calories among items on menus in 2012, 2013, or 2014 were found. Conclusions The previously observed declines in newly introduced menu items among large restaurant chains have been maintained, which suggests the beginning of a trend toward reducing calories. PMID:26163168

  1. Accuracy of stated energy contents of restaurant foods in a multi-site study

    Context National recommendations for prevention and treatment of obesity emphasize reducing energy intake. Foods purchased in restaurants provide approximately 35% of daily energy intake, but the accuracy of information on the energy contents of these foods is unknown. Objective To examine the a...

  2. Information management and technology strategy in healthcare: local timescales and national requirements

    Les Smith

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The UK National Health Service’s strategic switch-back is well documented and each centrally originated change results in various attempts to record the repercussions and predict the outcomes. The most recent shift is embodied in the Department of Health’s information strategy, Information for health published in September 1998. This document provides the context for an examination of the issue of developing an Information Management and Technology (IM&T strategy at the local level within the changing national requirements for NHS information management. The particular pressures on an individual unit and the need to react to them alongside the requirements of the national strategy are the subjects of this article. The case detailed is that of Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology (CCO on Merseyside, the second largest centre of its type in the UK. Its initial investigation of information needs preceded the publication of the national strategy and its implementation straddled the timescale devised by the NHS Information Authority. The inevitable incompatibility between timescales for the local and the national developments is examined within the case. The work of the new NHS Information Authority and its supporting guidance in its Circular, Information for Health: Initial Local Implementation Strategies, is evaluated as a tool in aligning local and national strategy. Information Managers in other centrally governed organisations within the public sector and large corporations are often alert to similar issues.

  3. Obesogenic and youth oriented restaurant marketing in public housing neighborhoods.

    Lee, Rebecca E; Heinrich, Katie M; Reese-Smith, Jacqueline Y; Regan, Gail R; Adamus-Leach, Heather J

    2014-03-01

    To compare restaurant marketing by restaurant and neighborhood type. All restaurants (61=fast food, FF; 72=table service, TS) within an 800-meter radius of 13 public housing developments (HD) and 4 comparison neighborhoods were audited using the Restaurant Assessment Tool©2010. HD neighborhoods were lower income and higher minority than comparison neighborhoods with similar density and street connectivity. Restaurants in HD neighborhoods had fewer healthy entrées than comparison neighborhoods. FF restaurants had cheaper beverages and more children's meals, supersize drinks, free prize with purchase, super-size items, special characters, and more items geared to driving than TS restaurants. Residents of lower socioeconomic neighborhoods may be differentially exposed to unhealthy food options.

  4. Perceptions on the use of bottled water in restaurants in Harare's Central Business District (CBD)

    Juba, Olivia Sakhile; Tanyanyiwa, Vincent Itai

    2018-06-01

    Bottled water use continues to expand worldwide and in the last two decades, a significant number of consumers have shifted from tap water to bottled water due to Cryptosporidium outbreaks. Bottled water consumption has increased in Harare due to erratic tap water supplies. Since 2011, forty bottled water brands have been banned because of failure to meet safety and quality standards due to contamination, unsuitable packaging, and wrong labelling. Nevertheless, the bottled water industry continues to thrive as local authorities fail to adequately purify municipal water. The study assessed the perceptions on drinking bottled water in restaurants within Harare's CBD. Demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users were established and the role and influence of stakeholders in bottling and distribution of water documented. A field survey through the administration of questionnaires to fifty restaurant users was carried out to assess the perceptions of people on the use of bottled water in terms of its safety and potential health benefits. Key informant interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview with ten local water bottling companies as well as representatives from the Environmental Management Agency (EMA) and Standards Association of Zimbabwe (SAZ). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Standard descriptive statistics were generated, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Consumers used bottled water as their primary drinking water source when they perceived that tap water was not safe. Perceptions of purity of water, bottled water convenience, and tap water unavailability seemed to determine consumption patterns among users. Females in the 18-48 age groups were more likely to think that bottled water was cleaner, safer, tasted better and was more convenient than tap water. Consumers regularly purchased bottled water for drinking and used bottled water as their primary drinking water

  5. 76 FR 3064 - Travelers Information Stations

    2011-01-19

    ... stations, restaurants, and lodging conveyed through advertising.'' The broadcasters worried that this would..., tourist information, and information about the township's history, environment and parks. This latter...

  6. A fingerprint classification algorithm based on combination of local and global information

    Liu, Chongjin; Fu, Xiang; Bian, Junjie; Feng, Jufu

    2011-12-01

    Fingerprint recognition is one of the most important technologies in biometric identification and has been wildly applied in commercial and forensic areas. Fingerprint classification, as the fundamental procedure in fingerprint recognition, can sharply decrease the quantity for fingerprint matching and improve the efficiency of fingerprint recognition. Most fingerprint classification algorithms are based on the number and position of singular points. Because the singular points detecting method only considers the local information commonly, the classification algorithms are sensitive to noise. In this paper, we propose a novel fingerprint classification algorithm combining the local and global information of fingerprint. Firstly we use local information to detect singular points and measure their quality considering orientation structure and image texture in adjacent areas. Furthermore the global orientation model is adopted to measure the reliability of singular points group. Finally the local quality and global reliability is weighted to classify fingerprint. Experiments demonstrate the accuracy and effectivity of our algorithm especially for the poor quality fingerprint images.

  7. Association between salt substitutes/enhancers and changes in sodium levels in fast-food restaurants: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Scourboutakos, Mary J; Murphy, Sarah A; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2018-03-07

    Restaurant foods have high sodium levels, and efforts have been made to promote reductions. The objective of this study was to understand if salt substitutes and enhancers are associated with changes in sodium levels in fast-food restaurants. A longitudinal database (MENU-FLIP) containing nutrition information for Canadian chain restaurants with 20 or more locations nationally was created in 2010 and updated in 2013 and 2016. In 2016, when available, ingredient lists were collected from restaurant websites and searched for the presence of salt substitutes/enhancers. Changes in sodium levels (per serving) and the prevalence of salt substitutes/enhancers in 222 foods from 12 of the leading fast-food restaurant chains were compared across 3 time points. Sixty-nine percent of foods contained a salt substitute/enhancer. Substitutes/enhancers were found in every restaurant chain ( n = 12) for which ingredient data were available. The most common substitutes/enhancers were yeast extracts (in 30% of foods), calcium chloride (28%), monosodium glutamate (14%) and potassium chloride (12%). Sodium levels in foods that contained substitutes/enhancers decreased significantly more (190 ± 42 mg/serving) over the study period than those in foods that did not contain a substitute/enhancer (40 ± 17 mg/serving, p restaurant foods and are one means by which restaurants may be lowering sodium levels in their foods. At this time, the potential consequences of these findings, if any, are uncertain. Copyright 2018, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  8. Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success

    Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

    2009-01-01

    In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in…

  9. Trends in Consumption of Solid Fats, Added Sugars, Sodium, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, and Fruit from Fast Food Restaurants and by Fast Food Restaurant Type among US Children, 2003–2010

    Colin D. Rehm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy intakes from fast food restaurants (FFRs have declined among US children. Less is known about the corresponding trends for FFR-sourced solid fats, added sugars, and sodium, and food groups of interest, such as fruit and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs. Using data from a single 24-h dietary recall among 12,378 children aged 4–19 years from four consecutive cycles of the nationally-representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2003–2010 a custom algorithm segmented FFRs into burger, pizza, sandwich, Mexican cuisine, chicken, Asian cuisine, fish restaurants, and coffee shops. There was a significant population-wide decline in FFR-sourced solid fats (−32 kcal/day, p-trend < 0.001, added sugars (−16 kcal/day; p-trend < 0.001, SSBs (−0.12 servings (12 fluid ounces or 355 mL/day; p-trend < 0.001, and sodium (−166 mg/day; p-trend < 0.001. Declines were observed when restricted to fast food consumers alone. Sharp declines were observed for pizza restaurants; added sugars, solid fats, and SSBs declined significantly from burger restaurants. Fruit did not change for fast food restaurants overall. Temporal analyses of fast food consumption trends by restaurant type allow for more precise monitoring of the quality of children’s diets than can be obtained from analyses of menu offerings. Such analyses can inform public health interventions and policy measures.

  10. Trends in Consumption of Solid Fats, Added Sugars, Sodium, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, and Fruit from Fast Food Restaurants and by Fast Food Restaurant Type among US Children, 2003-2010.

    Rehm, Colin D; Drewnowski, Adam

    2016-12-13

    Energy intakes from fast food restaurants (FFRs) have declined among US children. Less is known about the corresponding trends for FFR-sourced solid fats, added sugars, and sodium, and food groups of interest, such as fruit and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Using data from a single 24-h dietary recall among 12,378 children aged 4-19 years from four consecutive cycles of the nationally-representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2003-2010 a custom algorithm segmented FFRs into burger, pizza, sandwich, Mexican cuisine, chicken, Asian cuisine, fish restaurants, and coffee shops. There was a significant population-wide decline in FFR-sourced solid fats (-32 kcal/day, p -trend restaurants; added sugars, solid fats, and SSBs declined significantly from burger restaurants. Fruit did not change for fast food restaurants overall. Temporal analyses of fast food consumption trends by restaurant type allow for more precise monitoring of the quality of children's diets than can be obtained from analyses of menu offerings. Such analyses can inform public health interventions and policy measures.

  11. Trends in Consumption of Solid Fats, Added Sugars, Sodium, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, and Fruit from Fast Food Restaurants and by Fast Food Restaurant Type among US Children, 2003–2010

    Rehm, Colin D.; Drewnowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Energy intakes from fast food restaurants (FFRs) have declined among US children. Less is known about the corresponding trends for FFR-sourced solid fats, added sugars, and sodium, and food groups of interest, such as fruit and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Using data from a single 24-h dietary recall among 12,378 children aged 4–19 years from four consecutive cycles of the nationally-representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2003–2010 a custom algorithm segmented FFRs into burger, pizza, sandwich, Mexican cuisine, chicken, Asian cuisine, fish restaurants, and coffee shops. There was a significant population-wide decline in FFR-sourced solid fats (−32 kcal/day, p-trend restaurants; added sugars, solid fats, and SSBs declined significantly from burger restaurants. Fruit did not change for fast food restaurants overall. Temporal analyses of fast food consumption trends by restaurant type allow for more precise monitoring of the quality of children’s diets than can be obtained from analyses of menu offerings. Such analyses can inform public health interventions and policy measures. PMID:27983573

  12. Globally COnstrained Local Function Approximation via Hierarchical Modelling, a Framework for System Modelling under Partial Information

    Øjelund, Henrik; Sadegh, Payman

    2000-01-01

    be obtained. This paper presents a new approach for system modelling under partial (global) information (or the so called Gray-box modelling) that seeks to perserve the benefits of the global as well as local methodologies sithin a unified framework. While the proposed technique relies on local approximations......Local function approximations concern fitting low order models to weighted data in neighbourhoods of the points where the approximations are desired. Despite their generality and convenience of use, local models typically suffer, among others, from difficulties arising in physical interpretation...... simultaneously with the (local estimates of) function values. The approach is applied to modelling of a linear time variant dynamic system under prior linear time invariant structure where local regression fails as a result of high dimensionality....

  13. Association between neighbourhood fast-food and full-service restaurant density and body mass index: a cross-sectional study of Canadian adults.

    Hollands, Simon; Campbell, M Karen; Gilliland, Jason; Sarma, Sisira

    2014-05-07

    Frequent fast-food consumption is a well-known risk factor for obesity. This study sought to determine whether the availability of fast-food restaurants has an influence on body mass index (BMI). BMI and individual-level confounding variables were obtained from the 2007-08 Canadian Community Health Survey. Neighbourhood socio-demographic variables were acquired from the 2006 Canadian Census. The geographic locations of all restaurants in Canada were assembled from a validated business registry database. The density of fast-food, full-service and non-chain restaurants per 10,000 individuals was calculated for respondents' forward sortation area. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between restaurant density and BMI. Fast-food, full-service and non-chain restaurant density variables were statistically significantly associated with BMI. Fast-food density had a positive association whereas full-service and non-chain restaurant density had a negative association with BMI (additional 10 fast-food restaurants per capita corresponded to a weight increase of 1 kilogram; p<0.001). These associations were primarily found in Canada's major urban jurisdictions. This research was the first to investigate the influence of fast-food and full-service restaurant density on BMI using individual-level data from a nationally representative Canadian survey. The finding of a positive association between fast-food restaurant density and BMI suggests that interventions aiming to restrict the availability of fast-food restaurants in local neighbourhoods may be a useful obesity prevention strategy.

  14. Information Seeking and Satisfaction with Information Sources Among Spouses of Men with Newly Diagnosed Local-Stage Prostate Cancer.

    Bansal, Aasthaa; Koepl, Lisel M; Fedorenko, Catherine R; Li, Chunyu; Smith, Judith Lee; Hall, Ingrid J; Penson, David F; Ramsey, Scott D

    2018-04-01

    Information sources about prostate cancer treatment and outcomes are typically designed for patients. Little is known about the availability and utility of information for partners. The objectives of our study were to evaluate information sources used by partners to understand prostate cancer management options, their perceived usefulness, and the relationship between sources used and satisfaction with treatment experience. A longitudinal survey of female partners of men newly diagnosed with local-stage prostate cancer was conducted in three different geographic regions. Partners and associated patients were surveyed at baseline (after patient diagnosis but prior to receiving therapy) and at 12 months following diagnosis. Information sources included provider, literature, friends or family members, Internet websites, books, traditional media, and support groups. Utility of an information source was defined as whether the partner would recommend it to caregivers of other patients with local-stage prostate cancer. Our study cohort included 179 partner-patient pairs. At diagnosis, partners consulted an average of 4.6 information sources. Non-Hispanic white partners were more likely than others to use friends and family as an information source (OR = 2.44, 95% CI (1.04, 5.56)). More educated partners were less likely to use support groups (OR = 0.31, 95% CI (0.14, 0.71)). At 12-month follow-up, partners were less likely to recommend books (OR = 0.23, 95% CI (0.11, 0.49)) compared to baseline. Partners consulted a large number of information sources in researching treatment options for local-stage prostate cancer and the types of sources accessed varied by race/ethnicity and educational attainment. Additional resources to promote selection of high-quality non-provider information sources are warranted to enable partners to better aid patients in their treatment decision-making process.

  15. Evaluating the use of in-store measures in retail food stores and restaurants in Brazil

    Duran, Ana Clara; Lock, Karen; Latorre, Maria do Rosario D O; Jaime, Patricia Constante

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess inter-rater reliability, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of retail food store, open-air food market, and restaurant observation tools adapted to the Brazilian urban context. METHODS This study is part of a cross-sectional observation survey conducted in 13 districts across the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil in 2010-2011. Food store and restaurant observational tools were developed based on previously available tools, and then tested it. They included measures on the availability, variety, quality, pricing, and promotion of fruits and vegetables and ultra-processed foods. We used Kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients to assess inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities in samples of 142 restaurants, 97 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), and of 62 restaurants and 45 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), respectively. Construct validity as the tool’s abilities to discriminate based on store types and different income contexts were assessed in the entire sample: 305 retail food stores, 8 fruits and vegetable markets, and 472 restaurants. RESULTS Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were generally high, with most Kappa values greater than 0.70 (range 0.49-1.00). Both tools discriminated between store types and neighborhoods with different median income. Fruits and vegetables were more likely to be found in middle to higher-income neighborhoods, while soda, fruit-flavored drink mixes, cookies, and chips were cheaper and more likely to be found in lower-income neighborhoods. CONCLUSIONS The measures were reliable and able to reveal significant differences across store types and different contexts. Although some items may require revision, results suggest that the tools may be used to reliably measure the food stores and restaurant food environment in urban settings of middle-income countries. Such studies can help .inform health promotion interventions and policies in these

  16. Media Outlet and Consumer Reactions to Promotional Activities of the Choose Health LA Restaurants Program in Los Angeles County.

    Gase, Lauren N; Montes, Christine; Robles, Brenda; Tyree, Rachel; Kuo, Tony

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess promotional activities undertaken to raise public awareness of the Choose Health LA Restaurants program in Los Angeles County, an environmental change strategy that recognizes restaurants for offering reduced-size and healthier menu options. We used multiple methods to assess public awareness of and reactions to the promotional activities, including an assessment of the reach of core promotional activities, a content analysis of earned media, and an Internet panel survey. The study was conducted in Los Angeles County, home to more than 10 million residents. An online survey firm recruited participants for an Internet panel survey; to facilitate generalization of results to the county's population, statistical weights were applied to analyses of the survey data. Promotional activities to raise awareness of the program included community engagement, in-store promotion, and a media campaign. Outcomes included media impressions, the number of people who reported seeing the Choose Health LA Restaurants logo, and a description of the themes present in earned media. Collectively, paid media outlets reported 335 587 229 total impressions. The Internet panel survey showed that 12% of people reported seeing the program logo. Common themes in earned media included the Choose Health LA Restaurants program aims to provide restaurant patrons with more choices, represents a new opportunity for restaurants and public health to work together, will benefit participating restaurants, and will positively impact health. Promotional activities for the Choose Health LA Restaurants program achieved modest reach and positive reactions from media outlets and consumers. The program strategy and lessons learned can help inform present and future efforts to combine environmental and individually focused strategies that target key influences of consumer food selection.

  17. Innovation within Fast Food Restaurants : The role of the local restaurant management

    Antonsson, Henrik; Engström, Lukas; Verbus, Vytautas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Innovation is an important aspect of business today. It is important for companies to be innovative in order to stay competitive with their competitors. During the last couple of decades, technology has become more and more common both in our daily life, as well as in businesses. This has lead to an increase in technology implementation, especially within the service industry, where customers now can use self-service technologies in order to receive the service on their own. Howev...

  18. Exchanging environmental information and decision making: developing the local Pilot Environmental Virtual Observatory with stakeholder communities

    Mackay, E.; Beven, K.; Brewer, P.; M, Haygarth, P.; Macklin, M.; Marshall, K.; Quinn, P.; Stutter, M.; Thomas, N.; Wilkinson, M.

    2012-04-01

    Public participation in the development of flood risk management and river basin management plans are explicit components of both the Water Framework and Floods Directives. At the local level, involving communities in land and water management has been found to (i) aid better environmental decision making, (ii) enhance social, economic and environmental benefits, and (iii) increase a sense of ownership. Facilitating the access and exchange of information on the local environment is an important part of this new approach to the land and water management process, which also includes local community stakeholders in decisions about the design and content of the information provided. As part of the Natural Environment Research Council's pilot Environment Virtual Observatory (EVO), the Local Level group are engaging with local community stakeholders in three different catchments in the UK (the rivers Eden, Tarland and Dyfi) to start the process of developing prototype visualisation tools to address the specific land and water management issues identified in each area. Through this local collaboration, we will provide novel visualisation tools through which to communicate complex catchment science outcomes and bring together different sources of environmental data in ways that better meet end-user needs as well as facilitate a far broader participatory approach in environmental decision making. The Local Landscape Visualisation Tools are being evolved iteratively during the project to reflect the needs, interests and capabilities of a wide range of stakeholders. The tools will use the latest concepts and technologies to communicate with and provide opportunities for the provision and exchange of information between the public, government agencies and scientists. This local toolkit will reside within a wider EVO platform that will include national datasets, models and state of the art cloud computer systems. As such, local stakeholder groups are assisting the EVO

  19. Nutritional value of meals at full-service restaurant chains.

    Auchincloss, Amy H; Leonberg, Beth L; Glanz, Karen; Bellitz, Samantha; Ricchezza, Andrew; Jervis, Allison

    2014-01-01

    To assess the nutritional value of meals at full-service national restaurant chains with outlets in the Philadelphia region in 2011. Chains were eligible if nutritional information for all menu items was on company Web pages or printed menus at Philadelphia outlets. Nutrient profiles were analyzed for 2,615 items from 21 eligible chains (out of 29) and compared with United States Department of Agriculture guidelines. Adult meals (entree, side dish, and one-half appetizer) approximated 1,495 kcal, 28 g saturated fat, 3,512 mg sodium, and 11 g fiber; and rose to 2,020 kcal after including a beverage and one-half dessert. Better calorie and fat profiles were observed for entrees tagged "healthy choice" or aimed at seniors or children; however, sodium far exceeded recommended limits. Foods served at full-service restaurant chains are high in calories, saturated fat, and sodium. Standard definitions are needed for "healthy choice" tags and for entrees targeted to vulnerable age groups. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Energy modeling issues in quick service restaurants

    Smith, V.A.; Johnson, K.F.

    1997-03-01

    The complexity of monitoring and modeling the energy performance of food-service facilities was discussed. Usually, less than one third of the energy consumed in a commercial food-service facility is used by equipment and systems typically modeled in building simulation software such as DOE-2. Algorithms have not yet been developed to handle independent makeup air units and the kitchen and dining room HVAC systems. The energy used by food process equipment and water heating is based on customer-volume and operation-hours. Monitoring projects have been undertaken to provide detailed energy use profiles of individual appliances and whole restaurants. Some technical issues that are unique to food-service modeling in current versions of DOE-2.1E software in the context of quick service restaurants, such as difficulties in modelling internal heat gains of hooded cooking appliances and walk-in refrigeration, and system and zone limitations on tracking energy consumption, were discussed. 1 fig.

  1. CERN restaurants: opening hours during summer

    2016-01-01

    In the summer, the three CERN restaurants remain open during their usual hours. On Monday 1st August and Thursday 8 September, the Restaurant 1 will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.   The satellites will be open as follows: Building 6: normal hours Building 13: normal hours Building 30: normal hours Building 40: closing at 4:30 p.m. instead of 5:00 pm Building 54: normal hours in July, closed in August Building 864: normal hours Building 865: normal hours Building 774: normal hours

  2. Restaurant 1: dance theatre for a day

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    On Tuesday 31 July, CERN’s Restaurant 1 transformed into a dance studio for the duration of a public rehearsal. The performers from the dance troupe of Geneva choreographer Gilles Jobin, CERN’s current artist in residence, presented their 2011 creation, Spider Galaxies. The result: a voyage of bodies suspended between art and science.   Just two months after the choreographer’s “Strangels” invaded the library, the same bodies returned to take over another iconic CERN space: Restaurant 1. While a black floor covering was spread over the dance floor, bordered on three sides by the glass partitions overlooking the terrace, the four dancers warmed up. Gilles Jobin, the first prize winner of the “Collide@CERN” competition held last March in the dance/performance category, briefly introduced the dance that would follow, called Spider Galaxies. The piece, created in 2011, features four dancers moving to music...

  3. Dynamical study of symmetries: breaking and restauration

    Schuck, P.

    1986-09-01

    First symmetry breaking (spontaneous) is explained and the physical implication discussed for infinite systems. The relation with phase transitions is indicated. Then the specific aspects of symmetry breaking in finite systems is treated and illustrated in detail for the case of translational invariance with the help of an oversimplified but exactly solvable model. The method of projection (restauration of symmetry) is explained for the static case and also applied to the model. Symmetry breaking in the dynamical case and for instance the notion of a soft mode responsible for the symmetry breaking is discussed in the case of superfluidity and another exactly solvable model is introduced. The Goldstone mode is treated in detail. Some remarks on analogies with the breaking of chiral symmetry are made. Some recent developments in the theory of symmetry restauration are briefly outlined [fr

  4. The Chinese restaurant syndrome: an anecdote revisited.

    Kenney, R A

    1986-04-01

    The Chinese Restaurant Syndrome arose from an anecdote of discomfort experienced after eating Chinese cuisine. Monosodium glutamate has been implicated as the causative agent. Work over the past 17 years has consistently failed to reveal any objective sign accompanying the transient sensations that some individuals experience after the experimental ingestion of monosodium glutamate and it is questionable whether the term 'Chinese Restaurant Syndrome' has any validity. When some common food materials are used in the same experimental setting, similar symptoms can be produced in a limited number of people. Double-blind testing of individuals who identify themselves as suffering the 'syndrome' has failed to confirm the role of monosodium glutamate as the provocative agent.

  5. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEK-END

    2004-01-01

    As Friday April 9 and Monday April 12 2004 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday and Sunday, April 10 - 11. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 13 at 7 a.m. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.

  6. 77 FR 24959 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    2012-04-26

    ...The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is seeking scientific information submissions from manufacturers of local, minimally invasive, medical devices for unresectable primary hepatocellular carcinoma (e.g., ablation, radiotherapy, or embolization devices). Scientific information is being solicited to inform our Comparative Effectiveness Review of Local Therapies for Unresectable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma, which is currently being conducted by the Evidence-based Practice Centers for the AHRQ Effective Health Care Program. Access to published and unpublished pertinent scientific information on this device will improve the quality of this comparative effectiveness review. AHRQ is requesting this scientific information and conducting this comparative effectiveness review pursuant to Section 1013 of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, Public Law 108-173.

  7. The Role of Global and Local Visual Information during Gaze-Cued Orienting of Attention.

    Munsters, Nicolette M; van den Boomen, Carlijn; Hooge, Ignace T C; Kemner, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Gaze direction is an important social communication tool. Global and local visual information are known to play specific roles in processing socially relevant information from a face. The current study investigated whether global visual information has a primary role during gaze-cued orienting of attention and, as such, may influence quality of interaction. Adults performed a gaze-cueing task in which a centrally presented face cued (valid or invalid) the location of a peripheral target through a gaze shift. We measured brain activity (electroencephalography) towards the cue and target and behavioral responses (manual and saccadic reaction times) towards the target. The faces contained global (i.e. lower spatial frequencies), local (i.e. higher spatial frequencies), or a selection of both global and local (i.e. mid-band spatial frequencies) visual information. We found a gaze cue-validity effect (i.e. valid versus invalid), but no interaction effects with spatial frequency content. Furthermore, behavioral responses towards the target were in all cue conditions slower when lower spatial frequencies were not present in the gaze cue. These results suggest that whereas gaze-cued orienting of attention can be driven by both global and local visual information, global visual information determines the speed of behavioral responses towards other entities appearing in the surrounding of gaze cue stimuli.

  8. Corporate social responsibility approaches and implementation in selected fast food restaurants

    Emma E. Montalbo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine Corporate Social Responsibility approaches and implementation in Fast Food Restaurants in Batangas City, Philippines. The researchers employed a descriptive design and quantitative method in the analysis of data with the questionnaire as the main instrument. Five (5 restaurant- participants were purposively chosen from the total population of 15. Results showed that CSR related mission/vision is clearly not embedded in the institutional websites of fast food restaurants while personal relation/social proximity approach is highly evident. Also, factors in the implementation of corporate social responsibility in relation to philanthropic behavior, shows a significant behavioral change from the statistical result such as moderately evident. CSR approaches and implementation are highly evident that clearly proves the responsible behavior of local fast food restaurants. Institutional integration of CSR in the company’s mission/vision statements, structure, decisions, activities, communication, practices stated appears to be beneficial in light of new corporate-state-market-society relationship.

  9. Culinary culture and globalization: an analysis of British and German Michelin-starred restaurants.

    Lane, Christel

    2011-12-01

    The high-end restaurant segment in Britain and Germany has long been shaped by the cultural hegemony of French haute cuisine, perpetuated by multiple processes, including the influence of the Michelin or Red Guide. Traditionally, this hegemony has been expressed in the prevalence of French expatriate chefs, culinary techniques and style and even restaurant culture. This paper investigates whether processes of globalization have weakened or even undermined this French cultural dominance in fine-dining restaurants and their culinary culture. To this end, the study identifies the various forms taken by globalization processes in this industry segment and then assesses their impact on the dominance of the French paradigm of culinary culture. The investigation focuses on British and German Michelin-starred restaurants, underlining both commonalities and divergences in the process of interaction between French, global and local influences. The study employs a qualitative method, using a number of case studies to discern cross-industry patterns. All chefs with two or three stars in the two countries, i.e. 45 chefs, were selected for the analysis of their cuisine. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2011.

  10. [Application of tobacco smoking regulations in restaurants in Tromsö 1998].

    Emaus, A; Løchen, M L; Høifødt, R

    2001-02-10

    Under the Norwegian Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act, a minimum of 50% of tables in restaurants have to be in smoke-free areas. The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs has defined "smoke-free restaurants" as a priority objective in its anti-tobacco strategy. We have investigated smoking policies in restaurants in the City of Tromsø in Northern Norway, as reported by restaurateurs in 1998. Representatives of all the 85 restaurants, bars and pubs in the city were interviewed and their smoking policies and habits reported. This study was part of the local health authority's evaluation of the degree of compliance with the legislation. In 71% of establishments, at least 50% of tables were smoke-free; in 88%, smoking areas were in compliance with the legislation. 86% of restaurateurs reported a positive or neutral attitude to the legislation, 80% thought that their guests were of the same opinion. 47% smoked every day; however, there was no association between smoking habits and smoking policies. Though the prevalence of smoking was high among restaurateurs, this did not affect their attitudes towards the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act or their policies on smoking.

  11. Improving children's menus in community restaurants: best food for families, infants, and toddlers (Best Food FITS) intervention, South Central Texas, 2010-2014.

    Crixell, Sylvia Hurd; Friedman, Bj; Fisher, Deborah Torrey; Biediger-Friedman, Lesli

    2014-12-24

    Approximately 32% of US children are overweight or obese. Restaurant and fast food meals contribute 18% of daily calories for children and adolescents aged 2 to 18 years. Changing children's menus may improve their diets. This case study describes Best Food for Families, Infants, and Toddlers (Best Food FITS), a community-based intervention designed to address childhood obesity. The objective of this study was to improve San Marcos children's access to healthy diets through partnerships with local restaurants, removing sugar-sweetened beverages, decreasing the number of energy-dense entrées, and increasing fruit and vegetable offerings on restaurant menus. San Marcos, Texas, the fastest growing US city, has more restaurants and fewer grocery stores than other Texas cities. San Marcos's population is diverse; 37.8% of residents and 70.3% of children are Hispanic. Overweight and obesity rates among school children exceed 50%; 40.3% of children live below the poverty level. This project received funding from the Texas Department of State Health Services Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity Prevention Program to develop Best Food FITS. The case study consisted of developing a brand, engaging community stakeholders, reviewing existing children's menus in local restaurants, administering owner-manager surveys, collaborating with restaurants to improve menus, and assessing the process and outcomes of the intervention. Best Food FITS regularly participated in citywide health events and funded the construction of a teaching kitchen in a new community building where regular nutrition classes are held. Sixteen independent restaurants and 1 chain restaurant implemented new menus. Improving menus in restaurants can be a simple step toward changing children's food habits. The approach taken in this case study can be adapted to other communities. Minimal funding would be needed to facilitate development of promotional items to support brand recognition.

  12. Improving Children’s Menus in Community Restaurants: Best Food for Families, Infants, and Toddlers (Best Food FITS) Intervention, South Central Texas, 2010–2014

    Friedman, BJ; Fisher, Deborah Torrey; Biediger-Friedman, Lesli

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 32% of US children are overweight or obese. Restaurant and fast food meals contribute 18% of daily calories for children and adolescents aged 2 to 18 years. Changing children’s menus may improve their diets. This case study describes Best Food for Families, Infants, and Toddlers (Best Food FITS), a community-based intervention designed to address childhood obesity. The objective of this study was to improve San Marcos children’s access to healthy diets through partnerships with local restaurants, removing sugar-sweetened beverages, decreasing the number of energy-dense entrées, and increasing fruit and vegetable offerings on restaurant menus. Community Context San Marcos, Texas, the fastest growing US city, has more restaurants and fewer grocery stores than other Texas cities. San Marcos’s population is diverse; 37.8% of residents and 70.3% of children are Hispanic. Overweight and obesity rates among school children exceed 50%; 40.3% of children live below the poverty level. Methods This project received funding from the Texas Department of State Health Services Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity Prevention Program to develop Best Food FITS. The case study consisted of developing a brand, engaging community stakeholders, reviewing existing children’s menus in local restaurants, administering owner–manager surveys, collaborating with restaurants to improve menus, and assessing the process and outcomes of the intervention. Outcome Best Food FITS regularly participated in citywide health events and funded the construction of a teaching kitchen in a new community building where regular nutrition classes are held. Sixteen independent restaurants and 1 chain restaurant implemented new menus. Interpretation Improving menus in restaurants can be a simple step toward changing children’s food habits. The approach taken in this case study can be adapted to other communities. Minimal funding would be needed to facilitate development

  13. A local area network and information management system for a submarine overhaul facility

    Bushmire, Jeffrey D

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design of a local area network for a submarine overhaul facility is developed using System Engineering concepts. SOFLAN, the Submarine Overhaul Facility Local Area Network, is necessary to provide more timely and accurate information to submarine overhaul managers in order to decrease the overhaul time period and become more competitive. The network is a microcomputer based system following the Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 standards with a server .. client architecture. SOFLAN serves...

  14. Hardronic Festival | 23 July | Restaurant 3

    2016-01-01

    Hardronic is back and the 2016 edition will take place on Saturday 23 July behind the Restaurant 3. Come celebrate our 25th edition with 11 bands, 2 stages, bouncy castle, drinks and a food stand (profits go to charity)! Hardronic is made thanks to sponsors and volunteers, if you would like to volunteer, please send a message to contact-hardronic@cern.ch - http://hardronic.web.cern.ch.  

  15. Women entrepreneurs in the Bangladeshi restaurant business.

    Khan, M R

    1995-08-01

    The Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) is a nongovernmental organization involved with multisectoral programs and income generation schemes for rural poor women. The program objective is the search for effective income generation activities to be owned, operated, and managed by BRAC's landless members. The evaluation was conducted among five restaurants in the Restaurant Program, which was initiated in 1991. Entrepreneurs started with a loan of Taka 6500 and sold tea, snacks, and meals. 273 such establishments were started by January 1993. In practice, selection of entrepreneurs was different from the designated formal selection process. Preference was given to women whose husbands or brothers already had some involvement in the marketplace. The women tended to handle the cooking, washing, cleaning, and maybe some shopping and serving, but men controlled handling of cash and keeping accounts. Restaurants make modest profits in general, but a detailed accounting of employee wages and meals for owner-operators indicated lower profits. Loans were being repaid. The analysis shows that women's position did not change, women were just as or more dependent on men, and women's respect in the community did not increase. The restaurants were run in ways reinforcing the traditional purdah and definition of space. The goal should be women's independence, access to markets, and acquisition of business skills. The recommendations are made for strictly following the selection criteria, providing training before starting the business, operating of the business in a building separate from family, assuring a uniform system of accounting, maintaining BRAC files on individual women, and testing whether a fixed amount of loan would stimulate business capability.

  16. Customer Satisfaction Level in Mount Sherpa Restaurant

    Shrestha, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the key to every successful business in the sense of profit motive, as well as in the long run. It is the desire of every business to be able to understand their customers’ need. Many businesses, especially related with the service industry, carry out different surveys and conduct research in order to know what their customers really want. This research was carried out to measure the customer satisfaction level in Mount Sherpa restaurant. The results and findings ...

  17. Making Texas Restaurants Healthier for Children

    2014-12-30

    Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Professor of Nutrition at Texas State University, discusses her study which details the success of a community-based program in Texas aimed at combatting childhood obesity by improving children’s menus in restaurants.  Created: 12/30/2014 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/30/2014.

  18. A prospective study of frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals and subsequent 9-year risk of all-cause and cardiometabolic mortality in US adults

    Graubard, Barry I.

    2018-01-01

    Restaurant prepared foods are known to be energy-dense and high in fat and sodium, but lower in protective nutrients. There is evidence of higher risk of adiposity, type II diabetes, and heart disease in frequent consumers of restaurant meals. However, the risk of mortality as a long-term health consequence of frequent consumption of restaurant meals has not been examined. We examined the prospective risk of all-cause and coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and diabetes (cardiometabolic) mortality in relation to frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals in a national cohort. We used frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals information collected in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, conducted from 1999–2004, with mortality follow-up completed through Dec. 31, 2011 (baseline age ≥ 40y; n = 9107). We estimated the relative hazard of all-cause and cardiometabolic mortality associated with weekly frequency of eating restaurant meals using Cox-proportional hazards regression methods to adjust for multiple covariates. All analyses accounted for complex survey design and included sample weights. Over 33% of all respondents reported eating ≥3 restaurant prepared meals/week. In this cohort, 2200 deaths due to all causes and 665 cardiometabolic deaths occurred over a median follow-up of 9 years. The covariate-adjusted hazard ratio of all cause or cardiometabolic mortality in men and women reporters of meals did not differ from those reporting ≥3 meals/week (P>0.05). The results were robust to effect modification by baseline BMI, years of education, and baseline morbidity. Expectedly, the 24-h dietary intakes of whole grains, fruits, dietary fiber, folate, vitamin C, potassium and magnesium at baseline were lower, but energy, energy density, and energy from fat were higher in more frequent restaurant meal reporters (Peating restaurant prepared meals (Peating restaurant prepared meals and prospective risk of mortality after 9

  19. THE PROFIT TARGET IN A RESTAURATION UNIT

    Briciu Sorin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hospitality industry represents one of the most dynamic sectors of the contemporary society, with an emphasised role in the process of globalization. Currently, the hospitality industry does not only face the challenges of the economic crisis but the changes in the market, the consumers behaviour and the technological trends, too. That is why, in this time, it is extremely important to apply the management accounting and the cost calculation in any entity in the hospitality industry in order to cope with the market challenges. The main services are performed through the hospitality industry: the accommodation and the restauration. These services satisfy the vital needs of the tourists, but this industry must meet other needs or requests such as the acknowledgement of the social status, the desire to know other cultures or traditions, to spend free time in a pleasant manner etc. Our intention and goal in the current article is to approach an image of the CVP analysis in the decision making process with an emphasis on the restauration in the hospitality industry. In order to cope with this critical time, the competition and to achieve the profits estimated, the managers in the hospitality industry can apply the CVP analysis, one of the simplest and most useful analytical instruments. The paper will tackle with the problem of the break even point in a restaurant, one of the main indicators of the CVP model and also the possibility of the decision making process orientation.

  20. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30.   RESTAURANT SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Opening times Usual opening times ASCENSION Thursday 9 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00 Friday 10 May 1 2 3   07h00 - 21h00 07h00 - 18h00 Bldg. 40 Bldg. 30, 54 Bldg. 864 08h00 - 17h00     Saturday 11 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday 12 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     WHITSUNTIDE Saturday 18 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Sunday 19 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Monday 20 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  1. The local exchange network in the information age - The need for new policy

    Fons, J.P. (Ausley, McMullen, McGehee, Carothers and Proctor, Tallahassee, FL (USA))

    1990-01-18

    This article is an analysis of a conventional belief that the local exchange telephone networks are bottleneck monopolies. It also examines the alleged bases for excluding the local exchange telephone companies from participating directly in existing and developing technologies and markets other than those of a telephone service, or dial-tone. The author concludes that adherence to the current policy in the face of a demand for information age technology and services, and the availability of competing systems, will condemn the local exchange networks to the technological junk heap - and at the same time deprive the public of some of its best opportunities for new and enhanced services.

  2. Assessing Local Model Adequacy in Bayesian Hierarchical Models Using the Partitioned Deviance Information Criterion

    Wheeler, David C.; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Waller, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Many diagnostic tools and goodness-of-fit measures, such as the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian deviance information criterion (DIC), are available to evaluate the overall adequacy of linear regression models. In addition, visually assessing adequacy in models has become an essential part of any regression analysis. In this paper, we focus on a spatial consideration of the local DIC measure for model selection and goodness-of-fit evaluation. We use a partitioning of the DIC into the local DIC, leverage, and deviance residuals to assess local model fit and influence for both individual observations and groups of observations in a Bayesian framework. We use visualization of the local DIC and differences in local DIC between models to assist in model selection and to visualize the global and local impacts of adding covariates or model parameters. We demonstrate the utility of the local DIC in assessing model adequacy using HIV prevalence data from pregnant women in the Butare province of Rwanda during 1989-1993 using a range of linear model specifications, from global effects only to spatially varying coefficient models, and a set of covariates related to sexual behavior. Results of applying the diagnostic visualization approach include more refined model selection and greater understanding of the models as applied to the data. PMID:21243121

  3. An Information-Based Approach to Precision Analysis of Indoor WLAN Localization Using Location Fingerprint

    Mu Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we proposed a novel information-based approach to precision analysis of indoor wireless local area network (WLAN localization using location fingerprint. First of all, by using the Fisher information matrix (FIM, we derive the fundamental limit of WLAN fingerprint-based localization precision considering different signal distributions in characterizing the variation of received signal strengths (RSSs in the target environment. After that, we explore the relationship between the localization precision and access point (AP placement, which can provide valuable suggestions for the design of the highly-precise localization system. Second, we adopt the heuristic simulated annealing (SA algorithm to optimize the AP locations for the sake of approaching the fundamental limit of localization precision. Finally, the extensive simulations and experiments are conducted in both regular line-of-sight (LOS and irregular non-line-of-sight (NLOS environments to demonstrate that the proposed approach can not only effectively improve the WLAN fingerprint-based localization precision, but also reduce the time overhead.

  4. WHY RESTAURANTS SHOULD GO GREEN? – MAIN ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES IN RESTAURANTS INDUSTRY

    Stefan-Dragos CÎRSTEA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality businesses influence the sustainability of their natural environment by consuming significant amounts of natural resources. Restaurant industry employs one in every three retail workers and consumes one-third of all retail electricity use and almost 30% of all meals were eaten away from home, last year. This study attempted to identify the most important benefits obtained from green practices implementation and which are the basic environmental practices that can be adopted by the organisations in order the improve their image and reduce their costs. Moreover, our research has been undertaken in parallel with worldwide existing trends in order to better understand the direction in which green restaurants are moving. This study results inventories the main environmental practices and actions that can be implemented in restaurants.

  5. Restaurant opening times for the Ascension and Whitsun weekends

    2012-01-01

    For the Ascension weekend (from Thursday, 17 May to Sunday, 20 May inclusive) and the Whitsun weekend (from Saturday, 26 May to Monday, 28 May inclusive), the restaurant opening times will be as follows: Restaurant No.1 will be open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., with hot meals being served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m. (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.2 will be closed (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.3 will be closed.

  6. Reference evapotranspiration forecasting based on local meteorological and global climate information screened by partial mutual information

    Fang, Wei; Huang, Shengzhi; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Guohe; Meng, Erhao; Luan, Jinkai

    2018-06-01

    In this study, reference evapotranspiration (ET0) forecasting models are developed for the least economically developed regions subject to meteorological data scarcity. Firstly, the partial mutual information (PMI) capable of capturing the linear and nonlinear dependence is investigated regarding its utility to identify relevant predictors and exclude those that are redundant through the comparison with partial linear correlation. An efficient input selection technique is crucial for decreasing model data requirements. Then, the interconnection between global climate indices and regional ET0 is identified. Relevant climatic indices are introduced as additional predictors to comprise information regarding ET0, which ought to be provided by meteorological data unavailable. The case study in the Jing River and Beiluo River basins, China, reveals that PMI outperforms the partial linear correlation in excluding the redundant information, favouring the yield of smaller predictor sets. The teleconnection analysis identifies the correlation between Nino 1 + 2 and regional ET0, indicating influences of ENSO events on the evapotranspiration process in the study area. Furthermore, introducing Nino 1 + 2 as predictors helps to yield more accurate ET0 forecasts. A model performance comparison also shows that non-linear stochastic models (SVR or RF with input selection through PMI) do not always outperform linear models (MLR with inputs screen by linear correlation). However, the former can offer quite comparable performance depending on smaller predictor sets. Therefore, efforts such as screening model inputs through PMI and incorporating global climatic indices interconnected with ET0 can benefit the development of ET0 forecasting models suitable for data-scarce regions.

  7. Restaurant quality: the case of Central Slovenian region

    Uran Maravić, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose – This study has two key goals. The first part presents and compares different expert systems for assessing quality in the restaurants alongside the Ljubljana Quality Selection assessment methodology - LQS. In the second part, this study presents the results of a restaurant assessment in the Central Slovenian region using the LQS methodology. Design/methodology – In the first part of the study, we compare restaurant assessment systems through different criteria. In the second p...

  8. Ljubljana quality selection (LQS) - innovative case of restaurant assessment system

    Maja Uran Maravić; Daniela Gračan; Zrinka Zadel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose – The purpose of this paper is to briefly present the most well-known restaurant assessment systems where restaurant are assessed by experts. The aim is to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each system. Design –The special focus is to give answers on questions: how are the restaurants assessed by experts, which are the elements and standards of assessment and whether they are consistent with the quality dimensions as advocated in the theory of service quality. Methodology ...

  9. Restaurant Policies and Practices for Serving Raw Fish in Minnesota.

    Hedeen, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    The number of restaurants serving sushi within Minnesota is continuously increasing. The practices and protocols of serving raw fish are complex and require detailed planning to ensure that food served to patrons will not cause illness. Although the popularity of sushi is increasing, there is a lack of research on food safety issues pertaining to preparation of raw fish and sushi rice. To address this gap, the Minnesota Department of Health Environmental Health Specialists Network Food program collected descriptive data on restaurant practices and policies concerning the service of raw fish and sushi rice in 40 Minnesota restaurants. At each restaurant, a specialist interviewed a restaurant manager, conducted an observation of the sushi prep areas in the restaurant kitchen, and reviewed parasite destruction letters and invoices from fish supplier(s). Over half of the restaurants (59%) were missing one or more of the parasite destruction letters from their fish supplier(s) guaranteeing that fish had been properly frozen to the time and temperature requirements in the Minnesota Food Code. A total of 42 parasite destruction letters from suppliers were observed; 10% were considered "adequate" letters. The majority of the letters were missing details pertaining to the types of fish frozen, the length of time fish were frozen, or details on what temperatures fish were held frozen or a combination of all three. Most restaurants were using time as a public health control for their sushi rice. For those restaurants using time as a public health control, 26% had a written procedure on-site, and approximately 53% were keeping track of time. Bare hand contact during sushi prep was observed in 17% of restaurants, and in more than 40% of the restaurants, at least one fish was mislabeled on the menu. Findings from this study indicate that many Minnesota restaurants are not complying with the Food Code requirements pertaining to parasite destruction for the service of raw fish or

  10. Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a Generalised El Farol Bar Problem

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

  11. Demand uncertainty and investment in the restaurant industry

    Sohn, Jayoung

    2016-01-01

    Since the collapse of the housing market, the prolonged economic uncertainty lingering in the U.S. economy has dampened restaurant performance. Economic uncertainty affects consumer sentiment and spending, turning into demand uncertainty. Nevertheless, the highly competitive nature of the restaurant industry does not allow much room for restaurants to actively control prices, leaving most food service firms exposed to demand uncertainty. To investigate the impact of demand uncertainty in the ...

  12. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Snježana Gagić; Dragan Tešanović; Ana Jovičić

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and inc...

  13. Evaluation of Customer Satisfaction with Restaurant Services with ACSI Application

    Derli Luís Angnes; Carlos Alberto Mello Moyano; Jorge Francisco Bertinetti Lengler

    2015-01-01

    Brazil has more than a million bars and restaurants, which are responsible for about 40% of the tourism GDP of the country. Restaurants are business organizations in the gastronomy and service sectors that besides providing individual satisfaction and social life are of great importance for people’s health. The main objective of this study was to validate a model for the customer satisfaction related to the service attributes in restaurants. The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) wa...

  14. For or against the smoking ban in restaurants?

    Marinakou, Evangelia

    2011-01-01

    A considerable number of countries have applied laws for the ban of smoking in public places. Furthermore, the separate area for smokers and non-smokers customers in private places such as restaurants and bars, is a significant change that has caused positive or negative attitudes. The different views of customers and restaurant owners have created a legal and social debate. The findings suggest that on the one hand, the majority of the restaurant owners impose the law, but not actively. On t...

  15. HR PRACTICES, EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR, CUSTOMER SATISFACTION, AND RESTAURANT PERFORMANCE

    Smela, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper looks at performance at the individual restaurant level from the perspective of management, customers and employees. The results are based on surveys of each of these three groups conducted between June and September 2001 at a sit-down, casual restaurant chain. There are several key findings. Service-related employee training and giving staff a say in making decisions improves customer satisfaction and loyalty. How employees perceive the service climate in their restaurant is a bet...

  16. Customer Satisfaction and Service Quality at Fafa's Restaurant

    Tcvetkova, Daria

    2017-01-01

    The commissioning company of this thesis is Fafa’s restaurant, which opened in Tampere in 2016. Fafa’s restaurant is a chain of fast-food concept restaurants located in several cities in Finland. The purpose of the research is to analyse customer satisfaction and service quality at the commissioning company and find positive solutions for its improvement. The theoretical framework of the study includes different theories on customer satisfaction and quality of the service, models and dime...

  17. Cooking smoke and respiratory symptoms of restaurant workers in Thailand

    Juntarawijit, Chudchawal; Juntarawijit, Yuwayong

    2017-01-01

    Background Restaurant workers are at risk from exposure to toxic compounds from burning of fuel and fumes from cooking. However, the literature is almost silent on the issue. What discussion that can be found in the literature focuses on the potential effects from biomass smoke exposure in the home kitchen, and does not address the problem as occurring in the workplace, particularly in restaurants. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of 224 worker from 142 food restaurants in the Tha Ph...

  18. The business plan of Izakaya restaurant in Helsinki

    Du, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The objective of thesis was to study the main areas of creating a business plan and to make research toward the current market environment of Asian fusion restaurant in the Helsinki area in order to make a realistic business plan of a Japanese Izakaya restaurant. The theoretical study is based on several business books, some suggestion from different types of restaurant owners in Helsinki, the business plan outline was finally made. For the empirical study, a survey of market analysis,...

  19. Non-local setting and outcome information for violation of Bell's inequality

    Pawlowski, Marcin; Kofler, Johannes; Paterek, Tomasz; Brukner, Caslav; Seevinck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Bell's theorem is a no-go theorem stating that quantum mechanics cannot be reproduced by a physical theory based on realism, freedom to choose experimental settings and two locality conditions: setting (SI) and outcome (OI) independence. We provide a novel analysis of what it takes to violate Bell's inequality within the framework in which both realism and freedom of choice are assumed, by showing that it is impossible to model a violation without having information in one laboratory about both the setting and the outcome at the distant one. While it is possible that outcome information can be revealed from shared hidden variables, the assumed experimenter's freedom to choose the settings ensures that the setting information must be non-locally transferred even when the SI condition is obeyed. The amount of transmitted information about the setting that is sufficient to violate the CHSH inequality up to its quantum mechanical maximum is 0.736 bits.

  20. An integrative review of information systems and terminologies used in local health departments.

    Olsen, Jeanette; Baisch, Mary Jo

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this integrative review based on the published literature was to identify information systems currently being used by local health departments and to determine the extent to which standard terminology was used to communicate data, interventions, and outcomes to improve public health informatics at the local health department (LHD) level and better inform research, policy, and programs. Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review methodology was used. Data were obtained through key word searches of three publication databases and reference lists of retrieved articles and consulting with experts to identify landmark works. The final sample included 45 articles analyzed and synthesized using the matrix method. The results indicated a wide array of information systems were used by LHDs and supported diverse functions aligned with five categories: administration; surveillance; health records; registries; and consumer resources. Detail regarding specific programs being used, location or extent of use, or effectiveness was lacking. The synthesis indicated evidence of growing interest in health information exchange groups, yet few studies described use of data standards or standard terminology in LHDs. Research to address these gaps is needed to provide current, meaningful data that inform public health informatics research, policy, and initiatives at and across the LHD level. Coordination at a state or national level is recommended to collect information efficiently about LHD information systems that will inform improvements while minimizing duplication of efforts and financial burden. Until this happens, efforts to strengthen LHD information systems and policies may be significantly challenged.

  1. Monitoring the Sodium Content of Restaurant Foods: Public Health Challenges and Opportunities

    Cogswell, Mary E.; Gunn, Janelle P.; Curtis, Christine J.; Rhodes, Donna; Hoy, Kathy; Pehrsson, Pamela; Nickle, Melissa; Merritt, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed methods of studies assessing restaurant foods’ sodium content and nutrition databases. We systematically searched the 1964–2012 literature and manually examined references in selected articles and studies. Twenty-six (5.2%) of the 499 articles we found met the inclusion criteria and were abstracted. Five were conducted nationally. Sodium content determination methods included laboratory analysis (n = 15), point-of-purchase nutrition information or restaurants’ Web sites (n = 8), and menu analysis with a nutrient database (n = 3). There is no comprehensive data system that provides all information needed to monitor changes in sodium or other nutrients among restaurant foods. Combining information from different sources and methods may help inform a comprehensive system to monitor sodium content reduction efforts in the US food supply and to develop future strategies. PMID:23865701

  2. QUALITY, EFFECTIVENESS AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE OF LOCAL TREASURIES BUDGET ACCOUNTING

    Biljana Tešić

    2011-01-01

    The role of management information systems (MIS) of local treasuries budget accounting is to provide qualitative information support to management in process of decision making and to provide effective managing of key processes of budget accounting, in accordance with requests of management on all levels of decision making. From the aspect of effectiveness and request for quality, in accordance with request of users and defined system goals, this research includes the analysis of characterist...

  3. The attractiveness of green restaurants among the youth

    Codruța Adina BĂLTESCU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest of the population in a healthy life is a constant of modern society. The culinary habits are essential elements in this respect. Concerns about the opening of green restaurants are related directly to the people's intentions to serve meals in such public catering establishments. The present article analyses the views of the youth on the attributes considered to be significant to outline the activity of green restaurants and the prospects of their consumption within these restaurants. The results obtained show the young people's willingness to eat in green restaurants, as well as their availability to allocate higher amounts of money for the consumption of healthy foods.

  4. Work on the extension of Restaurant No. 1

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    The work on the extension of Restaurant No. 1 began on 12 April and is expected to take 6 months to complete. For safety reasons, a worksite perimeter fence has been erected on the terrace, and a watertight shielding wall has been put up inside the restaurant. Restaurant customers are requested to comply with the signs in place. Various activities associated with the work are likely to generate noise and dust. As the terrace is used by diners in the summer, such activities will be kept to a minimum during mealtimes. We should like to thank the customers of the restaurant for their understanding. GS/SEM Group

  5. Helsinki market entry opportunity for a Vegan & Raw Danish restaurant chain 42˚RAW

    Yablokova, Anna

    2015-01-01

    For those who follow and are interested in the vegan lifestyle, the scarce number of restaurants which offer suchlike products in Helsinki is evident. Comparing the local market with cities around the globe this impression can be proven with statistical data. Despite the world growing trend of healthy eating and living, Finland is still far behind even the neighbouring Nordic countries on the level of niche vegan industry. The purpose of this thesis was to research the Helsinki market and fin...

  6. Indoor air quality in restaurant kitchens in the south Tehran (2006

    F. Naseri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims   Generally nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 and carbon monoxide (CO are emitted Toxic gases like carbon monoxide (CO., carbon dioxide (CO 2 , nitrogen oxides (NOx will remain in the kitchen when cooking with a gas stove. The purpose of the present study was to measure carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 levels during the operation of cooking  in restaurant kitchens that use gas or natural gas, which are widely used in Tehran.     Methods   One hundred thirty one restaurants were chosen randomly from a list of 276 restaurants in five region different geographic categories, of the metropolitan Tehran, area, in summer 2006. Simultaneous indoor and outdoor air sampling occurred at each sampling site.   Carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentrations were measured by a real-time analyzer portable computer monitors.     Results   The results of this study showed that %83 and %68 kitchens had local exhaust ventilation and fan system, respectively. The results of this study showed that the mean concentrations of CO and NO 2 with gas stoves for food cooking in restaurant kitchens were below the standard which was established as TLV-TWA=25 and 3 ppm, respectively by ACGIH. The I/O  ratios of CO and NO 2 , were larger than 1 when there were indoor sources.     Conclusion  In this study, the mean levels of CO and NO 2 indoor were upper than the CO and  NO 2 outdoor the restaurants. Generally, improved methods of cooking besides appropriate  ventilation of all indoor combustion appliances, including gas stoves, should be adopted in  industrial kitchens

  7. Restaurants in the Neighborhood, Eating Away from Home and BMI in China.

    Xu Tian

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between environmental risk factors, eating away from home, and increasing BMI of Chinese adults.Participants were selected from the recent four waves (2004, 2006, 2009, and 2011 of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS. 10633 participants, including 5084 men and 5549 women, were used in the analysis. 24-h dietary recall data for three consecutive days with information on the time and place of consumption were collected. Nearby restaurants were measured by the number of fast food outlets, indoor restaurants, and food stands in the neighborhood. Random effects multivariable regression was used to assess associations between these variables.People living in neighborhoods with large numbers of indoor restaurants are more likely to eat away from home (p<0.05. Higher frequency of eating away from home is positively associated with BMI, but this effect is only significant for men (p<0.05. Moreover, while eating dinner or breakfast away from home contributes to BMI increase for men (p<0.05, no such association is found for lunch.Eating dinner and breakfast away from home is positively associated with BMI for Chinese men. Labeling energy and portion size for the dishes served in indoor restaurants is recommended in China.

  8. Restaurants in the Neighborhood, Eating Away from Home and BMI in China.

    Tian, Xu; Zhong, Li; von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan; Tu, Huakang; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between environmental risk factors, eating away from home, and increasing BMI of Chinese adults. Participants were selected from the recent four waves (2004, 2006, 2009, and 2011) of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). 10633 participants, including 5084 men and 5549 women, were used in the analysis. 24-h dietary recall data for three consecutive days with information on the time and place of consumption were collected. Nearby restaurants were measured by the number of fast food outlets, indoor restaurants, and food stands in the neighborhood. Random effects multivariable regression was used to assess associations between these variables. People living in neighborhoods with large numbers of indoor restaurants are more likely to eat away from home (paway from home is positively associated with BMI, but this effect is only significant for men (paway from home contributes to BMI increase for men (paway from home is positively associated with BMI for Chinese men. Labeling energy and portion size for the dishes served in indoor restaurants is recommended in China.

  9. Corn content of French fry oil from national chain vs. small business restaurants.

    Jahren, A Hope; Schubert, Brian A

    2010-02-02

    Several issues, ranging from sustainability to health, may interest the consumers in the corn content of their food. However, because restaurants are excluded from the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990, national chain restaurants provide nonspecific ingredient information and small businesses supply none. We measured the carbon isotope composition of fry oil in French fries purchased from 68 (67%) of the 101 national chain fast food restaurants on Oahu (i.e., McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's, Arby's, and Jack in the Box), and paired this with a similar number of small businesses (n = 66) to calculate minimum percent contribution of corn to total fry oil. We found that the majority (69%) of the national chain restaurants served fries containing corn oil, whereas this was true for only a minority (20%) of the small businesses. Corn oil is more expensive than soybean oil (for example) when purchased from a small business supplier, suggesting that large-scale corporate agreements are necessary to make corn oil frying cost-effective. When considering French fry oil along with corn-fed beef and chicken, as well as high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened soda, we see the pervasive influence of corn as an ingredient in national chain fast food.

  10. Cooperative Localization for Multi-AUVs Based on GM-PHD Filters and Information Entropy Theory

    Lichuan Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative localization (CL is considered a promising method for underwater localization with respect to multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (multi-AUVs. In this paper, we proposed a CL algorithm based on information entropy theory and the probability hypothesis density (PHD filter, aiming to enhance the global localization accuracy of the follower. In the proposed framework, the follower carries lower cost navigation systems, whereas the leaders carry better ones. Meanwhile, the leaders acquire the followers’ observations, including both measurements and clutter. Then, the PHD filters are utilized on the leaders and the results are communicated to the followers. The followers then perform weighted summation based on all received messages and obtain a final positioning result. Based on the information entropy theory and the PHD filter, the follower is able to acquire a precise knowledge of its position.

  11. Accounting for Local Dependence with the Rasch Model: The Paradox of Information Increase.

    Andrich, David

    Test theories imply statistical, local independence. Where local independence is violated, models of modern test theory that account for it have been proposed. One violation of local independence occurs when the response to one item governs the response to a subsequent item. Expanding on a formulation of this kind of violation between two items in the dichotomous Rasch model, this paper derives three related implications. First, it formalises how the polytomous Rasch model for an item constituted by summing the scores of the dependent items absorbs the dependence in its threshold structure. Second, it shows that as a consequence the unit when the dependence is accounted for is not the same as if the items had no response dependence. Third, it explains the paradox, known, but not explained in the literature, that the greater the dependence of the constituent items the greater the apparent information in the constituted polytomous item when it should provide less information.

  12. Systems Factorial Technology provides new insights on global-local information processing in autism spectrum disorders.

    Johnson, Shannon A; Blaha, Leslie M; Houpt, Joseph W; Townsend, James T

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies of global-local processing in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have indicated mixed findings, with some evidence of a local processing bias, or preference for detail-level information, and other results suggesting typical global advantage, or preference for the whole or gestalt. Findings resulting from this paradigm have been used to argue for or against a detail focused processing bias in ASDs, and thus have important theoretical implications. We applied Systems Factorial Technology, and the associated Double Factorial Paradigm (both defined in the text), to examine information processing characteristics during a divided attention global-local task in high-functioning individuals with an ASD and typically developing controls. Group data revealed global advantage for both groups, contrary to some current theories of ASDs. Information processing models applied to each participant revealed that task performance, although showing no differences at the group level, was supported by different cognitive mechanisms in ASD participants compared to controls. All control participants demonstrated inhibitory parallel processing and the majority demonstrated a minimum-time stopping rule. In contrast, ASD participants showed exhaustive parallel processing with mild facilitatory interactions between global and local information. Thus our results indicate fundamental differences in the stopping rules and channel dependencies in individuals with an ASD.

  13. Global and Local Processing of Incidental Information and Memory Retrieval at 6 Months.

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Five experiments examined the role of global and local cues in memory retrieval in infancy. Results showed that infants encode and remember for substantial periods of time not only the shape of figures displayed in their periphery but also the global organization of these figures. They also adapt this information when responding to new events.…

  14. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Outbreak Associated with Restaurant Beef Grinding.

    Torso, Lauren M; Voorhees, Ronald E; Forest, Stephen A; Gordon, Andrew Z; Silvestri, Sharon A; Kissler, Bonnie; Schlackman, Jessica; Sandt, Carol H; Toma, Paul; Bachert, Joel; Mertz, Kristen J; Harrison, Lee H

    2015-07-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a common cause of foodborne illness in the United States. Beef ground at establishments regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service is routinely tested for E. coli O157:H7. Prior to December 2013, boxed beef product (wholesale cuts of beef, such as beef loin, packaged into bags and boxed for shipping) was not always tested for this pathogen. Downstream processors or retailers may grind the product; and, if the ground beef is not cooked to the recommended temperature, pathogens on the exterior of the beef introduced to the interior through grinding may survive. On 18 October 2013, the Allegheny County Health Department identified two E. coli O157:H7 cases, both of whom were food handlers at restaurant A, a restaurant that ground locally produced boxed beef for hamburgers on site. Case finding was conducted through public messaging, employee surveys, and disease surveillance. All potential cases were interviewed using a standard questionnaire. A confirmed case was defined as laboratory-confirmed E. coli O157:H7 with exposure to restaurant A. A probable case was defined as a patient with compatible symptoms and exposure to restaurant A but without laboratory confirmation. All human and food isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis. The analysis identified 14 confirmed and 10 probable cases of E. coli; 18 nonintact ground beef samples tested positive for E. coli O157:H7. Nine confirmed cases were restaurant A employees. All confirmed cases recalled eating a restaurant A hamburger in the 10 days before illness onset; most cases reported consuming medium to rare hamburgers. Multiple pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis patterns were identified among both the human and ground beef isolates, and the patient isolates matched those found in ground beef samples. Restaurant A

  15. The effect of a smoke-free law on restaurant business in South Australia.

    Wakefield, Melanie; Siahpush, Mohammad; Scollo, Michelle; Lal, Anita; Hyland, Andrew; McCaul, Kieran; Miller, Caroline

    2002-08-01

    Despite evidence to the contrary from overseas research, the introduction of smoke-free legislation in South Australia (SA), which required all restaurants to go smoke-free in January 1999, sparked concerns among the hospitality industry about loss of restaurant business. This study aimed to determine whether the law had a detrimental impact on restaurant business in SA. Using time series analysis, we compared the ratio of monthly restaurant turnover from restaurants and cafés in SA to (a) total retail tumover in SA (minus restaurants) for the years 1991 to 2001 and (b) Australian restaurant tumover (minus SA, Westem Australia and the Australian Capital Territory) for the years 1991-2000. There was no decline in the ratio of (a) SA restaurant turnover to SA retail turnover or (b) SA restaurant tumover to Australian restaurant turnover. The introduction of a smoke-free law applying to restaurants in SA did not adversely affect restaurant business in SA.

  16. Sociodemographic Disparities in Local Smoke-Free Law Coverage in 10 States.

    Huang, Jidong; King, Brian A; Babb, Stephen D; Xu, Xin; Hallett, Cynthia; Hopkins, Maggie

    2015-09-01

    We assessed sociodemographic disparities in local 100% smoke-free laws prohibiting smoking in all indoor areas of nonhospitality worksites, restaurants, and bars in 10 states. We obtained data on local 100% smoke-free laws (US Tobacco Control Laws Database) and subcounty characteristics (2006-2010 American Community Survey) for Alabama, Alaska, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. Outcomes included (1) 100% smoke-free law covering restaurants, bars, and workplaces; (2) 100% smoke-free law covering restaurants, bars, or workplaces; and (3) number of venue types covered by 100% smoke-free laws (0-3). Sociodemographics included total population, urban status, percentage racial/ethnic minority, per capita income, percentage with high-school diploma, percentage with blue-collar jobs, and percentage of workers who live and work in the same locality. Across states, localities with less-educated residents, smaller proportions of workers living and working in the same locality, or both generally had lower odds of being covered by 100% smoke-free laws. Coverage varied across states for other sociodemographics. Disparities exist in local smoke-free law coverage. Identifying patterns in coverage can inform state efforts to address related disparities.

  17. Association between full service and fast food restaurant density, dietary intake and overweight/obesity among adults in Delhi, India.

    Patel, Opal; Shahulhameed, Safraj; Shivashankar, Roopa; Tayyab, Mohammad; Rahman, Atiqur; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tandon, Nikhil; Jaacks, Lindsay M

    2017-07-19

    The food environment has been implicated as an underlying contributor to the global obesity epidemic. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship between the food environment, dietary intake, and overweight/obesity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The aim of this study was to assess the association of full service and fast food restaurant density with dietary intake and overweight/obesity in Delhi, India. Data are from a cross-sectional, population-based study conducted in Delhi. Using multilevel cluster random sampling, 5364 participants were selected from 134 census enumeration blocks (CEBs). Geographic information system data were available for 131 CEBs (n = 5264) from a field survey conducted using hand-held global positioning system devices. The number of full service and fast food restaurants within a 1-km buffer of CEBs was recorded by trained staff using ArcGIS software, and participants were assigned to tertiles of full service and fast food restaurant density based on their resident CEB. Height and weight were measured using standardized procedures and overweight/obesity was defined as a BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 . The most common full service and fast food restaurants were Indian savory restaurants (57.2%) and Indian sweet shops (25.8%). Only 14.1% of full service and fast food restaurants were Western style. After adjustment for age, household income, education, and tobacco and alcohol use, participants in the highest tertile of full service and fast food restaurant density were less likely to consume fruit and more likely to consume refined grains compared to participants in the lowest tertile (both p restaurant density were significantly more likely to be overweight/obese: odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.44 (1.24, 1.67). After adjustment for age, household income, and education, the effect was attenuated: 1.08 (0.92, 1.26). Results were consistent with further adjustment for tobacco and alcohol use, moderate physical activity

  18. Healthier side dishes at restaurants: an analysis of children’s perspectives, menu content, and energy impacts

    2014-01-01

    Background Children consume restaurant-prepared foods at high rates, suggesting that interventions and policies targeting consumption of these foods have the potential to improve diet quality and attenuate excess energy intake. One approach to encouraging healthier dietary intake in restaurants is to offer fruits and vegetables (FV) as side dishes, as opposed to traditional, energy-dense accompaniments like French fries. The aims of the current study were to examine: children's views about healthier side dishes at restaurants; current side dish offerings on children's menus at leading restaurants; and potential energy reductions when substituting FV side dishes in place of French fries. Methods To investigate children’s attitudes, a survey was administered to a nationally representative sample of U.S. 8- to 18-year-olds (n = 1178). To examine current side dish offerings, children's menus from leading quick service (QSR; n = 10) and full service restaurant chains (FSR; n = 10) were analyzed. Energy reductions that could result from substituting commonly-offered FV side dishes for French fries were estimated using nutrition information corresponding to the children's menu items. Results Two-thirds of children reported that they would not feel negatively about receiving FV sides instead of French fries with kids' meals. Liking/taste was the most common reason that children gave to explain their attitudes about FV side dishes. Nearly all restaurants offered at least 1 FV side dish option, but at most restaurants (60% of QSR; 70% of FSR), FV sides were never served by default. Substituting FV side dishes for French fries yielded an average estimated energy reduction of at least 170 calories. Conclusions Results highlight some healthy trends in the restaurant context, including the majority of children reporting non-negative attitudes about FV side dishes and the consistent availability of FV side dish options at leading QSR and FSR. Yet the minority of

  19. MULTI-TEMPORAL AND MULTI-SENSOR IMAGE MATCHING BASED ON LOCAL FREQUENCY INFORMATION

    X. Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Image Matching is often one of the first tasks in many Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing applications. This paper presents an efficient approach to automated multi-temporal and multi-sensor image matching based on local frequency information. Two new independent image representations, Local Average Phase (LAP and Local Weighted Amplitude (LWA, are presented to emphasize the common scene information, while suppressing the non-common illumination and sensor-dependent information. In order to get the two representations, local frequency information is firstly obtained from Log-Gabor wavelet transformation, which is similar to that of the human visual system; then the outputs of odd and even symmetric filters are used to construct the LAP and LWA. The LAP and LWA emphasize on the phase and amplitude information respectively. As these two representations are both derivative-free and threshold-free, they are robust to noise and can keep as much of the image details as possible. A new Compositional Similarity Measure (CSM is also presented to combine the LAP and LWA with the same weight for measuring the similarity of multi-temporal and multi-sensor images. The CSM can make the LAP and LWA compensate for each other and can make full use of the amplitude and phase of local frequency information. In many image matching applications, the template is usually selected without consideration of its matching robustness and accuracy. In order to overcome this problem, a local best matching point detection is presented to detect the best matching template. In the detection method, we employ self-similarity analysis to identify the template with the highest matching robustness and accuracy. Experimental results using some real images and simulation images demonstrate that the presented approach is effective for matching image pairs with significant scene and illumination changes and that it has advantages over other state-of-the-art approaches, which include: the

  20. An observational study of consumer use of fast-food restaurant drive-through lanes: implications for menu labelling policy.

    Roberto, Christina A; Hoffnagle, Elena; Bragg, Marie A; Brownell, Kelly D

    2010-11-01

    Some versions of restaurant menu labelling legislation do not require energy information to be posted on menus for drive-through lanes. The present study was designed to quantify the number of customers who purchase fast food through drive-in windows as a means of informing legislative labelling efforts. This was an observational study. The study took place at two McDonald's and Burger King restaurants, and single Dairy Queen, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Taco Bell and Wendy's restaurants. The number of customers entering the chain restaurants and purchasing food via the drive-through lane were recorded. A total of 3549 patrons were observed. The percentage of customers who made their purchases at drive-throughs was fifty-seven. The overall average (57 %) is likely a conservative estimate because some fast-food restaurants have late-night hours when only the drive-throughs are open. Since nearly six in ten customers purchase food via the drive-through lanes, menu labelling legislation should mandate the inclusion of menu labels on drive-through menu boards to maximise the impact of this public health intervention.

  1. Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program: focus groups with non-participating restaurant operators.

    Dwyer, John J M; Macaskill, Lesley A; Uetrecht, Connie L; Dombrow, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program is a standard provincial health promotion program. Public health units give an award of excellence to restaurants that meet nutrition, food safety, and non-smoking seating standards. The purpose of this study was to determine why some restaurant operators have not applied to participate in the program, and how to get them to apply. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 35 operators who didn't apply to participate. The analysis of responses yielded various themes. The participants' perceived barriers to participation were misunderstandings about how to qualify for the program, lack of time, concern about different non-smoking bylaw requirements, and potential loss of revenue. Their perceived facilitators to participation were convenience of applying to participate, franchise executives' approval to participate, a 100% non-smoking bylaw, flexibility in the assessment of restaurants, the opportunity for positive advertising, alternative payment for food handler training, and customer demand. Program staff can use the findings to develop and use strategies to encourage participation.

  2. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier [Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Grupo de Química Computacional y Teórica (QCT-USFQ), Departamento de Química e Ingeniería Química, Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Instituto de Simulación Computacional (ISC-USFQ), Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Rincon, Luis, E-mail: lrincon@usfq.edu.ec, E-mail: lrincon@ula.ve [Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Grupo de Química Computacional y Teórica (QCT-USFQ), Departamento de Química e Ingeniería Química, Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Instituto de Simulación Computacional (ISC-USFQ), Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes (ULA), La Hechicera, Mérida-5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-06-28

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for “knowing” about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (D{sub KL}) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. D{sub KL} is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of D{sub KL} with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (N{sup σ}), the quantity χ = (N{sup σ} − 1) D{sub KL}f{sub cut} is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. f{sub cut} is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  3. Gravelines local information commission: the long road to cooperation; Commission locale d'information de Gravelines: la longue marche vers la concertation

    Delalonde, J.C. [Commission Locale d' Information (CLI), 59 - Gravelines (France)

    2009-02-15

    The Chairman of the Gravelines Local Information Commission (CLI) tells us what he thinks about how relationships have changed between operators, the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) and civil society representatives over the last 20 years. He comments that remarkable progress has been made in terms of transparency and cooperation since the Chernobyl disaster. They have managed to find a common language and everyone has learnt to listen to and respect everyone else. For a long time, it has been the role of the CLIs to be nothing more than a source of information, but the situation has come a long way since the preparation and adoption of the TSN law. Even if the purpose of the CLIs is not to make decisions, it is responsible for furnishing public discussions with reliable and pluralistic in-formation and to relay the concerns of and the questions raised by stake-holders in the region. CLIs are also highly appreciated when it comes to the opportunity to call upon independent third-party experts. Even though the TSN law and its decree of 12 March 2008 now clearly lay down this right, which in itself is a big step forward, the initial experiences in Gravelines have highlighted the various obstacles which the CLIs are likely to come up against. (author)

  4. Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem: An Introduction

    Ghosh, Asim; Biswas, Soumyajyoti; Chatterjee, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Anindya Sundar; Naskar, Tapan; Mitra, Manipushpak; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    We discuss several stochastic optimization strategies in games with many players having large number of choices (Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem) and two choices (minority game problem). It is seen that a stochastic crowd avoiding strategy gives very efficient utilization in KPR problem. A slightly modified strategy in the minority game problem gives full utilization but the dynamics stops after reaching full efficiency, thereby making the utilization helpful for only about half of the population (those in minority). We further discuss the ways in which the dynamics may be continued and the utilization becomes effective for all the agents keeping fluctuation arbitrarily small.

  5. Amuse Restaurant Set Dinner Menu 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  6. Restaurant Forty One Dinner Menu 2017

    Restaurant Forty One

    2017-01-01

    This is fine-dining without the stuffiness. The restaurant can host up to 52 guests in the front and main room, with an additional two private dining rooms (with both catering for up to 10 guests each). Tasting menus and special requests are willingly accommodated, and wine tastings and dinner evenings are always available. Our welcoming team are proud to have recently hosted US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on her visit to Dublin. They now await your visit. “Exquisite works of art, and ...

  7. Rasam Indian Restaurant: Early Bird Menu

    Rasam Indian Restaurant

    2013-01-01

    Rasam Indian Restaurant is located in the Glasthule, a suburb of Dublin and opened in 2003. The objective is to serve high quality, authentic Indian cuisine. "We blend, roast and grind our own spices daily to provide a flavour that is unique to Rasam. Cooking Indian food is founded upon long held family traditions. The secret is in the varying elements of heat and spices, the tandoor clay oven is a hugely important fixture in our kitchen. Marinated meats are lowered into the oven on lon...

  8. local

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  9. Smoking status and associated factors among male Chinese restaurant workers in metropolitan Sydney.

    Jiang, Wei; Leung, Brenda; Tam, Nancy; Xu, Huilan; Gleeson, Suzanne; Wen, Li Ming

    2017-03-01

    Issue addressed The smoking rate among male Chinese migrants in Australia is higher than among the general population. This study investigated the smoking rate of male Chinese restaurant workers in metropolitan Sydney, and explored factors associated with smoking and quitting. Methods A self-administered questionnaire survey was completed by Chinese workers in selected Chinese restaurants in metropolitan Sydney from October-December 2012. Eighty-nine Chinese restaurants were approached and 54 (61%) took part in the study. The questionnaire asked participants about their smoking status, knowledge of and attitudes to smoking and quitting as well as socio-demographic information. Multivariable logistic regression was built to assess the associated factors. Results Of the 382 participants who completed the survey, 171 (45%) were current smokers and 50% of current smokers wanted to quit smoking. Participants who spoke Mandarin, had lower English proficiency, did not realise environmental smoke harms children, did not prefer a smoke-free environment or had more than 50% of relatives or friends who smoked were more likely to be current smokers. Participants who were aged 18-29 years, did not understand the benefits of quitting smoking or did not prefer a smoke-free environment were less likely to want to quit. Conclusions Nearly 50% of male Chinese restaurant workers surveyed in this study were current smokers. Key factors associated with the participants' smoking or quitting status are: aged 18-29 years; speaking Mandarin; lower English literacy; and not knowing the dangers of smoking. So what? Tobacco control programs targetted at male Chinese restaurant workers that raise awareness of the harm caused by smoking and the benefits of quitting smoking are required to enhance intention to quit smoking within this population.

  10. Environmental monitoring and independent analysis: the experience of the local information commission in Cadarache

    Foucher, M.

    2010-01-01

    The 2006 Act on 'Open Access to Information and Nuclear Safety' provides free access to nuclear installations data and submits nuclear facilities to an independent administrative authority, the ASN (French Nuclear Safety Authority). A local information committee (CLI - Commission locale d'informations) has been set up for each nuclear facility. It includes all the parties involved and may commission expert studies and environmental measurement tests from independent laboratories. Prompted by environmental organizations, the Cadarache CLI commissioned a CRIIRAD (Commission de Recherche et d'Informations Independantes sur la Radioactivite) fact-finding survey in 2008-2009 to evaluate the environmental impact of the CEA/Cadarache installations since they were created. This study points to a moderate present impact, though a lack of data makes it impossible to reconstruct environmental impact prior to 1979. A set of guidelines are put forward to assess the past impact in greater detail and to lessen the current impact even further. Following this study, additional steps to minimize this impact will be taken by CEA/Cadarache inside the facilities, and by the relevant LCI outside the installations. Developing independent expert skills is a major challenge for CLIs to gain better knowledge of nuclear activities and improve their local management. (author)

  11. ALA Conference 2009: The Second City's Newest Restaurants

    Daugherty, Robert Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author lists some of his favorites among Chicago's new restaurants. Most of the restaurants listed are easily accessible from the conference hotels by foot, taxi, or public transportation. The Chicago Transit Authority's (CTA) helpful trip planner can be used to determine the quickest and easiest routes. The price guide is…

  12. Store and Restaurant Advertising and Health of Public Housing Residents

    Heinrich, Katie M.; Li, Dongmei; Regan, Gail R.; Howard, Hugh H.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Lee, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine relationships between food and beverage signs and health. Methods: In 12 public housing neighborhoods, food and alcohol signs were counted for stores and restaurants. Health and demographic data were from 373 adults. Results: Multilevel modeling showed higher BMI was related to more store and restaurant alcohol signs,…

  13. The Methanizer : A Small Scale Biogas Reactor for a Restaurant

    Vasudevan, R.; Karlsson, O.; Dhejne, K.; Derewonko, P.; Brezet, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of a smallscale bioreactor called the Methanizer for a restaurant. The bioreactor converts organic waste produced by the restaurant into methane. This methane can be used to power the restaurant’s cooking stoves. The

  14. More than Food and Drink: Careers in Restaurants

    Liming, Drew

    2009-01-01

    In restaurants, the food's the thing. But the drinks, presentation, service, and ambiance are important, too. And it's up to restaurant workers to provide diners with a square meal that's well rounded. The hard work of the kitchen, bar, and dining-room staff gets food and drink from menu to mouth. Some of the more visible workers may include…

  15. Alcohol Service Practices: A Survey of Bar and Restaurant Managers

    Nederhoff, Dawn M.; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Horvath, Keith J.; Nelson, Toben F.; Ecklund, Alexandra M.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can result from illegal sales to intoxicated patrons at bars and restaurants. We surveyed bar/restaurant managers about their practices in reducing illegal sales to intoxicated patrons. We found that managers were confident that they could refuse service to intoxicated customers but were less likely to have…

  16. Critical Success Factors for Franchised Restaurants Entering the Kenyan Market

    Lucy Gikonyo; Adele Berndt; Joseph Wadawi

    2015-01-01

    In today’s globalized world, businesses look to expand to have a global presence. Restaurant businesses have expanded internationally using franchising. This study sought to determine the critical success factors (CSFs) of a franchised restaurant system entering the Kenyan market from the franchisors’ perspective. It sought to establish how franchisors define, identify, and evaluate success. This study provides a theor...

  17. "Closing the Loop": Overcoming barriers to locally sourcing food in Fort Collins, Colorado

    DeMets, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    for quantitatively determining a generalized answer, it is "currently impossible to state categorically whether or not local food systems emit fewer greenhouse gases than non-local food systems" (Edwards-Jones et al, 2008). Even so, numerous researchers have shown that "83 percent of emissions occur before food even leaves the farm gate" (Weber and Matthews, Garnett, cited in DeWeerdt, 2011); while this doesn't provide any information in terms of local vs. non-local, it is significant when viewed in light of the fact that local farmers tend to have much greater transparency and accountability in their agricultural practices. In other words, "a farmer who sells in the local food economy might be more likely to adopt or continue sustainable practices in order to meet…customer demand" (DeWeerdt, 2011), among other reasons such as environmental concern and desire to support the local economy (DeWeerdt, 2009). In identifying solutions to barriers to locally sourcing food, this research will enable restaurants to overcome these barriers and source their food locally, thereby supporting farmers and their ability to maintain sustainable practices.

  18. A prospective study of frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals and subsequent 9-year risk of all-cause and cardiometabolic mortality in US adults.

    Kant, Ashima K; Graubard, Barry I

    2018-01-01

    Restaurant prepared foods are known to be energy-dense and high in fat and sodium, but lower in protective nutrients. There is evidence of higher risk of adiposity, type II diabetes, and heart disease in frequent consumers of restaurant meals. However, the risk of mortality as a long-term health consequence of frequent consumption of restaurant meals has not been examined. We examined the prospective risk of all-cause and coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and diabetes (cardiometabolic) mortality in relation to frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals in a national cohort. We used frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals information collected in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, conducted from 1999-2004, with mortality follow-up completed through Dec. 31, 2011 (baseline age ≥ 40y; n = 9107). We estimated the relative hazard of all-cause and cardiometabolic mortality associated with weekly frequency of eating restaurant meals using Cox-proportional hazards regression methods to adjust for multiple covariates. All analyses accounted for complex survey design and included sample weights. Over 33% of all respondents reported eating ≥3 restaurant prepared meals/week. In this cohort, 2200 deaths due to all causes and 665 cardiometabolic deaths occurred over a median follow-up of 9 years. The covariate-adjusted hazard ratio of all cause or cardiometabolic mortality in men and women reporters of restaurant prepared meals did not differ from those reporting ≥3 meals/week (P>0.05). The results were robust to effect modification by baseline BMI, years of education, and baseline morbidity. Expectedly, the 24-h dietary intakes of whole grains, fruits, dietary fiber, folate, vitamin C, potassium and magnesium at baseline were lower, but energy, energy density, and energy from fat were higher in more frequent restaurant meal reporters (Prestaurant prepared meals (Prestaurant prepared meals and prospective risk of mortality after 9

  19. De la réparation à la restauration

    Céline Granjou

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A partir d’une approche sociologique empirique, ce texte propose une analyse de la mise en œuvre de la revégétalisation sur la station de l’Alpe d’Huez depuis les années 1970. Il montre comment la revégétalisation est passée d’un objectif de réparation des cicatrices provoquées par les aménagements à une entreprise plus complexe de restauration. S’il s’agissait au départ de répondre à un objectif technique de lutte contre l’érosion, la revégétalisation a pris rapidement une tournure paysagère (reverdissement ; elle a ensuite été pensée dans une perspective de restauration des écosystèmes ainsi que de restauration d’un paysage culturel « typique ». Aujourd’hui, gestionnaires de la station, techniciens, agriculteurs et chercheurs impliqués partagent un désir d’autochtonie qui touche dans certains cas à la foklorisation. Loin d’une perspective éthique surplombante, cette étude suggère ainsi comment les caractéristiques physiques du territoire, son histoire et la configuration des acteurs locaux informent largement les arbitrages et les choix techniques qui président à la restauration écologique, ainsi que les débats qui l’entourent. En conclusion, nous discutons de la spécificité de nos résultats et de leur validité pour d’autres stations alpines.In this article, we analysed how the objectives behind the revegetation of ski trails have evolved since the 1970’s. Our approach was based on a sociological survey. We show that the revegetation was first launched in order to repair the scars due to the works and to the infrastructures on the resort and then became, over time, a more complex restoration project. At first, revegetation techniques were developed to fight ground erosion. Soon, it was also associated with the idea of “turning the mountain green again”. Now, 40 years later, it aims at restoring both a natural ecosystem and a cultural landscape. The ski resort

  20. The Study Of Ethical Issues In Restaurant Of Karachi Pakistan

    Rimsha Zafar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ethics includes social cultural and moral values of an organization. Nowadays restaurant are involving in deceptive advertisement unhygienic food and poor food quality these out key ethical issues in restaurants of Karachi Pakistan. In this study researcher focuses on three main variables hygienic factor deceptive advertisements and food quality. All these three variables have been taken and gathered the data through mail survey questionnaire and email sample size of 200 respondents from different areas of Karachi male and female age group between 20 to 40 years. Data compiled and analyzed through Statistical techniques like descriptive correlate and regression. The results show that ethics influence hygienic factor whereas deceptive advertisement and food quality of a restaurant is better known when a family buy the food at restaurant. Therefore it is very important for restaurants to train their employees and give them a better knowledge of ethics.

  1. McDonald's restaurants and neighborhood deprivation in Scotland and England.

    Cummins, Steven C J; McKay, Laura; MacIntyre, Sally

    2005-11-01

    Features of the local fast food environment have been hypothesized to contribute to the greater prevalence of obesity in deprived neighborhoods. However, few studies have investigated whether fast food outlets are more likely to be found in poorer areas, and those that have are local case studies. In this paper, using national-level data, we examine the association between neighborhood deprivation and the density of McDonald's restaurants in small census areas (neighborhoods) in Scotland and England. Data on population, deprivation, and the location of McDonald's Restaurants were obtained for 38,987 small areas in Scotland and England (6505 "data zones" in Scotland, and 32,482 "super output areas" in England) in January 2005. Measures of McDonald's restaurants per 1000 people for each area were calculated, and areas were divided into quintiles of deprivation. Associations between neighborhood deprivation and outlet density were examined during February 2005, using one-way analysis of variance in Scotland, England, and both countries combined. Statistically significant positive associations were found between neighborhood deprivation and the mean number of McDonald's outlets per 1000 people for Scotland (p<0.001), England (p<0.001), and both countries combined (p<0.001). These associations were broadly linear with greater mean numbers of outlets per 1000 people occurring as deprivation levels increased. Observed associations between presence or absence of fast food outlets and neighborhood deprivation may provide support for environmental explanations for the higher prevalence of obesity in poor neighborhoods.

  2. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2001-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. RESTAURANT CAFETERIAS PERIPHERIQUES SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Horaire Opening times Horaire : comme d'habitude Usual opening times   ASCENSION         Jeudi 24 mai 1       Thursday, May 24 2 08h00 - 21h00 3           Vendredi 25 mai 1   Bâts. /Bldgs 6 13 17 40Bâts. /Bldgs. 30 54 Bâts. /Bldgs 864 08h00 — 17h00 Friday, May 25 2 07h00 - 21h00   3 07h00 - 18h00           Samedi 26 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Saturday, May 26 2   3           Dimanche 27 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday, May 27 2   3                   PENTECOTE WHITSUNTIDE         Samedi 2 juin 1 08h00 - 21h00     Saturday, June 2 2   3           Dimanche 3 juin 1 08h00 — 21h00     Sunday, Jun...

  3. Forecasting an invasive species’ distribution with global distribution data, local data, and physiological information

    Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Young, Nicholas E.; Talbert, Marian; Talbert, Colin

    2018-01-01

    Understanding invasive species distributions and potential invasions often requires broad‐scale information on the environmental tolerances of the species. Further, resource managers are often faced with knowing these broad‐scale relationships as well as nuanced environmental factors related to their landscape that influence where an invasive species occurs and potentially could occur. Using invasive buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), we developed global models and local models for Saguaro National Park, Arizona, USA, based on location records and literature on physiological tolerances to environmental factors to investigate whether environmental relationships of a species at a global scale are also important at local scales. In addition to correlative models with five commonly used algorithms, we also developed a model using a priori user‐defined relationships between occurrence and environmental characteristics based on a literature review. All correlative models at both scales performed well based on statistical evaluations. The user‐defined curves closely matched those produced by the correlative models, indicating that the correlative models may be capturing mechanisms driving the distribution of buffelgrass. Given climate projections for the region, both global and local models indicate that conditions at Saguaro National Park may become more suitable for buffelgrass. Combining global and local data with correlative models and physiological information provided a holistic approach to forecasting invasive species distributions.

  4. Influenza vaccination status and attitudes among restaurant employees.

    Parrish, Amanda T; Graves, Meredith C; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A; Hammerback, Kristen; Allen, Claire L

    2015-01-01

    Restaurant employees represent a substantial portion of the US workforce, interact closely with the public, and are at risk for contracting influenza, yet their influenza vaccination rates and attitudes are unknown. Assess influenza vaccination rates and attitudes among Seattle restaurant employees, to identify factors that could enhance the success of a restaurant-based vaccination program. In 2012, we invited employees of Seattle restaurants to complete an anonymous paper survey assessing participant demographics, previous influenza vaccination status, and personal attitudes toward influenza vaccination (using a 5-point scale). Sit-down, full service restaurants in or near Seattle, Washington, were eligible if they had no previous history of offering worksite influenza vaccinations and had more than 20 employees who were older than 18 years and spoke either English or Spanish. We invited staff in all restaurant positions (servers, bussers, kitchen staff, chefs, managers, etc) to complete the survey, which was available in English and Spanish. Of 428 restaurant employees surveyed, 26% reported receiving the seasonal influenza vaccine in 2011-2012 (response rate = 74%). Across 8 attitude statements, participants were most likely to agree that the vaccine is not too expensive (89%), and least likely to agree that it is relevant for their age group (25%), or normative at their workplace (13%). Vaccinated participants reported significantly more positive attitudes than unvaccinated participants, and Hispanics reported significantly more positive attitudes than non-Hispanic whites. Increasing influenza vaccination rates among restaurant employees could protect a substantial portion of the US workforce, and the public, from influenza. Seattle restaurant employees have low vaccination rates against seasonal influenza. Interventions aimed at increasing vaccination among restaurant employees should highlight the vaccine's relevance and effectiveness for working-age adults.

  5. Channels of social influence for decision making in restaurants: A case study

    M. Romero-Charneco

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Consumers use the Internet to obtain information on tourism products and services. When evaluating the alternatives, they are faced with a large volume of information that makes their purchasing decision difficult. In this context, the generalized use of mobile instant messaging (MIM has led to the implementation of chatbots in these channels, to help to plan the purchase. This research explores restaurant selection through a WhatsApp mobile instant messaging (MIM chatbot. A study is made of the channels consulted by travellers on Web 2.0 as well as the search models and restaurant selection processes, and a case study is presented. The results allow the diagnosis of the main criteria of user behaviour in this type of conversational interface in the decision-making process related to gastronomic consumption.

  6. Scene text detection by leveraging multi-channel information and local context

    Wang, Runmin; Qian, Shengyou; Yang, Jianfeng; Gao, Changxin

    2018-03-01

    As an important information carrier, texts play significant roles in many applications. However, text detection in unconstrained scenes is a challenging problem due to cluttered backgrounds, various appearances, uneven illumination, etc.. In this paper, an approach based on multi-channel information and local context is proposed to detect texts in natural scenes. According to character candidate detection plays a vital role in text detection system, Maximally Stable Extremal Regions(MSERs) and Graph-cut based method are integrated to obtain the character candidates by leveraging the multi-channel image information. A cascaded false positive elimination mechanism are constructed from the perspective of the character and the text line respectively. Since the local context information is very valuable for us, these information is utilized to retrieve the missing characters for boosting the text detection performance. Experimental results on two benchmark datasets, i.e., the ICDAR 2011 dataset and the ICDAR 2013 dataset, demonstrate that the proposed method have achieved the state-of-the-art performance.

  7. Restaurant owners' perspectives on a voluntary program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions, Los Angeles County, 2012.

    Gase, Lauren; Dunning, Lauren; Kuo, Tony; Simon, Paul; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2014-03-20

    Reducing the portion size of food and beverages served at restaurants has emerged as a strategy for addressing the obesity epidemic; however, barriers and facilitators to achieving this goal are not well characterized. In fall 2012, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health conducted semistructured interviews with restaurant owners to better understand contextual factors that may impede or facilitate participation in a voluntary program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions. Interviews were completed with 18 restaurant owners (representing nearly 350 restaurants). Analyses of qualitative data revealed 6 themes related to portion size: 1) perceived customer demand is central to menu planning; 2) multiple portion sizes are already being offered for at least some food items; 3) numerous logistical barriers exist for offering reduced-size portions; 4) restaurant owners have concerns about potential revenue losses from offering reduced-size portions; 5) healthful eating is the responsibility of the customer; and 6) a few owners want to be socially responsible industry leaders. A program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions may be a feasible approach in Los Angeles County. These findings may have applications for jurisdictions interested in engaging restaurants as partners in reducing the obesity epidemic.

  8. Restaurant Owners’ Perspectives on a Voluntary Program to Recognize Restaurants for Offering Reduced-Size Portions, Los Angeles County, 2012

    Dunning, Lauren; Kuo, Tony; Simon, Paul; Fielding, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reducing the portion size of food and beverages served at restaurants has emerged as a strategy for addressing the obesity epidemic; however, barriers and facilitators to achieving this goal are not well characterized. Methods In fall 2012, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health conducted semistructured interviews with restaurant owners to better understand contextual factors that may impede or facilitate participation in a voluntary program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions. Results Interviews were completed with 18 restaurant owners (representing nearly 350 restaurants). Analyses of qualitative data revealed 6 themes related to portion size: 1) perceived customer demand is central to menu planning; 2) multiple portion sizes are already being offered for at least some food items; 3) numerous logistical barriers exist for offering reduced-size portions; 4) restaurant owners have concerns about potential revenue losses from offering reduced-size portions; 5) healthful eating is the responsibility of the customer; and 6) a few owners want to be socially responsible industry leaders. Conclusion A program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions may be a feasible approach in Los Angeles County. These findings may have applications for jurisdictions interested in engaging restaurants as partners in reducing the obesity epidemic. PMID:24650622

  9. Factors That Lead to Environmentally Sustainable Practices in the Restaurant Industry: A Qualitative Analysis of Two Green Restaurant Innovators

    Nyheim, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, more organizations, including restaurants, have concerned themselves with sustainability. As with any new endeavor, guidance is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that lead to environmentally sustainable practices in the restaurant industry. Using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory as a…

  10. Note méthodologique : Exemple de restauration de la plaine de la Crau : l’écologie de la restauration face à la restauration écologique

    Renaud Jaunatre, Baptiste Dolidon, Élise Buiison et Thierry Dutoit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Quel peut être l’apport des recherches en écologie de la restauration pour la réhabilitation d’une communauté végétale unique à forte valeur patrimoniale ? Comment s’intègrent-elles aux opérations de restauration sur le terrain ? Exemple en plaine de Crau pour la réhabilitation des steppes méditerranéennes de Cossure.

  11. Local School Board Members Need Quality Public Information That Informs Decisions, Empowers Action. Don't Make Decisions in the Dark

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Local school board members need to be able to access and use high-quality data to make good decisions. Often this data is collected and stored locally, but information that is publicly reported by the state can provide additional value. Most state public reporting is designed to serve information needs, and are geared toward compliance with state…

  12. Do Adolescents Who Live or Go to School Near Fast Food Restaurants Eat More Frequently From Fast Food Restaurants?

    Forsyth, Ann; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    This population-based study examined whether residential or school neighborhood access to fast food restaurants is related to adolescents’ eating frequency of fast food. A classroom-based survey of racially/ethnically diverse adolescents (n=2,724) in 20 secondary schools in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota was used to assess eating frequency at five types of fast food restaurants. Black, Hispanic, and Native American adolescents lived near more fast food restaurants than white and Asian adolescents and also ate at fast food restaurants more often. After controlling for individual-level socio-demographics, adolescent males living near high numbers fast food restaurants ate more frequently from these venues compared to their peers. PMID:23064515

  13. User Acceptance of the Intranet in Restaurant Franchise Systems: An Empirical Study

    Park, Kunsoon

    2006-01-01

    This research study examined the acceptance of the intranet in restaurant franchise systems. The widely accepted Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) developed by Davis (1986, 1989) was the basis for this study. TAM is an excellent model to predict information technology (IT) usage and is based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA). Therefore, TAM was adopted in this study of intranet acceptance. Furthermore, this study attempted to see if the earlier results of TAM are still valid. The origina...

  14. Changing the restaurant food environment to improve cardiovascular health in a rural community: implementation and evaluation of the Heart of New Ulm restaurant programme.

    Lindberg, Rebecca; Sidebottom, Abbey C; McCool, Brigitte; Pereira, Raquel F; Sillah, Arthur; Boucher, Jackie L

    2018-04-01

    The goals of the present study were to: (i) describe the implementation of a programme to improve the restaurant food environment in a rural community; and (ii) describe how practices changed in community restaurants. The intervention included a baseline assessment of all community restaurants (n 32) and a report on how they could increase the availability and promotion of healthful options. The assessment focused on sixteen healthy practices (HP) derived from the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey for Restaurants. Restaurants were invited to participate at gold, silver or bronze levels based on the number of HP attained. Participating restaurants received dietitian consultation, staff training and promotion of the restaurant. All community restaurants were reassessed 1·5 years after baseline. The restaurant programme was part of the Heart of New Ulm Project, a community-based CVD prevention programme in a rural community. All community restaurants (n 32) were included in the study. Over one-third (38 %) of community restaurants participated in the programme. At baseline, 22 % achieved at least a bronze level. This increased to 38 % at follow-up with most of the improvement among participating restaurants that were independently owned. Across all restaurants in the community, the HP showing the most improvement included availability of non-fried vegetables (63-84 %), fruits (41-53 %), smaller portions and whole grains. Findings demonstrate successes and challenges of improving healthful food availability and promotion in a community-wide restaurant programme.

  15. Food labeling; nutrition labeling of standard menu items in restaurants and similar retail food establishments. Final rule.

    2014-12-01

    To implement the nutrition labeling provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Affordable Care Act or ACA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is requiring disclosure of certain nutrition information for standard menu items in certain restaurants and retail food establishments. The ACA, in part, amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), among other things, to require restaurants and similar retail food establishments that are part of a chain with 20 or more locations doing business under the same name and offering for sale substantially the same menu items to provide calorie and other nutrition information for standard menu items, including food on display and self-service food. Under provisions of the ACA, restaurants and similar retail food establishments not otherwise covered by the law may elect to become subject to these Federal requirements by registering every other year with FDA. Providing accurate, clear, and consistent nutrition information, including the calorie content of foods, in restaurants and similar retail food establishments will make such nutrition information available to consumers in a direct and accessible manner to enable consumers to make informed and healthful dietary choices.

  16. Generation and collection of restaurant waste: Characterization and evaluation at a case study in Italy.

    Tatàno, Fabio; Caramiello, Cristina; Paolini, Tonino; Tripolone, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Because restaurants (as a division of the hospitality sector) contribute to the generation of commercial and institutional waste, thus representing both a challenge and an opportunity, the objective of the present study was to deepen the knowledge of restaurant waste in terms of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste generation and the performance achievable by the implementation of a separate collection scheme. In this study, the generated waste was characterized and the implemented separate collection was evaluated at a relevant case study restaurant in a coastal tourist area of Central Italy (Marche Region, Adriatic Sea side). The qualitative (compositional) characterization of the generated total restaurant waste showed considerable incidences of, in decreasing order, food (28.2%), glass (22.6%), paper/cardboard (19.1%), and plastic (17.1%). The quantitative (parametric) characterization of the generated restaurant waste determined the unit generation values of total waste and individual fractions based on the traditional employee and area parameters and the peculiar meal parameter. In particular, the obtained representative values per meal were: 0.72kgmeal -1 for total waste, and ranging, for individual fractions, from 0.20 (for food) to 0.008kgmeal -1 (for textile). Based on the critical evaluation of some of the resulting unit waste generation values, possible influences of restaurant practices, conditions, or characteristics were pointed out. In particular, food waste generation per meal can likely be limited by: promoting and using local, fresh, and quality food; standardizing and limiting daily menu items; basing food recipes on consolidated cooking knowledge and experience; and limiting plate sizes. The evaluation of the monthly variation of the monitored separate collection, ranging from an higher level of 52.7% to a lower level of 41.4%, indicated the following: a reduction in the separate collection level can be expected at times of

  17. The use of analytical procedures in the internal audit of the restaurant business expenses

    T.Yu. Kopotienko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The important task of carrying out the internal audit of expenses is to get the sufficient and reliable audit evidence. This can be achieved by using the analytical procedures in the audit process. The identification of the analytical procedures with the financial analysis of the business activities prevents from the efficient usage of them in the internal audit of the restaurant business expenses. The knowledge of internal auditors about the instructional techniques of analytical procedures and their tasks, depending on the verification steps are insufficient. The purpose of the article is the developing the methods of the internal audit of the restaurant business expenses based on an integrated application of analytical procedures. The nature and purpose of analytical procedures have been investigated in the article. It have been identified the factors influencing on auditor’s decision about the choice of analytical procedures complex. It was recommended to identify among them the purpose of analytical procedures, the type and structure of the enterprise, the source of the available information, the existence of financial and non-financial information, reliability and comparability of the available information. It have been identified the tasks of analytical procedures, depending on the verification steps. It was offered the analytical procedures complex as a part of internal audit of the restaurant business expenses. This complex contains a list of the analytical procedures, instructional techniques of analysis that are used in the appropriate procedure and the brief overview of the content of procedure.

  18. Effect of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on restaurant and cafeteria food choices: a review of the literature.

    Harnack, Lisa J; French, Simone A

    2008-10-26

    Eating away from home has increased in prevalence among US adults and now comprises about 50% of food expenditures. Calorie labeling on chain restaurant menus is one specific policy that has been proposed to help consumers make better food choices at restaurants. The present review evaluates the available empirical literature on the effects of calorie information on food choices in restaurant and cafeteria settings. Computer-assisted searches were conducted using the PUBMED database and the Google Scholar world wide web search engine to identify studies published in peer-review journals that evaluated calorie labeling of cafeteria or restaurant menu items. Studies that evaluated labeling only some menu items (e.g. low calorie foods only) were excluded from the review since the influence of selective labeling may be different from that which may be expected from comprehensive labeling. Six studies were identified that met the selection criteria for this review. Results from five of these studies provide some evidence consistent with the hypothesis that calorie information may influence food choices in a cafeteria or restaurant setting. However, results from most of these studies suggest the effect may be weak or inconsistent. One study found no evidence of an effect of calorie labeling on food choices. Each of the studies had at least one major methodological shortcoming, pointing toward the need for better designed studies to more rigorously evaluate the influence of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on food choices. More research is needed that meets minimum standards of methodological quality. Studies need to include behavioral outcomes such as food purchase and eating behaviors. Also, studies need to be implemented in realistic settings such as restaurants and cafeterias.

  19. Effect of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on restaurant and cafeteria food choices: A review of the literature

    French Simone A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating away from home has increased in prevalence among US adults and now comprises about 50% of food expenditures. Calorie labeling on chain restaurant menus is one specific policy that has been proposed to help consumers make better food choices at restaurants. The present review evaluates the available empirical literature on the effects of calorie information on food choices in restaurant and cafeteria settings. Methods Computer-assisted searches were conducted using the PUBMED database and the Google Scholar world wide web search engine to identify studies published in peer-review journals that evaluated calorie labeling of cafeteria or restaurant menu items. Studies that evaluated labeling only some menu items (e.g. low calorie foods only were excluded from the review since the influence of selective labeling may be different from that which may be expected from comprehensive labeling. Results Six studies were identified that met the selection criteria for this review. Results from five of these studies provide some evidence consistent with the hypothesis that calorie information may influence food choices in a cafeteria or restaurant setting. However, results from most of these studies suggest the effect may be weak or inconsistent. One study found no evidence of an effect of calorie labeling on food choices. Each of the studies had at least one major methodological shortcoming, pointing toward the need for better designed studies to more rigorously evaluate the influence of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on food choices. Conclusion More research is needed that meets minimum standards of methodological quality. Studies need to include behavioral outcomes such as food purchase and eating behaviors. Also, studies need to be implemented in realistic settings such as restaurants and cafeterias.

  20. Community-based restaurant interventions to promote healthy eating: a systematic review.

    Valdivia Espino, Jennifer N; Guerrero, Natalie; Rhoads, Natalie; Simon, Norma-Jean; Escaron, Anne L; Meinen, Amy; Nieto, F Javier; Martinez-Donate, Ana P

    2015-05-21

    Eating in restaurants is associated with high caloric intake. This review summarizes and evaluates the evidence supporting community-based restaurant interventions. We searched all years of PubMed and Web of Knowledge through January 2014 for original articles describing or evaluating community-based restaurant interventions to promote healthy eating. We extracted summary information and classified the interventions into 9 categories according to the strategies implemented. A scoring system was adapted to evaluate the evidence, assigning 0 to 3 points to each intervention for study design, public awareness, and effectiveness. The average values were summed and then multiplied by 1 to 3 points, according to the volume of research available for each category. These summary scores were used to determine the level of evidence (insufficient, sufficient, or strong) supporting the effectiveness of each category. This review included 27 interventions described in 25 studies published since 1979. Most interventions took place in exclusively urban areas of the United States, either in the West or the South. The most common intervention categories were the use of point-of-purchase information with promotion and communication (n = 6), and point-of-purchase information with increased availability of healthy choices (n = 6). Only the latter category had sufficient evidence. The remaining 8 categories had insufficient evidence because of interventions showing no, minimal, or mixed findings; limited reporting of awareness and effectiveness; low volume of research; or weak study designs. No intervention reported an average negative impact on outcomes. Evidence about effective community-based strategies to promote healthy eating in restaurants is limited, especially for interventions in rural areas. To expand the evidence base, more studies should be conducted using robust study designs, standardized evaluation methods, and measures of sales, behavior, and health outcomes.

  1. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Snježana Gagić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and increased retention.Service quality is fundamental component which produce higher levels of guest satisfaction, which in turn lead to higher sales revenue.The main purpose of this study was to examine the quality dimensions that affect guest satisfaction in restaurant industry. Food and beverage quality, the quality of service delivery, physical environment and price fairness are analyzed as a key components of restaurant experience. The results could be helpful tool for restaurant managers to invest their resources more efficiently, making changes to crucial quality attributes that elicit the guests’ satisfaction level. A management approach focused on guest satisfaction can improve restaurant business performance.

  2. Restaurant No. 1 seating capacity increases by 240

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    These days you need patience when looking for a seat in Restaurant No. 1 to eat your lunch. The opening of the new dining room, which will increase the restaurant’s seating capacity by 240, should alleviate the problem and improve service.   The new restaurant area. For the past several years the number of people using Restaurant No. 1 has grown steadily. Now, for a change, the restaurant itself is growing. Luz Lopez-Hernandez, leader of the project in the GS Department, explains: “Enlarging the restaurant has been on the GS Department's agenda for several years, but the project really got off the ground in 2009. Once it was approved and the design completed, construction itself only took seven months.” Seven months later, the restaurant extension is indeed on the verge of opening. One of the people who will be particularly happy is Joël Nallet, who manages the Novae restaurant: “I am thrilled, because until now, even if we managed to increase...

  3. Choice attributes in restaurant services: An exploratory study

    Derli Luís Angnes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are about one million of bars and restaurants that generate around six millions of jobs in Brazil. Among the most important reasons to choose a restaurant are the service attributes. Attributes are judgments the client makes about the performance and quality of the service provided. The identification of restaurant choice attributes is important in order to propose a higher value to services and to make marketing strategies. This article aims to identify the choice attributes of service quality in restaurants. The methodology employed was a qualitative exploratory study based on interviews made using the critical incident technique. It was used a sample of 72 restaurant customers. The content analysis technique was used to treat and analyze the critical incidents obtained in the interviews. The result obtained was a relation of 615 critical incidents, which after being analyzed generated a list of 27 attributes that influence customer’s choice and customer’s evaluation of service quality provided in restaurants. The identified attributes can subsidize and contribute to improvement of future research and studies in the academic environment, besides contributing for the management of restaurants business.

  4. Public knowledge and attitudes regarding public health inspections of restaurants.

    Jones, Timothy F; Grimm, Karen

    2008-06-01

    Foodborne diseases cause 76 million illnesses in the U.S. each year, and almost half of all money spent on food is spent in restaurants. Restaurant inspections are a critical public health intervention for the prevention of foodborne disease. A telephone survey of randomly selected Tennessee residents aged > or =18 was performed. Data were collected on respondents' demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and expectations regarding restaurant inspections. Of 2000 respondents, 97% were aware that restaurants are inspected regularly by the health department. More than half of the respondents believed that inspections should be performed at least 12 times per year; only one third were aware that inspections currently occur only twice per year in Tennessee. More than one third of the respondents considered an inspection score of > or =90 acceptable for a restaurant at which they would eat; the mean score in Tennessee is 82. When presented with a variety of scenarios, an overwhelming number of respondents felt that public health responses to safety violations should be far more draconian than they actually are. Survey answers did not differ consistently based on respondents' race, gender, or history of having worked in a restaurant. This study identified a number of public misconceptions and unrealistically high expectations of the public health restaurant-inspection system. It is important to improve consumers' understanding of inspection scores and the limitations of regulatory inspections, as well as the role of such inspections in disease prevention.

  5. Mapping local knowledge of hazards to inform research, practice and policy in the Americas

    Coles, Ashley; Eosco, Gina; Norton, Todd; Ruiz, Jorge; Tate, Eric; Weathers, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Hazards are fundamentally understood and experienced spatially; therefore, it is not surprising that hazards research, management, communication, and policy have relied heavily on spatial representations using geomatics tools such as remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS). As powerful and useful as these tools have been, they tend to privilege the collection and utilization of quantifiable data at the expense of qualitative data (e.g., experiential local knowledge). Local knowledge has been increasingly used both to challenge and to supplement mapping strategies, although less so in the realm of hazards than in other areas such as natural resource management. In this paper, we propose a unique framework for taking these approaches one-step further through the development of a knowledge management system that integrates local knowledge of hazards with spatial visualization tools. First, we discuss relevant literature related to current tools and practices for visualizing hazard information. Next we propose a methodology for mapping mental models of individuals. Finally, we discuss the potential applications of such a framework for hazards research, practice, and policy, as well as discuss the challenges associated with this framework.

  6. Identifying fast-food restaurants using a central register as a measure of the food environment

    Toft, Ulla; Erbs-Maibing, Peter; Glümer, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    To validate the identification and location of fast-food restaurants according to a government list of inspected food stores and restaurants.......To validate the identification and location of fast-food restaurants according to a government list of inspected food stores and restaurants....

  7. 29 CFR 779.386 - Restaurants may qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) establishments.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restaurants may qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) establishments... Service Establishments Restaurants and Establishments Providing Food and Beverage Service § 779.386 Restaurants may qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) establishments. (a) A restaurant may qualify as an exempt retail or...

  8. An empirical study of the relationship between restaurant image and customer loyalty

    Oh, Heung Chul

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to empirically determine the relationship between restaurant images and loyalties toward seven competing casual dinner house restaurant chains, and to understand the nature of their competition by matching patronage behavior toward alternative restaurant chains with perceptions of alternative restaurants on particular image attributes.

  9. Quantum measurement information as a key to energy extraction from local vacuums

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a protocol is proposed in which energy extraction from local vacuum states is possible by using quantum measurement information for the vacuum state of quantum fields. In the protocol, Alice, who stays at a spatial point, excites the ground state of the fields by a local measurement. Consequently, wave packets generated by Alice's measurement propagate the vacuum to spatial infinity. Let us assume that Bob stays away from Alice and fails to catch the excitation energy when the wave packets pass in front of him. Next Alice announces her local measurement result to Bob by classical communication. Bob performs a local unitary operation depending on the measurement result. In this process, positive energy is released from the fields to Bob's apparatus of the unitary operation. In the field systems, wave packets are generated with negative energy around Bob's location. Soon afterwards, the negative-energy wave packets begin to chase after the positive-energy wave packets generated by Alice and form loosely bound states.

  10. Estimated Cost to a Restaurant of a Foodborne Illness Outbreak.

    Bartsch, Sarah M; Asti, Lindsey; Nyathi, Sindiso; Spiker, Marie L; Lee, Bruce Y

    Although outbreaks of restaurant-associated foodborne illness occur periodically and make the news, a restaurant may not be aware of the cost of an outbreak. We estimated this cost under varying circumstances. We developed a computational simulation model; scenarios varied outbreak size (5 to 250 people affected), pathogen (n = 15), type of dining establishment (fast food, fast casual, casual dining, and fine dining), lost revenue (ie, meals lost per illness), cost of lawsuits and legal fees, fines, and insurance premium increases. We estimated that the cost of a single foodborne illness outbreak ranged from $3968 to $1.9 million for a fast-food restaurant, $6330 to $2.1 million for a fast-casual restaurant, $8030 to $2.2 million for a casual-dining restaurant, and $8273 to $2.6 million for a fine-dining restaurant, varying from a 5-person outbreak, with no lost revenue, lawsuits, legal fees, or fines, to a 250-person outbreak, with high lost revenue (100 meals lost per illness), and a high amount of lawsuits and legal fees ($1 656 569) and fines ($100 000). This cost amounts to 10% to 5790% of a restaurant's annual marketing costs and 0.3% to 101% of annual profits and revenue. The biggest cost drivers were lawsuits and legal fees, outbreak size, and lost revenue. Pathogen type affected the cost by a maximum of $337 000, the difference between a Bacillus cereus outbreak (least costly) and a listeria outbreak (most costly). The cost of a single foodborne illness outbreak to a restaurant can be substantial and outweigh the typical costs of prevention and control measures. Our study can help decision makers determine investment and motivate research for infection-control measures in restaurant settings.

  11. RESTAURANT RESERVATION MANAGEMENT CONSIDERING TABLE COMBINATION

    Qing Miao

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper presents a case study of table reservation practice for restaurant business within Walt Disney World. A unique feature here is to consider table combination to capture revenue potentials from different party sizes and at different time periods. For example, a party of large size can be served by combining two or more small tables. A mixed integer programming (MIP model is developed to make the reservation recommendation. We propose a rolling horizon reservation policy such that the value of a particular table is periodically evaluated and updated. This is a typical revenue management method in the airlines and other industries, the essence of which is to compare the future expected revenue with a currently offered price. Using historical data, numerical test shows a significant revenue improvement potential from our proposed model.

  12. MAP Fault Localization Based on Wide Area Synchronous Phasor Measurement Information

    Zhang, Yagang; Wang, Zengping

    2015-02-01

    In the research of complicated electrical engineering, the emergence of phasor measurement units (PMU) is a landmark event. The establishment and application of wide area measurement system (WAMS) in power system has made widespread and profound influence on the safe and stable operation of complicated power system. In this paper, taking full advantage of wide area synchronous phasor measurement information provided by PMUs, we have carried out precise fault localization based on the principles of maximum posteriori probability (MAP). Large numbers of simulation experiments have confirmed that the results of MAP fault localization are accurate and reliable. Even if there are interferences from white Gaussian stochastic noise, the results from MAP classification are also identical to the actual real situation.

  13. Estimation of restaurant solid waste generation rates

    Heck, H.H.; Major, I.

    2002-01-01

    Most solid waste utilities try to create a billing schedule that is proportional to solid waste generation rates. This research was trying to determine if the current billing rate structure was appropriate or if a different rate structure should be implemented. A multiple regression model with forward stepwise addition was developed which accurately predicts weekly solid waste generation rates for restaurants. The model was based on a study of daily solid waste generation at twenty-one different businesses. The weight and volume of solid waste generated was measure daily for two weeks during the winter and two weeks during the summer. Researchers followed the collection truck and measured the volume and weight of the container contents. Data was collected on the following independent variables describing each establishment; weight of waste per collection, volume per collection, container utilization factor, building area, contract haulers bill, yearly property tax, yearly solid waste tax, average number of collections per week, type of restaurant, modal number of collections per week, storage container size, waste density, number of employees, number of hours open per week, and weekly collection capacity (collections per week times storage container size). Independent variables were added to the regression equation based on their partial correlation coefficient and confidence level. The regression equations developed had correlation coefficients of 0.87 to 1.00, which was much better than the correlation coefficient (0.84) of an existing model DeGeare and Ongerth (1971) and a correlation coefficient of 0.54 based on the current solid waste disposal tax. (author)

  14. Overview Michelin Star Reputation Restaurant in Hospitality Industry

    Agung Gita Subakti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For most chefs and Restaurateur, having his restaurant being awarded one or more stars in the famous Michelin Guide Rouge represents a major achievement, recognition of their work, and also important publicity generating increased notoriety. In this specific industry, experts play a decisive role, and reputation of restaurants and chefs are basically established according to their opinions. The aim of this paper is to overview some of the Restaurants achieving the Michelin Star Reputation and able to sustain it for years. Moreover, how these reputations are made and to understand better the development of gaining such a high reputation.

  15. THE PERCEPTION OF ADOPTING AN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION ON RURAL BANKS OWNED BY THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT

    Elen Puspitasari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance of rural banks owned by the local government showed progress veryproud. Therefore, policies and strategies for the future development of rural banks directedin accordance with the fundamental characteristics of rural banks, which is rural banks ascommunity banks are healthy, strong, productive and spread throughout Indonesia and focusedin the provision of financial services the small, micro and medium enterprises (SME’s andlocal communities, especially in rural areas.The purpose of this study was to find out whichvariables are to be determinant to measure the user’s perceptions of adopting an informationtechnology (IT innovation on the rural banks owned by local government. Respondents in this study were employees as user’s adoption of IT on rural banks. Data obtained from respondents’ answers to the questionnaire. The factors that influence adopting an information technologyinnovation, which is voluntariness, relative advantage, compatibility, image, ease of use, resultdemonstrability, visibility, trial ability, and facilitating conditions to be determined by principlecomponent analysis under Factor Analysis Techniques.The adoption of information technologiesby individuals and organizations has been an area of substantial research to extend informationsystem. One of the important strategies that need to be done by the rural banks in order toincrease competitiveness and outreach is empowering of supporting infrastructure industriesowned by rural banks effectively, especially in information technology.

  16. Distributed Input and State Estimation Using Local Information in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    Dzung Tran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new distributed input and state estimation architecture is introduced and analyzed for heterogeneous sensor networks. Specifically, nodes of a given sensor network are allowed to have heterogeneous information roles in the sense that a subset of nodes can be active (that is, subject to observations of a process of interest and the rest can be passive (that is, subject to no observation. Both fixed and varying active and passive roles of sensor nodes in the network are investigated. In addition, these nodes are allowed to have non-identical sensor modalities under the common underlying assumption that they have complimentary properties distributed over the sensor network to achieve collective observability. The key feature of our framework is that it utilizes local information not only during the execution of the proposed distributed input and state estimation architecture but also in its design in that global uniform ultimate boundedness of error dynamics is guaranteed once each node satisfies given local stability conditions independent from the graph topology and neighboring information of these nodes. As a special case (e.g., when all nodes are active and a positive real condition is satisfied, the asymptotic stability can be achieved with our algorithm. Several illustrative numerical examples are further provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed architecture.

  17. The informal recycling in the international and local context: theoretical Elements

    Yepes P, Dora Luz

    2002-01-01

    This article is a synthesis of the theoretical aspects related with the urban problem of the informal recycling in our means, and it is framed inside the denominated investigation project alternatives for their invigoration of the informal recycling in Medellin, which is a thesis of the grade that looks for to strengthen the informal recycling through the study of the factors associated to the labor productivity of the informal recycle. Specifically, the study will identify options of improvement of its work y points to propose alternatives to dignify the labor of these people integrally by the light of environmental precepts, technicians, normative, institutional social and of sustainability. This document describe the theoretical elements in which this investigation will be based, showing the informal recycling inside of an international context, and their situation in a national and local environment. As a result of the bibliographical revision carried out, can be said, that it glimpses a low interest in to improve the conditions of work a International level of the informal recycle, unless the strategies that it outlines the international labor organization, with regard to the strengthening of the informal economy; in Latin America, it has not been possible to go further of the official rhetoric and the pro motion of the groups environmentalists, but in the issue of the recovery policies, reuse, and the recycling of solid wastes, if there. Has been a sustained advance; at national level clear strategies to improve the informal work of the recycle are being identified, however, lacks many efforts to develop the committed actions with these strategies, in spite of the fact that has been advancing the creation of recycle organizations little by little

  18. Feasibility of Integrated Menu Recommendation and Self-Order System for Small-Scale Restaurants

    Kashima, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Shimpei; Ishii, Hiroaki

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, point of sales (POS) systems with order function have been developed for restaurants. Since expensive apparatus and system are required for installing POS systems, usually only large-scale restaurant chains can afford to introduce them. In this research, we consider the POS management in a restaurant, which cooperates with an automatic order function by using a personal digital device aiming at the safety of the food, pursuit of service, and further operational efficiency improvements, such as foods management, accounting treatment, and ordering work. In traditional POS systems, information recommendation technology is not taken into consideration. We realize the recommendation of a menu according to the user's preference using rough sets and menu planning based on stock status by applying information recommendation technology. Therefore, we believe that this system can be used in comfort with regard to freshness of foods, allergy, diabetes, etc. Furthermore, due to the reduction of the personnel expenses by an operational efficiency improvement such technology becomes even feasible for small-scale stores.

  19. Does the type of CIA policy significantly affect bar and restaurant employment in Minnesota cities?

    Klein, Elizabeth G.; Forster, Jean L.; Erickson, Darin J.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Schillo, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Background Clean indoor air (CIA) policies that include free-standing bars and restaurants have been adopted by communities to protect employees in all workplaces from exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, most notably employees working in restaurants and free-standing bars. However, due to the perception of negative economic effects on alcohol-licensed hospitality businesses, partial CIA policies (those that provide an exemption for free-standing bars) have been proposed as a means to reduce the risk of economic effects of comprehensive CIA policies applied to all worksites. Objective To determine if partial CIA produce differential economic effects compared to comprehensive CIA policies using bar and restaurant employment per capita. Design, setting, and subjects Ten cities in the state of Minnesota were studied from 2003 to 2006. Economic data were drawn from monthly employment in bars and restaurants, and a pooled time-series was completed to evaluate three types of local CIA policies: Comprehensive, partial, or none beyond the state law. Results Communities with a comprehensive CIA policy had a decrease of 9 employees per 10,000 residents compared with communities with a partial CIA policies (p=0.10). Communities with any type of CIA policy (partial or comprehensive) had an increase of 3 employees per 10,000 residents compared to communities without any CIA policies (p=0.36). Conclusion There were no significant differential economic effects by CIA policy type in Minnesota cities. These findings support the adoption of comprehensive CIA policies to provide all employees protection from environmental tobacco smoke exposure. PMID:19184432

  20. A Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome extranet: supporting local communication and information dissemination

    Kealey Cathy M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to explore the use and perceptions of a local Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS Extranet and its potential to support future information and communication applications. The SARS Extranet was a single, managed electronic and limited access system to manage local, provincial and other SARS control information. Methods During July, 2003, a web-based and paper-based survey was conducted with 53 SARS Steering Committee members in Hamilton. It assessed the use and perceptions of the Extranet that had been built to support the committee during the SARS outbreak. Before distribution, the survey was user-tested based on a think-aloud protocol, and revisions were made. Quantitative and qualitative questions were asked related to frequency of use of the Extranet, perceived overall usefulness of the resource, rationale for use, potential barriers, strengths and limitations, and potential future uses of the Extranet. Results The response rate was 69.4% (n = 34. Of all respondents, 30 (88.2% reported that they had visited the site, and rated it highly overall (mean = 4.0; 1 = low to 5 = high. However, the site was rated 3.4 compared with other communications strategies used during the outbreak. Almost half of all respondents (44.1% visited the site at least once every few days. The two most common reasons the 30 respondents visited the Extranet were to access SARS Steering Committee minutes (63.3% and to access Hamilton medical advisories (53.3%. The most commonly cited potential future uses for the Extranet were the sending of private emails to public health experts (63.3%, and surveillance (63.3%. No one encountered personal barriers in his or her use of the site, but several mentioned that time and duplication of email information were challenges. Conclusion Despite higher rankings of various communication strategies during the SARS outbreak, such as email, meetings, teleconferences, and other web

  1. Effects of new logistics services on restaurants' business model and strategy

    Vlassis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The restaurant industry is present in every part of the world and has been a subject of significant interest for academic scholars. Despite being a more stable industry, technological innovations have started to reach restaurants as well. The purpose of this research is to study and analyze one of these innovations introduced to the full-service restaurant industry. Traditional delivery services in the restaurant industry have been acting as agents between restaurants and customers with the r...

  2. Low parental awareness about energy (calorie) recommendations for children's restaurant meals: findings from a national survey in the USA.

    Lynskey, Vanessa M; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Harelick, Linda; Korn, Ariella; Sharma, Shanti; Simms, Stephanie; Economos, Christina D

    2017-08-01

    To assess parental awareness of per-meal energy (calorie) recommendations for children's restaurant meals and to explore whether calorie awareness was associated with parental sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of eating restaurant food. Cross-sectional online survey administered in July 2014. Parents estimated calories (i.e. kilocalories; 1 kcal=4·184 kJ) recommended for a child's lunch/dinner restaurant meal (range: 0-2000 kcal). Responses were categorized as 'underestimate' (600 kcal). Confidence in response was measured on a 4-point scale from 'very unsure' to 'very sure'. Logistic regressions estimated the odds of an 'accurate' response and confident response ('somewhat' or 'very sure') by parental sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of eating from restaurants. Sampling weights based on demographics were incorporated in all analyses. USA. Parents (n 1207) of 5-12-year-old children. On average, parents estimated 631 (se 19·4) kcal as the appropriate amount for a 5-12-year-old child's meal. Thirty-five per cent answered in the accurate range, while 33·3 and 31·8 % underestimated and overestimated, respectively. Frequent dining at restaurants, lower income and urban geography were associated with lower odds of answering accurately. Parents' confidence in their estimates was low across the sample (26·0 % confident) and only 10·1 % were both accurate and confident. Parent education about calorie recommendations for children could improve understanding and use of menu labelling information in restaurants. Targeted strategies are recommended to ensure that such efforts address, rather than exacerbate, health disparities.

  3. Impact of product information and repeated exposure on consumer liking, sensory perception and concept associations of local apple juice

    Stolzenbach, Sandra; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2013-01-01

    The impact of product information and repeated exposure of local apple juice on consumer liking, sensory perception and concept associations was studied. Findings showed that consumers had high expectations towards the studied local apples juices. Consequently, the liking for the local apple juices...... did not fully determine consumer liking. Thus the sensory characteristics were also found to be of importance. Besides liking, the concept associations were also affected by product information. All local apple juices were associated as being more exclusive under informed tasting conditions....... No effects were found for liking of the apple juices over repeated exposure. Also, the consumers did not change their sensory perception over repeated consumption. However, the local apple juices were conceptualised as more familiar but remained exclusive after repeated consumption. When local producers have...

  4. Assessing the association of nativity and acculturation to fast food restaurant use and its relationship to metabolic risk factors among US blacks with Afro-Caribbean ethnicity.

    Tull, Eugene S; Taylor, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This investigation among Afro-Caribbean adults in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI) examined whether acculturation and preference for dining out accounted for variation by nativity in the frequency of fast food restaurant use, and assessed the relationship of fast food restaurant use to body weight and insulin resistance. A randomly selected sample of 679 Afro-Caribbean adults (aged ≥ 20 years), including 436 who were foreign-born and 243 who were native-born, were recruited on the island of St. Croix, USVI. Information on demographic characteristics, level of acculturation and dietary practices were obtained from participants by questionnaire. Fasting blood samples, which were measured for glucose and insulin, and anthropometric measurements were also collected from participants. Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Relationships between variables were assessed with analysis of variance and logistic regression analyses. In bivariate analyses, birth in the USVI, younger age, being single, greater preference for dining out and higher levels of education and acculturation were significantly (P restaurant use. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, birth in the USVI, younger age and preference for dining out were independently associated with frequent (≥ 2 days/week) fast food restaurant use. The mean level of HOMA insulin resistance among participants increased significantly with more frequent use of fast food restaurants. Among Afro-Caribbean adults in the USVI, fast food restaurant use is positively associated with insulin resistance and varies by nativity, but acculturation does not account for this variation.

  5. Identifying essential proteins based on sub-network partition and prioritization by integrating subcellular localization information.

    Li, Min; Li, Wenkai; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Pan, Yi; Wang, Jianxin

    2018-06-14

    Essential proteins are important participants in various life activities and play a vital role in the survival and reproduction of living organisms. Identification of essential proteins from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has great significance to facilitate the study of human complex diseases, the design of drugs and the development of bioinformatics and computational science. Studies have shown that highly connected proteins in a PPI network tend to be essential. A series of computational methods have been proposed to identify essential proteins by analyzing topological structures of PPI networks. However, the high noise in the PPI data can degrade the accuracy of essential protein prediction. Moreover, proteins must be located in the appropriate subcellular localization to perform their functions, and only when the proteins are located in the same subcellular localization, it is possible that they can interact with each other. In this paper, we propose a new network-based essential protein discovery method based on sub-network partition and prioritization by integrating subcellular localization information, named SPP. The proposed method SPP was tested on two different yeast PPI networks obtained from DIP database and BioGRID database. The experimental results show that SPP can effectively reduce the effect of false positives in PPI networks and predict essential proteins more accurately compared with other existing computational methods DC, BC, CC, SC, EC, IC, NC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Localizing Climate Information for Municipal Planning in the Central U.S.

    Shulski, M.; Umphlett, N.; Abdel-Monem, T.; Tang, Z.; Uhlarik, F.

    2017-12-01

    The impacts of projected climate change are an ongoing concern for municipalities. Planning at the local level often involves investigations of multiple hazards on decadal timescales. Of particular interest to cities are implications of too much or too little water, snow storms, heat waves, and freeze/thaw cycles on infrastructure, health, energy demands and water quality and availability. A two-year project led by the University of Nebraska - Lincoln has brought together scientist and stakeholder for the purpose of informing municipal planning and climate adaptation for 12 cities in the lower Missouri River Basin states (IA, NE, KS, MO). City-specific climate reports have been developed with municipal input to aid local planning efforts. Surveys to assess municipal climate data usage were distributed to all cities with a population greater than 5,000 in the four-state region. In addition, planning efforts for 18 municipalities have been evaluated for nearly 20 cities in the region to investigate local hazard mitigation, emergency, and comprehensive plans. This presentation will outline key outcomes of the project and discuss decision support tools developed in co-production with city planners.

  7. Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem and the Cyclically Fair Norm

    Banerjee, Priyodorshi; Mitra, Manipushpak; Mukherjee, Conan

    In this paper we revisit the Kolkata Paise Restaurant problem by allowing for a more general (but common) preference of the n customers defined over the set of n restaurants. This generalization allows for the possibility that each pure strategy Nash equilibrium differs from the Pareto efficient allocation. By assuming that n is small and by allowing for mutual interaction across all customers we design strategies to sustain cyclically fair norm as a sub-game perfect equilibrium of the Kolkata Paise Restaurant problem. We have a cyclically fair norm if n strategically different Pareto efficient strategies are sequentially sustained in a way such that each customer gets serviced in all the n restaurants exactly once between periods 1 and n and then again the same process is repeated between periods (n+1) and 2n and so on.

  8. Subjective evaluation of restaurant acoustics in a virtual sound environment

    Nielsen, Nicolaj Østergaard; Marschall, Marton; Santurette, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Many restaurants have smooth rigid surfaces made of wood, steel, glass, and concrete. This often results in a lack of sound absorption. Such restaurants are notorious for high sound noise levels during service that most owners actually desire for representing vibrant eating environments, although...... surveys report that noise complaints are on par with poor service. This study investigated the relation between objective acoustic parameters and subjective evaluation of acoustic comfort at five restaurants in terms of three parameters: noise annoyance, speech intelligibility, and privacy. At each...... location, customers filled out questionnaire surveys, acoustic parameters were measured, and recordings of restaurant acoustic scenes were obtained with a 64-channel spherical array. The acoustic scenes were reproduced in a virtual sound environment (VSE) with 64 loudspeakers placed in an anechoic room...

  9. Mrs. B.'s Lakeside Restaurant (In the Classroom).

    Borysiewicz, Pat

    1992-01-01

    Describes how the author and her kindergarten students created a cooking center and restaurant in which they participate in regular cooking projects to provide opportunities to apply newly acquired skills in reading, writing, and math. (MG)

  10. Investigation of Noise Pollution in Restaurants in Morogoro ...

    MICHAEL

    suggesting little or no impact of the indoor environment on the outdoor environment's noise level. ... provided by the music systems which are run in most restaurants. Therefore, proper ... people who visit or work in those areas depend on.

  11. RESTAURANT AND CAFETERIA SERVICES ARRANGEMENTS FOR 1 MAY 2002

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    1. Restaurants As Wednesday 1 May is an official CERN holiday, restaurants no. 2 (DSR: bldg. 504 - Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance: bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed as from Tuesda 30 April at 18h00. They will reopen on Thursday 2 May at 6h30 (rest. no. 2) and at 7h00 (rest. no. 3). On 1 May, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 1 (COOP: bldg. 501 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. 2. Decentralised services No decentralised services (satellite cafétérias etc.) will operate. 3. Newspaper stand The newspaper kiosque in building 501 will be closed. Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  12. Automatic segmentation of myocardium from black-blood MR images using entropy and local neighborhood information.

    Qian Zheng

    Full Text Available By using entropy and local neighborhood information, we present in this study a robust adaptive Gaussian regularizing Chan-Vese (CV model to segment the myocardium from magnetic resonance images with intensity inhomogeneity. By utilizing the circular Hough transformation (CHT our model is able to detect epicardial and endocardial contours of the left ventricle (LV as circles automatically, and the circles are used as the initialization. In the cost functional of our model, the interior and exterior energies are weighted by the entropy to improve the robustness of the evolving curve. Local neighborhood information is used to evolve the level set function to reduce the impact of the heterogeneity inside the regions and to improve the segmentation accuracy. An adaptive window is utilized to reduce the sensitivity to initialization. The Gaussian kernel is used to regularize the level set function, which can not only ensure the smoothness and stability of the level set function, but also eliminate the traditional Euclidean length term and re-initialization. Extensive validation of the proposed method on patient data demonstrates its superior performance over other state-of-the-art methods.

  13. [Sex differences in relationship between creativity and hemispheric information processing in global and local levels].

    Razumnikova, O M; Vol'f, N V

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in creativity related global-local hemispheric selective processing were examined by hierarchical letter presenting in conditions of their perception and comparison. Fifty-six right-handed males and 68 females (aged 17-22 years) participated in the experiments. Originality-imagery was assessed by a computer-based Torrance 'Incomplete Figures' test software. Verbal creativity was valued by original sentence using of three nouns from remote semantic categories. The results show that irrespectively of the sex factor and the type of creative thinking, its originality is provided by high speed of right-hemispheric processes of information selection on the global level and delay in the interhemispheric communication. Relationships between originality of ideas and hemispheric attentional characteristics are presented mostly in men while verbal creative problem solving, and in women while figurative original thinking. Originality of verbal activity in men is more associated with success of selective processes in the left hemisphere, but in women--with selective functions of both hemispheres. Figurative thinking in men is less related to hemispheric characteristics of attention compared with women. Increase of figurative originality in women is accompanied acceleration of processes of selection of the information in the right hemisphere, and also higher efficiency of local attention as well as speeds ofglobal processing in the left hemisphere.

  14. QUALITY, EFFECTIVENESS AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE OF LOCAL TREASURIES BUDGET ACCOUNTING

    Biljana Tešić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of management information systems (MIS of local treasuries budget accounting is to provide qualitative information support to management in process of decision making and to provide effective managing of key processes of budget accounting, in accordance with requests of management on all levels of decision making. From the aspect of effectiveness and request for quality, in accordance with request of users and defined system goals, this research includes the analysis of characteristics and goals of identified key processes, critical success factors (CSF, key performance indicators (KPI, standards for realization of users requests, results of processes and indicators of goals realisation. The aim of this paper, based on the results of the analysis, is to develop models for evaluation of quality and effectiveness and to define key performance indicators of MIS of budget accounting, in order to perceive the level of achievement of the goals of the system, effectiveness of processes and level of fulfillment of requirements and needs of all users groups that are significant for budge t accounting of local treasuries.

  15. Prediction of N2O emission from local information with Random Forest

    Philibert, Aurore; Loyce, Chantal; Makowski, David

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas, with a global warming potential 298 times greater than that of CO 2 . In agricultural soils, N 2 O emissions are influenced by a large number of environmental characteristics and crop management techniques that are not systematically reported in experiments. Random Forest (RF) is a machine learning method that can handle missing data and ranks input variables on the basis of their importance. We aimed to predict N 2 O emission on the basis of local information, to rank environmental and crop management variables according to their influence on N 2 O emission, and to compare the performances of RF with several regression models. RF outperformed the regression models for predictive purposes, and this approach led to the identification of three important input variables: N fertilization, type of crop, and experiment duration. This method could be used in the future for prediction of N 2 O emissions from local information. -- Highlights: ► Random Forest gave more accurate N 2 O predictions than regression. ► Missing data were well handled by Random Forest. ► The most important factors were nitrogen rate, type of crop and experiment duration. -- Random Forest, a machine learning method, outperformed the regression models for predicting N 2 O emissions and led to the identification of three important input variables

  16. Multi-information fusion sparse coding with preserving local structure for hyperspectral image classification

    Wei, Xiaohui; Zhu, Wen; Liao, Bo; Gu, Changlong; Li, Weibiao

    2017-10-01

    The key question of sparse coding (SC) is how to exploit the information that already exists to acquire the robust sparse representations (SRs) of distinguishing different objects for hyperspectral image (HSI) classification. We propose a multi-information fusion SC framework, which fuses the spectral, spatial, and label information in the same level, to solve the above question. In particular, pixels from disjointed spatial clusters, which are obtained by cutting the given HSI in space, are individually and sparsely encoded. Then, due to the importance of spatial structure, graph- and hypergraph-based regularizers are enforced to motivate the obtained representations smoothness and to preserve the local consistency for each spatial cluster. The latter simultaneously considers the spectrum, spatial, and label information of multiple pixels that have a great probability with the same label. Finally, a linear support vector machine is selected as the final classifier with the learned SRs as input. Experiments conducted on three frequently used real HSIs show that our methods can achieve satisfactory results compared with other state-of-the-art methods.

  17. The information published by local governments. The websites of Catalonia’s municipal governments

    M Corcoy Rius

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The information issued by government institutions must be complete and intelligible so that citizens are able to exercise their right to participation based on informed decisions and the media professionals can use consider these institutions as reliable sources of information. This article presents the results of the development and application of a method to evaluate the information offered by the websites of the municipal governments of Catalonia in order to encourage policymakers to introduce improvements to these platforms. Methods. The sample of study includes the institutional websites run by the government of 947 municipalities of Catalonia. The evaluation is based on 41 purpose-created indicators. Results. The results have been represented on an online geographical mapping tool, titled Map of Good Practices in Local Public Communication, which offers individual and general results and statistics. Conclusions. The publication of results has quickly led to improvements in the sample of websites under analysis, which has led the research team to apply the same evaluation method to the websites of the municipal governments of other five Spanish autonomous communities.

  18. Observability and Estimation of Distributed Space Systems via Local Information-Exchange Networks

    Fathpour, Nanaz; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Mesbahi, Mehran; Rahmani, Amirreza

    2011-01-01

    Spacecraft formation flying involves the coordination of states among multiple spacecraft through relative sensing, inter-spacecraft communication, and control. Most existing formation-flying estimation algorithms can only be supported via highly centralized, all-to-all, static relative sensing. New algorithms are proposed that are scalable, modular, and robust to variations in the topology and link characteristics of the formation exchange network. These distributed algorithms rely on a local information exchange network, relaxing the assumptions on existing algorithms. Distributed space systems rely on a signal transmission network among multiple spacecraft for their operation. Control and coordination among multiple spacecraft in a formation is facilitated via a network of relative sensing and interspacecraft communications. Guidance, navigation, and control rely on the sensing network. This network becomes more complex the more spacecraft are added, or as mission requirements become more complex. The observability of a formation state was observed by a set of local observations from a particular node in the formation. Formation observability can be parameterized in terms of the matrices appearing in the formation dynamics and observation matrices. An agreement protocol was used as a mechanism for observing formation states from local measurements. An agreement protocol is essentially an unforced dynamic system whose trajectory is governed by the interconnection geometry and initial condition of each node, with a goal of reaching a common value of interest. The observability of the interconnected system depends on the geometry of the network, as well as the position of the observer relative to the topology. For the first time, critical GN&C (guidance, navigation, and control estimation) subsystems are synthesized by bringing the contribution of the spacecraft information-exchange network to the forefront of algorithmic analysis and design. The result is a

  19. Restaurant inspection frequency: The RestoFreq Study.

    Medu, Olanrewaju; Turner, Hollie; Cushon, Jennifer A; Melis, Deborah; Rea, Leslie; Abdellatif, Treena; Neudorf, Cory O; Schwandt, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Foodborne illness is an important contributor to morbidity and health system costs in Canada. Using number of critical hazards as a proxy for food safety, we sought to better understand how to improve food safety in restaurants. We compared the current standard of annual inspections to twice-yearly inspections among restaurants "at risk" for food safety infractions. These were restaurants that had three or more elevated-risk inspection ratings in the preceding 36 months. We conducted a two-arm randomized controlled trial between November 2012 and October 2014. The intervention was twice-yearly routine restaurant inspection compared to standard once-yearly routine inspection. Included were all restaurants within Saskatoon Health Region that were assessed as "at risk", with 73 restaurants in the intervention arm and 78 in the control arm. Independent sample t-tests were conducted between groups to compare: i) average number of critical hazards per inspection; and ii) proportion of inspections resulting in a rating indicating an elevated hazard. Over time we noted statistically significant improvements across both study arms, in number of both critical food safety hazards (decreased by 61%) and elevated-risk inspection ratings (decreased by 45%) (p < 0.0001). We observed no significant differences between the two groups pre- or post-intervention. Results suggest increasing the number of annual routine inspections in high-risk restaurants was not associated with a significant difference in measures of compliance with food safety regulations. Findings of this study do not provide evidence supporting increased frequency of restaurant inspection from annually to twice annually.

  20. DISPARITIES BETWEEN SERVICES DEMANDED AND SERVICES RECEIVED IN TAIWANESE RESTAURANTS

    Jui-Kuei Chen; I-Shuo Chen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the service quality performance of Taiwanese foreign restaurants. After a review of the literature on service quality and discussions with managers of Taiwanese foreign restaurants, we decided to use the DINERSERV questionnaire. The methodology, an Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA), is used to categorize whole service items into four dimensions: 1) keep up the good work, 2) possible overkill, 3) low priority, and 4) concentrate here, all in accordance ...