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Sample records for responses iii effects

  1. The effect of breast anthropometry on the Hybrid III 5th female chest response.

    Tylko, Suzanne; Charlebois, Dominique; Bussières, Alain; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2006-11-01

    Two manufacturers, Denton ATD and FTSS, currently produce the Hybrid III 5th percentile female dummy. In response to concerns raised by industry that differences in the anthropometry of the molded breasts between the two manufacturers may influence chest responses, Transport Canada conducted a comparative testing program. Thorax biofidelity tests were conducted to compare force-deflection characteristics; full frontal rigid-barrier tests were conducted at 40, 48 and 56 km/h to compare chest responses, and out-of-position chest on module static airbag deployment tests were conducted to compare peak chest deflections of the Denton and FTSS dummy jackets and of a prototype jacket without breasts. Differences in force-deflection characteristics were observed during biofidelity pendulum impacts of the two dummies, with much of the differences attributed to the different chest jackets. Differences of up to 11 mm in the peak sternum deflection and of the order of 15 g for the 3-ms chest acceleration clips were noted in rigid-barrier vehicle tests. In the out-of-position airbag-deployment tests, differences in the magnitude of peak chest deflections were observed. The prototype chest jacket without breasts was found to improve repeatability in the belted crash tests and in out-of-position airbag testing. Though neither the Denton nor the FTSS chest jackets fully meet the original design intent of the Hybrid III 5th percentile dummy, the Denton dummy more closely met the drawing specifications and had less manufacturing variability. The results demonstrate the importance of detailed chest flesh assembly specifications, provide evidence that a fully molded jacket design would eliminate manufacturing variability and suggest that removal of the breasts may further improve test repeatability.

  2. First-principles study lone-pair effects of Sb (III)-S chromophore influence on SHG response in quaternary potassium containing silver antimony sulfides

    Huang, Junben [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Su, Xin; Hou, Dianwei; Lei, Binghua [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Zhihua, E-mail: zhyang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); Pan, Shilie, E-mail: slpan@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2017-05-15

    First-principles studies of the geometric structures, electronic structures and optical properties of non-centrosymmetrical (NCS) KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4}, K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4} and K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} and centrosymmetrical (CS) KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 3} and K{sub 3}Ag{sub 9}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 12} have been performed by means of density functional theory. It is indicated that although they have similarity in their anionic groups and, the electronic structures, prominent features of the optical anisotropy or second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) susceptibilities are apparently different. The calculated birefringences are 0.0537, 0.0343, 0.1324, 0.2217 and 0.0604 which are attributed to the different anionic groups [SbS{sub 3}] and triangles [AgS{sub 3}]. Also, the calculated NLO responses are about 0.5×, 1.0× and 2.0× times than that commercial AgGaS{sub 2} (AGS, d{sub 36}=11 pm/V) for K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4}, KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4} and K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7}, respectively. In comparison with the absolute magnitude of second harmonic generation (SHG) coefficients, the order K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7}>KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4}>K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4} is clearly established in the SHG response. Further analysis based on the real-space atom-cutting method reveals that the main sources of the SHG properties of these compounds are from the Sb-S group, especially K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} is mainly attributed to the lone pair stereochemical activity of Sb (III)-S group. - Graphical abstract: Compounds K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4}, KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4} and K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} exhibit second-order NLO response: 15×, 30× and 62× times than that KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, d{sub 36}=0.39 pm/V), respectively. First-principles methods reveal that the large SHG response of K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} is dominated by the Sb-S chromophore with lone pairs.

  3. Cellular cooperation in lymphocyte activation. III. B-cell helper effect in the enhancement of T-cell response.

    Kasahara, T; Kin, K; Itoh, Y; Kawai, T; Kano, Y; Shioiri-Nakano, K

    1979-01-01

    T and B cells were purified from human tonsil and peripheral blood by the removal of phagocytic cells, followed by filtration through a nylon fiber column (NC) and E-rosette formation. Purified T and B cells contained less than 1% of other cell types. The responses of T cells to concanavalin A (Con A) and soluble protein A were greatly enhanced in the presence of autologous B cells. Participation of B cells in T-cell enhancement was confirmed by the following observations: (a) purified B copulation, which was separated further from adherent B cells, retained its enhancing activity. (b) Another adherent cell-free B-cell preparation, which was purified from the NC-passed fraction, and (c) no T lymphoid but some B lymphoid cell lines, elicited strong T-cell enhancement. It was also found that the enhancing capacity of B cells required no metabolic activity, but rather an intact cell form and direct cell-to-cell contact with responding cells. The stimulatory determinants on B cells were resistant to trypsin and neuraminidase treatment. In this paper a hypothesis will be presented that at least two signals are prerequisite for the effective activation of T cells.

  4. BWR Mark III pressure suppression containment response to hydrogen deflagration

    Fuls, G.M.; Gunter, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The CLASIX-3 computer program has been used to evaluate the temperature and pressure response of the BWR Mark III Suppression Containment System to hydrogen deflagration resulting from a degraded core condition. The CLASIX-3 computer program is an extension of the CLASIX program which was originally developed to analyze ice condenser containments. A brief description is given of the modifications made to CLASIX to increase its flexibility and versatility to include the capability of analyzing the Mark III Containment. Analytical results are presented for the two base case transients. The two base cases are the stuck open steam relief valve and the small break LOCA, both of which are assumed to lead to a degraded core condition and the release of hydrogen to the containment. Results include pressure and temperature response, gas concentrations and suppression pool response

  5. Solvent effects on extraction of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III), with decanoic acid

    Yamada, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Fujii, Yukio; Mizuta, Masateru

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of aluminum(III) and indium(III) with decanoic acid in 1-octanol was carried out at 25 deg C and at an aqueous ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm -3 (NaClO 4 ). Monomeric and tetrameric aluminum(III) decanoates and monomeric indium(III) decanoate are responsible for the extraction. From a comparison of the present results with those obtained from the previous works, the polymerization of the extracted species was found to be more extensive in benzene than in 1-octanol, and the metal decanoates were highly polymerized in the following order in both solvents: Al > Ga > In. (author)

  6. Human Lung Cancer Risks from Radon – Part III - Evidence of Influence of Combined Bystander and Adaptive Response Effects on Radon Case-Control Studies - A Microdose Analysis

    Leonard, Bobby E.; Thompson, Richard E.; Beecher, Georgia C.

    2012-01-01

    Since the publication of the BEIR VI (1999) report on health risks from radon, a significant amount of new data has been published showing various mechanisms that may affect the ultimate assessment of radon as a carcinogen, in particular the potentially deleterious Bystander Effect (BE) and the potentially beneficial Adaptive Response radio-protection (AR). The case-control radon lung cancer risk data of the pooled 13 European countries radon study (Darby et al 2005, 2006) and the 8 North American pooled study (Krewski et al 2005, 2006) have been evaluated. The large variation in the odds ratios of lung cancer from radon risk is reconciled, based on the large variation in geological and ecological conditions and variation in the degree of adaptive response radio-protection against the bystander effect induced lung damage. The analysis clearly shows Bystander Effect radon lung cancer induction and Adaptive Response reduction in lung cancer in some geographical regions. It is estimated that for radon levels up to about 400 Bq m−3 there is about a 30% probability that no human lung cancer risk from radon will be experienced and a 20% probability that the risk is below the zero-radon, endogenic spontaneous or perhaps even genetically inheritable lung cancer risk rate. The BEIR VI (1999) and EPA (2003) estimates of human lung cancer deaths from radon are most likely significantly excessive. The assumption of linearity of risk, by the Linear No-Threshold Model, with increasing radon exposure is invalid. PMID:22942874

  7. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  8. Assessing child belt fit, volume II : effect of restraint configuration, booster seat designs, seating procedure, and belt fit on the dynamic response of the hybrid III 10-year-old ATD in sled tests.

    2008-09-01

    A total of 49 dynamic sled tests were performed with the Hybrid III 10YO to examine issues relating to child belt fit. The goals of these tests were to evaluate ATD response to realistic belt geometries and belt fit, develop methods for accurate, rep...

  9. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III and As(III/Sb(III-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    Jingxin Li

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III]/antimonite [Sb(III]-oxidizing strain. The As(III oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III, ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  10. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  11. Biosorption and toxicity responses to arsenite (As[III]) in Scenedesmus quadricauda.

    Zhang, Jianying; Ding, Tengda; Zhang, Chunlong

    2013-08-01

    Toxicity and biosorption responses to arsenite (As[III]) were examined in a 96-h exposure study using Scenedesmus quadricauda, one of the most popular green algae distributed in freshwaters in China. Results indicated that the pH-dependent distribution of two arsenite species (H2AsO3(-) and H3AsO3) played an important role in biosorption and toxicity. The undissociated H3AsO3 was more toxic than its monoanionic H2AsO3(-) through comparison of algal cell numbers, chlorophyll-a contents, and algal ultrastructural changes observed with transmission electron microscopy. An effective biosorption of 89.0mgg(-1) at 100mgL(-1) As[III] was found in the treatments with an initial pH of 9.3 and 25.2μgg(-1) at 0.03mgL(-1) As[III] at an initial pH of 8.2 as a result of the predominant species of H2AsO3(-) under the ambient pH and Eh conditions. Our results imply that S. quadricauda may provide a new means for the removal of toxic arsenite species present in contaminated surface water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Response of a Type III waste tank to hydrogen deflagration

    Gong, Chung; Jerrell, J.W.; Pelfrey, J.R.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1992-01-01

    The type III waste tank is built with ASTM A516 Grade 70 steel shells in the shape of a torus with a central concrete core. The tank is buried underground and covered with a four foot thick reinforced concrete slab. The tank is enriched by 2.5 foot thick reinforced concrete wall. Between the tank surface and the wall there is a 2.5 foot annular space. The tank itself is called the ''primary liner.'' The interior surface of the concrete wall is line with steel plates, called the ''secondary liner.'' The base of the tank rests on a concrete mat. Underneath the mat the secondary liner extends from the wall to the central column surfaces. The bottom liner is attached to the reinforced concrete foundation. Based on the conditions that the tank is filled with liquid wastes to 50% of the design capacity, and that the accumulation of hydrogen becomes 20% inside its free board, the resulting deflagration would cause an overpressure of 100 psig in the tank [Wallace and Yau, 1986]. The task of this analysis is to simulate the ''hydrogen deflagration'' scenario in the Type III Waste Tank complex. During the deflagration, the stresses in the steel tank would be expected to exceed the elastic limit of the steel and the tank would then undergo large deformation. The concrete roof slab could be fractured by the expansion of the tank. The central concrete column would start to exhibit large deformation first. All the structural members in the system are expected to interact drastically during the deflagration

  13. A pyrophosphate-responsive gadolinium(III) MRI contrast agent.

    Surman, Andrew J; Bonnet, Célia S; Lowe, Mark P; Kenny, Gavin D; Bell, Jimmy D; Tóth, Eva; Vilar, Ramon

    2011-01-03

    This study shows that the relaxivity and optical properties of functionalised lanthanide-DTPA-bis-amide complexes (lanthanide=Gd(3+) and Eu(3+) , DTPA=diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) can be successfully modulated by addition of specific anions, without direct Ln(3+) /anion coordination. Zinc(II)-dipicolylamine moieties, which are known to bind strongly to phosphates, were introduced in the amide "arms" of these ligands, and the interaction of the resulting Gd-Zn(2) complexes with a range of anions was screened by using indicator displacement assays (IDAs). Considerable selectivity for polyphosphorylated species (such as pyrophosphate and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)) over a range of other anions (including monophosphorylated anions) was apparent. In addition, we show that pyrophosphate modulates the relaxivity of the gadolinium(III) complex, this modulation being sufficiently large to be observed in imaging experiments. To establish the binding mode of the pyrophosphate and gain insight into the origin of the relaxometric modulation, a series of studies including UV/Vis and emission spectroscopy, luminescence lifetime measurements in H(2) O and D(2) O, (17) O and (31) P NMR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) studies were carried out. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effects of phosphodiesterase III inhibition on length-dependent regulation of myocardial function in coronary surgery patients

    de Hert, S. G.; ten Broecke, P. W.; Mertens, E.; Rodrigus, I. E.; Stockman, B. A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphodiesterase III inhibitors increase myocardial contractility and decrease left ventricular (LV) afterload. We studied whether these effects altered LV response to an increase in cardiac load and affected length-dependent regulation of myocardial function. METHODS: Before the start

  15. The Moessbauer effect in Fe(III) HEDTA, Fe(III) EDTA, and Fe(III) CDTA compounds

    Prado, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of Moessbauer spectra with pH value of Fe(III)HEDTA and Fe(III)CDTA compounds is studied. Informations on formation processes of LFe-O-FeL (L=ligand) type dimers by the relation of titration curves of Fe(III)EDTA, Fe(III)HEDTA and Fe(III)CDTA compounds with the series of Moessbauer spectra, are obtained. Some informations on Fe-O-Fe bond structure are also obtained. Comparing the titration curves with the series of Moessbauer spectra, it is concluded that the dimerization process begins when a specie of the form FeXOH α (X = EDTA, HEDTA, CDTA; α = -1, -2) arises. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Comparison between Hybrid III dummy and cadaver knee response in frontal impact

    MASSON, Catherine; CAVALLERO, Claude

    2003-01-01

    Lower limb injuries frequently occur during car accidents. The purpose of this work was to compare the response of the hybrid iii lower limb with the response of cadaver lower limb subjected to similar impacts. These experiments were performed with the objective to evaluate the biofidelity, repeatability and response characteristics of the knee-femur-pelvis HIII dummy. The tests have examined the dynamic response of the knee-femur-pelvis complex to sub injury simple pendulum impacts. The expe...

  17. Proteomic and properties analysis of botanical insecticide rhodojaponin III-induced response of the diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella (L..

    Xiaolin Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rhodojaponin III, as a botanical insecticide, affects a wide variety of biological processes in insects, including reduction of feeding, suspension of development, and oviposition deterring of adults in a dose-dependent manner. However, the mode of these actions remains obscure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was adopted to examine the effect of rhodojaponin III on the Plutella xyllostella (L.. Following treating 48 hours, newly emergence moths were collected and protein samples were prepared. The proteins were separated by 2-DE, and total 31 proteins were significantly affected by rhodojaponin III compared to the control identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. These differentially expressed proteins act in the nervous transduction, odorant degradation and metabolic change pathways. Further, gene expression patterns in treated and untreated moths were confirmed by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. RNAi of the chemosensory protein (PxCSP gene resulted in oviposition significantly increased on cabbage plants treated with rhodojaponin III. CONCLUSIONS: These rhodojaponin III-induced proteins and gene properties analysis would be essential for a better understanding of the potential molecular mechanism of the response to rhodojaponin III from moths of P. xylostella.

  18. An assessment of the response of Military lower extremity and Hybrid III leg during typical blast impact using the Hybrid III and EUROSID-2 ATD.

    Pandelani, T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of the response of Military lower extremity and Hybrid III leg during typical blast impact using the Hybrid III and EUROSID-2 ATD Thanyani Pandelani, David Reinecke, Tleyane Sono, Frans Beetge and Phumlane Nkosi Abstract: This paper...

  19. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or until...

  20. Molecular genetics of human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne (rye) allergen, Lol p III.

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Marsh, D G

    1989-01-01

    Lol p II and III are each about 11-kD protein allergens from the pollen of Lolium perenne (rye grass). We have found that human immune responses (IgE and IgG antibodies) to both proteins are significantly associated with HLA-DR3. In addition, the two proteins are cross-reactive with the antibodies in many human sera (about 84% human sera showed the cross-reactivity). We have determined greater than 90% of the amino acid sequences of the two proteins and found that they are at least 54% homologous. Berzofsky found that 75% of the 23 known T cell sites in various proteins had an amphipathic structure. Our analysis by the same method showed that both Lol p II and III have a major region of amphipathicity (at residues 61-67, Lol p III numbering) which might contain sites for binding to an Ia molecule and a T cell receptor. This region is identical between Lol p II and III, except for an Arg-Lys substitution, and could account, in part, for the DR3 association with responsiveness to both molecules. An interesting difference between the two proteins is that immune response to Lol p III is associated with DR5 (in addition to DR3), whereas no DR5 association is found in the case of Lol p II. One possibility is that Lol p III has an additional site which binds to the DR5 Ia molecule. Lol p III indeed has a second highly amphiphathic peptide, 24-30 (Lol p III 24 R P G D T L A 30), which is different and not amphipathic in Lol p II.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

    1989-05-01

    A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain.

  2. Improving Hybrid III injury assessment in steering wheel rim to chest impacts using responses from finite element Hybrid III and human body model.

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Davidsson, Johan; Mendoza-Vazquez, Manuel; Rundberget, Peter; Svensson, Mats Y; Thorn, Stefan; Törnvall, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to improve the quality of injury risk assessments in steering wheel rim to chest impacts when using the Hybrid III crash test dummy in frontal heavy goods vehicle (HGV) collision tests. Correction factors for chest injury criteria were calculated as the model chest injury parameter ratios between finite element (FE) Hybrid III, evaluated in relevant load cases, and the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS). This is proposed to be used to compensate Hybrid III measurements in crash tests where steering wheel rim to chest impacts occur. The study was conducted in an FE environment using an FE-Hybrid III model and the THUMS. Two impactor shapes were used, a circular hub and a long, thin horizontal bar. Chest impacts at velocities ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 m/s were simulated at 3 impact height levels. A ratio between FE-Hybrid III and THUMS chest injury parameters, maximum chest compression C max, and maximum viscous criterion VC max, were calculated for the different chest impact conditions to form a set of correction factors. The definition of the correction factor is based on the assumption that the response from a circular hub impact to the middle of the chest is well characterized and that injury risk measures are independent of impact height. The current limits for these chest injury criteria were used as a basis to develop correction factors that compensate for the limitations in biofidelity of the Hybrid III in steering wheel rim to chest impacts. The hub and bar impactors produced considerably higher C max and VC max responses in the THUMS compared to the FE-Hybrid III. The correction factor for the responses of the FE-Hybrid III showed that the criteria responses for the bar impactor were consistently overestimated. Ratios based on Hybrid III and THUMS responses provided correction factors for the Hybrid III responses ranging from 0.84 to 0.93. These factors can be used to estimate C max and VC max values when the Hybrid III is

  3. Hepatitis E virus persists in the presence of a type III interferon response.

    Yin, Xin; Li, Xinlei; Ambardekar, Charuta; Hu, Zhimin; Lhomme, Sébastien; Feng, Zongdi

    2017-05-01

    The RIG-I-like RNA helicase (RLR)-mediated interferon (IFN) response plays a pivotal role in the hepatic antiviral immunity. The hepatitis A virus (HAV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) counter this response by encoding a viral protease that cleaves the mitochondria antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), a common signaling adaptor for RLRs. However, a third hepatotropic RNA virus, the hepatitis E virus (HEV), does not appear to encode a functional protease yet persists in infected cells. We investigated HEV-induced IFN responses in human hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. HEV infection resulted in persistent virus replication despite poor spread. This was companied by a type III IFN response that upregulated multiple IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), but type I IFNs were barely detected. Blocking type III IFN production or signaling resulted in reduced ISG expression and enhanced HEV replication. Unlike HAV and HCV, HEV did not cleave MAVS; MAVS protein size, mitochondrial localization, and function remained unaltered in HEV-replicating cells. Depletion of MAVS or MDA5, and to a less extent RIG-I, also diminished IFN production and increased HEV replication. Furthermore, persistent activation of the JAK/STAT signaling rendered infected cells refractory to exogenous IFN treatment, and depletion of MAVS or the receptor for type III IFNs restored the IFN responsiveness. Collectively, these results indicate that unlike other hepatotropic RNA viruses, HEV does not target MAVS and its persistence is associated with continuous production of type III IFNs.

  4. Mussel-Inspired Protein Nanoparticles Containing Iron(III)-DOPA Complexes for pH-Responsive Drug Delivery.

    Kim, Bum Jin; Cheong, Hogyun; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-06-15

    A novel bioinspired strategy for protein nanoparticle (NP) synthesis to achieve pH-responsive drug release exploits the pH-dependent changes in the coordination stoichiometry of iron(III)-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) complexes, which play a major cross-linking role in mussel byssal threads. Doxorubicin-loaded polymeric NPs that are based on Fe(III)-DOPA complexation were thus synthesized with a DOPA-modified recombinant mussel adhesive protein through a co-electrospraying process. The release of doxorubicin was found to be predominantly governed by a change in the structure of the Fe(III)-DOPA complexes induced by an acidic pH value. It was also demonstrated that the fabricated NPs exhibited effective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells through efficient cellular uptake and cytosolic release. Therefore, it is anticipated that Fe(III)-DOPA complexation can be successfully utilized as a new design principle for pH-responsive NPs for diverse controlled drug-delivery applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Reactive inspection response of NRC Region III to potential technical deficiencies identified in recent Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference papers

    Gill, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    In order to effectively meet its responsibility to protect the public health and safety, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) nuclear power plant licensing and inspection programs respond to potential technical deficiencies identified by conference and professional society meeting papers when deemed appropriate. The NRC staff's response mechanisms for such technical deficiencies include: generic letters, Bulletins, Information Notices, Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800) revisions, docketed Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) questions, special studies, special (reactive) inspection, and inspection program revisions. This paper describes reactive inspection efforts by Region III in response to potential technical deficiencies identified in recent air cleaning conference papers, including: post-accident effluent sample line deposition losses; failure to implement good engineering practices in the design, construction, and testing of Nuclear Air Treatment Systems (NATS); filter bypass via filter housing drain lines; spinster carbon degradation; use of silicone sealants and other temporary patching material in NATS; filter housing fire protection deluge system problems; lack of charcoal batch traceability; Quality Assurance records problems involving equipment, vendor, filter, and personnel qualifications; inadequate ANSI/ASME N510 acceptance criteria and tests; and failure to adequately demonstrate control room habitability per 10 CFR 50, Appendix A, General Design Criterion-19. Region III inspections indicate that many of these deficiencies appear to be prevalent. Inspection findings and utility responses to the findings are discussed. NRC Region III and Headquarters programmatic reactions to the identified generic problem areas are also discussed

  6. Radiation Effects in III-V Nanowire Devices

    2016-09-01

    fabrication of an in-plane nanowire (NW) GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field- effect transistor (MOSFET) by focused -ion beam (FIB) etching and chemical...8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-16-94 Radiation Effects in III-V...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY

  7. Hormone-Balancing Effect of Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Lepidium peruvianum Chacon): (III) Clinical responses of early-postmenopausal women to Maca in double blind, randomized, Placebo-controlled, crossover configuration, outpatient study.

    Meissner, H O; Mscisz, A; Reich-Bilinska, H; Mrozikiewicz, P; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, T; Kedzia, B; Lowicka, A; Barchia, I

    2006-12-01

    This is the second, conclusive part of the clinical study on clinical responses of early-postmenopausal women to standardized doses of pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Maca-GO). Total of 34 Caucasian women volunteers participated in a double-blind, randomized, four months outpatient crossover configuration Trial. After fulfilling the criteria of being early-postmenopausal: blood Estrogen (E230 IU/ml) at admission, they were randomly allocated to Placebo (P) and Maca-GO (M) treatments (2 groups of 11 participants each). Two 500 mg vegetable hard gel capsules with Maca-GO or Placebo powder were self-administered twice daily with meals (total 2 g/day). At admission and follow-up monthly intervals, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, levels of gonadal, pituitary, thyroid and adrenal hormones, lipids and key minerals were measured. Bone markers were determined after four months M and P use in 12 participants. Menopausal symptoms were assessed according to Greene's Score (GMS) and Kupperman's Index (KMI). Data were analyzed using multivariate technique on blocs of monthly. Results and canonical variate technique was applied to GMS and KMI matrices. Two months application of Maca-GO stimulated (PMaca-GO noticeably increased bone density markers. In conclusion, Maca-GO applied to early-postmenopausal women (i) acted as a toner of hormonal processes along the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Ovarian axis, (ii) balanced hormone levels and (iii) relieved symptoms of menopausal discomfort, (hot flushes and night sweating in particular), thus, (iv) exhibited a distinctive function peculiar to adaptogens, providing an alternative non-hormonal plant option to reduce dependence on hormone therapy programs (HRT).

  8. TS gene polymorphisms are not good markers of response to 5-FU therapy in stage III colon cancer patients.

    Fariña-Sarasqueta, A; Gosens, M J E M; Moerland, E; van Lijnschoten, I; Lemmens, V E P P; Slooter, G D; Rutten, H J T; van den Brule, Adriaan J C

    2011-08-01

    Although the predictive and prognostic value of thymidylate synthase (TS) expression and gene polymorphism in colon cancer has been widely studied, the results are inconclusive probably because of methodological differences. With this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of TS gene polymorphisms genotyping in therapy response in stage III colon carcinoma patients treated with 5-FU adjuvant chemotherapy. 251 patients diagnosed with stage III colon carcinoma treated with surgery followed by 5-FU based adjuvant therapy were selected. The variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5'untranslated region of the TS gene were genotyped. There was a positive association between tumor T stage and the VNTR genotypes (p = 0.05). In both univariate and multivariate survival analysis no effects of the studied polymorphisms on survival were found. However, there was an association between both polymorphisms and age. Among patients younger than 60 years, the patients homozygous for 2R seemed to have a better overall survival, whereas among the patients older than 67 this longer survival was seen by the carriers of other genotypes. We conclude that the TS VNTR and SNP do not predict response to 5-FU therapy in patients with stage III colon carcinoma. However, age appears to modify the effects of TS polymorphisms on survival.

  9. The effects of Basel III liquidity regulations on banks’ profitability

    Tafirei Mashamba

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The new Basel III Liquidity Coverage Ratio standard which encourages banks to maintain a diversified pool of high-quality liquid assets against their short-term expected net cash outflows although it appears to be noble from a theoretic perspective it may weigh down banks’ performance because liquid assets earn low returns. It is against this background that this study sought to evaluate the impact of the new Basel III liquidity regulations on the profitability of banks in emerging market economies. A sample of 40 banks operating in 11 emerging markets over the period 2011 to 2016 was used in the study. For estimation, system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM estimator was employed. Surprisingly, empirical results demonstrated that regulatory pressure stemming from Liquidity Coverage Ratio requirement increased instead of diminishing the profitability of banks in emerging markets. The plausible explanation given for this evidence was that banks in emerging markets managed their liquidity in a manner that is consistent with Liquidity Coverage Ratio rule hence the regulation had no detrimental effects on banks in emerging economies.

  10. Combinative effects of a bacterial type-III effector and a biocontrol ...

    Madhu

    defense responses toward salinity and infection by pathogens in rice. ... it is interesting to study mechanisms that underlie interactions involving biocontrol bacteria, type-III ... depending on the response speed and magnitude in contrast.

  11. Effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Nankawa, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The transuranic elements, such as Am(III) and Cm(III), are highly toxic because they emit high-energy α particles and have long half-lives. To estimate their long-term environmental behavior, we need to elucidate degradation of actinide-organic complexes by microorganisms. We studied the biodegradation of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Malic acid is ubiquitous in the environment and is one of the microbial metabolites that is part of the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Europium(III) is a good analogue for Am(III) and Cm(III). To investigate the effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by P. fluorescens, we compared the degradation behavior of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes to that of Fe(III) and Al(III)-malic acid complexes. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0-0.5 mM Fe(III), malic acid was degraded completely. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Al(III), malic acid was degraded until the concentration of malic acid became equal to that of Al(III), indicating that Al(III)-malic acid complex with 1: 1 molar ratio was recalcitrant to biodegradation. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Eu(III), degradation of malic acid was not observed. The effect of metals on degradation of malic acid was in the order of Fe(III) < Al(III) < Eu(III). The stability constants of 1:1 Fe(III)-, Al(III)-, and Eu(III)-malic acid complexes are 7.1, 4.6, and 4.9, respectively. These results indicate that degradability of malic acid does not depend on the stability constants of metal-malic acid complexes. We found that 10 mM malic acid was degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III) but 1 mM malic acid was not degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III). The degradation rate of malic acid increased with a decreasing ratio of Eu(III) to malic acid. (authors)

  12. Human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: the BEIR III controversy

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Controversy in the BEIR III Subcommittee on Somatic Effects concerning human health effects of low doses of low-LET radiation has centered on (a) the appropriate dose-response relationship by which extrapolation to low doses of data obtained at relatively high doses should be governed, and (b) the appropriate human evidence which should be the basis of estimation of lifetime cancer risk from radiation exposure. It is shown that the use of the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship for extrapolation purposes is an excellent approximation that is in agreement with widely accepted fundamental radiobiological principles. The appropriate human data for derivation of cancer risks are the composite age-specific risks derived from all epidemiologic studies of human cancer resulting from partial-body and whole-body radiation exposure; this composite is in good agreement with the currently available cancer incidence dose-response data obtained from the Nagasaki Tumor Registry. The current version of BEIR III significantly underestimates the radiation-induced cancer risk because it ignores the effect of high-dose-rate, low-LET radiation on cell survival in relation to cancer induction probability, and because it emphasizes cancer mortality rather than cancer incidence. The controversy and the way in which it was resolved raises important questions about how the public and its representatives can in the future obtain objective scientific evaluations of issues that may have significant economic, social, and political implications

  13. Traveling waves in a diffusive predator-prey model with holling type-III functional response

    Li Wantong; Wu Shiliang

    2008-01-01

    We establish the existence of traveling wave solutions and small amplitude traveling wave train solutions for a reaction-diffusion system based on a predator-prey model with Holling type-III functional response. The analysis is in the three-dimensional phase space of the nonlinear ordinary differential equation system given by the diffusive predator-prey system in the traveling wave variable. The methods used to prove the results are the shooting argument, invariant manifold theory and the Hopf bifurcation theorem

  14. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to peptide vaccination predicts survival in stage III colorectal cancer.

    Kawamura, Junichiro; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Sukegawa, Yasushi; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Hida, Jin-Ichi; Hazama, Shoichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2018-02-23

    We previously reported a phase I clinical trial of a peptide vaccine ring finger protein 43 (RNF43) and 34-kDa translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOMM34) combined with uracil-tegafur (UFT)/LV for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), and demonstrated the safety and immunological responsiveness of this combination therapy. In this study, we evaluated vaccination-induced immune responses to clarify the survival benefit of the combination therapy as adjuvant treatment. We enrolled 44 patients initially in an HLA-masked fashion. After the disclosure of HLA, 28 patients were in the HLA-A*2402-matched and 16 were in the unmatched group. In the HLA-matched group, 14 patients had positive CTL responses specific for the RNF43 and/or TOMM34 peptides after 2 cycles of treatment and 9 had negative responses; in the HLA-unmatched group, 10 CTL responses were positive and 2 negative. In the HLA-matched group, 3-year relapse-free survival (RFS) was significantly better in the positive CTL subgroup than in the negative-response subgroup. Patients with negative vaccination-induced CTL responses showed a significant trend towards shorter RFS than those with positive responses. Moreover, in the HLA-unmatched group, the positive CTL response subgroup showed an equally good 3-year RFS as in the HLA-matched group. In conclusion, vaccination-induced CTL response to peptide vaccination could predict survival in the adjuvant setting for stage III CRC. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Modulation of innate immune responses by Yersinia type III secretion system translocators and effectors.

    Bliska, James B; Wang, Xiaoying; Viboud, Gloria I; Brodsky, Igor E

    2013-10-01

    The innate immune system of mammals responds to microbial infection through detection of conserved molecular determinants called 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' (PAMPs). Pathogens use virulence factors to counteract PAMP-directed responses. The innate immune system can in turn recognize signals generated by virulence factors, allowing for a heightened response to dangerous pathogens. Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens encode type III secretion systems (T3SSs) that translocate effector proteins, subvert PAMP-directed responses and are critical for infection. A plasmid-encoded T3SS in the human-pathogenic Yersinia species translocates seven effectors into infected host cells. Delivery of effectors by the T3SS requires plasma membrane insertion of two translocators, which are thought to form a channel called a translocon. Studies of the Yersinia T3SS have provided key advances in our understanding of how innate immune responses are generated by perturbations in plasma membrane and other signals that result from translocon insertion. Additionally, studies in this system revealed that effectors function to inhibit innateimmune responses resulting from insertion of translocons into plasma membrane. Here, we review these advances with the goal of providing insight into how a T3SS can activate and inhibit innate immune responses, allowing a virulent pathogen to bypass host defences. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  17. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  18. Structural Response of Lower Leg Muscles in Compression: A Low Impact Energy Study Employing Volunteers, Cadavers and the Hybrid III.

    Dhaliwal, Trilok S; Beillas, Philippe; Chou, Clifford C; Prasad, Priya; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2002-11-01

    Little has been reported in the literature on the compressive properties of muscle. These data are needed for the development of finite element models that address impact of the muscles, especially in the study of pedestrian impact. Tests were conducted to characterize the compressive response of muscle. Volunteers, cadaveric specimens and a Hybrid III dummy were impacted in the posterior and lateral aspect of the lower leg using a free flying pendulum. Volunteer muscles were tested while tensed and relaxed. The effects of muscle tension were found to influence results, especially in posterior leg impacts. Cadaveric response was found to be similar to that of the relaxed volunteer. The resulting data can be used to identify a material law using an inverse method.

  19. Genotoxic effects of bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles by comet assay

    Reecep Liman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide is one of the important transition metal oxides and it has been intensively studied due to their peculiar characteristics (semiconductor band gap, high refractive index, high dielectric permittivity, high oxygen conductivity, resistivity, photoconductivity and photoluminescence etc.. Therefore, it is used such as microelectronics, sensor technology, optical coatings, transparent ceramic glass manufacturing, nanoenergetic gas generator, biosensor for DNA hybridization, potential immobilizing platforms for glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase, fuel cells, a additive in paints, an astringent in a variety of medical creams and topical ointments, and for the determination of heavy metal ions in drinking water, mineral water and urine. In addition this, Bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles (BONPs are favorable for the biomolecules adsorption than regular sized particles because of their greater advantages and novel characteristics (much higher specific surface, greater surface free energy, and good electrochemical stability etc.. Genotoxic effects of BONPs were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5 ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan’s multiple range test was performed. These result indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  20. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  1. Distinct Effects of Type I and III Interferons on Enteric Viruses

    Harshad Ingle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are key host cytokines in the innate immune response to viral infection, and recent work has identified unique roles for IFN subtypes in regulating different aspects of infection. Currently emerging is a common theme that type III IFNs are critical in localized control of infection at mucosal barrier sites, while type I IFNs are important for broad systemic control of infections. The intestine is a particular site of interest for exploring these effects, as in addition to being the port of entry for a multitude of pathogens, it is a complex tissue with a variety of cell types as well as the presence of the intestinal microbiota. Here we focus on the roles of type I and III IFNs in control of enteric viruses, discussing what is known about signaling downstream from these cytokines, including induction of specific IFN-stimulated genes. We review viral strategies to evade IFN responses, effects of IFNs on the intestine, interactions between IFNs and the microbiota, and briefly discuss the role of IFNs in controlling viral infections at other barrier sites. Enhanced understanding of the coordinate roles of IFNs in control of viral infections may facilitate development of antiviral therapeutic strategies; here we highlight potential avenues for future exploration.

  2. One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III).

    Guo, Shaofen; Cao, Rui; Lu, Aihua; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Li, Chaojun; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III) was investigated using some biophysical and biochemical methods. Firstly, it was found that a large amount of Tb(III) can be distributed on the cell wall, that some Tb(III) can enter into the horseradish cell, indicating that peroxidase was mainly distributed on cell wall, and thus that Tb(III) would interact with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the plant. In addition, peroxidase bioactivity was decreased in the presence of Tb(III). Secondly, a new peroxidase-containing Tb(III) complex (Tb-HRP) was obtained from horseradish after treatment with Tb(III); the molecular mass of Tb-HRP is near 44 kDa and the pI is about 8.80. Thirdly, the electrocatalytic activity of Tb-HRP is much lower than that of HRP obtained from horseradish without treatment with Tb(III). The decrease in the activity of Tb-HRP is due to the destruction (unfolding) of the conformation in Tb-HRP. The planarity of the heme active center in the Tb-HRP molecule was increased and the extent of exposure of Fe(III) in heme was decreased, leading to inhibition of the electron transfer. The microstructure change in Tb-HRP might be the result of the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish.

  3. Effect of Class III bone anchor treatment on airway.

    Nguyen, Tung; De Clerck, Hugo; Wilson, Michael; Golden, Brent

    2015-07-01

    To compare airway volumes and minimum cross-section area changes of Class III patients treated with bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) versus untreated Class III controls. Twenty-eight consecutive skeletal Class III patients between the ages of 10 and 14 years (mean age, 11.9 years) were treated using Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (two in the infra-zygomatic crests of the maxilla and two in the anterior mandible). The subjects had cone beam computed tomographs (CBCTs) taken before initial loading (T1) and 1 year out (T2). Twenty-eight untreated Class III patients (mean age, 12.4 years) had CBCTs taken and cephalograms generated. The airway volumes and minimum cross-sectional area measurements were performed using Dolphin Imaging 11.7 3D software. The superior border of the airway was defined by a plane that passes through the posterior nasal spine and basion, while the inferior border included the base of the epiglottis to the lower border of C3. From T1 to T2, airway volume from BAMP-treated subjects showed a statistically significant increase (1499.64 mm(3)). The area in the most constricted section of the airway (choke point) increased slightly (15.44 mm(2)). The airway volume of BAMP patients at T2 was 14136.61 mm(3), compared with 14432.98 mm(3) in untreated Class III subjects. Intraexaminer correlation coefficients values and 95% confidence interval values were all greater than .90, showing a high degree of reliability of the measurements. BAMP treatment did not hinder the development of the oropharynx.

  4. Collagen Type III and VI Turnover in Response to Long-Term Immobilization.

    Shu Sun

    Full Text Available Muscle mass and function are perturbed by immobilization and remobilization. When muscle mass changes, the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix protein, particularly the collagens, change with it. In this study, we investigated the temporal profile of three peptide biomarkers derived from turnover of collagen type III and type VI in a long-term immobilization and remobilization study. We also compared individual biomarker levels with Lean body Mass (LBM and changes therein, hypothesizing that these biomarkers would be biomarkers of the remodeling processes associated with immobilization and/or remobilization.In the Berlin bed rest study, 20 young men were recruited and randomly assigned to 8-week's strict bed rest with or without resistive vibration exercise countermeasure. We measured three neo-epitope ELISA kits in the serum samples of this study: Pro-C3, measured the synthesis of collagen type III; Pro-C6, measured the synthesis of collagen type VI; and C6M measured the degradation of collagen type VI induced by MMP-2 and MMP-9 cleavage.Pro-C3 and Pro-C6 biomarkers are up-regulated with both immobilization and remobilization, whereas C6M is hardly affected at all. We found that Pro-C3 and C6M levels are related to LBM at baseline and that high levels of Pro-C6 are associated with smaller changes in muscle mass during both immobilization and remobilization.The Pro-C3 and-C6 biomarkers change likely reflect remodeling changes in response to unloading or reloading, whereas C6M does not appear to respond to unloading. Pro-C3 and C6M levels correlate with LBM at baseline, while Pro-C6 is related to the anabolic and catabolic responses to unloading and reloading.

  5. Salmonella Typhimurium type III secretion effectors stimulate innate immune responses in cultured epithelial cells.

    Vincent M Bruno

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of conserved bacterial products by innate immune receptors leads to inflammatory responses that control pathogen spread but that can also result in pathology. Intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to bacterial products and therefore must prevent signaling through innate immune receptors to avoid pathology. However, enteric pathogens are able to stimulate intestinal inflammation. We show here that the enteric pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium can stimulate innate immune responses in cultured epithelial cells by mechanisms that do not involve receptors of the innate immune system. Instead, S. Typhimurium stimulates these responses by delivering through its type III secretion system the bacterial effector proteins SopE, SopE2, and SopB, which in a redundant fashion stimulate Rho-family GTPases leading to the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and NF-kappaB signaling. These observations have implications for the understanding of the mechanisms by which Salmonella Typhimurium induces intestinal inflammation as well as other intestinal inflammatory pathologies.

  6. Possible effects of basel III accord on Turkish banking system

    Çölgezen, Petek

    2013-01-01

    138 pages Bu tez Basel Komitesinin Basel I ve Basel II uzlaşılarında görülen eksiklikleri gidermek için Basel III Uzlaşısı adı altında getirdiği yeni düzenlemelere, uygulanmış olan uzlaşıların Türkiye ve bütün dünyada yarattığı pozitif ve negatif etkilere ve henüz uygulanmamış olan Basel III Uzlaşısının olası etkilerine değinmek amacıyla hazırlanmıştır. Bu amaçla akademik araştırma yapılarak Basel I, Basel II, Basel 2.5 ve Basel III uzlaşılarının temel kuralları ve hedefleri ayrıntılı b...

  7. Enrichment of Geobacter species in response to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in sandy aquifer sediments

    Snoeyenbos-West, O.L.; Nevin, K.P.; Anderson, R.T.; Lovely, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Engineered stimulation of Fe(III) has been proposed as a strategy to enhance the immobilization of radioactive and toxic metals in metal-contaminated subsurface environments. Therefore, laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine which microbial populations would respond to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in the sediments of sandy aquifers. In laboratory studies, the addition of either various organic electron donors or electron shuttle compounds stimulated Fe(III) reduction and resulted in Geobacter sequences becoming important constituents of the Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences that could be detected with PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Quantification of Geobacteraceae sequences with a PCR most-probable-number technique indicated that the extent to which numbers of Geobacter increased was related to the degree of stimulation of Fe(III) reduction. Geothrix species were also enriched in some instances, but were orders of magnitude less numerous than Geobacter species. Shewanella species were not detected, even when organic compounds known to be electron donors for Shewanella species were used to stimulate Fe(III) reduction in the sediments. Geobacter species were also enriched in two field experiments in which Fe(III) reduction was stimulated with the addition of benzoate or aromatic hydrocarbons. The apparent growth of Geobacter species concurrent with increased Fe(III) reduction suggests that Geobacter species were responsible for much of the Fe(III) reduction in all of the stimulation approaches evaluated in three geographically distinct aquifers. Therefore, strategies for subsurface remediation that involve enhancing the activity of indigenous Fe(III)-reducing populations in aquifers should consider the physiological properties of Geobacter species in their treatment design.

  8. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under either...

  9. Effect of iron(III) ion on moso bamboo pyrolysis under microwave irradiation.

    Dong, Qing; Li, Xiangqian; Wang, Zhaoyu; Bi, Yanhong; Yang, Rongling; Zhang, Jinfeng; Luo, Hongzhen; Niu, Miaomiao; Qi, Bo; Lu, Chen

    2017-11-01

    The effect of iron(III) ion on microwave pyrolysis of moso bamboo was investigated. Hydrofluoric acid washing was used as a pilot process to demineralize moso bamboo in order to eliminate the influences of the other inorganics contained in moso bamboo itself. The results indicated that the addition of iron(III) ion increased the maximal reaction temperatures under microwave condition dependent on the amount of the added iron(III) ion. The production of the non-condensable gases was promoted by the addition of iron(III) ion mainly at the expense of liquid products. Iron(III) ion exhibited the positive effect for syngas production and inhibited the formation of CO 2 and CH 4 . The formation of Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 was found during microwave pyrolysis and the mechanism of the two metallic oxides formation was described in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HLA-D gene studies in relation to immune responsiveness to a grass allergen Lol p III.

    Ansari, A A; Shinomiya, N; Zwollo, P; Marsh, D G

    1991-01-01

    The grass pollen allergen Lol p III (Mr 11,000) is a well-characterized antigen that has been found useful in immunogenetic studies of human immune responsiveness. Since immune responsiveness to this allergen is associated with HLA-DR3, we investigated whether there was any sequence in the HLA-D region that would render a person "susceptible" [antibody (Ab)-positive] to the allergen. By sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) slot-blot and sequence analyses of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from Lol p III responder and nonresponder subjects, Ab responsiveness was found to be strongly associated with the sequence Glu-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser (EYSTS), present in the first polymorphic regions of DR beta I polypeptide chains of DR3, DR11 (split of DR5), and DRw6. Of the 41 grass-allergic subjects investigated, 19 had the EYSTS sequence, of whom 18 (95%) were Lol p III immunoglobulin G (IgG) Ab responders; among the 22 EYSTS- subjects, ten were Lol p III responders (P = 0.001, relative risk = 21.6). No such association was found with any polymorphic sequences in other DR beta chains, or in DQ alpha I and DQ beta I chains. These findings suggest that the EYSTS sequence is important in the presentation of an epitope of Lol p III; other sequence(s) may be involved in the presentation of other epitope(s). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a strong association between a specific HLA sequence and immune responsiveness to a well-defined antigen. The paper shows that presence of the EYSTS sequence classifies subjects as Lol p III responders in 18/19 cases.

  11. Involvement of Cholinergic and Adrenergic Receptors in Pathogenesis and Inflammatory Response Induced by Alpha-Neurotoxin Bot III of Scorpion Venom.

    Nakib, Imene; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Bot III neurotoxin is the most lethal α neurotoxin purified from Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion venom. This toxin binds to the voltage-gated sodium channel of excitable cells and blocks its inactivation, inducing an increased release of neurotransmitters (acetylcholine and catecholamines). This study aims to elucidate the involvement of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in pathogenesis and inflammatory response triggered by this toxin. Injection of Bot III to animals induces an increase of peroxidase activities, an imbalance of oxidative status, tissue damages in lung parenchyma, and myocardium correlated with metabolic disorders. The pretreatment with nicotine (nicotinic receptor agonist) or atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) protected the animals from almost all disorders caused by Bot III toxin, especially the immunological alterations. Bisoprolol administration (selective β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist) was also efficient in the protection of animals, mainly on tissue damage. Propranolol (non-selective adrenergic receptor antagonist) showed less effect. These results suggest that both cholinergic and adrenergic receptors are activated in the cardiopulmonary manifestations induced by Bot III. Indeed, the muscarinic receptor appears to be more involved than the nicotinic one, and the β1 adrenergic receptor seems to dominate the β2 receptor. These results showed also that the activation of nicotinic receptor leads to a significant protection of animals against Bot III toxin effect. These findings supply a supplementary data leading to better understanding of the mechanism triggered by scorpionic neurotoxins and suggest the use of drugs targeting these receptors, especially the nicotinic one in order to counteract the inflammatory response observed in scorpion envenomation.

  12. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on domestic aramid fiber III reinforced bismaleimide composite interfacial properties

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Ping; Feng, Jiayue; Cui, Jinyuan; Yang, Faze

    2017-12-01

    Domestic Aramid Fiber III (DAF III) was modified by oxygen plasma treatment. The fiber surface characteristics was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results showed that oxygen plasma treatment changed surface morphologies. The effects of oxygen plasma treatment on DAF III reinforced bismaleimides (BMI) composite bending and interfacial properties were investigated, respectively. The ILSS value increased from 49.3 MPa to 56.0 MPa (by 13.5%) after oxygen plasma treatment. The bending strength changed a little. Furthermore, the composite rupture mode changed from interfacial rupture to fiber or resin bulk rupture.

  13. The Effect of Excipients on the Permeability of BCS Class III Compounds and Implications for Biowaivers

    Parr, Alan; Hidalgo, Ismael J.; Bode, Chris; Brown, William; Yazdanian, Mehran; Gonzalez, Mario A.; Sagawa, Kazuko; Miller, Kevin; Jiang, Wenlei; Stippler, Erika S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Currently, the FDA allows biowaivers for Class I (high solubility and high permeability) and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Scientific evidence should be provided to support biowaivers for BCS Class I and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds. Methods Data on the effects of excipients on drug permeability are needed to demonstrate that commonly used excipients do not affect the permea...

  14. The Effect of Excipients on the Permeability of BCS Class III Compounds and Implications for Biowaivers.

    Parr, Alan; Hidalgo, Ismael J; Bode, Chris; Brown, William; Yazdanian, Mehran; Gonzalez, Mario A; Sagawa, Kazuko; Miller, Kevin; Jiang, Wenlei; Stippler, Erika S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the FDA allows biowaivers for Class I (high solubility and high permeability) and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Scientific evidence should be provided to support biowaivers for BCS Class I and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds. Data on the effects of excipients on drug permeability are needed to demonstrate that commonly used excipients do not affect the permeability of BCS Class III compounds, which would support the application of biowaivers to Class III compounds. This study was designed to generate such data by assessing the permeability of four BCS Class III compounds and one Class I compound in the presence and absence of five commonly used excipients. The permeability of each of the compounds was assessed, at three to five concentrations, with each excipient in two different models: Caco-2 cell monolayers, and in situ rat intestinal perfusion. No substantial increases in the permeability of any of the compounds were observed in the presence of any of the tested excipients in either of the models, with the exception of disruption of Caco-2 cell monolayer integrity by sodium lauryl sulfate at 0.1 mg/ml and higher. The results suggest that the absorption of these four BCS Class III compounds would not be greatly affected by the tested excipients. This may have implications in supporting biowaivers for BCS Class III compounds in general.

  15. Effects of ionic strength on the coordination of Eu(III) and Cm(III) to a Gram-negative bacterium, Paracoccus denitrificans

    Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Kimura, T.; Francis, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effect of ionic strength on the interactions of Europium(III) and Curium(III) with a Gram-negative bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans. Bacterial cells grown in 0.5-, 3.5-, and 5.0% NaCl were used in adsorption experiments and laser experiments that were performed at the same ionic strengths as those in the original growth media. The distribution ratio (log K d ) for Eu(III) and Cm(III) was determined at pHs 3-5. To elucidate the coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on P. denitrificans, we estimated the number of water molecules in the inner sphere and strength of the ligand field by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at pHs 4-6. The log K d of Eu(III) and Cm(III) increased with an increase of pH at all ionic strengths because there was less competition for ligands in cells with H + at higher pHs, wherein less H + was present in solution: cation adsorption generally occurs through an exchange with H + on the functional groups of coordination sites. No significant differences were observed in the log K d of Eu(III) and Cm(III) at each pH in 0.5-, 3.5-, and 5.0% NaCl solutions, though competition for ligands with Na + would be expected to increase at higher NaCl concentrations. The log K d of Eu(III) was almost equivalent to that of Cm(III) under all the experimental conditions. TRLFS showed that the coordination environments of Eu(III) did not differ from each other at 0.5-, 3.5-, and 5.0% NaCl at pHs 4-6. TRLFS also showed that the characteristic of the coordination environment of Eu(III) on P. denitrificans was similar to that on a halophile, Nesterenkonia halobia, while it significantly differed from that on a non-halophile, Pseudomonas putida. These findings indicate that the number of coordination sites for Eu(III) on P. denitrificans, whose cell surface may have similar structures to that of halophiles, increased with increasing ionic strength, though their structure remained unchanged. (orig.)

  16. Noncanonical Effects of IRF9 in Intestinal Inflammation: More than Type I and Type III Interferons.

    Rauch, Isabella; Rosebrock, Felix; Hainzl, Eva; Heider, Susanne; Majoros, Andrea; Wienerroither, Sebastian; Strobl, Birgit; Stockinger, Silvia; Kenner, Lukas; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription factor with its Stat1, Stat2, and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits is employed for transcriptional responses downstream of receptors for type I interferons (IFN-I) that include IFN-α and IFN-β and type III interferons (IFN-III), also called IFN-λ. Here, we show in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis that IRF9 deficiency protects animals, whereas the combined loss of IFN-I and IFN-III receptors worsens their condition. We explain the different phenotypes by demonstrating a function of IRF9 in a noncanonical transcriptional complex with Stat1, apart from IFN-I and IFN-III signaling. Together, Stat1 and IRF9 produce a proinflammatory activity that overrides the benefits of the IFN-III response on intestinal epithelial cells. Our results further suggest that the CXCL10 chemokine gene is an important mediator of this proinflammatory activity. We thus establish IFN-λ as a potentially anticolitogenic cytokine and propose an important role for IRF9 as a component of noncanonical Stat complexes in the development of colitis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  18. The effect of types I and III interferons on adrenocortical cells and its possible implications for autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Hellesen, A; Edvardsen, K; Breivik, L; Husebye, E S; Bratland, E

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is caused by selective destruction of the hormone-producing cells of the adrenal cortex. As yet, little is known about the potential role played by environmental factors in this process. Type I and/or type III interferons (IFNs) are signature responses to virus infections, and have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune endocrine disorders such as type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis. Transient development of AAD and exacerbation of established or subclinical disease, as well as the induction of autoantibodies associated with AAD, have been reported following therapeutic administration of type I IFNs. We therefore hypothesize that exposure to such IFNs could render the adrenal cortex susceptible to autoimmune attack in genetically predisposed individuals. In this study, we investigated possible immunopathological effects of type I and type III IFNs on adrenocortical cells in relation to AAD. Both types I and III IFNs exerted significant cytotoxicity on NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells and potentiated IFN-γ- and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly (I : C)]-induced chemokine secretion. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules and up-regulation of 21-hydroxylase, the primary antigenic target in AAD. We propose that these combined effects could serve to initiate or aggravate an ongoing autoimmune response against the adrenal cortex in AAD. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  19. Distinct Molecular Effects of Angiotensin II and Angiotensin III in Rat Astrocytes

    Michelle A. Clark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that central effects of angiotensin (Ang II may be indirect due to rapid conversion to Ang III by aminopeptidase A (APA. Previously, we showed that Ang II and Ang III induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases ERK1/2 and stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNK phosphorylation in cultured rat astrocytes. Most importantly, both peptides were equipotent in causing phosphorylation of these MAP kinases. In these studies, we used brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes to determine whether Ang II’s phosphorylation of these MAP kinases is due to the conversion of the peptide to Ang III. We pretreated astrocytes with 10 μM amastatin A or 100 μM glutamate phosphonate, selective APA inhibitors, prior to stimulating with either Ang II or Ang III. Both peptides were equipotent in stimulating ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. The APA inhibitors failed to prevent Ang II- and Ang III-mediated phosphorylation of the MAP kinases. Further, pretreatment of astrocytes with the APA inhibitors did not affect Ang II- or Ang III-induced astrocyte growth. These findings suggest that both peptides directly induce phosphorylation of these MAP kinases as well as induce astrocyte growth. These studies establish both peptides as biologically active with similar intracellular and physiological effects.

  20. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes

  1. Rotifer neuropharmacology--III. Adrenergic drug effects on Brachionus plicatilis.

    Keshmirian, J; Nogrady, T

    1987-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) induces three pharmacological effects in Brachionus plicatilis. As a result of excitation the rate of ciliary motion and swimming increases, and the animals flip their foot constantly at a rapid rate. This rapid foot flipping was used as a specific model to measure adrenergic effects in B. plicatilis. Phenylephrine induces the same effect at identical efficacy, while isoproterenol and salbutamol, two beta-agonists, show one-half and one-tenth NE efficacy. The beta blocker propranolol and the alpha blocker tolazoline both antagonize foot flipping induced by NE. However, propranolol shows antagonism because it causes foot paralysis by itself. Timolol, another beta blocker but without the membrane effect of propranolol, does not antagonize the alpha receptor mediated NE effect, nor does it cause foot paralysis. Propranolol, timolol and tolazoline also show agonist activity, inducing foot flipping. NE does not antagonize the foot paralysis induced by propranolol, only its anesthetic effect by delaying its onset. These results indicate that the foot flipping induced by NE is a receptor-mediated alpha adrenergic effect, while the foot paralysis is caused by membrane phenomena.

  2. The Dynamics of an Impulsive Predator-Prey System with Stage Structure and Holling Type III Functional Response

    Zhixiang Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the biological resource management of natural resources, a stage-structured predator-prey model with Holling type III functional response, birth pulse, and impulsive harvesting at different moments is proposed in this paper. By applying comparison theorem and some analysis techniques, the global attractivity of predator-extinction periodic solution and the permanence of this system are studied. At last, examples and numerical simulations are given to verify the validity of the main results.

  3. pH-Responsive Fe(III)-Gallic Acid Nanoparticles for In Vivo Photoacoustic-Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Yong; Wen, Ling; Chen, Ling; Li, Zhen; Wu, Yongyou; Gao, Mingyuan; Chai, Zhifang

    2016-04-06

    pH-responsive biocompatible Fe(III)-gallic acid nanoparticles with strong near-infrared absorbance are very stable in mild acidic conditions, but easily decomposed in neutral conditions, which enables the nanoparticles to be stable in a tumor and easily metabolized in other organs, thus providing a safe nanoplatform for in vivo photoacoustic imaging/photothermal therapy theranostic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Antigen modulation of the immune response. III. Evaluation of the hypothetical short-lived memory cell

    Feldbush, T.L.; Lande, I.; Bryan, B.; O'Neill, E.

    1974-01-01

    The putative short-lived memory cells, whose existence has been suggested by the results of secondary adoptive transfer experiments, were investigated. On the basis of the following evidences we have concluded that the short-lived memory cell is probably an artifact of the adoptive transfer technique: when immune thoracic duct lymphocytes, known to consist predominantly of long-lived memory cells, were transferred to irradiated recipients and challenged at various times after transfer, approximately 80 to 90 percent of the initial response was absent by Day 14 challenge; preirradiating adoptive recipients with increasing dose of x-irradiation tended to lengthen the observed half life of memory cells; single or multiple treatments of immune donors with 0.3 mg Vinblastin before transfer resulted in neither a depression of the initial secondary response nor an alteration in the rate of decline of the memory potential; reconstitution of irradiated hosts with normal spleen cells one day before transfer of memory cells and challenge resulted in inhibition of the adoptive secondary response; and the transfer of memory cells to antigen free intermediate hosts, in which they were allowed to reside for one day or fourteen days before transfer to irradiated recipients, resulted in only a slight decline in their capacity to respond. We propose that the rapid decline of memory potential in adoptive recipients challenged at various times after transfer is due to modulating effects by the hosts as it recovers from irradiation. These effects may be the result of cell crowding or the loss of irradiation-produced stimulatory factors. The relevance of these findings to adoptive transfer systems in general and the secondary response of intact animals is discussed

  5. Antithrombin III prevents deleterious effects of remote ischemia-reperfusion injury on healing of colonic anastomoses.

    Tekin, Koray; Aytekin, Faruk; Ozden, Akin; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Erdem, Ergün; Sungurtekin, Ugur; Güney, Yildiz

    2002-08-01

    Antithrombin III is known as the most important natural inhibitor of thrombin activity and has been shown to attenuate local harmful effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury in many organs. In recent animal studies, delaying effect of remote organ ischemia-reperfusion injury on healing of intestinal anastomoses has been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated whether antithrombin III reduces deleterious systemic effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury on healing of colonic anastomoses in rats. Anastomosis of the left colon was performed in 24 rats that were divided into three groups: sham operated control (group I, n = 8), 30 minutes of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by superior mesenteric artery occlusion (group II, n = 8), antithrombin III treated group (250 U/kg before and after the ischemia-reperfusion, group III, n = 8). On postoperative day 6, all animals were sacrificed, and bursting pressure and tissue hydroxyproline content of the anastomoses were assessed and compared. On postoperative day 6 the mean bursting pressures were 149.6 +/- 4.8, 69.8 +/- 13.5, and 121.8 +/- 8.7 mm Hg for groups I, II, and III, respectively (P = 0.000). Mean tissue hydroxyproline concentration values were 389.5 +/- 29.6, 263.1 +/- 10.0, and 376.0 +/- 33.8 microg/mg for groups I, II, III respectively (P = 0.005). This study showed that, antithrombin III treatment significantly prevented the delaying effect of remote organ ischemia-reperfusion injury on anastomotic healing in the colon. Further clinical studies are needed to clarify whether antithrombin may be a useful therapeutic agent to increase the safety of the anastomosis during particular operations where remote organ ischemia-reperfusion injury takes place.

  6. Doorways III: Teacher Reference Materials. On School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). This booklet, "Doorways III: Teacher Reference Materials on School-Related…

  7. Metal-poor star formation triggered by the feedback effects from Pop III stars

    Chiaki, Gen; Susa, Hajime; Hirano, Shingo

    2018-04-01

    Metal enrichment by first-generation (Pop III) stars is the very first step of the matter cycle in structure formation and it is followed by the formation of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. To investigate the enrichment process by Pop III stars, we carry out a series of numerical simulations including the feedback effects of photoionization and supernovae (SNe) of Pop III stars with a range of masses of minihaloes (MHs), Mhalo, and Pop III stars, MPopIII. We find that the metal-rich ejecta reach neighbouring haloes and external enrichment (EE) occurs when the H II region expands before the SN explosion. The neighbouring haloes are only superficially enriched, and the metallicity of the clouds is [Fe/H] < -5. Otherwise, the SN ejecta fall back and recollapse to form an enriched cloud, i.e. an internal-enrichment (IE) process takes place. In the case where a Pop III star explodes as a core-collapse SN (CCSN), the MH undergoes IE, and the metallicity in the recollapsing region is -5 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -3 in most cases. We conclude that IE from a single CCSN can explain the formation of EMP stars. For pair-instability SNe (PISNe), EE takes place for all relevant mass ranges of MHs, consistent with the lack of observational signs of PISNe among EMP stars.

  8. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

    Monica Poggianella

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  9. Effects of reactive Mn(III)-oxalate complexes on structurally intact plant cell walls

    Summering, J. A.; Keiluweit, M.; Goni, M. A.; Nico, P. S.; Kleber, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lignin components in the in plant litter are commonly assumed to have longer residence times in soil than many other compounds, which are supposedly, more easily degradable. The supposed resistance of lignin compounds to decomposition is generally attributed to the complex chain of biochemical steps required to create footholds in the non-porous structure of ligno-cellulose in cell walls. Interestingly, Mn(III) complexes have shown the ability to degrade ligno-cellulose. Mn(III) chelated by ligands such as oxalate are soluble oxidizers with a high affinity for lignin structures. Here we determined (i) the formation and decay kinetics of the Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in aqueous solution and (ii) the effects that these complexes have on intact ligno-cellulose. UV/vis spectroscopy and iodometric titrations confirmed the transient nature of Mn(III)-oxalate complexes with decay rates being in the order of hours. Zinnia elegans tracheary elements - a model ligno-cellulose substrate - were treated with Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in a newly developed flow-through reactor. Soluble decomposition products released during the treatment were analyzed by GC/MS and the degree of cell integrity was measured by cell counts, pre- and post-treatment counts indicate a decrease in intact Zinnia elegans as a result of Mn(III)-treatment. GC/MS results showed the release of a multitude of solubilized lignin breakdown products from plant cell walls. We conclude that Mn(III)-oxalate complexes have the ability to lyse intact plant cells and solubilize lignin. Lignin decomposition may thus be seen as resource dependent, with Mn(III) a powerful resource that should be abundant in terrestrial characterized by frequent redox fluctuations.

  10. Effects of Al(III and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    Rong Fu Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT modified glass carbon electrode (GCE. The results showed that Al(III and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  11. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  12. Effect of pH on stability constants of Am(III)- and Cm(III)- humate complexes

    Samadfam, Mohammad; Jintoku, Takashi; Sato, Seichi; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Hara, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yoshimitsu

    1999-01-01

    The apparent stability constants of Am(III)- and Cm(III)-humate complexes were determined by dialysis method at ionic strength 0.1 in the pH range from 3.3 to 5.7 under N 2 bubbling. The Am(III) and Cm(III) loadings were about 10 -7 and 10 -10 mol/dm 3 . The concentrations of Am-241 and Cm-242 tracers were measured by α-spectrometry. It was found that the apparent stability constants were almost identical for both the Am(III)-humate and Cm(III)-humate complexes. The apparent stability constants showed a small pH-dependence, increasing from 10 4.6 at pH 3.3 to 10 5.1 at pH 5.7. The ionization of acidic functional groups of humic acid is possibly the primary factor. Above pH 6, the dialysis membrane was no langer permeable to Am(III) and Cm(III) ions and the apparent stability constant could not be experimentally obtained. The apparent stability constants between pH 6 and pH 8.5 were evaluated by considering that both binary metal-humate and ternary metal-hydroxo-humate complexes exist at pHs above 6. It was assumed that mono-hydroxo-humate complex Am(OH)HA and Cm(OH)HA are the major ternary complexes that exist below pH 9. The overall stability constants for Am(III)- and Cm(III)-humate complexes increased from 10 5.7 at pH 6 to 10 7.2 at pH 8. This implies that the formation of metal-hydroxo-humate species is preferred over the formation of hydroxide species. The apparent overall stability constants can be easily incorporated into geochemical modeling of trivalent actinide migration. The results of the present study show that the apparent stability constants determined experimentally at pH≤6 do not represent the complexation properties at higher pHs and the formation of ternary complexes should be considered in speciation calculations of radionuclides at terrestrial environment. (J.P.N.)

  13. Speciation of Am(III)/Eu(III) sorbed on γ-alumina. Effect of metal ion concentration

    Kumar, S.; Tomar, B.S.; Godbole, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the speciation of Am(III)/Eu(III) sorbed on γ-alumina, and its evolution with changing metal ion concentration, studied using batch sorption experiment, time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and surface Complexation modeling (SCM). Though numerous studies exist in the literature on the speciation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides on alumina surface, the mechanism of sorption at high metal ion concentrations is not yet fully understood. Batch sorption experiments of Am(III) on γ-alumina under varying condition of pH (3-10), ionic strength (0.005-0.1 M NaClO 4 ) and metal ion concentration (10 -7 -10 -4 M) were performed. Higher metal ion concentration was achieved by the addition of Eu(III) considering it as an analogue of Am(III). Time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) study of Eu(III) sorbed on γ-alumina at the metal ion concentration of 5.0 x 10 -5 M was carried out over pH 4 to 7. TRFS showed the presence of two surface species, with distinctly different fluorescence decay life times. The shorter lifetime value and its changing pattern with pH indicate the surface species corresponding to this component to be monodentate species > AlOAm 2+ and its hydrolyzed forms. The sorbed Eu 3+ species corresponding to the longer lifetime value has 2-3 water molecules in its first coordination sphere and is multidentate in its binding on alumina surface. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement of Eu:γ-Al 2 O 3 sorption systems at pH 6.18 and 7.15 corroborate the existence of two surface complexes. Further it suggests the edge sharing bidentate binding of Eu on AlO 6 octahedra as the co-ordination mode of the higher lifetime component. Surface Complexation Modeling (SCM) of Am(III)/Eu(III) sorption onto γ-alumina at pH ≤7 has been carried out using these two surface species. 2-pK surface complexation modeling coupled with constant capacitance model

  14. The glycomic effect of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III overexpression in metastatic melanoma cells. GnT-III modifies highly branched N-glycans.

    Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Bubka, Monika; Balog, Crina I A; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Butters, Terry D; Wuhrer, Manfred; Lityńska, Anna

    2018-04-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) is known to catalyze N-glycan "bisection" and thereby modulate the formation of highly branched complex structures within the Golgi apparatus. While active, it inhibits the action of other GlcNAc transferases such as GnT-IV and GnT-V. Moreover, GnT-III is considered as an inhibitor of the metastatic potential of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of GnT-III may be more diverse and depend on the cellular context. We describe the detailed glycomic analysis of the effect of GnT-III overexpression in WM266-4-GnT-III metastatic melanoma cells. We used MALDI-TOF and ESI-ion-trap-MS/MS together with HILIC-HPLC of 2-AA labeled N-glycans to study the N-glycome of membrane-attached and secreted proteins. We found that the overexpression of GnT-III in melanoma leads to the modification of a broad range of N-glycan types by the introduction of the "bisecting" GlcNAc residue with highly branched complex structures among them. The presence of these unusual complex N-glycans resulted in stronger interactions of cellular glycoproteins with the PHA-L. Based on the data presented here we conclude that elevated activity of GnT-III in cancer cells does not necessarily lead to a total abrogation of the formation of highly branched glycans. In addition, the modification of pre-existing N-glycans by the introduction of "bisecting" GlcNAc can modulate their capacity to interact with carbohydrate-binding proteins such as plant lectins. Our results suggest further studies on the biological function of "bisected" oligosaccharides in cancer cell biology and their interactions with carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  15. Dengue-1 envelope protein domain III along with PELC and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides synergistically enhances immune responses.

    Chen-Yi Chiang

    Full Text Available The major weaknesses of subunit vaccines are their low immunogenicity and poor efficacy. Adjuvants can help to overcome some of these inherent defects with subunit vaccines. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of the newly developed water-in-oil-in-water multiphase emulsion system, termed PELC, in potentiating the protective capacity of dengue-1 envelope protein domain III. Unlike aluminum phosphate, dengue-1 envelope protein domain III formulated with PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induced neutralizing antibodies against dengue-1 virus and increased the splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ after in vitro re-stimulation. The induced antibodies contained both the IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses. A rapid anamnestic neutralizing antibody response against a live dengue virus challenge was elicited at week 26 after the first immunization. These results demonstrate that PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides broaden the dengue-1 envelope protein domain III-specific immune responses. PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides is a promising adjuvant for recombinant protein based vaccination against dengue virus.

  16. Effect of age on proximal esophageal response to swallowing

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been demonstrated that the ageing process affects esophageal motility. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the age on the proximal esophageal response to wet swallows. METHOD: We measured the proximal esophageal response to swallows of a 5 mL bolus of water in 69 healthy volunteers, 20 of them aged 18-30 years (group I, 27 aged 31-50 years (group II, and 22 aged 51-74 years (group III. We used the manometric method with continuous perfusion. The proximal esophageal contractions were recorded 5 cm from a pharyngeal recording site located 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter. The time between the onset of the pharyngeal and of the proximal esophageal recording (pharyngeal-esophageal time and the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of the proximal esophageal contraction were measured. RESULTS: The pharyngeal-esophageal time was shorter in group I subjects than in group II and III subjects (P<0.05. The duration of proximal esophageal contractions was longer in group I than in groups II and III (P<0.001. There was no differences between groups in the amplitude or area under the curve of contractions. There were no differences between groups II and III for any of the measurements. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the age may affects the response of the proximal esophagus to wet swallows.

  17. John L. LaBrecque Receives 2013 Edward A. Flinn III Award: Response

    LaBrecque, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Jean Bernard Minster and those who supported my nomination for the Edward A. Flinn III Award. We owe so much to colleagues such as Bernard Minster who support NASA and Earth Science with unrelenting and unselfish service. I am also grateful to my parents, the people of Lewiston, Maine, and the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) of 1958 for nurturing my early interest in science with an education that ultimately led me to Columbia University and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Lamont for me was a scientific wonderland tended by scientists with global appetites for discovery and adventure. Marine geophysics, geomagnetism, and satellite altimetry of the oceans were creating a revolution of discovery, and Lamont was the center of this revolution. I owe so much to my mentor and dear friend, Walter C. Pitman III, who showed me that great science was accomplished through boundless curiosity, perseverance, and, most of all, humility.

  18. Antiviral type I and type III interferon responses in the central nervous system.

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Kreit, Marguerite; Hermant, Pascale; Lardinois, Cécile; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    The central nervous system (CNS) harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i) preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii) the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii) the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv) the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  19. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Thomas Michiels

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  20. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer.

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Despite the presence of interplay effect, the

  1. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  2. Effects of PECS Phase III Application Training on Independent Mands in Young Children with Autism

    Love, Jessica June

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PECS phase III application training on independent mands in young children with autism. Participants were five children with autism ranging from ages 2 to 4 years old. A multiple baseline across participants was used to evaluate acquisition of independent correct mands across baseline and…

  3. Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) response to head impacts and potential implications for athletic headgear testing.

    Bartsch, Adam; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Morr, Douglas; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-09-01

    The Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) is the most widely used human impact testing surrogate and has historically been used in automotive or military testing. More recently, this ATD is finding use in applications evaluating athletic helmet protectivity, quantifying head impact dosage and estimating injury risk. But ATD head-neck response has not been quantified in omnidirectional athletic-type head impacts absent axial preload. It is probable that headgear injury reduction that can be quantified in a laboratory, including in American football, boxing, hockey, lacrosse and soccer, is related to a number of interrelated kinetic and kinematic factors, such as head center of gravity linear acceleration, head angular acceleration, head angular velocity, occipito-cervical mechanics and neck stiffness. Therefore, we characterized ATD head-neck dynamic response to direct head impacts in a series of front, oblique front and lateral head impacts. Key findings were: (1) impacts producing highest ATD resultant center of gravity linear acceleration resulted in the lowest resultant occipito-cervical spine bending moment/force. (2) Resultant ATD head angular velocity and angular acceleration did not appear coupled to impact direction at lower impact energy levels; these parameters were coupled at higher energy levels. (3) The ATD had progressively increasing occipito-cervical stiffness in extension, torsion and lateral bending, respectively. Because the ATD neck influenced head and neck impact dosage parameters, testing agencies, manufacturers and researchers should consider using the Hybrid III head form attached to a neck as a means to quantify head and neck injury risks as opposed to systems that do not utilize a neck. This heightened understanding of Hybrid III ATD head-neck response, and consideration of order of stiffest axes in the lateral, oblique and extension directions, respectively, should aid in the development of head and neck injury

  4. Hopf and Bautin Bifurcation in a Tritrophic Food Chain Model with Holling Functional Response Types III and IV

    Castellanos, Víctor; Castillo-Santos, Francisco Eduardo; Dela-Rosa, Miguel Angel; Loreto-Hernández, Iván

    In this paper, we analyze the Hopf and Bautin bifurcation of a given system of differential equations, corresponding to a tritrophic food chain model with Holling functional response types III and IV for the predator and superpredator, respectively. We distinguish two cases, when the prey has linear or logistic growth. In both cases we guarantee the existence of a limit cycle bifurcating from an equilibrium point in the positive octant of ℝ3. In order to do so, for the Hopf bifurcation we compute explicitly the first Lyapunov coefficient, the transversality Hopf condition, and for the Bautin bifurcation we also compute the second Lyapunov coefficient and verify the regularity conditions.

  5. Effective cancer vaccine platform based on attenuated salmonella and a type III secretion system.

    Xu, Xin; Hegazy, Wael A H; Guo, Linjie; Gao, Xiuhua; Courtney, Amy N; Kurbanov, Suhrab; Liu, Daofeng; Tian, Gengwen; Manuel, Edwin R; Diamond, Don J; Hensel, Michael; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines explored for cancer therapy have been based generally on injectable vector systems used to control foreign infectious pathogens, to which the immune system evolved to respond naturally. However, these vectors may not be effective at presenting tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to the immune system in a manner that is sufficient to engender antitumor responses. We addressed this issue with a novel orally administered Salmonella-based vector that exploits a type III secretion system to deliver selected TAA in the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells in situ. A systematic comparison of candidate genes from the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) locus was conducted in the vaccine design, using model antigens and a codon-optimized form of the human TAA survivin (coSVN), an oncoprotein that is overexpressed in most human cancers. In a screen of 20 SPI2 promoter:effector combinations, a PsifB::sseJ combination exhibited maximal potency for antigen translocation into the APC cytosol, presentation to CD8 T cells, and murine immunogenicity. In the CT26 mouse model of colon carcinoma, therapeutic vaccination with a lead PsifB::sseJ-coSVN construct (p8032) produced CXCR3-dependent infiltration of tumors by CD8 T cells, reversed the CD8:Treg ratio at the tumor site, and triggered potent antitumor activity. Vaccine immunogenicity and antitumor potency were enhanced by coadministration of the natural killer T-cell ligand 7DW8-5, which heightened the production of IL12 and IFNγ. Furthermore, combined treatment with p8032 and 7DW8-5 resulted in complete tumor regression in A20 lymphoma-bearing mice, where protective memory was demonstrated. Taken together, our results demonstrate how antigen delivery using an oral Salmonella vector can provide an effective platform for the development of cancer vaccines. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (˜10-6 to 10-2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) III and ΔKIII is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity Γ III, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces. The latter effect is found to be dependent upon the mode of applied loading (i.e., the presence of superimposed axial loads) and the crack length and torque level. Mechanistically, high-torque surfaces were transverse, macroscopically flat, and smeared. Lower torques showed additional axial cracks (longitudinal shear cracking) perpendicular to the main transverse surface. A micro-mechanical model for the main radi l Mode III growth, based on the premise that crack advance results from Mode II coalescence of microcracks initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front, is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔΓIII if local Mode II growth rates are

  7. Oil spills - effects and response

    Dicks, B.M.; White, I.C.

    1992-01-01

    The incidence of oil spills from offshore industry operates on the United Kingdom continental shelf is reported for the period 1979 to 1988. The properties of North Sea crude oils which determine their fate and effects when spilled onto the surface of the sea are summarized. Examples of oil impacts on specific North Sea habitats and communities are used to illustrate the effect of oil spills and the economic impact on human activities such as recreation, industry and fishing are considered. Since most oil spills will dissipate through natural processes if they remain at sea long enough, the most appropriate response to a spill from a platform in the middle of the sea is often aerial surveillance to monitor the movement and dissipation of the oil. However, if an active response is required, containment and collection of the oil or chemical dispersion are the two main options. In coastal waters, it will be necessary to focus protection efforts on selected sensitive areas of coastline. Once the oil is ashore there are still occasions when the best course of actions is to do nothing as clean-up operations may do more harm than good. If oil removal is feasible and necessary, the methods which are most effective are usually straightforward and require no sophisticated technology. Contingency planning is an essential preparation for all operations to deal with oil spills. (UK)

  8. Causal signal transmission by quantum fields. III: Coherent response of fermions

    Plimak, L.I.; Stenholm, S.

    2009-01-01

    Structural response properties of fermionic fields are investigated. In the presence of fermions the key technical concept becomes response combination, or R-normal product, of field operators. It generalises the notion of time-normal operator product to response problems. Time-normal products are a special case of R-normal products without inputs; this paper thus also generalises the concept of time-normal ordering to fermions. Explicit causality of R-normal products of arbitrary (bosonic and/or fermionic) field operators is proven, and explicit relations expressing them by conventional Green's functions of quantum field theory are derived

  9. Histopathological effects of Chromium (III Sulfate on Liver and Kidney of Swiss Albino Mice (Mus musculus

    Iffat Fatima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (III sulfate has various industrial applications and is widely used in leather industry due to its high tanning properties. Cr (III is required for efficient metabolism of fats and carbohydrates in traces. Various studies have reported that its constant exposure may lead to severe health problems in both animals and humans. In this study, histopathological effect of dietary Cr (III was evaluated on liver and kidneys of rodents. For this purpose, adult Swiss albino mice (n=25 were divided into different treatment and control groups (n=5/group after sufficient acclimatization. After 3 weeks of treatment, animals were sacrificed and observations regarding histopathology of liver and kidneys were made in all treatment groups and compared to control. Microscopy and photography was performed after processing the tissues according to standard protocol of sectioning and staining. Liver cross sections of treated animals showed signs of fibrosis in portal area, and congestion of sinusoid and central vein. Whereas, more pronounced effects of Cr (III toxicity were observed in kidneys. These include mononuclear cell infiltration, necrosis and contraction of glomerulus within Bowman’s capsule. However, No pathological changes were observed in control group. These results support the hypothesis that enhanced level of Cr (III contamination of food can induce both hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. These basic findings prove that currently increasing levels of trivalent chromium in environment are hazardous to living organisms. Therefore, to avoid health risks to both animals and humans, conversion of toxic chromium waste to less toxic compounds is required. Moreover, exposure level through any route should also be minimized.

  10. Genomic organization, sequence characterization and expression analysis of Tenebrio molitor apolipophorin-III in response to an intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes.

    Noh, Ju Young; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Tindwa, Hamisi; Seo, Gi Won; Kim, Dong Hyun; Patnaik, Hongray Howrelia; Jo, Yong Hun; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Bok Luel; Kim, Nam Jung; Han, Yeon Soo

    2014-01-25

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is a well-known hemolymph protein having a functional role in lipid transport and immune response of insects. We cloned full-length cDNA encoding putative apoLp-III from larvae of the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor (TmapoLp-III), by identification of clones corresponding to the partial sequence of TmapoLp-III, subsequently followed with full length sequencing by a clone-by-clone primer walking method. The complete cDNA consists of 890 nucleotides, including an ORF encoding 196 amino acid residues. Excluding a putative signal peptide of the first 20 amino acid residues, the 176-residue mature apoLp-III has a calculated molecular mass of 19,146Da. Genomic sequence analysis with respect to its cDNA showed that TmapoLp-III was organized into four exons interrupted by three introns. Several immune-related transcription factor binding sites were discovered in the putative 5'-flanking region. BLAST and phylogenetic analyses reveal that TmapoLp-III has high sequence identity (88%) with Tribolium castaneum apoLp-III but shares little sequence homologies (molitor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Flow Velocity Effects on Fe(III Clogging during Managed Aquifer Recharge Using Urban Storm Water

    Xinqiang Du

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Storm water harvesting and storage has been employed for nearly a hundred years, and using storm water to recharge aquifers is one of the most important ways to relieve water scarcity in arid and semi-arid regions. However, it cannot be widely adopted because of clogging problems. The risk of chemical clogging is mostly associated with iron oxyhydroxide precipitation; anhydrous ferric oxide (HFO clogging remains a problem in many wellfields. This paper investigates Fe(III clogging levels at three flow velocities (Darcy velocities, 0.46, 1.62 and 4.55 m/d. The results indicate that clogging increases with flow velocity, and is mostly affected by the first 0–3 cm of the column. The highest water velocity caused full clogging in 35 h, whereas the lowest took 53 h to reach an stable 60% reduction in hydraulic conductivity. For the high flow velocity, over 90% of the HFO was deposited in the 0–1 cm section. In contrast, the lowest flow velocity deposited only 75% in this section. Fe(III deposition was used as an approximation for Fe(OH3. High flow velocity may promote Fe(OH3 flocculent precipitate, thus increasing Fe(III deposition. The main mechanism for a porous matrix interception of Fe(III colloidal particles was surface filtration. Thus, the effects of deposition, clogging phenomena, and physicochemical mechanisms, are more significant at higher velocities.

  12. Impurity effect of iron(III) on the growth of potassium sulfate crystal in aqueous solution

    Kubota, Noriaki; Katagiri, Ken-ichi; Yokota, Masaaki; Sato, Akira; Yashiro, Hitoshi; Itai, Kazuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Growth rates of the {1 1 0} faces of a potassium sulfate crystal were measured in a flow cell in the presence of traces of impurity Fe(III) (up to 2 ppm) over the range of pH=2.5-6.0. The growth rate was significantly suppressed by the impurity. The effect became stronger as the impurity concentration was increased and at pH5 it finally disappeared completely. The concentration and supersaturation effects on the impurity action were reasonably explained with a model proposed by Kubota and Mullin [J. Crystal Growth, 152 (1995) 203]. The surface coverage of the active sites by Fe(III) is estimated to increase linearly on increasing its concentration in solution in the range examined by growth experiments. The impurity effectiveness factor is confirmed to increase inversely proportional to the supersaturation as predicted by the model. Apart from the discussion based on the model, the pH effect on the impurity action is qualitatively explained by assuming that the first hydrolysis product of aqua Fe(III) complex compound, [Fe(H 2O) 5(OH)] 2+, is both growth suppression and adsorption active, but the second hydrolysis product, [Fe(H 2O) 4(OH) 2] +, is only adsorption active.

  13. Treatment and posttreatment effects of mandibular cervical headgear followed by fixed appliances in Class III malocclusion.

    Rey, Diego; Angel, David; Oberti, Giovanni; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-03-01

    In this cephalometric investigation, we compared the treatment and posttreatment effects on patients undergoing an initial phase of mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) therapy followed later by comprehensive edgewise therapy with untreated Class III controls. The treated sample consisted of 21 patients treated consecutively with MCH before the pubertal growth spurt (average age, 10 years 2 months at the beginning of treatment). At the final observation period (average age, 15 years 3 months), all patients were in decelerative growth phases as determined by the cervical vertebral maturation method. Active treatment and posttreatment effects were evaluated in the treated group with nonparametric statistical analysis for paired samples. The treated sample was compared with a nonparametric statistical test for independent samples with 20 untreated Class III subjects who were matched for malocclusion, sex, and stage of cervical vertebral maturation to the treatment group. MCH therapy followed by fixed appliances was shown to be an effective treatment for the correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion at postpubertal observation. The favorable skeletal effects consisted mainly of smaller increases in mandibular length and advancement with respect to the controls, with the final outcome of significant improvements in the sagittal skeletal (+4 mm for the Wits appraisal) and dental (+2.7 mm for overjet, -4.4 mm for molar relationship) parameters. This treatment protocol also induced significant downward rotation of the mandible (2.8 degrees ).

  14. Three-Dimensional Vibration Isolator for Suppressing High-Frequency Responses for Sage III Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP)

    Li, Y.; Cutright, S.; Dyke, R.; Templeton, J.; Gasbarre, J.; Novak, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III - International Space Station (ISS) instrument will be used to study ozone, providing global, long-term measurements of key components of the Earth's atmosphere for the continued health of Earth and its inhabitants. SAGE III is launched into orbit in an inverted configuration on SpaceX;s Falcon 9 launch vehicle. As one of its four supporting elements, a Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP) mounted to the top panel of the Interface Adapter Module (IAM) box experiences high-frequency response due to structural coupling between the two structures during the SpaceX launch. These vibrations, which were initially observed in the IAM Engineering Development Unit (EDU) test and later verified through finite element analysis (FEA) for the SpaceX launch loads, may damage the internal electronic cards and the Thermoelectric Quartz Crystal Microbalance (TQCM) sensors mounted on the CMP. Three-dimensional (3D) vibration isolators were required to be inserted between the CMP and IAM interface in order to attenuate the high frequency vibrations without resulting in any major changes to the existing system. Wire rope isolators were proposed as the isolation system between the CMP and IAM due to the low impact to design. Most 3D isolation systems are designed for compression and roll, therefore little dynamic data was available for using wire rope isolators in an inverted or tension configuration. From the isolator FEA and test results, it is shown that by using the 3D wire rope isolators, the CMP high-frequency responses have been suppressed by several orders of magnitude over a wide excitation frequency range. Consequently, the TQCM sensor responses are well below their qualification environments. It is indicated that these high-frequency responses due to the typical instrument structural coupling can be significantly suppressed by a vibration passive control using the 3D vibration isolator. Thermal and contamination

  15. The effect of a single blade limiter on energetic neutral beam particles in Doublet III

    Petrie, T.W.; Armentrout, C.; Burrell, K.H.; Hino, T.; Kahn, C.; Kim, J.; Lohr, J.; Rottler, L.; Schissel, D.; St John, H.

    1984-01-01

    Energetic beam ion collisions with the main limiter can be a significant power loss process under certain operating conditions in Doublet III. Futhermore, these collisions may cause measurable damage to the limiter itself. Under low current and low toroidal field conditions (e.g., Isub(p) = 290 kA and Bsub(T) = 6.3 kG), 20-38% of the inferred absorbed beam power may be deposited directly on the ion drift side of the limiter by the beam ions. However, for higher plasma current and toroidal fields (e.g., Isub(p) = 480 kA and Bsub(t) = 15 kG), the fraction of inferred absorbed beam power deposited on the limiter is reduced to < 10%. Monte Carlo code simulations show that this loss of beam power is primarily a result of the large poloidal and toroidal gyro-orbits of the energetic beam ions. Other factors which may enhance beam ion losses to the limiter are (1) large separation distances between the primary limiter and the (outboard) vacuum vessel wall, and (2) plasma density buildup near the plasma edge during high gas puff operation. In addition, our data suggests enhanced plasma density and recycling near the limiter. This localized density can cause appreciable premature ionizations of the incoming beam neutrals and thus reduce the effective plasma heating of the beamline which is immediately upcurrent of the limiter. The prematurely-ionized beam particles from this adjacent beamline are responsible for much of the damage to the ion drift side of the limiter. We have found that under certain operating conditions (1) the direct beam heating of the limiter is 50% greater and (2) the stored plasma energy is 10% less when the beamline immediately upcurrent of the limiter heats the plasma. Thus, the relative positions of the limiters to the beamlines are important in designing future tokamaks. (orig.)

  16. A model of spin crossover in manganese(III) compounds: effects of intra- and intercenter interactions.

    Klokishner, Sophia I; Roman, Marianna A; Reu, Oleg S

    2011-11-21

    A microscopic approach to the problem of cooperative spin crossover in the [MnL2]NO3 crystal, which contains Mn(III) ions as structural units, is elaborated on, and the main mechanisms governing this effect are revealed. The proposed model also takes into account the splitting of the low-spin 3T1 (t(2)(4)) and high-spin 5E (t(2)(3)e) terms by the low-symmetry crystal field. The low-spin → high-spin transition has been considered as a cooperative phenomenon driven by interaction of the electronic shells of the Mn(III) ions with the all-around full-symmetric deformation that is extended over the crystal lattice via the acoustic phonon field. The model well explains the observed thermal dependencies of the magnetic susceptibility and the effective magnetic moment.

  17. Assessment of the transition strip effect in the transonic flow over the sounding rocket Sonda III

    Filho, J B P Falcão; Reis, M L C C; Francisco, C P F; Silva, L M

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of normalized pressure distribution are carried out over a 1:8 scale half-model of the Sonda III sounding rocket. The objective is to analyze the effect of the implementation of transition devices on the flow over the vehicle. Measurements show that the presence of the transition devices affect pressure distributions in different Mach numbers around the inter-stage region of Sonda III depending on its location and independently of the turbulent transition method employed. The study of these effects plays a significant role for future developments, since transition phenomena and the modification of the boundary layer behaviour due to the expansion can alter the load distributions and the turbulent structures of the flow. Furthermore, the experimental verification of such phenomena is crucial for the correct implementation of computational fluid dynamics calculations, as they might be able to capture the correct flow behaviour in these regions. (paper)

  18. Effects of Pop III to PopII transition on the lowest metallicity stars in dwarf galaxies

    Zhang, Yimiao; Keres, Dusan; FIRE Team

    2018-01-01

    We examine the effects of the enrichments from Population III (Pop III) stars on the formation and properties of the first generation of the Population II (Pop II) stars. Pop III stars begin to transition towards Pop II stars when the metals dispersed in Pop III supernovae pollute the nearby gas. However, details of this transition are still largely unknown. We use dwarf galaxy simulations from the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to identify the star-forming gas that is likely to be pre-enriched by Pop III supernovae and follow the stars that form in such gas. This pre-enrichment will leave the signature in the lowest metallicity stars that can be used to better constrain the details of the Pop III-to-Pop II transition.

  19. Adjuvant Autologous Melanoma Vaccine for Macroscopic Stage III Disease: Survival, Biomarkers, and Improved Response to CTLA-4 Blockade

    Michal Lotem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is not yet an agreed adjuvant treatment for melanoma patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages III B and C. We report administration of an autologous melanoma vaccine to prevent disease recurrence. Patients and Methods. 126 patients received eight doses of irradiated autologous melanoma cells conjugated to dinitrophenyl and mixed with BCG. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH response to unmodified melanoma cells was determined on the vaccine days 5 and 8. Gene expression analysis was performed on 35 tumors from patients with good or poor survival. Results. Median overall survival was 88 months with a 5-year survival of 54%. Patients attaining a strong DTH response had a significantly better (p=0.0001 5-year overall survival of 75% compared with 44% in patients without a strong response. Gene expression array linked a 50-gene signature to prognosis, including a cluster of four cancer testis antigens: CTAG2 (NY-ESO-2, MAGEA1, SSX1, and SSX4. Thirty-five patients, who received an autologous vaccine, followed by ipilimumab for progressive disease, had a significantly improved 3-year survival of 46% compared with 19% in nonvaccinated patients treated with ipilimumab alone (p=0.007. Conclusion. Improved survival in patients attaining a strong DTH and increased response rate with subsequent ipilimumab suggests that the autologous vaccine confers protective immunity.

  20. 75 FR 11530 - Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status

    2010-03-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status March 4, 2010. Docket Nos. Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC EG10-6-000 GardenGarden Wind, LLC EG10-7-000 Star Point Wind Project LLC EG10-8-000...

  1. THE NEW BASEL III REGULATIONS ON LIQUIDITY AND ITS POSSIBLE EFFECTS

    APĂTĂCHIOAE Adina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The global financial crisis determined a series of proposals to reform the regulatory framework that govern the banking sector in order to strengthen its resilience in poor circumstances. For this purpose, the provisions of Basel III regulatory package is reflected on the issues and risks that have caused the financial crisis, including those related to liquidity. The aim of this article is to present the new Basel III on liquidity rules, their implementation need to ensure financial stability and their possible effects. The objectives of Basel III in terms of liquidity are formulated to determine the increase in liquid assets and the reduction of the short-term funding. However, all measures taken through the new regulations can reduce the risks, but can not exclude the emergence of vulnerabilities affecting the banking system in the future. We believe that the new regulations have caused a series of reforms to the banking system, but the compliance degree of their implementation and the effects of new laws differs depending on the degree of development of each country, the main implications are differentiated by monetary transmission channels.

  2. [Comparison of the effects of phosphodiesterase III inhibitors, milrinone and olprinone, in infant corrective cardiac surgery].

    Sakimura, Shotaro; Yoshino, Jun; Izumi, Kaoru; Jimi, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Rieko; Mizuno, Keiichiro

    2013-05-01

    Clinical characteristics of phosphodiesterase (PDE) III inhibitors, milrinone and olprinone, is not fully understood in infants. We therefore retrospectively examined the hemodynamics, metabolism, and oxygenation of two different PDE III inhibitors in infants undergoing radical correction of ventricular septal defect with pulmonary hypertension. Twenty-six infants with pulmonary hypertension undergoing ventricular septum defect repair were retrospectively allocated to milrinone group (n= 13)and olprinone group(n=13). Hemodynamic parameters, acid-base balance, oxygenation and postoperative mechanical ventilation period were compared between the two groups at induction of anesthesia, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and the end of the surgery. The patients' mean age was 4.4 +/- 2.5 months. Demographic data were almost similar between the two groups. Milrinone and olprinone were administered at the rates of 0.5 and 0.3 microg x kg-1 x min-1 at the end of surgery, respectively. Hemodynamic variables, acid-base balance, Pao2 /FIo2 ratio and mechanical ventilation period were not significantly different between the two groups. No adverse side effects were observed during the study period. The effects of the PDE III inhibitors, milrinone and olprinone, on hemodynamic parameters, acid-base balance and oxygenation were similar in these infants. Both milrinone and olprinone could be used safely in infant cardiac surgery.

  3. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment power on Aramid fiber III/BMI composite humidity resistance properties

    Wang, Jing; Shi, Chen; Feng, Jiayue; Long, Xi; Meng, Lingzhi; Ren, Hang

    2018-01-01

    The effects of oxygen plasma treatment power on Aramid Fiber III chemical structure and its reinforced bismaleimides (BMI) composite humidity resistance properties were investigated in this work. The aramid fiber III chemical structure under different plasma treatment power were measured by FTIR. The composite bending strength and interlinear shear strength with different plasma treatment power before and after absorption water were tested respectively. The composite rupture morphology was observed by SEM. The FTIR results showed that oxygen plasma treatment do not change the fiber bulk chemical structure. The composite humidity resistance of bending strength and interlinear shear strength are similar for untreated and plasma treated samples. The retention rate of composite bending strength and interlinear shear strength are about 75% and 94%, respectively. The composite rupture mode turns to be the fiber failure after water absorption.

  4. Enhancement effects of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed percarbonate system

    Miao, Zhouwei; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Brusseau, Mark L.; Yan, Ni; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PCE degradation by reducing-agent modified Fe-catalyzed percarbonate was studied. • The addition of reducing agents significantly increased PCE degradation. • Hydroxylamine hydrochloride showed the best effect on enhancing PCE degradation. • The primary PCE degradation mechanism was oxidation by hydroxyl radical. • O_2·"− participated in the degradation of PCE in reducing-agent modified system. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) were investigated in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) system. The addition of reducing agents, including hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium sulfite, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, accelerated the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox cycle, leading to a relatively steady Fe(II) concentration and higher production of free radicals. This, in turn, resulted in enhanced PCE oxidation by SPC, with almost complete PCE removal obtained for appropriate Fe and SPC concentrations. The chemical probe tests, using nitrobenzene and carbon tetrachloride, demonstrated that HO· was the predominant radical in the system and that O_2·"− played a minor role, which was further confirmed by the results of electron spin resonance measurements. PCE degradation decreased significantly with the addition of isopropanol, a HO· scavenger, supporting the hypothesis that HO· was primarily responsible for PCE degradation. It is noteworthy that Cl"− release was slightly delayed in the first 20 min, indicating that intermediate products were produced. However, these intermediates were further degraded, resulting in the complete conversion of PCE to CO_2. In conclusion, the use of reducing agents to enhance Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed SPC oxidation appears to be a promising approach for the rapid degradation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

  5. Enhancement effects of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed percarbonate system

    Miao, Zhouwei [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Soil, Water and Environmental Science Department, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Arizona, 429 Shantz Building, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gu, Xiaogang [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lu, Shuguang, E-mail: lvshuguang@ecust.edu.cn [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Brusseau, Mark L. [Soil, Water and Environmental Science Department, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Arizona, 429 Shantz Building, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Yan, Ni [Hydrology and Water Resources Department, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona, 429 Shantz Building, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • PCE degradation by reducing-agent modified Fe-catalyzed percarbonate was studied. • The addition of reducing agents significantly increased PCE degradation. • Hydroxylamine hydrochloride showed the best effect on enhancing PCE degradation. • The primary PCE degradation mechanism was oxidation by hydroxyl radical. • O{sub 2}·{sup −} participated in the degradation of PCE in reducing-agent modified system. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) were investigated in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) system. The addition of reducing agents, including hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium sulfite, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, accelerated the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox cycle, leading to a relatively steady Fe(II) concentration and higher production of free radicals. This, in turn, resulted in enhanced PCE oxidation by SPC, with almost complete PCE removal obtained for appropriate Fe and SPC concentrations. The chemical probe tests, using nitrobenzene and carbon tetrachloride, demonstrated that HO· was the predominant radical in the system and that O{sub 2}·{sup −} played a minor role, which was further confirmed by the results of electron spin resonance measurements. PCE degradation decreased significantly with the addition of isopropanol, a HO· scavenger, supporting the hypothesis that HO· was primarily responsible for PCE degradation. It is noteworthy that Cl{sup −} release was slightly delayed in the first 20 min, indicating that intermediate products were produced. However, these intermediates were further degraded, resulting in the complete conversion of PCE to CO{sub 2}. In conclusion, the use of reducing agents to enhance Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed SPC oxidation appears to be a promising approach for the rapid degradation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

  6. Collagen Type III and VI Turnover in Response to Long-Term Immobilization

    Sun, Shu; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A

    2015-01-01

    with immobilization and/or remobilization. METHODS: In the Berlin bed rest study, 20 young men were recruited and randomly assigned to 8-week's strict bed rest with or without resistive vibration exercise countermeasure. We measured three neo-epitope ELISA kits in the serum samples of this study: Pro-C3, measured...... to unloading or reloading, whereas C6M does not appear to respond to unloading. Pro-C3 and C6M levels correlate with LBM at baseline, while Pro-C6 is related to the anabolic and catabolic responses to unloading and reloading....

  7. Children's understanding of facial expression of emotion: III. Adults' categorical and dimensional responses to children's drawings.

    Moland, M; Whissell, C M

    1993-08-01

    49 adult subjects responded to 37 children's drawings of six emotions (happy, sad, angry, afraid, surprised, and disgusted) by naming the emotion depicted and by identifying the pleasantness and arousal status of each drawing. Various analyses indicated that assignment to categories could be predicted on the basis of ratings of pleasantness and arousal (the two key dimensions of a bipolar affect space). Data support the contention that emotional responses should not be assessed solely on the basis of literal accuracy but should rather be described in terms of their location in affect space.

  8. Incremental Validity of the WJ III COG: Limited Predictive Effects beyond the GIA-E

    McGill, Ryan J.; Busse, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    This study is an examination of the incremental validity of Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) broad clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ III ACH). The participants were children and adolescents, ages 6-18 (n = 4,722), drawn from the WJ…

  9. Magnetically responsive polypyrrole nanotubes using Ce(III)-stabilized maghemite nanoparticles

    Esman, Natasha; Haviv, Amit; Lellouche, Jean-Paul, E-mail: lellouj@biu.ac.il [Department of Chemistry, Nanomaterials Research Center, Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    Nanocomposites (NCs) that are made magnetically responsive in controlled conditions attract continuing interest for their added magnetic properties. In this study, we report on the preparation and full characterization of a multifunctional NC composed of magnetic {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (NPs) covalently attached to the surface of polyaminated (polyNH{sub 2}) poly(2,6-di-pyrrol-1-yl-hexanoic acid) (pDPL) nanotubes (NTs). Such a hybrid conducting polymer iron oxide maghemite {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pDPL NC built specifically on covalent bonding has never been reported. The maghemite {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were prepared using an innovative ultrasound-assisted Ce{sup 3+} doping process, resulting in polycarboxylation of the NP surface useful for control of aggregation and derivatization of functionality. The second component of the NC, i.e. polyNH{sub 2}-modified pDPL NTs, was prepared from an acid functional pyrrole species followed by amine modification. The resulting innovative {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pDPL NC can be viewed as a multifunctional nanomaterial since it possesses both types of derivatization, i.e. polyCOOH (NPs) and polyNH{sub 2} (NTs) combined with magnetic responsivity.

  10. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  11. Expression of class III beta tubulin in cervical cancer patients administered preoperative radiochemotherapy: correlation with response to treatment and clinical outcome.

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Martinelli, Enrica; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Distefano, Mariagrazia; Paglia, Amelia; Ferlini, Cristiano; Scambia, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    Alterations of the beta subunit of tubulin have been reported to be predictive of resistance to radiation and antitubulin agents in several solid tumors. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical role of beta III tubulin expression as prognostic factor for survival and as a predictive parameter of response to preoperative radiochemotherapy in a single institutional series of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients. The study included 98 LACC patients admitted to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University of Rome and Campobasso between January 1998 and January 2005. Immunohistochemistry was performed by using the polyclonal rabbit anti-beta III tubulin antibody (Covance, Princeton, NJ, USA). The value of 10% immunostained tumor cells was arbitrarily chosen as cut-off value to distinguish cases with high versus low beta III tubulin content. In the whole series, beta III tubulin immunoreaction was detectable in 66/98 cases (67.3%), and the percentage of positively stained cells ranged from 0 to 100% (median=10%). The percentages of cases with high beta III tubulin expression were shown not to be differently distributed according to clinico-pathological characteristics. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of cases with high beta III tubulin expression according to clinical and pathological response to treatment. During the follow-up period, recurrence and death of disease occurred in 15 and 13 cases, respectively. There was no difference in disease-free and overall survival in cases with high versus low beta III tubulin expression. The assessment of class III beta tubulin status seems of little usefulness in order to identify LACC patients with poor chance of response to concomitant radiochemotherapy and unfavorable prognosis.

  12. Group III mGlu receptor agonists potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of AMPA and NMDA receptor block.

    De Sarro, Giovambattista; Chimirri, Alba; Meldrum, Brian S

    2002-09-06

    We report the anticonvulsant action in DBA/2 mice of two mGlu Group III receptor agonists: (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine, (R,S)-PPG, a compound with moderate mGlu8 selectivity, and of (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid, ACPT-1, a selective agonist for mGlu4alpha receptors. Both compounds, given intracerebroventricularly at doses which did not show marked anticonvulsant activity, produced a consistent shift to the left of the dose-response curves (i.e. enhanced the anticonvulsant properties) of 1-(4'-aminophenyl)-3,5-dihydro-7,8-dimethoxy-4H-2,3-benzodiazepin-4-one hydrochloride, CFM-2, a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist, and 3-((+/-)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-1-phosphonic acid, CPPene, a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, in DBA/2 mice. In addition, (R,S)-PPG and ACPT-1 administered intracerebroventricularly prolonged the time course of the anticonvulsant properties of CFM-2 (33 micromol/kg, i.p.) and CPPene (3.3 micromol/kg, i.p.) administered intraperitoneally. We conclude that modest reduction of synaptic glutamate release by activation of Group III metabotropic receptors potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of AMPA and NMDA receptor blockade. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Tuning of "antenna effect" of Eu(III) in ternary systems in aqueous medium through binding with protein.

    Ghorai, Shyamal Kr; Samanta, Swarna Kamal; Mukherjee, Manini; Saha Sardar, Pinki; Ghosh, Sanjib

    2013-02-04

    A simple ternary system containing a protein [human serum albumin (HSA)/bovine serum albumin (BSA)], tetracycline hydrochloride (TC), and Eu(III) in suitable aqueous buffer medium at physiological pH (= 7.2) has been shown to exhibit highly efficient "antenna effect" compared to the binary complex of TC with Eu(III) (Eu(3)TC). The ternary system containing E. coli alkaline phosphatase (AP), TC, and Eu(III), however, shows a slight enhancement of Eu(III) emission, although the binding constant of AP with TC is 2 orders of magnitude greater than with BSA/HSA. The enhanced emission of bound TC in the binary systems containing proteins and TC gets quenched in the ternary systems containing HSA/BSA, showing the efficient energy transfer (ET) from TC to Eu(III). Steady state and time-resolved emission studies of each component in all the ternary systems in H(2)O and in D(2)O medium reveal that Eu(III) is very well protected from the O-H oscillator in the ternary system containing HSA/BSA compared to that containing AP. The docking studies locating the binding site of TC in the proteins suggest that TC binds near the surface of AP. In the case of HSA/BSA, TC resides in the interior of the protein resulting in a large shielding effect of Eu(III). The rotational correlation time (θ(c)) determined from the anisotropy decay of bound TC in the complexes and the accessible surface area (ASA) of the ligand in the complexes obtained from the docking studies also support the contention that Eu(3)TC is more exposed to solvent in the case of the ternary system consisting of AP, TC, and Eu(III). The calculated radiative lifetime and the sensitization efficiency ratio of Eu(III) in all the systems clearly demonstrate the protein mediated tuning of "antenna effect" in Eu(III).

  14. Combined effects of Lanthanum(III) and elevated Ultraviolet-B radiation on root nitrogen nutrient in soybean seedlings.

    Huang, Guangrong; Wang, Lihong; Sun, Zhaoguo; Li, Xiaodong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Rare earth element pollution and elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation occur simultaneously in some regions, but the combined effects of these two factors on plants have not attracted enough attention. Nitrogen nutrient is vital to plant growth. In this study, the combined effects of lanthanum(III) and elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots were investigated. Treatment with 0.08 mmol L(-1) La(III) did not change the effects of elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), nitrate, ammonium, amino acids, or soluble protein in the roots. Treatment with 0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation synergistically decreased the NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities as well as the nitrate, amino acid, and soluble protein levels, except for the GDH activity and ammonium content. Combined treatment with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation produced severely deleterious effects on all test indices, and these effects were stronger than those induced by La(III) or elevated UV-B radiation treatment alone. Following the withdrawal of La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation, all test indices for the combined treatments with 0.08/0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation recovered to a certain extent, but they could not recover for treatments with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation. In summary, combined treatment with La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation seriously affected nitrogen nutrition in soybean roots through the inhibition of nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation.

  15. Rhodium(III) as a potentiator of the effects of X-rays on cells

    Richmond, R C; Centilli, M A; Cross, M H; Powers, E L

    1986-08-01

    A rhodium compound, Rh(NH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Cl/sub 3/, does not sensitize the spores of Bacillus megaterium to X-rays. However, it is a very effective sensitizer of vegetative cells of Staphylococcus aureus, raising the sensitivity four times in O/sub 2/ and over 100 times in anoxia. The inhibition by oxygen of the sensitizing action of Rh(III), which operates over a wide range of (O/sub 2/), is noteworthy. These experiments were performed in saline-phosphate buffer using 50 kVp X-rays. The results are discussed in terms of the known radiation chemistry of this compound.

  16. Gamma irradiation effects of 51Cr(III) isotope exchange in doped magnesium chromate - zinc chromate mixtures

    Mahfouz, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Gamma irradiation effects of 51 Cr(III) isotope exchange in magnesium chromate - zinc chromate mixtures doped with 51 Cr(III) were investigated. It was found that γ irradiation has an oxidation effect and the percentage of exchanged 51 Cr(VI) increases with the increasing γ-ray dose. The data are explained in terms of mechanistic model involving metal and ligand vacancies exchange and substitution reactions. (author)

  17. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 μm) and nanoscale (particles for comparative studies of their cytotoxic potential in macrophage (THP-1) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines. We found that nanosized III-V arsenides, including GaAs and InAs, could induce significantly more cytotoxicity over a 24-72 h observation period. In contrast, GaP and InP particulates of all sizes as well as ionic GaCl3 and InCl3 were substantially less hazardous. The principal mechanism of III-V arsenide nanoparticle toxicity is dissolution and shedding of toxic As(III) and, to a lesser extent, As(V) ions. GaAs dissolves in the cell culture medium as well as in acidifying intracellular compartments, while InAs dissolves (more slowly) inside cells. Chelation of released As by 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid interfered in GaAs toxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that III-V arsenides, GaAs and InAs nanoparticles, contribute in a major way to the toxicity of III-V materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries.

  18. [Biomedical research, the market, clinicians, safety and corporate social responsibility post-phase III: maintaining confidence].

    Marín-Gámez, N; Kessel-Sardiñas, H; Cervantes-Bonet, B; López-Palmero, S; Antón-Molina, F; Martínez-García, L

    2010-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard in the western world for decision making, as much for the clinicians as for the agencies or managers for community policies. In this powerful deployment of investigative effort there are variable degrees of conflict of interests, and the clinicians, not foreign to this, are entering a sea of doubts on safety, a dimension that emerges like a diacritical, inalienable element. The aim of the study was to select and ctically evaluate editorials, clinical trials and/or meta-analyses published on physical support, or the more important internationally credited websites, which has patient safety as their primary objective. Evaluative study performed in the Torrecardenas Hospital, of the Andalucian Public Health Service (SSPA), in the context of an accredited training unit (Mejora_F), so called "transference of the biomedical knowledge from the bibliography" from 2008 to 2009. Analyzed articles: 170 (75 % in English, with predominance of N Eng J Med >50 %; followed by Journal Of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, British Medical Journal, Journal of American Geriatrics; Med Clin, Rev Clin Esp.; and Infectología). From 170 eligible articles we selected 5 key topoi due to their impact as the most representative owing to their citation frequency. They represented, in our judgment, "a red flag" of safety: long-acting beta-stimulators or LABS and increase in mortality in asthma; neuroleptics in the elderly and extension of the QT interval associated with sudden death; thiazolidinediones in type II diabetes and negative cardiovascular effects; promotion of statins-ezetimibe and the debatable association with major mortality for cancer, and intensive treatment in diabetes and probable increase in mortality. What really maters in biomedicine is that it leads to a given strategy in real patients, not the intermediate points. Clinicians should not support partial results of designs based on intermediate information

  19. [Positive inotropic and lusitropic effect of RP 62719, a new class III antiarrhythmia agent].

    Beregi, J P; Escande, D; Coudray, N; Chemla, D; Mestre, M; Péry, N; Lecarpentier, Y

    1994-02-01

    Antiarrhythmic drugs, especially the Class I family, exert a negative inotropic effect on the myocardium which is particularly undesirable in patients with depressed left ventricular function. Therefore, research has been directed to the development of new, more specific molecules of the Class III family. The authors studies the mechanical effects of RP 62719 on guinea pig left ventricular papillary muscle. This new molecule is a pure Class III antiarrhythmic, known to lengthen the duration of the cardiac action potential by selectively blocking the potassium current iK1 (inward rectifier K+ current). The mechanical parameters were determined during the phases of contraction and relaxation under isotonic and isometric conditions. At 0.2 and 2 microM concentrations, RP 62719 improved cardiac contraction under both isotonic and isometric conditions with an increase of about 30% of Vmax (p delta 1 (p force normalized per cross-sectional area [AF/S (p actions could provide significant therapeutic advantages especially in patients cardiac failure.

  20. Effect of using heat-inactivated serum with the Abbott human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III antibody test.

    Jungkind, D L; DiRenzo, S A; Young, S J

    1986-01-01

    The Abbott enzyme immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) antibody was evaluated to determine the effect of using heat-inactivated (56 degrees C for 30 min) serum as the sample. Each of 58 nonreactive serum samples gave a higher A492 value when tested after heat inactivation. Ten of the samples became reactive after heating. Heat-inactivated serum should not be used in the current Abbott HTLV-III antibody test, because thi...

  1. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  2. Narrow-linewidth Si/III-V lasers: A study of laser dynamics and nonlinear effects

    Vilenchik, Yaakov Yasha

    Narrow-linewidth lasers play an important role in a wide variety of applications, from sensing and spectroscopy to optical communication and on-chip clocks. Current narrow-linewidth systems are usually implemented in doped fibers and are big, expensive, and power-hungry. Semiconductor lasers compete favorably in size, cost, and power consumption, but their linewidth is historically limited to the sub-MHz regime. However, it has been recently demonstrated that a new design paradigm, in which the optical energy is stored away from the active region in a composite high-Q resonator, has the potential to dramatically improve the coherence of the laser. This work explores this design paradigm, as applied on the hybrid Si/III-V platform. It demonstrates a record sub-KHz white-noise-floor linewidth. It further shows, both theoretically and experimentally, that this strategy practically eliminates Henry's linewidth enhancement by positioning a damped relaxation resonance at frequencies as low as 70 MHz, yielding truly quantum limited devices at frequencies of interest. In addition to this empirical contribution, this work explores the limits of performance of this platform. Here, the effect of two-photon-absorption and free-carrier-absorption are analyzed, using modified rate equations and Langevin force approach. The analysis predicts that as the intra-cavity field intensity builds up in the high-Q resonator, non-linear effects cause a new domain of performance-limiting factors. Steady-state behavior, laser dynamics, and frequency noise performance are examined in the context of this unique platform, pointing at the importance of nonlinear effects. This work offers a theoretical model predicting laser performance in light of nonlinear effects, obtaining a good agreement with experimental results from fabricated high-Q Si/III-V lasers. In addition to demonstrating unprecedented semiconductor laser performance, this work establishes a first attempt to predict and demonstrate

  3. The Biochemistry of Sensing: Enteric Pathogens Regulate Type III Secretion in Response to Environmental and Host Cues.

    De Nisco, Nicole J; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Orth, Kim

    2018-01-16

    Enteric pathogens employ sophisticated strategies to colonize and infect mammalian hosts. Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli , Salmonella , and Campylobacter jejuni , are among the leading causes of gastrointestinal tract infections worldwide. The virulence strategies of many of these Gram-negative pathogens rely on type III secretion systems (T3SSs), which are macromolecular syringes that translocate bacterial effector proteins directly into the host cytosol. However, synthesis of T3SS proteins comes at a cost to the bacterium in terms of growth rate and fitness, both in the environment and within the host. Therefore, expression of the T3SS must be tightly regulated to occur at the appropriate time and place during infection. Enteric pathogens have thus evolved regulatory mechanisms to control expression of their T3SSs in response to specific environmental and host cues. These regulatory cascades integrate multiple physical and chemical signals through complex transcriptional networks. Although the power of bacterial genetics has allowed elucidation of many of these networks, the biochemical interactions between signal and sensor that initiate the signaling cascade are often poorly understood. Here, we review the physical and chemical signals that Gram-negative enteric pathogens use to regulate T3SS expression during infection. We highlight the recent structural and functional studies that have elucidated the biochemical properties governing both the interaction between sensor and signal and the mechanisms of signal transduction from sensor to downstream transcriptional networks. Copyright © 2018 De Nisco et al.

  4. The Biochemistry of Sensing: Enteric Pathogens Regulate Type III Secretion in Response to Environmental and Host Cues

    Nicole J. De Nisco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteric pathogens employ sophisticated strategies to colonize and infect mammalian hosts. Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter jejuni, are among the leading causes of gastrointestinal tract infections worldwide. The virulence strategies of many of these Gram-negative pathogens rely on type III secretion systems (T3SSs, which are macromolecular syringes that translocate bacterial effector proteins directly into the host cytosol. However, synthesis of T3SS proteins comes at a cost to the bacterium in terms of growth rate and fitness, both in the environment and within the host. Therefore, expression of the T3SS must be tightly regulated to occur at the appropriate time and place during infection. Enteric pathogens have thus evolved regulatory mechanisms to control expression of their T3SSs in response to specific environmental and host cues. These regulatory cascades integrate multiple physical and chemical signals through complex transcriptional networks. Although the power of bacterial genetics has allowed elucidation of many of these networks, the biochemical interactions between signal and sensor that initiate the signaling cascade are often poorly understood. Here, we review the physical and chemical signals that Gram-negative enteric pathogens use to regulate T3SS expression during infection. We highlight the recent structural and functional studies that have elucidated the biochemical properties governing both the interaction between sensor and signal and the mechanisms of signal transduction from sensor to downstream transcriptional networks.

  5. A Comparative Test of the Interval-Scale Properties of Magnitude Estimation and Case III Scaling and Recommendations for Equal-Interval Frequency Response Anchors.

    Schriesheim, Chester A.; Novelli, Luke, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between recommended sets of equal-interval response anchors derived from scaling techniques using magnitude estimations and Thurstone Case III pair-comparison treatment of complete ranks were compared. Differences in results for 205 undergraduates reflected differences in the samples as well as in the tasks and computational…

  6. Addition effect of erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate in the homopolymerization kinetics of a DGEBA resin

    Garcia, S.J.; Ramis, X.; Serra, A.; Suay, J.

    2006-01-01

    Solid bisphenol-A epoxy resin of medium molecular weight was cured using a Lewis acid initiator (erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate) in three different proportions (0.5, 1 and 2 phr). A kinetic study was performed in a differential scanning calorimeter. The complete kinetic triplet was determined (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and integral function of the deg.ree of conversion) for each system. A kinetic analysis was performed with an integral isoconversional procedure (model-free), and the kinetic model was determined both with the Coats-Redfern method (the obtained isoconversional E value being accepted as the effective activation energy) and through the compensation effect. All the systems followed the same isothermal curing model simulated from non-isothermal ones. The 'nucleation and growth' Avrami kinetic model A 3/2 has been proposed as the polymerization kinetic model. The addition of initiator accelerated the reaction having higher influence when low temperatures were applied

  7. Effect of heptadentate (N{sub 4}O{sub 3}) tripodal Schiff base ligand and its yttrium(III) complex on the luminescence and extraction of tris({beta}-diketonato)europium(III)

    Hasegawa, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)], E-mail: yhasegaw@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp; Saitou, S.; Nagaoka, D.; Yajima, H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Kanesato, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2008-02-28

    In order to learn the effect of a Schiff base and the complex of Y{sup III} on the extraction of Eu{sup III} with {beta}-diketones and on the luminescence of the extracted species, the extraction of Eu{sup III} with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) and/or these Schiff bases, tris(5-t-butyl)salicylidenaminoethyl amine (H{sub 3}L{sup 1}), and its Y{sup III} complex ([YL{sup 1}]) prepared, into CHCl{sub 3} was examined. Further, the luminescence and excited spectra of CHCl{sub 3} phases extracted Eu{sup III} complexes and the solutions containing tris({beta}-diketonato)Eu{sup III} and/or the Schiff bases were measured. On the measurement of the luminescence spectra, tris(pivaloyltrifluoroacetonato)Eu{sup III} (Eu(pta){sub 3}) as well as Eu(tta){sub 3} was used. Synergistic effect with Htta and these Schiff bases was observed. However, proper effect of Y{sup III} was not observed. The luminescence intensity of Eu(tta){sub 3} at 613 nm decreased with increasing concentration of H{sub 3}L{sup 1} or [YL{sup 1}], whereas that of Eu(pta){sub 3} increased with increasing concentration of the ligands, but no difference between both Schiff bases was observed, because of picking up of Y{sup III} from [YL{sup 1}] with the interaction between [YL{sup 1}] and water.

  8. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-III, Part III - Environmental effect of the maximum credible accident

    Raisic, N.

    1963-02-01

    Maximum credible accident at the RA reactor would consider release of fission products into the environment. This would result from fuel elements failure or meltdown due to loss of coolant. The analysis presented in this report assumes that the reactor was operating at nominal power at the moment of maximum possible accident. The report includes calculations of fission products activity at the moment of accident, total activity release during the accident, concentration of radioactive material in the air in the reactor neighbourhood, and the analysis of accident environmental effects

  9. Secondary IgG responses to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. II. Different cellular requirements for induction and elicitation.

    Braley-Mullen, H

    1976-04-01

    Mice primed with a thymus- (T) dependent form of Type III pneumococcal polysaccharide (S3), i.e., S3 coupled to erythrocytes (S3-RBC) produce S3-specific IgG antibody after secondary challenge with either S3 or S3-RBC. The production of IgG antibody by mice challenged with S3 was shown to be T independent since secondary responses were enhanced when mice were treated with anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS) at the time of secondary challenge with S3 and T-depleted spleen cells responded as well as unfractionated spleen cells to S3 in an adoptive transfer system. Secondary S3-specific IgG responses in mice challenged with S3-RBC were shown to be T dependent by the same criteria. The results obtained by using S3 as the antigen indicate that IgG-producing B cells (B lambda cells) can recognize and respond to antigen in the absence of helper T cells. On the other hand, T cells were required for the induction of S3-specific memory B lambda cells since mice depleted of T cells by treatment with ALS at the time of priming with S3-RBC failed to produce S3-specific IgG antibody after secondary challenge with either S3-specific IgG antibody after secondary chall-nge with either S3 or S3rbc. Since RBC-specific memory cells were induced in T-deprived mice the results suggest that T cell regulation of IgG antibody production may vary for different antigens.

  10. Cytogenotoxic effects of two potential anticancer Ruthenium(III Schiff Bases complexes

    Izet Eminovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of cancer has been subject of great interest. Researchers are continuously searching for new medicines. In this sense, ruthenium complexes have big potential. Some evidences suggest that ruthenium compounds possess anticancer activities. We synthesized two recently published ruthenium(III complexes with bidentate O,N and tridentate O,O,N Schiff bases derived from 5-substituted salicylaldehyde and aminophenol or anilineare. These compounds showed affinity for binding to the DNA molecule, however, insufficient data are available regarding their possible toxic effects on biological systems.Methods: In the present study we evaluated genotoxic, cytotoxic, and cytostatic effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22], using the Allium cepa assay.Results: Different toxic effects were observed depending on the substance, tested concentration, and endpoint measured. In general, the tested compounds significantly lowered the root growth and mitotic index values as compared to the control group. Additionally, a wide range of abnormal mitotic stages, both clastogenic and non-clastogenic were observed in the treated cells. Na[RuCl2(L12] significantly increased the frequency of sticky metaphases, chromosome bridges, micronuclei, impaired chromosome segregation, as well as number of apoptotic and necrotic cells over the controls. In contrast, Na[Ru(L22] did not show significant evidence of genotoxicity with regard to chromosome aberrations and micronuclei, however, significant differences were detected in the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells when the highest concentration was applied.Conclusions: In this study we demonstrated antiproliferative effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22]. At clinical level, these results could be interesting for further studies on anticancer potential of the ruthenium(III complexes using animal models.

  11. Effective operational oil spill response planning

    Meyers, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    An operational Contingency Plan is one of the single most important aspects of effective oil spill response operations. It is a spill control game plan. A thorough contingency plan provides a set of guidelines that can be used to help direct all phases of spill response activities. More than simple a compilation of lists and rosters, the contingency plan reflects strategic and philosophical elements of spill response that help to ensure a viable response to any spill incident. Facilities and oil carrying vessels should have well maintained contingency plans with these features. This paper describes the requirement for effective oil spill response pans and the training required to exercise them

  12. Response Expectancy and the Placebo Effect.

    Kirsch, Irving

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, I review basic tenets of response expectancy theory (Kirsch, 1985), beginning with the important distinction between response expectancies and stimulus expectancies. Although both can affect experience, the effects of response expectancies are stronger and more resistant to extinction than those of stimulus expectancies. Further, response expectancies are especially important to understanding placebo effects. The response expectancy framework is consistent with and has been amplified by the Bayesian model of predictive coding. Clinical implications of these phenomena are exemplified. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Studies of. gamma. -ray irradiation effects on tris(. beta. -diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) coordination compounds by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Sakai, Y.; Endo, K.; Sano, H. (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    Both absorption Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements on tris(..beta..-diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) compounds indicate that ligands which have phenyl group as a substituent are more stable to ..gamma..-ray radiolysis, in accordance with previous results of emission Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of /sup 57/Co-labelled tris (..beta..-diketonato)cobalt(III) compounds.

  14. Test-retest reliability and practice effects of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III.

    Lo, Ada H Y; Humphreys, Michael; Byrne, Gerard J; Pachana, Nancy A

    2012-09-01

    Although serial administration of cognitive tests is increasingly common, there is a paucity of research on test-retest reliabilities and practice effects, both of which are important for evaluating changes in functioning. Reliability is generally conceptualized as involving short-lasting changes in performance. However, when repeated testing occurs over a period of years, there will be some longer lasting effects. The implications of these longer lasting effects and practice effects on reliability were examined in the context of repeated administrations of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III in 339 community-dwelling women aged 40-79 years over 2 to 7 years. The results showed that Logical Memory and Verbal Paired Associates subtests were consistently the most reliable subtests across the age cohorts. The magnitude of practice effects varied as a function of subtests and age. The largest practice effects were found in the youngest age cohort, especially on the Faces, Logical Memory, and Verbal Paired Associates subtests. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  16. Synergic effect of tribenzylamine on the extraction of Fe(III) with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone in chloroform

    Cheema, M.N.; Saeed, M.M.; Qureshi, I.H.

    1980-01-01

    Synergic effect of tribenzylamine (TBA) on the solvent extraction of Fe(III), Co(II) and Cu(II), by thenoyltrifluoracetone (HTTA) in chloroform from aqueous medium of ionic strength 0.33 M (H + ,NaClO 4 ) has been studied. For trivalent iron an enhanced extraction > 98% was observed at pH 2.5 and the equilibrium was attained within 5 minutes. Extraction parameters such as concentrations of HTTA, TBA and pH were optimised by a triangular co-ordinate graph. The stoichiometry of the extractable adduct Fe (TTA) 3 TBA was established by slope analysis. Extraction and formation constants of extractable species were computed. (orig.) [de

  17. Neutron flux effect on the fracture toughness behavior of Tihange-III RPV material

    Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.; Bertolis, D.

    2015-01-01

    The question whether material test reactor (MTR) data can be used to supplement power reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance data is still debated in the international community and its implications are particularly important in the perspective of long term operation (LTO). However, addressing the flux effect can be confusing if specific material and irradiation variables are not taken into account. This means that the answer to whether there is flux effect or not is neither 'no' nor 'yes' without specifying the application range. Indeed, neutron flux effect was recognized to occur in high Cu-containing steels in the low fluence range. But at high fluence, relevant for long term operation, it becomes difficult to clearly distinguish the differences between high flux and low flux. In this work, we irradiated the low Cu base metal and weld of the Tihange-III surveillance coupon in the BR2 reactor at high flux. The BR2 flux is about two orders of magnitude higher than the flux in the surveillance position. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests were performed on both the surveillance and MTR specimens and compared to assess the neutron flux effect. The results confirm that, at high fluence levels, the flux effect on mechanical properties is not significant, offering therefore the possibility of accelerated irradiation to investigate RPV embrittlement in the high fluence regime relevant for long term operation. (authors)

  18. Effect of metal ion Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as photosensitizers on dye sensitized solar cell

    Harsasi Setyawati

    Full Text Available The energy crisis is a major problem facing the world today and will need a renewable energy source that is environmentally friendly; one of these is the dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC. DSSC is photochemical electric cell that can convert solar energy into electrical energy. This research aims to study the characteristics of chlorophyll compounds with the addition of metal ions Fe(III and to determine the effect of Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as a photosensitizer in the DSSC. The formation of complex compounds of Fe(III-chlorophyll is shown by the phenomenon of metal ligand charge transfer (MLCT at a wavelength of 263.00 nm and absorption transition d-d at 745.00 nm. Fourier transform infrared characterization of the binding of Fe-O complex compounds appears at 486.06 cm−1. The complex compound of Fe(III-chlorophyll has a magnetic moment value of 9.62 Bohr Magneton (BM. The existence of ion Fe(III in chlorophyll can improve the performance of chlorophyll as a dye sensitizer with a maximum current of 4.00 mA/cm2, maximum voltage of 0.18 volts and efficiency values of 1.35%. Keywords: Fe(III-chlorophyll, Dye sensitized solar cell, Metal ligand charge transfer, Photosensitizer

  19. Dose-response relationship in locoregional control for patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    Zhang Zhen; Liao Zhongxing; Jin Jing; Ajani, Jaffer; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melenda; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.; Swisher, Stephen; Ho, Linus; Yao, James; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between radiation dose and locoregional control (LRC) for patients with Stage II-III unresectable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods and materials: The medical records of 69 consecutive patients with clinical Stage II or III esophageal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1998 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 69 patients, 43 had received ≤51 Gy (lower dose group) and 26 >51 Gy (higher dose group). The median dose in the lower and higher dose groups was 30 Gy (range, 30-51 Gy) and 59.4 Gy (range, 54-64.8 Gy), respectively. Two fractionation schedules were used: rapid fractionation, delivering 30 Gy at 3 Gy/fraction within 2 weeks, and standard fractionation, delivering ≥45 Gy at 1.8-2 Gy/fraction daily. Total doses of 5% (46.2% vs. 23.3%). The lower dose group had more N1 tumors, but the tumor classification and stage grouping were similar in the two groups. The median follow-up time for all patients was 22 months (range, 2-56 months). Patients in the higher dose group had a statistically significant better 3-year local control rate (36% vs. 19%, p = 0.011), disease-free survival rate (25% vs. 10%, p = 0.004), and overall survival rate (13% vs. 3%, p = 0.054). A trend toward a better distant-metastasis-free survival rate was noted in the higher dose group (72% vs. 59%, p = 0.12). The complete clinical response rate was significantly greater in the higher dose group (46% vs. 23%, p = 0.048). In both groups, the most common type of first failure was persistence of the primary tumor. Significantly fewer patients in the higher dose group had tumor persistence after treatment (p = 0.02). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in the pattern of locoregional or distant failure. The long-term side effects of chemoradiotherapy were similar in the two groups, although

  20. Effects of a Combination Therapy of Sclerostin Antibody III and Raloxifene on Bone Formation Markers in Ovariectomized Rats

    Allam, H. I. G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the systemic effect of sclerostin monoclonal antibody (Scl-AbIII) administration on markers of bone formation and compare it with a combination of sclerostin antibody and raloxifene. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical College Animal House at King Khaled University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to November 2014. Methodology: Forty-five female rats were divided into 5 groups equally; 1 control group and 4 groups of ovariectomized (OVX) rats: control OVX rats and OVX rats treated by Scl-AbIII, raloxifene or Scl-AbIII+raloxifene one month after ovariectomy, continued for 4 weeks. At the end of treatment, serum levels of Bone Specific Alkaline Phosphatase (BSAP), alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Parathyroid Hormone (PTH), Ca/sup 2+/ and phosphorus were measured. Uterus was weighed and body weight change was calculated. Results: Scl-AbIII or raloxifene treatment produced significant increase of serum BSAP, osteocalcin, IGF-1, PTH and Ca/sup 2+/ levels. Raloxifene, either alone or combined with Scl-AbIII attenuated the decrease in uterus wet weight, and the increase in body weight seen in OVX rats. Combination therapy of Scl-AbIII, and raloxifene produced significant increase of serum alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and IGF-1 levels than treatment with either Scl-AbIII or raloxifene alone. Conclusion: Combination therapy of Scl-AbIII and raloxifene is an attractive strategy to enhance bone formation and can offer better gain over treatment with either one of them alone. Confirmation of these preliminary observations must await careful long-term studies. (author)

  1. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in mode III

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1982-01-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (R /SUB B/ 88, 590 MN/m 2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) /SUB III/ can be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔK /SUB III/ for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (about 10 -6 to 10 -2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) /SUB III/ and ΔK /SUB III/ is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity GAMMA /SUB III/, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces A micro-mechanical model for the main radial Mode III growth is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔGAMMA /SUB III/) if local Mode II growth rates are proportional to the displacements. Such predictions are shown to be in agreement with measured growth rates in AISI 4140 steel from 10 -6 to 10 -2 mm per cycle

  2. Effect of Fadama III programme on poverty status of rice farming ...

    Based on findings of the study, it was recommended that farming households especially women should be given increased access to programmes such as the National fadama III programme to improve their welfare and increase agricultural production in the country. Keywords: Fadama III; poverty; Tobit; Beneficiaries; Patigi ...

  3. Phase III study of ibuprofen versus placebo for radiation-induced genitourinary side effects

    Coleman, C. Norman; Kelly, Laura; Riese Daly, Nancy; Beard, Clair; Kaplan, Irving; Lamb, Carolyn; Propert, Kathleen; Manola, Judith

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: On the basis of our anecdotal clinical observations that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents relieved dysuria during radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer, we conducted a Phase III randomized trial of ibuprofen vs. placebo for patients who had an increase in acute urinary symptoms. Our in vitro and in vivo laboratory data with a higher concentration of ibuprofen than achievable in this study demonstrated radiosensitization. This study examined whether the inflammatory response within the prostate during radiotherapy would respond to the standard dose of ibuprofen as assessed by a symptom score. Methods and Materials: Patients were registered to the study and were followed weekly with a formal symptom assessment. A double-blind randomization to ibuprofen, 400 mg q.i.d., vs. placebo for 7 days was done at a time when the severity score increased. The symptom response was evaluated at the end of the week. Results: Between 1995 and 1998, 100 patients were entered, 28 did not have a sufficient change in symptom score to be randomized, and 19 were either unable to take ibuprofen or withdrew before randomization. Of the 53 patients randomized, 27 received placebo and 26 ibuprofen. No statistically significant differences were found between the placebo and ibuprofen groups between baseline and randomization or between randomization and the 1-week posttreatment assessment. Neither group had a change in symptom severity between randomization and the 1-week posttreatment evaluation. Conclusion: The standard anti-inflammatory dose of ibuprofen did not relieve the acute urinary or rectal symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are potential radiation sensitizers with the mechanism of action as yet unknown. Clinical trials of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors as radiation sensitizers should explore a range of doses and evaluate potential mechanisms of action, including cyclooxygenase inhibition and other non

  4. Type I and III procollagen propeptides in growth hormone-deficient patients: effects of increasing doses of GH

    Jensen, L T; Jørgensen, J O; Risteli, J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of increasing doses of growth hormone on collagen synthesis in GH-treated GH-deficient patients was determined in a short-term study. The synthesis of type I and III collagen was estimated by measurements of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen and the aminoterminal...... procollagen propeptide increased twice as much as type I procollagen propeptide, by 47 vs 25%, at a GH dose of 6 IU/day compared with 2 IU/day. The differences between the effects on type I and type III collagen may reflect differences in secretion or turn-over rate of collagen in bone and loose connective...

  5. CpG island methylator phenotype is associated with response to adjuvant irinotecan-based therapy for stage III colon cancer.

    Shiovitz, Stacey; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Renfro, Lindsay A; Nam, Eunmi; Foster, Nathan R; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Luo, Yanxin; Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Monnat, Raymond J; Emond, Mary J; Maizels, Nancy; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Goldberg, Richard M; Saltz, Leonard B; Venook, Alan; Warren, Robert S; Grady, William M

    2014-09-01

    The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), defined by a high frequency of aberrantly methylated genes, is a characteristic of a subclass of colon tumors with distinct clinical and molecular features. Cohort studies have produced conflicting results on responses of CIMP-positive tumors to chemotherapy. We assessed the association between tumor CIMP status and survival of patients receiving adjuvant fluorouracil and leucovorin alone or with irinotecan (IFL). We analyzed data from patients with stage III colon adenocarcinoma randomly assigned to groups given fluorouracil and leucovorin or IFL after surgery, from April 1999 through April 2001. The primary end point of the trial was overall survival and the secondary end point was disease-free survival. DNA isolated from available tumor samples (n = 615) was used to determine CIMP status based on methylation patterns at the CACNA1G, IGF2, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1 loci. The effects of CIMP on survival were modeled using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards; interactions with treatment and BRAF, KRAS, and mismatch repair (MMR) status were also investigated. Of the tumor samples characterized for CIMP status, 145 were CIMP positive (23%). Patients with CIMP-positive tumors had shorter overall survival times than patients with CIMP-negative tumors (hazard ratio = 1.36; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.84). Treatment with IFL showed a trend toward increased overall survival for patients with CIMP-positive tumors, compared with treatment with fluorouracil and leucovorin (hazard ratio = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.37-1.05; P = .07), but not for patients with CIMP-negative tumors (hazard ratio = 1.38; 95% CI: 1.00-1.89; P = .049). In a 3-way interaction analysis, patients with CIMP-positive, MMR-intact tumors benefited most from the addition of irinotecan to fluorouracil and leucovorin therapy (for the interaction, P = .01). CIMP was more strongly associated with response to IFL than MMR status. Results for disease

  6. Dentofacial effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction: a controlled study of consecutively treated Class III patients.

    De Clerck, Hugo; Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-11-01

    In this cephalometric investigation, we analyzed the treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) with miniplates in the maxilla and mandible connected by Class III elastics in patients with Class III malocclusion. The treated sample consisted of 21 Class III patients consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol before the pubertal growth spurt (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.8 years) and reevaluated after BAMP therapy, about 1 year later. The treated group was compared with a matched control group of 18 untreated Class III subjects. Significant differences between the treated and control groups were assessed with independent-sample t tests (P <0.05). Sagittal measurements of the maxilla showed highly significant improvements during active treatment (about 4 mm more than the untreated controls), with significant protraction effects at orbitale and pterygomaxillare. Significant improvements of overjet and molar relationship were recorded, as well as in the mandibular skeletal measures at Point B and pogonion. Vertical skeletal changes and modifications in incisor inclination were negligible, except for a significant proclination of the mandibular incisors in the treated group. Significant soft-tissue changes reflected the underlying skeletal modifications. Compared with growth of the untreated Class III subjects, the BAMP protocol induced an average increment on skeletal and soft-tissue advancement of maxillary structures of about 4 mm, and favorable mandibular changes exceeded 2 mm. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Medical response to effects of ionising radiation

    Crosbie, W.A.; Gittus, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on 'Medical Response to Effects of Ionising Radiation' in 1989 in the form of nineteen papers published as a book. Topics discussed include radiation accidents at nuclear facilities, the medical management of radiation casualties, the responsibilities, plans and resources for coping with a nuclear accident and finally the long term effects of radiation, including leukaemia epidemiology studies. All papers were selected and indexed separately. (UK)

  8. Antimicrobial Effects of Helix D-derived Peptides of Human Antithrombin III*

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K. V.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix d-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense. PMID:25202017

  9. Antimicrobial effects of helix D-derived peptides of human antithrombin III.

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-10-24

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix D-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Addition effect of erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate in the homopolymerization kinetics of a DGEBA resin

    Garcia, S.J. [Area de Ciencia de los Materiales, Departament d' Enginyeria de Sistemes Industrials i Disseny, Universitat Jaume I, Avda. Vicent Sos Baynat s/n, 12071 Castellon (Spain)]. E-mail: espallar@sg.uji.es; Ramis, X. [Laboratori de Termodinamica, Escola Tecnica Superior Enginyeria Industrial Barcelona, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Serra, A. [Departament de Q. Analitica i Q. Organica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, C/Marcel.li Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Suay, J. [Centro de Biomateriales, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    Solid bisphenol-A epoxy resin of medium molecular weight was cured using a Lewis acid initiator (erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate) in three different proportions (0.5, 1 and 2 phr). A kinetic study was performed in a differential scanning calorimeter. The complete kinetic triplet was determined (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and integral function of the deg.ree of conversion) for each system. A kinetic analysis was performed with an integral isoconversional procedure (model-free), and the kinetic model was determined both with the Coats-Redfern method (the obtained isoconversional E value being accepted as the effective activation energy) and through the compensation effect. All the systems followed the same isothermal curing model simulated from non-isothermal ones. The 'nucleation and growth' Avrami kinetic model A {sub 3/2} has been proposed as the polymerization kinetic model. The addition of initiator accelerated the reaction having higher influence when low temperatures were applied.

  11. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  12. Strong ligand field effects of blue phosphorescent mono-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes

    Ham, Ho Wan; Jung, Kyung Yoon; Kim, Young Sik

    2010-01-01

    A series of mono-cyclometalated blue phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes with two phosphines trans to each other and two cis-ancillary ligands, such as Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)(Cl), [Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)(NCMe)] + and Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 -(H)(CN), [F 2 Meppy = 2-(2',4'-difluorophenyl)-4-methyl-pyridine] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. We investigate the electron-withdrawing capabilities of ancillary ligands using the DFT and TD-DFT calculations on the ground and excited states of the three complexes to gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the different luminescence efficiency. Reducing the molecular weight of phosphine ligand with PPhMe 2 leads to a strategy of the efficient deep blue organic light-emitting devices (OLED) by thermal processing instead of the solution processing. The electron-withdrawing difluoro group substituted on the phenyl ring and the cyano strong field ancillary ligand in the trans position to the carbon atom of phenyl ring increased HOMO-LUMO gap and achieved the hypsochromic shift in emission color. As a result, the maximum emission spectra of Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)(Cl), [Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)-(NCMe)] + and Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPh-Me 2 ) 2 (H)(CN) were in the ranges of 446, 440, 439 nm, respectively.

  13. Strong ligand field effects of blue phosphorescent mono-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes

    Ham, Ho Wan [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung Yoon [International Design School for Advanced Studies, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Sik, E-mail: youngkim@hongik.ac.k [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-01

    A series of mono-cyclometalated blue phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes with two phosphines trans to each other and two cis-ancillary ligands, such as Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)(Cl), [Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)(NCMe)]{sup +} and Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-(H)(CN), [F{sub 2}Meppy = 2-(2',4'-difluorophenyl)-4-methyl-pyridine] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. We investigate the electron-withdrawing capabilities of ancillary ligands using the DFT and TD-DFT calculations on the ground and excited states of the three complexes to gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the different luminescence efficiency. Reducing the molecular weight of phosphine ligand with PPhMe{sub 2} leads to a strategy of the efficient deep blue organic light-emitting devices (OLED) by thermal processing instead of the solution processing. The electron-withdrawing difluoro group substituted on the phenyl ring and the cyano strong field ancillary ligand in the trans position to the carbon atom of phenyl ring increased HOMO-LUMO gap and achieved the hypsochromic shift in emission color. As a result, the maximum emission spectra of Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)(Cl), [Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)-(NCMe)]{sup +} and Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPh-Me{sub 2}){sub 2} (H)(CN) were in the ranges of 446, 440, 439 nm, respectively.

  14. Study of the effect of anions and mixed solvents on the kinetics of reduction of Eu(III)

    Chandrasekaran, V.R.; Sundaram, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of reduction of Eu(III) to Eu(II) in aqueous solutions of perchlorate, chloride, sulphate, acetate and lactate anions and water-methanol and water-acetone mixtures containing potassium chloride as the inert electrolyte is reported and the effect of anions and solvent on the kinetics is studied. (author)

  15. The future of international banking regulations in response to the financial crisis of 2007/2009: After Basel iii then what next?

    Joseph E. Isebor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The financial crisis 2007-2009 will not be forgotten in a hurry because of its impact on the global financial system almost replicating the Great Depression. Major and causal factors contributed to the financial crisis, and this prompted the establishment of Basel III to contain the crisis. Basel III introduced improved capital and liquidity rules, but still could not contain the crisis. This leaves regulators with questions of how to prevent another financial crisis in the future. Evidences suggest that the financial market is evolving because of its complex and changing nature, and so are the international banking regulations (Basel I, Basel II and Basel III that support the system in terms of maintaining economic and financial stability. It is clear that Basel III will not stop the next financial crisis even though the Basel accords continue to evolve in response to maintaining economic and financial stability, with the core purpose of preventing another financial crisis. Uncertainties lies ahead, and regulators cannot be sure of what will likely cause the next crisis, but indications suggest that the financial markets and international banking regulations in the form of Basel accords will continue to evolve

  16. Effect of chelate ring sizes and their substitution on intensities of hypersensitive transitions of lanthanoids (Ln(III)) ions and j (total quantum number profiles)

    Dubey, J.; Pandey, P.; Yadav, A.; Limaye, S.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Electronic spectral studies of Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III) Dy(III), Eu(III) and Tm(III) complexes with some aliphatic and aromatic O-O donor ligands viz., Glycolic (gly), Malonic (main) Succinic (suc), Glutaric (glut), Salicylic (sal), Phthalic acids and Catechol (cat) having varied chelate ring sizes and different substitutions as side chains have been carried out with a view to study the effect of chelate ring sizes on the intensities of hypersensitive and pseudo-hypersensitive transitions in lanthanoids. The intensities of these HST transitions have also been correlated with the total quantum number (J) of the lanthanoid metal ions in order to seek a probable mechanism for the phenomenon hypersensitivity. A comparison of the spectral and nephelauxetic parameters for Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III) with Dy(III) Er(III) and Tm(III) exhibit a variation in the bonding pattern from electrostatic to covalo-electrostatic from pre-Gd elements to post-Gd elements. The J-(total) quantum number profiles of the oscillator strength values for the specific HST transitions have also been examined

  17. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2

    María Pilar Castañeda-Ojeda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts.

  18. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2

    Castañeda-Ojeda, María Pilar; Moreno-Pérez, Alba; Ramos, Cayo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E) in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts. PMID:28529516

  19. The sorption of inorganic arsenic on modified sepiolite: Effect of hydrated iron(III-oxide

    Ilić Nikola I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of inorganic arsenic species, As(III and As(V, from water by sepiolite modified with hydrated iron(III oxide was investigated at 25 °C through batch studies. The influence of the initial pH value, the initial As concentrations, the contact time and types of water on the sorption capacity was investigated. Two types of water were used, deionized and groundwater. The maximal sorption capacity for As(III from deionized water was observed at initial and final pH value 7.0, while the bonding of As(V was observed to be almost pH independent for pH value in the range from 2.0 to 7.0, and the significant decrease in the sorption capacity was observed at pH values above 7.0. The sorption capacity at initial pH 7.0 was about 10 mg gˉ1 for As(III and 4.2 mg gˉ1 for As(V in deionized water. The capacity in groundwater was decreased by 40 % for As(III and by 20 % for As(V. The Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetic model revealed good agreement with the experimental results. The results show that Fe(III-modified sepiolite exhibits significant affinity for arsenic removal and it has a potential for the application in water purification processes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019, III 43009 i TR 37010

  20. EGFR and EGFRvIII Promote Angiogenesis and Cell Invasion in Glioblastoma: Combination Therapies for an Effective Treatment

    Stefanie Keller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and the mutant EGFRvIII are major focal points in current concepts of targeted cancer therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most malignant primary brain tumor. The receptors participate in the key processes of tumor cell invasion and tumor-related angiogenesis and their upregulation correlates with the poor prognosis of glioma patients. Glioma cell invasion and increased angiogenesis share mechanisms of the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM through upregulation of ECM-degrading proteases as well as the activation of aberrant signaling pathways. This review describes the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII in those mechanisms which might offer new combined therapeutic approaches targeting EGFR or EGFRvIII together with drug treatments against proteases of the ECM or downstream signaling to increase the inhibitory effects of mono-therapies.

  1. Leptin's effect on taste bud calcium responses and transmitter secretion.

    Meredith, Tricia L; Corcoran, Alan; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone released by adipose tissue, acts on the hypothalamus to control cravings and appetite. Leptin also acts to decrease taste responses to sweet substances, though there is little detailed information regarding where leptin acts in the taste transduction cascade. The present study examined the effects of leptin on sweet-evoked responses and neuro transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Our results indicate that leptin moderately decreased sweet-evoked calcium mobilization in isolated mouse taste buds. We also employed Chinese hamster ovary biosensor cells to examine taste transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Leptin reduced ATP and increased serotonin release in response to sweet stimulation. However, leptin has no effect on bitter-evoked transmitter release, further showing that the action of leptin is sweet specific. Our results support those of previous studies, which state that leptin acts on taste tissue via the leptin receptor, most likely on Type II (Receptor) cells, but also possibly on Type III (Presynaptic) cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. RA reactor safety analysis I-III, Part III - Environmental effect of the maximum credible accident; Analiza sigurnosti rada Reaktora RA I-III, III deo - Posledica maksimalno moguceg akcidenta na okolinu reaktora

    Raisic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    The objective of the maximum credible accident analysis was to determine the integral radiation doses in the vicinity of the reactor and in the environment. In case of RA reactor the maximum credible accident, meaning release of the fission products, would be caused by fuel elements meltdown. This analysis includes the following calculation results: activity of the fission products, volatility of the fission products, concentration of radioactive materials in the air, analysis of the accident environmental effects.

  3. Zero-range effective field theory for resonant wino dark matter. Part III. Annihilation effects

    Braaten, Eric; Johnson, Evan; Zhang, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Near a critical value of the wino mass where there is a zero-energy S-wave resonance at the neutral-wino-pair threshold, low-energy winos can be described by a zero-range effective field theory (ZREFT) in which the winos interact nonperturbatively through a contact interaction and through Coulomb interactions. The effects of wino-pair annihilation into electroweak gauge bosons are taken into account through the analytic continuation of the real parameters for the contact interaction to comple...

  4. A phase III multicenter trail of radiosensitizing effect and safety of sodium glycididazole in thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma

    Qin Shangbin; Wang Yadi; Yang Junquan; Wang Xiaohu; Li Haibin; Yang Zhiyong; Yu Hong; Li Xueying; Gao Xianshu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and clinical safety glycididazole (CMNa) in thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma. Methods: From June 1, 2008 to October 13, 2009, 66 pathologically proved thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma (stage II a -III, stage IV with metastases only in supraclavicular lymph nodes, by AJCC 6 th ed) were randomized into radiotherapy plus CMNa (A) or radiotherapy plus placebo (B) group. Radiotherapy was given by conventional schedule: 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction, 5 times per week to a total dose of 66 Gy/6.6-7.2 w. CMNa was given intravenously 800 mg/m 2 3 times a week in solution of 100 ml saline within 30 minutes. Radiotherapy was started 30-60 minutes after completion of infusion. Patients of Group B received placebo in saline solution. A total of 66 patients were enrolled (Group A: 32; Group B: 34), and four patients were unanalyzable, remaining 31 patients in each Group. Baseline factors were balanced. Results: Follow-up rate was 97%. Group A vs. Group B: the overall response rate was 93.5% vs. 67.7% (χ 2 =6.61, P=0.01), 2-year overall survival was 39.9% vs. 29.9% (χ 2 = 0.62, P=0.433), 2-year cancer specific survival was 43.1% vs. 26.8% (χ 2 = 0.30, P=0.878), and 2-year progression-free survival was 30.1% vs. 27.9% (χ 2 = 0.02, P=0.586). No severe side effects observed. All patients tolerated CMNa infusion well. Conclusions: CMNa is tolerable and effective as a hypoxic radiosensitizer, and its combination with radiotherapy can improve short term effect. However, survival is not improved within our follow-up period. (authors)

  5. Positive inotropic effects of RP 62719, a new pure class III antiarrhythmic agent, on guinea pig myocardium.

    Beregi, J P; Escande, D; Coudray, N; Mery, P; Mestre, M; Chemla, D; Lecarpentier, Y

    1992-12-01

    The mechanical effects of RP 62719 [(-)1-[-2-(3,4-dihydro-2H-1- benzopyran-4-yl)ethyl]-4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-piperidine] were tested in vitro on guinea pig left ventricular papillary muscle. RP 62719 is a novel pure class III antiarrhythmic agent known to prolong the cardiac action potential duration by selectively blocking the inward rectifying K+ current. Mechanical parameters were determined from contraction and relaxation phases under isotonic and isometric conditions. At a concentration of 0.02 microM, RP 62719 did not produce significant effects on inotropy or lusitropy. At 0.2 and 2 microM, the drug improved contraction under both heavy and low loading conditions, as evidenced by a 30% increase in maximum unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax, P delta L, P force normalized per cross-sectional area (AF/s, P force derivative per mm2 (+dF/s, P force derivative per mm2 (-dF/s, P < .001). At a higher concentration (20 microM), effects of RP 62719 on inotropy and lusitropy were less marked, thus accounting for the bell-shaped form of the dose-response curve. An increase in the extracellular Ca++ concentration from 2.5 to 3.75 mM improved inotropy to a similar extent (+30-50%) as did 2 microM RP 62719. However, lusitropy and mechanical coupling between contraction and relaxation were not modified in the same proportion under RP 62719 and under 3.75 mM Ca++.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-III, Part III - Environmental effect of the maximum credible accident; Analiza sigurnosti rada reaktora RA - I-III, III deo - Posledica maksimalno moguceg akcidenta na okolinu reaktora

    Raisic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    Maximum credible accident at the RA reactor would consider release of fission products into the environment. This would result from fuel elements failure or meltdown due to loss of coolant. The analysis presented in this report assumes that the reactor was operating at nominal power at the moment of maximum possible accident. The report includes calculations of fission products activity at the moment of accident, total activity release during the accident, concentration of radioactive material in the air in the reactor neighbourhood, and the analysis of accident environmental effects.

  7. Correlation of F-18 FDG PET with morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced (stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Bonnet, R.; Presselt, N.; Przetak, C.; Junker, K.; Schneider, C.P.; Hoeffken, K.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To determine the role of 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, findings in 32 patients were analyzed prospectively in an ongoing multicenter trial (LUCAS-MD, Germany). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria was histologically confirmed NSCLC stage IIIA/IIIB. For staging all patients received a PET scan in addition to a spiral CT and/or MRI before therapy. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of chemotherapy with paclitaxel (225 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6), each d1 q22 and a block of chemoradiation (45Gy, 1.5Gy b.i.d., concomitant with paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC = 2), each d1, d8, d15) followed by surgery. All patients received a second PET after completion of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Whole-body PET (ECAT Exact 47) studies (attenuation corrected, iteratively reconstructed) were obtained 60 min. after injection of 6 MBq/kg body weight F-18 FDG. For semi-quantitative analysis, the tumor standardized uptake values (SUV), the tumor to background SUV ratio (T/B ratio), the metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and the metabolic tumor index (MTI = SUV x MTD) were assessed in all primary tumors and in metastatic lymph nodes. Additionally, image fusion of PET with CT data was applied (using a HERMES Computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden). Results: So far, all patients (7/32) with complete metabolic response in lymph node metastases detected by PET, had no vital tumor cells (morphometric regression grade III). In primary tumors showing complete metabolic response, the regression grade was IIB (less than 10% vital tumor cells) or III. Conclusion: Morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. PET precedes the tumor response as measured by CT after neoadjuvant treatment and may predict the long term therapeutic outcome in stage III NSCLC

  8. Effect of Fadama III program on dry-season vegetable growers in Kwara State, Nigeria

    Babatunde Michael Matanmi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of the Fadama III program on dry-season vegetable growers in Kwara State, Nigeria. The study emanated from the need to know how well agricultural programs have achieved their targets. Data collected from 200 beneficiaries selected through a combination of purposive and random sampling techniques were used for the study. The data obtained were analyzed with descriptive statistics, a five-point Likert scale, and a t test. The results showed that the beneficiaries were mainly female, married, and relatively old, with farming as their primary occupation. The benefits accrued from the program by the farmers were a knapsack sprayer, training on record keeping, agro-chemicals, fertilizer, improved seeds, a watering can, pest and disease management, conflict resolution, and the construction of a well, borehole, cooling shed and market stall. The mean farm size of the farmers before and after participating in the program was 1.15 and 2.15 ha, respectively, with a corresponding average monthly income of NGN 6,833.75 and NGN 16,137.50, respectively (USD 1 = NGN 165. The study further revealed a positive effect of the program on the farmers' livelihoods. The major problems faced by the farmers were inadequate credit, conflict with herdsmen, land ownership problems, inadequate labor, and poor market linkage. Therefore, the study recommends the provision of credit facilities by relevant stakeholders, putting lasting conflict resolution measures in place, encouraging youths to practice agriculture, and training farmers on market linkage.

  9. Effects of probiotic type, dose and treatment duration on irritable bowel syndrome diagnosed by Rome III criteria: a meta-analysis.

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Lixiang; Guo, Chuanguo; Mu, Dan; Feng, Bingcheng; Zuo, Xiuli; Li, Yanqing

    2016-06-13

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastroenterological diseases, affecting 11.2 % of people worldwide. Previous studies have shown that probiotic treatment may benefit IBS patients. However, the effect of probiotics and the appropriate type, dose, and treatment duration for IBS are still unclear. The aim of the current study was to assess the efficacy of different probiotic types, doses and treatment durations in IBS patients diagnosed by Rome III criteria via a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to October 2015 were searched. RCTs including comparisons between the effects of probiotics and placebo on IBS patients diagnosed by Rome III criteria were eligible. Dichotomous data were pooled to obtain the relative risk (RR) with a 95 % confidence interval (CI), whereas continuous data were pooled using a standardized mean difference (SMD) with a 95 % CI. Twenty-one RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. Probiotic therapy was associated with more improvement than placebo administration in overall symptom response (RR: 1.82, 95 % CI 1.27 to 2.60) and quality of life (QoL) (SMD: 0.29, 95 % CI 0.08 to 0.50), but not in individual IBS symptoms. Single probiotics, a low dose, and a short treatment duration were more effective with respect to overall symptom response and QoL. No differences were detected in individual IBS symptoms in the subgroup analyses. Probiotics are an effective pharmacological therapy in IBS patients. Single probiotics at a low dose and with a short treatment duration appear to be more effective in improving overall symptom response and QoL, but more evidence for these effects is still needed.

  10. A free response test of interpersonal effectiveness.

    Getter, H; Nowinski, J K

    1981-06-01

    Development of the Interpersonal Problem Solving Assessment Technique (IPSAT), College form, is described. Guided by Rotter's Social Learning Theory, problem-solving, and assertiveness research, a semi-structured free response format was designed to assess components of interpersonal effectiveness, The instrument yields patterns of self-reported behaviors in six classes of problematic social situations. A detailed manual enabled reliable scoring of the following response categories: Effectiveness, avoidance, appropriateness, dependency and solution productivity. Scores were not materially affected by sex, verbal ability, or social desirability response sets. Correlations with the College Self-Expression Scale, the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule and the Lanyon Psychological Screening Inventory provided initial evidence of validity. Comparison of mean IPSAT scores of 23 psychotherapy clients with those of 78 normative subjects showed that clients report less interpersonal effectiveness and more avoidance than controls. Implications for utility of the IPSAT are discussed.

  11. Effects of 3d-4f magnetic exchange interactions on the dynamics of the magnetization of Dy(III)-M(II)-Dy(III) trinuclear clusters.

    Pointillart, Fabrice; Bernot, Kevin; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2007-01-01

    [{Dy(hfac)(3)}(2){Fe(bpca)(2)}] x CHCl(3) ([Dy(2)Fe]) and [{Dy(hfac)(3)}(2){Ni(bpca)(2)}]CHCl(3) ([Dy(2)Ni]) (in which hfac(-)=1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate and bpca(-)=bis(2-pyridylcarbonyl)amine anion) were synthesized and characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction shows that [Dy(2)Fe] and [Dy(2)Ni] are linear trinuclear complexes. Static magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal a weak ferromagnetic exchange interaction between Ni(II) and Dy(III) ions in [Dy(2)Ni], whereas the use of the diamagnetic Fe(II) ion leads to the absence of magnetic exchange interaction in [Dy(2)Fe]. Dynamic susceptibility measurements show a thermally activated behavior with the energy barrier of 9.7 and 4.9 K for the [Dy(2)Fe] and [Dy(2)Ni] complexes, respectively. A surprising negative effect of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction has been found and has been attributed to the structural conformation of these trinuclear complexes.

  12. Differential carrier lifetime and transport effects in electrically injected III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Rashidi, A.; Nami, M.; Monavarian, M.; Aragon, A.; DaVico, K.; Ayoub, F.; Mishkat-Ul-Masabih, S.; Rishinaramangalam, A.; Feezell, D.

    2017-07-01

    This work describes a small-signal microwave method for determining the differential carrier lifetime and transport effects in electrically injected InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). By considering the carrier diffusion, capture, thermionic escape, and recombination, the rate equations are used to derive an equivalent small-signal electrical circuit for the LEDs, from which expressions for the input impedance and modulation response are obtained. The expressions are simultaneously fit to the experimental data for the input impedance and modulation response for nonpolar InGaN/GaN micro-LEDs on free-standing GaN substrates. The fittings are used to extract the transport related circuit parameters and differential carrier lifetimes. The dependence of the parameters on the device diameter and current density is reported. We also derive approximations for the modulation response under low and high injection levels and show that the transport of carriers affects the modulation response of the device, especially at low injection levels. The methods presented are relevant to the design of high-speed LEDs for visible-light communication.

  13. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Campbell, Philip M., E-mail: philip.campbell@gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Vogel, Eric M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Ready, W. Jud [Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  14. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Chih-Ta; Huang, Kai-Yu

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20 V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30 V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  15. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption

    Chou, Wei-Lung, E-mail: wlchou0388@hotmail.com [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chih-Ta [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan Hsien 717, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kai-Yu [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20 V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30 V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  16. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  17. The Effective Dynamic Ranges for Glaucomatous Visual Field Progression With Standard Automated Perimetry and Stimulus Sizes III and V.

    Wall, Michael; Zamba, Gideon K D; Artes, Paul H

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown that threshold estimates below approximately 20 dB have little effect on the ability to detect visual field progression in glaucoma. We aimed to compare stimulus size V to stimulus size III, in areas of visual damage, to confirm these findings by using (1) a different dataset, (2) different techniques of progression analysis, and (3) an analysis to evaluate the effect of censoring on mean deviation (MD). In the Iowa Variability in Perimetry Study, 120 glaucoma subjects were tested every 6 months for 4 years with size III SITA Standard and size V Full Threshold. Progression was determined with three complementary techniques: pointwise linear regression (PLR), permutation of PLR, and linear regression of the MD index. All analyses were repeated on "censored'' datasets in which threshold estimates below a given criterion value were set to equal the criterion value. Our analyses confirmed previous observations that threshold estimates below 20 dB contribute much less to visual field progression than estimates above this range. These findings were broadly similar with stimulus sizes III and V. Censoring of threshold values < 20 dB has relatively little impact on the rates of visual field progression in patients with mild to moderate glaucoma. Size V, which has lower retest variability, performs at least as well as size III for longitudinal glaucoma progression analysis and appears to have a larger useful dynamic range owing to the upper sensitivity limit being higher.

  18. Predictive value of PET-CT for pathological response in stages II and III breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel.

    García García-Esquinas, Marta A; Arrazola García, Juan; García-Sáenz, José A; Furió-Bacete, V; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel E; Ortega Candil, Aída; Cabrera Martín, María N; Carreras Delgado, José L

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively study the value of PET-CT with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response of locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients. A written informed consent and approval were obtained from the Ethics Committee. PET-CT accuracy in the prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC was studied in primary tumors and lymph node metastasis in 43 women (mean age: 50 years: range: 27-71 years) with histologically proven breast cancer between December 2009 and January 2011. PET-CT was performed at baseline and after NAC. SUV(max) percentage changes (ΔSUV(max)) were compared with pathology findings at surgery. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to discriminate between locoregional pCR and non-pCR. In patients not achieving pCR, it was investigated if ΔSUV(max) could accurately identify the residual cancer burden (RCB) classes: RCB-I (minimal residual disease (MRD)), RCB-II (moderate RD), and RCB-III (extensive RD). pCR was obtained in 11 patients (25.6%). Residual disease was found in 32 patients (74.4%): 16 (37.2%) RCB-I, 15 (35.6%) RCB-II and 2 (4.7%) RCB-III. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 90.9%, 90.6%, and 90.7%, respectively. Specificity was 94.1% in the identification of a subset of patients who had either pCR or MRD. Accuracy of ΔSUV(max) in the locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients after NAC is high for the identification of pCR cases. Its specificity is potentially sufficient to identify a subgroup of patients who could be managed with conservative surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  19. Linear scan voltammetric indirect determination of Al(III) by the catalytic cathodic response of norepinephrine at the hanging mercury drop electrode.

    Zhang, Fuping; Ji, Ming; Xu, Quan; Yang, Li; Bi, Shuping

    2005-09-01

    The biological effects of aluminum (Al) have received much attention in recent years. Al is of basic relevance as concern with its reactivity and bioavailability. In this paper, the electrochemical behaviors of norepinephrine (NE) in the absence and presence of Al(III) at the hanging mercury drop electrode have been studied and applied to the practical analysis. Highly selective catalytic cathodic peak of NE is yielded by linear scan voltammetry (LSV) at -1.32 V (vs. SCE). A linear relationship holds between the cathodic peak current and the Al(III) concentration. It has been successfully applied to the determination of Al(III) in real waters and synthetic biological samples with satisfying results, which are in accordance with those obtained by ICP-AES method. The electrochemical properties and the mechanisms of the peaks in the presence and absence of Al(III) have been explored. The results show that they are irreversible adsorptive hydrogen catalytic waves. These studies not only enrich the methods of determining Al, but also lay foundations of further understanding of the mechanisms of neurodementia.

  20. THE BLUESHIFTING AND BALDWIN EFFECTS FOR THE [O III] λ5007 EMISSION LINE IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Zhang Kai; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Tinggui; Gaskell, C. Martin

    2011-01-01

    We use homogeneous samples of radio-quiet Seyfert 1 galaxies and QSOs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the connection between the velocity shift and the equivalent width (EW) of the [O III] λ5007 emission line, and their correlations with physical parameters of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find a significant and negative correlation between the EW of the core component, EW(core), and the blueshift of either the core (the peak), the wing, or the total profile of [O III] emission; it is fairly strong for the blueshift of the total profile in particular. However, both quantities (EW and velocity shift) generally have only weak, if any, correlations with fundamental AGN parameters such as the nuclear continuum luminosity at 5100 A ( 5100 ), black hole mass (M BH ), and the Eddington ratio (L/L Edd ); these correlations include the classical Baldwin effect of EW(core), an inverse Baldwin effect of EW(wing), and the relationship between velocity shifts and L/L Edd . Our findings suggest that both the large object-to-object variation in the strength of [O III] emission and the blueshift-EW(core) connection are not governed primarily by fundamental AGN parameters such as L 5100 , M BH , and L/L Edd . We propose that the interstellar medium conditions of the host galaxies play a major role instead in the diversity of the [O III] properties in active galaxies. This suggests that the use of [O III] λ5007 luminosity as a proxy of AGN luminosity does not depend strongly on the above-mentioned fundamental AGN parameters.

  1. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  2. Bio-production of Baccatin III, an Important Precursor of Paclitaxel by a Cost-Effective Approach.

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wei, Tao; Lin, Jun-Fang; Guo, Li-Qiong; Wu, Guang-Pei; Wei, Jun-Bin; Huang, Jia-Jun; Ouyang, Ping-Lan

    2018-07-01

    Natural production of anti-cancer drug taxol from Taxus has proved to be environmentally unsustainable and economically unfeasible. Currently, bioengineering the biosynthetic pathway of taxol is an attractive alternative production approach. 10-deacetylbaccatin III-10-O-acetyl transferase (DBAT) was previously characterized as an acyltransferase, using 10-deacetylbaccatin III (10-DAB) and acetyl CoA as natural substrates, to form baccatin III in the taxol biosynthesis. Here, we report that other than the natural acetyl CoA (Ac-CoA) substrate, DBAT can also utilize vinyl acetate (VA), which is commercially available at very low cost, acylate quickly and irreversibly, as acetyl donor in the acyl transfer reaction to produce baccatin III. Furthermore, mutants were prepared via a semi-rational design in this work. A double mutant, I43S/D390R was constructed to combine the positive effects of the different single mutations on catalytic activity, and its catalytic efficiency towards 10-DAB and VA was successfully improved by 3.30-fold, compared to that of wild-type DBAT, while 2.99-fold higher than the catalytic efficiency of WT DBAT towards 10-DAB and Ac-CoA. These findings can provide a promising economically and environmentally friendly method for exploring novel acyl donors to engineer natural product pathways.

  3. Treatment and post-treatment effects of facemask therapy on the sagittal pharyngeal dimensions in Class III subjects.

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Mucedero, Manuela; Cozza, Paola

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this cephalometric study was to analyse the treatment and post-treatment craniofacial effects of a facemask (FM) combined with a bite block (BB) with specific regard to the sagittal pharyngeal dimensions in subjects with a Class III malocclusion when compared with an untreated Class III control group. The FM/BB group (22 subjects, 12 females and 10 males) had a mean age pre-treatment (T1) of 8.9 +/- 1.5 years, at the end of active treatment (T2) of 10.5 +/- 1.3 years, and post-treatment (T3) of 12.6 +/- 1.9 years. The treated group was compared with a control group of 14 subjects (6 females and 8 males) with untreated Class III malocclusions that matched the FM/BB group as to age at T1, T2, and T3, observation periods and skeletal maturation. Comparisons of the T2-T1 and T3-T1 changes between the two groups were analysed with the Mann-Whitney test. Significant favourable skeletal changes in the maxilla and mandible were observed in the treated group both after Ts2 and T3. No significant short- or long-term changes in the sagittal oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal airway dimensions were induced by maxillary protraction in subjects with a Class III malocclusion when compared with untreated controls.

  4. Through-Space Paramagnetic NMR Effects in Host-Guest Complexes: Potential Ruthenium(III) Metallodrugs with Macrocyclic Carriers.

    Chyba, Jan; Novák, Martin; Munzarová, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Marek, Radek

    2018-04-05

    The potential of paramagnetic ruthenium(III) compounds for use as anticancer metallodrugs has been investigated extensively during the past several decades. However, the means by which these ruthenium compounds are transported and distributed in living bodies remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we prepared several novel ruthenium(III) compounds with the general structure Na + [ trans-Ru III Cl 4 (DMSO)(L)] - (DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide), where L stands for pyridine or imidazole linked with adamantane, a hydrophobic chemophore. The supramolecular interactions of these compounds with macrocyclic carriers of the cyclodextrin (CD) and cucurbit[ n]uril (CB) families were investigated by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and relativistic DFT methods. The long-range hyperfine NMR effects of the paramagnetic guest on the host macrocycle are related to the distance between them and their relative orientation in the host-guest complex. The CD and CB macrocyclic carriers being studied in this account can be attached to a vector that attracts the drug-carrier system to a specific biological target and our investigation thus introduces a new possibility in the field of targeted delivery of anticancer metallodrugs based on ruthenium(III) compounds.

  5. Rethinking anaerobic As(III) oxidation in filters: Effect of indigenous nitrate respirers.

    Cui, Jinli; Du, Jingjing; Tian, Haixia; Chan, Tingshan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2018-04-01

    Microorganisms play a key role in the redox transformation of arsenic (As) in aquifers. In this study, the impact of indigenous bacteria, especially the prevailing nitrate respirers, on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation was explored during groundwater filtration using granular TiO 2 and subsequent spent TiO 2 anaerobic landfill. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy analysis showed As(III) oxidation (46% in 10 days) in the presence of nitrate in the simulated anaerobic landfills. Meanwhile, iron (Fe) species on the spent TiO 2 were dominated by amorphous ferric arsenate, ferrihydrite and goethite. The Fe phase showed no change during the anaerobic landfill incubation. Batch incubation experiments implied that the indigenous bacteria completely oxidized As(III) to arsenate (As(V)) in 10 days using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. The bacterial community analysis indicated that various kinds of microbial species exist in groundwater matrix. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum, with Hydrogenophaga (34%), Limnohabitans (16%), and Simplicispira (7%) as the major bacterial genera. The nitrate respirers especially from the Hydrogenophaga genus anaerobically oxidized As(III) using nitrate as an electron acceptor instead of oxygen. Our study implied that microbes can facilitate the groundwater As oxidation using nitrate on the adsorptive media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intramedullary rodding in type III osteogenesis imperfecta. Effects on neuromotor development in 10 children

    Engelbert, R. H.; Helders, P. J.; Keessen, W.; Pruijs, H. E.; Gooskens, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    We studied retrospectively gross motor development and the impact of intramedullary rodding in 10 children with type III osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). There was a pronounced delay in motor development and the order in achieving gross motor milestones differed from the normal developmental sequence.

  7. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  8. Effect of thermomechanical treatment of the stress corrosion cracking of metastable beta III titanium

    Seats, J.H.; Condit, D.O.

    1974-01-01

    Results of studies on the relations of microstructural changes with stress corrosion of Ti--11.5 Mo--6 Zr--4.5 Sn (Beta III) alloys are presented. It was found that this alloy is virtually immune to stress corrosion cracking if no imperfections in the surface are present. Specimens that had not been cold worked showed surface deterioration, but it was not serious enough to cause any marked reduction in yield strengths. The alloy is, however, susceptible to SCC if the surface contains an imperfection such as a fatigue crack where high stresses can concentrate during testing. These high stress levels at the crack tip may cause mechanical destruction of the passivating oxide and allow a higher concentration of chloride ions near the fresh metal surfaces. However, even with precracked specimens, crack propagation is slow as evidenced by no failures within the 720 hour test period. The extreme notch sensitivity of Beta III prevented initiation of fatigue cracks in the sections of the alloy with 20 and 50 percent cold work. More research must be done to test Beta III in this condition. However, on the basis of the research conducted thus far, SCC susceptibility of Beta III titanium alloy appears to be independent of thermomechanical pretreatment. (U.S.)

  9. Revisiting The First Galaxies: The effects of Population III stars on their host galaxies

    Muratov, Alexander L. [U. Michigan, Dept. Astron.; Gnedin, Oleg Y. [U. Michigan, Dept. Astron.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Zemp, Marcel [Beijing, KITPC

    2013-07-12

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H2 formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 108 years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 × 106 M re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  10. Effectiveness of Blog Response Strategies to Minimize Crisis Effects

    Tomsic, Louis P.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of four post-crisis responses on five different variables using a blog tool. The four post-crisis responses are information only, compensation, apology, and sympathy. The five dependent variables are reputation, anger (negative emotion), negative word-of-mouth, account acceptance and state of the publics based on…

  11. A novel fusion protein domain III-capsid from dengue-2, in a highly aggregated form, induces a functional immune response and protection in mice

    Valdes, Iris; Bernardo, Lidice; Gil, Lazaro; Pavon, Alekis; Lazo, Laura; Lopez, Carlos; Romero, Yaremis; Menendez, Ivon; Falcon, Viviana; Betancourt, Lazaro; Martin, Jorge; Chinea, Glay; Silva, Ricardo; Guzman, Maria G.; Guillen, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2009-01-01

    Based on the immunogenicity of domain III from the Envelope protein of dengue virus as well as the proven protective capacity of the capsid antigen, we have designed a novel domain III-capsid chimeric protein with the goal of obtaining a molecule potentially able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity (CMI). After expression of the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli, the domain III moiety retained its antigenicity as evaluated with anti-dengue sera. In order to explore alternatives for modulating the immunogenicity of the protein, it was mixed with oligodeoxynucleotides in order to obtain particulated aggregates and then immunologically evaluated in mice in comparison with non-aggregated controls. Although the humoral immune response induced by both forms of the protein was equivalent, the aggregated variant resulted in a much stronger CMI as measured by in vitro IFN-γ secretion and protection experiments, mediated by CD4 + and CD8 + cells. The present work provides additional evidence in support for a crucial role of CMI in protection against dengue virus and describes a novel vaccine candidate against the disease based on a recombinant protein that can stimulate both arms of the acquired immune system.

  12. Relationship between time to clinical response and outcomes among Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) risk class III and IV hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia who received ceftriaxone and azithromycin.

    Zasowski, Evan; Butterfield, Jill M; McNutt, Louise-Ann; Cohen, Jason; Cosler, Leon; Pai, Manjunath P; Gottwald, Joseph; Chen, Wen Zhen; Lodise, Thomas P

    2014-07-01

    Recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance endorses the use of an early clinical response endpoint as the primary outcome for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) trials. While antibiotics will now be approved for CABP, in practice they will primarily be used to treat patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). More importantly, it is unclear how achievement of the new FDA CABP early response endpoint translates into clinically applicable real-world outcomes for patients with CAP. To address this, a retrospective cohort study was conducted among adult patients who received ceftriaxone and azithromycin for CAP of Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) risk class III and IV at an academic medical center. The clinical response was defined as clinical stability for 24 h with improvement in at least one pneumonia symptom and with no symptom worsening. A classification and regression tree (CART) was used to determine the delay in response time, measured in days, associated with the greatest risk of a prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS) and adverse outcomes (in-hospital mortality or 30-day CAP-related readmission). A total of 250 patients were included. On average, patients were discharged 2 days following the achievement of a clinical response. In the CART analysis, adverse clinical outcomes were higher among day 5 nonresponders than those who responded by day 5 (22.4% versus 6.9%, P = 0.001). The findings from this study indicate that time to clinical response, as defined by the recent FDA guidance, is a reasonable prognostic indicator of real-world effectiveness outcomes among hospitalized PORT risk class III and IV patients with CAP who received ceftriaxone and azithromycin. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Effect of ionizing radiation on the activity of restriction nucleases PvuII and HindIII

    Luzova, M.; Michaelidesova, A.; Davidkova, M.

    2014-01-01

    The research is focused on the influence of the ionizing radiation on the activity of the restriction enzymes PvuII and HindIII. Enzymes PvuII and HindIII are restriction endonucleases of type II. These enzymes can be found in bacteria and they have a significant role in defense mechanisms of bacteria against viruses. They cleave DNA double helix at specific recognition palindromic sequences in the presence of cofactor Mg 2+ . PvuII cleaves the sequence CAG↓CTG and HindIII cleaves the sequence A↓AGCTT in marked places. Plasmid pcDNA3 has been used as the DNA substrate for the whole experimental study. It is 5446 base pairs (bp) long, circular DNA molecule and it contains three recognition sites for enzyme PvuII and one recognition site for enzyme HindIII. After the correct interaction of pcDNA3 with PvuII, we thus have three plasmid fragments with lengths 1069, 1097 and 3280 bp. When HindIII is incubated with this plasmid, we shall obtain the linear form of the DNA plasmid.The method for processing the cleaved DNA samples is the agarose gel electrophoresis. The activity of the irradiated enzymes decreases with increasing dose of radiation, because a part of the enzymes is deactivated due to induced radiation damage. To determine effect of radiation quality, samples were irradiated using proton and gamma sources. The results of our experimental study will be presented and discussed with respect to molecular structure of both enzymes and particular sites of radical damage influencing their function. (authors)

  14. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    Uwamariya, V.

    2014-06-25

    The effects of calcium on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of As(III) and As(V) onto iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were investigated through batch experiments, rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT) and kinetics modelling. Batch experiments showed that at calcium concentrations≤20 mg/L, high As(III) and As(V) removal efficiencies by IOCS and GFH are achieved at pH 6. An increase of the calcium concentration to 40 and 80 mg/L reversed this trend, giving higher removal efficiencies at higher pH (8). The adsorption capacities of IOCS and GFH at an equilibrium arsenic concentration of 10 g/L were found to be between 2.0 and 3.1 mg/g for synthetic water without calcium and between 2.8 and 5.3 mg/g when 80 mg/L of calcium was present at the studied pH values. After 10 hours of filter run in RSSCT, approximately 1000 empty bed volumes, the ratios of C/Co for As(V) were 26% and 18% for calcium-free model water; and only 1% and 0.2% after addition of 80 mg/L of Ca for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without calcium addition, and moves to the second-reaction-order kinetics when calcium is added. Based on the intraparticle diffusion model, the main controlling mechanism for As(III) adsorption is intraparticle diffusion, while surface diffusion contributes greatly to the adsorption of As(V).

  15. The biowaiver extension for BCS class III drugs: the effect of dissolution rate on the bioequivalence of BCS class III immediate-release drugs predicted by computer simulation.

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-08-02

    The Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) guidance issued by the FDA allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I drugs. However, a number of drugs within BCS class III have been proposed to be eligible for biowaivers. The World Health Organization (WHO) has shortened the requisite dissolution time of BCS class III drugs on their Essential Medicine List (EML) from 30 to 15 min for extended biowaivers; however, the impact of the shorter dissolution time on AUC(0-inf) and C(max) is unknown. The objectives of this investigation were to assess the ability of gastrointestinal simulation software to predict the oral absorption of the BCS class I drugs propranolol and metoprolol and the BCS class III drugs cimetidine, atenolol, and amoxicillin, and to perform in silico bioequivalence studies to assess the feasibility of extending biowaivers to BCS class III drugs. The drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted using physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of test drugs provided by GastroPlus (version 6.0). Virtual trials with a 200 mL dose volume at different drug release rates (T(85%) = 15 to 180 min) were performed to predict the oral absorption (C(max) and AUC(0-inf)) of the above drugs. Both BCS class I drugs satisfied bioequivalence with regard to the release rates up to 120 min. The results with BCS class III drugs demonstrated bioequivalence using the prolonged release rate, T(85%) = 45 or 60 min, indicating that the dissolution standard for bioequivalence is dependent on the intestinal membrane permeability and permeability profile throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The results of GastroPlus simulations indicate that the dissolution rate of BCS class III drugs could be prolonged to the point where dissolution, rather than permeability, would control the overall absorption. For BCS class III drugs with intestinal absorption patterns

  16. Hydration effects on the barrier function of stratum corneum lipids: Raman analysis of ceramides 2, III and 5.

    Tfayli, Ali; Jamal, Dima; Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2013-11-07

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin; its barrier function is highly dependent on the composition and the structure as well as the organization of lipids in its extracellular matrix. Ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol represent the major lipid classes present in this matrix. They play an important role in maintaining the normal hydration levels required for the normal physiological function. Despite the advancement in the understanding of the structure, composition and the function of the stratum corneum (SC), the concern of "dry skin" remains important in dermatology and care research. Most studies focus on the quantification of water in the skin using different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, while the studies that investigate the effect of hydration on the quality of the barrier function of the skin are limited. Raman spectroscopy provides structural, conformational and organizational information that could help elucidate the effect of hydration on the barrier function of the skin. In order to assess the effect of relative humidity on the lipid barrier function; we used Raman spectroscopy to follow-up the evolution of the conformation and the organization of three synthetic ceramides (CER) differing from each other by the nature of their polar heads (sphingosine, phytosphingosine and α hydroxyl sphingosine), CER 2, III and 5 respectively. CER III and 5 showed a more compact and ordered organization with stronger polar interactions at intermediate relative humidity values, while CER 2 showed opposite tendencies to those observed with CER III and 5.

  17. Estimating the adjuvant chemotherapy effect in elderly stage II and III colon cancer patients in an observational study.

    Kim, Ki-Yeol; Cha, In-Ho; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Nam Kyu; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Roh, Jae Kyung; Shin, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has been known as a standard treatment for patients with resected colon cancer. However, in elderly colon cancer patients, the characteristics of patients are heterogeneous with regard to life expectancy and comorbidities. Thus, with regard to the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer, it is difficult to extrapolate data of clinical trials from the younger into the older general population. Data for 382 elderly colon cancer patients were analyzed: 217 in Stage II and 165 in Stage III. The efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy was evaluated in elderly colon cancer patients after a match by the propensity score method. For matched patients with Stage II colon cancer, there was no significant efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in the risk of death during all follow-up periods (P-value, 0.06-0.37). Though there was a tendency that the adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the death rate during the follow-up periods, it was not statistically significant. In the case of Stage III, the adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly effective in matched patients for 5-year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.90) and overall survival (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.94). Adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients with Stage II colon cancer is not effective, whereas elderly patients with Stage III with adjuvant chemotherapy appear to have a better survival rate in the general population. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of survey mode on response patterns

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    .7%). Marital status, ethnic background and highest completed education were associated with non-response in both modes. Furthermore, sex and age were associated with non-response in the self-administered mode. No significant mode effects were observed for indicators related to use of health services......BACKGROUND: While face-to-face interviews are considered the gold standard of survey modes, self-administered questionnaires are often preferred for cost and convenience. This article examines response patterns in two general population health surveys carried out by face-to-face interview and self......-administered questionnaire, respectively. METHOD: Data derives from a health interview survey in the Region of Southern Denmark (face-to-face interview) and The Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010 (self-administered questionnaire). Identical questions were used in both surveys. Data on all individuals were obtained from...

  19. The Immunodominance Change and Protection of CD4+ T-Cell Responses Elicited by an Envelope Protein Domain III-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine in Mice.

    Hsin-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Dengue is the leading cause of mosquito-borne viral infections and no vaccine is available now. Envelope protein domain III (ED3 is the major target for the binding of dengue virus neutralizing antibodies; however, the ED3-specifc T-cell response is less well understood. To investigate the T-cell responses to four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to 4, we immunized mice using either a tetravalent ED3-based DNA or protein vaccine, or combined both as a DNA prime-protein boost strategy (prime-boost. A significant serotype-dependent IFN-γ or IL-4 response was observed in mice immunized with either the DNA or protein vaccine. The IFN-γ response was dominant to DENV-1 to 3, whereas the IL-4 response was dominant to DENV-4. Although the similar IgG titers for the four serotypes were observed in mice immunized with the tetravalent vaccines, the neutralizing antibody titers varied and followed the order of 2 = 3>1>4. Interestingly, the lower IFN-γ response to DENV-4 is attributable to the immunodominance change between two CD4+ T-cell epitopes; one T-cell epitope located at E349-363 of DENV-1 to 3 was more immunogenic than the DENV-4 epitope E313-327. Despite DENV-4 specific IFN-γ responses were suppressed by immunodominance change, either DENV-4-specific IFN-γ or neutralizing antibody responses were still recalled after DENV-4 challenge and contributed to virus clearance. Immunization with the prime-boost elicited both IFN-γ and neutralizing antibody responses and provided better protection than either DNA or protein immunization. Our findings shed light on how ED3-based tetravalent dengue vaccines sharpen host CD4 T-cell responses and contribute to protection against dengue virus.

  20. Evidence of scattering effects on the sizes of interplanetary Type III radio bursts

    Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.; Dulk, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of 162 interplanetary Type III radio bursts; some of these bursts have been observed in association with fast electrons and Langmuir wave events at 1 AU and, in addition, have been subjected to in situ plasma parameter measurements. It is noted that the sizes of burst sources are anomalously large, compared to what one would anticipate on the basis of the interplanetary plasma density distribution, and that the variation of source size with frequency, when compared with the plasma frequency variation measured in situ, implies that the source sizes expand with decreasing frequency to fill a cone whose apex is at the sun. It is also found that some local phenomenon near the earth controls the apparent size of low frequency Type III sources.

  1. Mechanistic investigation of food effect on disintegration and dissolution of BCS class III compound solid formulations: the importance of viscosity.

    Radwan, Asma; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2012-10-01

    A negative food effect, i.e. a decrease in bioavailability upon the co-administration of compounds together with food, has been attributed particularly with high solubility/low permeability compounds (BCS class III). Different mechanisms have been proposed including intestinal dilution leading to a lower concentration gradient across the intestinal wall as well as binding of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to food components in the intestine and thereby decreasing the fraction of the dose available for absorption. These mechanisms refer primarily to the compound and not to the dosage form. An increase in viscosity of the dissolution fluid will in particular affect the absorption of BCS type III compounds with preferential absorption in the upper small intestine if the API release is delayed from the dosage form. The present study demonstrated that the increase in viscosity of the dissolution medium, following ingestion of a solid meal, may drastically reduce disintegration and dissolution. For that purpose the viscosity of the standard FDA meal was determined and simulated by solutions of HPMC in buffer. As model formulations, three commercially available tablets containing trospium chloride, a BCS class III m-cholinoreceptor antagonist was used. Trospium chloride drug products have been described to undergo a negative food effect of more than 80% following ingestion with food. The tablets showed prolonged disintegration times and reduced dissolution rates in viscous media, which could be attributed to changes in the liquid penetration rates. The effect was particularly significant for film-coated tablets relative to uncoated dosage forms. The results show the necessity of considering media viscosity when designing in vitro models of drug release for BCS type III drug formulations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Effect of radiation on gestation periods in dams of Segment III beagles

    Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    The lengths of the gestation periods for bitches whose offspring were potentially assignable to Segment III of the Long-Term Study were not affected by radiation exposure (P = .998). Other factors were found to significantly correlate with the duration of the gestation periods, including the length of the first gestation period (P < .001), size of first litter (P = .175), the average environmental temperature during pregnancy (P = .055) and the size of the second litter

  3. Colorimetric sensing of oxalate based on its inhibitory effect on the reaction of Fe (III) with curcumin nanoparticles

    Pourreza, Nahid; Lotfizadeh, Neda; Golmohammadi, Hamed

    2018-03-01

    In this research, a new colorimetric method for the determination of oxalate using curcumin nanoparticles (CURNs) in the presence Fe (III) is introduced. The method is based on the inhibitory effect of oxalate ion on the reaction of (CURNs) with Fe (III) in acidic media. This reaction was monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance of CURNs-Fe3 + complex in the presence of oxalate ion at 427 nm. The effect of different parameters such as the pH of the sample solution, concentration of Fe (III), concentration of CURNs and the reaction time was examined and optimized. Under optimum experimental conditions, the absorption intensity was linear with the concentration of oxalate in the range of 0.15 to 1.70 μg mL- 1. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.077 μg mL- 1 and the relative standard deviations (RSD) for 8 replicate measurements of 0.40 and 1.05 μg mL- 1 of oxalate were 4.20% and 2.74%, respectively. The developed method was successfully employed to the determination of oxalate in water, food and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Electrochemical Studies of the Inhibition and Activation Effects of Al (III on the Activity of Bovine Liver Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    Shuping Bi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the study of Al3+ ion on the enzyme activity by using of electrochemical techniques was rarely found in available literatures, the differential-pulse polarography (DPP technique was applied to study the effects of Al3+ ion on the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH activity in the catalytical reaction of α-KG +NADH+NH4 + ⇔ L-Glu+NAD++H2O by monitoring the DPP reduction current of NAD+. At the plant and animal physiologically relevant pH values (pH=6.5 and 7.5, the GDH enzyme activities were strongly depended on the concentrations of the metal ion in the assay mixture solutions. In the lower Al (III concentration solutions (80μM, the inhibition effects of Al (III were shown again. The cyclic voltammetry of NAD+ and NAD+-GDH in the presence of Al (III can help to explain some biological phenomena. According to the differential-pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry experiments, the present research confirmed that the electrochemical technique is a convenient and reliable sensor for accurate determination of enzyme activity in biological and environmental samples.

  5. DRD4-exonIII-VNTR moderates the effect of childhood adversities on emotional resilience in young-adults.

    Debjani Das

    Full Text Available Most individuals successfully maintain psychological well-being even when exposed to trauma or adversity. Emotional resilience or the ability to thrive in the face of adversity is determined by complex interactions between genetic makeup, previous exposure to stress, personality, coping style, availability of social support, etc. Recent studies have demonstrated that childhood trauma diminishes resilience in adults and affects mental health. The Dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4 exon III variable number tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism was reported to moderate the impact of adverse childhood environment on behaviour, mood and other health-related outcomes. In this study we investigated whether DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype moderates the effect of childhood adversities (CA on resilience. In a representative population sample (n = 1148 aged 30-34 years, we observed an interactive effect of DRD4 genotype and CA (β = 0.132; p = 0.003 on resilience despite no main effect of the genotype when effects of age, gender and education were controlled for. The 7-repeat allele appears to protect against the adverse effect of CA since the decline in resilience associated with increased adversity was evident only in individuals without the 7-repeat allele. Resilience was also significantly associated with approach-/avoidance-related personality measures (behavioural inhibition/activation system; BIS/BAS measures and an interactive effect of DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype and CA on BAS was observed. Hence it is possible that approach-related personality traits could be mediating the effect of the DRD4 gene and childhood environment interaction on resilience such that when stressors are present, the 7-repeat allele influences the development of personality in a way that provides protection against adverse outcomes.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of optimizing prevention in patients with coronary heart disease: the EUROASPIRE III health economics project.

    De Smedt, Delphine; Kotseva, Kornelia; De Bacquer, Dirk; Wood, David; De Backer, Guy; Dallongeville, Jean; Seppo, Lehto; Pajak, Andrzej; Reiner, Zeljko; Vanuzzo, Diego; Georgiev, Borislav; Gotcheva, Nina; Annemans, Lieven

    2012-11-01

    The EUROASPIRE III survey indicated that the guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention are poorly implemented in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this health economic project was to assess the potential clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of optimizing cardiovascular prevention in eight EUROASPIRE III countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Finland, France, Italy, Poland, and the U.K.). METHODS AND RESULTS The individual risk for subsequent cardiovascular events was estimated, based on published Framingham equations. Based on the EUROASPIRE III data, the type of suboptimal prevention, if any, was identified for each individual, and the effects of optimized tailored prevention (smoking cessation, diet and exercise, better management of elevated blood pressure and/or LDL-cholesterol) were estimated. Costs of prevention and savings of avoided events were based on country-specific data. A willingness to pay threshold of €30,000/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was used. The robustness of the results was validated by sensitivity analyses. Overall, the cost-effectiveness analyses for the eight countries showed mainly favourable results with an average incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €12,484 per QALY. Only in the minority of patients at the lowest risk for recurrent events, intensifying preventive therapy seems not cost-effective. Also, the single impact of intensified cholesterol control seems less cost-effective, possibly because their initial 2-year risk was already fairly low, hence the room for improvement is rather limited. These results underscore the societal value of optimizing prevention in most patients with established CHD, but also highlight the need for setting priorities towards patients more at risk and the need for more studies comparing intensified prevention with usual care in these patients.

  7. Sorption of Eu(III) at feldspar/water interface. Effects of pH, organic matter, counter ions, and temperature

    Li, Ping; Liang, Jianjun; Fan, Qiaohui [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China). Key Lab. of Petroleum Resources Research; Wu, Hanyu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China). Key Lab. of Petroleum Resources Research; Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Lab.; Yin, Zhuoxin; Pan, Duoqiang; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Lab.; Xu, Di [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Lake Science and Environment

    2017-07-01

    The sorption of Eu(III) on potassium feldspar (K-feldspar) was studied under various physicochemical conditions such as pH, temperature, counter ions and organic matter. The results showed that the sorption of Eu(III) on K-feldspar significantly increased with the increase of pH, and high Eu(III) concentration can inhibit such immobility to some extent. The presence of humic acid (HA) can increase the sorption of Eu(III) on K-feldspar in low pH range; while inhibit to a large extent under alkaline conditions. It is very interesting that at pH ∝6.5, high ionic strength can promote the sorption of Eu(III) on K-feldspar in the presence of HA. In contrast, Eu(III) sorption was restricted obviously by NaCl in the absence of HA. The sorption procedure was involved with ion exchange and/or outer-sphere complexation as well as inner-sphere complexation. The presence of F{sup -} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} dramatically enhanced Eu(III) sorption on K-feldspar, whereas both SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} had negative effects on Eu(III) sorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that Eu(III) tended to form hydrolysates at high initial concentration (3 x 10{sup -4} mol/L) and high temperature (338 K).

  8. Incremental Criterion Validity of the WJ-III COG Clinical Clusters: Marginal Predictive Effects beyond the General Factor

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental validity of the clinical clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III ACH). All participants were children and adolescents (N = 4,722) drawn from the nationally representative WJ-III…

  9. Fatigue crack growth in mixed mode I+III+III non proportional loading conditions in a 316 stainless steel, experimental analysis and modelization of the effects of crack tip plasticity

    Fremy, F.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with fatigue crack growth in non-proportional variable amplitude mixed mode I + II + III loading conditions and analyses the effects of internal stresses stemming from the confinement of the plastic zone in small scale yielding conditions. The tests showed that there are antagonistic long-distance and short-distance effects of the loading history on fatigue crack growth. The shape of loading path, and not only the maximum and minimum values in this path, is crucial and, by comparison, the effects of contact and friction are of lesser importance. Internal stresses play a major role on the fatigue crack growth rate and on the crack path. An approach was developed to analyze the elastic-plastic behavior of a representative section of the crack front using the FEA. A model reduction technic is used to extract the relevant information from the FE results. To do so, the velocity field is partitioned into mode I, II, III elastic and plastic components, each component being characterized by an intensity factor and a fixed spatial distribution. The calculations were used to select seven loading paths in I + II and I + II + III mixed mode conditions, which all have the same amplitudes for each mode, the same maximum, minimum and average values. These paths are supposed to be equivalent in the sense of common failure criteria, but differ significantly when the elastic-plastic behavior of the material is accounted for. The results of finite element simulations and of simulations using a simplified model proposed in this thesis are both in agreement with experimental results. The approach was also used to discuss the role of mode III loading steps. Since the material behavior is nonlinear, the nominal loading direction does not coincide with the plastic flow direction. Adding a mode III loading step in a mode I+II fatigue cycle, may, in some cases, significantly modify the behaviour of the crack (crack growth rate, crack path and plastic flow). (author)

  10. Ferrous Iron Oxidation under Varying pO2 Levels: The Effect of Fe(III)/Al(III) Oxide Minerals and Organic Matter.

    Chen, Chunmei; Thompson, Aaron

    2018-01-16

    Abiotic Fe(II) oxidation by O 2 commonly occurs in the presence of mineral sorbents and organic matter (OM) in soils and sediments; however, this tertiary system has rarely been studied. Therefore, we examined the impacts of mineral surfaces (goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 ) and organic matter [Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA)] on Fe(II) oxidation rates and the resulting Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides under 21 and 1% pO 2 at pH 6. We tracked Fe dynamics by adding 57 Fe(II) to 56 Fe-labeled goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 and characterized the resulting solids using 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. We found Fe(II) oxidation was slower at low pO 2 and resulted in higher-crystallinity Fe(III) phases. Relative to oxidation of Fe(II) (aq) alone, both goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 surfaces increased Fe(II) oxidation rates regardless of pO 2 levels, with goethite being the stronger catalyst. Goethite surfaces promoted the formation of crystalline goethite, while γ-Al 2 O 3 favored nano/small particle or disordered goethite and some lepidocrocite; oxidation of Fe(II) aq alone favored lepidocrocite. SRFA reduced oxidation rates in all treatments except the mineral-free systems at 21% pO 2 , and SRFA decreased Fe(III) phase crystallinity, facilitating low-crystalline ferrihydrite in the absence of mineral sorbents, low-crystalline lepidocrocite in the presence of γ-Al 2 O 3 , but either crystalline goethite or ferrihydrite when goethite was present. This work highlights that the oxidation rate, the types of mineral surfaces, and OM control Fe(III) precipitate composition.

  11. Diffraction and depths-of-field effects in electron beam imaging at SURF III

    Arp, U.

    2001-01-01

    Imaging an electron beam with visible light is a common method of diagnostics applied to electron accelerators. It is a straightforward way to deduce the transverse electron distribution as well as its changes over time. The electrons stored in the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) III at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were studied over an extended period of time to characterize the upgraded accelerator. There is good agreement between experimental and theoretical horizontal beam sizes at three different electron energies

  12. The effect of initial conditions on the electromagnetic radiation generation in type III solar radio bursts

    Schmitz, H.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas, 18, 052903 (2011)]. The numerical simulations were carried out using different density profiles and fast electron distribution functions. It is shown that electromagnetic L and R modes are excited by the transverse current, initially imposed on the system. In the course of the simulations, no further interaction of the electron beam with the background plasma could be observed

  13. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Bi(III based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenylfluorone by hydrogen peroxide

    SOFIJA M. RANČIĆ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new reaction was suggested and a new kinetic method was elaborated for determination of Bi(III in solution, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenyl-fluorone (PF by hydrogen peroxide in ammonia buffer. By application of spectrophotometric technique, a limit of quantification (LQ of 128 ng cm-3 was reached, and the limit of detection (LD of 37 ng cm-3 was obtained, where LQ was defined as the ratio signal:noise = 10:1 and LD was defined as signal 3:1 against the blank. The RSD value was found to be in the range 2.8–4.8 % for the investigated concentration range of Bi(III. The influence of some ions upon the reaction rate was tested. The method was confirmed by determining Bi(III in a stomach ulcer drug (“Bicit HP”, Hemofarm A.D.. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by AAS and good agreement of results was obtained.

  14. Value relevance and corporate responsibility reporting in the South African context: An alternate view post King-III

    Adrian Marcia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study tests for the value relevance of corporate responsibility reporting (CRR based on a sample of companies listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE. It also provides evidence of the statistical significance of the potential contribution of CRR to share price values in the South African context at a particular point. On the basis of a sample of 82 companies on the JSE, hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the contribution of levels of corporate social responsibility disclosures to company share prices, over and above the contribution of the size of a firm’s equity and net income. In contrast with other findings which predict a positive relationship between company share price and levels of corporate social responsibility disclosures, the latter are found to have no significant association with company share price over and above the associations of the size of a firm’s equity and net income. Bivariate associations, however, indicate a significant association between share price and levels of corporate social responsibility disclosures. On the basis of these findings, it is argued that disclosures increase for firms with larger endowments of equity, yet corporate social responsibility disclosures do not necessarily add value to company share price.

  15. Cocktail effects on biomarker responses in fish

    Celander, Malin C., E-mail: malin.celander@zool.gu.se [University of Gothenburg, Department of Zoology, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-10-15

    One of today's greatest challenges in environmental toxicology is to understand effects of mixture toxicity, commonly referred to as cocktail effects, in humans and in wildlife. Biomarker responses in fish are routinely used to assess exposure of anthropogenic chemicals in the aquatic environment. However, little is known about how cocktail effects affect these biomarker responses. For this reason, there is an obvious risk for misinterpretation of biomarker-data and this can have profound negative effects on stakeholder's decisions and actions, as well as on legislations and remediation-plans initiated in order to reduce exposure to certain chemicals. Besides, chemical safety-levels are traditionally based on experiences from lab-studies with single chemicals, which is unfortunate as a chemical can be more toxic when it is mixed with other chemicals, because of the cocktail effect. This review focuses on pharmacokinetic interactions between different classes of pollutants on detoxification mechanisms and how that affects two commonly used biomarkers in the aquatic environment: (1) induction of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) that is mediated via activation of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), used to assess exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons; (2) induction of vitellogenin (VTG) that is mediated via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER), used to assess exposure to estrogenic chemicals. These responses can be either directly or indirectly affected by the presence of other classes of pollutants as a result of cocktail effects. For example, chemicals that inhibit the function of key metabolic enzymes and transporter pumps that are involved in elimination of AhR- and ER agonists, can result in bioaccumulation of aromatic hydrocarbons and estrogenic chemicals resulting in increased biomarker responses. This cocktail effect can lead to overestimation of the actual exposure pressure. On the contrary, induction of expression of key metabolic enzymes and transporter

  16. The influence of personal protection equipment, occupant body size, and restraint system on the frontal impact responses of Hybrid III ATDs in tactical vehicles.

    Zaseck, Lauren Wood; Orton, Nichole Ritchie; Gruber, Rebekah; Rupp, Jonathan; Scherer, Risa; Reed, Matthew; Hu, Jingwen

    2017-08-18

    TAP. ATD kinematics and injury outcomes were determined for each test. Maximum excursions were generally greater in the 95th percentile male compared to the 50th percentile male ATD and in ATDs wearing TAP compared to ATDs without TAP. Pretensioners and load limiters were effective in decreasing excursions and injury measures, even when the ATD was outfitted in military gear. ATD injury response and kinematics are influenced by the size of the ATD, military gear, and restraint system. This study has provided important data for validating FE models of military occupants, which can be used for design optimization of military vehicle restraint systems.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    2010-07-01

    ...—for services excess of the local agency's standard work day or work weekPC2: Experts and consultants... unit of local government. OS Other Contractual Services OS1: Contracts for technical or scientific analysis—for tasks requiring specialized hazardous sustance response expertiseOS2: Decontamination services...

  18. Assessment of time to clinical response, a proxy for discharge readiness, among hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia who received either ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone in two phase III FOCUS trials.

    Lodise, Thomas P; Anzueto, Antonio R; Weber, David J; Shorr, Andrew F; Yang, Min; Smith, Alexander; Zhao, Qi; Huang, Xingyue; File, Thomas M

    2015-02-01

    The primary driver of health care costs for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the hospital length of stay (LOS). Unfortunately, hospital LOS comparisons are difficult to make from phase III CAP trials because of their structured designs and prespecified treatment durations. However, an opportunity still exists to draw inferences about potential LOS differences between treatments through the use of surrogates for hospital discharge. The intent of this study was to quantify the time to a clinical response, a proxy for the time to discharge readiness, among hospitalized CAP patients who received either ceftaroline or ceftriaxone in two phase III CAP FOCUS clinical trials. On the basis of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and American Thoracic Society CAP management guidelines and recent FDA guidance documents for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, a post hoc adjudication algorithm was constructed a priori to compare the time to a clinical response, a proxy for the time to discharge readiness, between patients who received ceftaroline or ceftriaxone. Overall, 1,116 patients (ceftaroline, n=562; ceftriaxone, n=554) from the pooled FOCUS trials met the selection criteria for this analysis. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that ceftaroline was associated with a shorter time, measured in days, to meeting the clinical response criteria (P=0.03). Of the patients on ceftaroline, 61.0, 76.1, and 83.6% achieved a clinical response by days 3, 4, and 5, compared to 54.3, 69.8, and 79.3% of the ceftriaxone-treated patients. In the Cox regression, ceftaroline was associated with a shorter time to a clinical response (HR, 1.16, P=0.02). The methodology employed here provides a framework to draw comparative effectiveness inferences from phase III CAP efficacy trials. (The FOCUS trials whose data were analyzed in this study have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00621504 and NCT00509106.). Copyright © 2015, American Society

  19. Phase I-II study of lenalidomide and alemtuzumab in refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL): effects on T cells and immune checkpoints.

    Winqvist, Maria; Mozaffari, Fariba; Palma, Marzia; Eketorp Sylvan, Sandra; Hansson, Lotta; Mellstedt, Håkan; Österborg, Anders; Lundin, Jeanette

    2017-01-01

    This phase I-II study explored safety, immunomodulatory and clinical effects of lenalidomide (weeks 1-16) and alemtuzumab (weeks 5-16) in 23 patients with refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Most patients had Rai stage III/IV disease and were heavily pretreated (median 4 prior therapies), and 61% had del(17p)/del(11q). Eleven of 19 evaluable patients (58%) responded, with a median response duration of 12 months (1-29+); time to progression was short in non-responders. Lenalidomide had a narrow therapeutic dose range, 2.5 mg/day was not efficient, and maximum tolerated dose was 5 mg/day. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 84 and 55%, 30% had febrile neutropenia, and CMV-reactivation requiring valganciclovir occurred in 30% of patients. The frequency of proliferating (Ki67 + ) CD8 + T cells was increased at week 4, with further increase in both the CD4 + and CD8 + subsets (p cells increased at week 4 as the frequency of effector memory cells increased in the CD8 + subset (p cells decreased in both the CD8 + and CD4 + subsets (p regulatory T cells was reduced (p T cells decreased, and effector memory T cells increased (p T cells increased at 30-week follow-up (p T cells, including increased proliferative activity and cytotoxic potential.

  20. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT to monitor early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer

    Ji, Bin; Chen, Bin; Wang, Ting; Chen, Minglong; Ji, Tiefeng; Gao, Shi; Ma, Qingjie [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changchun (China); Song, Yan [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Breast Surgery, Changchun (China); Wang, Xueju [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Pathology, Changchun (China)

    2015-08-15

    Monitoring of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is important for optimal management of patients with breast cancer. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT is a newly developed imaging modality for evaluating tumor vascular status. In this study, we investigated the application of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT in evaluating therapy response to NCT in patients with stage II or III breast cancer. Thirty-three patients were scheduled to undergo {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT at baseline, after the first and second cycle of NCT. Four patients had extremely low {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, and were not included in the subsequent studies. Changes in tumor to nontumor (T/N) ratio were compared with pathological tumor responses classified using the residual cancer burden system. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to compare the power to identify responders between the end of the first and the end of the second cycle of NCT. The impact of breast cancer subtype on {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake was evaluated. The correlation between {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake and pathological tumor response was also evaluated in each breast cancer subtype. Surgery was performed after four cycles of NCT and pathological analysis revealed 18 responders and 15 nonresponders. In patients with clearly visible {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT were 86.7 %, 85.7 % and 86.7 % after the first cycle of NCT, and 92.9 %, 93.3 % and 93.3 % after the second cycle, respectively. Among these patients, the HER-2-positive group demonstrated both higher T/N ratios and a greater change in T/N ratio than patients with other breast cancer subtypes (P < 0.05). A strong correlation was found between changes in T/N ratio and pathological tumor response in the HER-2-positive group (P < 0.03). {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT seems to be useful for determining the pathological

  1. Effect of genotype, Cr(III and Cr(VI on plant growth and micronutrient status in Silene vulgaris (Moench

    A. E. Pradas-del-Real

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium released into the environment from industrial activities has become an important environmental concern. Silene vulgaris has been proven to be tolerant to many heavy metals, so it is considered an interesting species in the revegetation and restoration of polluted soils, but no information is available about its response to Cr. The objective of this work was to study uptake and influence on plant growth of Cr(III and Cr(VI in six genotypes (four hermaphrodites and two females of S. vulgaris from different sites of Madrid (Spain. Plants were treated for 12 days with 60 µM of Cr(III or Cr(VI in semihydroponics. Dry weights, soil-plant analysis development values (SPAD reading with chlorophylls and micronutrient and total Cr concentrations were determined. Metal uptake was higher in presence of Cr(VI than of Cr(III and poorly translocated to the shoots. In both cases S. vulgaris did not show visual toxicity symptoms, biomass reduction, or differences among SPAD values as consequence of Cr additions. However genotypes SV36 and SV38 showed Fe and Mn imbalance. This is the first report on the relatively good performance of hermaphrodite and female S. vulgaris genotypes in Cr uptake and physiological traits, but further studies will be necessary to elucidate the mechanisms by which the gender may influence these variables. S. vulgaris presented high diversity at genotypic level; the treatment with hexavalent Cr increased the differences among genotypes so the use of cuttings from an homogeneous genotype seems to be an adequate method for the study of this species.

  2. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    Silari, M; Beck, P; Bedogni, R; Cale, E; Caresana, M; Domingo, C; Donadille, L; Dubourg, N; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernández, F; Ferrarini, M; Fiechtner, A; Fuchs, A; García, M J; Golnik, N; Gutermuth, F; Khurana, S; Klages, Th; Latocha, M; Mares, V; Mayer, S; Radon, T; Reithmeier, H; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Rühm, W; Sandri, S; Schardt, D; Simmer, G; Spurný, F; Trompier, F; Villa-Grasa, C; Weitzenegger, E; Wiegel, B; Wielunski, M; Wissmann, F; Zechner, A; Zielczyński, M

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. Th...

  3. Effects of strength mis-matching on the fracture behavior of nuclear pressure steel A508-III welded joint

    Zhu Zhengqiang [School of Material Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: zhuzhq01@sjtu.edu.cn; Jing Hongyang [School of Material Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ge Jingguo [School of Material Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Chen Ligong [School of Material Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2005-01-15

    In this paper, according to the nuclear pressure steel A508-III, the effect of strength mis-matching on the fracture behavior was analyzed by fracture mechanics test and the crack tip stress field of three-point bend specimen was analyzed by using finite element analysis method (FEM). The fracture of heat-affected zone (HAZ) was emphasized especially. The results of FEM show that if the under-matching weld was used, the opening stress and stress triaxiality in the vicinity of crack tip would increase for weld-crack specimen, and would reduce for HAZ-crack specimen. This tendency was confirmed by the test results.

  4. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complex I and III

    Daniel P Lindsay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS emission is a critical component in the etiolo-gy of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complex I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rote-none, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study sug-gests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III.

  5. Comparative risk assessment of spill response options for a deepwater oil well blowout: Part III. Stakeholder engagement.

    Walker, Ann Hayward; Scholz, Debra; McPeek, Melinda; French-McCay, Deborah; Rowe, Jill; Bock, Michael; Robinson, Hilary; Wenning, Richard

    2018-05-25

    This paper describes oil spill stakeholder engagement in a recent comparative risk assessment (CRA) project that examined the tradeoffs associated with a hypothetical offshore well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, with a specific focus on subsea dispersant injection (SSDI) at the wellhead. SSDI is a new technology deployed during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill response. Oil spill stakeholders include decision makers, who will consider whether to integrate SSDI into future tradeoff decisions. This CRA considered the tradeoffs associated with three sets of response strategies: (1) no intervention; (2) mechanical recovery, in-situ burning, and surface dispersants; and, (3) SSDI in addition to responses in (2). For context, the paper begins with a historical review of U.S. policy and engagement with oil spill stakeholders regarding dispersants. Stakeholder activities throughout the project involved decision-maker representatives and their advisors to inform the approach and consider CRA utility in future oil spill preparedness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Immobilized Antithrombin III on the Thromboresistance of Polycarbonate Urethane.

    Lukas, Karin; Stadtherr, Karin; Gessner, Andre; Wehner, Daniel; Schmid, Thomas; Wendel, Hans Peter; Schmid, Christof; Lehle, Karla

    2017-03-24

    The surface of foils and vascular grafts made from a thermoplastic polycarbonate urethanes (PCU) (Chronoflex AR) were chemically modified using gas plasma treatment, binding of hydrogels-(1) polyethylene glycol bisdiamine and carboxymethyl dextran (PEG-DEX) and (2) polyethyleneimine (PEI)-and immobilization of human antithrombin III (AT). Their biological impact was tested in vitro under static and dynamic conditions. Static test methods showed a significantly reduced adhesion of endothelial cells, platelets, and bacteria, compared to untreated PCU. Modified PCU grafts were circulated in a Chandler-Loop model for 90 min at 37 °C with human blood. Before and after circulation, parameters of the hemostatic system (coagulation, platelets, complement, and leukocyte activation) were analyzed. PEI-AT significantly inhibited the activation of both coagulation and platelets and prevented the activation of leukocytes and complement. In conclusion, both modifications significantly reduce coagulation activation, but only PEI-AT creates anti-bacterial and anti-thrombogenic functionality.

  7. Antithrombin III in animal models of sepsis and organ failure.

    Dickneite, G

    1998-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT III) is the physiological inhibitor of thrombin and other serine proteases of the clotting cascade. In the development of sepsis, septic shock and organ failure, the plasma levels of AT III decrease considerably, suggesting the concept of a substitution therapy with the inhibitor. A decrease of AT III plasma levels might also be associated with other pathological disorders like trauma, burns, pancreatitis or preclampsia. Activation of coagulation and consumption of AT III is the consequence of a generalized inflammation called SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome). The clotting cascade is also frequently activated after organ transplantation, especially if organs are grafted between different species (xenotransplantation). During the past years AT III has been investigated in numerous corresponding disease models in different animal species which will be reviewed here. The bulk of evidence suggests, that AT III substitution reduces morbidity and mortality in the diseased animals. While gaining more experience with AT III, the concept of substitution therapy to maximal baseline plasma levels (100%) appears to become insufficient. Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies now suggests to adjust the AT III plasma levels to about 200%, i.e., doubling the normal value. During the last few years several authors proposed that AT III might not only be an anti-thrombotic agent, but to have in addition an anti-inflammatory effect.

  8. RTS,S/AS01E Malaria Vaccine Induces Memory and Polyfunctional T Cell Responses in a Pediatric African Phase III Trial

    Gemma Moncunill

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive assessment of cellular responses to the RTS,S/AS01E vaccine is needed to understand potential correlates and ultimately mechanisms of protection against malaria disease. Cellular responses recognizing the RTS,S/AS01E-containing circumsporozoite protein (CSP and Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg were assessed before and 1 month after primary vaccination by intracellular cytokine staining and 16-color flow cytometry in 105 RTS,S/AS01-vaccinated and 74 rabies-vaccinated participants (controls in a pediatric phase III trial in Africa. RTS,S/AS01E-vaccinated children had significantly higher frequencies of CSP- and HBsAg-specific CD4+ T cells producing IL-2, TNF-α, and CD40L and HBsAg-specific CD4+ T producing IFN-γ and IL-17 than baseline and the control group. Vaccine-induced responses were identified in both central and effector memory (EM compartments. EM CD4+ T cells expressing IL-4 and IL-21 were detected recognizing both vaccine antigens. Consistently higher response rates to both antigens in RTS,S/AS01E-vaccinated than comparator-vaccinated children were observed. RTS,S/AS01E induced polyfunctional CSP- and HBsAg-specific CD4+ T cells, with a greater degree of polyfunctionality in HBsAg responses. In conclusion, RTS,S/AS01E vaccine induces T cells of higher functional heterogeneity and polyfunctionality than previously characterized. Responses detected in memory CD4+ T cell compartments may provide correlates of RTS,S/AS01-induced immunity and duration of protection in future correlates of immunity studies.

  9. Correlation of FDG-PET measurements with morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Docetaxel (D) and carboplatin (C) combination chemotherapy (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced NSCLC. Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined modality induction is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy with etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin (VIP) has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. Finally, erythropoietin (EPO) may prevent the decrease in hemoglobin levels that was seen in a previous study of DC (median drop 2.7 g/dl) and thus may enhance treatment efficacy. The aim of the present study was to correlate FDG-PET studies with histomorphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Epo. 33 patients (pts) with NSCLC stage IIIA (7 pts) or IIIB (24 pts) were enrolled and received treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 dl and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles. Epo was given at 10,000 IU s.c. three times a week. All pts received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of 33 enrolled patients, 22 were evaluable for response by CT imaging. 14/22 pts (64 %) achieved PR. Of the 22 responders, 20 were evaluable for repeated FDG-PET studies. 13/20 pts had a decrease of standardized uptake values (SUV) and of the metabolic tumor index (MTI) by >50 %, 9/20 had SUV <2.5 (CR). Seven of these 9 pts underwent tumor resection, and specimens were subjected to morphometric analysis. In 7/7 cases, no vital tumor cells were detected in the specimens. In contrast to our previous study, hemoglobin levels increased by a median of 0.3 g/dl. Morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. FDG-PET appears to be a useful non-invasive diagnostic tool to predict pathologic response and potentially long-term outcome in stage III NSCLC. (author)

  10. The effect of frequency and environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of SA508 Cl.III RPV steel

    Achilles, R.D.; Bulloch, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of frequency and environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of SA508 Cl. III RPV steel. The study has shown that the effect of the Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) environment is directly related to the frequency and the level of applied stress intensity of the test; these results further showed that the lower the frequency the greater the environmental effect, especially at low ΔK levels. No such frequency effect was observed in either the laboratory air or ultra-high purity argon environments. At a frequency of 0.1 Hz the PWR water test exhibited characteristic EAC growth, i.e. plateau growth behaviour. Fractographical examination of the fracture surface revealed that the fracture mode during plateau growth was intergranular failure. The experimental results are described and discussed in terms of the hydrogen assisted cracking mechanism. (author)

  11. Richard III

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  12. Strong ligand field effects of blue phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes with phenylpyrazole and phosphines.

    Park, Se Won; Ham, Ho Wan; Kim, Young Sik

    2012-04-01

    In the paper, we describe new Ir complexes for achieving efficient blue phosphorescence. New blue-emitting mixed-ligand Ir complexes comprising one cyclometalating, two phosphines trans to each other such as Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(L) (Ll= Cl, NCMe+, CN), [dppz = 3,5-Diphenylpyrazole] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. To gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the variation of luminescence efficiency, we investigate the electron-withdrawing capabilities of ancillary ligands using DFT and TD-DFT calculations on the ground and excited states of the complexes. To achieve deep blue emission and increase the emission efficiency, (1) we substitute the phenyl group on the 3-position of the pyrazole ring that lowers the triplet energy enough that the quenching channel is not thermally accessible and (2) change the ancillary ligands coordinated to iridium atom to phosphine and cyano groups known as very strong field ligands. Their inclusion in the coordination sphere can increase the HOMO-LUMO gap to achieve the hypsochromic shift in emission color and lower the HOMO and LUMO energy level, which causes a large d-orbital energy splitting and avoids the quenching effect to improve the luminescence efficiency. The maximum emission spectra of Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(CI) and Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(CN) were in the ranges of 439, 432 nm, respectively.

  13. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    Silari, M.; Agosteo, S.; Beck, P.; Bedogni, R.; Cale, E.; Caresana, M.; Domingo, C.; Donadille, L.; Dubourg, N.; Esposito, A.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Fernandez, F.; Ferrarini, M.; Fiechtner, A.; Fuchs, A.; Garcia, M.J.; Golnik, N.; Gutermuth, F.; Khurana, S.; Klages, Th.

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. The paper describes in detail the detectors employed in the experiment, followed by a discussion of the results. A comparison is also made with the H*(10) values predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations and those measured by the BSS systems.

  14. PARDISEKO III

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  15. Response to duloxetine in chronic low back pain: exploratory post hoc analysis of a Japanese Phase III randomized study

    Tsuji T

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Toshinaga Tsuji,1 Naohiro Itoh,1 Mitsuhiro Ishida,2 Toshimitsu Ochiai,3 Shinichi Konno4 1Medical Affairs Department, 2Clinical Research Development, 3Biostatistics Department, Shionogi & Co. Ltd, Osaka, 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan Purpose: Duloxetine is efficacious for chronic low back pain (CLBP. This post hoc analysis of a Japanese randomized, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01855919 assessed whether patients with CLBP with early pain reduction or treatment-related adverse events of special interest (TR-AESIs; nausea, somnolence, constipation have enhanced responses to duloxetine. Patients and methods: Patients (N = 456 with CLBP for ≥6 months and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI average pain severity score of ≥4 were randomized (1:1 to duloxetine 60 mg/day or placebo for 14 weeks. Primary outcome was change from baseline in BPI average pain severity score (pain reduction. Subgroup analyses included early pain reduction (≥30%, 10%–30%, or <10% at Week 4 and early TR-AESIs (with or without TR-AESIs by Week 2. Measures included changes from baseline in BPI average pain severity score and BPI Interference scores (quality of life; QOL, and response rate (≥30% or ≥50% pain reduction at Week 14. Results: Patients with ≥30% early pain reduction (n = 108 or early TR-AESIs (n = 50 had significantly greater improvements in pain and QOL than placebo-treated patients (n = 226, whereas patients with 10%–30% (n = 63 or <10% (n = 48 pain reduction did not; patients without early TR-AESIs (n = 180 had significant improvements in pain at Week 14. Response rates (≥30%/≥50% pain reduction were 94.4%/82.4%, 66.7%/49.2%, and 25.0%/18.8% for patients with ≥30%, 10%–30%, and <10% early pain reduction, respectively, 74.0%/64.0% for patients with early TR-AESIs, 67.2%/54.4% for patients without early TR-AESIs, and 52.2%/39.4% for placebo.Conclusion: Early pain reduction or TR

  16. Effective As(III) Removal by A Multi-Charged Hydroacid Complex Draw Solute Facilitated Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation (FO-MD) Processes

    Ge, Qingchun; Han, Gang; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Effective removal of As(III) from water by an oxalic acid complex with the formula of Na3[Cr(C2O4)3] (Na-Cr-OA) is demonstrated via an forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system in this study. Na-Cr-OA first proved its superiority as a draw solute with high water fluxes and negligible reverse fluxes in FO, then a systematic investigation of the Na-Cr-OA promoted FO process was conducted to ascertain the factors in As(III) removal. Relatively high water fluxes of 28 LMH under the FO mode and 74 LMH under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode were achieved when using a 1000 ppm As(III) solution as the feed and 1.0 M Na-Cr-OA as the draw solution at 60 °C. As(III) removal with a water recovery up to 21.6% (FO mode) and 48.3% (PRO mode) were also achieved in 2 h. An outstanding As(III) rejection with 30-3000 μg/L As(III) in the permeate was accomplished when As(III) feed solutions varied from 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 μg/L, superior to the best FO performance reported for As(III) removal. Incorporating MD into FO not only makes As(III) removal sustainable by reconcentrating the Na-Cr-OA solution simultaneously, but also reduces the As(III) concentration below 10 μg/L in the product water, meeting the WHO standard.

  17. Effective As(III) Removal by A Multi-Charged Hydroacid Complex Draw Solute Facilitated Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation (FO-MD) Processes.

    Ge, Qingchun; Han, Gang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-03-01

    Effective removal of As(III) from water by an oxalic acid complex with the formula of Na3[Cr(C2O4)3] (Na-Cr-OA) is demonstrated via an forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system in this study. Na-Cr-OA first proved its superiority as a draw solute with high water fluxes and negligible reverse fluxes in FO, then a systematic investigation of the Na-Cr-OA promoted FO process was conducted to ascertain the factors in As(III) removal. Relatively high water fluxes of 28 LMH under the FO mode and 74 LMH under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode were achieved when using a 1000 ppm As(III) solution as the feed and 1.0 M Na-Cr-OA as the draw solution at 60 °C. As(III) removal with a water recovery up to 21.6% (FO mode) and 48.3% (PRO mode) were also achieved in 2 h. An outstanding As(III) rejection with 30-3000 μg/L As(III) in the permeate was accomplished when As(III) feed solutions varied from 5 × 10(4) to 1 × 10(6) μg/L, superior to the best FO performance reported for As(III) removal. Incorporating MD into FO not only makes As(III) removal sustainable by reconcentrating the Na-Cr-OA solution simultaneously, but also reduces the As(III) concentration below 10 μg/L in the product water, meeting the WHO standard.

  18. Effective As(III) Removal by A Multi-Charged Hydroacid Complex Draw Solute Facilitated Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation (FO-MD) Processes

    Ge, Qingchun

    2016-01-29

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Effective removal of As(III) from water by an oxalic acid complex with the formula of Na3[Cr(C2O4)3] (Na-Cr-OA) is demonstrated via an forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system in this study. Na-Cr-OA first proved its superiority as a draw solute with high water fluxes and negligible reverse fluxes in FO, then a systematic investigation of the Na-Cr-OA promoted FO process was conducted to ascertain the factors in As(III) removal. Relatively high water fluxes of 28 LMH under the FO mode and 74 LMH under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode were achieved when using a 1000 ppm As(III) solution as the feed and 1.0 M Na-Cr-OA as the draw solution at 60 °C. As(III) removal with a water recovery up to 21.6% (FO mode) and 48.3% (PRO mode) were also achieved in 2 h. An outstanding As(III) rejection with 30-3000 μg/L As(III) in the permeate was accomplished when As(III) feed solutions varied from 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 μg/L, superior to the best FO performance reported for As(III) removal. Incorporating MD into FO not only makes As(III) removal sustainable by reconcentrating the Na-Cr-OA solution simultaneously, but also reduces the As(III) concentration below 10 μg/L in the product water, meeting the WHO standard.

  19. Respiratory Effects and Systemic Stress Response Following ...

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to the pulmonary irritant ozone causes myriad systemic metabolic and pulmonary effects attributed to sympathetic and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, which are exacerbated in metabolically impaired models. We examined respiratory and systemic effects following exposure to a sensory irritant acrolein to elucidate the systemic and pulmonary consequences in healthy and diabetic rat models. Male Wistar and Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, a nonobese type II diabetic Wistar-derived model, were exposed by inhalation to 0, 2, or 4 ppm acrolein, 4 h/d for 1 or 2 days. Exposure at 4 ppm significantly increased pulmonary and nasal inflammation in both strains with vascular protein leakage occurring only in the nose. Acrolein exposure (4 ppm) also caused metabolic impairment by inducing hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance (GK > Wistar). Serum total cholesterol (GKs only), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (both strains), and free fatty acids (GK > Wistar) levels increased; however, no acrolein-induced changes were noted in branched-chain amino acid or insulin levels. These responses corresponded with a significant increase in corticosterone and modest but insignificant increases in adrenaline in both strains, suggesting activation of the HPA axis. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein exposure has a profound effect on nasal and pulmonary inflammation, as well as glucose and lipid metabolis

  20. Effect of treatment with single total-dose intravenous iron versus daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose on moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia

    Iyoke CA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 Fausta Chioma Emegoakor,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,2 Leonard Ogbonna Ajah,1 Jude Anazoeze Madu,3 Hyginus Uzo Ezegwui,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, 3Department of Haematology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, Enugu State University, Enugu, Nigeria Background: Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional cause of anemia in pregnancy and is often responsible for puerperal anemia. Puerperal anemia can impair postpartum maternal and neonatal well-being. Objective: To determine the effect of treatment of moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia using a single intravenous total-dose iron dextran versus daily single dose oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose. Methodology: A randomized controlled study in which postpartum women with moderate iron-deficiency anemia were randomized into treatment with either a single total-dose intravenous iron dextran or with daily single doses of oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets for 6 weeks. Effects on hemoglobin concentration using either method were compared at 6 weeks postpartum. Analysis was per protocol using SPSS version 17 for windows. P-values ≤0.05 were considered significant. Results: Two hundred eighty-four women were recruited for the study: 142 women received single total dose intravenous infusion of iron dextran while 142 received daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets. Approximately 84.0% (237/282 completed the study and were analyzed including 81% (115/142 of those randomized to injectable iron therapy compared to 85.9% (122/142 of those randomized to oral treatment. The proportions of women who had attained hemoglobin concentration of at least 10 g/dL by the 6 weeks postpartum visit did not differ

  1. High pressure effects on a trimetallic Mn(II/III) SMM.

    Prescimone, Alessandro; Sanchez-Benitez, Javier; Kamenev, Konstantin V; Moggach, Stephen A; Lennie, Alistair R; Warren, John E; Murrie, Mark; Parsons, Simon; Brechin, Euan K

    2009-09-28

    A combined study of the high pressure crystallography and high pressure magnetism of the complex [Mn3(Hcht)2(bpy)4](ClO4)3.Et2O.2MeCN (1.Et2O.2MeCN) (H3cht is cis,cis-1,3,5-cyclohexanetriol) is presented in an attempt to observe and correlate pressure induced changes in its structural and physical properties. At 0.16 GPa the complex 1.Et2O.2MeCN loses all associated solvent in the crystal lattice, becoming 1. At higher pressures structural distortions occur changing the distances between the metal centres and the bridging oxygen atoms making the magnetic exchange between the manganese ions weaker. No significant variations are observed in the Jahn-Teller axis of the only Mn(III) present in the structure. High pressure dc chiMT plots display a gradual decrease in both the low temperature value and slope. Simulations show a decrease in J with increasing pressure although the ground state is preserved. Magnetisation data do not show any change in |D|.

  2. Temperature effects on the interaction mechanisms between the europium (III) and uranyl ions and zirconium diphosphate

    Finck, N.

    2006-10-01

    Temperature should remain higher than 25 C in the near field environment of a nuclear waste repository for thousands years. In this context, the aim of this work is to study the temperature influence on the interaction mechanisms between europium (III) and uranyl ions and zirconium diphosphate, as well as the influence of a complexing medium (nitrate) on the sorption of the lanthanide. The experimental definition of the equilibria was achieved by combining a structural investigation with the macroscopic sorption data. Surface complexes were characterized at all temperatures (25 C to 90 C) by TRLFS experiments carried out on dry and in situ samples using an oven. This characterization was completed by XPS experiments carried out at 25 C on samples prepared at 25 C and 90 C. The reaction constants (surface hydration and cations sorption) were obtained by simulating the experimental data with the constant capacitance surface complexation model. The reaction constants temperature dependency allowed one to characterize thermodynamically the different reactions by application of the van't Hoff relation. The validity of this law was tested by performing microcalorimetric measurements of the sorption heat for both cations. (author)

  3. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  4. Effects of 14-day treatment with the schedule III anorectic phendimetrazine on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys.

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-08-01

    The clinical utility of monoamine releasers such as phenmetrazine or d-amphetamine as candidate agonist medications for cocaine dependence is hindered by their high abuse liability. Phendimetrazine is a clinically available schedule III anorectic that functions as a prodrug for phenmetrazine and thus may have lower abuse liability. This study determined the effects of continuous 14-day treatment with phendimetrazine on cocaine vs. food choice in rhesus monkeys (N=4). Responding was maintained under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0-0.1mg/kg/injection, fixed-ratio 10 schedule). Cocaine choice dose-effect curves were determined daily before and during 14-day periods of continuous intravenous treatment with saline or (+)-phendimetrazine (0.32-1.0mg/kg/h). Effects of 14-day treatment with (+)-phenmetrazine (0.1-0.32 mg/kg/h; N=5) and d-amphetamine (0.032-0.1mg/kg/h; N=6) were also examined for comparison. During saline treatment, food was primarily chosen during availability of low cocaine doses (0, 0.0032, and 0.01 mg/kg/injection), and cocaine was primarily chosen during availability of higher cocaine doses (0.032 and 0.1mg/kg/injection). Phendimetrazine initially decreased overall responding without significantly altering cocaine choice. Over the course of 14 days, tolerance developed to rate decreasing effects, and phendimetrazine dose-dependently decreased cocaine choice (significant at 0.032 mg/kg/injection cocaine). Phenmetrazine and d-amphetamine produced qualitatively similar effects. These results demonstrate that phendimetrazine can produce significant, though modest, reductions in cocaine choice in rhesus monkeys. Phendimetrazine may be especially suitable as a candidate medication for human studies because of its schedule III clinical availability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 8 Gy single-dose radiotherapy is effective in metastatic spinal cord compression: Results of a phase III randomized multicentre Italian trial

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Trippa, Fabio; Casale, Michelina; Costantini, Sara; Lupattelli, Marco; Bellavita, Rita; Marafioti, Luigi; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Santacaterina, Anna; Mignogna, Marcello; Silvano, Giovanni; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a previous randomized trial we showed that the short-course radiotherapy (RT) regimen of 8 Gy x 2 was feasible in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) and short life expectancy. This phase III trial was planned to determine whether in the same category of patients 8 Gy single-dose is as effective as 8 Gy x 2. Materials and methods: Three hundred and twenty-seven patients with MSCC and short life expectancy were randomly assigned to a short-course of 8 Gy x 2 or to 8 Gy single-dose RT. Median follow-up was 31 months (range, 4-58). Results: A total of 303 (93%) patients are assessable, 150 treated with the short-course and 153 with the single-dose RT. No difference in response was found between the two RT schedules adopted. Median duration of response was 5 and 4.5 months for short-course and single-dose RT (p = 0.4), respectively. The median overall survival was 4 months for all cases. Light acute toxicity was registered in a minority of cases. Late toxicity was never recorded. Conclusions: Both RT schedules adopted were effective. As already shown in several trials evaluating RT regimens in uncomplicated painful bone metastases, also MSCC patients may achieve palliation with minimal toxicity and inconvenience with a single-dose of 8 Gy.

  6. Implementing practice change in chronic cancer pain management: clinician response to a phase III study of ketamine.

    Hardy, J R; Spruyt, O; Quinn, S J; Devilee, L R; Currow, D C

    2014-06-01

    An adequately powered, double-blind, multisite, randomised controlled trial has shown no net clinical benefit for subcutaneous ketamine over placebo in the management of cancer pain refractory to combination opioid and co-analgesic therapy. The results of the trial were disseminated widely both nationally and internationally. To determine whether the trial had impacted on clinical practice in Australasia. Members of the Australia and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine were sent an online ketamine utilisation survey. A total of 123/392 clinicians responded (31% response rate). The majority of respondents had practised for more than 10 years in a metropolitan hospital setting. Ketamine had been prescribed by 91% of respondents, and 92% were aware of the trial. As a result, 65% of respondents had changed practice (17% no longer prescribed ketamine, 46% used less and 2% more). Thirty-five per cent had not changed practice. Reasons for change included belief in the results of the study, concerns over the toxicity reported or because there were alternatives for pain control. Of those who prescribed less, over 80% were more selective and would now only use the drug in certain clinical situations or pain types, or when all other medications had failed. Although two-thirds of respondents reported practice change as a result of the randomised controlled trial, a minority remained convinced of the benefit of the drug from their own observations and would require additional evidence. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Influence of the control bars pattern on the response of the operation channels of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    Paredes G, L.C.

    1991-07-01

    The local flow perturbations not generated by movements of bars not planned adequately to operate the reactor to 1 MW of thermal power, are reflected in the independent responses of the operation channels of the same one, find variations average from 17% to 30% for the channel of the power percent and of until 10% for the logarithmic channel. For the case of the lineal and percent power channels, these are between 14% and 46% as maximum when moving some of the bars. These variations can diminish until 5% in the channel of the power percent and until 3% on the average for the logarithmic one, all times when the calculated bars pattern for that irradiation considers that all the bars operate inside the lineal region of its calibration curve with approximately the same reactivity value each one and that during the operation the required reactivity compensations are carried out with the diametrically opposed bar to the irradiation installation used in that experiment. (Author)

  8. Numerical simulation of the effect of hydrogen on recombination gain in the transition to ground state of Li III

    Avitzour, Yoav; Suckewer, Szymon

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of recombination gain in the Li III transition to ground state (2→1 at 13.5 nm) are presented. The plasma simulated is a mixture of Li and H ions, and the space-time-dependent gain coefficient is calculated for different mixing ratios and different pumping beam parameters. The numerical model includes the initial optical field ionization of the plasma by an intense 100 fs laser pulse, taking into account residual heating, particle collisions, and spatial effects. Gain is then calculated during the process of recombination as the plasma expands and cools. We show that the addition of hydrogen to the plasma can lead to higher gain with a less restrictive range of experimental parameters. We analyze the effects of the addition of hydrogen on the gain and point to the optimal plasma and pump parameters to produce gain

  9. COLLISION STRENGTHS AND EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR TRANSITIONS WITHIN THE GROUND-STATE CONFIGURATION OF S III

    Hudson, C. E.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P., E-mail: c.hudson@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: c.ramsbottom@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: p.scott@qub.ac.uk [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-01

    We have carried out a 29-state R-matrix calculation in order to calculate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for the electron impact excitation of S III. The recently developed parallel RMATRX II suite of codes have been used, which perform the calculation in intermediate coupling. Collision strengths have been generated over an electron energy range of 0-12 Ryd, and effective collision strength data have been calculated from these at electron temperatures in the range 1000-100,000 K. Results are here presented for the fine-structure transitions between the ground-state configurations of 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 23} P{sub 0,1,2}, {sup 1}D{sub 2}, and {sup 1} S{sub 0}, and the values given resolve a discrepancy between two previous R-matrix calculations.

  10. Psychophysiological adaptation of the patient with the remote effect of the III degree acute radiation syndrome

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2013-12-01

    putation of both shins at level in top / 3, late beam buttock, right hip ulcers, a beam cataract of the III degree of both eyes, stabilized. The assessment of the efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation in dynamics with 2009 indicates emergence of prevalence of hypochondriac tendencies over a demonstration with accession of high uneasiness and autistic lines at preservation of the leading role of an hypochondriac somatization of alarm with considerable decrease in an emotionality, an integration, a freedom of behavior. The changes revealed in dynamics correspond to the specific increase weight of violations of mental adaptation, characteristic for the period of adaptation exhaustion. The high intelligence, good figurative and logical thinking, well-mannered forms of behavior, high control over the emotional sphere, restraint of emotions, independence, self-sufficiency, organization, behavior taking into account environment requirements provided the patient M. firmness before a heavy illness, promoted good adaptation to an environment with confidence in myself, high social adaptability, opportunity successfully to carry out duties, hold the work account (worked 39 years after accident. Comparative assessment of operator ability of the patient M. showed good average time of common and difficult sensorimotor reactions with 2 mistakes, high time of reaction for moving object, however decrease in accuracy of reaction from 10-13% to 2% testifies to manifestation in dynamics of insufficiency of real functional reserves of nervous system. Conclusions. Efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation depends not only on a dose of radiation and weight of the transferred disease, but, mostly, on premorbid properties of the identity of the victim and his social and labor installation.

  11. Fermilab III

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  12. Fermilab III

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  13. Specific Reagent for Cr(III): Imaging Cellular Uptake of Cr(III) in Hct116 Cells and Theoretical Rationalization.

    Ali, Firoj; Saha, Sukdeb; Maity, Arunava; Taye, Nandaraj; Si, Mrinal Kanti; Suresh, E; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Das, Amitava

    2015-10-15

    A new rhodamine-based reagent (L1), trapped inside the micellar structure of biologically benign Triton-X 100, could be used for specific recognition of Cr(III) in aqueous buffer medium having physiological pH. This visible light excitable reagent on selective binding to Cr(III) resulted in a strong fluorescence turn-on response with a maximum at ∼583 nm and tail of that luminescence band extended until 650 nm, an optical response that is desired for avoiding the cellular autofluorescence. Interference studies confirm that other metal ions do not interfere with the detection process of Cr(III) in aqueous buffer medium having pH 7.2. To examine the nature of binding of Cr(III) to L1, various spectroscopic studies are performed with the model reagent L2, which tend to support Cr(III)-η(2)-olefin π-interactions involving two olefin bonds in molecular probe L1. Computational studies are also performed with another model reagent LM to examine the possibility of such Cr(III)-η(2)-olefin π-interactions. Presumably, polar functional groups of the model reagent LM upon coordination to the Cr(III) center effectively reduce the formal charge on the metal ion and this is further substantiated by results of the theoretical studies. This assembly is found to be cell membrane permeable and shows insignificant toxicity toward live colon cancer cells (Hct116). Confocal laser scanning microscopic studies further revealed that the reagent L1 could be used as an imaging reagent for detection of cellular uptake of Cr(III) in pure aqueous buffer medium by Hct116 cells. Examples of a specific reagent for paramagnetic Cr(III) with luminescence ON response are scanty in the contemporary literature. This ligand design helped us in achieving the turn on response by utilizing the conversion from spirolactam to an acyclic xanthene form on coordination to Cr(III).

  14. Effect of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Plasma Metabolome in Mice with Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III Deficiency

    Jayasimman Rajendran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders cause energy failure and metabolic derangements. Metabolome profiling in patients and animal models may identify affected metabolic pathways and reveal new biomarkers of disease progression. Using liver metabolomics we have shown a starvation-like condition in a knock-in (Bcs1lc.232A>G mouse model of GRACILE syndrome, a neonatal lethal respiratory chain complex III dysfunction with hepatopathy. Here, we hypothesized that a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD, 60% dextrose will alleviate the hypoglycemia and promote survival of the sick mice. However, when fed HCD the homozygotes had shorter survival (mean ± SD, 29 ± 2.5 days, n = 21 than those on standard diet (33 ± 3.8 days, n = 30, and no improvement in hypoglycemia or liver glycogen depletion. We investigated the plasma metabolome of the HCD- and control diet-fed mice and found that several amino acids and urea cycle intermediates were increased, and arginine, carnitines, succinate, and purine catabolites decreased in the homozygotes. Despite reduced survival the increase in aromatic amino acids, an indicator of liver mitochondrial dysfunction, was normalized on HCD. Quantitative enrichment analysis revealed that glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, and urea cycle were also partly normalized on HCD. This dietary intervention revealed an unexpected adverse effect of high-glucose diet in complex III deficiency, and suggests that plasma metabolomics is a valuable tool in evaluation of therapies in mitochondrial disorders.

  15. The effect of heterocyclic S,S’-ligands on the electrochemical properties of some cobalt(III complexes in acid

    V. M. JOVANOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Eight mixed-ligand cobalt(III complexes with the macrocyclic amine 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam and a heterocyclic dithiocarbamate (Rdtc- i.e., morpholine- (Morphdtc, thiomorpholine- (Timdtc, piperazine- (Pzdtc, N-methylpiperazine-(Mepzdtc, piperidine- (Pipdtc, 2-, 3- or 4-methylpiperidine- (2-, 3- and 4-Mepipdtc carbodithionato-S,S ions, of the general formula [Co(cyclamRdtc](ClO42, were investigated in deoxygenated 0.1MHClO4 solutions. Cyclic voltammetry data at a glassy carbon (GC electrode demonstrate a redox reaction of cobalt(III from the complexes at potentials strongly influenced by the presence of different heterocyclic Rdtc- ligands. In this respect, the complexes were separated into two groups: the first, with a heteroatom O, S or N in the heterocyclic ring, and the second, with a methyl group on the piperidine ring of the Rdtc- ligand. Anodic polarization of an Fe electrode in the presence of the complexes shows their influence not only on the dissolution of iron but also on the hydrogen evolution reactions and on this basis complexes the complexes could be divided into the same two groups. It was found that the weaker the inhibiting effect of the free heterocyclic amines is, the significantly higher is the efficiency of the corresponding complexes.

  16. Effects of the functional regulator III on transversal changes: a postero-anterior cephalometric and model study.

    Kilic, Nihat; Celikoglu, Mevlüt; Oktay, Hüsamettin

    2011-12-01

    Studies assessing the transversal treatment changes caused by the functional regulator III (FR-3) are limited in number. This clinical study was planned to analyse the transversal effects of the FR-3 appliance therapy. The treatment group consisted of 17 patients (8 males and 9 females) with Class III malocclusion, who were treated with the FR-3 appliance. The control group consisted of 17 subjects (7 males and 10 females) with a normal occlusion. Mean ages of the subjects were 10.73 and 10.66 years in the treatment and control groups, respectively. Postero-anterior radiographs and stone casts were obtained before (T1) and after (T2) treatment/observation. The results of the Student's t-test comparing initial values showed that maxillary dentoalveolar and skeletal widths are significantly larger in the control group than those in the treatment group. At the end of the treatment, significant transverse increments occurred only at the dentoalveolar level of the maxilla. The transversal changes in the mandible were not statistically significant. Buccal shields of FR-3 did not stimulate the growth of maxillary apical base but caused an enhanced and supplementary widening of maxillary dental and alveolar structures.

  17. Posterior cerebellar Purkinje cells in an SCA5/SPARCA1 mouse model are especially vulnerable to the synergistic effect of loss of β-III spectrin and GLAST.

    Perkins, Emma M; Suminaite, Daumante; Clarkson, Yvonne L; Lee, Sin Kwan; Lyndon, Alastair R; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wyllie, David J A; Tanaka, Kohichi; Jackson, Mandy

    2016-10-15

    Clinical phenotypes of spinocerebellar ataxia type-5 (SCA5) and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type-1 (SPARCA1) are mirrored in mice lacking β-III spectrin (β-III-/-). One function of β-III spectrin is the stabilization of the Purkinje cell-specific glutamate transporter EAAT4 at the plasma membrane. In β-III-/- mice EAAT4 levels are reduced from an early age. In contrast levels of the predominant cerebellar glutamate transporter GLAST, expressed in Bergmann glia, only fall progressively from 3 months onwards. Here we elucidated the roles of these two glutamate transporters in cerebellar pathogenesis mediated through loss of β-III spectrin function by studying EAAT4 and GLAST knockout mice as well as crosses of both with β-III-/- mice. Our data demonstrate that EAAT4 loss, but not abnormal AMPA receptor composition, in young β-III-/- mice underlies early Purkinje cell hyper-excitability and that subsequent loss of GLAST, superimposed on the earlier deficiency of EAAT4, is responsible for Purkinje cell loss and progression of motor deficits. Yet the loss of GLAST appears to be independent of EAAT4 loss, highlighting that other aspects of Purkinje cell dysfunction underpin the pathogenic loss of GLAST. Finally, our results demonstrate that Purkinje cells in the posterior cerebellum of β-III-/- mice are most susceptible to the combined loss of EAAT4 and GLAST, with degeneration of proximal dendrites, the site of climbing fibre innervation, most pronounced. This highlights the necessity for efficient glutamate clearance from these regions and identifies dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission particularly within the posterior cerebellum as a key mechanism in SCA5 and SPARCA1 pathogenesis.

  18. Two tandem RNase III cleavage sites determine betT mRNA stability in response to osmotic stress in Escherichia coli.

    Minji Sim

    Full Text Available While identifying genes regulated by ribonuclease III (RNase III in Escherichia coli, we observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA, which encodes a transporter mediating the influx of choline, are dependent on cellular concentrations of RNase III. In the present study, we also observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA are dependent on RNase III activity upon exposure to osmotic stress, indicating the presence of cis-acting elements controlled by RNase III in betT mRNA. Primer extension analyses of betT mRNA revealed two tandem RNase III cleavage sites in its stem-loop region, which were biochemically confirmed via in vitro cleavage assays. Analyses of cleavage sites suggested the stochastic selection of cleavage sites by RNase III, and mutational analyses indicated that RNase III cleavage at either site individually is insufficient for efficient betT mRNA degradation. In addition, both the half-life and abundance of betT mRNA were significantly increased in association with decreased RNase III activity under hyper-osmotic stress conditions. Our findings demonstrate that betT mRNA stability is controlled by RNase III at the post-transcriptional level under conditions of osmotic stress.

  19. Global transcriptional profiling of Burkholderia pseudomallei under salt stress reveals differential effects on the Bsa type III secretion system

    Singsuksawat Ekapot

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis where the highest reported incidence world wide is in the Northeast of Thailand, where saline soil and water are prevalent. Moreover, recent reports indicate a potential pathogenic role for B. pseudomallei in cystic fibrosis lung disease, where an increased sodium chloride (NaCl concentration in airway surface liquid has been proposed. These observations raise the possibility that high salinity may represent a favorable niche for B. pseudomallei. We therefore investigated the global transcriptional response of B. pseudomallei to increased salinity using microarray analysis. Results Transcriptome analysis of B. pseudomallei under salt stress revealed several genes significantly up-regulated in the presence of 320 mM NaCl including genes associated with the bsa-derived Type III secretion system (T3SS. Microarray data were verified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR. Western blot analysis confirmed the increased expression and secretion of the invasion-associated type III secreted proteins BipD and BopE in B. pseudomallei cultures at 170 and 320 mM NaCl relative to salt-free medium. Furthermore, salt-treated B. pseudomallei exhibited greater invasion efficiency into the lung epithelial cell line A549 in a manner partly dependent on a functional Bsa system. Conclusions B. pseudomallei responds to salt stress by modulating the transcription of a relatively small set of genes, among which is the bsa locus associated with invasion and virulence. Expression and secretion of Bsa-secreted proteins was elevated in the presence of exogenous salt and the invasion efficiency was enhanced. Our data indicate that salinity has the potential to influence the virulence of B. pseudomallei.

  20. Effect of silica surface coating on the luminescence lifetime and upconversion temperature sensing properties of semiconductor zinc oxide doped with gallium(III) and sensitized with rare earth ions Yb(III) and Tm(III).

    Li, Yuemei; Li, Yongmei; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Wei

    2018-02-26

    Optical sensing of temperature by measurement of the ratio of the intensities of the 700 nm emission and the 800 nm emission of Ga(III)-doped ZnO (GZO) nanoparticles (NPs) and of GZO NPs coated with a silica shell are demonstrated at 980 nm excitation. It is found that the relative sensitivity of SiO 2 @Yb/Tm/GZO is 6.2% K -1 at a temperature of 693 K. This is ~3.4 times higher than that of Yb/Tm/GZO NPs. Obviously, the SiO 2 shell structure decreases the rate of the nonradiative decay. The decay time of the 800 nm emission of the Yb/Tm/GZO NPs (15 mol% Ga; 7 mol% Yb; 0.5 mol% Tm) displays a biexponential decay with a dominant decay time of 148 μs and a second decay time of ~412 μs. The lifetime of the Yb/Tm/GZO NPs at 293 K, and of the SiO 2 @Yb/Tm/GZO NPs are ~412 μs. Both the Yb/Tm/GZO and SiO 2 @Yb/Tm/GZO can be used up to 693 K. These results indicate that the SiO 2 shell on the Yb/Tm/GZO is beneficial in terms of sensitivity and resolution. Graphical abstract The enhancement the decay time and thermal sensitivity in the SiO 2 @Yb/Tm/GZO shell@core structure have been studied compared to the Ga(III)-doped Yb/Tm-doped ZnO (Yb/Tm/GZO). The SiO 2 @Yb/Tm/GZO have good thermal accuracy up to 693 °C.

  1. Neutralizing Antibody Response and Efficacy of Novel Recombinant Tetravalent Dengue DNA Vaccine Comprising Envelope Domain III in Mice

    Ajit Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is a global arboviral threat to humans; causing 390 million infections per year. The availability of safe and effective tetravalent dengue vaccine is a global requirement to prevent epidemics, morbidity, and mortality associated with it. Methods: Five experimental groups (6 mice per group each of 5-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with vaccine and placebo (empty plasmid (100 µg, i.m. on days 0, 14 and 28. Among these, four groups (one group per serotype of each were subsequently challenged 3 weeks after the last boost with dengue virus (DENV serotypes 1-4 (100 LD50, 20 µl intracerebrally to determine vaccine efficacy. The fifth group of each was used as a control. The PBS immunized group was used as mock control. Serum samples were collected before and after subsequent immunizations. EDIII fusion protein expression was determined by Western blot. Total protein concentration was measured by Bradford assay. Neutralizing antibodies were assessed by TCID50-CPE inhibition assay. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata/IC 10.1 software for Windows. One-way repeated measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test were used for neutralizing antibody analysis and vaccine efficacy, respectively. Results: The recombinant EDIII fusion protein was expressed adequately in transfected 293T cells. Total protein concentration was almost 3 times more than the control. Vaccine candidate induced neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes with a notable increase after subsequent boosters. Vaccine efficacy was 83.3% (DENV-1, -3, -4 and 50% (DENV-2. Conclusion: Our results suggest that vaccine is immunogenic and protective; however, further studies are required to improve the immunogenicity particularly against DENV-2.

  2. Basel III and Asset Securitization

    M. Mpundu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asset securitization via special purpose entities involves the process of transforming assets into securities that are issued to investors. These investors hold the rights to payments supported by the cash flows from an asset pool held by the said entity. In this paper, we discuss the mechanism by which low- and high-quality entities securitize low- and high-quality assets, respectively, into collateralized debt obligations. During the 2007–2009 financial crisis, asset securitization was seriously inhibited. In response to this, for instance, new Basel III capital and liquidity regulations were introduced. Here, we find that we can explicitly determine the transaction costs related to low-quality asset securitization. Also, in the case of dynamic and static multipliers, the effects of unexpected negative shocks such as rating downgrades on asset price and input, debt obligation price and output, and profit will be quantified. In this case, we note that Basel III has been designed to provide countercyclical capital buffers to negate procyclicality. Moreover, we will develop an illustrative example of low-quality asset securitization for subprime mortgages. Furthermore, numerical examples to illustrate the key results will be provided. In addition, connections between Basel III and asset securitization will be highlighted.

  3. Corporate Governance Effects on Social Responsibility Disclosures

    António Dias

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study uses stakeholder theory to explore how corporate governance [CG] characteristics influence corporate social responsibility disclosure [CSRD] in the context of a global financial crisis [GFC]. Empirical data are drawn from Portugal, a country strongly affected by the GFC. Portuguese companies are characterized by high ownership concentration. The largest shareholder is often the CEO and Board Chair (a phenomenon known as CEO duality. We analyse the association between CSRD (measured by a 40-item disclosure index and CG variables (board size, CEO duality, board independence, ownership concentration and presence of an audit committee or CSR committee for 48 of the 51 listed companies in Portugal. The control variables are company size and industry type. We find that CSRD is affected positively by board size, CEO duality, company size and industry type. This accords with suggestions implicit in stakeholder theory that a larger board will represent a broader diversity of stakeholders and will promote better monitoring, more assertive stakeholder management, greater transparency, and increased levels of CSRD. Larger companies and companies close-to-consumers are associated with high levels of CSRD, ostensibly because they are more visible and subject to greater societal monitoring during a period of financial crisis. We reveal that in a country characterized by high ownership concentration, CEO duality has a positive effect on CSRD.

  4. The framing effect and skin conductance responses

    Patrick eRing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and finally to reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e. decision-processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e. whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa.

  5. The framing effect and skin conductance responses.

    Ring, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and to finally reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM) on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e., decision processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs) while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e., whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa.

  6. [Toxicodynamic properties of liquids used for the cooling of high-power turbines. III. Neurotoxic effects].

    Florek, E; Malendowicz, L; Seńczuk, W

    1984-01-01

    Results of neurotoxicity studies indicate that preparations IWiOL -3-n, IWiOL -3-e and OMTI administered intragastrically or intraperitoneally induce neurotoxic effects in hens. Those effects are, however, weaker than those of the standard substance, i.e. triorthocresyl . Yet, they get increased in result of IWiOL -3-e, as compared to IWiOL -3-n administration.

  7. Effects of solid acellular type-I/III collagen biomaterials on in vitro and in vivo chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Gao, Liang; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2017-09-01

    Type-I/III collagen membranes are advocated for clinical use in articular cartilage repair as being able of inducing chondrogenesis, a technique termed autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC). Area covered: The current in vitro and translational in vivo evidence for chondrogenic effects of solid acellular type-I/III collagen biomaterials. Expert commentary: In vitro, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) adhere to the fibers of the type-I/III collagen membrane. No in vitro study provides evidence that a type-I/III collagen matrix alone may induce chondrogenesis. Few in vitro studies compare the effects of type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds on chondrogenesis. Recent investigations suggest better chondrogenesis with type-II collagen scaffolds. A systematic review of the translational in vivo data identified one long-term study showing that covering of cartilage defects treated by microfracture with a type-I/III collagen membrane significantly enhanced the repair tissue volume compared with microfracture alone. Other in vivo evidence is lacking to suggest either improved histological structure or biomechanical function of the repair tissue. Taken together, there is a paucity of in vitro and preclinical in vivo evidence supporting the concept that solid acellular type-I/III collagen scaffolds may be superior to classical approaches to induce in vitro or in vivo chondrogenesis of MSCs.

  8. [COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS BETWEEN TWO OPERATIVE TECHNIQUES OF CORACOCLAVICULAR LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION FOR TREATMENT OF Tossy TYPE III ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION].

    Tang, Hongwei; Gao, Sheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Yunfei; Han, Qingtian; Li, Huizhang

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of double Endobutton technique and suture anchor combined Endobutton plate in the treatment of Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Between May 2010 and March 2014, a retrospective study was preformed on 56 patients with Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The coracoclavicular ligament was reconstructed with double Endobutton technique in 31 cases (Endobutton group), and with suture anchor combined Endobutton plate in 25 cases (Anchor group). There was no significant difference in age, gender, injury causes, injury side, associated injury, medical comorbidities, and disease duration between 2 groups (P>0.05). The operation time, medical device expenses, postoperative complications, preoperative and postoperative Constant-Murley scores, and postoperative Karlsson grading of the injured shoulder were compared between 2 groups. The average operation time in Endobutton group was significantly greater than that in Anchor group (t = 4.285, P = 0.000); there was no significant difference in the medical device expenses between 2 groups (t = 1.555, P = 0.126). Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients of 2 groups; no early complications of infection and skin necrosis occurred. All patients were followed up 15.6 months on average (range, 11-35 months). During follow-up, some loss of reduction and ectopic ossification in the coracoclavicular gap were observed in 1 case and 6 cases of Endobutton group, respectively. No recurrence of acromioclavicular joint dislocation, implant fixation loosening and broken, and secondary fractures occurred in the other patients. There was significant difference in the incidence of postoperative complications between 2 groups (P = 0.013). Constant-Murley scores of the injured shoulder significantly increased at 9 months after operation when compared with preoperative values in 2 groups (P 0.05). At last follow-up, there was no significant difference in

  9. Effect of III-nitride polarization on V{sub OC} in p-i-n and MQW solar cells

    Namkoong, Gon; Boland, Patrick; Foe, Kurniawan; Latimer, Kevin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Applied Research Center, 12050 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bae, Si-Young; Shim, Jae-Phil; Lee, Dong-Seon [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro (Oryong-dong), Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seong-Ran [Korea Photonics Technology Institute, 971-35, Wolchul-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-779 (Korea, Republic of); Doolittle, W. Alan [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    We performed detailed studies of the effect of polarization on III-nitride solar cells. Spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations were assessed to determine their impacts upon the open circuit voltages (V{sub OC}) in p-i(InGaN)-n and multi-quantum well (MQW) solar cells. We found that the spontaneous polarization in Ga-polar p-i-n solar cells strongly modifies energy band structures and corresponding electric fields in a way that degrades V{sub OC} compared to non-polar p-i-n structures. In contrast, we found that piezoelectric polarization in Ga-polar MQW structures does not have a large influence on V{sub OC} compared to non-polar MQW structures. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. [Effectiveness of phytotherapy in supportive treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus III. Momordica (Momordica charantia)].

    Rudá-Kučerová, Jana; Kotolová, Hana; Koupý, David

    2015-09-01

    Momordica charantia is a thermophilic voluble plant from the tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. In central Europe, momordica requires greenhouse plantations. Mature fruits resemble a cucumber or a pumpkin and can be used as other similar vegetables. Crude fruits are very bitter and refreshing. For centuries the plant has been known in Chinese traditional medicine for its antidiabetic effects as well as for the treatment of cancer or infections caused by worms, viruses and malaria. Antidiabetic effects are attributed namely to cucurbitane type triterpenoids, charantin, p-insulin and 9cis-11trans-13trans-conjugated linolenic acid. These substances in momordica preparations show antidiabetic effectiveness in clinical studies by increasing insulin secretion and deceasing insulin resistance or glucose absorption from the gut. Beside this main effect the extract possesses certain neuroprotective and antioxidant effects (especially p9cis-11trans-13trans-conjugated linolenic acid) and contributes to normalize blood lipid and adipokine levels which results in the normalization of metabolic syndrome. Antidiabetic effectiveness of momordica was compared to active treatment with several oral antidiabetic drugs and proved comparable effects. However, the number of studies is limited and their methodological approach variable. Therefore, the evidence is so far inconclusive.

  11. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Iron Fe (II and Fe (III in a Binary System Evaluated Bioluminescent Method

    Elena Sorokina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of iron ions Fe2+ and Fe3+ on the bioluminescent recombinant strain of Escherichia coli in a single-component and binary system. Found that for the bacteria E. coli Fe3+ ions are more toxic than Fe2+. Under the combined effect of iron toxicity increases, the percentage of luminescence quenching increases, but the value is much less than the sum of the indicator for the Fe2+ and Fe3+. The biological effect of insertion of iron is not proportional to their content in the mixture.

  13. Effect of Cortical Screw Diameter on Reduction and Stabilization of Type III Distal Phalanx Fractures: An Equine Cadaveric Study.

    Kay, Alastair T; Durgam, Sushmitha; Stewart, Matthew; Joslyn, Stephen; Schaeffer, David J; Horn, Gavin; Kesler, Richard; Chew, Peter

    2016-11-01

    To compare reduction of type III distal phalangeal fractures using 4.5 and 5.5 mm cortical screws placed in lag fashion and an intact hoof capsule model. Cadaveric experimental study. Hooves from 12 adult horses (n=24). Sagittal fractures were created in pairs of distal phalanges after distal interphalangeal joint disarticulation and were reduced with either 4.5 or 5.5 mm cortical screws placed in lag fashion. Contralateral phalanges served as non-reduced controls. Fracture reduction following screw placement was assessed by comparing pre-reduction and post-reduction fracture gap measurements from radiographs using paired t-tests. Effects of incremental loading (0, 135, 270, 540, 800, 1070, and 1335 kg) on fracture gaps in 6 phalanges reduced with 4.5 mm screws and 5 phalanges reduced with 5.5 mm screws were measured from fluoroscopic images and assessed by 2-way ANOVA. Significance was set at Pfractures were reliably created. Only 5.5 mm cortical screws, not 4.5 mm screws, significantly reduced fracture gaps and constrained fracture gap expansion 3 cm distal to the articular surface. Compressive loading closed the fracture gaps at the articular surface in both non-reduced control groups and those reduced with either 5.5 or 4.5 mm screws. The 5.5 mm cortical screws were more effective than 4.5 mm screws in reducing type III distal phalanx fractures and restricting distal fracture gap expansion under load. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Effect of selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors on the rat eosinophil chemotactic response in vitro

    Alves Alessandra C

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of the effect of selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase (PDE type III, IV and V on eosinophil chemotaxis triggered by platelet activating factor (PAF and leukotriene B4 (LTB4 in vitro. The effect of the analogues N6-2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3':5' cyclic monophosphate (Bt2 cyclic AMP and N2-2'-O- dibutyrylguanosine 3':5' cyclic monophosphate (Bt2 cyclic GMP has also been determined. The eosinophils were obtained from the peritoneal cavity of naive Wistar rats and purified in discontinuous Percoll gradients to 85-95% purity. We observed that pre-incubation of eosinophils with the PDE type IV inhibitor rolipram suppressed the chemotactic response triggered by PAF and LTB4, in association with an increase in the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. In contrast, neither zaprinast (type V inhibitor nor type III inhibitors milrinone and SK&F 94836 affected the eosinophil migration. Only at the highest concentration tested did the analogue Bt2 cyclic AMP suppress the eosinophil chemotaxis, under conditions where Bt2 cyclic GMP was ineffective. We have concluded that inhibition of PDE IV, but not PDE III or V, was able to block the eosinophil chemotaxis in vitro, suggesting that the suppressive activity of selective PDE IV inhibitors on tissue eosinophil accumulation may, at least, be partially dependent on their ability to directly inhibit the eosinophil migration.

  15. Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMAIII Has an Adverse Effect on the Innate Immune Response of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Emily G Notch

    Full Text Available Arsenic is the number one contaminant of concern with regard to human health according to the World Health Organization. Epidemiological studies on Asian and South American populations have linked arsenic exposure with an increased incidence of lung disease, including pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both of which are associated with bacterial infection. However, little is known about the effects of low dose arsenic exposure, or the contributions of organic arsenic to the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This study examined the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa induced cytokine secretion by human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC by inorganic sodium arsenite (iAsIII and two major metabolites, monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII and dimethylarsenic acid (DMAV, at concentrations relevant to the U.S.Neither iAsIII nor DMAV altered P. aeruginosa induced cytokine secretion. By contrast, MMAIII increased P. aeruginosa induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6 and CXCL2. A combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV (10 pbb total reduced IL-8 and CXCL1 secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that exposure to MMAIII alone, and a combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV at levels relevant to the U.S. may have negative effects on the innate immune response of human bronchial epithelial cells to P. aeruginosa.

  16. Effect of Glucocorticoids on the Clinical and Radiographic Efficacy of Tofacitinib in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Posthoc Analysis of Data from 6 Phase III Studies.

    Charles-Schoeman, Christina; van der Heijde, Désirée; Burmester, Gerd R; Nash, Peter; Zerbini, Cristiano A F; Connell, Carol A; Fan, Haiyun; Kwok, Kenneth; Bananis, Eustratios; Fleischmann, Roy

    2018-02-01

    Tofacitinib has been investigated for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in phase III studies in which concomitant glucocorticoids (GC) were allowed. We analyzed the effect of GC use on efficacy outcomes in patients with RA receiving tofacitinib and/or methotrexate (MTX) or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) in these studies. Our posthoc analysis included data from 6 phase III studies (NCT01039688; NCT00814307; NCT00847613; NCT00853385; NCT00856544; NCT00960440). MTX-naive patients or patients with inadequate response to csDMARD or biological DMARD received tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily alone or with csDMARD, with or without concomitant GC. Patients receiving GC (≤ 10 mg/day prednisone or equivalent) before enrollment maintained a stable dose throughout. Endpoints included the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20/50/70 response rates, rates of Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI)-defined low disease activity (LDA; CDAI ≤ 10) and remission (CDAI ≤ 2.8), and changes from baseline in CDAI, 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28-4)-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), pain visual analog scale (VAS), and modified total Sharp score. Of 3200 tofacitinib-treated patients, 1258 (39.3%) received tofacitinib monotherapy and 1942 (60.7%) received tofacitinib plus csDMARD; 1767 (55.2%) received concomitant GC. ACR20/50/70 response rates, rates of CDAI LDA and remission, and improvements in CDAI, DAS28-4-ESR, HAQ-DI, and pain VAS with tofacitinib were generally similar with or without GC in monotherapy and combination therapy studies. GC use did not appear to affect radiographic progression in tofacitinib-treated MTX-naive patients. MTX plus GC appeared to inhibit radiographic progression to a numerically greater degree than MTX alone. Concomitant use of GC with tofacitinib did not appear to affect clinical or radiographic efficacy. MTX plus GC showed a

  17. In pursuit of vehicle landmine occupant protection: Evaluating the dynamic response characteristic of the military lower extremity leg (MiL-Lx) compared to the Hybrid III (HIII) lower leg

    Pandelani, T

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available typical mine-protected vehicle landmine blast load conditions. Tests were performed using the Lower Limb Impactor (LLI) on both the MiL-Lx leg and the Hybrid III leg, and the relative responses compared. The results show that the MiL-Lx leg appears...

  18. Evaluation of conservatisms and environmental effects in ASME Code, Section III, Class 1 fatigue analysis

    Deardorff, A.F.; Smith, J.K.

    1994-08-01

    This report documents the results of a study regarding the conservatisms in ASME Code Section 3, Class 1 component fatigue evaluations and the effects of Light Water Reactor (LWR) water environments on fatigue margins. After review of numerous Class 1 stress reports, it is apparent that there is a substantial amount of conservatism present in many existing component fatigue evaluations. With little effort, existing evaluations could be modified to reduce the overall predicted fatigue usage. Areas of conservatism include design transients considerably more severe than those experienced during service, conservative grouping of transients, conservatisms that have been removed in later editions of Section 3, bounding heat transfer and stress analysis, and use of the ''elastic-plastic penalty factor'' (K 3 ). Environmental effects were evaluated for two typical components that experience severe transient thermal cycling during service, based on both design transients and actual plant data. For all reasonable values of actual operating parameters, environmental effects reduced predicted margins, but fatigue usage was still bounded by the ASME Section 3 fatigue design curves. It was concluded that the potential increase in predicted fatigue usage due to environmental effects should be more than offset by decreases in predicted fatigue usage if re-analysis were conducted to reduce the conservatisms that are present in existing component fatigue evaluations

  19. The influence of a change in medicare reimbursement on the effectiveness of stage III or greater decubitus ulcer home health nursing care.

    Eaton, Melody K

    2005-02-01

    This study was designed to describe and evaluate the influence of a change in a Medicare reimbursement on the effectiveness of home health nursing care for stage III or greater decubitus ulcer patients. This health policy originated from the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 and took its full effect with initiation of the Prospective Payment System (PPS) on October 1, 2000. A quantitative quasi-experimental design used OASIS data from the state of Virginia to evaluate 555 stage III or greater decubitus ulcer patients, age 65 or older. Comparisons were investigated between pre-PPS, 2000, and post-PPS, 2001, outcomes related to reported ulcer healing, lengths of stay, and discharge disposition. Results demonstrated significant differences for the outcomes studied. In addition, sanitation, ulcer healing, and discharge disposition were linked as predictors for length of stay. Results demonstrated that PPS has affected nursing care effectiveness for stage III or greater decubitus ulcer home health patients.

  20. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  1. A phase I/II study to evaluate the effect of fractionated hemibody irradiation in the treatment of osseous metastases--RTOG 88-22

    Scarantino, C.W.; Caplan, R.; Rotman, M.; Coughlin, C.; Demas, W.; Delrowe, J.

    1996-01-01

    the hemibody field were: Arms I--36%; II--30%; III--33%; IV--32%; and V--19%. When compared to single high-dose HBI the estimated reduction in the failure rate was 36% after fractionated HBI which potentially represents a modest improvement. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of fractionated (2.50 Gy) HBI was found to be 17.5 Gy. The major dose limiting toxicity was hematological (thrombo leukopenia). There was not a significant dose response effect on occult disease (appearance of new disease) or in the requirement for additional treatment, although certain trends were noted for the higher doses. When only patients completing assigned HBI from RTOG 82-06 and 88-22 were compared, there was no difference in the time to new disease or additional treatment in the treated field. Based on the investigative parameters of this study, single high-dose HBI was as effective as fractionated HBI. The incorporation of cytokines, to ameliorate hematological toxicity, should allow for the delivery of higher doses of fractionated HBI and sequential HBI as a means of delivering systemic irradiation

  2. Beryllium and growth. III. The effect of beryllium on plant phosphatase

    Hoagland, M B

    1952-01-01

    The purpose of the investigations was to correlate the apparent ability of beryllium to substitute for magnesium in plant growth with a specific biochemical effect of the metal. Through association with earlier work on beryllium inhibition of animal alkaline phosphatase, a study was made of the effect of beryllium and other metals upon the activity of a phosphatase derived from tomato leaves. Although only indirect evidence is available that this enzyme system was magnesium-activated, beryllium was found to inhibit reversibly the splitting of GP and ATP. Other metals were also found to be inhibitory but the ATP-ase inhibition - and especially the ratio of P split from GP to P split from ATP - was higher for beryllium than for any other metal studied. The significance of this finding in relation to energy metabolism, growth, and beryllium toxicity is discussed. 12 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Effect of Ascorbate on the Cyanide-Scavenging Capability of Cobalt(III) meso-Tetra(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphine Pentaiodide: Deactivation by Reduction?

    Benz, Oscar S; Yuan, Quan; Cronican, Andrea A; Peterson, Jim; Pearce, Linda L

    2016-03-21

    The Co(III)-containing water-soluble metalloporphyrin cobalt(III) meso-tetra(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphine pentaiodide (Co(III)TMPyP) is a potential cyanide-scavenging agent. The rate of reduction of Co(III)TMPyP by ascorbate is facile enough that conversion to the Co(II)-containing Co(II)TMPyP should occur within minutes at prevailing in vivo levels of the reductant. It follows that any cyanide-decorporating capability of the metalloporphyrin should depend more on the cyanide-binding characteristics of Co(II)TMPyP than those of the administered form, Co(III)TMPyP. Addition of cyanide to buffered aqueous solutions of Co(II)TMPyP (pH 7.4, 25-37 °C) results in quite rapid (k2 = ∼10(3) M(-1) s(-1)) binding/substitution of cyanide anion in the two available axial positions with high affinity (K'β = 10(10) to 10(11)). Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements and cyclic voltammetry indicate that cyanide induces oxidation to the Co(III)-containing dicyano species. The constraints that these observations put on plausible mechanisms for the reaction of Co(II)TMPyP with cyanide are discussed. Experiments in which Co(III)TMPyP and cyanide were added to freshly drawn mouse blood showed the same sequence of reactions (metalloporphyrin reduction → cyanide binding/substitution → reoxidation) to occur. Therefore, in cyanide-scavenging applications with this metalloporphyrin, we should be taking advantage of both the improved rate of ligand substitution at Co(II) compared to that at Co(III) and the increased affinity of Co(III) for anionic ligands compared to that of Co(II). Finally, using an established sublethal mouse model for cyanide intoxication, Co(III)TMPyP, administered either 5 min before (prophylaxis) or 1 min after the toxicant, is shown to have very significant antidotal capability. Possible explanations for the results of a previous contradictory study, which failed to find any prophylactic effect of Co(III)TMPyP toward cyanide intoxication, are

  4. Disclosure of double exchange bias effect in chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles

    Rinaldi-Montes, N.; Gorria, P.; Fuertes, A.B.; Martinez-Blanco, D.; Olivi, L.; Puente-Orench, I.; Alonso, J.M.; Phan, M.-H.; Skrikanth, H.; Martí, Xavier; Blanco, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-4, č. článku 2300204. ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnetism * exchange bias (EB) * magnetic nanoparticles * magnetoelectric effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.243, year: 2016

  5. Temperature during the last week of incubation. III. Effects on chicken embryo physiology

    Maatjens, C.M.; Roovert-Reijrink, van I.A.M.; Engel, B.; Pol, van der C.W.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated effects of eggshell temperature (EST) of 35.6, 36.7, 37.8, or 38.9°C applied from d of incubation (E) 15, E17, or E19 onward on chicken embryo physiology. A total of 2,850 first-grade eggs of a 43-week-old Ross 308 broiler breeder flock were incubated at an EST of 37.8°C until E15.

  6. Chronic copper poisoning. III. Effects of copper acetate injected into the bloodstream of sheep

    Todd, J R; Thompson, R H

    1964-01-01

    A study was made of the clinical and biochemical effects of injections of copper (as acetate) into the bloodstream of sheep of 100 to 130 lb. liveweight. Copper in a dose of 160 mg. caused death in 3 sheep in a few hours, and 80 mg. caused death in 3 out of 4 sheep, 2 after 2 days and 1 after 11 days. Symptoms, biochemical lesions and post-mortem appearances did not resemble those of chronic copper poisoning, but rather those of gastro-enteritis. Blood glutathione concentrations were not markedly reduced, but haemoconcentration was a prominent feature. Post-mortem examination showed gross congestion of blood vessels and marked inflammatory reactions in the abomasum and small intestine. Single injections of smaller amounts (25 to 40 mg. copper) were tolerated without effect, but repeated injections, twice daily for 2 to 3 days, caused haemolytic episodes in 3 sheep similar to the crisis of chronic copper poisoning in that a marked reduction in blood glutathione concentration and accumulation of methaemoglobin occurred. No other clinical effects were produced, however, and all three animals recovered uneventfully.

  7. Complement-induced histamine release from human basophils. III. Effect of pharmacologic agents.

    Hook, W A; Siraganian, R P

    1977-02-01

    Human serum activated with zymosan generates a factor (C5a) that releases histamine from autologous basophils. Previously we have presented evidence that this mechanism for C5a-induced release differs from IgE-mediated reactions. The effect of several pharmacologic agents known to alter IgE-mediated release was studied to determine whether they have a similar action on serum-induced release. Deuterium oxide (D2O), which enhances allergic release, inhibited in a concentration-dependent fashion the serum-induced reaction at incubation temperatures of 25 and 32 degrees C. The colchicine-induced inhibition was not reversed by D2O. Cytochalasin B, which gives a variable enhancement of IgE-mediated release, had a marked enhancing effect on the serum-induced reaction in all subjects tested. The following agents known to inhibit the IgE-mediated reaction also inhibited serum-induced release at 25 degrees C: colchicine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, aminophylline, isoproterenol, cholera toxin, chlorphenesin, diethylcarbamazine, and 2-deoxy-D-glucose. These results suggest that the serum-induced release is modulated by intracellular cyclic AMP, requires energy, and is enhanced by the disruption of microfilaments. The lack of an effect by D2O would suggest that microtubular stabilization is not required. The data can be interpreted to indicate that IgE- and C5a-mediated reactions diverge at a late stage in the histamine release pathway.

  8. Photochemical oxidants injury in rice plants. III. Effect of ozone on physiological activities in rice plants

    Nakamura, H; Saka, H

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were made to determine the effect of photochemical oxidants on physiological activities of rice plants. Rice plants were fumigated with ozone at concentrations of 0.12-0.20 ppm for 2-3 hr to investigate acute injury and at 0.05 and 0.09 ppm for daily exposure from 3.0 leaf stage to assess the effect of ozone on growth. It was observed that malondialdehyde produced by disruption of the components of the membrane increased in the leaves exposed to ozone. Ozone reduced the RuBP-carboxylase activity in both young and old leaves 12-24 hr after fumigation. In the young leaves the activity of this enzyme recovered to some extent after 48 hr, but it did not show any recovery in the old leaves. On the other hand, ozone remarkably increased the peroxidase activity and slightly increased acid phosphatase in all leaves. Abnormally high ethylene evolution and oxygen uptake were detected in leaves soon after ozone fumigation. In general, high molecular protein and chlorophyll contents in the detached leaves decreased with incubation in dark, particularly in the old ones. These phenomena were more accelerated by ozone fumigation. Kinetin and benzimidazole showed significant effects on chlorophyll retention in ozone-exposed leaves. Reduction of plant growth and photosynthetic rate was recognized even in low concentration of ozone in daily exposure at 0.05 and 0.09 ppm. From these results it was postulated that ozone may cause the senescence of leaves in rice plants.

  9. Indication of the Hanle Effect by Comparing the Scattering Polarization Observed by CLASP in the Ly α and Si iii 120.65 nm Lines

    Ishikawa, R.; Kubo, M.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Katsukawa, Y.; Giono, G.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Science, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Uitenbroek, H. [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Goto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Cirtain, J. [University of Virginia, Department of Astronomy, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Champey, P. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); and others

    2017-05-20

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment that has provided the first successful measurement of the linear polarization produced by scattering processes in the hydrogen Ly α line (121.57 nm) radiation of the solar disk. In this paper, we report that the Si iii line at 120.65 nm also shows scattering polarization and we compare the scattering polarization signals observed in the Ly α and Si iii lines in order to search for observational signatures of the Hanle effect. We focus on four selected bright structures and investigate how the U / I spatial variations vary between the Ly α wing, the Ly α core, and the Si iii line as a function of the total unsigned photospheric magnetic flux estimated from Solar Dynamics Observatory /Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations. In an internetwork region, the Ly α core shows an antisymmetric spatial variation across the selected bright structure, but it does not show it in other more magnetized regions. In the Si iii line, the spatial variation of U / I deviates from the above-mentioned antisymmetric shape as the total unsigned photospheric magnetic flux increases. A plausible explanation of this difference is the operation of the Hanle effect. We argue that diagnostic techniques based on the scattering polarization observed simultaneously in two spectral lines with very different sensitivities to the Hanle effect, like Ly α and Si iii, are of great potential interest for exploring the magnetism of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region.

  10. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    Uwamariya, V.; Petruševski, Branislav; Lens, Piet Nl L; Amy, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without

  11. POLARIZED LINE FORMATION IN MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MEDIA. III. HANLE EFFECT WITH PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    In two previous papers, we solved the polarized radiative transfer (RT) equation in multi-dimensional (multi-D) geometries with partial frequency redistribution as the scattering mechanism. We assumed Rayleigh scattering as the only source of linear polarization (Q/I, U/I) in both these papers. In this paper, we extend these previous works to include the effect of weak oriented magnetic fields (Hanle effect) on line scattering. We generalize the technique of Stokes vector decomposition in terms of the irreducible spherical tensors T K Q , developed by Anusha and Nagendra, to the case of RT with Hanle effect. A fast iterative method of solution (based on the Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate-Gradient technique), developed by Anusha et al., is now generalized to the case of RT in magnetized three-dimensional media. We use the efficient short-characteristics formal solution method for multi-D media, generalized appropriately to the present context. The main results of this paper are the following: (1) a comparison of emergent (I, Q/I, U/I) profiles formed in one-dimensional (1D) media, with the corresponding emergent, spatially averaged profiles formed in multi-D media, shows that in the spatially resolved structures, the assumption of 1D may lead to large errors in linear polarization, especially in the line wings. (2) The multi-D RT in semi-infinite non-magnetic media causes a strong spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles, which is more pronounced in the line wings. (3) The presence of a weak magnetic field modifies the spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles in the line core, by producing significant changes in their magnitudes.

  12. Urinary steroid hormone patterns: III. Effect of continuous daily administration of low dose megestrol acetate.

    Kumari, G L; Roy, S; Allag, I S; Ghosal, J

    1975-12-01

    The effect of megestrol acetate, administered in daily doses of .5 mg, on urinary steroid levels was studied before, during, and after therapy in 4 women volunteers. In each case, pregnanediol levels were reduced, though ovulatory biphasic patterns, as reflected in basal body temperature patterns, were apparent in the majority of the cycles, which suggests that corpus luteum function, but not ovulation, was impaired. 17-ketosteroid levels were significantly (p less than .001) increased either during or after treatment, while 17-hydroxycorticoid levels were reduced in 3 of the women. 2 subjects showed a marked reduction in levels of 17-ketogenic steroids and corticoid levels. Total estrogen levels seemed to correlate with the levels of corticoid excretion.

  13. In vitro tests for aerosol deposition. III: effect of inhaler insertion angle on aerosol deposition.

    Delvadia, Renish R; Longest, P Worth; Hindle, Michael; Byron, Peter R

    2013-06-01

    Inhaler orientation with respect to a patient's mouth may be an important variable determining the efficiency of aerosol lung delivery. The effect of insertion angle on regional deposition was evaluated for a series of inhalers using concurrent in vitro and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Geometrically realistic physical mouth-throat (MT) and upper tracheobronchial (TB) models were constructed to connect different inhalers at a series of insertion angles relative to the horizontal plane of the model. These models were used to assess albuterol sulfate deposition from the Novolizer(®) dry powder inhaler (DPI), Proventil(®) HFA pressurized metered dose inhaler (MDI), and Respimat(®) Soft Mist™ Inhaler (SMI) following the actuation of a single dose. Drug deposition from Novolizer DPI was studied for Salbulin(®) and an experimental "drug only" formulation. Albuterol sulfate was recovered and quantified from the device and the MT and TB regions. Significant differences in MT and total lung dose (TLD) of albuterol sulfate deposition were not observed for Salbulin Novolizer DPI and Respimat SMI inserted at different angles. In contrast, drug-only Novolizer DPI and Proventil HFA MDI showed a significant difference in MT and TLD deposition using different insertion angles. For drug-only Novolizer DPI and Proventil HFA MDI, the lowest and the highest MT depositions were observed at +10° and -20°, respectively; for Respimat SMI and Salbulin Novolizer DPI, these angles were -10° and +10°, and +20° and -20°, respectively. CFD simulations were in agreement with the experimental results and illustrated shifts in local particle deposition associated with changes in insertion angle. The effect of inhaler orientation at the inhaler-mouth interface on MT aerosol deposition appeared to be dependent on velocity, aerosol size, and formulation. These findings not only demonstrate the need for patient education on correct inhaler orientation, but provide important

  14. Effects of acupuncture on behavioral, cardiovascular and hormonal responses in restraint-stressed Wistar rats

    Guimarães C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a well-known entity and may be defined as a threat to the homeostasis of a being. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of acupuncture on the physiological responses induced by restraint stress. Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic technique which is used in the treatment and prevention of diseases. Its proposed mechanisms of action are based on the principle of homeostasis. Adult male Wistar EPM-1 rats were divided into four groups: group I (N = 12, unrestrained rats with cannulas previously implanted into their femoral arteries for blood pressure and heart rate measurements; group II (N = 12, rats that were also cannulated and were submitted to 60-min immobilization; group III (N = 12, same as group II but with acupuncture needles implanted at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 during the immobilization period; group IV (N = 14, same as group III but with needles implanted at points not related to acupuncture (non-acupoints. During the 60-min immobilization period animals were assessed for stress-related behaviors, heart rate, blood pressure and plasma corticosterone, noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Group III animals showed a significant reduction (60% on average, P<0.02 in restraint-induced behaviors when compared to groups II and IV. Data from cardiovascular and hormonal assessments indicated no differences between group III and group II and IV animals, but tended to be lower (50% reduction on average in group I animals. We hypothesize that acupuncture at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 has an anxiolytic effect on restraint-induced stress that is not due to a sedative action

  15. Effects of iron(III)chelates on the solubility of heavy metals in calcareous soils

    Ylivainio, Kari, E-mail: kari.ylivainio@mtt.f [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-10-15

    In this study I evaluated the effects of complexing agents on the solubility of heavy metals in an incubation experiment up to 56 days when complexing agents were applied as Fe-chelates (Fe-EDDS(S,S), Fe-EDDS(mix), Fe-EDTA and Fe-EDDHA) on calcareous soils at a level sufficient to correct Fe chlorosis (0.1 mmol kg{sup -1}). Of these ligands, EDDHA was the most efficient in keeping Fe in water-soluble form, and EDDS increased the solubility of Cu and Zn most, and only EDTA increased the solubility of Cd and Pb. EDTA increased the solubility of Ni steadily during the incubation period, equalling about 5-8% of the added EDTA concentration. [S,S]-EDDS was biodegraded within 56 days, whereas EDDS(mix) was less biodegradable. Ni-chelates were the most recalcitrant against biodegradation. The study shows that even a moderate input of chelates to soil increases the solubility of toxic heavy metals and their risk of leaching. - When correcting Fe chlorosis Fe-EDDS causes lower environmental concern than Fe-EDTA.

  16. Effects of iron(III)chelates on the solubility of heavy metals in calcareous soils

    Ylivainio, Kari

    2010-01-01

    In this study I evaluated the effects of complexing agents on the solubility of heavy metals in an incubation experiment up to 56 days when complexing agents were applied as Fe-chelates (Fe-EDDS(S,S), Fe-EDDS(mix), Fe-EDTA and Fe-EDDHA) on calcareous soils at a level sufficient to correct Fe chlorosis (0.1 mmol kg -1 ). Of these ligands, EDDHA was the most efficient in keeping Fe in water-soluble form, and EDDS increased the solubility of Cu and Zn most, and only EDTA increased the solubility of Cd and Pb. EDTA increased the solubility of Ni steadily during the incubation period, equalling about 5-8% of the added EDTA concentration. [S,S]-EDDS was biodegraded within 56 days, whereas EDDS(mix) was less biodegradable. Ni-chelates were the most recalcitrant against biodegradation. The study shows that even a moderate input of chelates to soil increases the solubility of toxic heavy metals and their risk of leaching. - When correcting Fe chlorosis Fe-EDDS causes lower environmental concern than Fe-EDTA.

  17. Effects of iron(III)chelates on the solubility of heavy metals in calcareous soils.

    Ylivainio, Kari

    2010-10-01

    In this study I evaluated the effects of complexing agents on the solubility of heavy metals in an incubation experiment up to 56 days when complexing agents were applied as Fe-chelates (Fe-EDDS(S,S), Fe-EDDS(mix), Fe-EDTA and Fe-EDDHA) on calcareous soils at a level sufficient to correct Fe chlorosis (0.1 mmol kg(-1)). Of these ligands, EDDHA was the most efficient in keeping Fe in water-soluble form, and EDDS increased the solubility of Cu and Zn most, and only EDTA increased the solubility of Cd and Pb. EDTA increased the solubility of Ni steadily during the incubation period, equalling about 5-8% of the added EDTA concentration. [S,S]-EDDS was biodegraded within 56 days, whereas EDDS(mix) was less biodegradable. Ni-chelates were the most recalcitrant against biodegradation. The study shows that even a moderate input of chelates to soil increases the solubility of toxic heavy metals and their risk of leaching. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [The effectiveness of magnetic therapy of grade I-II radiation pneumofibrosis].

    Grushina, T I

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy of malignant tumours of the chest organs may result in radiation damage of the lungs. To prevent and reduce radiation-induced lung injuries, new types of radiation therapy have been developed, a number of various modifiers investigated, the methods of pharmacotherapy and physiotherapy proposed. The present study involved 37 patients presenting with radiation pneumofibrosis, including 7 ones with lung cancer and 30 patients with breast cancer. Based on the results of clinical, radiographic, and functional investigations, grade 1 and II pneumofibrosis was diagnosed in 20 and 17 patients respectively. After the application of an alternating magnetic field during 15 days, all the patients experience the overall regression of clinical symptoms and disorders of respiratory biomechanics. However, it seems premature to draw a definitive conclusion about the effectiveness of magnetic therapy of grade 1 and II radiation pneumofibrosis before the extensive in-depth investigations are carried out based on a large clinical material including the results of long-term follow-up studies and continuous monitoring.

  19. J/ψ gluonic dissociation revisited: III. Effects of transverse hydrodynamic flow

    Patra, B.K.; Menon, V.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a recent paper [B.K. Patra, V.J. Menon, Eur. Phys. J. C 44, 567 (2005)] we developed a very general formulation to take into account explicitly the effects of the hydrodynamic flow profile on the gluonic breakup of J/ψs produced in an equilibrating quark-gluon plasma. Here we apply that formulation to the case when the medium is undergoing a cylindrically symmetric transverse expansion starting from RHIC or LHC initial conditions. Our algebraic and numerical estimates demonstrate that the transverse expansion causes enhancement of the local gluon number density n g , affects the p T -dependence of the average dissociation rate left angle anti Γ right angle through a partial-wave interference mechanism and makes the survival probability S(p T ) to change with p T very slowly. Compared to the previous case of a longitudinal expansion the new graph of S(p T ) is pushed up at LHC but develops a rich structure at RHIC, due to a competition between the transverse catch-up time and the plasma lifetime. (orig.)

  20. The effect of sustained release boli with ammoniumiron(III)-hexacyanoferrate(II) on radiocesium accumulation in sheep grazing contaminated pasture

    Hansen, H.S.; Hove, K.; Barvik, K.

    1996-01-01

    Sustained release boli with the cesium binder ammoniumiron(III)-hexacyanoferrate(II) (AFCF) were tested under practical conditions for sheep grazing on pastures contaminated with radiocesium ( 134 Cs+ 137 Cs) from the Chernobyl fallout. Two types of AFCF boli were developed: boli without a protective surface coating intended to last 4-8 wk; and boli coated by a wax-mixture with an extended duration of 10-12 wk. From 1989 to 1993 we measured the effect of wax-coated and uncoated boli administered at various times during the grazing season to a total of 3,248 animals. Reductions in radiocesium levels in meat of sheep were measured by in vivo monitoring. Administration of AFCF boli without a wax-coating reduced the mean radiocesium levels in lambs by 42-75% over a 408 wk period, and administration of the wax-coated AFCF boli reduced the mean radiocesium levels by 48-65% over a 9-11 wk period. The coefficients of variation in meat radiocesium levels were similar in treated and control groups at the end of the observation period, showing that the reduction of meat radiocesium values was homogeneous throughout the treated groups. The boli giving sustained release of AFCF is a labor-saving and cost effective counter-measure for sheep grazing radiocesium contaminated pastures. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  1. The effect of biofeedback physical therapy in men with Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Type III.

    Cornel, Erik B; van Haarst, Ernst P; Schaarsberg, Ria W M Browning-Groote; Geels, Jenet

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the symptoms of chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CP) or Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) may be due to or associated with pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Therapies aimed to improve relaxation and proper use of the pelvic floor muscles such as biofeedback physical therapy and pelvic floor re-education are expected to give symptom improvement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of biofeedback physical therapy on the symptoms of men with CPPS. Between March 2000 to March 2004, 33 consecutive men were diagnosed with CP/CPPS based on history including the NIH-CPSI questionnaire and physical examination including pelvic floor muscle tonus, urinalysis, uroflowmetry with residual urine measurement and transrectal ultrasonography of the prostate. All patients participated in a pelvic floor biofeedback re-educating program. A rectal EMG probe was used to measure resting tone of the pelvic floor muscles and was helpful for instruction pelvic floor muscles contraction and relaxation. Two of the 33 men dropped out. In the remaining 31 men, mean age 43.9 years (range 23-70), the mean total Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) changed from 23.6 (range 11-34) at baseline to 11.4 (range 1-25) after treatment (ppelvic floor muscle tonus was 4.9 at diagnosis (range 2.0-10.0) and decreased to 1.7 (range 0.5-2.8) after treatment (pphysical therapy and pelvic floor re-education for CP/CPPS patients, leading to a significant improvement of the symptom score. The correlation between the pelvic muscle tonus results with NIH-CPSI score is highly suggestive that the pelvic floor plays an important role in the pathophysiology of CP/CPPS.

  2. GASP. III. JO36: A Case of Multiple Environmental Effects at Play?

    Fritz, Jacopo; Bruzual, Gustavo; Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, A.P. 3-72, C.P. 58089 (Mexico); Moretti, Alessia; Gullieuszik, Marco; Poggianti, Bianca; Vulcani, Benedetta; Bettoni, Daniela; Fasano, Giovanni [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, Padova (Italy); Nicastro, Fabrizio [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone, RM (Italy); Jaffé, Yara; Biviano, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Charlot, Stéphane [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Bellhouse, Callum [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edgbaston, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Hau, George, E-mail: j.fritz@irya.unam.mx [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

    2017-10-20

    The so-called jellyfish galaxies are objects exhibiting disturbed morphology, mostly in the form of tails of gas stripped from the main body of the galaxy. Several works have strongly suggested ram pressure stripping to be the mechanism driving this phenomenon. Here, we focus on one of these objects, drawn from a sample of optically selected jellyfish galaxies, and use it to validate sinopsis, the spectral fitting code that will be used for the analysis of the GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) survey, and study the spatial distribution and physical properties of the gas and stellar populations in this galaxy. We compare the model spectra to those obtained with gandalf, a code with similar features widely used to interpret the kinematics of stars and gas in galaxies from IFU data. We find that sinopsis can reproduce the pixel-by-pixel spectra of this galaxy at least as well as gandalf does, providing reliable estimates of the underlying stellar absorption to properly correct the nebular gas emission. Using these results, we find strong evidences of a double effect of ram pressure exerted by the intracluster medium onto the gas of the galaxy. A moderate burst of star formation, dating between 20 and 500 Myr ago and involving the outer parts of the galaxy more strongly than the inner regions, was likely induced by a first interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. Stripping by ram pressure, plus probable gas depletion due to star formation, contributed to create a truncated ionized gas disk. The presence of an extended stellar tail on only one side of the disk points instead to another kind of process, likely gravitational interaction by a fly-by or a close encounter with another galaxy in the cluster.

  3. GASP. III. JO36: A Case of Multiple Environmental Effects at Play?

    Fritz, Jacopo; Bruzual, Gustavo; Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Moretti, Alessia; Gullieuszik, Marco; Poggianti, Bianca; Vulcani, Benedetta; Bettoni, Daniela; Fasano, Giovanni; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Jaffé, Yara; Biviano, Andrea; Charlot, Stéphane; Bellhouse, Callum; Hau, George

    2017-01-01

    The so-called jellyfish galaxies are objects exhibiting disturbed morphology, mostly in the form of tails of gas stripped from the main body of the galaxy. Several works have strongly suggested ram pressure stripping to be the mechanism driving this phenomenon. Here, we focus on one of these objects, drawn from a sample of optically selected jellyfish galaxies, and use it to validate sinopsis, the spectral fitting code that will be used for the analysis of the GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) survey, and study the spatial distribution and physical properties of the gas and stellar populations in this galaxy. We compare the model spectra to those obtained with gandalf, a code with similar features widely used to interpret the kinematics of stars and gas in galaxies from IFU data. We find that sinopsis can reproduce the pixel-by-pixel spectra of this galaxy at least as well as gandalf does, providing reliable estimates of the underlying stellar absorption to properly correct the nebular gas emission. Using these results, we find strong evidences of a double effect of ram pressure exerted by the intracluster medium onto the gas of the galaxy. A moderate burst of star formation, dating between 20 and 500 Myr ago and involving the outer parts of the galaxy more strongly than the inner regions, was likely induced by a first interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. Stripping by ram pressure, plus probable gas depletion due to star formation, contributed to create a truncated ionized gas disk. The presence of an extended stellar tail on only one side of the disk points instead to another kind of process, likely gravitational interaction by a fly-by or a close encounter with another galaxy in the cluster.

  4. Interaction effects on galaxy pairs with Gemini/GMOS- III: stellar population synthesis

    Krabbe, A. C.; Rosa, D. A.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Hägele, G. F.; Cardaci, M. V.; Dors, O. L., Jr.; Winge, C.

    2017-05-01

    We present an observational study of the impacts of interactions on the stellar population in a sample of galaxy pairs. Long-slit spectra in the wavelength range 3440-7300 Å obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at Gemini South for 15 galaxies in nine close pairs were used. The spatial distributions of the stellar population contributions were obtained using the stellar population synthesis code starlight. Taking into account the different contributions to the emitted light, we found that most of the galaxies in our sample are dominated by young/intermediate stellar populations. This result differs from the one derived for isolated galaxies, where the old stellar population dominates the disc surface brightness. We interpreted such different behaviour as being due to the effect of gas inflows along the discs of interacting galaxies on the star formation over a time-scale of the order of about 2 Gyr. We also found that, in general, the secondary galaxy of a pair has a higher contribution from the young stellar population than the primary one. We compared the estimated values of stellar and nebular extinction derived from the synthesis method and the Hα/Hβ emission-line ratio, finding that nebular extinctions are systematically higher than stellar ones by about a factor of 2. We did not find any correlation between nebular and stellar metallicities. Neither did we find a correlation between stellar metallicities and ages, while a positive correlation between nebular metallicities and stellar ages was obtained, with older regions being the most metal-rich.

  5. The Effect of Accounting Question Response Formats on Student Performance

    Jonick, Christine; Schneider, Jennifer; Boylan, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to examine the effect of different response formats on student performance on introductory accounting exam questions. The study analyzes 1104 accounting students' responses to quantitative questions presented in two formats: multiple-choice and fill-in. Findings indicate that response format impacts student…

  6. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  7. Effects of tibolone on fibrinogen and antithrombin III: A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    Bała, Małgorzata; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Ursoniu, Sorin; Serban, Maria-Corina; Undas, Anetta; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Lip, Gregory Y H; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2017-10-01

    Tibolone is a synthetic steroid with estrogenic, androgenic and progestogenic activity, but the evidence regarding its effects on fibrinogen and antithrombin III (ATIII) has not been conclusive. We assessed the impact of tibolone on fibrinogen and ATIII through a systematic review and meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The search included PUBMED, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar (up to January 31st, 2016) to identify controlled clinical studies investigating the effects of oral tibolone treatment on fibrinogen and ATIII. Overall, the impact of tibolone on plasma fibrinogen concentrations was reported in 10 trials comprising 11 treatment arms. Meta-analysis did not suggest a significant reduction of fibrinogen levels following treatment with tibolone (WMD: -5.38%, 95% CI: -11.92, +1.16, p=0.107). This result was robust in the sensitivity analysis and not influenced after omitting each of the included studies from meta-analysis. When the studies were categorized according to the duration of treatment, there was no effect in the subsets of trials lasting either analysis. There was no differential effect of tibolone on plasma ATIII concentrations in trials with either analysis, meta-regression did not suggest any significant association between the changes in plasma concentrations of fibrinogen (slope: +0.40; 95% CI: -0.39, +1.19; p=0.317) and ATIII (slope: -0.17; 95% CI: -0.54, +0.20; p=0.374) with duration of treatment. In conclusion, meta-analysis did not suggest a significant reduction of fibrinogen and ATIII levels following treatment with tibolone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protective effect of Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B upon oxidative stress caused by ozone and acid rain in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba".

    Esposito, Jéssica Bordotti Nobre; Esposito, Breno Pannia; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes; Cruz, Luciano Soares; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the Mn complex (Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B (MnDFB)) on oxidative stress in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba" following exposure to ozone and acid rain. We determined the suitable dose of MnDFB to apply to G. max seedlings using a dose-response curve. The highest superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and Mn content in leaves were found upon the application of 8 μM MnDFB. Thus, G. max seedlings pretreated with 8 μM MnDFB were individually exposed to ozone and acid rain simulated. Pretreatment with MnDFB reduced lipid peroxidation upon ozone exposure and increased SOD activity in leaves; it did not alter the metal content in any part of the plant. Conversely, following acid rain exposure, neither the metal content in leaves nor SOD enzyme activity were directly affected by MnDFB, unlike pH. Our findings demonstrated that exogenous MnDFB application before ozone exposure may modulate the MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD, and FeSOD activities to combat the ROS excess in the cell. Here, we demonstrated that the applied dose of MnDFB enhances antioxidative defenses in soybean following exposure to acid rain and especially to ozone.

  9. A recombinant influenza A virus expressing domain III of West Nile virus induces protective immune responses against influenza and West Nile virus.

    Martina, Byron E E; van den Doel, Petra; Koraka, Penelope; van Amerongen, Geert; Spohn, Gunther; Haagmans, Bart L; Provacia, Lisette B V; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2011-04-26

    West Nile virus (WNV) continues to circulate in the USA and forms a threat to the rest of the Western hemisphere. Since methods for the treatment of WNV infections are not available, there is a need for the development of safe and effective vaccines. Here, we describe the construction of a recombinant influenza virus expressing domain III of the WNV glycoprotein E (Flu-NA-DIII) and its evaluation as a WNV vaccine candidate in a mouse model. FLU-NA-DIII-vaccinated mice were protected from severe body weight loss and mortality caused by WNV infection, whereas control mice succumbed to the infection. In addition, it was shown that one subcutaneous immunization with 10(5) TCID(50) Flu-NA-DIII provided 100% protection against challenge. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that protection was mediated by antibodies and CD4+T cells. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with FLU-NA-DIII developed protective influenza virus-specific antibody titers. It was concluded that this vector system might be an attractive platform for the development of bivalent WNV-influenza vaccines.

  10. A recombinant influenza A virus expressing domain III of West Nile virus induces protective immune responses against influenza and West Nile virus.

    Byron E E Martina

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV continues to circulate in the USA and forms a threat to the rest of the Western hemisphere. Since methods for the treatment of WNV infections are not available, there is a need for the development of safe and effective vaccines. Here, we describe the construction of a recombinant influenza virus expressing domain III of the WNV glycoprotein E (Flu-NA-DIII and its evaluation as a WNV vaccine candidate in a mouse model. FLU-NA-DIII-vaccinated mice were protected from severe body weight loss and mortality caused by WNV infection, whereas control mice succumbed to the infection. In addition, it was shown that one subcutaneous immunization with 10(5 TCID(50 Flu-NA-DIII provided 100% protection against challenge. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that protection was mediated by antibodies and CD4+T cells. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with FLU-NA-DIII developed protective influenza virus-specific antibody titers. It was concluded that this vector system might be an attractive platform for the development of bivalent WNV-influenza vaccines.

  11. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    targeting bone density, cardiovascular function, lean and fat mass, physical function and falls risk as primary study endpoints. In terms of advancement of prostate cancer care, we expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce fracture risk, improve physical and functional ability, quality of life and ultimately survival rate in this population. A Phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer; ACTRN12609000200280

  12. Substrate effects on the formation of flat Ag films on (110) surfaces of III-V compound semiconductors

    Chao, K.; Zhang, Z.; Ebert, P.; Shih, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    Ag films grown at 135 K on (110) surfaces of III-V compound semiconductors and annealed at room temperature are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Ag films on Ga-V semiconductors are well ordered, atomically flat, and exhibit a specific critical thickness, which is a function of the substrate material. Films grown on In-V semiconductors are still rather flat, but significantly more disordered. The (111) oriented Ag films on III-arsenides and III-phosphides exhibit a clear twofold superstructure. Films on III-antimonides exhibit threefold low-energy electron diffraction images. The morphology of the Ag films can be explained on the basis of the electronic growth mechanism. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  13. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial: A TITE-CRM Phase I/II Clinical Trial.

    Kim, Michelle M; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S; Lao, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. FP-APW plus lo calculations of the elastic properties in zinc-blende III-P compounds under pressure effects

    Bouhemadou, A.; Khenata, R.; Kharoubi, M.; Seddik, R.; Al-Douri, Y.; Reshak, Ali H

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2009), s. 474-479 ISSN 0927-0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : III-P compounds * Elastic moduli * Pressure effect Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2009

  15. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans

  16. The Effect of Growth Temperature and V/III Flux Ratio of MOCVD Antimony Based Semiconductors on Growth Rate and Surface Morphology

    Ramelan Ari Handono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial Alx Ga1-x Sb layers on GaSb and GaAs substrates have been grown by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using TMAl, TMGa and TMSb. Nomarski microscope and a profiler were employed to examine the surface morphology and growth rate of the samples. We report the effect of growth temperature and V/III flux ratio on growth rate and surface morphology. Growth temperatures in the range of 520°C and 680°C and V/III ratios from 1 to 5 have been investigated. A growth rate activation energy of 0.73 eV was found. At low growth temperatures between 520 and 540°C, the surface morphology is poor due to antimonide precipitates associated with incomplete decomposition of the TMSb. For layers grown on GaAs at 580°C and 600°C with a V/III ratio of 3 a high quality surface morphology is typical, with a mirror-like surface and good composition control. It was found that a suitable growth temperature and V/III flux ratio was beneficial for producing good AlGaSb layers. Undoped AlGaSb grown at 580°C with a V/III flux ratio of 3 at the rate of 3.5 μm/hour shows p-type conductivity with smooth surface morphology

  17. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

    Rosemary C Challis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII, a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found, similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology.

  18. Effect of temperature on the extraction of europium (III) bymixtures of neutral phosphoro-organic extractants from nitrate solutions

    Milchlin, E.B.; Khmuran, M.A.; Mikhailichenko, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the distribution of microquantities of europium (III) on extraction with neutral phosphoorganic compounds-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), diisooctylmethyl phosphonate (DIOMP),trialkylphosphine oxide with dissimilar radicals (PODR), or mixtures thereof-from a solution of 2 mole/liter NH 4 NO 3 and 0.01 mole/liter HNO 3 , in the temperature range 20-60 0 C. A temperature rise results in a decrease of the distribution coefficients of the europium on extraction by all of the extractants tested and their mixtures, and also in a reduction of the synergistic effect in extraction by mixtures of the extractants. Based on an investigation of the temperature dependences of the distribution constants of europium nitrate upon extraction by TBP, DIOMP, PODR, or their mixtures, values have been determined for the enthalpy, free energy, and entropy of extraction. It is shown that the enthalpy (-ΔH) increases in the order TBP< DIOMP< PODR. In an extraction with mixed extractants, the enthalpy has a value intermediate between those with the individual extractants. The entropy of extraction (-ΔS) increases in the reverse order PODR< DIOMP< TBP

  19. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology.

  20. Early prediction of therapy response and disease free survival after induction chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer by FDG-PET: Correlation between tumor FDG-metabolism and morphometric tumor response

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Niesen, A.; Przetak, C.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Chemotherapy with Docetaxel and Carboplatin (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction VIP-chemotherapy has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. The aim of the present study was to correlate the tumor FDG metabolism as measured by F-18 FDG-PET with morphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Erythropoietin (10,000 IU Epo s.c. three times a week). Material and Methods: In this prospective multicenter study, 54 patients with NSCLC stage IIIA (9 patients) or IIIB (45 patients) were enrolled and received neoadjuvant treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 d1 and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles prior to surgery. Postoperatively, all patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. WB-PET-studies (ECAT Exact 47) were obtained p.i. of 400 MBq F-18 FDG. Standardized uptake values (SUV), metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and metabolic tumor index (MTI SUV x MTD) were assessed. Image fusion of PET and CT data was applied on a HERMES computer. Results: Of 54 enrolled patients, 46 were evaluable for response by CT. 30/46 patients (65%) achieved complete remission (CR, 1 patient) or partial remission (PR 29 patients.). Of the 46 patients, 37 patients completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Chx) and were studied before and after Chx by FDG-PET. 14 (30% of the 46 evaluable patients) had SUV < 2.5, corresponding to metabolic complete remission (mCR), 23 had PR or stable disease (non-mCR); in 9 patients, PET was not performed because of progressive disease demonstrated by CT. The R0-resection rate was 56% (27/48 evaluable patients). Of the 14 patients with metabolic CR, 9 were evaluated by morphometry. All had regression grades III (no vital tumor cells) or grade IIB (< 10% vital tumor cells and induced apoptosis). With a median

  1. Effectiveness of cellulose sulfate vaginal gel for the prevention of HIV infection: results of a Phase III trial in Nigeria.

    Vera Halpern

    Full Text Available This trial evaluated the safety and effectiveness of 6% cellulose sulfate vaginal gel in preventing male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydial infection.This Phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted between November 2004 and March 2007 in Lagos and Port Harcourt, Nigeria. We enrolled 1644 HIV-antibody negative women at high risk of HIV acquisition. Study participants were randomized 1:1 to cellulose sulfate or placebo and asked to use gel plus a condom for each act of vaginal intercourse over one year of follow-up. The participants were evaluated monthly for HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydial infection, and for adverse events.The trial was stopped prematurely after the data safety monitoring board of a parallel trial concluded that cellulose sulfate might be increasing the risk of HIV. In contrast, we observed fewer infections in the active arm (10 than on placebo (13, a difference that was nonetheless not statistically significant (HR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.3-1.8; p = 0.56. Rates of gonorrhea and chlamydial infection were lower in the CS group but the difference was likewise not statistically significant (HR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.5-1.1; p = 0.19 for the combined STI outcome. Rates of adverse events were similar across study arms. No serious adverse events related to cellulose sulfate use were reported.Cellulose sulfate gel appeared to be safe in the evaluated study population but we found insufficient evidence that it prevented male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV, gonorrhea or chlamydial infection. The early closure of the trial compromised the ability to draw definitive conclusions about the effectiveness of cellulose sulfate against HIV.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120770.

  2. Growth, immune responses and protection of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus immunized with formalin-killed Streptococcus agalactiae serotype Ia and III vaccines

    Atchariya Suwannasang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The protective efficacy of formalin-killed Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS serotype Ia (GBS-Ia and III (GBS-III vaccines were assessed in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. The fish with an average weight of 34.45± 0.08 g were immunized by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection with 4 different formalin-killed vaccines prepared from GBS-Ia (1x1010 CFU/mL, GBS-III (1x1010 CFU/mL, and combined GBS-Ia and GBS-III in an equal volume at final concentrations 1x1010 CFU/mL and 2x1010 CFU/mL in comparison with the non-immunized control group. At 2 and 4 weeks post vaccination, no significant differences were observed (p>0.05 among treatments in growth performance or haemato-immunological parameters, except the increased red blood cell at 2 weeks. Significantly increased antibody titers (p<0.05 against GBS-Ia and GBS-III antigens were noted in the groups immunized with homologous GBS vaccines, whereas the group reacted with heterologous GBS antigen showed less antibody titer as compared with the control group. The vaccination experiment indicated that i.p. injection of Nile tilapia with formalin-killed cells prepared from GBS-Ia or GBS-III provides significant protection, with relative percent survival (RPS value of 52.17 to 71.42%, against a challenge with the homologous serotype isolate, whereas the RPS in fish challenged with a heterologous serotype isolate varied from 20.00 to 53.57%. These results suggested that vaccines from either GBS-Ia or GBS-III have insufficient cross-protective efficacy against the other serotypes. However, a mixed vaccine produced from both GBS serotypes Ia and III provided significant protection with 65.00 to 95.66% RPS which could be an excellent vaccine to protect fish against streptococcosis caused by both GBS serotypes Ia and III.

  3. Effects of Ligands on a Ternary Hydroxo Complex Formation with Eu(III) in a Aqueous Solution: Comparison of a Pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate with a Phthalate

    Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.; Kim, W. H.; Jung, E. C.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of a radionuclide with ligands in a groundwater influences its migration through a hydrogeological system due to a change in the characteristics of a dissolution and a sorption. Actinide ions are classified as a hard acid and strongly interact with ligands having an oxygen donor atom of a hard base such as a hydroxide, carbonate and carboxylate. These ligands reveal a large ionic bonding character. A number of experimental results on a binary complex formation of actinides have been reported. However, actinides may easily form a ternary complex by interacting simultaneously with two different ligands, since an ionic bonding does not restrict the spatial orientation of a ligand. In previous studies, a ternary hydroxo complex formation was investigated by using pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate (PDA) or phthalate as an organic ligand and Eu(III) as an analogue of an actinide(III) ion. Although these organic ligands equally contain two carboxylate groups that interact with an Eu(III) ion, their stabilities reveal big differences. PDA is a tridentate ligand forming two 5-membered chelates, while phthalate is a bidentate ligand forming a 7-membered chelate. The latter reveals a lower stability than the former due to an angle strain. This is one of the reasons for the lower stability of the Eu(III)-phthalate than that of the Eu(III)- PDA. The difference in the stabilities of binary complexes, EuL + (L=organic ligand), influences the stabilities of the ternary hydroxo complexes, Eu(OH)L. The coordination of a phenylic or pyridine ligand can greatly enhance the fluorescence of an Eu(III) ion due to the high absorbance of a ligand by a π → π * transition and the transfer of this energy to an Eu(III) ion. These fluorescence characteristics in a binary complex system could be changed in a ternary complex. In this study, the effect of a ligand on the stability of a ternary hydroxo complex is reported by comparing the stabilities of Eu-PDA with Eu-phthalate systems

  4. Developmental Effects of Incentives on Response Inhibition

    Geier, Charles F.; Luna, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory control and incentive processes underlie decision making, yet few studies have explicitly examined their interaction across development. Here, the effects of potential rewards and losses on inhibitory control in 64 adolescents (13- to 17-year-olds) and 42 young adults (18- to 29-year-olds) were examined using an incentivized antisaccade…

  5. Analgesic Effect and Immunomodulation Response on Pro ...

    ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 (electronic). © Pharmacotherapy ... Methods: The extract of Scrophularia megalantha was obtained with ethanol. In order to determine ... dependence, tolerance and other side effects including ... nitric oxide production using in vitro and ex vivo models [7]. ... temperature. The plant was ...

  6. Differential modulation of plant immune responses by diverse members of the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi HopAF type III effector family.

    Castañeda-Ojeda, M Pilar; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Ramos, Cayo

    2017-06-01

    The Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 type III secretion system (T3SS) effector repertoire includes 33 candidates, seven of which translocate into host cells and interfere with plant defences. The present study was performed to investigate the co-existence of both plasmid- and chromosomal-encoded members of the HopAF effector family, HopAF1-1 and HopAF1-2, respectively, in the genome of NCPPB 3335. Here, we show that the HopAF1 paralogues are widely distributed in the Pseudomonas syringae complex, where HopAF1-1 is most similar to the homologues encoded by other P. syringae pathovars infecting woody hosts that belong to phylogroups 1 and 3. We show that the expression of both HopAF1-1 and HopAF-2 is transcriptionally dependent on HrpL and demonstrate their delivery into Nicotiana tabacum leaves. Although the heterologous delivery of either HopAF1-1 or HopAF1-2 significantly suppressed the production of defence-associated reactive oxygen species levels, only HopAF1-2 reduced the levels of callose deposition. Moreover, the expression of HopAF1-2 by functionally effectorless P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000D28E completely inhibited the hypersensitive response in tobacco and significantly increased the competitiveness of the strain in Nicotiana benthamiana. Despite their functional differences, subcellular localization studies reveal that green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to either HopAF1-1 or HopAF1-2 are targeted to the plasma membrane when they are expressed in plant cells, a process that is completely dependent on the integrity of their N-myristoylation motif. Our results further support the notion that highly similar T3SS effectors might differentially interact with diverse plant targets, even when they co-localize in the same cell compartment. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  7. Permanganate/bisulfite (PM/BS) conditioning-horizontal electro-dewatering (HED) of activated sludge: Effect of reactive Mn(III) species.

    Guo, Xinxin; Wang, Yili; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-11-01

    A novel activated sludge (AS) conditioning method through permanganate/bisulfate (PM/BS) process was proposed. The method involved a new conditioner of reactive Mn(III) intermediate. Moreover, a Mn(III) conditioning-horizontal electro-dewatering (Mn(III) C-HED) process was established to improve AS dewatering performance. Underlying mechanisms were unraveled by investigating changes in physicochemical characteristics, scanning electron microscope (SEM) morphology, and transformation of water and organic matters. The optimum dewatering conditions for Mn(III) C-HED process with the final water content of 86.94% were determined as the combination of KMnO 4 0.01 mol/L AS and NaHSO 3 0.05 mol/L AS at 20 V for 120 min. Results showed that Mn(III) C-HED process effectively reduced free water and bound water with the corresponding removal ratios of 51.68% and 87.62% at the anode-side as well as 36.55% and 85.08% at the cathode-side, respectively. During the PM/BS process, the produced Mn(III), Mn 2+ , and MnO 2 exerted chemical and physical effects on AS conditioning and dewatering. Mn(III) disintegrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) fractions and cells in AS, as well as induced partial bound water release. Additionally, flocculation effect induced by Mn 2+ and MnO 2 skeleton building also benefited AS dewatering. AS cells were further disrupted under the effect of a horizontal electric field. Accordingly, EPS within the AS matrix was solubilized, tightly bound (TB)-EPS or loosely bound (LB)-EPS was converted to their corresponding outer EPS fractions, and AS dewaterability improved. Additionally, changes in pH and temperature at HED stage damaged the AS cells and changed the floc properties, thereby leading to easy separation of liquid and AS particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effectiveness of IDF and ATP-III in identifying metabolic syndrome and the usefulness of these tools for health-promotion in older Taiwanese.

    Chen, M M; Tsai, A C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of IDF (International Diabetes Federation) and ATP-III (National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III) for predicting metabolic syndrome, and to evaluate the usefulness of these definitions for health promotion. A cross-sectional study. A national random sample. A population representative sample of 1021 54-91 year-old Taiwanese. Subjects were measured for anthropometric and biochemical indicators and rated for the presence of metabolic syndrome using the two definitions. We evaluated the effectiveness of the two definitions in predicting MetS among those who had specific metabolic disorders. Results were analyzed with Student t-test and McNemar's test. Among the 918 subjects who had one or more MetS-item disorders, ATP-III rated greater proportions of subjects as having MetS than IDF, but both definitions predicted less than 50% (37.7% and 45.4%, respectively) as having MetS. Compared to IDF, ATP-III rated a greater proportion of subjects as having MetS, but both definitions missed more than 50% of subjects who had metabolic disorder(s). Since those who are missed have as much need for lifestyle intervention, the definitions appear not appropriate for health promotion.

  9. Effect of obesity and exercise on the expression of the novel myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5

    Jonathan M. Peterson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle is a major contributor to the development of type 2 diabetes. Endurance exercise training has long been established as an effective means to directly restore skeletal muscle glucose and lipid uptake and metabolism. However, in addition to the direct effects of skeletal muscle on glucose and lipids, there is renewed interest in the ability of skeletal muscle to coordinate metabolic activity of other tissues, such as adipose tissue and liver. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of endurance exercise on the expression level of two novel muscle-derived secreted factors, or myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5, the precursor for Irisin.Methods. We performed immunoblot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of Myonectin and FNDC5 in the diaphragm muscles of obese Zucker rat (OZR and lean Zucker rat (LZR with 9 weeks of aerobic training on a motorized treadmill.Results. We show that myonectin gene expression is increased in the OZR model of obesity and decreases with exercise in both lean and obese Zucker rats. Conversely, myonectin protein concentration was elevated with exercise. Similarly, FNDC5 mRNA levels are significantly higher in the OZR, however exercise training had no effect on the expression level of FNDC5 in either the LZR or OZR. We did not observe any difference in muscle protein content of Irisin with obesity or exercise.Conclusion. Our data shows that exercise training does not increase either FNDC5 or myonectin gene expression, indicating that increased transcriptional regulation of these myokines is not induced by exercise. However, our data also indicates a yet to be explored disconnect between myonectin gene expression and protein content. Further, this report highlights the importance of verifying reference genes when completing gene expression analysis. We found that many commonly used reference genes varied significantly by

  10. Respiratory Effects and Systemic Stress Response Following ...

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to ozone, a pulmonary irritant, causes myriad systemic metabolic and pulmonary effects that are attributed to neuronal and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, which are exacerbated in metabolically-impaired models. In order to elucidate the systemic consequences and the contribution of the HPA axis in mediating metabolic and respiratory effects of acrolein, a sensory irritant, we examined pulmonary, nasal, and systemic effects in rats following exposure. Male, 10 week old Wistar and Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, a non-obese type II diabetic Wistar-derived model, were exposed to 0, 2 or 4 ppm acrolein, 4h/day for 1 or 2 days. Acrolein exposure at 4 ppm significantly increased pulmonary and nasal damage in both strains as demonstrated by increased inspiratory and expiratory times indicating labored breathing, elevated biomarkers of injury, and neutrophilic inflammation. Overall, at both time points acrolein exposure caused noticeably more damage in the nasal passages as opposed to the lung with vascular protein leakage occurring only in the nose. Acrolein exposure (4 ppm) also led to metabolic impairment by inducing hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance (GK>Wistar) as indicated by glucose tolerance testing. In addition, serum total cholesterol (GKs only), LDL cholesterol (both strains), and free fatty acids (GK>Wistar) levels increased; however, no acrolein-induced changes were noted in branched-c

  11. Evaluation of the effectiveness of diabetic nephropathy stage III in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus therapy with sulodexide

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes mellitus (DM - takes the main place in the structure of endocrine diseases, and the third after cardiovascular and cancer pathology. In Ukraine 1.2 million of people suffer from diabetes and type 2 diabetes occurs in 85-90% of them. In 2004, 3.4 million of people died from diabetes complications. Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a serious chronic complication of diabetes that leads to the formation of nodular or diffuse glomerulosclerosis. It is the most frequent cause of terminal chronic renal failure (CRF in the world, accounting for over 25% of all cases of CRF. The generally accepted classification is Moggensen`s classification (1983, WHO, according to which five stages of diabetic nephropathy are identified, the first two stages of them are preclinical. Leading role in the pathogenesis of DN takes hyperglycemia, which is implemented by the phenomenon of glucosetoxicity. A lot of facts underscore the importance of inflammatory mechanisms triggered by cytokines. There's immune and non-immune theory of DN. The basis of non-immune theory is a violation of the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs that are a major component of the glomerular basement membrane (GMB. GAGs create its negative charge, which prevents the passage through the renal filter small negatively charged molecules, including albumin. In hemodynamic regulation leading role belongs to the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS. The blockade of the RAAS system with ACE inhibitors is the basis of a treatment strategy of DN. All mentioned above became a reason for study of the possibility of a new direction in the treatment of DN using the drug sulodexid, which is a natural mixture of GAGs. Objective of the research. Evaluating the effectiveness of sulodexide therapy of DN stage III in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and methods. The patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I consisted of 24 patients aged 40 to 68 years. 5 of them were women and 19

  12. Effects of endocrine disruptors on prosobranch snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in the laboratory. Part III: Cyproterone acetate and vinclozolin as antiandrogens.

    Tillmann, M; Schulte-Oehlmann, U; Duft, M; Markert, B; Oehlmann, J

    2001-12-01

    The effects of suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals on freshwater and marine prosobranch species were analysed in laboratory experiments. In this last of three publications, the responses of the fresh water snail Marisa cornuarietis and of two marine prosobranchs (Nucella lapillus, Nassarius (Hinia) reticulatus) to the antiandrogenic model compounds cyproterone acetate (CPA) and vinclozolin (VZ) are presented. The snails were exposed to nominal CPA concentrations of 1.25 mg/L alone and simultaneously to a potent synthetic estrogen (ethinylestradiol), androgen (methyltestosterone) or an indirectly acting xeno-androgen (tributyltin) in experiments with adult specimens and in a life cycle test for 12 months. Marisa and Nucella were furthermore exposed to nominal concentrations of 0.03-1.0 microgram VZ/L for up to 5 months. The antiandrogens induced a number of biological responses in all three species. The length of the penis and of accessory male sex organs (e.g., penis sheath, prostate) were significantly reduced. For Marisa, this effect occurred only in sexually immature specimens and was reversible as the males attained puberty. Typical androgen-mediated responses (imposex development, delayed spermatogenesis, tubulus necrosis of the testis with orchitis and Leydig cell hyperplasia) were partially or totally suppressed by a simultaneous administration of CPA. In the two marine species even adult, sexually mature males responded to antiandrogens with a reduction of the male sex organs and an advancement of the sexual repose phase. The results for CPA and VZ are compared with the effects of an exposure to xeno-estrogens (bisphenol A, octylphenol) and xeno-androgens (triphenyltin, tributyltin) in the same species. Each group of endocrine disruptors induces a characteristic set of toxicological effects in prosobranch snails which can be used as endpoints in an organismic invertebrate test for the identification of endocrine mimetic test compounds. Estrogens cause

  13. A study of the solvent effect on the chemical interaction between ortho-positronium and iron(III)-chloride

    Vertes, A.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical rate constant (k) between ortho-positronium (o-Ps) and iron(III)-chloride was measured in donor solvents as benzene, acetone, pyridine and ethanol. The minimal k was obtained in benzene and the maximal one in acetone. The minimal k value was explained by the low dispersity of FeCl 3 in benzene, and the high rate of the interaction in acetone was considered to be the result of the presence of monomer and dimer iron(III)-species and of the chloride coordination to iron(III). The probability of Ps formation depended only on the character of the solvent and not on the concentration of the FeCl 3 solute. (author)

  14. Training socially responsive health care graduates: is service learning an effective educational approach?

    Mc Menamin, Ruth; Mc Grath, Margaret; Cantillon, Peter; Mac Farlane, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Health care educators strive to train graduates who are socially responsive and can act as "change agents" for communities they serve. Service learning (SL) is increasingly being used to teach the social aspects of health care and develop students' social responsiveness. However, the effectiveness of SL as an educational intervention has not been established. To assess the evidence for the effectiveness of SL. Seven electronic databases were searched up to 2012 and included all articles on SL for pre-professional health care students. Hand searching was also conducted. A total of 1485 articles were identified, 53 fulfilled the search and quality appraisal criteria and were reviewed across six domains of potential SL effects: (i) personal and interpersonal development; (ii) understanding and applying knowledge; (iii) engagement, curiosity and reflective practice; (iv) critical thinking; (v) perspective transformation and (vi) citizenship. While SL experiences appear highly valued by educators and students the effectiveness of SL remains unclear. SL is different from other forms of experiential learning because it explicitly aims to establish reciprocity between all partners and increase students' social responsiveness. Impact studies based on the interpretative paradigm, aligned with the principles of social accountability and including all stakeholder perspectives are necessary.

  15. Biological effects of exposure to non-ionising electromagnetic fields and radiation: III radiofrequency and microwave radiation

    Saunders, R.D.; Kowalczuk, C.I.; Sienkiewicz, Z.J.

    1991-12-01

    The biological effects of experimental exposure to radiofrequency (RF) and microwave radiation above 100 kHz are reviewed with the intention of providing a summary of effects directly relevant to considerations of the health and safety of exposed people. The biological bases for restricting exposures are also briefly discussed. Studies of the possible effects of electromagnetic field exposure on human populations are described in a separate report. The majority of the biological effects of acute exposure to radiofrequency (RF) and microwave radiation are consistent with responses to induced heating, resulting either from frank rises in tissue or body temperature of about 1 0 C or more, or from responses involved in minimising the total heat load. Most responses have been reported at specific energy absorption rates (SARs) above about 1-2 W kg -1 in different animal species exposed under various environmental conditions. These animal, particularly primate, data indicate the sorts of responses that are likely to occur in humans subject to a sufficient heat load. In addition, most animal and cell culture data indicate that RF and microwave exposure is not mutagenic and so will not result in somatic mutation or in hereditary effects; such exposure is therefore unlikely to initiate cancers. With some exceptions that are described below, restrictions on the acute exposure of humans to RF or microwave radiation should be based on the acute responses to raised body temperature. It seems probable that healthy people can tolerate short-term (minute-hour) rises in body temperature of up to about 1 0 C. This rise is well below the maximum tolerable increase but nevertheless represents a significant thermal load. The evidence suggests that the exposure of resting humans in moderate environments at whole-body SARs of 1 W kg -1 , and up to 4 W kg -1 for short periods, will result in body temperature rises of less than 1 0 C. A restriction of whole-body SAR for healthy people to 0

  16. Creactive protein and interleukin-6 as markers of systemic inflammatory response and as prognostic factors for metastatic colorectal cancer. Data from the randomized phase III NORDIC-VII study

    Thomsen, M.; Kersten, C.; Sorbye, H.

    2015-01-01

    -6 (IL-6). Methods: The study was based on data from the randomized phase III NORDIC-VII study (Nordic FLOX +/cetuximab as first line treatment of mCRC). The effect of different markers of SIR, including modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), derived Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio (dNLR), levels...

  17. Phytotoxicity of thallium (Tl) in culture solution. Pt. 2. Effects of Tl(III) on the growth and heavy metal contents of pea and field bean plants

    Pieper, B; Austenfeld, F A

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Tl(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ and Tl(III)EDTA on growth and heavy metal contents of pea plants and field bean plants were compared in hydroponic culture experiments. In the presence of Tl(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, the essential heavy metals were available to the plants in their ionic forms. When Tl(III)EDTA was present the essential heavy metals were available as chelated complexes. Dry matter production of the pea plants was inhibited to a greater extent by Tl(III)EDTA than by Tl(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. The distribution of Tl within the plant was unaffected by the accompanying anion, however an increase of the Tl content of the stems and the leaves was observed in the presence of Tl(III)EDTA. The micronutrients exhibited different interactions with Tl(III). In the presence of increasing concentrations of Tl(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ the Mn content of each organ and the Zn content of the roots were lowered, but the Zn content of the stems was increased. Increasing concentrations of Tl(III)EDTA resulted only in a decrease of the Mn content of the roots, but in an increase of the contents of Fe and Mn within the stems, and Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu within the leaves. The increases may be due to concentration by growth inhibition. In contrast to pea plants, growth of field bean plants was inhibited only by Tl(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. The field bean plants retained most of the Tl within the roots independent of the Tl compound in the solution. Chelation of Tl(III) resulted in higher Tl contents of both the roots and the stems, but equal or reduced Tl contents of the leaves. Whereas increasing concentrations of Tl(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ reduced the Mn content of each organ as well as the Zn content of the roots and the leaves, Tl(III)EDTA only reduced the Mn content of the roots.

  18. Redox Cycling, pH Dependence, and Ligand Effects of Mn(III) in Oxalate Decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis.

    Twahir, Umar T; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2016-11-29

    This contribution describes electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments on Mn(III) in oxalate decarboxylase of Bacillus subtilis, an interesting enzyme that catalyzes the redox-neutral dissociation of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide. Chemical redox cycling provides strong evidence that both Mn centers can be oxidized, although the N-terminal Mn(II) appears to have the lower reduction potential and is most likely the carrier of the +3 oxidation state under moderate oxidative conditions, in agreement with the general view that it represents the active site. Significantly, Mn(III) was observed in untreated OxDC in succinate and acetate buffers, while it could not be directly observed in citrate buffer. Quantitative analysis showed that up to 16% of the EPR-visible Mn is in the +3 oxidation state at low pH in the presence of succinate buffer. The fine structure and hyperfine structure parameters of Mn(III) are affected by small carboxylate ligands that can enter the active site and have been recorded for formate, acetate, and succinate. The results from a previous report [Zhu, W., et al. (2016) Biochemistry 55, 429-434] could therefore be reinterpreted as evidence of formate-bound Mn(III) after the enzyme is allowed to turn over oxalate. The pH dependence of the Mn(III) EPR signal compares very well with that of enzymatic activity, providing strong evidence that the catalytic reaction of oxalate decarboxylase is driven by Mn(III), which is generated in the presence of dioxygen.

  19. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  20. Different arsenate and phosphate incorporation effects on the nucleation and growth of iron(III) (Hydr)oxides on quartz.

    Neil, Chelsea W; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-10-21

    Iron(III) (hydr)oxides play an important role in the geochemical cycling of contaminants in natural and engineered aquatic systems. The ability of iron(III) (hydr)oxides to immobilize contaminants can be related to whether the precipitates form heterogeneously (e.g., at mineral surfaces) or homogeneously in solution. Utilizing grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), we studied heterogeneous iron(III) (hydr)oxide nucleation and growth on quartz substrates for systems containing arsenate and phosphate anions. For the iron(III) only system, the radius of gyration (Rg) of heterogeneously formed precipitates grew from 1.5 to 2.5 (± 1.0) nm within 1 h. For the system containing 10(-5) M arsenate, Rg grew from 3.6 to 6.1 (± 0.5) nm, and for the system containing 10(-5) M phosphate, Rg grew from 2.0 to 4.0 (± 0.2) nm. While the systems containing these oxyanions had more growth, the system containing only iron(III) had the most nucleation events on substrates. Ex situ analyses of homogeneously and heterogeneously formed precipitates indicated that precipitates in the arsenate system had the highest water content and that oxyanions may bridge iron(III) hydroxide polymeric embryos to form a structure similar to ferric arsenate or ferric phosphate. These new findings are important because differences in nucleation and growth rates and particle sizes will impact the number of available reactive sites and the reactivity of newly formed particles toward aqueous contaminants.

  1. Group Effects on Individual Attitudes Toward Social Responsibility.

    Secchi, Davide; Bui, Hong T M

    2018-01-01

    This study uses a quasi-experimental design to investigate what happens to individual socially responsible attitudes when they are exposed to group dynamics. Findings show that group engagement increases individual attitudes toward social responsibility. We also found that individuals with low attitudes toward social responsibility are more likely to change their opinions when group members show more positive attitudes toward social responsibility. Conversely, individuals with high attitudes do not change much, independent of group characteristics. To better analyze the effect of group dynamics, the study proposes to split social responsibility into relative and absolute components. Findings show that relative social responsibility is correlated with but different from absolute social responsibility although the latter is more susceptible than the former to group dynamics.

  2. Temperature effect on life-time of electron-excited uranyl ion. III. Effect of deuteration of solvent

    Lotnik, S.V.; Khamidullina, L.A.; Kazakov, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of deuteration of solvent was detected. The effect appeared in significant difference of shape of curves of uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ )* life-time temperature dependences in electron-excited state (τ). The curves were plotted during heating of frozen up to 77 K H 2 SO 4 solutions in H 2 O and D 2 SO 4 solutions in D 2 O. It was shown that in the case of D 2 SO 4 τ value in glass-like solution was lower then in polycrystalline sample, whereas in frozen H 2 SO 4 solutions there was opposite picture. Detected isotope effect was explained just as different proceeding of phase transition in H 2 SO 4 and D 2 SO 4 solutions so significant decrease of probability of nonradiating deactivation of (UO 2 2+ )* absorbed on D 2 SO 4 ·4D 2 O crystallohydrate surface in comparison with (UO 2 2+ )* absorbed on H 2 SO 4 ·4H 2 O and H 2 SO 4 ·6.5H 2 O crystallohydrate surfaces [ru

  3. Exploring the representational basis of response-effect compatibility: Evidence from bilingual verbal response-effect mappings.

    Földes, Noémi; Philipp, Andrea M; Badets, Arnaud; Koch, Iring

    2018-05-01

    The ideomotor principle states that actions are represented by their anticipated sensory effects. This notion is often tested using the response-effect compatibility (REC) paradigm, where participants' responses are followed either by a compatible or incompatible response effect (e.g., an effect on the right side after a right-hand response is considered R-E compatible due to the spatial overlap, whereas an effect on the left side after the right-hand response is considered incompatible). Shorter reaction times are typically observed in the compatible condition compared to the incompatible condition (i.e., REC effect), suggesting that effect anticipation plays a role in action control. Previous evidence from verbal REC suggested that effect anticipation can be due to conceptual R-E overlap, but there was also phonological overlap (i.e., anticipated reading of a word preceded by the vocal response of saying that very word). To examine the representational basis of REC, in three experiments, we introduced a bilingual R-E mapping to exclude phonological R-E overlap (i.e., in the R-E compatible condition, the translation equivalent of the response word is presented as an effect word in a different language). Our findings show that the REC effect is obtained when presenting the effect word in the same language as the response (i.e., monolingual condition), but the compatibility effect was not found when the semantically same word is presented in a different language, suggesting no conceptually generalized REC in a bilingual setting. (232 words). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Examining the Effectiveness of Social Responsibility Courses in Higher Education

    Droms, Courtney; Stephen, Sheryl-Ann K.

    2015-01-01

    Individual and corporate social responsibility has been gaining more and more attention over the last several years. We examine the effectiveness of incorporating social responsibility courses into the curriculum in higher education, with a specific look at Butler University. In general, the results indicate that implementing this type of…

  5. The Effect of Police Response Time on Crime Detection

    Blanes i Vidal, Jordi; Kirchmaier, Tom

    preferred estimate, a 10% increase in response time leads to a 4.6 percentage points decrease in the likelihood of detection. A faster response time also decreases the number of days that it takes for the police to detect a crime, conditional on eventual detection. We find stronger effects for thefts than...

  6. Development of effective emergency preparedness and response

    2012-01-01

    It has been discussed that there were many differences to international standards and the delay for prior planning implementation of unclear emergency preparedness. Therefore, it was necessary to promote the study to take the concept of the international standard to the Guide 'Emergency Preparedness for Nuclear Facilities', and to apply the Precautionary Action Zone (PAZ) etc. as the protective actions procedure. This study was started since the fiscal year 2010 to enhance the effectiveness of the protective actions, which are corresponding to these requirements based on international aspects in the nuclear disaster occurrence. And the study was conducted to introduce the emergency action level (EAL) as decision criteria and to apply urgent protective action considering PAZ, and the results from this study will be used as the basic data necessary to modify and improve the Guide. In order to fulfill the purposes described above, in fiscal year 2011, followings are executed, (1) analysis and verification for basic evacuation area such as the PAZ, (2) analysis with regard to the EAL and prototype of protective actions for public, and (3) analysis with regard to prototype of protective actions for public including evacuation plan. However, taking account of the significance of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, Japanese emergency preparedness strategy should be studied and reconstructed in logically, systematically, and with international standard, but also being based on the reflection of individual lessons from this accident. (author)

  7. The Effect of Police Response Time on Crime Clearance Rates

    Blanes i Vidal, Jordi; Kirchmaier, Tom

    2018-01-01

    significant effects: in our preferred estimate, a 10% increase in response time leads to a 4.7 percentage points decrease in the likelihood of clearing the crime. We find stronger effects for thefts than for violent offenses, although the effects are large for every type of crime. We find suggestive evidence...

  8. Marginal and Interaction Effects in Ordered Response Models

    Debdulal Mallick

    2009-01-01

    In discrete choice models the marginal effect of a variable of interest that is interacted with another variable differs from the marginal effect of a variable that is not interacted with any variable. The magnitude of the interaction effect is also not equal to the marginal effect of the interaction term. I present consistent estimators of both marginal and interaction effects in ordered response models. This procedure is general and can easily be extended to other discrete choice models. I ...

  9. Effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on photo-degradation of phenanthrene catalyzed by Fe(III)-smectite under visible light.

    Jia, Hanzhong; Chen, Hongxia; Nulaji, Gulimire; Li, Xiyou; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-11-01

    The photolysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is potentially an important process for its transformation and fate on contaminated soil surfaces. In this study, phenanthrene is employed as a model to explore PAH photodegradation with the assistance of Fe(III)-smectite under visible-light while focusing on roles played by five low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs), i.e., malic acid, oxalic acid, citric acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and nitrilotriacetic acid. Our results show that oxalic acid is most effective in promoting the photodegradation of phenanthrene, while only a slight increase in the rate of phenanthrene photodegradation is observed in the presence of malic acid. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments confirm the formation of CO2(-) radicals in the presence of malic and oxalic acid, which provides strong evidence for generating OH and subsequent photoreaction pathways. The presence of EDTA or nitrilotriacetic acid significantly inhibits both Fe(II) formation and phenanthrene photodegradation because these organic anions tend to chelate with Fe(III), leading to decreases in the electron-accepting potential of Fe(III)-smectite and a weakened interaction between phenanthrene and Fe(III)-smectite. These observations provide valuable insights into the transformation and fate of PAHs in the natural soil environment and demonstrate the potential for using some LMWOAs as additives for the remediation of contaminated soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adsorption of La(III) onto GMZ bentonite. Effect of contact time, bentonite content, pH value and ionic strength

    Yonggui Chen; Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha; Chunming Zhu; Weimin Ye; Yanhong Sun; Huiying Duan; Dongbei Wu

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite has been studied extensively because of its strong adsorption capacity. A local Na-bentonite named GMZ bentonite, collected from Gaomiaozi County (Inner Mongolia, China), was selected as the first choice of buffer/backfill material for the high-level radioactive waste repository in China. In this research, the adsorption of La (III) onto GMZ bentonite was performed as a function of contact time, pH, solid content and metal ion concentrations by using the batch experiments. The results indicate that the adsorption of La (III) on GMZ bentonite achieves equilibration quickly and the kinetic adsorption follows the pseudo-second-order model; the adsorption of La (III) on the adsorbent is strongly dependent on pH and solid content, the adsorption process follows Langmuir isotherm. The equilibrium batch experiment data demonstrate that GMZ bentonite is effective adsorbent for the removal of La (III) from aqueous solution with the maximum adsorption capacity of 26.8 mg g -1 under the given experimental conditions. (author)

  11. Cadmium, follicle-stimulating hormone, and effects on bone in women age 42-60 years, NHANES III

    Gallagher, Carolyn M., E-mail: 2crgallagher@optonline.net [PhD Program in Population Health and Clinical Outcomes Research, Stony Brook University, Health Sciences Center L3-R071, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8338 (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York (United States); Moonga, Baljit S. [Stony Brook University School of Dental Medicine, New York (United States); Kovach, John S. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Background: Increased body burden of environmental cadmium has been associated with greater risk of decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis in middle-aged and older women, and an inverse relationship has been reported between follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and BMD in middle-aged women; however, the relationships between cadmium and FSH are uncertain, and the associations of each with bone loss have not been analyzed in a single population. Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the associations between creatinine-adjusted urinary cadmium (UCd) and FSH levels, and the associations between UCd and FSH with BMD and osteoporosis, in postmenopausal and perimenopausal women aged 42-60 years. Methods: Data were obtained from the Third National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey, 1988-1994 (NHANES III). Outcomes evaluated were serum FSH levels, femoral bone mineral density measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and osteoporosis indicated by femoral BMD cutoffs based on the international standard. Urinary cadmium levels were analyzed for association with these outcomes, and FSH levels analyzed for association with bone effects, using multiple regression. Subset analysis was conducted by a dichotomous measure of body mass index (BMI) to proxy higher and lower adipose-synthesized estrogen effects. Results: UCd was associated with increased serum FSH in perimenopausal women with high BMI (n=642; {beta}=0.45; p{<=}0.05; R{sup 2}=0.35) and low BMI (n=408; {beta}=0.61; p{<=}0.01; R{sup 2}=0.34). Among perimenopausal women with high BMI, BMD was inversely related to UCd ({beta}=-0.04; p{<=}0.05) and FSH ({beta}=-0.03; p{<=}0.05). In postmenopausal women with low BMI, an incremental increase in FSH was associated with 2.78 greater odds for osteoporosis (109 with and 706 without) (OR=2.78; 95% CI=1.43, 5.42; p{<=}0.01). Conclusion: Long-term cadmium exposure at environmental levels is associated with increased serum FSH, and both FSH

  12. The therapeutic effect and possible harm of puerarin for treatment of stage III diabetic nephropathy: a meta-analysis.

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Shibo; Yan, Xiufeng; Li, Mingdi; Li, Daqi; Lv, Pin; Ti, Guixiang

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the main cause of end-stage kidney disease in developed countries. Current therapy can slow the rate of progression of DN, but eventually end-stage renal failure will occur in a proportion of patients. Identification of new strategies and additional complementary and alternative therapies for treating DN are important. The research team wanted to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of using puerarin plus angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) compared with using only ACEI for treatment of individuals with stage III DN. The research team performed a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) by searching the following electronic databases: (1) the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (3) PubMed, (4) EMBASE (Elsevier), (5) the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), (6) the Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), (7) the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and (8) the Chinese Biomedical Journals (VIP), with no language restrictions, as well as databases of clinical trials. Measured outcomes included (1) urinary protein measured as urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) (μg/min) and 24-h urine protein (24-h UP) (mg/24 h); (2) renal function measured as blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (mmol/L) and serum creatinine (SCr) (μmol/L); (3) α1-microglobulin (α1-MG) (mg/24 h) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) (ng/24 h); (4) end points (EPs); and (5) adverse events (AEs). Ten RCTs involving 669 participants were included. All trials were conducted and published in China. Treatment of DN with puerarin plus ACEI significantly decreased the UAER-P < .0001, MD = -23.43 (95% CI, -33.95 to -12.91), and had no effect on 24-h UP-P = .09, MD = -56.76 (95% CI, -122.65 to 9.12); BUN-P = .17, MD = -0.51 (95% CI, -1.24 to 0.21); and SCr-P = .26, MD = -4.43 (95% CI, -12.05 to 3.20). One trial reported abdominal discomfort and nausea (2 cases) in the treatment

  13. Effects of feed forms on growth pattern, behavioural responses and ...

    Effects of feed forms on growth pattern, behavioural responses and feacal microbial load ... load and behavioural activities (eating, drinking, physical pen interaction and ... Total organism counts varied significantly (p<0.05) with pigs on T1, T2, ...

  14. The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and Their Teachers

    Carr, Deborah; Felce, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the impact of mastery of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) to Phase III, on the communications of children with autism. Children aged between 3 and 7 years, formed a PECS intervention group and a non-intervention control group. The intervention group received 15 h of PECS teaching over 5 weeks. Three 2-h…

  15. Interactive effects of climate and wildland fires on forests and other ecosystems—section III synthesis

    Nancy E. Grulke

    2009-01-01

    The chapters in Section III of this book provide an overview of how components of climate change, including air pollution, are likely to interact with fire in modifying key ecosystem processes, whether those processes were demographic, successional, or elemental cycling. These chapters primarily  discuss increased temperature, reduced available soil moisture, and...

  16. Immune responses to a recombinant, four-component, meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) in adolescents: a phase III, randomized, multicentre, lot-to-lot consistency study.

    Perrett, Kirsten P; McVernon, Jodie; Richmond, Peter C; Marshall, Helen; Nissen, Michael; August, Allison; Percell, Sandra; Toneatto, Daniela; Nolan, Terry

    2015-09-22

    For decades, a broadly effective vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) has remained elusive. Recently, a four-component recombinant vaccine (4CMenB) has been developed and is now approved in Europe, Canada, Australia and some Latin American countries. This phase III, randomized study evaluated the lot consistency, early immune responses and the safety profile of 4CMenB in 11 to 17-year-old adolescents in Australia and Canada (NCT01423084). In total, 344 adolescents received two doses of one of 2 lots of 4CMenB, 1-month apart. Immunogenicity was assessed before, 2-weeks and 1-month following the second vaccination. Serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA) was measured against three reference strains 44/76-SL, 5/99 and NZ98/254, selected to express one of the vaccine antigens; Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), factor H binding protein (fHbp) and porin A (PorA) containing outer membrane vesicle (OMV), respectively. Responses to the Neisseria heparin binding antigen (NHBA) were assessed with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Local and systemic reactions were recorded for 7 days following each vaccination; unsolicited adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Immunological equivalence of the two lots of 4CMenB was established at 1-month. At baseline, ≤7% of participants had hSBA titers ≥5 to all three reference strains. Two weeks following the second dose of 4CMenB, all participants had hSBA titers ≥5 against fHbp and NadA compared with 84-96% against the PorA reference strains. At 1-month, corresponding proportions were 99%, 100% and 70-79%, respectively. Both lots were generally well tolerated and had similar adverse event profiles. Two doses of 4CMenB had an acceptable safety profile and induced a robust immune response in adolescents. Peak antibody responses were observed at 14 days following vaccination. While a substantial non-uniform antigen-dependent early decline in antibody titers was seen thereafter, a

  17. Effect of silodosin on specific urinary symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia: analysis of international prostate symptom scores in 2 phase III clinical studies.

    Gittelman, Marc C; Marks, Leonard S; Hill, Lawrence A; Volinn, Weining; Hoel, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Pooled results from 2 randomized, placebo-controlled, US phase III studies (NCT00224107, NCT00224120) showed that silodosin, a uroselective α-blocker, significantly improved International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This analysis evaluated the effect of silodosin on each symptom assessed by IPSS questionnaire. Study participants (N = 923) were men aged ≥50 years with IPSS ≥13 and Qmax 4-15 mL/s. They received silodosin 8 mg or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Patient responses to 7 IPSS questions were collected at weeks 0 (baseline), 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 12 and scored on a 6-point scale. Efficacy of silodosin versus placebo was assessed by analysis of covariance. For each symptom, the 2 treatment groups had similar mean baseline scores. Decrease in score from baseline (mean ± standard deviation) to last observation was significantly greater with silodosin than with placebo for all symptoms (P silodosin (versus placebo) was greatest for weak stream (silodosin, -1.1 ± 1.4 versus placebo, -0.5 ± 1.2; P nocturia (silodosin, -0.6 ± 1.1 versus placebo, -0.4 ± 1.2; P = 0.0037). Compared with placebo, silodosin significantly improved nocturia within 1 week (silodosin, -0.5 ± 1.07 versus placebo, -0.3 ± 1.05; P = 0.009) and all other symptoms within 3 to 4 days (P Silodosin significantly improved all BPH-associated symptoms assessed by IPSS questionnaire within the first week of treatment. All improvements were maintained over the 12-week study period.

  18. Three isostructural one-dimensional Ln(III) chains with distorted cubane motifs showing dual fluorescence and slow magnetic relaxation/magnetocaloric effect.

    Li, Yan; Yu, Jia-Wen; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Yang, En-Cui; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-05

    Three new homometallic lanthanide complexes with mixed carboxylate-modified rigid ligands, [Ln(μ3-OH)(na)(pyzc)]n (na(-) = 1-naphtholate, pyzc(-) = 2-pyrazinecarboxylate, Ln = Dy (1), Yb (2), and Gd (3)), were solvothermally synthesized, and their structures and magnetic as well as photophysical properties were completely investigated. Complexes 1-3 are crystallographically isostructural, exhibiting linear chains with four bidentate bridging μ-COO(-) moieties encapsulated cubic {Ln4(μ3-OH)4}(8+) clusters repeatedly extended by 4-fold chelating-bridging-pyzc(-) connectors. Magnetically, the former two complexes with highly anisotropic Dy(III) and weak anisotropic Yb(III) ions in the distorted NO7 triangular dodecahedron coordination environment display field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. Fitting the dynamic magnetic data to the Arrhenius law gives energy barrier ΔE/kB = 39.6 K and pre-exponential factor τo = 1.52 × 10(-8) s for 1 and ΔE/kB = 14.1 K and τo = 2.13 × 10(-7) s for 2. By contrast, complex 3 with isotropic Gd(III) ion and weak intracluster antiferromagnetic coupling shows a significant cryogenic magnetocaloric effect, with a maximum -ΔSm value of 30.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 2.5 K and 70 kOe. Additionally, the chromophoric na(-) and pyzc(-) ligands can serve as antenna groups, selectively sensitizing the Dy(III)- and Yb(III)-based luminescence of 1 and 2 in the UV-visible region by an intramolecular energy transfer process. Thus, complexes 1-3, incorporating field-induced slow magnetic magnetization and interesting luminescence together, can be used as composite magneto-optical materials. More importantly, these interesting results further demonstrate that the mixed-ligand system with rigid carboxylate-functionalized chromophores can be excellent candidates for the preparations of new bifunctional magneto-optical materials.

  19. Effect of pKa on the extraction behavior of Am(III) in organo phosphorus acid and diglycolamide solvent system

    Swami, K. Rama; Antony, M.P.; Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai; Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.

    2018-01-01

    A combination of neutral and acidic extractant has been proposed for the single-cycle separation of trivalent actinides from high-level liquid waste (HLLW). The nature of acidic extractant in the combined solvent formulation plays a profound role in deciding the extraction and stripping of trivalent actinides. Therefore, the extraction behavior of Am(III) in a solution of tetra-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-diglycolamide (TEHDGA) and acidic extractant (HA) was studied from nitric acid medium. The acidic extractants chosen were bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphonic acid (PC88A) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid (CYANEX-272) whose pKa values were 3.24, 4.51 and 6.37, respectively. The distribution ratio of Am(III) was measured as a function of various parameters such as concentration of nitric acid, TEHDGA, HA etc. The data were compared with those obtained in individual solvent systems namely 0.1 M TEHDGA/n-DD and HA/n-DD. Slope analysis of the extraction data indicated the synergic participation of both TEHDGA and HDEHP in the extraction of Am(III) at all acidities. However, antagonistic effect was observed at lower acidity when TEHDGA was mixed to PC88A or CYANEX-272 present in n-DD. Accordingly, a suitable mechanism has been proposed for the extraction of Am(III) at all acidities using these combined solvent formulation. Studies with fast reactor simulated high level liquid waste indicated that extraction of Am(III) was accompanied by co-extraction of lanthanides and unwanted metal ions such as Zr(IV), Mo(VI), Y(III) and Pd(II). However, addition of trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N,N ' -tetraaceticacid (CyDTA) reduced the extraction of unwanted metal ions. Batch extraction and stripping studies indicated the possibility of using 0.1 M TEHDGA+0.25 M HDEHP in n-dodecane for the single cycle separation of Am(III) from FR-SHLLW.

  20. Complementary Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Root Responses to Assess the Effectiveness of Different Iron Foliar Applications for Chlorosis Remediation

    Marta Fuentes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency in plants is caused by a low availability of iron in the soil, and its main visual symptom is leaf yellowing due to a decrease in chlorophyll content, along with a reduction in plant growth and fruit quality. Foliar sprays with Fe compounds are an economic alternative to the treatment with expensive synthetic Fe-chelates applied to the soil, although the efficacy of foliar treatments is rather limited. Generally, plant response to Fe-foliar treatments is monitored by measuring chlorophyll content (or related parameters as SPAD index. However, different studies have shown that foliar Fe sprays cause a local regreening and that translocation of the applied Fe within the plant is quite low. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of foliar applications of different Fe compounds [FeSO4, Fe(III-EDTA, and Fe(III-heptagluconate] on Fe-deficient cucumber plants, by studying the main physiological plant root responses to Fe deficiency [root Fe(III chelate reductase (FCR activity; acidification of the nutrient solution; and expression of the Fe deficiency responsive genes encoding FCR, CsFRO1, Fe(II root transporter CsIRT1, and two plasma membrane H+-ATPases, CsHA1 and CsHA2], along with SPAD index, plant growth and Fe content. The results showed that the overall assessment of Fe-deficiency root responses improved the evaluation of the efficacy of the Fe-foliar treatments compared to just monitoring SPAD indexes. Thus, FCR activity and expression of Fe-deficiency response genes, especially CsFRO1 and CsHA1, preceded the trend of SPAD index and acted as indicators of whether the plant was sensing or not metabolically active Fe due to the treatments. Principal component analysis of the data also provided a graphical tool to evaluate the evolution of plant responses to foliar Fe treatments with time.

  1. Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    Lovley, D R

    1991-06-01

    The oxidation of organic matter coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) is one of the most important biogeochemical reactions in aquatic sediments, soils, and groundwater. This process, which may have been the first globally significant mechanism for the oxidation of organic matter to carbon dioxide, plays an important role in the oxidation of natural and contaminant organic compounds in a variety of environments and contributes to other phenomena of widespread significance such as the release of metals and nutrients into water supplies, the magnetization of sediments, and the corrosion of metal. Until recently, much of the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction in sedimentary environments was considered to be the result of nonenzymatic processes. However, microorganisms which can effectively couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) have recently been discovered. With Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor, these organisms can completely oxidize fatty acids, hydrogen, or a variety of monoaromatic compounds. This metabolism provides energy to support growth. Sugars and amino acids can be completely oxidized by the cooperative activity of fermentative microorganisms and hydrogen- and fatty-acid-oxidizing Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reducers. This provides a microbial mechanism for the oxidation of the complex assemblage of sedimentary organic matter in Fe(III)- or Mn(IV)-reducing environments. The available evidence indicates that this enzymatic reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) accounts for most of the oxidation of organic matter coupled to reduction of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) in sedimentary environments. Little is known about the diversity and ecology of the microorganisms responsible for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and only preliminary studies have been conducted on the physiology and biochemistry of this process.

  2. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work.

  3. Effectively simultaneous naked-eye detection of Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) using cyanidin extracted from red cabbage as chelating agent

    Khaodee, Warangkhana; Aeungmaitrepirom, Wanlapa; Tuntulani, Thawatchai

    Simultaneous determination of Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) using cyanidin as a chelating agent was investigated in terms of both quantitative and qualitative detections. Cyanidin was extracted and purified from red cabbage which is a local plant in Thailand. The selectivity of this method was examined by regulating the pH of cyanidin solution operated together with masking agents. It was found that Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) simultaneously responded with the color change at pH 7, pH 6, pH 5 and pH 4, respectively. KF, DMG and the mixture of KF and DMG were used as masking agents for the determination of Fe(III), Al(III) and Pb(II), respectively. Results from naked-eye detection were evaluated by comparing with those of inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and there was no significant difference noticed. Cyanidin using as a multianalyte reagent could be employed for simultaneous determination of Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) at the lowest concentration at 50, 80, 50 and 200 μM, respectively, by slightly varying pHs. Moreover, the proposed method could be potentially applied for real water samples with simplicity, rapidity, low cost and environmental safety.

  4. The effect of diluents on the extraction of Sm(III using N,N,N’,N’-tetrabutylmalonamide

    SUN SI-XIU

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A study has been made of the extraction of samarium(III from nitrate solutions using N,N,N’,N’-tetrabutylmalonamide (TBMA in a series of diluents. The dependence of the extraction distribution on the concentrations of aqueous nitric acid, lithium nitrate and organic TBMA was investigated. The experimental results showed that the extraction efficiency of TMBA in different diluents for Sm(III increases in the order: chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, xylene, toluene, cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-octane. The stoichiometry of the extracted species conform to Sm(NO33.3TBMA in all the employed diluents. The interaction between extractant or extracted species and diluent is discussed and a quantitative expression relating the extraction constant and the parameters of the diluent has been established.

  5. Effects of Stressor Controllability on Acute Stress Responses: Cardiovascular, Neuroendocrine, and Immune Responses

    磯和, 勅子; Isowa, Tokiko

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the effects of controllability over acute stressors on psychological and physiological responses intermediated by immune, cardiovascular, neuroendocrine systems. The effects of stressor controllability have been examined in animal studies based on the learned helplessness theory. However, there were few studies in human. Especially, there were remarkably few studies that examined the effects of stressor controllability on immunological system. In addition, result...

  6. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  7. After-Effects of the Cobalt-57-Iron-57 Electron-Capture Reaction in Hexacyanocobaltate (III) Complexes

    Fenger, Jørgen Folkvard; Siekierska, K.E.; Olsen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Isomorphous hexacyanocobaltate(III) complexes with the bivalent metal cations Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ have been labelled with 57Co and used as Mössbauer sources. Whilst the spectrum of the complex Fe3[57Co(CN)6]2 can be resolved into a single line corresponding to the ion Fe II...

  8. Thermal stress analysis and the effect of temperature dependence of material properties on Doublet III limiter design

    McKelvey, T.E.; Koniges, A.E.; Marcus, F.; Sabado, M.; Smith, R.

    1979-10-01

    Temperature and thermal stress parametric design curves are presented for two materials selected for Doublet III primary limiter applications. INC X-750 is a candidate for the medium Z limiter design and ATJ graphite for the low Z design. The dependence of significant material properties on temperature is shown and the impact of this behavior on the decision to actively or passively cool the limiter is discussed

  9. Item Response Theory to Quantify Longitudinal Placebo and Paliperidone Effects on PANSS Scores in Schizophrenia.

    Krekels, Ehj; Novakovic, A M; Vermeulen, A M; Friberg, L E; Karlsson, M O

    2017-08-01

    As biomarkers are lacking, multi-item questionnaire-based tools like the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) are used to quantify disease severity in schizophrenia. Analyzing composite PANSS scores as continuous data discards information and violates the numerical nature of the scale. Here a longitudinal analysis based on Item Response Theory is presented using PANSS data from phase III clinical trials. Latent disease severity variables were derived from item-level data on the positive, negative, and general PANSS subscales each. On all subscales, the time course of placebo responses were best described with Weibull models, and dose-independent functions with exponential models to describe the onset of the full effect were used to describe paliperidone's effect. Placebo and drug effect were most pronounced on the positive subscale. The final model successfully describes the time course of treatment effects on the individual PANSS item-levels, on all PANSS subscale levels, and on the total score level. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  10. Paradoxical effect of pertussis toxin on the delayed hypersensitivity response to autoantigens in mice.

    Rajwahrdhan Yadav

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pertussis toxin (PTX, an exotoxin of Bordetella pertussis, enhances the development of experimental autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in rodent models. The mechanisms of the promotion of experimental autoimmune diseases by PTX may be based upon PTX-induced disruption of the blood eye/brain barriers facilitating the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the modulation of inflammatory cell migration and the enhancement of the activation of inflammatory cells. We hypothesized that the facilitation of experimental autoimmunity by PTX suggests that its influence on the in vivo immune response to auto-antigen may differ from its influence on non-self antigens.We have evaluated the effect of PTX on the simultaneous generation of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH responses and autoimmune responses to uveitogenic interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein peptide (IRBP161-180, encephalitogenic myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55 or ovalbumin (OVA. PTX injection of mice immunized to IRBP peptide161-180 led to (i the development of EAU as shown by histopathology of the retina, (ii pro-inflammatory cytokine production by splenocytes in response to IRBP peptide161-180, and (iii symptomatic EAE in mice immunized with encephalitogenic MOG peptide35-55. However, mice that received PTX had a reduced DTH response to IRBP161-180 peptide or MOG peptide35-55 when challenged distal to the site affected by autoreactive T cells. Moreover, footpad challenge with MOG35-55 peptide reduced EAE in mice immunized with MOG peptide. In contrast, the use of PTX when immunizing with OVA protein or an OVA immunogenic peptide did not affect the DTH response to OVA.The results suggest that that the reduced DTH response in mice receiving PTX may be specific for autoantigens and autoantigen-reactive T cells are diverted away from ectopic sites that received the autoantigen and towards

  11. Exposure of [Mn{sup III}{sub 6}Cr{sup III}]{sup 3+} single-molecule magnets to soft X-rays: The effect of the counterions on radiation stability

    Helmstedt, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.helmstedt@uni-bielefeld.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Universitaetsstrasse 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Sacher, Marc D.; Gryzia, Aaron; Harder, Alexander; Brechling, Armin; Mueller, Norbert; Heinzmann, Ulrich [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Universitaetsstrasse 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Hoeke, Veronika; Krickemeyer, Erich; Glaser, Thorsten [Fakultaet fuer Chemie, Universitaet Bielefeld, Universitaetsstrasse 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Bouvron, Samuel; Fonin, Mikhail [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Mn{sup III}{sub 6}Cr{sup III}]{sup 3+} single-molecule magnets adsorbed on gold are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxidation state of the Mn{sup III} constituents changes under X-ray exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The change is monitored by Mn-L{sub 3}-edge XAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Choice of anions strongly influences radiation stability of the SMM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No influence of the sample morphology on radiation stability could be observed. - Abstract: X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of the [Mn{sup III}{sub 6}Cr{sup III}]{sup 3+} single-molecule magnet deposited as a microcrystalline layer on gold substrates are presented. The oxidation state of the manganese centers changes from Mn{sup III} to Mn{sup II} due to irradiation with soft X-rays. The influence of the charge-neutralizing anions on the stability of [Mn{sup III}{sub 6}Cr{sup III}]{sup 3+} against soft X-ray exposure is investigated for the different anions tetraphenylborate (BPh{sub 4}{sup -}), lactate (C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}{sup -}) and perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}). The exposure dependence of the radiation-induced reduction process is compared for [Mn{sup III}{sub 6}Cr{sup III}]{sup 3+} with the three different anions.

  12. Skeletal anteroposterior discrepancy and vertical type effects on lower incisor preoperative decompensation and postoperative compensation in skeletal Class III patients.

    Ahn, Hyo-Won; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2011-01-01

    To determine the initial compensation, preoperative decompensation, and postoperative compensation of the lower incisors according to the skeletal anteroposterior discrepancy and vertical type in skeletal Class III patients. The samples consisted of 68 skeletal Class III patients treated with two-jaw surgery and orthodontic treatment. Lateral cephalograms were taken before preoperative orthodontic treatment (T0) and before surgery (T1) and after debonding (T2). According to skeletal anteroposterior discrepancy/vertical type (ANB, criteria  =  -4°; SN-GoMe, criteria  =  35°) at the T0 stage, the samples were allocated into group 1 (severe anteroposterior discrepancy/hypodivergent vertical type, N  =  17), group 2 (moderate anteroposterior discrepancy/hypodivergent vertical type, N  =  17), group 3 (severe anteroposterior discrepancy/hyperdivergent vertical type, N  =  17), or group 4 (moderate anteroposterior discrepancy/hyperdivergent vertical type, N  =  17). After measurement of variables, one-way analysis of variance with Duncan's multiple comparison test, crosstab analysis, and Pearson correlation analysis were performed. At T0, groups 3 and 2 exhibited the most and least compensated lower incisors. In group 2, good preoperative decompensation and considerable postoperative compensation resulted in different values for T0, T1, and T2 (IMPA, T0 lower incisors in Class III patients.

  13. The Effects of Discipline Responses in Delaying Toddler Misbehavior Recurrences.

    Larzelere, Robert E.; Schneider, William N.; Larson, David B.; Pike, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the effectiveness of maternal punishment (time out, spanking), reasoning, and a combination of the two. Results based on mothers' (N=40) structured diaries of toddler fighting and disobedience indicate that mild punishment, combined with reasoning, is an effective discipline response to toddler misbehavior in terms of recurrence of…

  14. The Effectiveness of Reward and Punishment Contingencies on Response Inhibition

    Costantini, Arthur F.; Hoving, Kenneth L.

    1973-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of reward and punishment on the development of response inhibition was evaluated developmentally with kindergarteners and second graders. Removal of positive reinforcers was apparently more effective than reward in producing inhibiting at both age levels. Transfer of inhibition training was also evaluated. (DP)

  15. Failures in Phase III: Causes and Consequences.

    Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-15

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCT) in oncology fail to lead to registration of new therapies more often than RCTs in other medical disciplines. Most RCTs are sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, which reflects industry's increasing responsibility in cancer drug development. Many preclinical models are unreliable for evaluation of new anticancer agents, and stronger evidence of biologic effect should be required before a new agent enters the clinical development pathway. Whenever possible, early-phase clinical trials should include pharmacodynamic studies to demonstrate that new agents inhibit their molecular targets and demonstrate substantial antitumor activity at tolerated doses in an enriched population of patients. Here, we review recent RCTs and found that these conditions were not met for most of the targeted anticancer agents, which failed in recent RCTs. Many recent phase III RCTs were initiated without sufficient evidence of activity from early-phase clinical trials. Because patients treated within such trials can be harmed, they should not be undertaken. The bar should also be raised when making decisions to proceed from phase II to III and from phase III to marketing approval. Many approved agents showed only better progression-free survival than standard treatment in phase III trials and were not shown to improve survival or its quality. Introduction of value-based pricing of new anticancer agents would dissuade the continued development of agents with borderline activity in early-phase clinical trials. When collaborating with industry, oncologists should be more critical and better advocates for cancer patients. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of radioactive waste encapsulated by bisphenol-A polycarbonate and effect of bismuth-III oxide filler material

    Özdemir, Tonguç

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from the nuclear industry and non-power applications should carefully be treated, conditioned and disposed according to the regulations set by the competent authority(ies). Bisphenol-a polycarbonate (BPA-PC), a very widely used polymer, might be considered as a potential candidate material for low level radioactive waste encapsulation. In this work, the dose rate distribution in the radioactive waste drum (containing radioactive waste and the BPA-PC polymer matrix) was determined using Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, the change of mechanical properties of BPA-PC was estimated and their variation within the waste drum was determined for the periods of 15, 30 and 300 years after disposal to the final disposal site. The change of the dose rate within the waste drum with different contents of bismuth-III oxide were also simulated. It was concluded that addition of bismuth-III oxide filler decreases the dose delivered to the polymeric matrix due to photoelectric effect. - Highlights: • Bisphenol-a polycarbonate (BPA-PC) is a widely used polymeric material and have a considerable gamma radiation stability. • BPA-PC could have a potential candidate material for radioactive waste embedding. • Activity of the radioactive waste that could be embedded into the BPA-PC matrix was simulated. • Effect of bismuth-III-oxide filler to the BPA-PC matrix was determined.

  17. Novel Arsenic Nanoparticles Are More Effective and Less Toxic than As (III) to Inhibit Extracellular and Intracellular Proliferation of Leishmania donovani

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Bhar, Kaushik; Saha, Sandip; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Pal, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, a vector-borne tropical disease that is threatening about 350 million people worldwide, is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. Metalloids like arsenic and antimony have been used to treat diseases like leishmaniasis caused by the kinetoplastid parasites. Arsenic (III) at a relatively higher concentration (30 μg/mL) has been shown to have antileishmanial activity, but this concentration is reported to be toxic in several experimental mammalian systems. Nanosized metal (0) particles have been shown to be more effective than their higher oxidation state forms. There is no information so far regarding arsenic nanoparticles (As-NPs) as an antileishmanial agent. We have tested the antileishmanial properties of the As-NPs, developed for the first time in our laboratory. As-NPs inhibited the in vitro growth, oxygen consumption, infectivity, and intramacrophage proliferation of L. donovani parasites at a concentration which is about several fold lower than that of As (III). Moreover, this antileishmanial activity has comparatively less cytotoxic effect on the mouse macrophage cell line. It is evident from our findings that As-NPs have more potential than As (III) to be used as an antileishmanial agent. PMID:25614827

  18. Thin-plate spline analysis of treatment effects of rapid maxillary expansion and face mask therapy in early Class III malocclusions.

    Baccetti, T; Franchi, L; McNamara, J A

    1999-06-01

    An effective morphometric method (thin-plate spline analysis) was applied to evaluate shape changes in the craniofacial configuration of a sample of 23 children with Class III malocclusions in the early mixed dentition treated with rapid maxillary expansion and face mask therapy, and compared with a sample of 17 children with untreated Class III malocclusions. Significant treatment-induced changes involved both the maxilla and the mandible. Major deformations consisted of forward displacement of the maxillary complex from the pterygoid region and of anterior morphogenetic rotation of the mandible, due to a significant upward and forward direction of growth of the mandibular condyle. Significant differences in size changes due to reduced increments in mandibular dimensions were associated with significant shape changes in the treated group.

  19. Heavy components coupling effect on building response spectra generation

    Liu, T.H.; Johnson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates the dynamic coupling effect on the floor response spectra between the heavy components and the Reactor Interior (R/I) building in a PWR. The following cases were studied: (I) simplified models of one and two lump mass models representing building and heavy components, and (II) actual plant building and heavy component models. Response spectra are developed at building nodes for all models, using time-history analysis methods. Comparisons of response spectra from various models are made to observe the coupling effects. In some cases, this study found that the coupling would reduce the response spectra values in certain frequency regions even if the coupling is not required according to the above criteria. (orig./HP)

  20. A randomised trial and economic evaluation of the effect of response mode on response rate, response bias, and item non-response in a survey of doctors

    Witt Julia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveys of doctors are an important data collection method in health services research. Ways to improve response rates, minimise survey response bias and item non-response, within a given budget, have not previously been addressed in the same study. The aim of this paper is to compare the effects and costs of three different modes of survey administration in a national survey of doctors. Methods A stratified random sample of 4.9% (2,702/54,160 of doctors undertaking clinical practice was drawn from a national directory of all doctors in Australia. Stratification was by four doctor types: general practitioners, specialists, specialists-in-training, and hospital non-specialists, and by six rural/remote categories. A three-arm parallel trial design with equal randomisation across arms was used. Doctors were randomly allocated to: online questionnaire (902; simultaneous mixed mode (a paper questionnaire and login details sent together (900; or, sequential mixed mode (online followed by a paper questionnaire with the reminder (900. Analysis was by intention to treat, as within each primary mode, doctors could choose either paper or online. Primary outcome measures were response rate, survey response bias, item non-response, and cost. Results The online mode had a response rate 12.95%, followed by the simultaneous mixed mode with 19.7%, and the sequential mixed mode with 20.7%. After adjusting for observed differences between the groups, the online mode had a 7 percentage point lower response rate compared to the simultaneous mixed mode, and a 7.7 percentage point lower response rate compared to sequential mixed mode. The difference in response rate between the sequential and simultaneous modes was not statistically significant. Both mixed modes showed evidence of response bias, whilst the characteristics of online respondents were similar to the population. However, the online mode had a higher rate of item non-response compared

  1. Tunnel flexibility effect on the ground surface acceleration response

    Baziar, Mohammad Hassan; Moghadam, Masoud Rabeti; Choo, Yun Wook; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Flexibility of underground structures relative to the surrounding medium, referred to as the flexibility ratio, is an important factor that influences their dynamic interaction. This study investigates the flexibility effect of a box-shaped subway tunnel, resting directly on bedrock, on the ground surface acceleration response using a numerical model verified against dynamic centrifuge test results. A comparison of the ground surface acceleration response for tunnel models with different flexibility ratios revealed that the tunnels with different flexibility ratios influence the acceleration response at the ground surface in different ways. Tunnels with lower flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at short periods, whereas tunnels with higher flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at longer periods. The effect of the flexibility ratio on ground surface acceleration is more prominent in the high range of frequencies. Furthermore, as the flexibility ratio of the tunnel system increases, the acceleration response moves away from the free field response and shifts towards the longer periods. Therefore, the flexibility ratio of the underground tunnels influences the peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the ground surface, and may need to be considered in the seismic zonation of urban areas.

  2. State Responsibility in Peacekeeping
    The effect of responsibility on future contributions

    Nina Mileva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While the law on state responsibility is a well-developed field in international law, the potential for responsibility on the part of the state as a result of events taking place during peacekeeping missions is a fairly novel phenomenon. Internationally, claims in this field have been brought before the European Court of Human Rights and the International Court of Justice. National courts, on the other hand, have heard a total of six cases on the matter, in Belgium, the UK, and the Netherlands, all eventually apportioning responsibility to the state. This paper explores the effect that the potential for responsibility, as manifested in the outcomes of these recent cases, may have on state behaviour with respect to its future contributions to peacekeeping. The paper combines an exploration of the relevant adjudged cases with views collected from experts and academia in order to formulate three hypotheses on the effect of the potential for responsibility on future state behaviour. These hypotheses are then applied to the example of the Netherlands in the aftermath of a series of decisions finding it responsible for events taking place during its involvement in peacekeeping in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the 1990s. Due to the recent timing of the cases, the paper concludes with preliminary findings on each of the hypotheses, thereby opening the door to future research on the topic.

  3. Dupilumab with concomitant topical corticosteroid treatment in adults with atopic dermatitis with an inadequate response or intolerance to ciclosporin A or when this treatment is medically inadvisable: a placebo-controlled, randomized phase III clinical trial (LIBERTY AD CAFÉ).

    de Bruin-Weller, M; Thaçi, D; Smith, C H; Reich, K; Cork, M J; Radin, A; Zhang, Q; Akinlade, B; Gadkari, A; Eckert, L; Hultsch, T; Chen, Z; Pirozzi, G; Graham, N M H; Shumel, B

    2018-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that may require systemic therapy. Ciclosporin A (CsA) is a widely used, potent immunosuppressant but it is not effective in all patients with atopic dermatitis, and side-effects limit its use. Dupilumab, a fully human anti-interleukin 4 receptor-alpha monoclonal antibody, inhibits signaling of IL-4 and IL-13, key drivers of Type 2/Th2-mediated inflammation, and is approved in the U.S.A. and the European Union for the treatment of inadequately-controlled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in adults. To evaluate efficacy and safety of dupilumab with concomitant topical corticosteroids (TCS) in adults with atopic dermatitis with inadequate response to/intolerance of CsA, or for whom CsA treatment was medically inadvisable. In this 16-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase III trial, patients were randomized 1 : 1 : 1 to subcutaneous dupilumab 300 mg weekly (qw) or every 2 weeks (q2w) or placebo. All received concomitant medium-potency TCS from Week -2 through Week 16; dosage could be tapered if lesions cleared, or stopped for adverse reactions to TCS. In total, 390 patients were screened, 325 were randomized, and 318 completed the trial. Treatment groups had similar baseline characteristics. Significantly more patients in the dupilumab qw + TCS and q2w + TCS groups achieved ≥ 75% improvement from baseline in the Eczema Area and Severity Index at Week 16 vs. the placebo + TCS group (primary end point) (59·1% and 62·6% vs. 29·6%, respectively; P < 0·001 vs. placebo + TCS, both doses). Other clinical outcomes and atopic dermatitis symptoms were significantly improved in the dupilumab qw + TCS and q2w + TCS groups, including pruritus, pain, sleep disturbance, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and quality of life (QoL). Treatment groups had similar overall rates of adverse events (qw + TCS, q2w + TCS and placebo + TCS groups: 69·1%, 72·0% and 69·4%, respectively) and serious adverse

  4. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an independent predictive factor irrespective of simplified breast cancer intrinsic subtypes: a landmark and two-step approach analyses from the EORTC 10994/BIG 1-00 phase III trial.

    Bonnefoi, H; Litière, S; Piccart, M; MacGrogan, G; Fumoleau, P; Brain, E; Petit, T; Rouanet, P; Jassem, J; Moldovan, C; Bodmer, A; Zaman, K; Cufer, T; Campone, M; Luporsi, E; Malmström, P; Werutsky, G; Bogaerts, J; Bergh, J; Cameron, D A

    2014-06-01

    Pathological complete response (pCR) following chemotherapy is strongly associated with both breast cancer subtype and long-term survival. Within a phase III neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial, we sought to determine whether the prognostic implications of pCR, TP53 status and treatment arm (taxane versus non-taxane) differed between intrinsic subtypes. Patients were randomized to receive either six cycles of anthracycline-based chemotherapy or three cycles of docetaxel then three cycles of eprirubicin/docetaxel (T-ET). pCR was defined as no evidence of residual invasive cancer (or very few scattered tumour cells) in primary tumour and lymph nodes. We used a simplified intrinsic subtypes classification, as suggested by the 2011 St Gallen consensus. Interactions between pCR, TP53 status, treatment arm and intrinsic subtype on event-free survival (EFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were studied using a landmark and a two-step approach multivariate analyses. Sufficient data for pCR analyses were available in 1212 (65%) of 1856 patients randomized. pCR occurred in 222 of 1212 (18%) patients: 37 of 496 (7.5%) luminal A, 22 of 147 (15%) luminal B/HER2 negative, 51 of 230 (22%) luminal B/HER2 positive, 43 of 118 (36%) HER2 positive/non-luminal, 69 of 221(31%) triple negative (TN). The prognostic effect of pCR on EFS did not differ between subtypes and was an independent predictor for better EFS [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.40, P analysis. EORTC 10994/BIG 1-00 Trial registration number NCT00017095. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part III. Evaluating Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys: An Item Response Theory Approach

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2012-01-01

    This is the third of five papers detailing our national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. In this paper, we use item response theory to analyze students' responses to three out of the four conceptual cosmology surveys we developed. The specific item response theory model we use is…

  6. A prospective phase I/II trial of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in patients with carcinoma of the cervix - acute toxicity and biomarker response analysis

    Chan, P.; Doll, C.; Oza, A.; Pintilie, M.; Levin, W.; Manchul, L.; Fyles, A.; Milosevic, M.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and biomarker response of celecoxib (C) as a biologic modifier in combination with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in women with cervix cancer. Fifteen cervix patients were entered into the first phase of this prospective study between March 2001 and January 2002. FIGO stages included IB(2), IIB(8), IIIB(4), and IVA(1), and median age was 51 years (range 26-62). Celecoxib 400mg orally was given b.i.d. 2 weeks prior to, and during the CRT. Toxicity assessments were performed weekly up to 12 weeks following treatment prior to further accrual using the NCIC-CTC. Hypoxia (HP5) and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) assays were performed at day 0 and 14. Eleven patients completed the prescribed therapy. Only 2 of 4 patients discontinued C due to GI toxicity. In total there were 6 (40%) with grade 3/4 acute toxicity. Four were related to GI, one to skin reaction while the other was haematological. Although it was difficult to distinguish CRT toxicity from C, the proportion of patients with severe acute toxicity was similar to what we previously reported with CRT alone (8/24 (33%), Rodrigues, IJROBP 2001:Vol 51:(3): (Supp 1): 334). GI toxicity was more common in this study whereas haematologic effects were more frequent in the previous study. Evaluating the most recent measurable data set, 6 of 16 patients showed a decrease in HP5, (3.8 - 89.7%) while 10 of 14 patients had a reduction in IFP, (1.3 - 16.2mmHg). Two grade 4 late GI toxicity developed. Celecoxib is tolerated by patients receiving CRT for cervix cancer. Response of microenvironmental biomarkers to C was seen in the majority, suggesting a role as early markers of treatment outcome. Further follow-up is needed to assess the risk of late toxicity. The trial has been re-opened with C reduced to 300 mg b.i.d

  7. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  8. Investigations into the bystander effect: signal versus response

    Vines, A.M.; Seymour, C.B.; Mothersill, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The bystander effect is the general term used to describe the effects seen in cells or tissue that have never been directly irradiated, but display similar symptoms to those that have. Some of these symptoms include reduced cell survival, chromosomal aberrations, and increased apoptosis. This investigation aims to explore the signal produced by certain cell and tissue types, and the relationship this has with the subsequent response. The goal is to elucidate whether the reduction in cell survival frequently seen in response to the bystander effect is determined by the signal produced or the response of the cell type. Firstly, a matrix design experiment was set up using 3 cell lines. Each cell line was irradiated to produce ICCM (Irradiated Cell Conditioned Medium), which was in turn used to treat all cell lines in the study. Medium transfer is carried out within cell lines, (ICCM from CHO onto CHO cells) and between cell lines (ICCM from CHO onto HPV-G cells). In the second set of experiments, tissue samples from male Wister rats were used to generate ITCM (Irradiated Tissue Conditioned Medium). This medium was then tested on a cell line with an established response to the bystander effect. As an extension to these two experimental protocols, both ICCM and ITCM were used to investigate if there is calcium flux in the cells as a response to the bystander medium. This has recently been shown to be an early response to the bystander signal. Results indicate that it is the signal produced by the irradiated cells that determine the overall effect of the bystander signal, and not the response of the cells expose to it. CHO-K1 cells treated with autologous ICCM show a 16.2% drop in cell survival. However, when this cell line is treated with HPV-G ICCM, it shows a 36.5% drop in survival. HPV-G cells treated with autologous medium display a similar response to this, with a 41.1% drop in survival, though when treated with CHO-K1 ICCM, the drop in survival is 22.9%. This

  9. Rapid response teams: qualitative analysis of their effectiveness.

    Leach, Linda Searle; Mayo, Ann M

    2013-05-01

    Multidisciplinary rapid response teams focus on patients' emergent needs and manage critical situations to prevent avoidable deaths. Although research has focused primarily on outcomes, studies of the actual team effectiveness within the teams from multiple perspectives have been limited. To describe effectiveness of rapid response teams in a large teaching hospital in California that had been using such teams for 5 years. The grounded-theory method was used to discover if substantive theory might emerge from interview and/or observational data. Purposeful sampling was used to conduct in-person semistructured interviews with 17 key informants. Convenience sampling was used for the 9 observed events that involved a rapid response team. Analysis involved use of a concept or indicator model to generate empirical results from the data. Data were coded, compared, and contrasted, and, when appropriate, relationships between concepts were formed. Results Dimensions of effective team performance included the concepts of organizational culture, team structure, expertise, communication, and teamwork. Professionals involved reported that rapid response teams functioned well in managing patients at risk or in crisis; however, unique challenges were identified. Teams were loosely coupled because of the inconsistency of team members from day to day. Team members had little opportunity to develop relationships or team skills. The need for team training may be greater than that among teams that work together regularly under less time pressure to perform. Communication between team members and managing a crisis were critical aspects of an effective response team.

  10. Influence of the control bars pattern on the response of the operation channels of the TRIGA Mark III reactor; Influencia del patron de barras de control sobre la respuesta de los canales de operacion del reactor TRIGA Mark III

    Paredes G, L.C

    1991-07-15

    The local flow perturbations not generated by movements of bars not planned adequately to operate the reactor to 1 MW of thermal power, are reflected in the independent responses of the operation channels of the same one, find variations average from 17% to 30% for the channel of the power percent and of until 10% for the logarithmic channel. For the case of the lineal and percent power channels, these are between 14% and 46% as maximum when moving some of the bars. These variations can diminish until 5% in the channel of the power percent and until 3% on the average for the logarithmic one, all times when the calculated bars pattern for that irradiation considers that all the bars operate inside the lineal region of its calibration curve with approximately the same reactivity value each one and that during the operation the required reactivity compensations are carried out with the diametrically opposed bar to the irradiation installation used in that experiment. (Author)

  11. Effect of transcutaneous electrical stimulation treatment on lower urinary tract symptoms after class III radical hysterectomy in cervical cancer patients: study protocol for a multicentre, randomized controlled trial.

    Sun, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hai-Bo; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Cao, Ting-Ting; Yang, Xin; Han, Jing-Song; Wu, Yang-Feng; Reilly, Kathleen H; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2017-06-15

    Class III radical hysterectomy (RH III)_plus pelvic lymphadenectomy is the standard surgery for early stage cervical cancer (CC) patients, the 5 year survival rate is about 90%, but pelvic floor disorders especially bladder dysfunction are common due to damaged vessels and nerve fibers following surgery. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) treatment has been used to treat bladder disorders for many years, but its effect on cervical cancer patients, the best treatment time point and stimulated protocol, had never been assessed. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of TENS treatment on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) after RH III in CC patients. The study will be conducted as a clinical, multicentre, randomised controlled trial with balanced randomisation (1:1). The planned sample size is 208 participants (at 1:1 ratio, 104 subjects in each group). At 5-7 days after RH III, patients are screened according to operative and pathological findings. Enrolled participants are randomised into an intervention group (TENS plus conventional clinical care) or control group (conventional clinical care), with stratification by menopausal status (menopause vs. non-menopause) and surgical modality (laparoscopic RH or abdominal RH). Participants in both groups will be followed up at 14 days, 21 days, 28 days, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months after surgery. The primary endpoint is improvement rate of urination function which is defined as recovery (residual urine ≤50 ml) or improvement (residual urine 50-100 ml). Secondary endpoints include urodynamic parameter, urinary incontinence, anorectal function, pelvic function, quality of life (QOL), disease-free survival and adverse events. Primary endpoint analyses will be carried out by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests taking into center effect. To our knowledge this is the first trial to investigate the effect of TENS treatment on bladder function recovery after RH III among

  12. Effect of alkali cations on two-dimensional networks of two new quaternary thioarsenates (III) prepared by a facile surfactant-thermal method

    Yan, Dongming [School of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Hou, Peipei; Liu, Chang [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chai, Wenxiang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zheng, Xuerong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, Luodong [School of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhi, Mingjia; Zhou, Chunmei [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: liuyimse@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Two new quaternary thioarsenates(III) NaAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O (1) and KAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} (2) with high yields have been successfully prepared through a facile surfactant-thermal method. It is interesting that 2 can only be obtained with the aid of ethanediamine (en), which indicates that weak basicity of solvent is beneficial to the growth of 2 compared with 1. Both 1 and 2 feature the similar two-dimensional (2D) layer structures. However, the distortion of the primary honeycomb-like nets in 2 is more severe than that of 1, which demonstrates that Na{sup +} and K{sup +} cations have different structure directing effects on these two thioarsenates(III). Both experimental and theoretical studies confirm 1 and 2 are semiconductors with band gaps in the visible region. Our success in preparing these two quaternary thioarsenates(III) proves that surfactant-thermal technique is a powerful yet facile synthetic method to explore new complex chalcogenides. - Graphical abstract: Two new quaternary thioarsenates(III) NaAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O (1) and KAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} (2) with high yields have been successfully prepared through a facile surfactant-thermal method. X-ray single crystal diffraction analyses demonstrate that Na{sup +} and K{sup +} cations have different structure directing effects on these two thioarsenates(III). Both experimental and theoretical studies confirm 1 and 2 are semiconductors with band gaps in the visible region. Display Omitted - Highlights: • NaAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}⋅H{sub 2}O (1) and KAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} (2) were prepared through surfactant-thermal method. • Crystal structures show Na{sup ±} and K{sup ±} have different structure directing effects. • The weak basicity of solvent is benefit to the growth of 2 compared with 1. • Experimental and theoretical studies confirm 1 and 2 are semiconductors.

  13. Effect of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFX RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy for Stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-nine patients treated in a randomized study were retrospectively analyzed. Group I patients were treated by HFX RT with 1.2 Gy twice daily with a total dose of 64.8 Gy in 27 treatment days, while Groups II and III patients were treated by the same HFX RT and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide (every week in Group II and every other week in Group III). Interfraction intervals of either 4.5-5 h or 5.5-6 h were used for each patient. Results: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) had a better prognosis than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h) (median survival: 22 vs. 7 months; 5-year survival rate: 27% vs. 0%, p = 0.00000). This phenomenon was observed in all treatment groups. Patients ≥ 60 years of age, with Stage IIIA disease, or with previous weight loss ≤ 5% were treated more often with the shorter intervals than those 5%, respectively, but in all of these subgroups of patients, the shorter intervals were associated with a better prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the interfraction interval was an independent prognostic factor, together with sex, age, performance status, and stage. The shorter intervals were associated with an increased incidence of acute high grade toxicity, but not with an increase in late toxicity. Conclusion: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) appeared to have a better survival than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h). Prospective randomized studies are warranted to further investigate the influence of interfraction interval in HFX RT

  14. Fluorescence enhancement effect for the determination of curcumin with yttrium(III)-curcumin-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate system

    Wang Feng; Huang Wei; Wang Yanwei

    2008-01-01

    It is found that the fluorescence of curcumin is greatly enhanced by yttrium(III) (Y 3+ ) in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate. Based on this, a sensitive fluorimetric method for the determination of curcumin in aqueous solution is proposed. In the potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) buffer, the fluorescence intensity of curcumin is proportional to the concentration of curcumin in the range of 7.37x10 -4 -0.18, 0.18-2.95 μg mL -1 and the detection limit is 0.1583 ng mL -1 . The actual samples are satisfactorily determined. In addition, the interaction mechanism is also studied

  15. The sky is falling III: The effect of deposition from static solid rocket motor tests on juvenile crops.

    Doucette, William J; Curry, Eric; McNeill, Laurie S; Heavilin, Justin

    2017-12-01

    A mixture of combustion products (mainly hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water) and entrained soil, referred to as Test Fire Soil (TFS), can be deposited on crops during static solid rocket motor tests. The impact of a reported worst-case event was previously evaluated by exposing corn and alfalfa to 3200-gTFS/m 2 at 54days after emergence. Exposures via soil and leaves were evaluated separately. Reduced growth (soil exposure) and leaf "scorch" (leaf exposure) were attributed mainly to the high chloride concentrations in the TFS (56,000mg/kg). A follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a typical deposition event (70-gTFS/m 2 , estimated by radar during several tests) and exposure (soil and leaves simultaneously) on juvenile corn, alfalfa, and winter wheat. Younger crops were used to examine potential age sensitivity differences. Impact was evaluated by comparing the growth, elemental composition, and leaf chlorophyll content of treated and untreated plants. The relationship between deposition exposure and response was also addressed. Growth of corn, alfalfa, and winter wheat exposed to a typical TFS loading was not impacted, although slightly elevated concentrations of aluminum and iron were found in the leaves. At the highest loadings used for the exposure-response experiment, concentrations of chloride and calcium were higher in TFS-exposed corn leaves than in the untreated leaves. Overall results indicate that exposure to a typical deposition event does not adversely impact juvenile crops and that younger plants may be less vulnerable to TFS. However, higher TFS loadings can cause leaf scorch and increase the leaf concentrations of some elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Response efficiency during functional communication training: effects of effort on response allocation.

    Richman, D M; Wacker, D P; Winborn, L

    2001-01-01

    An analogue functional analysis revealed that the problem behavior of a young child with developmental delays was maintained by positive reinforcement. A concurrent-schedule procedure was then used to vary the amount of effort required to emit mands. Results suggested that response effort can be an important variable when developing effective functional communication training programs.

  17. Dissociating action-effect activation and effect-based response selection.

    Schwarz, Katharina A; Pfister, Roland; Wirth, Robert; Kunde, Wilfried

    2018-05-25

    Anticipated action effects have been shown to govern action selection and initiation, as described in ideomotor theory, and they have also been demonstrated to determine crosstalk between different tasks in multitasking studies. Such effect-based crosstalk was observed not only in a forward manner (with a first task influencing performance in a following second task) but also in a backward manner (the second task influencing the preceding first task), suggesting that action effect codes can become activated prior to a capacity-limited processing stage often denoted as response selection. The process of effect-based response production, by contrast, has been proposed to be capacity-limited. These observations jointly suggest that effect code activation can occur independently of effect-based response production, though this theoretical implication has not been tested directly at present. We tested this hypothesis by employing a dual-task set-up in which we manipulated the ease of effect-based response production (via response-effect compatibility) in an experimental design that allows for observing forward and backward crosstalk. We observed robust crosstalk effects and response-effect compatibility effects alike, but no interaction between both effects. These results indicate that effect activation can occur in parallel for several tasks, independently of effect-based response production, which is confined to one task at a time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    Shervin, Shahab; Asadirad, Mojtaba [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Kim, Seung-Hwan; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Bulashevich, Kirill [STR Group, Inc., Engels av. 27, P.O. Box 89, 194156, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  19. Assessment of the effects of As(III) treatment on cyanobacteria lipidomic profiles by LC-MS and MCR-ALS.

    Marques, Aline S; Bedia, Carmen; Lima, Kássio M G; Tauler, Romà

    2016-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in a wide variety of habitats such as freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. In this work, the effects of As(III), a major toxic environmental pollutant, on the lipidomic profiles of two cyanobacteria species (Anabaena and Planktothrix agardhii) were assessed by means of a recently proposed method based on the concept of regions of interest (ROI) in liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) together with multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). Cyanobacteria were exposed to two concentrations of As(III) for a week, and lipid extracts were analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in full scan mode. The data obtained were compressed by means of the ROI strategy, and the resulting LC-MS data sets were analyzed by the MCR-ALS method. Comparison of profile peak areas resolved by MCR-ALS in control and exposed samples allowed the discrimination of lipids whose concentrations were changed due to As(III) treatment. The tentative identification of these lipids revealed an important reduction of the levels of some galactolipids such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, the pigment chlorophyll a and its degradation product, pheophytin a, as well as carotene compounds such as 3-hydroxycarotene and carotene-3,3'-dione, all of these compounds being essential in the photosynthetic process. These results suggested that As(III) induced important changes in the composition of lipids of cyanobacteria, which were able to compromise their energy production processes. Graphical abstract Steps of the proposed LC-MS + MCR-ALS procedure.

  20. Tannin-immobilized mesoporous silica bead (BT-SiO{sub 2}) as an effective adsorbent of Cr(III) in aqueous solutions

    Huang Xin [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liao Xuepin, E-mail: xpliao@scu.edu.cn [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi Bi [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2010-01-15

    This study describes a new approach for the preparation of tannin-immobilized adsorbent by using mesoporous silica bead as the supporting matrix. Bayberry tannin-immobilized mesoporous silica bead (BT-SiO{sub 2}) was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction to verify the crystallinity, field-emission scanning electron microscopy to observe the surface morphology, and surface area and porosity analyzer to measure the mesoporous porous structure. Subsequently, the adsorption experiments to Cr(III) were applied to evaluate the adsorption performances of BT-SiO{sub 2}. It was found that the adsorption of Cr(III) onto BT-SiO{sub 2} was pH-dependent, and the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained in the pH range of 5.0-5.5. The adsorption capacity was 1.30 mmol g{sup -1} at 303 K and pH 5.5 when the initial concentration of Cr(III) was 2.0 mmol L{sup -1}. Based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (HNMR) analyses, the adsorption mechanism of Cr(III) on BT-SiO{sub 2} was proved to be a chelating interaction. The adsorption kinetic data can be well described using pseudo-first-order model and the equilibrium data can be well fitted by the Langmuir isothermal model. Importantly, no bayberry tannin was leached out during the adsorption process and BT-SiO{sub 2} can simultaneously remove coexisting metal ions from aqueous solutions. In conclusion, this study provides a new strategy for the preparation of tannin-immobilized adsorbents that are highly effective in removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

  1. Tannin-immobilized mesoporous silica bead (BT-SiO2) as an effective adsorbent of Cr(III) in aqueous solutions

    Huang Xin; Liao Xuepin; Shi Bi

    2010-01-01

    This study describes a new approach for the preparation of tannin-immobilized adsorbent by using mesoporous silica bead as the supporting matrix. Bayberry tannin-immobilized mesoporous silica bead (BT-SiO 2 ) was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction to verify the crystallinity, field-emission scanning electron microscopy to observe the surface morphology, and surface area and porosity analyzer to measure the mesoporous porous structure. Subsequently, the adsorption experiments to Cr(III) were applied to evaluate the adsorption performances of BT-SiO 2 . It was found that the adsorption of Cr(III) onto BT-SiO 2 was pH-dependent, and the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained in the pH range of 5.0-5.5. The adsorption capacity was 1.30 mmol g -1 at 303 K and pH 5.5 when the initial concentration of Cr(III) was 2.0 mmol L -1 . Based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (HNMR) analyses, the adsorption mechanism of Cr(III) on BT-SiO 2 was proved to be a chelating interaction. The adsorption kinetic data can be well described using pseudo-first-order model and the equilibrium data can be well fitted by the Langmuir isothermal model. Importantly, no bayberry tannin was leached out during the adsorption process and BT-SiO 2 can simultaneously remove coexisting metal ions from aqueous solutions. In conclusion, this study provides a new strategy for the preparation of tannin-immobilized adsorbents that are highly effective in removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

  2. THE GENDER DIFFERENCES EFFECTS ON CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR

    LILIANA NICOLETA SIMIONESCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR refers to company's activities through which they need to contribute to the society well-being. Companies which are socially responsible operate their business in such way stakeholders requirements are a meet as well as ethical, legal, economical and philanthropic expectations toward the society where companies operates. Moreover, businesses decisions and strategies should take into consideration and should act with more responsibility to shareholders, customers, employees, and suppliers. Company's responsibility is more than just legal and economic responsibility. Companies including CSR into their business strategies increase their competitiveness alongside other benefits. Regardless of the heated debates which have been taking place between academics, researchers, scholars, and corporate executives, CSR concept remains open to a range of definitions As well as understanding. This paper aim is to theoretically investigate how differences in gender effect on corporate social responsibility activities with impact on companies’ performance in developing countries. In order to achieve the paper aim, following the literature on CSR and research background, comprehensive research framework was developed. Despite the fact that CSR have been debated on many topics, the gender differences effects on CSR in developing countries is scarce. To fill in this gap, this paper developed a conceptual research framework that enhance the literature on CSR as regard the differences linking male and female’s orientation toward CSR activities.

  3. Does modifying personal responsibility moderate the mental contamination effect?

    Kennedy, Tinisha S; Simonds, Laura M

    2017-12-01

    Mental contamination is the psychological sense of internal dirtiness that arises in the absence of physical contact with a perceived contaminant. Mental contamination can be evoked through imagining perpetrating a moral transgression. This study experimentally evoked mental contamination by asking men to imagine perpetrating a non-consensual kiss. It explored whether reducing sense of personal responsibility for the kiss moderated the mental contamination effect. Male students (N = 60) imagined giving either a consensual or non-consensual kiss. Personal responsibility for the kiss was manipulated in one of two non-consensual kiss conditions by way of the inclusion of social influence information. Feelings of mental contamination were assessed by self-report and through a behavioural index. Mental contamination was successfully induced in the two non-consensual kiss conditions. There was evidence to support the hypothesis that reducing personal responsibility might moderate specific components of mental contamination (shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse). The effect of responsibility modification was evident in the self-report measures, but not in the behavioural index. The sample comprised male university students which limits generalizability of the findings. The behavioural assessment of mental contamination was limited to a proxy measure. Imagined moral violations are associated with increases in indices of mental contamination. Further research should investigate whether feelings of shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse are particularly responsive to responsibility modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. As(III) oxidation by MnO2 during groundwater treatment.

    Gude, J C J; Rietveld, L C; van Halem, D

    2017-03-15

    The top layer of natural rapid sand filtration was found to effectively oxidise arsenite (As(III)) in groundwater treatment. However, the oxidation pathway has not yet been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether naturally formed manganese oxide (MnO 2 ), present on filter grains, could abiotically be responsible for As(III) oxidation in the top of a rapid sand filter. For this purpose As(III) oxidation with two MnO 2 containing powders was investigated in aerobic water containing manganese(II) (Mn(II)), iron(II) (Fe(II)) and/or iron(III) (Fe(III)). The first MnO 2 powder was a very pure - commercially available - natural MnO 2 powder. The second originated from a filter sand coating, produced over 22 years in a rapid filter during aeration and filtration. Jar test experiments showed that both powders oxidised As(III). However, when applying the MnO 2 in aerated, raw groundwater, As(III) removal was not enhanced compared to aeration alone. It was found that the presence of Fe(II)) and Mn(II) inhibited As(III) oxidation, as Fe(II) and Mn(II) adsorption and oxidation were preferred over As(III) on the MnO 2 surface (at pH 7). Therefore it is concluded that just because MnO 2 is present in a filter bed, it does not necessarily mean that MnO 2 will be available to oxidise As(III). However, unlike Fe(II), the addition of Fe(III) did not hinder As(III) oxidation on the MnO 2 surface; resulting in subsequent effective As(V) removal by the flocculating hydrous ferric oxides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of oxycodone on brain responses to emotional images.

    Wardle, Margaret C; Fitzgerald, Daniel A; Angstadt, Michael; Rabinak, Christine A; de Wit, Harriet; Phan, K Luan

    2014-11-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that opiate drugs decrease emotional responses to negative stimuli and increase responses to positive stimuli. Such emotional effects may motivate misuse of oxycodone (OXY), a widely abused opiate. Yet, we know little about how OXY affects neural circuits underlying emotional processing in humans. We examined effects of OXY on brain activity during presentation of positive and negative visual emotional stimuli. We predicted that OXY would decrease amygdala activity to negative stimuli and increase ventral striatum (VS) activity to positive stimuli. Secondarily, we examined the effects of OXY on other emotional network regions on an exploratory basis. In a three-session study, healthy adults (N = 17) received placebo, 10 and 20 mg OXY under counterbalanced, double-blind conditions. At each session, participants completed subjective and cardiovascular measures and underwent functional MRI (fMRI) scanning while completing two emotional response tasks. Our emotional tasks reliably activated emotional network areas. OXY produced subjective effects but did not alter either behavioral responses to emotional stimuli or activity in our primary areas of interest. OXY did decrease right medial orbitofrontal cortex (MOFC) responses to happy faces. Contrary to our expectations, OXY did not affect behavioral or neural responses to emotional stimuli in our primary areas of interest. Further, the effects of OXY in the MOFC would be more consistent with a decrease in value for happy faces. This may indicate that healthy adults do not receive emotional benefits from opiates, or the pharmacological actions of OXY differ from other opiates.

  6. Investigation of optimal conditions for production of highly crystalline nanocellulose with increased yield via novel Cr(III)-catalyzed hydrolysis: Response surface methodology.

    Chen, You Wei; Lee, Hwei Voon; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-12-15

    For the first time, a highly efficient Cr(NO 3 ) 3 catalysis system was proposed for optimization the yield and crystallinity of nanocellulose end product. A five-level three-factor central composite design coupled with response surface methodology was employed to elucidate parameters interactions between three design factors, namely reaction temperature (x 1 ), reaction time (x 2 ) and concentration of Cr(NO 3 ) 3 (x 3 ) over a broad range of process conditions and determine the effect on crystallinity index and product yield. The developed models predicted the maximum nanocellulose yield of 87% at optimum process conditions of 70.6°C, 1.48h, and 0.48M Cr(NO 3 ) 3 . At these conditions, the obtained nanocellulose presented high crystallinity index (75.3%), spider-web-like interconnected network morphology with the average width of 31.2±14.3nm. In addition, the yielded nanocellulose rendered a higher thermal stability than that of original cellulosic source and expected to be widely used as reinforcement agent in bio-nanocomposites materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Curcumin on Blood Glucose Level and Some Neurobehavioral Responses in Alloxan-induced Diabetic Swiss Albino Mice

    U. A. Garkuwa; A. W. Alhassan; Y. Tanko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of curcumin on blood glucose level and neurobehavioral response in Alloxan-induced diabetic Swiss Albino mice. The animals were divided into five (5) groups of four each (n=4). Group I served as control and received distilled water, group II, III, IV and V were diabetic and received olive oil 1 ml/kg, glibenclamide 1 mg/kg, curcumin 50 mg/kg and curcumin 100 mg/kg respectively. Diabetes was induced using Alloxan (150 mg/kg). All administrations...

  8. Effects of response preference on resistance to change.

    Ringdahl, Joel E; Berg, Wendy K; Wacker, David P; Crook, Kayla; Molony, Maggie A; Vargo, Kristina K; Neurnberger, Jodi E; Zabala, Karla; Taylor, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    Treatments based on differential reinforcement of alternative behavior, such as functional communication training, are widely used. Research regarding the maintenance of related treatment effects is limited. Nevin and Wacker (2013) provided a conceptual framework, rooted in behavioral momentum theory, for the study of treatment maintenance that addressed two components: (a) reemergence of problem behavior, and (b) continued expression of appropriate behavior. In the few studies on this topic, focus has been on variables impacting the reemergence of problem behavior, with fewer studies evaluating the persistence of appropriate behavior. Given the findings from applied research related to functional communication training, variables related to response topography, such as response preference, may impact this aspect of maintenance. In the current study, the impact of response preference on persistence was evaluated in the context of functional communication training for individuals who did not exhibit problem behavior (Experiment 1) and for individuals with a history of reinforcement for problem behavior (Experiment 2). High-preferred mands were more persistent than low-preferred mands. These findings suggest that response related variables, such as response preference, impact response persistence and further suggest that response related variables should be considered when developing interventions such as functional communication training. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  9. DESCRIPTION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF CILOSTAZOL AND ASPIRIN AS ADJUVANT OF DIABETIC FOOT WAGNER GRADE II AND III

    Pandji Winata Nurikhwan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Inflammation in patients with diabetic foot will activate platelets and cause aggregation and lead to stasis of blood flow. This inflammation is caused by infection of the diabetic foot. Management of diabetic foot infections in patients is the use of antibiotics. However, the presence of vascularization disorders causing antibiotic delivery to the site of infection to be disrupted so that the process of eradication of infection would be inhibited. One of inflamation markers on patient with diabetic foot is increasing of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESRs.The general objective of this study was to determine the efficacy difference between cilostazol and aspirin as an adjuvant to accelerate tissue healing of diabetic foot care Wagner Grade II – III based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate. This study is a descriptive study using the double-blind and randomized pretest-posttest design. A total of 14 samples is obtained by consecutive sampling. The results showed that four patients given cilostazol showed a 35% reduction in ESR and ten patients were given aspirin showed a 35% reduction in ESR. It can be concluded giving cilostazol and aspirin as adjuvant diabetic foot Wagner II and III showed a decrease in ESR.

  10. The effect of orthognathic surgery on the lip lines while smiling in skeletal class III patients with facial asymmetry.

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; An, Sang-In; Lee, Ji-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between improvements in lip asymmetry at rest and while smiling after orthognathic surgery in patients with skeletal class III malocclusion. This study included 21 patients with skeletal class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry. We used preoperative and postoperative CT data and photographs to measure the vertical distance of the lips when smiling. The photographs were calibrated based on these distances and the CT image. We compared preoperative and postoperative results with the t test and correlations between measurements at rest and when smiling by regression analyses. There were significant correlations between the postoperative changes in canting of the mouth corners at rest, canting of the canines, canting of the first molars, the slope of the line connecting the canines, and the slope of the line connecting first molars. The magnitude of the postoperative lip line improvement while smiling was not significantly correlated with changes in the canting and slopes of the canines, molars, and lip lines at rest. It remains difficult to predict lip line changes while smiling compared with at rest after orthognathic surgery in patients with mandibular prognathism, accompanied by facial asymmetry.

  11. Luminescence and Magnetic Properties of Tb(III) Complexes with TETA and Synergistic Effect by 1,10-Phenanthroline

    Kang, Jung Youl; Shin, Su jeong; Kim, Jae Kwan; Park, Kyoung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Two Tb(III) complexes, [Tb(TETA)]− and [Tb(TETA)(phen)]− (TETA = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,8,11-tetraacetate and phen=1,10-phenanthroline), were synthesized and their luminescence ("5D_4 → "7F_=_0_-_6 transitions) and magnetic properties were examined. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield of [Tb(TETA)(phen)]− (Q = 0.47) was significantly higher than that of [Tb(TETA)]− (Q = 0.006). The dramatic increase (78 x) in green luminescence was attributed to intramolecular energy transfer from phen to Tb(III). The energy transfer rate according to Dexter theory was found to be approximately 1011s−1. The temperature dependence of the molar susceptibilities confirmed that the two complexes behave as paramagnets obeying the Curie–Weiss law. In addition, the field-dependent magnetization of the two complexes measured in the −70 to + 70 kOe range at T=1.8K fitted well with the Brillouin function with the following values: g _e_f_f=1.5, μ B =9.27×10−21 emu, and J=6. These results provide new insights into the development of lanthanide metal complexes with tetraaza

  12. Luminescence and Magnetic Properties of Tb(III) Complexes with TETA and Synergistic Effect by 1,10-Phenanthroline

    Kang, Jung Youl; Shin, Su jeong; Kim, Jae Kwan; Park, Kyoung Chan [Hanbat National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Two Tb(III) complexes, [Tb(TETA)]− and [Tb(TETA)(phen)]− (TETA = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,8,11-tetraacetate and phen=1,10-phenanthroline), were synthesized and their luminescence ({sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub =0-6} transitions) and magnetic properties were examined. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield of [Tb(TETA)(phen)]− (Q = 0.47) was significantly higher than that of [Tb(TETA)]− (Q = 0.006). The dramatic increase (78 x) in green luminescence was attributed to intramolecular energy transfer from phen to Tb(III). The energy transfer rate according to Dexter theory was found to be approximately 1011s−1. The temperature dependence of the molar susceptibilities confirmed that the two complexes behave as paramagnets obeying the Curie–Weiss law. In addition, the field-dependent magnetization of the two complexes measured in the −70 to + 70 kOe range at T=1.8K fitted well with the Brillouin function with the following values: g {sub eff}=1.5, μ B =9.27×10−21 emu, and J=6. These results provide new insights into the development of lanthanide metal complexes with tetraaza.

  13. Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching

    Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.; Leonard, William J.; Dufresne, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom response systems can be powerful tools for teaching physics. Their efficacy depends strongly on the quality of the questions. Creating effective questions is difficult and differs from creating exam and homework problems. Each classroom response system question should have an explicit pedagogic purpose consisting of a content goal, a process goal, and a metacognitive goal. Questions can be designed to fulfill their purpose through four complementary mechanisms: directing students' attention, stimulating specific cognitive processes, communicating information to the instructor and students via classroom response system-tabulated answer counts, and facilitating the articulation and confrontation of ideas. We identify several tactics that are useful for designing potent questions and present four "makeovers" to show how these tactics can be used to convert traditional physics questions into more powerful questions for a classroom response system.

  14. Looking for the GAP effect in manual responses and the role of contextual influences in reaction time experiments

    Faria Jr. A.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When the offset of a visual stimulus (GAP condition precedes the onset of a target, saccadic reaction times are reduced in relation to the condition with no offset (overlap condition - the GAP effect. However, the existence of the GAP effect for manual responses is still controversial. In two experiments using both simple (Experiment 1, N = 18 and choice key-press procedures (Experiment 2, N = 12, we looked for the GAP effect in manual responses and investigated possible contextual influences on it. Participants were asked to respond to the imperative stimulus that would occur under different experimental contexts, created by varying the array of warning-stimulus intervals (0, 300 and 1000 ms and conditions (GAP and overlap: i intervals and conditions were randomized throughout the experiment; ii conditions were run in different blocks and intervals were randomized; iii intervals were run in different blocks and conditions were randomized. Our data showed that no GAP effect was obtained for any manipulation. The predictability of stimulus occurrence produced the strongest influence on response latencies. In Experiment 1, simple manual responses were shorter when the intervals were blocked (247 ms, P < 0.001 in relation to the other two contexts (274 and 279 ms. Despite the use of choice key-press procedures, Experiment 2 produced a similar pattern of results. A discussion addressing the critical conditions to obtain the GAP effect for distinct motor responses is presented. In short, our data stress the relevance of the temporal allocation of attention for behavioral performance.

  15. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. The Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Responses to a Glacial Cycle and their Potential Implications for Deep Geological Disposal of Nuclear Fuel Waste in a Fractured Crystalline Rock Mass. Report of BMT3/WP4

    Chan, T.; Stanchell, F.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, Toronto (Canada); Christiansson, R. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Figeholm (Sweden); Boulton, G.S. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). School of GeoSciences; Eriksson, L.O.; Vistrand, P.; Wallroth, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Geology; Hartikainen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Inst. of Mathematics; Jensen, M.R. [0ntario Power Generation, Toronto (Canada); Mas lvars, D. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Land and Water Resources engineering

    2005-02-15

    A number of studies related to past and on-going deep repository performance assessments have identified glaciation/deglaciation as major future events in the next few hundred thousand years capable of causing significant impact on the long term performance of the repository system. Benchmark Test 3 (BMT3) of the international DECOVALEX III project has been designed to provide an illustrative example that explores the mechanical and hydraulic response of a fractured crystalline rock mass to a period of glaciation. The primary purpose of this numerical study is to investigate whether transient events associated with a glacial cycle could significantly influence the performance of a deep geological repository in a crystalline shield setting. A conceptual site-scale (tens of kilometres) hydro-mechanical (HM) model was assembled based primarily on site-specific litho-structural, hydrogeological and geomechanical data from the Whiteshell Research Area in the Canadian Shield, with simplification and generalization. Continental glaciological modelling of the Laurentide ice sheet through the last glacial cycle lasting approximately 100,000 years suggests that this site was glaciated at about 60 ka and between about 22.5 ka and 11 ka before present with maximum ice sheet thickness reaching 2,500 m and maximum basal water pressure head reaching 2000 m. The ice-sheet/drainage model was scaled down to generate spatially and temporally variable hydraulic and mechanical glaciated surface boundary conditions for site-scale subsurface HM modelling and permafrost modelling. Under extreme periglacial conditions permafrost was able to develop down to the assumed 500-m repository horizon. Two- and three-dimensional coupled HM finite-element simulations indicate: during ice-sheet advance there is rapid rise in hydraulic head, high transient hydraulic gradients and high groundwater velocities 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than under nonglacial conditions; surface water recharges deeper

  16. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. The Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Responses to a Glacial Cycle and their Potential Implications for Deep Geological Disposal of Nuclear Fuel Waste in a Fractured Crystalline Rock Mass. Report of BMT3/WP4

    Chan, T.; Stanchell, F.W.; Christiansson, R.; Boulton, G.S.; Mas lvars, D.

    2005-02-01

    A number of studies related to past and on-going deep repository performance assessments have identified glaciation/deglaciation as major future events in the next few hundred thousand years capable of causing significant impact on the long term performance of the repository system. Benchmark Test 3 (BMT3) of the international DECOVALEX III project has been designed to provide an illustrative example that explores the mechanical and hydraulic response of a fractured crystalline rock mass to a period of glaciation. The primary purpose of this numerical study is to investigate whether transient events associated with a glacial cycle could significantly influence the performance of a deep geological repository in a crystalline shield setting. A conceptual site-scale (tens of kilometres) hydro-mechanical (HM) model was assembled based primarily on site-specific litho-structural, hydrogeological and geomechanical data from the Whiteshell Research Area in the Canadian Shield, with simplification and generalization. Continental glaciological modelling of the Laurentide ice sheet through the last glacial cycle lasting approximately 100,000 years suggests that this site was glaciated at about 60 ka and between about 22.5 ka and 11 ka before present with maximum ice sheet thickness reaching 2,500 m and maximum basal water pressure head reaching 2000 m. The ice-sheet/drainage model was scaled down to generate spatially and temporally variable hydraulic and mechanical glaciated surface boundary conditions for site-scale subsurface HM modelling and permafrost modelling. Under extreme periglacial conditions permafrost was able to develop down to the assumed 500-m repository horizon. Two- and three-dimensional coupled HM finite-element simulations indicate: during ice-sheet advance there is rapid rise in hydraulic head, high transient hydraulic gradients and high groundwater velocities 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than under nonglacial conditions; surface water recharges deeper

  17. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Hakim, R.; Schulman, G. [Department of Nephrology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significat activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these dsata serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  18. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Hernanz-Schulman, M.; Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A.; Hakim, R.; Schulman, G.

    2000-01-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significant activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these data serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  19. Antithrombin III blood test

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  20. Effect of childhood physical abuse on cortisol stress response.

    Carpenter, Linda L; Shattuck, Thaddeus T; Tyrka, Audrey R; Geracioti, Thomas D; Price, Lawrence H

    2011-03-01

    Abuse and neglect are highly prevalent in children and have enduring neurobiological effects. Stressful early life environments perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which in turn may predispose to psychiatric disorders in adulthood. However, studies of childhood maltreatment and adult HPA function have not yet rigorously investigated the differential effects of maltreatment subtypes, including physical abuse. In this study, we sought to replicate our previous finding that childhood maltreatment was associated with attenuated cortisol responses to stress and determine whether the type of maltreatment was a determinant of the stress response. Salivary cortisol response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was examined in a non-clinical sample of women (n = 110). Subjects had no acute medical problems and were not seeking psychiatric treatment. Effects of five maltreatment types, as measured by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, on cortisol response to the TSST were investigated. To further examine the significant (p < 0.005) effect of one maltreatment type, women with childhood physical abuse (PA) (n = 20) were compared to those without past PA (n = 90). Women reporting childhood PA displayed a significantly blunted cortisol response to the TSST compared with subjects without PA, after controlling for estrogen use, age, other forms of maltreatment, and other potential confounds. There were no differences between PA and control groups with regard to physiological arousal during the stress challenge. In a non-clinical sample of women with minimal or no current psychopathology, physical abuse is associated with a blunted cortisol response to a psychosocial stress task.

  1. Effect of Mangifera Indica Leaves Extract on Growth Response of ...

    Effect of Mangifera indica leaves extracts on growth response of Oreochromis niloticus was evaluated for 42 days. 5 diets at approximately 40% crude protein containing varying levels of the extracts at 0%, 5%, 15% and 25% were formulated. These were fed to fingerlings of O. niloticus (mean weight, 5.25 – 6.05g) that were ...

  2. Computer security incident response team effectiveness : A needs assessment

    Kleij, R. van der; Kleinhuis, G.; Young, H.J.

    2017-01-01

    Computer security incident response teams (CSIRTs) respond to a computer security incident when the need arises. Failure of these teams can have far-reaching effects for the economy and national security. CSIRTs often have to work on an ad-hoc basis, in close cooperation with other teams, and in

  3. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine

    Juli Broggi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects. However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks’ carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers.

  4. the effects of legislation on corporate social responsibility in the ...

    RAYAN_

    This paper examines the effect of legislated Corporate Social Responsibility in the minerals and mines sector .... mining companies for shared commitment to the mining enterprise between the host communities and the ..... Even in some developing countries such as Chile, Botswana and Malaysia, good governance went a ...

  5. Effects of Different Student Response Modes on Science Learning

    Kho, Lee Sze; Chen, Chwen Jen

    2017-01-01

    Student response systems (SRSs) are wireless answering devices that enable students to provide simple real-time feedback to instructors. This study aims to evaluate the effects of different SRS interaction modes on elementary school students' science learning. Three interaction modes which include SRS Individual, SRS Collaborative, and Classroom…

  6. Effect of external noise on the current response in superlattices

    Suqing Duan; Wu Binyi; Wang Zhigang; Zhao Xiangeng

    2004-01-01

    Within the single-band model and the nearest-neighbor approximation we investigate the effect of external noise on the current response driven by dc-ac field which has a fluctuating component. We find the external noise can destroy the current resonant peaks. When the strength of the external noise becomes enough large, all the current resonant peaks will completely disappear

  7. Effect of Forewarning on Emotional Responses to a Horror Film.

    Cantor, Joanne; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study which used the heart rate of subjects as the measure of physiological arousal to assess the effect of forewarning on emotional reactions and physiological responses to a frightening television film. Results indicate that although forewarning did not significantly affect anxiety, it did promote more intense fright and upset. (MBR)

  8. Effect of silodosin on specific urinary symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia: analysis of international prostate symptom scores in 2 phase III clinical studies

    Lawrence A Hill

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Marc C Gittelman1, Leonard S Marks2, Lawrence A Hill3, Weining Volinn3, Gary Hoel31South Florida Medical Research, Aventura, Florida, USA; 2University of California at Los Angeles and Urological Sciences Research Foundation, Los Angeles, California, USA; 3Watson Laboratories, Salt Lake City, Utah, USAPurpose: Pooled results from 2 randomized, placebo-controlled, US phase III studies (NCT00224107, NCT00224120 showed that silodosin, a uroselective α-blocker, significantly improved International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. This analysis evaluated the effect of silodosin on each symptom assessed by IPSS questionnaire.Materials and methods: Study participants (N = 923 were men aged ≥50 years with IPSS ≥13 and Qmax 4–15 mL/s. They received silodosin 8 mg or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Patient responses to 7 IPSS questions were collected at weeks 0 (baseline, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 12 and scored on a 6-point scale. Efficacy of silodosin versus placebo was assessed by analysis of covariance.Results: For each symptom, the 2 treatment groups had similar mean baseline scores. Decrease in score from baseline (mean ± standard deviation to last observation was significantly greater with silodosin than with placebo for all symptoms (P < 0.005; symptom improvement with silodosin (versus placebo was greatest for weak stream (silodosin, -1.1 ± 1.4 versus placebo, -0.5 ± 1.2; P < 0.0001 and smallest for nocturia (silodosin, -0.6 ± 1.1 versus placebo, -0.4 ± 1.2; P = 0.0037. Compared with placebo, silodosin significantly improved nocturia within 1 week (silodosin, -0.5 ± 1.07 versus placebo, -0.3 ± 1.05; P = 0.009 and all other symptoms within 3 to 4 days (P < 0.01.Conclusions: Silodosin significantly improved all BPH-associated symptoms assessed by IPSS questionnaire within the first week of treatment. All improvements were maintained over the 12-week study period.Keywords: BPH, symptoms

  9. Impact of Fe(III) as an effective electron-shuttle mediator for enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in microbial fuel cells: Reduction of diffusional resistances and cathode overpotentials

    Wang, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Huang, Liping, E-mail: lipinghuang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Pan, Yuzhen [College of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Quan, Xie [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li Puma, Gianluca, E-mail: g.lipuma@lboro.ac.uk [Environmental Nanocatalysis & Photoreaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Fe(III) shuttles electrons for enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs. • The coulombic efficiency increases by 1.6 fold in the presence of Fe(III). • The reduction of Cr(VI) occurs via an indirect Fe(III) mediation mechanism. • Fe(III) decreases the diffusional resistances and the cathode overpotentials. - Abstract: The role of Fe(III) was investigated as an electron-shuttle mediator to enhance the reduction rate of the toxic heavy metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in wastewaters, using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The direct reduction of chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup −}) and dichromate (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2−}) anions in MFCs was hampered by the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged cathode and Cr(VI) functional groups. In contrast, in the presence of Fe(III), the conversion of Cr(VI) and the cathodic coulombic efficiency in the MFCs were 65.6% and 81.7%, respectively, 1.6 times and 1.4 folds as those recorded in the absence of Fe(III). Multiple analytical approaches, including linear sweep voltammetry, Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and kinetic calculations demonstrated that the complete reduction of Cr(VI) occurred through an indirect mechanism mediated by Fe(III). The direct reduction of Cr(VI) with cathode electrons in the presence of Fe(III) was insignificant. Fe(III) played a critical role in decreasing both the diffusional resistance of Cr(VI) species and the overpotential for Cr(VI) reduction. This study demonstrated that the reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs was effective in the presence of Fe(III), providing an alternative and environmentally benign approach for efficient remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated sites with simultaneous production of renewable energy.

  10. Impact of Fe(III) as an effective electron-shuttle mediator for enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in microbial fuel cells: Reduction of diffusional resistances and cathode overpotentials

    Wang, Qiang; Huang, Liping; Pan, Yuzhen; Quan, Xie; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe(III) shuttles electrons for enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs. • The coulombic efficiency increases by 1.6 fold in the presence of Fe(III). • The reduction of Cr(VI) occurs via an indirect Fe(III) mediation mechanism. • Fe(III) decreases the diffusional resistances and the cathode overpotentials. - Abstract: The role of Fe(III) was investigated as an electron-shuttle mediator to enhance the reduction rate of the toxic heavy metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in wastewaters, using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The direct reduction of chromate (CrO_4"−) and dichromate (Cr_2O_7"2"−) anions in MFCs was hampered by the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged cathode and Cr(VI) functional groups. In contrast, in the presence of Fe(III), the conversion of Cr(VI) and the cathodic coulombic efficiency in the MFCs were 65.6% and 81.7%, respectively, 1.6 times and 1.4 folds as those recorded in the absence of Fe(III). Multiple analytical approaches, including linear sweep voltammetry, Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and kinetic calculations demonstrated that the complete reduction of Cr(VI) occurred through an indirect mechanism mediated by Fe(III). The direct reduction of Cr(VI) with cathode electrons in the presence of Fe(III) was insignificant. Fe(III) played a critical role in decreasing both the diffusional resistance of Cr(VI) species and the overpotential for Cr(VI) reduction. This study demonstrated that the reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs was effective in the presence of Fe(III), providing an alternative and environmentally benign approach for efficient remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated sites with simultaneous production of renewable energy.

  11. Sparkle/PM3 for the modeling of europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2009-01-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes. The validation procedure was carried out using only high quality crystallographic structures, for a total of ninety-six Eu(III) complexes, seventy Gd(III) complexes, and forty-two Tb(III) complexes. The Sparkle/PM3 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is: 0.080 A for Eu(III); 0.063 A for Gd(III); and 0.070 A for Tb(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.082 A, 0.061 A, and 0.068 A respectively, indicating they are all comparable parameterizations. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective core potential full geometry optimization calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Finally, we report a preliminary attempt to show that Sparkle/PM3 geometry predictions are reliable. For one of the Eu(III) complexes, BAFZEO, we created hundreds of different input geometries by randomly varying the distances and angles of the ligands to the central Eu(III) ion, which were all subsequently fully optimized. A significant trend was unveiled, indicating that more accurate local minima geometries cluster at lower total energies, thus reinforcing the validity of sparkle model calculations. (author)

  12. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) to more..

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) more...

  13. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

  14. Extraction of Eu(III) by dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid and synergistic effects of crown ethers and trioctylphosphine oxide

    Ramadan, A.; Khalifa, S.M.; Mahmoud, M.; Souka, N.

    1993-01-01

    The extraction of Eu(III) by dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) in benzene from nitrate and perchlorate solutions has been investigated. For nitrate solutions the ionic strength of the aqueous phase was kept constant at 0.1M using NaNO 3 -HNO 3 mixtures. The Eu distribution was measured at different temperatures. The following stoichiometric formulae for the Eu species in benzene were derived: Eu(NO 3 )(H n-1 (DNNS) n ) 2 and Eu(H n-1 (DNNS) n )3, from the nitrate and perchlorate medium respectively (n being a small number, e.g. 1,2 or 3). The equilibrium constants were calculated and the thermodynamic parameters of the system were determined. When adding dibenzo-24-crown-8, dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 or trioctylphosphine oxide, no synergism, but rather antagonism was observed. (author) 14 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Climate Change Effects on Agriculture: Economic Responses to Biophysical Shocks

    Nelson, Gerald C.; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald D.; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and thus directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's representative concentration pathway with end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 W/m(sup 2). The mean biophysical yield effect with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17% reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11%, increase area of major crops by 11%, and reduce consumption by 3%. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences include model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

  16. Effects of Mg/Ga and V/III source ratios on hole concentration of N-polar (000\\bar{1}) p-type GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    Nonoda, Ryohei; Shojiki, Kanako; Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Katayama, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of growth conditions such as Mg/Ga and V/III ratios on the properties of N-polar (000\\bar{1}) p-type GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy were studied. Photoluminescence spectra from Mg-doped GaN depended on Mg/Ga and V/III ratios. For the lightly doped samples, the band-to-acceptor emission was observed at 3.3 eV and its relative intensity decreased with increasing V/III ratio. For the heavily doped samples, the donor-acceptor pair emission was observed at 2.8 eV and its peak intensity monotonically decreased with V/III ratio. The hole concentration was maximum for the Mg/Ga ratio. This is the same tendency as in group-III polar (0001) growth. The V/III ratio also reduced the hole concentration. The higher V/III ratio reduced the concentration of residual donors such as oxygen by substituting nitrogen atoms. The surface became rougher with increasing V/III ratio and the hillock density increased.

  17. Pressure/cross-sectional area relations in the proximal urethra of healthy males. Part III: the time dependent pressure response following forced dilation: standardization of a technique

    Bagi, Per

    2002-01-01

    (beta) are time constants. The size and velocity of dilation, as well as the degree of distension before dilation, proved of significance for the magnitude of the pressure response. The characteristics of the pressure response are given by the properties of the periluminal structures strained during dilation......, and are thus predominantly determined of elastic, collagen, muscular, and glandular components. However, a high degree of relaxation after straining, and a modest stiffness, indicates that the muscular component dominates the response. The significance of the prostatic tissues remains unclear....

  18. Effectiveness of Counter-Trafficking Response in Albania

    Meçe Merita H.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human trafficking is a new phenomenon of Albanian post-socialist society which significantly increased during the difficult years of its transformation from centralized state-led economy to market economy. Both economic and political instability contributed to its size, nature and multiple dynamics. Drawing on a rights-based approach to human trafficking, this paper examines the effectiveness of the counter-trafficking response of the Albanian government with a special emphasis on prevention, protection and prosecution. Using secondary data and reviewing various country strategic documents, it highlights a range of weaknesses and challenges which have hindered its effectiveness over years. It concludes that successful and effective counter-trafficking response requires well rounded and coordinated gender sensitive, victim-centred, holistic and human rights-based efforts. Combined with adequate law enforcement, they will sustainably tackle the full spectrum of this problem.

  19. Thalamic VPM nucleus in the behaving monkey. III. Effects of reversible inactivation by lidocaine on thermal and mechanical discrimination.

    Duncan, G H; Bushnell, M C; Oliveras, J L; Bastrash, N; Tremblay, N

    1993-11-01

    1. The present study evaluates the necessity of the ventroposterior medial thalamic nucleus (VPM) for discrimination of the intensity of noxious heating, innocuous cooling, and innocuous tactile (airpuff) stimulation of the maxillary skin. 2. Two rhesus monkeys were trained to detect small differences (Lidocaine hydrochloride (2%) was microinjected into regions of thalamus where single-unit recordings had identified neuronal responses to the noxious heating and/or cooling stimuli. The effectiveness of the anesthetic blockade was monitored by multiunit recordings using microelectrodes positioned 1-3 mm from the orifice of the injection cannula. The monkey's ability to detect near-threshold changes in stimulus intensity was compared before and after each injection. 3. During six experimental sessions, single injections of 1-4 microliters lidocaine near the dorsomedial border of VPM did not significantly alter the monkey's ability to detect small changes in the intensity of noxious heat, cool, airpuff, or visual stimuli despite neurophysiological evidence that spontaneous neuronal activity was blocked within parts of VPM. 4. During three experiments, dual simultaneous microinjections of lidocaine (delivered through 2 microcannulae separated by approximately 1 mm) resulted in profound deficits in noxious heat discrimination, with lesser deficits in cool and airpuff discrimination; visual discrimination was never altered. Monitoring of adjacent microelectrodes revealed that although activity ventral to the injection sites was blocked, activity in medial thalamic nuclei, implicated in nociceptive processing, was probably not altered by these injections. 5. These data suggest that VPM is important for the perception of noxious and innocuous thermal stimuli as well as for the perception of tactile stimuli. However, considering the ineffectiveness of small single microinjections of lidocaine, it appears that some critical proportion of VPM must be inactivated to disrupt

  20. The Effect of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy on Overall Survival in 237 Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Zhao Lujun; Hayman, James; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Kong Fengming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and their interaction in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 237 consecutive Stage III NSCLC patients were evaluated. Median follow-up was 69.0 months. Patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone (n = 106), sequential chemoradiation (n = 69), or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Radiation dose ranged from 30 to 102.9 Gy (median 60 Gy), corresponding to a bioequivalent dose (BED) of 39 to 124.5 Gy (median 72 Gy). Results: The median OS of the entire cohort was 12.6 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rates were 22.4% and 10.0%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression model demonstrated that Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.020), weight loss < 5% (p = 0.017), chemotherapy (yes vs. no), sequence of chemoradiation (sequential vs. concurrent; p < 0.001), and BED (p < 0.001) were significant predictors of OS. For patients treated with RT alone, sequential chemoradiation, and concurrent chemoradiation, median survival was 7.4, 14.9, and 15.8 months, and 5-year OS was 3.3%, 7.5%, and 19.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). The effect of higher radiation doses on survival was independent of whether chemotherapy was given. Conclusion: Radiation dose and use of chemotherapy are independent predictors of OS in Stage III NSCLC, and concurrent chemoradiation is associated with the best survival. There is no interaction between RT dose and chemotherapy.

  1. [Analysis on the long-term effects of modified double endobutton technique in the treatment of Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations].

    Yan, Rui-Jian; Lu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the long-term clinical effects of modified double Endobutton technique for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III. A retrospective study was done in 42 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III treated with modified double Endobutton technique from December 2008 to December 2010. There were 24 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21 to 56 years old (averaged, 32.5 years old). All the patients were treated with open reduction, coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using double Endobutton technique, and repair of acromioclavicular ligament. The Karlsson system was used to evaluate therapeutic effects. The distance from coracoid to clavicle was measured to evaluate reduction loss. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 2.0 to 3.2 years (averaged,2.4 years). According to Karlsson system, 32 patients got an A degree and 10 patients got a B degree at three months post-operatively; 26 patients got an A degree and 16 patients got a B degree at the latest follow-up; 6 patients got an A degree at 3 months after operation lowered to B degree at the latest follow-up. The coracoid-clavicle distance increased from (26.91 +/- 0.91) mm at 3 months after operation to (27.41 +/- 1.10) mm at the latest follow-up. Te patients treated with over-reduction during operation or with heavy physical labour work after operation had obvious widened coracoid-clavicle distance. Bone absorption was found around the plate in most cases, mainly in the clavicular side. Treatment for acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III with modified double Endobutton technique has satisfactory early clinical results. But with time passing, loss of reduction and bone absorption around the plate could be observed, and clinical outcomes of some cases downgrade during the long-term follow-up.

  2. Equatorial electrojet and its response to external electromagnetic effects

    Bespalov, P. A.; Savina, O. N.

    2012-09-01

    In the quiet low-latitude Earth's ionosphere, a sufficiently developed current system that is responsible for the Sq magnetic-field variations is formed in quiet Sun days under the action of tidal streams. The density of the corresponding currents is maximum in the midday hours at the equatorial latitudes, where the so-called equatorial electrojet is formed. In this work, we discuss the nature of the equatorial electrojet. This paper studies the value of its response to external effects. First of all, it is concerned with estimating the possibility of using the equatorial electrojet for generating low-frequency electromagnetic signals during periodic heating of the ionosphere by the heating-facility radiation. The equatorial electrojet can also produce electrodynamic response to the natural atmospheric processes, e.g., an acoustic-gravity wave.

  3. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  4. Spectral responses in near-infrared of the mixed compounds III-V ternary and quaternary, based on GaSb

    Mbow, B.; Rezzoug, N.; Peremarti, C.; Mezerreg, A.; Llinares, C.

    1993-09-01

    From the simulation of the spectral response of the different photodetector devices elaborated in our laboratory (C.E.M.), we determine the influence of geometrical and physical parameters in order to achieve the best photodetector operating at the wavelength 2.55 μm. In this paper we present: Gao{0.6}In{0.4}Sbn/Ga{0.6}In{0.4}Sbp homojunctions matched on GaSbp substrate, Ga{0.75}In{0.25}As{0.23}Sbp/GaSbn ternary heterojunction and GaSbp/Ga{0.74}In{0.26}As{0.23}Sb0.77p/GaSbn quaternary heterojunction. The GaSbp layer with an energy band gap greater than Ga{0.74}In{0.26}As{0.23}Sb0.77p optical gap will act as a window, reducing the effect of surface recombinaison. Results of the simulation are compared to experimental curves to determine the values of photoelectrical parameters (diffusion length, recombination velocity at the surface ...). Les mesures de réponse spectrale dans la gamme [0,4 eV à 2 eV] ont été effectuées sur des homojonctions, Ga{0,6}In{0,4}Sbn/Ga{0,6}In{0,4}Sbp déposées sur un substrat de GaSb et des hétérostructures ternaires Ga{0,75}In{0,25}Sbp/GaSbn et quaternaires GaSbp/Ga{0,74}In{0,26}As{0,23}Sb0,77p/GaSbn. La couche de GaSbp avec un gap plus grand que celui de Ga{0,74}In{0,26}As{0,23}Sb0,77p joue le rôle d'effet fenêtre. En s'appuyant sur les résultats de la simulation et en accordant les spectres expérimentaux aux spectres théoriques, on détermine les valeurs des paramètres photoélectriques (longueurs de diffusion, les vitesses de recombinaison en surface ... ) intervenant dans le rendement quantique.

  5. Quality of life after radiation therapy of cerebral low-grade gliomas of the adult: results of a randomised Phase III trial on dose response (EORTC trial 22844)

    Kiebert, G.M. [MEDTAP International, 27 Gilbert Street, London (United Kingdom); Curran, D. [EORTC Data Centre Brussels (Belgium); Aaronson, N.K. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire, Grenoble (France); Menten, J. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven (Belgium); Rutten, E.H.J.M. [University Hospital St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nordman, E. [Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Silvestre, M.E. [Hospital Santa Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Pierart, M. [EORTC Data Centre, Brussels (Belgium); Karim, A.B.M.F. [Free University Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    In 1985, the EORTC Radiotherapy Co-operative Group launched a randomised phase III study comparing high-dose (59.4 Gy in 6.5 weeks) versus low-dose (45 Gy in 5 weeks) radiotherapy with conventional techniques in patients diagnosed with low-grade cerebral glioma. The primary endpoint of the study was survival. No difference in survival was observed between the two treatment strategies. A quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of 47 items assessing a range of physical, psychological, social, and symptom domains was included in the trial to measure the impact of treatment over time. Patients who received high-dose radiotherapy tended to report lower levels of functioning and more symptom burden following completion of radiotherapy. These group differences were statistically significant for fatigue/malaise and insomnia immediately after radiotherapy and in leisure time and emotional functioning at 7-15 months after randomisation. These findings suggest that for conventional radiotherapy for low-grade cerebral glioma, a schedule of 45 Gy in 5 weeks not only saves valuable resources, but also spares patients a prolonged treatment at no loss of clinical efficacy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Quality of life after radiation therapy of cerebral low-grade gliomas of the adult: results of a randomised Phase III trial on dose response (EORTC trial 22844)

    Kiebert, G.M.; Curran, D.; Aaronson, N.K.; Bolla, M.; Menten, J.; Rutten, E.H.J.M.; Nordman, E.; Silvestre, M.E.; Pierart, M.; Karim, A.B.M.F.

    1998-01-01

    In 1985, the EORTC Radiotherapy Co-operative Group launched a randomised phase III study comparing high-dose (59.4 Gy in 6.5 weeks) versus low-dose (45 Gy in 5 weeks) radiotherapy with conventional techniques in patients diagnosed with low-grade cerebral glioma. The primary endpoint of the study was survival. No difference in survival was observed between the two treatment strategies. A quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of 47 items assessing a range of physical, psychological, social, and symptom domains was included in the trial to measure the impact of treatment over time. Patients who received high-dose radiotherapy tended to report lower levels of functioning and more symptom burden following completion of radiotherapy. These group differences were statistically significant for fatigue/malaise and insomnia immediately after radiotherapy and in leisure time and emotional functioning at 7-15 months after randomisation. These findings suggest that for conventional radiotherapy for low-grade cerebral glioma, a schedule of 45 Gy in 5 weeks not only saves valuable resources, but also spares patients a prolonged treatment at no loss of clinical efficacy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  8. Neuropharmacologic responses of animals to extreme effects: exposure to radiation

    Mikhajlichenko, P.P.; Tikhonchuk, V.S.; Ushakov, I.B.

    1990-01-01

    The functional state of neurochemical structures of male mice was investigated after their gamma-irradiation with 137 Cs (1.9 Gy/min) at a dose of 100 Gy. The animals were treated with the following drugs that produce selective effects on specific receptors: galanthamine, amizyl, arpenal, phenamine, phentolamine and obsidan, haloperidol, apomorphine, phenazepam, phenibut and strychnin. The results point to the development of heterologous desensibilization of receptors at early post-irradiation periods. The high effectiveness of agonists and antagonists of CNS transmitters in the nonirradiated animals and their low effectiveness in the irradiated animals and their low effectiveness in the irradiated animals may be considered as an indicator of post-radiation injury of specific receptors. These neuropharmacological interactions may obviously be modified in response to the combined effects of space flight factors

  9. Comparison of incidences of normal tissue complications with tumor response in a phase III trial comparing heat plus radiation to radiation alone

    Dewhirst, M.W.; Sim, D.A.; Grochowski, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    The success of hyperthermia (/sup Δ/) as an adjuvant to radiation (XRT) will depend on whether the increase in tumor control is greater than that for normal tissue reactions. One hundred and thirty dogs and cats were stratified by histology and randomized to receive XRT (460 rads per fraction, two fractions per week, for eight fractions) or /sup Δ/ + XRT (30 min. at 44 +-2 0 C; one fraction per week, four fractions; immediately prior to XRT). Heat induced changes in tumor and normal tissue responses were made by comparing ratios of incidence for /sup Δ/ + XRT and XRT alone (TRR; Thermal Relative Risk). Change in tumor response duration was calculated from statistical analysis of response duration curves (RRR; Relative Relapse Rate). Heat increased early normal tissue reactions (moist desquamation and mucositis by a factor of 1.08. Tumor complete response, by comparison, was significantly improved (TRR = 2.12, p < .001). Late skin fibrosis was also increased (TRR = 1.51), but the prolongation in tumor response was greater (RRR 1.85). The degree of thermal enhancement for all tissues was dependent on the minimum temperature achieved on the first treatment, but the values for tumor were consistently greater than those achieved for normal tissues

  10. Response inhibition under alcohol: effects of cognitive and motivational conflict.

    Fillmore, M T; Vogel-Sprott, M

    2000-03-01

    This experiment tested the effect of cognitive and motivational conflict on response inhibition under alcohol. Fifty-six male social drinkers were randomly assigned to one of eight groups (n = 8). Four pairs of groups received 0.62 g/kg of alcohol, or a placebo, and each pair performed a go/stop choice reaction time task under one of four conflict conditions. One condition (C) produced cognitive conflict by presenting "go" and "stop" signals in the task. Another condition (IR) added motivational conflict by administering an equal monetary reward for inhibiting responses to stop-signals, and for responding to go-signals. The remaining two conditions resolved the motivational conflict by administering the monetary reward only for inhibitions (I), or only for responses (R). Compared with placebo, alcohol reduced inhibitions (i.e., impaired inhibitory control) under cognitive conflict (C; p = .041) and under motivational conflict (IR; p = .012). No significant effect of alcohol on inhibitions was observed in conditions where conflict was resolved (i.e., I and R). The study shows that alcohol can reduce the ability to inhibit a response. However, impaired inhibitory control is not an inevitable outcome of the drug action, because it can be counteracted by the consequences of behavior in the situation.

  11. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results.

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-28

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  12. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Sasai, Keisuke; Veld, Aart A. van't; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D_2 − D_9_8, where D_2 and D_9_8 are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to 98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects have limited impact on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and

  13. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  14. Does transcutaneous nerve stimulation have effect on sympathetic skin response?

    Okuyucu, E Esra; Turhanoğlu, Ayşe Dicle; Guntel, Murat; Yılmazer, Serkan; Savaş, Nazan; Mansuroğlu, Ayhan

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on the sympathetic nerve system by sympathetic skin response test. Fifty-five healthy volunteers received either: (i) 30minutes TENS (25 participants) (ii) 30minutes sham TENS (30 participants) and SSR test was performed pre- and post-TENS. The mean values of latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of five consecutive SSRs were calculated. A significant amplitude difference was found between TENS and sham TENS group both in right and left hand (p=0.04, p=0.01, respectively). However there was no significant latancy difference between two groups (p>0.05 ). TENS has an inhibitory effect on elicited SNS responses when compared with sham TENS control group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On the effect of response transformations in sequential parameter optimization.

    Wagner, Tobias; Wessing, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Parameter tuning of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is attracting more and more interest. In particular, the sequential parameter optimization (SPO) framework for the model-assisted tuning of stochastic optimizers has resulted in established parameter tuning algorithms. In this paper, we enhance the SPO framework by introducing transformation steps before the response aggregation and before the actual modeling. Based on design-of-experiments techniques, we empirically analyze the effect of integrating different transformations. We show that in particular, a rank transformation of the responses provides significant improvements. A deeper analysis of the resulting models and additional experiments with adaptive procedures indicates that the rank and the Box-Cox transformation are able to improve the properties of the resultant distributions with respect to symmetry and normality of the residuals. Moreover, model-based effect plots document a higher discriminatory power obtained by the rank transformation.

  16. Effects of air humidity on ionization chamber response

    Meger, C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Venci, R.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effect of air humidity on four different ionization chamber cap materials verified earlier studies (Kristensen and Sundbom, 1981; Mijnheer et al., 1983) and extended our understanding of the problem. We found nylon and A-150 plastic caps swell as they absorb water from the air. This accounts for as much as 2.5% increase in ionization response. Graphite chambers readily absorb and desorb water from the air. This creates a problem in maintaining dry air in a wet graphite chamber. Humid air has a different density and W value than dry air (Niatel, 1969, 1975). This decreases the charge collected in a wet graphite chamber. We observe a decrease in response of approximately 2%, a value greater than can be accounted for by these effects alone. Polyethylene chambers are unaffected by humid air. 4 refs., 9 figs

  17. Defluoridation of drinking water by combined electrocoagulation: effects of the molar ratio of alkalinity and fluoride to Al(III).

    Zhao, Hua-Zhang; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2009-03-01

    The defluoridation efficiency (epsilon(F)) of electrocoagulation (EC) is closely related to the pH level of the F(-)-containing solution. The pH level usually needs to be adjusted by adding acid in order to obtain the highest epsilon(F) for the F(-)-containing groundwater. The use of combined EC (CEC), which is the combination of chemical coagulation with EC, was proposed to remove fluoride from drinking water for the first time in this study. The optimal scheme for the design and operation of CEC were obtained through experiments on the treatment of F(-)-containing groundwater. It was found, with OH(-) being the only alkalinity of the raw water, that the highest efficiency would be obtained when the molar ratio of alkalinity and fluoride to Al(III) (gamma(Alkalinity+F)) was controlled at 3.0. However, when the raw water contained HCO(3)(-) alkalinity, a correction coefficient was needed to correct the concentration of HCO(3)(-) to obtain the optimal defluoridation condition of gamma(Alkalinity+F)=3.0 for CEC. The correction coefficient of HCO(3)(-) concentration was concluded as 0.60 from the experiment. For the practical F(-)-containing groundwater treatment, CEC can achieve similar epsilon(F) as an acid-adding EC process. The consumption of aluminum electrode was decreased in CEC. The energy consumption also declined greatly in CEC, which is less than one third of that in the acid-adding EC process.

  18. Effect of Topical Probiotic on MMP-13 and Collagen III Expression in the Dermis Layer of Male Rats Irradiated with Ultraviolet-B

    Vita M. Tawaran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a big interest in the use of topical probiotic preparations for skin health. One of the probiotics therurapeutic benefits is used as anti-aging. During aging, there is stimulation of activator protein-1 (AP-1 which is a transcription factor that inhibits the production of collagen and AP-1 supports the breakdown of collagen by enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. As administration of oral Lactobacillus plantarum could inhibit skin aging by lowering the activity of MMP, so the collagen degradation can be derived so probably topical use of Lactobacillus plantarum may give more prominent effects. We used 24 male rats Sprague-Dawley strain as research objects. This study was divided into two groups, the treatment and control groups. The shaved dorsal skin of rats were irradiated with UVB three times a week for 4 weeks with total irradiation dose of 840 mJ/cm2. Skin cream, containing 247.27x107 CFU non-replicating Lactobacillus plantarum FNCC 0020, was smeared on the treatment group, two times daily, whereas the control group did not receive any treatment. Skin biopsies were done at the end of the study for examination of MMP-13 and collagen III expressions. Intensity, distribution, and histoscore of MMP-13 between the treatment and the control group showed no significant difference (p>0.05. The treatment group showed a significant different in the intensity of collagen III with the density distribution of 20–50% and the highest density was 80% (p<0.01. Administration of topical cream L. plantarum FNCC 0020 increased the expression of collagen III density distribution, but not the MMP-13 expression.

  19. Endovascular Therapy is Effective and Safe for Patients with Severe Ischemic Stroke: Pooled Analysis of IMS III and MR CLEAN Data

    Broderick, Joseph P.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Dippel, Diederik W.J.; Foster, Lydia D.; Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Majoie, Charles B.L.M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lingsma, Hester F.; Hill, Michael D.; Roozenbeek, Bob; Jauch, Edward C.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Yan, Bernard; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Molina, Carlos A.; Goyal, Mayank; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Mazighi, Mikael; Engelter, Stefan T.; Anderson, Craig S.; Spilker, Judith; Carrozzella, Janice; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Janis, L. Scott; Simpson, Kit

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We assessed the effect of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke patients with severe neurological deficit (NIHSS ≥20) following a pre-specified analysis plan. Methods The pooled analysis of the IMS III and MR CLEAN trial included participants with an NIHSS ≥20 prior to intravenous (IV) t-PA treatment (IMS III) or randomization (MR CLEAN) who were treated with IV t-PA ≤ 3 hours of stroke onset. Our hypothesis was that participants with severe stroke randomized to endovascular therapy following IV t-PA would have improved 90-day outcome (distribution of modified Rankin scale [mRS] scores), as compared to those who received IV t-PA alone. Results Among 342 participants in the pooled analysis (194 from IMS III, 148 from MR CLEAN), an ordinal logistic regression model showed that the endovascular group had superior 90-day outcome compared to the IV t-PA group (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-2.66). In the logistic regression model of the dichotomous outcome (mRS 0-2, or ‘functional independence’), the endovascular group had superior outcomes (aOR 1.97; 95% CI 1.09-3.56). Functional independence (mRS ≤2) at 90 days was 25% in the endovascular group as compared to 14% in the IV t-PA group. Conclusions Endovascular therapy following IV t-PA within 3 hours of symptom onset improves functional outcome at 90 days after severe ischemic stroke. PMID:26486865

  20. EGFR and its mutant EGFRvIII as modulators of tumor cell radiosensitivity

    Lammering, G.; Hewit, T.H.; Contessa, J.N.; Hawkins, W.; Lin, P.S.; Valerie, K.; Mikkelsen, R.; Dent, P.; Schmidt-Ullrich, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Exposure of human carcinoma and malignant glioma cells to ionizing radiation (IR)activates EGFR,which as a consequence mediates a cytoprotective response. We have demonstrated that expression of a dominant negative mutant, EGFR-CD533 disrupts this cytoprotective response, resulting in significant radiosensitization. During studies of in vivo radiosensitization with intratumoral delivery of the Adenovirus (Ad) vector, Ad-EGFR-CD533, it became apparent that xenografts from human carcinoma and malignant glioma cells invariably expressed the constitutively active EGFR mutant, EGFRvIII. This mutant EGFRvIII is frequently found in vivo in glioblastoma, breast, prostate, lung and ovarian carcinoma, but does not appear to be expressed in tumor cells under in vitro conditions. The functional consequences of EGFRvIII expression on tumor cell radiation responses are currently unknown. We have therefore investigated in a transient transfection cell system the responses of EGFRvIII and downstream signal transduction pathways to IR. In addition, the capacity of EGFR-CD533 to disrupt the function of EGFRvIII was tested. Materials and Methods: The MDA-MB-231, U-87 MG and U-373 MG cell lines were established as tumors and then intratumorally transduced with Ad-EGFR-CD533 or Ad-LacZ (control vector). The transduction efficiency was > 40% in MDA-MB-231 tumors and reached > 70% in the glioma xenografts. Radiosensitivity was measured by ex vivo colony formation and growth delay assays. The functional consequences of EGFRvIII expression on cellular IR responses were studied in transiently transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells because tumor cells do not express EGFRvIII in vitro. Transfection with null vectors and vectors encoding either EGFRvIII or EGFR were performed and similar protein expression levels were verified by Western blot analyses. Results: The radiosensitivity of Ad-EGFR-CD533 transduced tumors was significantly increased compared with Ad-LacZ transduced

  1. Dominant gain-of-function mutations in transmembrane domain III of ERS1 and ETR1 suggest a novel role for this domain in regulating the magnitude of ethylene response in Arabidopsis.

    Deslauriers, Stephen D; Alvarez, Ashley A; Lacey, Randy F; Binder, Brad M; Larsen, Paul B

    2015-10-01

    Prior work resulted in identification of an Arabidopsis mutant, eer5-1, with extreme ethylene response in conjunction with failure to induce a subset of ethylene-responsive genes, including AtEBP. EER5, which is a TREX-2 homolog that is part of a nucleoporin complex, functions as part of a cryptic aspect of the ethylene signaling pathway that is required for regulating the magnitude of ethylene response. A suppressor mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify second site mutations that could restore the growth of ethylene-treated eer5-1 to wild-type levels. A dominant gain-of-function mutation in the ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE SENSOR 1 (ERS1) was identified, with the ers1-4 mutation being located in transmembrane domain III at a point nearly equivalent to the previously described etr1-2 mutation in the other Arabidopsis subfamily I ethylene receptor, ETHYLENE RESPONSE 1 (ETR1). Although both ers1-4 and etr1-2 partially suppress the ethylene hypersensitivity of eer5-1 and are at least in part REVERSION TO ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY 1 (RTE1)-dependent, ers1-4 was additionally found to restore the expression of AtEBP in ers1-4;eer5-1 etiolated seedlings after ethylene treatment in an EIN3-dependent manner. Our work indicates that ERS1-regulated expression of a subset of ethylene-responsive genes is related to controlling the magnitude of ethylene response, with hyperinduction of these genes correlated with reduced ethylene-dependent growth inhibition. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Giving patients responsibility or fostering mutual response-ability: family physicians' constructions of effective chronic illness management.

    Thille, Patricia H; Russell, Grant M

    2010-10-01

    Current visions of family medicine and models of chronic illness management integrate evidence-based medicine with collaborative, patient-centered care, despite critiques that these constructs conflict with each other. With this potential conflict in mind, we applied a critical discursive psychology methodology to present discursive patterns articulated by 13 family physicians in Ontario, Canada, regarding care of patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Physicians constructed competing versions of the terms "effective chronic illness management" and "patient involvement." One construction integrated individual responsibility for health with primacy of "evidence," resulting in a conceptualization consistent with paternalistic care. The second constructed effective care as involving active partnership of physician and patient, implying a need to foster the ability of both practitioners and patients to respond to complex challenges as they arose. The former pattern is inconsistent with visions of family medicine and chronic illness management, whereas the latter embodies it.

  3. Uranium (III)-Plutonium (III) co-precipitation in molten chloride

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2018-02-01

    Co-management of the actinides in an integrated closed fuel cycle by a pyrochemical process is studied at the laboratory scale in France in the CEA-ATALANTE facility. In this context the co-precipitation of U(III) and Pu(III) by wet argon sparging in LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) molten salt at 705 °C is studied. Pu(III) is prepared in situ in the molten salt by carbochlorination of PuO2 and U(III) is then introduced as UCl3 after chlorine purge by argon to avoid any oxidation of uranium up to U(VI) by Cl2. The oxide conversion yield through wet argon sparging is quantitative. However, the preferential oxidation of U(III) in comparison to Pu(III) is responsible for a successive conversion of the two actinides, giving a mixture of UO2 and PuO2 oxides. Surprisingly, the conversion of sole Pu(III) in the same conditions leads to a mixture of PuO2 and PuOCl, characteristic of a partial oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV). This is in contrast with coconversion of U(III)-Pu(III) mixtures but in agreement with the conversion of Ce(III).

  4. Effects of Cr III and Pb on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Cd in tropical periphyton communities: Implications of pulsed metal exposures

    Bere, Taurai; Chia, Mathias Ahii; Tundisi, José Galizia

    2012-01-01

    Metal exposure pattern, timing, frequency, duration, recovery period, metal type and interactions, has obscured effects on periphyton communities in lotic systems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intermittent exposures of Cr III and Pb on Cd toxicity and bioaccumulation in tropical periphyton communities. Natural periphyton communities were transferred to artificial stream chambers and exposed to metal mixtures at different pulse timing, duration, frequency and recovery periods. Chlorophyll a, dry mass and metal accumulation kinetics were recorded. Cr and Pb decrease the toxic effects of Cd on periphyton communities. Periphyton has high Cd, Cr and Pb accumulation capacity. Cr and Pb reduced the levels of Cd sequestrated by periphyton communities. The closer the frequency and duration of the pulse is to a continuous exposure, the greater the effects of the contaminant on periphyton growth and metal bioaccumulation. Light increased toxic and accumulative effects of metals on the periphyton community. - Highlights: ► We investigated toxicity effects of pulsed metal exposures on bioaccumulation and toxicity in periphyton. ► High frequency of short duration pulses has effects equal to long duration exposures. ► Important role of light in modulating metal toxicity on periphyton demonstrated. ► Factors other than magnitude and duration must be considered in water quality criteria. ► Accurate prediction of metal effects on biofilms requires data on effluent variability. - The study highlights the importance of pulse timing, frequency, duration, recovery period and chemical type on aquatic life.

  5. The Effect of Music on the Human Stress Response

    Thoma, Myriam V.; La Marca, Roberto; Brönnimann, Rebecca; Finkel, Linda; Ehlert, Ulrike; Nater, Urs M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Music listening has been suggested to beneficially impact health via stress-reducing effects. However, the existing literature presents itself with a limited number of investigations and with discrepancies in reported findings that may result from methodological shortcomings (e.g. small sample size, no valid stressor). It was the aim of the current study to address this gap in knowledge and overcome previous shortcomings by thoroughly examining music effects across endocrine, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional domains of the human stress response. Methods Sixty healthy female volunteers (mean age = 25 years) were exposed to a standardized psychosocial stress test after having been randomly assigned to one of three different conditions prior to the stress test: 1) relaxing music (‘Miserere’, Allegri) (RM), 2) sound of rippling water (SW), and 3) rest without acoustic stimulation (R). Salivary cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), subjective stress perception and anxiety were repeatedly assessed in all subjects. We hypothesized that listening to RM prior to the stress test, compared to SW or R would result in a decreased stress response across all measured parameters. Results The three conditions significantly differed regarding cortisol response (p = 0.025) to the stressor, with highest concentrations in the RM and lowest in the SW condition. After the stressor, sAA (p=0.026) baseline values were reached considerably faster in the RM group than in the R group. HR and psychological measures did not significantly differ between groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that music listening impacted the psychobiological stress system. Listening to music prior to a standardized stressor predominantly affected the autonomic nervous system (in terms of a faster recovery), and to a lesser degree the endocrine and psychological stress response. These findings may help better understanding the

  6. Radiation effects on tumor-specific DTH response, 2

    Nobusawa, Hiroshi; Hachisu, Reiko.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor-specific immunity was induced in C3H mice by immunizing with syngeneic MH134 hepatoma cells. Radiation sensitivity of anti-tumor activity of immunized spleen cells were examined and compared with the radiation sensitivity of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-response. The spleen cells were irradiated in vitro, then mixed with the tumor cells. DTH-response intensity was determined from the footpad increment twenty-four hours after inoculation of tumor cells with immunized spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of the spleen cells, based on growth inhibition of tumor cells, was measured by a cytostatic test in vivo with diffusion chambers. Tumor-specific DTH response was suppressed dose-dependently in the range of 12-24 Gy irradiation. No suppression was observed below 12 Gy. Without irradiation, growth of tumor cells was inhibited by immunized spleen cells more effectively than by normal spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of immunized and normal spleen cells was diminished by irradiation doses of 20 Gy and 10 Gy, respectively. Comparing our report with others that analyzed the type of anti-tumor effector cells induced in this experimental system, we concluded that tumor-specific anti-tumor activity (tumor growth inhibition in vivo) that was radiosensitive at 10-20 Gy depended on a DTH-response. (author)

  7. The effect of sampling, diagnostic criteria and assessment procedures on the observed prevalence of DSM-III-R personality disorders among treated alcoholics.

    Verheul, R; Hartgers, C; Van den Brink, W; Koeter, M W

    1998-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. In a recent review of empirical studies on the prevalence of DSM-III-R personality disorders among substance abusers, wide ranges of prevalence rates for overall Axis II, antisocial personality disorder (APD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) were shown. Utilizing subsamples from within a single study population, the current report explores the effect of sampling, diagnostic criteria and assessment procedures on the observed prevalence of DSM-III-R personality disorders among treated alcoholics. Personality disorders were assessed with the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire Revised (PDQR) at two times of measurement (Time 1 n = 459; Time 2 n = 90). In addition, APD was measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI; n = 587). Finally, an unselected subgroup (n = 136) was interviewed with the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE). There were few differences between inpatients or outpatients or between males and females. Using the IPDE, the exclusion of substance-related pathology did not affect the prevalence estimate. However, the prevalence rates according to the PDQR varied greatly across age groups. In a representative subsample (n = 109), the prevalence rates also varied greatly across assessment methods (PDQR, 52% vs IPDE, 31%). The prevalence estimate of APD according to the CIDI was related to setting, gender, age group and the applied time-frame. These findings indicate the examined factors to be necessary qualifiers of prevalence estimates and, consequently, support the use of a multiple-criteria/multimethod assessment battery in research as well as in clinical work.

  8. Effect of Compressive Mode I on the Mixed Mode I/II Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of 42CrMo4

    Heirani, Hasan; Farhangdoost, Khalil

    2018-01-01

    Subsurface cracks in mechanical contact loading components are subjected to mixed mode I/II, so it is necessary to evaluate the fatigue behavior of materials under mixed mode loading. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation tests are performed with compact tension shear specimens for several stress intensity factor (SIF) ratios of mode I and mode II. The effect of compressive mode I loading on mixed mode I/II crack growth rate and fracture surface is investigated. Tests are carried out for the pure mode I, pure mode II, and two different mixed mode loading angles. On the basis of the experimental results, mixed mode crack growth rate parameters are proposed according to Tanaka and Richard with Paris' law. Results show neither Richard's nor Tanaka's equivalent SIFs are very useful because these SIFs depend strongly on the loading angle, but Richard's equivalent SIF formula is more suitable than Tanaka's formula. The compressive mode I causes the crack closure, and the friction force between the crack surfaces resists against the crack growth. In compressive loading with 45° angle, d a/d N increases as K eq decreases.

  9. The Effects of Comorbidity and Age on RTOG Study Enrollment in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Are Eligible for RTOG Studies

    Firat, Selim; Byhardt, Roger W.; Gore, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of measured comorbidity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) combined modality therapy (CMT) study enrollment in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-one patients with a Karnofsky Performance Score ≥70 and clinical Stage III NSCLC were analyzed retrospectively for comorbidity, RTOG study eligibility, and enrollment at initial consultation. Effect of comorbidity scores (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) were tested on patient selection for CMT, RTOG enrollment, and overall survival. Results: Comorbidity (Grade 4; p 2, p = 0.001), and weight loss (>5%, p = 0.001). Thirty-three patients (19%) were enrolled in a CMT RTOG study (Group 1). Forty-nine patients (29%) were eligible but not enrolled (Group 2), and 57 (33%) were ineligible (Group 3). The most common ineligibility reasons were weight loss (67%) and comorbidity in the exclusion criteria of the RTOG studies (63%). Group 1 patients were the youngest (p = 0.02), with the lowest comorbidity scores (p 2; p = 0.006) and age (≥70; p = 0.05) were independent factors influencing RTOG study enrollment in patients meeting study eligibility requirements (Groups 1 and 2). Conclusions: Comorbidity scales could be useful in stratification of patients in advanced lung cancer trials and interpretation of results particularly regarding the elderly population.

  10. Effects of orthognathic surgery for class III malocclusion on signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and on pressure pain thresholds of the jaw muscles.

    Farella, M; Michelotti, A; Bocchino, T; Cimino, R; Laino, A; Steenks, M H

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine the effects of orthognathic surgery on signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and on pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of the jaw muscles. Fourteen consecutive class III patients undergoing pre-surgical orthodontic treatment were treated by combined Le Fort I osteotomy and bilateral sagittal ramus osteotomy. The clinical examination included the assessment of signs and symptoms of TMD and the assessment of PPTs of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Anamnestic, clinical and algometric data were collected during five sessions over a 1-year period. Seven out of 14 patients presented with disc displacement with reduction at baseline, whereas four patients (two of them were new cases) did so at the end of follow up (p>0.05). None of the patients were diagnosed with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles at the beginning or end of follow up. PPTs of the masseter and temporalis muscles did not change significantly from baseline values throughout the whole study period. The occurrence of signs and symptoms of TMD fluctuates with an unpredictable pattern after orthognathic surgery for class III malocclusions.

  11. Decreased fracture rate, pharmacogenetics and BMD response in 79 Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta types I, III and IV treated with Pamidronate.

    Lindahl, K; Kindmark, A; Rubin, C-J; Malmgren, B; Grigelioniene, G; Söderhäll, S; Ljunggren, Ö; Åström, E

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited heterogeneous bone fragility disorder, usually caused by collagen I mutations. It is well established that bisphosphonate treatment increases lumbar spine (LS) bone mineral density (BMD), as well as improves vertebral geometry in severe OI; however, fracture reduction has been difficult to prove, pharmacogenetic studies are scarce, and it is not known at which age, or severity of disease, treatment should be initiated. COL1A1 and COL1A2 were analyzed in 79 children with OI (type I n=33, type III n=25 and type IV n=21) treated with Pamidronate. Data on LS BMD, height, and radiologically confirmed non-vertebral and vertebral fractures were collected prior to, and at several time points during treatment. An increase in LS BMD Z-score was observed for all types of OI, and a negative correlation to Δ LS BMD was observed for both age and LS BMD Z-score at treatment initiation. Supine height Z-scores were not affected by Pamidronate treatment, The fracture rate was reduced for all OI types at all time points during treatment (overall p4yrs Pamidronate. Twice as many boys as girls with OI type I were treated with Pamidronate, and the fracture rate the year prior treatment was 2.2 times higher for boys (p=0.0236). Greater Δ LS BMD, but smaller Δ fracture numbers were observed on Pamidronate for helical glycine mutations in COL1A1 vs. COL1A2. Vertebral compression fractures did not progress in any individual during treatment; however, they did not improve in 9%, and these individuals were all >11years of age at treatment initiation (p<0.0001). Pamidronate treatment in children with all types of OI increased LS BMD, decreased fracture rate, and improved vertebral compression fractures. Fracture reduction was prompt and maintained during treatment, irrespective of age at treatment initiation and collagen I mutation type. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymorphisms in folate-metabolizing enzymes and response to 5-fluorouracil among patients with stage II or III rectal cancer (INT-0144; SWOG 9304).

    Ulrich, Cornelia M; Rankin, Cathryn; Toriola, Adetunji T; Makar, Karen W; Altug-Teber, Özge; Benedetti, Jacqueline K; Holmes, Rebecca S; Smalley, Stephen R; Blanke, Charles D; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-11-01

    Recurrence and toxicity occur commonly among patients with rectal cancer who are treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The authors hypothesized that genetic variation in folate-metabolizing genes could play a role in interindividual variability. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the associations between genetic variants in folate-metabolizing genes and clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. The authors investigated 8 functionally significant polymorphisms in 6 genes (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR] [C677T, A1298C], SLC19A1 [G80A], SHMT1 [C1420T], dihydrofolate reductase [DHFR] [Del19bp], TS 1494del,and TSER) involved in folate metabolism in 745 patients with TNM stage II or III rectal cancer enrolled in a phase 3 adjuvant clinical trial of 3 regimens of 5-FU and radiotherapy (INT-0144 and SWOG 9304). There were no statistically significant associations noted between polymorphisms in any of the genes and overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity in the overall analyses. Nevertheless, there was a trend toward worse DFS among patients with the variant allele of MTHFR C677T compared with wild-type, particularly in treatment arm 2, in which patients with the MTHFR C677T TT genotype had worse overall survival (hazards ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.93 [P = .03]) and DFS (hazards ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.03 [P = .02]) compared with those with homozygous wild-type. In addition, there was a trend toward reduced hematological toxicity among patients with variants of SLC19A1 G80A in treatment arm 1 (P for trend, .06) and reduced esophagitis/stomatitis noted among patients with variants of TSER in treatment arm 3 (P for trend, .06). Genetic variability in folate-metabolizing enzymes was found to be associated only to a limited degree with clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  13. Effects of CEOs’ Negative Traits on Corporate Social Responsibility

    Jae Kyu Myung

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The dark triad, composed of Machiavellianism, psychopathy and narcissism, refers to negative personality traits, which may influence business processes. While negative traits could be an important factor explaining the relationship between a CEO’s immoral and unethical behavior and corporate social responsibility (CSR, there has been minimal research focusing on this relationship. This paper thus attempts to investigate how a CEO exhibiting these negative traits affects CSR, and if an employee’s perception of ethics and social responsibility would mediate the relationship. In addition, this paper considers the moderating effects of an individual performance-based compensation system (IPBCS between employee’s CSR perception and CSR activities. The data are collected through a survey conducted on 165 employees (companies in twelve industries. The regression result indicates an inverse relationship between the negative traits of a CEO and an employee’s perception of ethics and social responsibility and CSR activities, and the mediating effect of the perception in the relationship between the negative traits and CSR activities. It also indicates that an IPBCS moderates the relationship between CSR perception and activities. Implications for the study, future research directions, and management approach are discussed.

  14. Effect of produced water on cod (Gadus morhua) immune responses

    Hamoutene, D.; Mabrouk, G.; Samuelson, S.; Mansour, A.; Lee, K. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Maritimes Region, Ocean Sciences Division; Volkoff, H.; Parrish, C. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Mathieu, A. [Oceans Ltd., St. John' s, NL (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Studies have shown that produced water (PW) discharged from North Sea offshore platforms affects the biota at greater distances from operational platforms than originally presumed. According to PW dispersion simulations, dilution by at least 240 times occurs within 50-100 m, and up to 9000 times by 20 km from the discharge. In this study, the effect of PW on cod immunity was investigated by exposing fish to 0, 100 ppm (x 10,000 dilution) or 200 ppm (x 500) of PW for 76 days. Immune responses were evaluated at the end of the exposure. Fish from the 3 groups were injected with Aeromonas salmonicida lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Blood cell observation and flow cytometry were used to investigate the serum cortisol levels and gill histology along with ratios and respiratory burst (RB) responses of both circulating and head-kidney white blood cells (WBCs). The study revealed that baseline immunity and stress response were not affected by PW, other than an irritant-induced change in gill cells found in treated cod. In all groups, LPS injection resulted in a pronounced decrease in RB of head-kidney cells and an increase in serum cortisol and protein levels. However, the group exposed to 200 ppm of PW exhibited the most significant changes. LPS injection was also shown to influence WBC ratios, but further studies are needed to determine if this impact is stronger in fish exposed to PW. This study suggested an effect of PW on cod immunity after immune challenge with LPS.

  15. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    2003-04-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  16. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    2000-12-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  17. Influence of agglomeration of cerium oxide nanoparticles and speciation of cerium(III) on short term effects to the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Röhder, Lena A. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); ETH-Zurich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Brandt, Tanja [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); Sigg, Laura [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); ETH-Zurich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Behra, Renata, E-mail: Renata.behra@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Phosphate-dispersed CeO₂ NP did not affect photosynthetic yield in C. reinhardtii. • Agglomerated CeO₂ NP slightly decreased photosynthetic yield. • Cerium(III) was shown to affect photosynthetic yield and intracellular ROS level. • Slight effects of CeO₂ NP were caused by dissolved Ce³⁺ ions present in suspensions. • Wild type and cell wall free mutant of C. reinhardtii showed the same sensitivity. - Abstract: Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO₂ NP) are increasingly used in industrial applications and may be released to the aquatic environment. The fate of CeO₂ NP and effects on algae are largely unknown. In this study, the short term effects of CeO₂ NP in two different agglomeration states on the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were examined. The role of dissolved cerium(III) on toxicity, its speciation and the dissolution of CeO₂ NP were considered. The role of cell wall of C. reinhardtii as a barrier and its influence on the sensitivity to CeO₂ NP and cerium(III) was evaluated by testing both, the wild type and the cell wall free mutant of C. reinhardtii. Characterization showed that CeO₂ NP had a surface charge of ~0 mV at physiological pH and agglomerated in exposure media. Phosphate stabilized CeO₂ NP at pH 7.5 over 24 h. This effect was exploited to test CeO₂ NP dispersed in phosphate with a mean size of 140 nm and agglomerated in absence of phosphate with a mean size of 2000 nm. The level of dissolved cerium(III) in CeO₂ NP suspensions was very low and between 0.1 and 27 nM in all tested media. Exposure of C. reinhardtii to Ce(NO₃)₃ decreased the photosynthetic yield in a concentration dependent manner with EC₅₀ of 7.5 ± 0.84 μM for wild type and EC₅₀ of 6.3 ± 0.53 μM for the cell wall free mutant. The intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased upon exposure to Ce(NO₃)₃ with effective concentrations similar to those inhibiting photosynthesis. The agglomerated Ce

  18. Nontrivial ac spin response in the effective Luttinger model

    Hu Liangbin; Zhong Jiansong; Hu Kaige

    2006-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional effective Luttinger Hamiltonian and the exact Heisenberg equations of motion and within a self-consistent semiclassical approximation, we present a theoretical investigation on the nontrivial ac spin responses due to the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of holes in p-doped bulk semiconductors. We show that the nontrivial ac spin responses induced by the combined action of an ac external electric field and the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of holes may lead to the generation of a nonvanishing ac spin Hall current in a p-doped bulk semiconductor, which shares some similarities with the dissipationless dc spin Hall current conceived previously and also exhibits some interesting new features that was not found before

  19. Effect of particle size on the thermoluminescent response of hydroxyapatite

    Barrera V, A.; Zarate M, J.; Contreras, M. E.; Rivera M, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present the study of the structural characterization and the thermoluminescent response of the hydroxyapatite as a function of the calcination temperature and the effect of the particle size. For precipitation synthesis, calcium nitrate (Ca(NO_3)_2 and dibasic ammonium phosphate ((NH_4)_2HPO_4) were used as precursors and ammonium hydroxide (NH_4OH) as a ph controlling agent. The characterization of the samples was carried out by the techniques of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The powders obtained are composed of hydroxyapatite, with a different degree of dehydroxylation. The thermoluminescent characterization indicates that at higher calcination temperature there is a higher thermoluminescent response, the calcined powders at 1300 degrees Celsius show a very well defined brightness curve with a higher intensity, with its maximum intensity located at a temperature of 210 degrees Celsius, which indicates that this material can be used as a dosimeter. (Author)

  20. Effects of lifestyle interventions that include a physical activity component in class II and III obese individuals: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Aurélie Baillot

    Full Text Available In class II and III obese individuals, lifestyle intervention is the first st