WorldWideScience

Sample records for response plan guidance

  1. Planning guidance for emergency response to a hypothetical nuclear attack on Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Shubayr, Nasser Ali M.

    The threat of nuclear attack will remain imminent in an ever-advancing society. Saudi Arabia is not immune to this threat. This dissertation establishes planning guidance for response to a nuclear attack on Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, based on a hypothetical scenario of a nuclear detonation. A case scenario of a one-megaton thermonuclear bomb detonated at ground level over Riyadh is used to support the thesis. Previous nuclear tests and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings have been used to present possible effects on Riyadh. US planning guidance and lessons learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear plants accidents have been used to develop the emergency response guidance. The planning guidance outlines a rapid response to the nuclear detonation. Four damage zones have been identified; severe damage zone, moderate damage zone, light damage zone and dangerous fallout zone. Actions that are recommended, and those that should be avoided, have been determined for each zone. Shelter/ evacuation evaluation for blast-affected and fallout-affected areas is the basis for the recommendation that shelter in place is the best decision for the first hours to days after the attack. Guidelines for medical care response and population monitoring and decontamination are included to reduce the early and long-term effects of the attack. Recommendations to the Saudi Arabian authorities have been made to facilitate suitable preparedness and response for such an event.

  2. Guidance Manual for preparing Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

    Muhammed, Kabiru [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Young [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan(NREPRP) describes the capabilities, responsibilities and authorities of government agencies and a conceptual basis for integrating the activities of these agencies to protect public health and safety. The NREPRP addresses issues related to actual or perceived radiation hazard requiring a national response in order to: i. Provide co-ordination of a response involving multi-jurisdictions or significant national responsibilities; or ii. Provide national support to state and local governments. The objective of this research is to establish Guidance Manual for preparing a timely, organized and coordinated emergency response plan for Authorities/agencies to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. The manual will not provide sufficient details for an adequate response. This level of details is contained in standard operating procedures that are being developed based on the plan developed. Base on the data obtain from integrated planning levels and responsibility sharing, the legal document of major government agencies participating in NREPRP form the legal basis for the response plan. Also the following documents should be some international legal binding documents. Base on the international safety requirement and some countries well developed NREPRP, we have drafted a guidance manual for new comer countries for easy development of their countries NREPRP. Also we have taken in to consideration lessons learn from most accident especially Fukushima accident.

  3. Guidance Manual for preparing Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

    Muhammed, Kabiru; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan(NREPRP) describes the capabilities, responsibilities and authorities of government agencies and a conceptual basis for integrating the activities of these agencies to protect public health and safety. The NREPRP addresses issues related to actual or perceived radiation hazard requiring a national response in order to: i. Provide co-ordination of a response involving multi-jurisdictions or significant national responsibilities; or ii. Provide national support to state and local governments. The objective of this research is to establish Guidance Manual for preparing a timely, organized and coordinated emergency response plan for Authorities/agencies to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. The manual will not provide sufficient details for an adequate response. This level of details is contained in standard operating procedures that are being developed based on the plan developed. Base on the data obtain from integrated planning levels and responsibility sharing, the legal document of major government agencies participating in NREPRP form the legal basis for the response plan. Also the following documents should be some international legal binding documents. Base on the international safety requirement and some countries well developed NREPRP, we have drafted a guidance manual for new comer countries for easy development of their countries NREPRP. Also we have taken in to consideration lessons learn from most accident especially Fukushima accident

  4. Science-based response planning guidance for the first 100 minutes of the response to a radiological dispersal device

    Musolino, S.V.; Harper, F.T.

    2016-01-01

    The first 100 minutes of a response to a radiological dispersal device are critical as this period will set the stage for how the overall response will be executed. First responders will be tasked with multiple activities such as confirming a radiological release, conducting lifesaving rescue operations, issuing protective actions, and beginning characterization of the scene. These activities need to take place as soon as the responders arrive on the scene (the first few minutes). The effectiveness of these early activities will define how well or how poorly the response will be in the emergency phase. The document which is under development provides guidance that can be used for planning an effective response to an RDD that will result in protection of the responders and the members of the public. The information is based on research and results of extensive experiments conducted by the Department of Energy National Laboratories. This guidance provides a realistic estimate of the possible consequences of an RDD detonation and delineates five missions and ten tactics that should be executed by the first responders and local response agencies in the first 100 minutes of a response. The guidance includes recommendations on how to execute the strategy, equipment requirements including personal protective equipment and public messaging

  5. CDM Convective Forecast Planning guidance

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CDM Convective Forecast Planning (CCFP) guidance product provides a foreast of en-route aviation convective hazards. The forecasts are updated every 2 hours and...

  6. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  7. Driving change : sustainable development action plans Guidance

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2008-01-01

    This guidance builds upon the Sustainable Development Commission’s previous guidance, Getting Started (August 2005), which set out the basic elements that the Sustainable Development Commission would expect to see in a good Sustainable Development Action Plan. Publisher PDF Original published August 2005.

  8. 'Tell us something we don't already know or do!' - The response of planning and transport professionals to public health guidance on the built environment and physical activity.

    Allender, Steven; Cavill, Nick; Parker, Mike; Foster, Charles

    2009-04-01

    A large proportion of non-communicable disease can be attributed to modifiable risk factors such as poor nutrition and physical inactivity. We present data on planning and transport practitioners' perceptions and responses to government public health guidance aimed at modifying environmental factors to promote physical activity. This study was informed by questions on the role of evidence-based guidance, the views of professionals towards the guidance, the links between guidance and existing legislation and policy and the practicality of guidelines. A key informant 'snowball' sampling technique was used to recruit participants from the main professional planning organisations across England. Seventy-six people were interviewed in eight focus groups. We found that evidence-based public health guidance is a new voice in urban and town planning, although much of the advice is already reflected by the 'accepted wisdom' of these professions. Evidence-based health guidance could be a powerful driver affecting planning practice, but other legislated planning guidance may take priority for planning and transport professionals.

  9. Equal employment opportunity plan development guidance

    None

    1978-09-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide instructions for the development of EEO Plans for Fiscal Year 1979. It supplements the National EEO Plan for the Department of Energy issued in August 1978 (DOE/S-0002). The material included should be used immediately as guidance to develop, document, and implement subordinate echelon commitments to EEO. A schedule for the development and submission of EEO Plans is included. Most of the continuing requirements will be published at a later date as part of the directives system. Any comments or helpful suggestions concerned with the program outlined would be appreciated by the Office of Equal Opportunity.

  10. Planning guidance for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    Shumpert, B.L.; Watson, A.P.; Sorensen, J.H. [and others

    1995-02-01

    This planning guide was developed under the direction of the U.S. Army and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which jointly coordinate and direct the development of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). It was produced to assist state, local, and Army installation planners in formulating and coordinating plans for chemical events that may occur at the chemical agent stockpile storage locations in the continental United States. This document provides broad planning guidance for use by both on-post and off-post agencies and organizations in the development of a coordinated plan for responding to chemical events. It contains checklists to assist in assuring that all important aspects are included in the plans and procedures developed at each Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP) location. The checklists are supplemented by planning guidelines in the appendices which provide more detailed guidance regarding some issues. The planning guidance contained in this document will help ensure that adequate coordination between on-post and off-post planners occurs during the planning process. This planning guide broadly describes an adequate emergency planning base that assures that critical planning decisions will be made consistently at every chemical agent stockpile location. This planning guide includes material drawn from other documents developed by the FEMA, the Army, and other federal agencies with emergency preparedness program responsibilities. Some of this material has been developed specifically to meet the unique requirements of the CSEPP. In addition to this guidance, other location-specific documents, technical studies, and support studies should be used as needed to assist in the planning at each of the chemical agent stockpile locations to address the specific hazards and conditions at each location.

  11. 77 FR 14047 - Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations

    2012-03-08

    ...)-4014, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations.'' This action is necessary to correct the NRC's... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0286] Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide; correction. SUMMARY: The U...

  12. 76 FR 9529 - Migratory Birds; Draft Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance

    2011-02-18

    ...-1231-9BPP] RIN 1018-AX53 Migratory Birds; Draft Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance AGENCY: Fish and... mail to: Attention: Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance; Division of Migratory Bird Management; U.S. Fish... implementing statutes including the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA), the Migratory Bird Treaty Act...

  13. 76 FR 75771 - Emergency Planning Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants

    2011-12-05

    ... Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Issuance of NUREG... Support of Nuclear Power Plants;'' NSIR/DPR-ISG-01, ``Interim Staff Guidance Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants;'' and NUREG/CR-7002, ``Criteria for Development of Evacuation Time Estimate Studies...

  14. 77 FR 8751 - Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations

    2012-02-15

    ..., 40, 50, 70, and 72 [NRC-2011-0286] Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations AGENCY... Guide, DG-4014, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations'' in the Federal Register with a public... Guide DG-4014, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations.'' This DG refers to NUREG-1757 Volume 3...

  15. 78 FR 54949 - Major Project Financial Plan Guidance

    2013-09-06

    ...'' (GA-090-751). That report recommended that Financial Plans include the cost of financing the project... Project Financial Plan Guidance AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; Request for comments. SUMMARY: This notice requests comments on draft Major Project Financial Plan...

  16. ROUTE PLAN DESIGNER FOR TRACTOR GUIDANCE SYSTEMS

    Sveistrup, Daniel; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Green, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Earlier works have shown field trial designs to be very labor extensive, even when combining autoguidancesystems with conventional machinery.Designing routes for semi-automated systems in a controlled manner is both resource demandingand complicated. Different types of auto-guidance systems vary ...

  17. Draft Updates to the Planning for Natural Disaster Debris Guidance and to Related Documents

    EPA is requesting comment on the draft update of the Planning for Natural Disaster Debris Guidance, along with two other documents. This Guidance is an update of the Planning for Natural Disaster Debris guidance that EPA published in March 2008.

  18. 78 FR 57450 - State Rail Plan Guidance

    2013-09-18

    ... of impact assessment required for the rail infrastructure, facilities, and service improvements contained in State rail plans. Other issues raised by commenters included the importance of involving... to emphasize the importance of preparing State rail plans within the policy and procedural contexts...

  19. Site Transition Plan Guidance, December 2004

    2004-01-01

    A short Department of Energy program document has been created to provide an outline on what the Site Transition Plan (STP) objectives are for the transition from the Office of Environmental Management to the newly established Office of Legacy Management

  20. Dental implant surgery: planning and guidance

    Lobregt, S.; Schillings, J.J.; Vuurberg, E.

    2001-01-01

    A prototype application has been developed for interactive planning of dental implants on the EasyVision workstation. The user is led step by step via virtual positioning of the implant to the design of a customized drill guide. (orig.)

  1. Robotic needle steering: design, modeling, planning, and image guidance

    Cowan, Noah J.; Goldberg, Ken; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Alterovitz, Ron; Reed, Kyle B.; Kallem, Vinutha; Misra, Sarthak; Park, Wooram; Okamura, Allison M.; Rosen, Jacob; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes how advances in needle design, modeling, planning, and image guidance make it possible to steer flexible needles from outside the body to reach specified anatomical targets not accessible using traditional needle insertion methods. Steering can be achieved using a variety of

  2. Asset Management Plans, Appraisal Guidance for 2003-04.

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    This document is one in a series which aims to assist Local Authorities in Britain with asset management planning (AMPs) for schools. AMPs set out the information needed, and the criteria used, to make decisions about spending on school premises. The document provides guidance on the appraisal of school AMPs in 2002 to inform 3-year formulaic…

  3. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 1: Planning Documents

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the planning documents from the GCS project. Volume 1 contains five appendices: A. Plan for Software Aspects of Certification for the Guidance and Control Software Project; B. Software Development Standards for the Guidance and Control Software Project; C. Software Verification Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; D. Software Configuration Management Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; and E. Software Quality Assurance Activities.

  4. 1999 vadose zone monitoring plan and guidance for subsequent years

    Horton, D.G.; Reidel, S.P.; Last, G.V.

    1998-08-01

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive waste in the US. The majority of the liquid waste was disposed to the soil column where much of it remains today. This document provides the rationale and general framework for vadose zone monitoring at cribs, ditches, trenches and other disposal facilities to detect new sources of contamination and track the movement of existing contamination in the vadose zone for the protection of groundwater. The document provides guidance for subsequent site-specific vadose zone monitoring plans and includes a brief description of past vadose monitoring activities (Chapter 3); the results of the Data Quality Objective process used for this plan (Chapter 4); a prioritization of liquid waste disposal sites for vadose monitoring (Chapter 5 and Appendix B); a general Monitoring and Analysis Plan (Chapter 6); a general Quality Assurance Project Plan (Appendix A), and a description of vadose monitoring activities planned for FY 1999 (Appendix C)

  5. Responsible Purchasing Network - Sustainable Purchasing Guidance Profile

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  6. 78 FR 22257 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    2013-04-15

    ... Blocking Agent in Radiation Emergencies, FDA (66 FR 64046, Dec. 11, 2001). Provide basic planning guidance... decision making. Chapter 4--Late Phase: A brief planning guidance on the cleanup process is included... PAG Manual. Basic planning guidance on approaching radioactive waste disposal is included. Please...

  7. Strategic planning for research reactors. Guidance for reactor managers

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide guidance on how to develop a strategic plan for a research reactor. The IAEA is convinced of the need for research reactors to have strategic plans and is issuing a series of publications to help owners and operators in this regard. One of these covers the applications of research reactors. That report brings together all of the current uses of research reactors and enables a reactor owner or operator to evaluate which applications might be possible with a particular facility. An analysis of research reactor capabilities is an early phase in the strategic planning process. The current document provides the rationale for a strategic plan, outlines the methodology of developing such a plan and then gives a model that may be followed. While there are many purposes for research reactor strategic plans, this report emphasizes the use of strategic planning in order to increase utilization. A number of examples are given in order to clearly illustrate this function

  8. Action Planning Mediates Guidance of Visual Attention from Working Memory

    Tobias Feldmann-Wüstefeld

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual search is impaired when a salient task-irrelevant stimulus is presented together with the target. Recent research has shown that this attentional capture effect is enhanced when the salient stimulus matches working memory (WM content, arguing in favor of attention guidance from WM. Visual attention was also shown to be closely coupled with action planning. Preparing a movement renders action-relevant perceptual dimensions more salient and thus increases search efficiency for stimuli sharing that dimension. The present study aimed at revealing common underlying mechanisms for selective attention, WM, and action planning. Participants both prepared a specific movement (grasping or pointing and memorized a color hue. Before the movement was executed towards an object of the memorized color, a visual search task (additional singleton was performed. Results showed that distraction from target was more pronounced when the additional singleton had a memorized color. This WM-guided attention deployment was more pronounced when participants prepared a grasping movement. We argue that preparing a grasping movement mediates attention guidance from WM content by enhancing representations of memory content that matches the distractor shape (i.e., circles, thus encouraging attentional capture by circle distractors of the memorized color. We conclude that templates for visual search, action planning, and WM compete for resources and thus cause interferences.

  9. Action Planning Mediates Guidance of Visual Attention from Working Memory.

    Feldmann-Wüstefeld, Tobias; Schubö, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Visual search is impaired when a salient task-irrelevant stimulus is presented together with the target. Recent research has shown that this attentional capture effect is enhanced when the salient stimulus matches working memory (WM) content, arguing in favor of attention guidance from WM. Visual attention was also shown to be closely coupled with action planning. Preparing a movement renders action-relevant perceptual dimensions more salient and thus increases search efficiency for stimuli sharing that dimension. The present study aimed at revealing common underlying mechanisms for selective attention, WM, and action planning. Participants both prepared a specific movement (grasping or pointing) and memorized a color hue. Before the movement was executed towards an object of the memorized color, a visual search task (additional singleton) was performed. Results showed that distraction from target was more pronounced when the additional singleton had a memorized color. This WM-guided attention deployment was more pronounced when participants prepared a grasping movement. We argue that preparing a grasping movement mediates attention guidance from WM content by enhancing representations of memory content that matches the distractor shape (i.e., circles), thus encouraging attentional capture by circle distractors of the memorized color. We conclude that templates for visual search, action planning, and WM compete for resources and thus cause interferences.

  10. Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1993-08-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods

  11. 78 FR 42071 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    2013-07-15

    ... Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents AGENCY... guidance ``PAG Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents... ``anonymous access'' system, which means the EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you...

  12. Multimodal system for the planning and guidance of bronchoscopy

    Higgins, William E.; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Zang, Xiaonan; Byrnes, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Many technical innovations in multimodal radiologic imaging and bronchoscopy have emerged recently in the effort against lung cancer. Modern X-ray computed-tomography (CT) scanners provide three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution chest images, positron emission tomography (PET) scanners give complementary molecular imaging data, and new integrated PET/CT scanners combine the strengths of both modalities. State-of-the-art bronchoscopes permit minimally invasive tissue sampling, with vivid endobronchial video enabling navigation deep into the airway-tree periphery, while complementary endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) reveals local views of anatomical structures outside the airways. In addition, image-guided intervention (IGI) systems have proven their utility for CT-based planning and guidance of bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, no IGI system exists that integrates all sources effectively through the complete lung-cancer staging work flow. This paper presents a prototype of a computer-based multimodal IGI system that strives to fill this need. The system combines a wide range of automatic and semi-automatic image-processing tools for multimodal data fusion and procedure planning. It also provides a flexible graphical user interface for follow-on guidance of bronchoscopy/EBUS. Human-study results demonstrate the system's potential.

  13. Public Comment Period Open for the Draft Update to the Planning for Natural Disaster Debris Guidance and to Related Documents

    EPA is requesting comment on the draft Planning for Natural Disaster Debris Guidance, and two other documents. The Guidance is an update of the Planning for Natural Disaster Debris guidance that EPA published in March 2008.

  14. Emergency response planning in Pennsylvania

    Reilly, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In the decade since the accident at Three Mile Island, emergency planning for response to these events has undergone a significant change in Pennsylvania, as elsewhere. Changes respond to federal guidance and to state agency initiatives. The most singular change is the practice of implementing a protective action throughout the entire emergency planning zone (EPZ). Due to Pennsylvania agency experiences during the accident, the decision was made soon after to develop a staff of nuclear engineers, each giving special day-to-day attention to a specific nuclear power station in the state. Changes in communications capabilities are significant, these being dedicated phone lines between the Commonwealth and each power station, and the reorientation of the Department of Environmental Resources radio network to accommodate direction of field monitoring teams from Harrisburg. Changes that are being or will be implemented in the near future include assessing the emergency response data system for electronic delivery of plant parameter data form facilities during accidents, increased participation in exercises, emergency medical planning, and training, the inclusion of all 67 counties in Pennsylvania in an ingestion EPZ, and the gradual severance of dependence on land-line emergency communication systems

  15. Oil spill response plan

    1999-08-01

    The plan outlined in this document specifies the actions that the Canadian Wildlife Service Atlantic Region is mandated to take in the event of an oil spill, or on discovering oiled migratory birds in terrestrial, fresh water, marine and inter-tidal habitats. In addition to describing the role and responsibilities of the Canadian Wildlife Service, the document also describes response plans of other agencies for dealing with all wildlife species affected by oil spills. Reporting paths, the lead agency concept, shared responsibilities with other Canadian Wildlife Service regional offices, provincial agencies, Heritage Canada, non-government wildlife response agencies, oil spill response organizations, and international organizations are outlined. An overview of the reporting and communications process is also provided

  16. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Programs in State Implementation Plans - Guidance Documents

    final document that provides guidance to States and local areas on quantifying and including emission reductions from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures in State Implementation Plans (SIPS).

  17. Unified State Plan for Guidance, Counseling and Placement in Colorado. Grades 7-12.

    Terrill, Jerry; And Others

    This guide, one of three units in the Colorado state plan for guidance program development, is written for educators as both a guideline and a needs assessment instrument to assist in the identification of deficit areas in school guidance programs. In a beginning section, this unit for grades 7-12 provides a brief philosophy of guidance and…

  18. Developing guidelines for incorporating managing demand into WSDOT planning and programming: transportation demand management guidance for corridor planning studies.

    2016-02-01

    The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) regional planning programs address current and forecasted deficiencies of State highways through the conduct of corridor studies. This Guidance for the conduct of corridor planning studies is ...

  19. Guidance for emergency planning in nuclear power plants

    Magnusson, Tommy; Ekdahl, Maria

    2008-06-01

    Ringhals has been a model for this study, but the purpose has been to make the report applicable at all nuclear power plants in Sweden. The work has been done in close co-operation with the Swedish nuclear power plants and Rescue Services in the nuclear power municipalities Oesthammar, Oskarshamn, and Varberg. The internal fire brigade at the nuclear power plants has also been involved. A document will also be published as a further guidance at efforts of the type fires, which are mentioned in the enclosed document. After a fire in a switchgear room in 2005 the need of making the existing effort planning more effective at nuclear power plants was observed. The idea with the planning is to plan the effort in order to give the operational and emergency staff a good and actual support to come to a decision and to start the mission without delay. The risk information is showed by planning layouts, symbols and drawings as basis, give risk information and effort information. The effort information shows outer arrangements, manual action points, fire installations, passive fire safety etc. The risk information is shown by risk symbols. Their purpose is to give a fast overview of the existing risks. Reactor safety effects is the ruling influence if an effort has to be done in order to secure safety for a third person. In order to make an effort in an area personal risks for rescue staff, such as electricity risks, radiological risks, chemicals and gas bottles with compressed gases, has to be eliminated. For complicated missions detailed instructions are needed in order to handle specific risks. In a group discussion different people with pertinent knowledge has to value which problematic efforts need detailed instruction. Missions that have to be analyzed in a work group as above are: fire may affect the reactor safety, fire that may threaten the structural integrity, chemical discharge with big consequence on environment/third person and handling of gas system (compressed

  20. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures

  1. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  2. Requirements, guidance and logic in planning environmental investigations: Approval versus implementation

    Brice, D.A.; Meredith, D.V.; Harris, M.Q.

    1993-01-01

    In today's litigious society, it is important for both private parties and government to plan and conduct environmental investigations in a scientifically sound manner, documenting the purpose, methods, and results in a consistent fashion throughout the exercise. Planning documents are prepared during the initial phases of environmental investigations. Project objectives, including data quality requirements, specific work to be conducted to fulfill data needs, and operating procedures are specified. Regulatory agency approval of these documents is often required prior to plan implementation. These approvals are necessary and appropriate to fulfilling the agency's mandated role. Many guidance documents prepared by regulatory agencies suggest the content and format of various scoping documents. These guidances help standardize thought processes and considerations in planning, and provide a template to ensure that both the plan and the proposed work will fulfill regulatory requirements. This work describes the preparation and use of guidance documents for planning environmental studies. The goals and some of the pitfalls of such documents are discussed. Guidance should include the following elements: the purpose of the guidance and a description of where it applies; the type of items to be addressed in planning; identification of requirements are applicable to all projects for which the guidance is intended; identification of requirements only applicable in certain situations; a description of items to facilitate planning; a suggested format for fulfilling requirements; example applications of the guidance. Disagreements arise between planners and reviewers/approvers when elements of guidance are used as leverage to require work not directly related to project objectives. Guidance may be inappropriately used as a milestone by which site-specific plans are judged. Regulatory agency review and approval may be regarded as a primary objective of the plan

  3. The Neural Basis of Aversive Pavlovian Guidance during Planning.

    Lally, Níall; Huys, Quentin J M; Eshel, Neir; Faulkner, Paul; Dayan, Peter; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2017-10-18

    Important real-world decisions are often arduous as they frequently involve sequences of choices, with initial selections affecting future options. Evaluating every possible combination of choices is computationally intractable, particularly for longer multistep decisions. Therefore, humans frequently use heuristics to reduce the complexity of decisions. We recently used a goal-directed planning task to demonstrate the profound behavioral influence and ubiquity of one such shortcut, namely aversive pruning, a reflexive Pavlovian process that involves neglecting parts of the decision space residing beyond salient negative outcomes. However, how the brain implements this important decision heuristic and what underlies individual differences have hitherto remained unanswered. Therefore, we administered an adapted version of the same planning task to healthy male and female volunteers undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine the neural basis of aversive pruning. Through both computational and standard categorical fMRI analyses, we show that when planning was influenced by aversive pruning, the subgenual cingulate cortex was robustly recruited. This neural signature was distinct from those associated with general planning and valuation, two fundamental cognitive components elicited by our task but which are complementary to aversive pruning. Furthermore, we found that individual variation in levels of aversive pruning was associated with the responses of insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices to the receipt of large monetary losses, and also with subclinical levels of anxiety. In summary, our data reveal the neural signatures of an important reflexive Pavlovian process that shapes goal-directed evaluations and thereby determines the outcome of high-level sequential cognitive processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Multistep decisions are complex because initial choices constrain future options. Evaluating every path for long decision sequences

  4. The Neural Basis of Aversive Pavlovian Guidance during Planning

    Faulkner, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Important real-world decisions are often arduous as they frequently involve sequences of choices, with initial selections affecting future options. Evaluating every possible combination of choices is computationally intractable, particularly for longer multistep decisions. Therefore, humans frequently use heuristics to reduce the complexity of decisions. We recently used a goal-directed planning task to demonstrate the profound behavioral influence and ubiquity of one such shortcut, namely aversive pruning, a reflexive Pavlovian process that involves neglecting parts of the decision space residing beyond salient negative outcomes. However, how the brain implements this important decision heuristic and what underlies individual differences have hitherto remained unanswered. Therefore, we administered an adapted version of the same planning task to healthy male and female volunteers undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine the neural basis of aversive pruning. Through both computational and standard categorical fMRI analyses, we show that when planning was influenced by aversive pruning, the subgenual cingulate cortex was robustly recruited. This neural signature was distinct from those associated with general planning and valuation, two fundamental cognitive components elicited by our task but which are complementary to aversive pruning. Furthermore, we found that individual variation in levels of aversive pruning was associated with the responses of insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices to the receipt of large monetary losses, and also with subclinical levels of anxiety. In summary, our data reveal the neural signatures of an important reflexive Pavlovian process that shapes goal-directed evaluations and thereby determines the outcome of high-level sequential cognitive processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Multistep decisions are complex because initial choices constrain future options. Evaluating every path for long decision sequences

  5. Unified State Plan for Guidance, Counseling and Placement in Colorado. Grades K-6.

    Terrill, Jerry; And Others

    This guide, one of three units in the Colorado state plan for guidance program development, is written for educators as both a guideline and a needs assessment instrument to assist in the identification of deficit areas in school guidance programs. In a beginning section, this unit for the elementary years provides a brief philosophy of elementary…

  6. Working together on automated vehicle guidance AVG : preliminary business plan, abridged version.

    Awareness (ed.)

    1998-01-01

    This plan describes the questions which will have to be answered in the short term, and the action which need to be taken in a phased and structured manner to gain insight into the potential of automated vehicle guidance (AVG).

  7. DMPTool: New Guidance, Resources, and Outreach for Quality Data Management Plans

    Cruse, P.; Sallans, A.

    2013-12-01

    A growing number of US federal funding agencies require data management plans (DMP) as part of new research grant proposals. To help researchers with this requirement, several organizations (the California Digital Library, University of Illinois, University of Virginia, Smithsonian Institution, the DataONE consortium and the (UK) Digital Curation Centre) came together to develop the DMPTool in 2011. The goal of the DMPTool is to provide researchers with guidance, links to resources and help with writing data management plans. Thanks to a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, these organizations have been able to develop DMPTool2, adding new features and functionality, while aiming to grow the number of users and funding requirements and build a community around DMP best practices. Researchers create plans in the tool by selecting their desired funding agency. The tool provides specific requirements from the selected agency as well as detailed help with each area of the plan. Users have access to complete DMP life cycle management, tracking changes through creation, editing, submission, evaluation, and publication. They may also perform enhanced keyword searches and view publicly available plans. With role-based user authorization, users may hold various roles within the interface: creators, collaborators, institutional administrators, and tool administrators. Furthermore, partner institutions can add significant value to the process with several special tool features. Along with institutional branding in the interface, they can provide links to resources they provide to users, such as to preservation repositories, consultation services, or news and event items. In addition, partner institutions can provide help with specific plan questions, and even suggest responses. Institutional administrators can also mine data on plans in order to better support researchers. Institutions may be represented in different roles: as a funder, a researcher's affiliate, or as

  8. Emergency response planning for transport accidents involving radioactive materials

    1982-03-01

    The document presents a basic discussion of the various aspects and philosophies of emergency planning and preparedness along with a consideration of the problems which might be encountered in a transportation accident involving a release of radioactive materials. Readers who are responsible for preparing emergency plans and procedures will have to decide on how best to apply this guidance to their own organizational structures and will also have to decide on an emergency planning and preparedness philosophy suitable to their own situations

  9. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented towards land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facility

  10. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented toward land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facilities

  11. ANS-8.23: Criticality accident emergency planning and response

    Pruvost, N.L.

    1991-01-01

    A study group has been formed under the auspices of ANS-8 to examine the need for a standard on nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response. This standard would be ANS-8.23. ANSI/ANS-8.19-1984, Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, provides some guidance on the subject in Section 10 titled -- Planned Response to Nuclear Criticality Accidents. However, the study group has formed a consensus that Section 10 is inadequate in that technical guidance in addition to administrative guidance is needed. The group believes that a new standard which specifically addresses emergency planning and response to a perceived criticality accident is needed. Plans for underway to request the study group be designated a writing group to create a draft of such a new standard. The proposed standard will divide responsibility between management and technical staff. Generally, management will be charged with providing the necessary elements of emergency planning such as a criticality detection and alarm system, training, safe evacuation routes and assembly areas, a system for timely accountability of personnel, and an effective emergency response organization. The technical staff, on the other hand, will be made responsible for establishing specific items such as safe and clearly posted evacuation evacuation routes and dose criteria for personnel assembly areas. The key to the question of responsibilities is that management must provide the resources for the technical staff to establish the elements of an emergency response effort

  12. Assessment of Adaptive Guidance for Responsive Launch Vehicles and Spacecraft

    2009-04-29

    Figures 1 Earth centered inertial and launch plumbline coordinate systems . . . . . . . 7 2 Geodetic and geocentric latitude...Dramatically reduced reoccurring costs related to guidance. The same features of the closed-loop ascent guidance that provide operational flexibility...also result in greatly reduced need for human intervention. Thus the operational costs related to ascent guidance could be reduced to minimum

  13. Transport accident emergency response plan

    Vallette-Fontaine, M.; Frantz, P.

    1998-01-01

    To comply with the IAEA recommendations for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan as described in Safety Series 87, Transnucleaire, a company deeply involved in the road and rail transports of the fuel cycle, masters means of Emergency Response in the event of a transport accident. This paper aims at analyzing the solutions adopted for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan and the development of a technical support and adapted means for the recovery of heavy packagings. (authors)

  14. RMP Guidance for Warehouses - Chapter 8: Emergency Response Program

    Implementing an emergency response program along with your risk management plan may be required if you have at least one Program 2 or 3 process in place, and if your employees will respond to some releases involving regulated toxic or flammable substances.

  15. Planned home birth: the professional responsibility response.

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B; Brent, Robert L; Levene, Malcolm I; Arabin, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the recrudescence of and new support for midwife-supervised planned home birth in the United States and the other developed countries in the context of professional responsibility. Advocates of planned home birth have emphasized patient safety, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and respect for women's rights. We provide a critical evaluation of each of these claims and identify professionally appropriate responses of obstetricians and other concerned physicians to planned home birth. We start with patient safety and show that planned home birth has unnecessary, preventable, irremediable increased risk of harm for pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients. We document that the persistently high rates of emergency transport undermines patient safety and satisfaction, the raison d'etre of planned home birth, and that a comprehensive analysis undermines claims about the cost-effectiveness of planned home birth. We then argue that obstetricians and other concerned physicians should understand, identify, and correct the root causes of the recrudescence of planned home birth; respond to expressions of interest in planned home birth by women with evidence-based recommendations against it; refuse to participate in planned home birth; but still provide excellent and compassionate emergency obstetric care to women transported from planned home birth. We explain why obstetricians should not participate in or refer to randomized clinical trials of planned home vs planned hospital birth. We call on obstetricians, other concerned physicians, midwives and other obstetric providers, and their professional associations not to support planned home birth when there are safe and compassionate hospital-based alternatives and to advocate for a safe home-birth-like experience in the hospital. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. General RMP Guidance - Chapter 9: Risk Management Plan

    You must submit one risk management plan (RMP) to EPA for all of your covered processes. The internet-based RMP*eSubmit allows you to submit your RMP in EPA's Central Data Exchange (CDX), where you can access and change/correct existing RMPs.

  17. Emergency response planning in Saskatchewan

    Irwin, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Release reporting and spill clean-up requirements by Saskatchewan Energy and Mines were reviewed. Wascana's experience in response planning was discussed. It was suggested that the key to prevention was up-front due diligence, including facility and oil well analysis. Details of Wascana's emergency plan, and details of Saskatchewan Energy and Mines release reporting procedures were also provided

  18. Volumetric image-guidance: Does routine usage prompt adaptive re-planning? An institutional review

    Tanyi, James A.; Fuss, Martin H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate how the use of volumetric image-guidance using an on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system impacts on the frequency of adaptive re-planning. Material and methods. Treatment courses of 146 patients who have undergone a course of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using volumetric CBCT image-guidance were analyzed. Target locations included the brain, head and neck, chest, abdomen, as well as prostate and non-prostate pelvis. The majority of patients (57.5%) were treated with hypo-fractionated treatment regimens (three to 15 fraction courses). The frequency of image-guidance ranged from daily (87.7%) to weekly or twice weekly. The underlying medical necessity for adaptive re-planning as well as frequency and consequences of plan adaptation to dose-volume parameters was assessed. Results. Radiation plans of 34 patients (23.3%) were adapted at least once (up to six time) during their course of EBRT as a result of image-guidance CBCT review. Most common causes for adaptive planning were: tumor change (mostly shrinkage: 10 patients; four patients more than one re-plan), change in abdominal girth (systematic change in hollow organ filling; n=7, two patients more than one re-plan), weight loss (n=5), and systematic target setup deviation from simulation (n=5). Adaptive re-plan was required mostly for conventionally fractionated courses; only 5 patient plans undergoing hypo-fractionated treatment were adjusted. In over 91% of adapted plans, the dose-volume parameters did deviate from the prescribed plan parameters by more than 5% for at least 10% of the target volume, or organs-at-risk in close proximity to the target volume. Discussion. Routine use of volumetric image-guidance has in our practice increased the demand for adaptive re-planning. Volumetric CBCT image-guidance provides sufficient imaging information to reliably predict the need for dose adjustment. In the vast majority of cases evaluated, the initial and adapted dose

  19. Strategic Environmental Assessment as catalyst of healthier spatial planning: The Danish guidance and practice

    Kørnøv, Lone

    2009-01-01

    and guidance. This paper examines the inclusion of health as a formal component in impact assessment of spatial plans. Based upon a documentary study of 100 environmental reports, the paper analyses and discusses how health impact considerations are incorporated in SEA practice. It is found that health impacts...

  20. 41 CFR 102-33.75 - What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    2010-07-01

    ... Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.75 What other guidance is available to us in... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.75 Section 102-33.75 Public Contracts and...

  1. Planning required in the development of radiation protection guidance for underground engineering applications

    Neill, R H [U.S. Public Health Service, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The potential variety of engineering applications from the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosives indicates an increased need for applicable radiation protection guidance to protect the public health of potentially exposed populations. To insure the orderly development of such uses, additional operational data as well as bioeffects data will be required to develop appropriate criteria and guidance to inform health officials and the public of the significance of possible exposures. The required planning includes an evaluation of the potential benefits and risks as well as the size and age of population, multiplicity of sources, likely and unlikely future uses, and the total environmental impact. (author)

  2. Planning required in the development of radiation protection guidance for underground engineering applications

    Neill, R.H.

    1969-01-01

    The potential variety of engineering applications from the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosives indicates an increased need for applicable radiation protection guidance to protect the public health of potentially exposed populations. To insure the orderly development of such uses, additional operational data as well as bioeffects data will be required to develop appropriate criteria and guidance to inform health officials and the public of the significance of possible exposures. The required planning includes an evaluation of the potential benefits and risks as well as the size and age of population, multiplicity of sources, likely and unlikely future uses, and the total environmental impact. (author)

  3. Radioactive materials transportation emergency response plan

    Karmali, N.

    1987-05-01

    Ontario Hydro transports radioactive material between its nuclear facilities, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at Chalk River Laboratories and Radiochemical Company in Kanata, on a regular basis. Ontario Hydro also occasionally transports to Whiteshell Laboratories, Hydro-Quebec and New Brunswick Electric Power Commission. Although there are stringent packaging and procedural requirements for these shipments, Ontario Hydro has developed a Radioactive Materials Transportation Emergency Response Plan in the event that there is an accident. The Transportation Emergency Response plan is based on six concepts: 1) the Province id divided into three response areas with each station (Pickering, Darlington, Bruce) having identified response areas; 2) response is activated via a toll-free number. A shift supervisor at Pickering will answer the call, determine the hazards involved from the central shipment log and provide on-line advice to the emergency worker. At the same time he will notify the nearest Ontario Hydro area office to provide initial corporate response, and will request the nearest nuclear station to provide response assistance; 3) all stations have capability in terms of trained personnel and equipment to respond to an accident; 4) all Ontario Hydro shipments are logged with Pickering NGS. Present capability is based on computerized logging with the computer located in the shift office at Pickering to allow quick access to information on the shipment; 5) there is a three tier structure for emergency public information. The local Area Manager is the first Ontario Hydro person at the scene of the accident. The responding facility technical spokesperson is the second line of Corporate presence and the Ontario Hydro Corporate spokesperson is notified in case the accident is a media event; and 6) Ontario Hydro will respond to non-Hydro shipments of radioactive materials in terms of providing assistance, guidance and capability. However, the shipper is responsible

  4. Applicable value of real time interventional ultrasound guidance in family planning reproduction operation

    Wu Guoping; Zou Dongfang; Sun Jian; Dong Weihua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical value of real time interventional ultrasound guidance in family planning reproduction operation. Methods: Under the guidance of ultrasound monitoring, 522 cases with high risk and difficult uterine operation were undertaken in our department. Results: The abdominal endoscopic contraceptive uterine operation under real time ultrasound monitoring was carried out for 522 cases in 4 years, with successful rates for high risk pregnancy as 287/289 cases, high risk troublesome withdrawal of contraceptive ring as 129/130 cases and puzzling uterine operation as 103/103 cases. The total successful rate reached 99.42%, without uterine rupture and other complications. Conclusion: The former complex, blind and difficult uterine operations turn to be simple, safe and reliable under the guidance of real time ultrasound. (authors)

  5. Guidance system operations plan for manned CM earth orbital missions using program SKYLARK 1. Section 4: Operational modes

    Dunbar, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The operational modes for the guidance system operations plan for Program SKYLARK 1 are presented. The procedures control the guidance and navigation system interfaces with the flight crew and the mission control center. The guidance operational concept is designed to comprise a set of manually initiated programs and functions which may be arranged by the flight crew to implement a large class of flight plans. This concept will permit both a late flight plan definition and a capability for real time flight plan changes.

  6. A manned maneuvering unit proximity operations planning and flight guidance display and control system

    Gershzohn, Gary R.; Sirko, Robert J.; Zimmerman, K.; Jones, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    This task concerns the design, development, testing, and evaluation of a new proximity operations planning and flight guidance display and control system for manned space operations. A forecast, derivative manned maneuvering unit (MMU) was identified as a candidate for the application of a color, highway-in-the-sky display format for the presentation of flight guidance information. A silicon graphics 4D/20-based simulation is being developed to design and test display formats and operations concepts. The simulation includes the following: (1) real-time color graphics generation to provide realistic, dynamic flight guidance displays and control characteristics; (2) real-time graphics generation of spacecraft trajectories; (3) MMU flight dynamics and control characteristics; (4) control algorithms for rotational and translational hand controllers; (5) orbital mechanics effects for rendezvous and chase spacecraft; (6) inclusion of appropriate navigation aids; and (7) measurement of subject performance. The flight planning system under development provides for: (1) selection of appropriate operational modes, including minimum cost, optimum cost, minimum time, and specified ETA; (2) automatic calculation of rendezvous trajectories, en route times, and fuel requirements; (3) and provisions for manual override. Man/machine function allocations in planning and en route flight segments are being evaluated. Planning and en route data are presented on one screen composed of two windows: (1) a map display presenting a view perpendicular to the orbital plane, depicting flight planning trajectory and time data attitude display presenting attitude and course data for use en route; and (2) an attitude display presenting local vertical-local horizontal attitude data superimposed on a highway-in-the-sky or flight channel representation of the flight planned course. Both display formats are presented while the MMU is en route. In addition to these displays, several original display

  7. Planning and preparing for emergency response to transport accidents involving radioactive material. Safety guide

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance to the public authorities and others (including consignors, carriers and emergency response authorities) who are responsible for developing and establishing emergency arrangements for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material. It may assist those concerned with establishing the capability to respond to such transport emergencies. It provides guidance for those Member States whose involvement with radioactive material is just beginning. It also provides guidance for those Member States that have already developed their radioactive material industries and the attendant emergency plans but that may need to review and improve these plans

  8. Strategic Environmental Assessment as catalyst of healthier spatial planning: The Danish guidance and practice

    Kornov, Lone

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of factors within spatial planning can affect health. There is therefore an important scope for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of spatial plans to protect and improve human health. Due to the EU Directive 2001/42/EC on SEA, health has been made explicit in Danish legislation and guidance. This paper examines the inclusion of health as a formal component in impact assessment of spatial plans. Based upon a documentary study of 100 environmental reports, the paper analyses and discusses how health impact considerations are incorporated in SEA practice. It is found that health impacts are included in SEA practice and are being interpreted in a broader sense than what the national guidance exemplifies. The frequent included health aspects are noise, drinking water, air pollution, recreation/outdoor life and traffic safety. The primary determinant for health is transport-whether it is at the overall or local planning level. The main conclusion is that SEA shows a potential to catalyse healthier spatial planning. Despite the broad inclusion of health in SEA practice the examination shows potential improvements, hereunder qualification of assessments by better explaining the nature and significance of impacts and by including the distributional aspects of human health impacts. Inclusion from the health sector is put forward as an important institutional mean to secure cross disciplinarily and higher quality assessment

  9. Test plan guidance for transuranic-contaminated arid landfill remedial technology development

    Evans, J.; Shaw, P.

    1995-05-01

    This document provides guidance for preparing plans to test or demonstrate buried waste assessment or remediation technologies supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, Transuranic-Contaminated Arid Landfill Product Line. This document also provides guidance for development of data quality objectives, along with the necessary data to meet the project objectives. The purpose is to ensure that useful data of known quality are collected to support conclusions associated with the designated demonstration or test. A properly prepared test plan will integrate specific and appropriate objectives with needed measurements to ensure data will reflect the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development's mission, be consistent with Landfill Stabilization Focus Area test goals, and be useful for the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs and other potential partners (e.g., commercial concerns). The test plan becomes the planning and working document for the demonstration or test to be conducted ensuring procedures are followed that will allow data of sufficient quality to be collected for comparison and evaluation

  10. 75 FR 69709 - Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance; Standard Review Plan...

    2010-11-15

    ... the Final Staff Guidance; Standard Review Plan, Section 13.6.6, Revision 0 on Cyber Security Plan... Reports for Nuclear Power Plants,'' Section 13.6.6, Revision 0 on ``Cyber Security Plan'' (Agencywide... reviews to amendments to licenses for operating reactors or for activities associated with review of...

  11. 76 FR 14025 - Guidance for Industry on Planning for the Effects of High Absenteeism To Ensure Availability of...

    2011-03-15

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Planning for the Effects of High Absenteeism To Ensure Availability of Medically... entitled ``Planning for the Effects of High Absenteeism to Ensure Availability of Medically Necessary Drug... components to develop production plans in the event of an emergency that results in high absenteeism at one...

  12. Planning, guidance, and quality assurance of pelvic screw placement using deformable image registration

    Goerres, J.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M.; Ramsay, B.; De Silva, T.; Ketcha, M.; Han, R.; Manbachi, A.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Osgood, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous pelvic screw placement is challenging due to narrow bone corridors surrounded by vulnerable structures and difficult visual interpretation of complex anatomical shapes in 2D x-ray projection images. To address these challenges, a system for planning, guidance, and quality assurance (QA) is presented, providing functionality analogous to surgical navigation, but based on robust 3D-2D image registration techniques using fluoroscopy images already acquired in routine workflow. Two novel aspects of the system are investigated: automatic planning of pelvic screw trajectories and the ability to account for deformation of surgical devices (K-wire deflection). Atlas-based registration is used to calculate a patient-specific plan of screw trajectories in preoperative CT. 3D-2D registration aligns the patient to CT within the projective geometry of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Deformable known-component registration (dKC-Reg) localizes the surgical device, and the combination of plan and device location is used to provide guidance and QA. A leave-one-out analysis evaluated the accuracy of automatic planning, and a cadaver experiment compared the accuracy of dKC-Reg to rigid approaches (e.g. optical tracking). Surgical plans conformed within the bone cortex by 3-4 mm for the narrowest corridor (superior pubic ramus) and  >5 mm for the widest corridor (tear drop). The dKC-Reg algorithm localized the K-wire tip within 1.1 mm and 1.4° and was consistently more accurate than rigid-body tracking (errors up to 9 mm). The system was shown to automatically compute reliable screw trajectories and accurately localize deformed surgical devices (K-wires). Such capability could improve guidance and QA in orthopaedic surgery, where workflow is impeded by manual planning, conventional tool trackers add complexity and cost, rigid tool assumptions are often inaccurate, and qualitative interpretation of complex anatomy from 2D projections is prone to trial

  13. Improving Access to Quality Care in Family Planning: WHO's Four Cornerstones of Evidence-based Guidance

    Shang-chun WU; Yan ZOU; K Church; O Meirik

    2007-01-01

    The four cornerstones of guidance in technique service of family planning are established by WHO based on high quality evidences. They have been updated according to the appearing new evidences, and the consensuses were reached by the international experts in this field. The four documents include Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, Decision-making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers and The Global Handbook for Family Planning Providers. The first two documents mainlyface to the policy-makers and programme managers and were treated as the important references for creating the local guideline. The other two documents were developed for the front-line health-care and family planning providers at different levels, which include plenty of essential technical information to help providers improve their ability in service delivery and counselling. China paid great attention to the introduction and application of WHO guidelines. As soon as the newer editions of these documents were available, the Chinese version would be followed. WHO guidelines have been primarily adapted with the newly issued national guideline, The Clinical Practical Skill Guidelines- Family Planning Part, which was established by China Medical Association. At the same time, the WHO guidelines have been introduced to some of the linicians and family planning providers at different levels. In the future, more special training courses will be introduced to the township level based on the needs of grassroot providers.

  14. Fully automatic guidance and control for rotorcraft nap-of-the-Earth flight following planned profiles. Volume 1: Real-time piloted simulation

    Clement, Warren F.; Gorder, Peter J.; Jewell, Wayne F.

    1991-01-01

    Developing a single-pilot, all-weather nap-of-the-earth (NOE) capability requires fully automatic NOE (ANOE) navigation and flight control. Innovative guidance and control concepts are investigated in a four-fold research effort that: (1) organizes the on-board computer-based storage and real-time updating of NOE terrain profiles and obstacles in course-oriented coordinates indexed to the mission flight plan; (2) defines a class of automatic anticipative pursuit guidance algorithms and necessary data preview requirements to follow the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal guidance commands dictated by the updated flight profiles; (3) automates a decision-making process for unexpected obstacle avoidance; and (4) provides several rapid response maneuvers. Acquired knowledge from the sensed environment is correlated with the forehand knowledge of the recorded environment (terrain, cultural features, threats, and targets), which is then used to determine an appropriate evasive maneuver if a nonconformity of the sensed and recorded environments is observed. This four-fold research effort was evaluated in both fixed-based and moving-based real-time piloted simulations, thereby, providing a practical demonstration for evaluating pilot acceptance of the automated concepts, supervisory override, manual operation, and re-engagement of the automatic system. Volume one describes the major components of the guidance and control laws as well as the results of the piloted simulations. Volume two describes the complete mathematical model of the fully automatic guidance system for rotorcraft NOE flight following planned flight profiles.

  15. Lessons learned from the second Federal Radiology Emergency Response Plan Field Exercise (FFE-2)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.; Weiss, B.H.; Wolff, W.F.; Adler, V.

    1988-01-01

    The FFE-2, held in 1987 at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, provided a large-scale, multiagency, field test of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). The FRERP provided workable guidance for coordinating the federal response efforts and effectively supplementing the states' resources. Needs for more training for responders and clarification in portions of the response were identified

  16. Effective operational oil spill response planning

    Meyers, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    An operational Contingency Plan is one of the single most important aspects of effective oil spill response operations. It is a spill control game plan. A thorough contingency plan provides a set of guidelines that can be used to help direct all phases of spill response activities. More than simple a compilation of lists and rosters, the contingency plan reflects strategic and philosophical elements of spill response that help to ensure a viable response to any spill incident. Facilities and oil carrying vessels should have well maintained contingency plans with these features. This paper describes the requirement for effective oil spill response pans and the training required to exercise them

  17. General RMP Guidance - Chapter 8: Emergency Response Program

    If you have a Program 2 or 3 process at your facility, 40 CFR Part 68 (risk management program) requires an emergency response program in place if employees respond to some releases involving regulated toxic or flammable substances.

  18. Guidance document for preparing water sampling and analysis plans for UMTRA Project sites. Revision 1

    1995-09-01

    A water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is prepared for each Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide the rationale for routine ground water sampling at disposal sites and former processing sites. The WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine ground water monitoring stations at each site. This guidance document has been prepared by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Its purpose is to provide a consistent technical approach for sampling and monitoring activities performed under the WSAP and to provide a consistent format for the WSAP documents. It is designed for use by the TAC in preparing WSAPs and by the DOE, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, state and tribal agencies, other regulatory agencies, and the public in evaluating the content of WSAPS

  19. Quality Assurance Plan, N springs expedited response action

    Jackson, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) to be followed during the definitive design, construction, and operational phases for activities associated with the N Springs Expedited Response Action (ERA) for the 100-NR-2 Operable Unit (OU). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) will comply with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance (DOE 1989), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), EPA/530-SW-86-031, Technical Guidance Document: Construction Quality Assurance for Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facilities (EPA 1986)

  20. Gender Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting ...

    ... Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting Tool for Local Governance ... in data collection, and another module that facilitates gender responsive and ... In partnership with UNESCO's Organization for Women in Science for the ...

  1. Guidance system operations plan for manned cm earth orbital and lunar missions using program Colossus 3. Section 2: Data links

    Hamilton, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    The data links for use with the guidance system operations plan for manned command module earth orbital and lunar missions using program Colossus 3 are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) digital uplink to CMC, (2) command module contiguous block update, (3) CMC retrofire external data update, (4) CMC digital downlink, and (5) CMC entry update.

  2. Responding to Hostility: Evidence-Based Guidance for Communication during Planned Organizational Change

    Campbell, Kim Sydow; Carmichael, Pierson; Naidoo, Jefrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Hostile challenges to planned organization change are common and challenging to deal with effectively. Little research has explained successful responses to such stakeholder hostility. To address this gap, we use the concept of readiness to characterize the content of hostile challenges. We also use rhetorical strategies based on speech act theory…

  3. Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis (CRIDA): A novel practical guidance for Climate Resilient Investments and Planning

    Jeuken, Ad; Mendoza, Guillermo; Matthews, John; Ray, Patrick; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Gilroy, Kristin; Olsen, Rolf; Kucharski, John; Stakhiv, Gene; Cushing, Janet; Brown, Casey

    2016-04-01

    over time. They are part of the Dutch adaptive planning approach Adaptive Delta Management, executed and develop by the Dutch Delta program. Both decision scaling and adaptation pathways have been piloted in studies worldwide. The objective of CRIDA is to mainstream effective climate adaptation for professional water managers. The CRIDA publication, due in april 2016, follows the generic water design planning design cycle. At each step, CRIDA describes stepwise guidance for incorporating climate robustness: problem definition, stress test, alternatives formulation and recommendation, evaluation and selection. In the presentation the origin, goal, steps and practical tools available at each step of CRIDA will be explained. In two other abstracts ("Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis: A Hypothetical Application to the Waas Region" by Gilroy et al., "The Application of Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis to the Ioland Water Treatment Plant in Lusaka, Zambia, by Kucharski et al.), the application of CRIDA to cases is explained

  4. Guidance for emergency planning in nuclear power plants; Vaegledning foer insatsplanering i kaerntekniska anlaeggningar

    Magnusson, Tommy; Ekdahl, Maria (Ringhals AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Ringhals has been a model for this study, but the purpose has been to make the report applicable at all nuclear power plants in Sweden. The work has been done in close co-operation with the Swedish nuclear power plants and Rescue Services in the nuclear power municipalities Oesthammar, Oskarshamn, and Varberg. The internal fire brigade at the nuclear power plants has also been involved. A document will also be published as a further guidance at efforts of the type fires, which are mentioned in the enclosed document. After a fire in a switchgear room in 2005 the need of making the existing effort planning more effective at nuclear power plants was observed. The idea with the planning is to plan the effort in order to give the operational and emergency staff a good and actual support to come to a decision and to start the mission without delay. The risk information is showed by planning layouts, symbols and drawings as basis, give risk information and effort information. The effort information shows outer arrangements, manual action points, fire installations, passive fire safety etc. The risk information is shown by risk symbols. Their purpose is to give a fast overview of the existing risks. Reactor safety effects is the ruling influence if an effort has to be done in order to secure safety for a third person. In order to make an effort in an area personal risks for rescue staff, such as electricity risks, radiological risks, chemicals and gas bottles with compressed gases, has to be eliminated. For complicated missions detailed instructions are needed in order to handle specific risks. In a group discussion different people with pertinent knowledge has to value which problematic efforts need detailed instruction. Missions that have to be analyzed in a work group as above are: fire may affect the reactor safety, fire that may threaten the structural integrity, chemical discharge with big consequence on environment/third person and handling of gas system (compressed

  5. Exercising the federal radiological emergency response plan

    Gant, K.S.; Adler, M.V.; Wolff, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Multiagency exercises were an important part of the development of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This paper concentrates on two of these exercises, the Federal Field Exercise in March 1984 and the Relocation Tabletop Exercise in December 1985. The Federal Field Exercise demonstrated the viability and usefulness of the draft plan; lessons learned from the exercise were incorporated into the published plan. The Relocation Tabletop Exercise examined the federal response in the postemergency phase. This exercise highlighted the change over time in the roles of some agencies and suggested response procedures that should be developed or revised. 8 refs

  6. Responsibility modelling for civil emergency planning

    Sommerville, Ian; Storer, Timothy; Lock, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to analysing and understanding civil emergency planning based on the notion of responsibility modelling combined with HAZOPS-style analysis of information requirements. Our goal is to represent complex contingency plans so that they can be more readily understood, so that inconsistencies can be highlighted and vulnerabilities discovered. In this paper, we outline the framework for contingency planning in the United Kingdom and introduce the notion of respons...

  7. The development and revision of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan

    Gant, K.S.; Adler, M.V.; Wolff, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1985, federal agencies have been using the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) in exercises and real events. This experience and the development of other emergency response guidance (e.g., National System for Emergency Coordination) are fueling current efforts to review and revise the FRERP to reflect what the agencies have learned since the FRERP was published. Revision efforts are concentrating on clarifying the plan and addressing deficiencies. No major changes are expected in the general structure of the federal response nor should states need to revise their plans because of these modifications. 5 refs

  8. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    appropriate responses by local responders and the general population within the hazard zones, regional planning is essential to success. The remainder of this Executive Summary provides summary guidance for response planning in three areas: (1) Public Protection Strategy details the importance of early, adequate shelter followed by informed evacuation. (2) Responder Priorities identify how to protect response personnel, perform regional situational assessment, and support public safety. (3) Key Planning Considerations refute common myths and provide important information on planning how to respond in the aftermath of nuclear terrorism.

  9. Preparation of waste analysis plans under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Interim guidance)

    1993-03-01

    This document is organized to coincide with the suggested structure of the actual Waste Analysis Plans (WAP) discussed in the previous section. The contents of the remaining eleven chapters and appendices that comprise this document are described below: Chapter 2 addresses waste streams, test parameters, and rationale for sampling and analytical method selection; test methods for analyzing parameters; proceduresfor collecting representative samples; and frequency of sample collection and analyses. These are the core WAP requirements. Chapter 3 addresses analysis requirements for waste received from off site. Chapter 4addresses additional requirements for ignitable, reactive, or incompatible wastes. Chapter 5 addresses unit-specific requirements. Chapter 6 addresses special procedures for radioactive mixed waste. Chapter 7 addresses wastes subject to the land disposal restrictions. Chapter 8 addresses QA/QC procedures. Chapter 9 compares the waste analysis requirements of an interim status facility with those of a permitted facility. Chapter 10 describes the petition process required for sampling and analytical procedures to deviate from accepted methods, such as those identified in promulgated regulations. Chapter 11 reviews the process for modification of WAPs as waste type or handling practices change at a RCRA permitted TSDF. Chapter 12 is the list of references that were used in the preparation of this guidance. Appendix A is a sample WAP addressing physical/chemical treatment and container storage. Appendix B is a sample WAP addressing an incinerator and tank systems. Appendix C discusses the relationship of the WAP to other permitting requirements and includes specific examples of how waste analysis is used to comply with certain parts of a RCRA permit. Appendix D contains the exact wording for the notification/certification requirements under theland disposal restrictions

  10. Disaster Response and Planning for Libraries.

    Kahn, Miriam B.

    Providing a customized disaster response plan to assist libraries in quick recovery, this resource also outlines step to minimize damage and protect materials before trouble strikes. The first section of the book, "Response," contains information how to handle small jobs in-house and suggestions for working with contractors--with an…

  11. The importance of socially responsible strategic planning

    Štrukelj, Tjaša

    2017-10-01

    This paper researches the importance of social responsible strategic planning regardless of the sector and shows research results on the case example of the selected tourism sector, which has economic and employment potential and social and environmental implications. Tourism sector is closely interdependent with transport sector and influences it. Therefore, the more we develop the tourism sector, the more the transport sector is developing as well. Based on Mulej’s Dialectical Systems Theory (DST) we found out that enterprises should integrate sustainability and social responsibility into their strategic planning if they want the Earth to survive. This urged the European Union, ISO International Standards Organization, many other organisations and many researchers. To make strategic planning socially responsible, enterprise’s governors should request social responsibility in business policy, which represents their governance guidelines and is implemented through the strategies set up by top managers and realised in the basic realisation process - their business operations.

  12. 78 FR 25758 - Migratory Birds; Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance: Module 1-Land-Based Wind Energy, Version 2

    2013-05-02

    ...-FXMB123209EAGL0L2] RIN 1018-AX53 Migratory Birds; Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance: Module 1-- Land-Based Wind... Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia... Act (BGEPA) (16 U.S.C. 668-668c), the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) (16 U.S.C. 703-12), and the...

  13. 78 FR 60015 - Proposed Policy Guidance on Metropolitan Planning Organization Representation

    2013-09-30

    ... rulemaking, performance measures and standards to be used by States to assess the condition of the pavements... on MPO boards, this proposed guidance proposes flexible approaches for MPOs and providers of public...

  14. 76 FR 12361 - Request for Information: Update of NIOSH Nanotechnology Strategic Plan for Research and Guidance

    2011-03-07

    ... Control and Prevention (CDC) has pioneered research on the toxicological properties and characteristics of nanoparticles. This research has involved characterizing occupationally relevant nanoparticles for predicting... explosion safety, (8) recommendations and guidance, (9) communication and information, and (10) applications...

  15. Planning and Preparing for Emergency Response to Transport Accidents Involving Radioactive Material. Safety Guide

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on various aspects of emergency planning and preparedness for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material, including the assignment of responsibilities. It reflects the requirements specified in Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and those of Safety Series No. 115, International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Framework for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 3. Responsibilities for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 4. Planning for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 5. Preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; Appendix I: Features of the transport regulations influencing emergency response to transport accidents; Appendix II: Preliminary emergency response reference matrix; Appendix III: Guide to suitable instrumentation; Appendix IV: Overview of emergency management for a transport accident involving radioactive material; Appendix V: Examples of response to transport accidents; Appendix VI: Example equipment kit for a radiation protection team; Annex I: Example of guidance on emergency response to carriers; Annex II: Emergency response guide.

  16. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a 60Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    Wooten, H. Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating 60 Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create 60 Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The 60 Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All 60 Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for 60 Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all 60 Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial 60 Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system

  17. Risk analysis in oil spill response planning

    Chernoplekov, A.N.; Alexandrov, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tiered response is a basic approach to emergency plans, including oil spill response (OSR). This paper delineates a huge set of accidental scenarios within a certain tier of response generated by a computer during risk assessment. Parameters such as the amount of oil spilled, duration of discharge and types of losses should be provided in OSR scenarios. Examples of applications include offshore installations, sub sea or onshore pipelines, and localized onshore facilities. The paper demonstrates how to use risk analysis results for delineating all likely spills into groups that need a specific tier response. The best world practices and Russian regulatory approaches were outlined and compared. Corresponding algorithms were developed and their application in pipelines was presented. The algorithm combines expert's skills and spill trajectory modeling with the net environmental benefit analysis principle into the incident specific emergency response planning. 9 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs

  18. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Comprehensive Environmentally Response, Compensation, and Liability Act

    1991-12-31

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  19. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O' Hara

    2004-11-30

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  20. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification. Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    Fink, R.; Hill, D.; O'Hara, J.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces

  1. Planning the medical response to radiological accidents

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive substances and other sources of ionizing radiation are used to assist in diagnosing and treating diseases, improving agricultural yields, producing electricity and expanding scientific knowledge. The application of sources of radiation is growing daily, and consequently the need to plan for radiological accidents is growing. While the risk of such accidents cannot be entirely eliminated, experience shows that most of the rare cases that have occurred could have been prevented, as they are often caused by human error. Recent radiological accidents such as those at Chernobyl (Ukraine 1986), Goiania (Brazil 1987), San Salvador (El Salvador 1989), Sor-Van (Israel 1990), Hanoi (Viet Nam 1992) and Tammiku (Estonia 1994) have demonstrated the importance of adequate preparation for dealing with such emergencies. Medical preparedness for radiological accidents must be considered an integral part of general emergency planning and preparedness and established within the national framework for radiation protection and safety. An IAEA Technical Committee meeting held in Istanbul in 1988 produced some initial guidance on the subject, which was subsequently developed, reviewed and updated by groups of consultants in 1989, 1992 and 1996. Special comments were provided by WHO, as co-sponsor of this publication, in 1997. This Safety Report outlines the roles and tasks of health authorities and hospital administrators in emergency preparedness for radiological accidents. Health authorities may use this document as the basis for their medical management in a radiological emergency, bearing in mind that adaptations will almost certainly be necessary to take into account the local conditions. This publication also provides information relevant to the integration of medical preparedness into emergency plans

  2. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants: Criteria for utility offsite planning and preparedness: Final report

    Podolak, E.M. Jr.; Sanders, M.E.; Wingert, V.L.; Donovan, R.W.

    1988-09-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have added a supplement to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1 that provides guidance for the development, review, and evaluation of utility offsite radiological emergency response planning and preparedness for those situations in which state and/or local governments decline to participate in emergency planning. While this guidance primarily applies to plants that do not have full-power operating licenses, it does have relevance to operating nuclear power plants

  3. 78 FR 4150 - Update of NIOSH Nanotechnology Strategic Plan for Research and Guidance

    2013-01-18

    ... for predicting whether these particles pose a risk of adverse health effects and for providing...) Support the creation of guidance materials to inform nanomaterial workers, employers, health professionals... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC-2013-0001...

  4. 76 FR 55923 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Submission of Warning Plans for Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco...

    2011-09-09

    ... Advertising Act (FCLAA) when that requirement takes effect. On June 22, 2009, the President signed the Family... Advertising Act, as amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, when that requirement takes effect. DATES: Although you can comment on any guidance at any time (see 21 CFR 10.115(g)(5)), to...

  5. Career Guidance for Student Nurses: An Unmet Need.

    Marsland, Louise

    1996-01-01

    A British survey of 1,164 new registered nurses (1,015 responses) asked about career guidance they received related to applying for their first job, taking postbasic courses, and making longer-term plans. Few received much guidance, especially about individual career planning. (SK)

  6. Pulmonary Masses: Initial Results of Cone-beam CT Guidance with Needle Planning Software for Percutaneous Lung Biopsy

    Braak, Sicco J., E-mail: sjbraak@gmail.com [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Herder, Gerarda J. M., E-mail: j.herder@antoniusziekenhuis.nl [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Pulmonology (Netherlands); Heesewijk, Johannes P. M. van, E-mail: j.heesewijk@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Strijen, Marco J. L. van, E-mail: m.van.strijen@antoniusziekenhuis.nl [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) findings using cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) guidance (CBCT guidance) and compared to conventional biopsy guidance techniques. Methods: CBCT guidance is a stereotactic technique for needle interventions, combining 3D soft-tissue cone-beam CT, needle planning software, and real-time fluoroscopy. Between March 2007 and August 2010, we performed 84 Tru-Cut PLBs, where bronchoscopy did not provide histopathologic diagnosis. Mean patient age was 64.6 (range 24-85) years; 57 patients were men, and 25 were women. Records were prospectively collected for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy. We also registered fluoroscopy time, room time, interventional time, dose-area product (DAP), and complications. Procedures were divided into subgroups (e.g., location, size, operator). Results: Mean lesion diameter was 32.5 (range 3.0-93.0) mm, and the mean number of samples per biopsy procedure was 3.2 (range 1-7). Mean fluoroscopy time was 161 (range 104-551) s, room time was 34 (range 15-79) min, mean DAP value was 25.9 (range 3.9-80.5) Gy{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, and interventional time was 18 (range 5-65) min. Of 84 lesions, 70 were malignant (83.3%) and 14 were benign (16.7%). Seven (8.3%) of the biopsy samples were nondiagnostic. All nondiagnostic biopsied lesions proved to be malignant during surgical resection. The outcome for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 86-96), 100% (95% CI 82-100), 100% (95% CI 96-100), 66.7% (95% CI 55-83), and 91.7% (95% CI 86-96), respectively. Sixteen patients (19%) had minor and 2 (2.4%) had major complications. Conclusion: CBCT guidance is an effective method for PLB, with results comparable to CT/CT fluoroscopy guidance.

  7. Pulmonary Masses: Initial Results of Cone-beam CT Guidance with Needle Planning Software for Percutaneous Lung Biopsy

    Braak, Sicco J.; Herder, Gerarda J. M.; Heesewijk, Johannes P. M. van; Strijen, Marco J. L. van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) findings using cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) guidance (CBCT guidance) and compared to conventional biopsy guidance techniques. Methods: CBCT guidance is a stereotactic technique for needle interventions, combining 3D soft-tissue cone-beam CT, needle planning software, and real-time fluoroscopy. Between March 2007 and August 2010, we performed 84 Tru-Cut PLBs, where bronchoscopy did not provide histopathologic diagnosis. Mean patient age was 64.6 (range 24–85) years; 57 patients were men, and 25 were women. Records were prospectively collected for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy. We also registered fluoroscopy time, room time, interventional time, dose–area product (DAP), and complications. Procedures were divided into subgroups (e.g., location, size, operator). Results: Mean lesion diameter was 32.5 (range 3.0–93.0) mm, and the mean number of samples per biopsy procedure was 3.2 (range 1–7). Mean fluoroscopy time was 161 (range 104–551) s, room time was 34 (range 15–79) min, mean DAP value was 25.9 (range 3.9–80.5) Gy·cm −2 , and interventional time was 18 (range 5–65) min. Of 84 lesions, 70 were malignant (83.3%) and 14 were benign (16.7%). Seven (8.3%) of the biopsy samples were nondiagnostic. All nondiagnostic biopsied lesions proved to be malignant during surgical resection. The outcome for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 86–96), 100% (95% CI 82–100), 100% (95% CI 96–100), 66.7% (95% CI 55–83), and 91.7% (95% CI 86–96), respectively. Sixteen patients (19%) had minor and 2 (2.4%) had major complications. Conclusion: CBCT guidance is an effective method for PLB, with results comparable to CT/CT fluoroscopy guidance.

  8. Participation and Choice in Funded Pension Plans : Guidance for the Netherlands from Worldwide Diversity

    Garcia Huitron, Manuel; Ponds, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth comparison of funded pension savings plans around the world. The large variety in plan designs is a reflection of historical, cultural, and institutional diversity. We postulate a new classification consisting of four role models of funded pension plans, primarily

  9. British Columbia inland oil spill response plan

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of the organization, procedures and duties of the provincial government in response to inland oil spills stemming from pipeline or tank-farm rupture, train derailment and vehicle accidents in British Columbia. Provincial response strategies were reviewed, along with their relationships to various policies and standards. Public, infrastructure and environmental protection were identified as key factors. Incident notification procedures were detailed, including outlines of roles, event criteria and call for incident management teams. Agreements and cost recovery issues were examined. The characteristics of site response were reviewed, including details of communications, tactical planning, and unified command among local and federal governments. The role of First Nations and responsible parties was also addressed. Details of shore cleanup, wildlife rescue, decontamination, and waste handling strategies were presented. The organization, missions and duties for an incident management team were outlined, along with a summary of operational guidelines and information on team positions and the establishment of joint information centres. The involvement of cooperating agencies was examined. An incident command system was also presented, including details of planning, operations, logistics, and organization. A checklist of individual duties was provided, with details of responsibilities, safety issues and general instructions for all team members. tabs., figs

  10. Some guidance on preparing validation plans for the DART Full System Models.

    Gray, Genetha Anne; Hough, Patricia Diane; Hills, Richard Guy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-03-01

    Planning is an important part of computational model verification and validation (V&V) and the requisite planning document is vital for effectively executing the plan. The document provides a means of communicating intent to the typically large group of people, from program management to analysts to test engineers, who must work together to complete the validation activities. This report provides guidelines for writing a validation plan. It describes the components of such a plan and includes important references and resources. While the initial target audience is the DART Full System Model teams in the nuclear weapons program, the guidelines are generally applicable to other modeling efforts. Our goal in writing this document is to provide a framework for consistency in validation plans across weapon systems, different types of models, and different scenarios. Specific details contained in any given validation plan will vary according to application requirements and available resources.

  11. A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents

    1993-09-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a results, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request. 2 tabs

  12. Pre-operative planning and intra-operative guidance in modern neurosurgery: a review of 300 cases.

    Wadley, J.; Dorward, N.; Kitchen, N.; Thomas, D.

    1999-01-01

    Operative neurosurgery has recently entered an exciting era of image guided surgery or neuronavigation and application of this novel technology is beginning to have a significant impact in many ways in a variety of intracranial procedures. In order to fully assess the advantages of image guided techniques over conventional planning and surgery in selected cases, detailed prospective evaluation has been carried out during the advanced development of an optically tracked neuronavigation system. Over a 2-year period, 300 operative neurosurgical procedures have been performed with the assistance of interactive image guidance, as well as the development of new software applications and hardware tools. A broad range of intracranial neurosurgical procedures were seen to benefit from image guidance, including 163 craniotomies, 53 interactive stereotactic biopsies, 7 tracked neuroendoscopies and 37 complex skull base procedures. The most common pathological diagnoses were cerebral glioma in 98 cases, meningioma in 64 and metastasis in 23. Detailed analysis of a battery of postoperative questions revealed benefits in operative planning, appreciation of anatomy, lesion location, safety of surgery and greatly enhanced surgical confidence. The authors believe that image guided surgical technology, with new developments such as those described, has a significant role to play in contemporary neurosurgery and its widespread adoption in practice will be realised in the near future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10615186

  13. Guidance for growth factors, projections, and control strategies for the 15 percent rate-of-progress plans

    1993-03-01

    Section 182(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act (Act) requires all ozone nonattainment areas classified as moderate and above to submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision by November 15, 1993, which describes, in part, how the areas will achieve an actual volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reduction of at least 15 percent during the first 6 years after enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). In addition, the SIP revision must describe how any growth in emissions from 1990 through 1996 will be fully offset. It is important to note that section 182(b)(1) also requires the SIP for moderate areas to provide for reductions in VOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for ozone by November 15, 1996. The guidance document focuses on the procedures for developing 1996 projected emissions inventories and control measures which moderate and above ozone nonattainment areas must include in their rate-of-progress plans. The document provides technical guidance to support the policy presented in the 'General Preamble: Implementation of Title I of the CAAA of 1990' (57 FR 13498)

  14. Guidance on accidents involving radioactivity

    1989-01-01

    This annex contains advice to Health Authorities on their response to accidents involving radioactivity. The guidance is in six parts:-(1) planning the response required to nuclear accidents overseas, (2) planning the response required to UK nuclear accidents a) emergency plans for nuclear installations b) nuclear powered satellites, (3) the handling of casualties contaminated with radioactive substances, (4) background information for dealing with queries from the public in the event of an accident, (5) the national arrangements for incident involving radioactivity (NAIR), (6) administrative arrangements. (author)

  15. Radiological emergency response planning in Pennsylvania

    Henderson, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The most important aspect of emergency preparedness is to recognize and accept the fact that there exists a potential for a problem or a condition and that it requires some attention. Emergency plans should be sufficiently flexible so as to accommodate the emergency situation as it unfolds. Of the several emergency responses that may be taken following a nuclear power plant accident evacuation evokes the greatest attention and discussion as to whether it is truly a feasible option. Movements of people confined to mass care facilities or on life support systems involve special requirements. The Three Mile Island accident has been the most studied nuclear incident in the history of the nuclear power reactor industry. The findings of these reports will have a major influence on nuclear power issues as they are addressed in the future. The question remains as to whether the political leadership will be willing to provide the resources required by the emergency plan. Future safety and emergency response to nuclear accidents depend upon Government and industry acting responsibly and not merely responding to regulations. The Three Mile Island accident has had some beneficial side effects for the emergency management community. It has: increased the level of awareness and importance of emergency planning; served as a catalyst for the sharing of experiences and information; encouraged standardization of procedures; and emphasized the need for identifying and assigning responsibilities. The Emergency Management Organization in responding to a disaster situation does not enjoy the luxury of time. It needs to act decisively and correctly. It does not often get a second chance. Governments, at all levels, and the nuclear power industry have been put on notice as a result of Three Mile Island. The future of nuclear energy may well hang in the balance, based upon the public's perception of the adequacy of preparedness and safety measures being taken. (author)

  16. Livelihood planning and career guidance in Palestine and the broader MENA region

    Sultana, Ronald G.

    2014-04-01

    It has often been stated that the Arab "world" is faced by a demographic challenge which is very different to that of many countries in the global North. As the Arab Spring has shown, youths across the region of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are keen to make a mark, and despite the internal conflicts and contests for power and influence, many young leaders are hoping to establish new forms of social cohesion which could lead to peace and prosperity within a globalised, interconnected world. This paper focuses on one aspect of the relationship between Arab youth and society, namely the difficult transition between formal education and employment. Drawing on, among other sources, a comparative study carried out across eight Arab states, the role which career education and guidance can play in the process is examined. This is followed by a case study of Palestine where, despite very challenging and difficult political and economic circumstances, significant and promising efforts have been made to help young people develop the life skills needed to engage with schooling in ways that do not only enhance learning, but also facilitate access to work and to self-employment. The paper argues that while career education and guidance (CEG) cannot possibly be expected to solve the disconnect between education and work, it does have a role to play in enhancing learning, in supporting transitions, and thus in contributing to both social and economic development goals.

  17. Planning and implementing nuclear emergency response facilities

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    After Three Mile Island, Arkansas Nuclear One produced a planning document called TMI-2 Response Program. Phase I of the program defined action plans in nine areas: safety assessment, training, organization, public information, communication, security, fiscal-governmental, technical and logistical support. Under safety assessment, the staff was made even better prepared to handle radioactive material. Under training, on site simulators for each unit at ANO were installed. The other seven topics interface closely with each other. An emergency control center is diagrammed. A habitable technical support system was created. A media center, with a large media area, and an auditorium, was built. Electric door strike systems increased security. Phone networks independently run via microwave were installed. Until Three Mile Island, logistical problems were guesswork. That incident afforded an opportunity to better identify and prepare for these problems

  18. C-arm CT for planning and guidance of extrahepatic embolizations

    Wacker, F.K.; Meissner, O.A.; Meyer, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiological vascular embolizations are complex procedures that require exact imaging of the target region to facilitate safe and effective treatment. The purpose of this paper is to present the technique and feasibility of flat detector C-arm computed tomography (C-arm CT) for control and guidance of extrahepatic abdominal embolization procedures. C-arm CT images can provide important information on both vascular and cross-sectional anatomy of the target region, help in determining therapy endpoints and provide follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions.The cases presented demonstrate that C-arm CT images are beneficial for abdominal embolization procedures and facilitate precise treatment. (orig.) [de

  19. Hurricane Season Public Health Preparedness, Response, and Recovery Guidance for Health Care Providers, Response and Recovery Workers, and Affected Communities - CDC, 2017.

    2017-09-22

    CDC and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) have guidance and technical materials available in both English and Spanish to help communities prepare for hurricanes and floods (Table 1). To help protect the health and safety of the public, responders, and clean-up workers during response and recovery operations from hurricanes and floods, CDC and ATSDR have developed public health guidance and other resources; many are available in both English and Spanish (Table 2).

  20. An emergency response plan for transportation

    Fontaine, M.V.; Guerel, E.

    2000-01-01

    Transnucleaire is involved in road and rail transport of nuclear fuel cycle materials. To comply with IAEA recommendations, Transnucleaire has to master methods of emergency response in the event of a transport accident. Considering the utmost severe situations, Transnucleaire has studied several cases and focused especially on an accident involving a heavy cask. In France, the sub-prefect of each department is in charge of the organisation of the emergency teams. The sub-prefect may request Transnucleaire to supply experts, organisation, equipment and technical support. The Transnucleaire Emergency Response Plan covers all possible scenarios of land transport accidents and relies on: (i) an organisation ready for emergency situations, (ii) equipment dedicated to intervention, and (iii) training of its own experts and specialised companies. (author)

  1. The UK national response plan: An 'all-risk' approach

    Englefield, C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The UK has been using and regulating radioactive materials for many years. The law, and the regulatory systems to implement it have developed over time, to meet the perceived need. More recently, the threat of inadvertent movements of, and illicit trafficking in radioactive materials has become apparent. This relatively new challenge cannot be met by a single U.K. law enforcement body. There will be Police and security services interest in any cases that arise of deliberate trafficking in fissile materials, and there will be statutory concerns for Customs and Excise. At the operational level, they do not have radioanalytical services and radiation protection support immediately available, as the frequency of occurrence of such incidents is extremely low. However, the typical case is an inadvertent movement. These usually involve orphaned sources, where none of the above law enforcement bodies have a statutory locus. In such cases, it is the UK environment agencies that take the lead (as regulators of radioactive substances), together with Health and Safety Executive as regulators of radiation safety. However they do not have all the statutory powers needed to intervene. This is in contrast to the position in some other countries. The UK paper at the International Conference of Regulators in Buenos Aires in December 2000 described the UK's co-ordination work to create synergies between law enforcement bodies and potentially affected industry groups. This was described as an 'All Risk Approach'. This is seen as the best way to manage an effective response to the challenge, given that the legislation cannot at present provide all the necessary powers. This new paper will describe the UK Response Plan and how it is designed to cover all risk: radiological and socio-economic. It will also describe how the Plan is being tested and validated as a project. The plan draws on UK Emergency Planning policy, as well as IAEA guidance on the Prevention, Detection and

  2. Development of preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery and the guidance for clinical applications.

    Chen, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jun; Gu, Xin; Sun, Yi; Politis, Constantinus

    2016-04-01

    Preoperative planning is of great importance for transforaminal endoscopic techniques applied in percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy. In this study, a modular preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery was developed and demonstrated. The path searching method is based on collision detection, and the oriented bounding box was constructed for the anatomical models. Then, image reformatting algorithms were developed for multiplanar reconstruction which provides detailed anatomical information surrounding the virtual planned path. Finally, multithread technique was implemented to realize the steady-state condition of the software. A preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery (TE-Guider) was developed; seven cases of patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations were planned preoperatively using TE-Guider. The distances to the midlines and the direction of the optimal paths were exported, and each result was in line with the empirical value. TE-Guider provides an efficient and cost-effective way to search the ideal path and entry point for the puncture. However, more clinical cases will be conducted to demonstrate its feasibility and reliability.

  3. High precision bladder cancer irradiation by integrating a library planning procedure of 6 prospectively generated SIB IMRT plans with image guidance using lipiodol markers

    Meijer, Gert Johan; Toorn, Peter-Paul van der; Bal, Matthieu; Schuring, Danny; Weterings, Jan; Wildt, Michel de

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To increase local control and decrease side effects for urinary bladder cancer patients by integrating a library planning procedure with image guidance using lipiodol markers. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with T2-T4N0M0 grade 2–3 invasive bladder carcinoma were treated according to an online adaptive protocol. Initially, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was demarcated during cystoscopy by injecting several drops of lipiodol in the submucosa around the tumour. Subsequently two CT scans were acquired with a full bladder and a voided bladder. On both scans, the boost volume (GTV) and the low-risk bladder volume were delineated. Using an interpolation tool, six concomitant boost IMRT plans with increasing bladder volumes were generated. For each fraction the procedure at the treatment unit was as follows: Firstly, a ConeBeam-CT was acquired and based on the amount of bladder filling the best fitting bladder contours and corresponding GTV and IMRT plans were selected. Secondly, the lipiodol markers were registered using the corresponding GTV contours and it was verified that the corresponding 95%-isodose surface covered the entire bladder. Finally, an online setup correction was applied based on this registration and the corresponding treatment plan was irradiated. Results: The lipiodol markers were very useful in outlining the GTV at the planning CT and for daily setup correction. While the patients strived for a full bladder filling at time of the treatment, this was seldom accomplished. Due to our protocol an appropriate plan with adequate coverage of the PTV and without excessive dose to healthy tissue was delivered every day. The treatment was very well tolerated by all patients. At the end of the treatment no grade 3 urinary or gastro-intestinal toxicity was observed. After a median follow-up of 28 months two local relapses occurred. Conclusion: Using the library planning approach combined with online image guidance using lipiodol markers, we

  4. High precision bladder cancer irradiation by integrating a library planning procedure of 6 prospectively generated SIB IMRT plans with image guidance using lipiodol markers.

    Meijer, Gert Johan; van der Toorn, Peter-Paul; Bal, Matthieu; Schuring, Danny; Weterings, Jan; de Wildt, Michel

    2012-11-01

    To increase local control and decrease side effects for urinary bladder cancer patients by integrating a library planning procedure with image guidance using lipiodol markers. Twenty patients with T2-T4N0M0 grade 2-3 invasive bladder carcinoma were treated according to an online adaptive protocol. Initially, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was demarcated during cystoscopy by injecting several drops of lipiodol in the submucosa around the tumour. Subsequently two CT scans were acquired with a full bladder and a voided bladder. On both scans, the boost volume (GTV) and the low-risk bladder volume were delineated. Using an interpolation tool, six concomitant boost IMRT plans with increasing bladder volumes were generated. For each fraction the procedure at the treatment unit was as follows: Firstly, a ConeBeam-CT was acquired and based on the amount of bladder filling the best fitting bladder contours and corresponding GTV and IMRT plans were selected. Secondly, the lipiodol markers were registered using the corresponding GTV contours and it was verified that the corresponding 95%-isodose surface covered the entire bladder. Finally, an online setup correction was applied based on this registration and the corresponding treatment plan was irradiated. The lipiodol markers were very useful in outlining the GTV at the planning CT and for daily setup correction. While the patients strived for a full bladder filling at time of the treatment, this was seldom accomplished. Due to our protocol an appropriate plan with adequate coverage of the PTV and without excessive dose to healthy tissue was delivered every day. The treatment was very well tolerated by all patients. At the end of the treatment no grade 3 urinary or gastro-intestinal toxicity was observed. After a median follow-up of 28 months two local relapses occurred. Using the library planning approach combined with online image guidance using lipiodol markers, we were able to deliver a highly conformal dose distribution

  5. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants. Interim report

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a common reference and interim guidance source for: state and local governments and nuclear facility operators in the development of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other Federal agency personnel engaged in the review of state, local government, and licensee plans and preparedness

  6. 77 FR 71008 - Guidance for Industry: Enforcement Policy Concerning Rotational Warning Plans for Smokeless...

    2012-11-28

    ... warning statements in advertising, for each brand of smokeless tobacco product ``in accordance with a plan... the Tobacco Control Act amended the Smokeless Tobacco Act to give smokeless tobacco the meaning that..., ``smokeless tobacco'' means any tobacco product that consists of cut, ground, powdered, or leaf tobacco and...

  7. Improving CT quality with optimized image parameters for radiation treatment planning and delivery guidance

    Guang-Pei Chen

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: CT image quality can be improved with the IQE protocols created in this study, to provide better soft tissue contrast, which would be beneficial for use in radiation therapy, e.g., for planning data acquisition or for IGRT for hypo-fractionated treatments.

  8. SMART Security Cooperation Objectives: Improving DoD Planning and Guidance

    2016-01-01

    been validated, they would constitute the basis for dis- cussions with defense industry representatives, providing them with a clear idea of DoD...tasks, which constitute the basic steps required to achieve effects. These stra- tegic tasks are evaluated by measures of performance, resources...Serbia Slovakia Slovenia Sweden Turkey Ukraine Vatican Wales EUCOM Findings 51 well as in the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan. At the CCMD level

  9. Criteria and Planning Guidance for Ex-Plant Harvesting to Support Subsequent License Renewal

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glass, Samuel W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Knobbs, Katherine J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-12-07

    As U.S. nuclear power plants look to subsequent license renewal (SLR) to operate for a 20-year period beyond 60 years, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the industry will be addressing technical issues around the capability of long-lived passive components to meet their functionality objectives. A key challenge will be to better understand likely materials degradation mechanisms in these components and their impacts on component functionality and margins to safety. Research addressing many of the remaining technical gaps in these areas for SLR may greatly benefit from materials sampled from plants (decommissioned or operating). Because of the cost and inefficiency of piecemeal sampling, there is a need for a strategic and systematic approach to sampling materials from structures, systems, and components (SSC) in both operating and decommissioned plants. This document describes a potential approach for sampling (harvesting) materials that focuses on prioritizing materials for sampling using a number of criteria. These criteria are based on an evaluation of technical gaps identified in the literature, research needs to address these technical gaps, and lessons learned from previous harvesting campaigns. The document also describes a process for planning future harvesting campaigns; such a plan would include an understanding of the harvesting priorities, available materials, and the planned use of the materials to address the technical gaps.

  10. 75 FR 1060 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Planning for the Effects of High Absenteeism to Ensure...

    2010-01-08

    .... This draft guidance applies to manufacturers of drug and therapeutic biologic products regulated by...: General preparedness through employee education and immunization, Prioritization of manufactured products... of information technology. The draft guidance recommends that manufacturers of drug and therapeutic...

  11. Regulatory guidance document

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM's evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7

  12. Understanding public sexual harassment : lesson plans and session guidance, key Stages 3 & 4.

    Vera-Gray, F.; Bullough, J.

    2017-01-01

    These lesson plans have been written by Dr. Fiona Vera-Gray at Durham University and Jayne Bullough from Rape Crisis South London (RASASC). They were created through a partnership project with Doll’s Eye Theatre, Purple Drum, RASASC, Dr. Maria Garner, and Dr. Fiona Vera-Gray. Lessons on public sexual harassment were drawn from the work of Dr. Vera-Gray at Durham University. The project was made possible by Durham Law School’s Impact Acceleration Grant from the Economics and ...

  13. A hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Lei Yu; Wu Qiuwen

    2010-01-01

    Offline adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been used to effectively correct and compensate for prostate motion and reduce the required margin. The efficacy depends on the characteristics of the patient setup error and interfraction motion through the whole treatment; specifically, systematic errors are corrected and random errors are compensated for through the margins. In online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, the translational setup error and inter-fractional prostate motion are corrected through pre-treatment imaging and couch correction at each fraction. However, the rotation and deformation of the target are not corrected and only accounted for with margins in treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the offline ART strategy is necessary for an online IGRT protocol and to evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy. First, to investigate the rationale of the hybrid strategy, 592 cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after each fraction for an online IGRT protocol from 16 patients were analyzed. Specifically, the characteristics of prostate rotation were analyzed. It was found that there exist systematic inter-fractional prostate rotations, and they are patient specific. These rotations, if not corrected, are persistent through the treatment fraction, and rotations detected in early fractions are representative of those in later fractions. These findings suggest that the offline adaptive replanning strategy is beneficial to the online IGRT protocol with further margin reductions. Second, to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy, 412 repeated helical CT scans from 25 patients during the course of treatment were included in the replanning study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, clinical target volume, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles) were included in the simulation. The contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were

  14. 75 FR 74045 - Guidance on Planning, Implementing, Maintaining, and Enforcing Institutional Controls at...

    2010-11-30

    ... comment directly to EPA without going through http://www.regulations.gov your e-mail address will be... of the Administrative Procedures Act. However, EPA recognizes the potential importance of this... concerning ICs that may be needed and relied upon to complement other response actions (i.e., engineered...

  15. Differences and simIlarities in the use of the portfolio and personal development plan for guidance in various vocational schools in the Netherlands

    Mittendorff, K.M.; Jochems, W.M.G.; Meijers, F.; Brok, den P.J.

    2008-01-01

    In The Netherlands, a growing number of vocational education and training institutes are implementing competence-based approaches to learning, including new career guidance practices. These practices often involve instruments such as portfolios or personal development plans, and are aimed at

  16. Evaluation criteria for emergency response plans in radiological transportation

    Lindell, M.K.; Perry, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper identifies a set of general criteria which can be used as guides for evaluating emergency response plans prepared in connection with the transportation of radiological materials. The development of criteria takes the form of examining the meaning and role of emergency plans in general, reviewing the process as it is used in connection with natural disasters and other nonnuclear disasters, and explicitly considering unique aspects of the radiological transportation setting. Eight areas of critical importance for such response plans are isolated: notification procedures; accident assessment; public information; protection of the public at risk; other protective responses; radiological exposure control; responsibility for planning and operations; and emergency response training and exercises. (Auth.)

  17. ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response

    Baker, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was published. Suggestions

  18. Improving health promotion through central rating of interventions: the need for Responsive Guidance.

    Kok, Maarten Olivier; Bal, Roland; Roelofs, Caspar David; Schuit, Albertine Jantine

    2017-11-23

    beneficial, the evidence based-inspired ERS approach is too limited to guide both intervention development and the improvement of health promotion in practice. To better contribute to improving health promotion, a more reflexive and responsive guidance approach is required, namely one which stimulates the improvement of different intervention aspects, provides targeted recommendations to practitioners and provides feedback to those who develop and rate interventions.

  19. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a ⁶⁰Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System.

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. All (60)Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for (60)Co was within 20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. A commercial (60)Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Building a year 2000 emergency response plan

    Riopel, P.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation emphasized the importance of developing an emergency plan to minimize any impacts in the event that something may go wrong when the clock changes over at midnight on December 31, 1999. It is usually impossible to anticipate what kinds of emergencies will happen. Planning for emergencies does not have to be an intimidating task. Hazard analysis is a subjective way to investigate what can go wrong, the likelihood of it happening relative to some other potential emergency, and the seriousness of the event. In general, emergency planning for Y2K should not be significantly different from planning for any other type of emergency. Y2K is not the emergency. The events that occur as a consequence of Y2K are. It is these events that should be the focus of a Year 2000 emergency plan

  1. Apollo guidance, navigation and control: Guidance system operations plans for manned LM earth orbital and lunar missions using Program COLOSSUS 3. Section 7: Erasable memory programs

    Hamilton, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Erasable-memory programs (EMPs) designed for the guidance computers used in the command (CMC) and lunar modules (LGC) are described. CMC programs are designated COLOSSUS 3, and the associated EMPs are identified by a three-digit number beginning with 5. LGC programs are designated LUMINARY 1E, and the associated EMPs are identified, with one exception, by a three-digit number beginning with 1. The exception is EMP 99. The EMPs vary in complexity from a simple flagbit setting to a long and intricate logical structure. They all, however, cause the computer to behave in a way not intended in the original design of the programs; they accomplish this off-nominal behavior by some alteration of erasable memory to interface with existing fixed-memory programs to effect a desired result.

  2. Design and evaluation of a portable intra-operative unified-planning-and-guidance framework applied to distal radius fracture surgery.

    Magaraggia, Jessica; Wei, Wei; Weiten, Markus; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vetter, Sven; Franke, Jochen; John, Adrian; Egli, Adrian; Barth, Karl; Angelopoulou, Elli; Hornegger, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    During a standard fracture reduction and fixation procedure of the distal radius, only fluoroscopic images are available for planning of the screw placement and monitoring of the drill bit trajectory. Our prototype intra-operative framework integrates planning and drill guidance for a simplified and improved planning transfer. Guidance information is extracted using a video camera mounted onto a surgical drill. Real-time feedback of the drill bit position is provided using an augmented view of the planning X-rays. We evaluate the accuracy of the placed screws on plastic bones and on healthy and fractured forearm specimens. We also investigate the difference in accuracy between guided screw placement versus freehand. Moreover, the accuracy of the real-time position feedback of the drill bit is evaluated. A total of 166 screws were placed. On 37 plastic bones, our obtained accuracy was [Formula: see text] mm, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in tip position and orientation (azimuth and elevation), respectively. On the three healthy forearm specimens, our obtained accuracy was [Formula: see text] mm, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. On the two fractured specimens, we attained: [Formula: see text] mm, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. When screw plans were applied freehand (without our guidance system), the achieved accuracy was [Formula: see text] mm, [Formula: see text], while when they were transferred under guidance, we obtained [Formula: see text] mm, [Formula: see text]. Our results show that our framework is expected to increase the accuracy in screw positioning and to improve robustness w.r.t. freehand placement.

  3. New Tsunami Response, Mitigation, and Recovery Planning "Playbooks" for California (USA) Maritime Communities

    Wilson, R. I.; Lynett, P. J.; Miller, K.; Eskijian, M.; Dengler, L. A.; Ayca, A.; Keen, A.; Admire, A. R.; Siegel, J.; Johnson, L. A.; Curtis, E.; Hornick, M.

    2015-12-01

    The 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan tsunamis both struck the California coast offering valuable experience and raised a number of significant issues for harbor masters, port captains, and other maritime entities. There was a general call for more planning products to help guide maritime communities in their tsunami response, mitigation, and recovery activities. The State of California is working with the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), and other tsunami experts to provide communities with new tsunami planning tools to address these issues: Response Playbooks and plans have been developed for ports and harbors identifying potential tsunami current hazards and related damage for various size events. Maps have been generated showing minor, moderate, and severe damage levels that have been linked to current velocity thresholds of 3, 6, and 9 knots, respectively. Knowing this information allows harbor personnel to move ships or strengthen infrastructure prior to the arrival of distant source tsunamis. Damage probability tools and mitigation plans have been created to help reduce tsunami damage by evaluating the survivability of small and large vessels in harbors and ports. These results were compared to the actual damage assessments performed in California and Japan following the 2011 Japanese tsunami. Fragility curves were developed based on current velocity and direction to help harbor and port officials upgrade docks, piles, and related structures. Guidance documents are being generated to help in the development of both local and statewide recovery plans. Additional tools, like post-tsunami sediment and debris movement models, will allow harbors and ports to better understand if and where recovery issues are most likely to occur. Streamlining the regulatory and environmental review process is also a goal of the guidance. These maritime products and procedures are being integrated into guidance

  4. Agency procedures for the NRC incident response plan. Final report

    1983-02-01

    The NRC Incident Response Plan, NUREG-0728/MC 0502 describes the functions of the NRC during an incident and the kinds of actions that comprise an NRC response. The NRC response plan will be activated in accordance with threshold criteria described in the plan for incidents occurring at nuclear reactors and fuel facilities involving materials licensees; during transportation of licensed material, and for threats against facilities or licensed material. In contrast to the general overview provided by the Plan, the purpose of these agency procedures is to delineate the manner in which each planned response function is performed; the criteria for making those response decisions which can be preplanned; and the information and other resources needed during a response. An inexperienced but qualified person should be able to perform functions assigned by the Plan and make necessary decisions, given the specified information, by becoming familiar with these procedures. This rule of thumb has been used to determine the amount of detail in which the agency procedures are described. These procedures form a foundation for the training of response personnel both in their normal working environment and during planned emergency exercises. These procedures also form a ready reference or reminder checklist for technical team members and managers during a response

  5. MO-DE-210-07: Investigation of Treatment Interferences of a Novel Robotic Ultrasound Radiotherapy Guidance System with Clinical VMAT Plans for Liver SBRT Patients

    Gong, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Bruder, R; Schweikard, A [University of Luebeck, Luebeck, Schleswig-Holstein (Germany); Schlosser, J [SoniTrack Systems Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States); Hristov, D [Stanford University Cancer Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the proportion of liver SBRT cases in which robotic ultrasound image guidance concurrent with beam delivery can be deployed without interfering with clinically used VMAT beam configurations. Methods: A simulation environment incorporating LINAC, couch, planning CT, and robotic ultrasound guidance hardware was developed. Virtual placement of the robotic ultrasound hardware was guided by a target visibility map rendered on the CT surface. The map was computed on GPU by using the planning CT to simulate ultrasound propagation and attenuation along rays connecting skin surface points to a rasterized imaging target. The visibility map was validated in a prostate phantom experiment by capturing live ultrasound images of the prostate from different phantom locations. In 20 liver SBRT patients treated with VMAT, the simulation environment was used to place the robotic hardware and ultrasound probe at imaging locations indicated on the visibility map. Imaging targets were either entire PTV (range 5.9–679.5 ml) or entire GTV (range 0.9–343.4 ml). Presence or absence of mechanical collisions with LINAC, couch, and patient body as well as interferences with treated beams were recorded. Results: For PTV targets, robotic ultrasound guidance without mechanical collision was possible in 80% of the cases and guidance without beam interference was possible in 60% of the cases. For the smaller GTV targets, these proportions were 95% and 85% correspondingly. GTV size (1/20), elongated shape (1/20), and depth (1/20) were the main factors limiting the availability of non-interfering imaging positions. Conclusion: This study indicates that for VMAT liver SBRT, robotic ultrasound tracking of a relevant internal target would be possible in 85% of cases while using treatment plans currently deployed in the clinic. With beam re-planning in accordance with the presence of robotic ultrasound guidance, intra-fractional ultrasound guidance may be an option for 95% of the

  6. MO-DE-210-07: Investigation of Treatment Interferences of a Novel Robotic Ultrasound Radiotherapy Guidance System with Clinical VMAT Plans for Liver SBRT Patients

    Gong, R; Bruder, R; Schweikard, A; Schlosser, J; Hristov, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the proportion of liver SBRT cases in which robotic ultrasound image guidance concurrent with beam delivery can be deployed without interfering with clinically used VMAT beam configurations. Methods: A simulation environment incorporating LINAC, couch, planning CT, and robotic ultrasound guidance hardware was developed. Virtual placement of the robotic ultrasound hardware was guided by a target visibility map rendered on the CT surface. The map was computed on GPU by using the planning CT to simulate ultrasound propagation and attenuation along rays connecting skin surface points to a rasterized imaging target. The visibility map was validated in a prostate phantom experiment by capturing live ultrasound images of the prostate from different phantom locations. In 20 liver SBRT patients treated with VMAT, the simulation environment was used to place the robotic hardware and ultrasound probe at imaging locations indicated on the visibility map. Imaging targets were either entire PTV (range 5.9–679.5 ml) or entire GTV (range 0.9–343.4 ml). Presence or absence of mechanical collisions with LINAC, couch, and patient body as well as interferences with treated beams were recorded. Results: For PTV targets, robotic ultrasound guidance without mechanical collision was possible in 80% of the cases and guidance without beam interference was possible in 60% of the cases. For the smaller GTV targets, these proportions were 95% and 85% correspondingly. GTV size (1/20), elongated shape (1/20), and depth (1/20) were the main factors limiting the availability of non-interfering imaging positions. Conclusion: This study indicates that for VMAT liver SBRT, robotic ultrasound tracking of a relevant internal target would be possible in 85% of cases while using treatment plans currently deployed in the clinic. With beam re-planning in accordance with the presence of robotic ultrasound guidance, intra-fractional ultrasound guidance may be an option for 95% of the

  7. Emergency planning and response preparedness in Slovenia

    Martincic, R.; Frlin-Lubi, A.; Usenicnik, B.

    2000-01-01

    Disasters do occur and so do nuclear or radiological accidents. Experience has shown that advance emergency response preparedness is essential in order to mitigate the consequences of an accident. In Slovenia, the Civil Protection Organization is the responsible authority for emergency preparedness and response to any kind of disasters. The Krko Nuclear Power Plant is the only nuclear power plant in Slovenia. To date the plant has operated safely and no serious incidents have been recorded. Slovenia nevertheless, maintains a high level of emergency preparedness, which is reflected in the area of prevention and safety and in the area of emergency response preparedness. The emergency management system for nuclear emergencies is incorporated into an overall preparedness and response system. The paper presents an overview of nuclear or radiological emergency response preparedness in Slovenia and its harmonization with the international guidelines. (author)

  8. Environmental aspects of contingency planning and spill response

    Hillman, S.O.

    1993-01-01

    Alyeska Pipeline Service Company has implemented an incident command system (ICS) for crisis management within the company for response to spills at all company facilities including the Valdez Marine Terminal. The system is also used by Alyeska acting as the initial response contractor for TAPS laden tankers within Prince William Sound. During the past three years, Alyeska has undertaken a complete review of the spill prevention and response plans for these areas. This poster session focuses on the environmental aspects of the response planning efforts. Information is available on contingency planning updates in the areas of dispersant use, burning as a response tool, bioremediation of marine oil spills, waste management, permitting, coastal resource and sensitive habitat data base, and wildlife protection and management. All of these subjects are addressed in the resource documents (RD) supplementing the contingency plans. The RD revisions have been a coordinated effort, involving operators, agencies, and the public through the citizen advisory group

  9. Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans - Implementing Sustainability: The Institutional-Behavioral Dimension

    Malone, Elizabeth L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Sanquist, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wolfe, Amy K. [ORNL; Diamond, Rick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Payne, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Dion, Jerry [ORNL

    2013-06-01

    This document is part of a larger, programmatic effort to assist federal agencies in taking action and changing their institutions to achieve and maintain federal sustainability goals, while meeting their mission goals. FEMP is developing guidance for federal agency efforts to enable institutional behavior change for sustainability, and for making sustainability “business as usual.” The driving requirement for this change is Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. FEMP emphasizes strategies for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy utilization as critical components of attaining sustainability, and promotes additional non-energy action pathways contained in EO 13514. This report contributes to the larger goal by laying out the conceptual and evidentiary underpinnings of guidance to federal agencies. Conceptual frameworks focus and organize the development of guidance. We outline a series of progressively refined conceptual frameworks, including a multi-layer approach, key steps in sustainability implementation, a process view of specific approaches to institutional change, the agency Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans (SSPPs), and concepts related to context-specific rules, roles and tools for sustainability. Additionally, we tap pertinent bodies of literature in drawing eight evidence-based principles for behavior change. These principles are important foundations upon which to build in selecting strategies to effect change in organizations. Taken together, this report presents a suite of components that inform the training materials, presentations, web site, and other products that provide guidance to federal agencies.

  10. Oil spill response planning on the Columbia river estuary

    Christopherson, S.K.; Slyman, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Columbia River Estuary lies along the Washington-Oregon state boundary on the west coast of the United States. The entire area is environmentally very sensitive with numerous large, shallow bays, exposed mud flats, wetland areas, and central channels having maximum currents of three to four knots. These features make the area very difficult to protect from an oil spill. Spill response is further complicated because of the many different state, federal, and local jurisdictions with mandated responsibilities in oil spill response and environmental protection. Under the leadership of the US Coast Guard Marine Safety Office in Portland, Oregon, a steering group was established to guide the development of a response plan for the Columbia River Estuary. A concerted effort was made to include representatives from response organizations, natural resource agencies, and resource users from federal, state, and local governments, and commercial sectors in the planning process. The first draft of an operational response plan was completed the summer of 1992 through a combination of technical workshops, field trips, and small working groups meeting with local communities. The Columbia River Estuary Response Plan prioritizes areas to protect; identifies specific response strategies for protecting these areas; and outlines the Iogistics needed to implement these strategies, including equipment needs, the location of staging areas, and the identification of pre-designed command posts. The local spill response cooperative and oil transportation industry are using the plan to coordinate the purchase of response equipment and the staging of this equipment at numerous locations along the river. The key to success is ensuring that all the groups responding to an event participate in the planning process together. This process has worked well and will serve as a model for response planning for other areas along the Columbia River and coastal areas of Washington and Oregon

  11. Technology disaster response and recovery planning a LITA guide

    Mallery, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Featuring contributions from librarians who offer hard-won advice gained from personal experience, this compendium leads readers through a step-by-step process of creating a library technology disaster response and recovery plan.

  12. Executive Order 13693: Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade; Guidance for Federal Agencies on Executive Order 13693 -- Federal Fleet Management

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) are issuing comprehensive guidance on the federal fleet requirements of Executive Order (E.O.) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade (E.O. 13693), to help federal agencies subject to the executive order develop an overall approach for reducing total fleet greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fleet-wide per-mile GHG emissions, and ensure the approach helps these agencies meet their requirements. Three key GHG emissions reduction strategies - right-sizing fleets to mission, increasing fleet fuel efficiency, and displacing petroleum with alternative fuel use - are essential to meeting the requirements and are discussed further in this document. This guidance document is intended to help agency Chief Sustainability Officers (CSOs) and headquarters fleet managers craft tailored executable plans that achieve the purpose of E.O. 13693. The guidance will assist agencies in completing the first phase of a comprehensive fleet management framework by identifying the strategies each agency will then implement to meet or exceed its requirements.

  13. Responsible energy planning and environmental stewardship

    Harrison, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses the idea that operating in the best interests of the environment is also in the best interests of shareholders. Topics discussed include utility environmental policy, cost-effective recycling of materials, environmental impact of new power sources, and energy efficiency. The author states that being environmentally responsible goes beyond good business, it is the right thing to do

  14. Emergency response planning in hospitals, United States: 2003-2004.

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-08-20

    This study presents baseline data to determine which hospital characteristics are associated with preparedness for terrorism and natural disaster in the areas of emergency response planning and availability of equipment and specialized care units. Information from the Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Preparedness Supplements to the 2003 and 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys was used to provide national estimates of variations in hospital emergency response plans and resources by residency and medical school affiliation, hospital size, ownership, metropolitan statistical area status, and Joint Commission accreditation. Of 874 sampled hospitals with emergency or outpatient departments, 739 responded for an 84.6 percent response rate. Estimates are presented with 95 percent confidence intervals. About 92 percent of hospitals had revised their emergency response plans since September 11, 2001, but only about 63 percent had addressed natural disasters and biological, chemical, radiological, and explosive terrorism in those plans. Only about 9 percent of hospitals had provided for all 10 of the response plan components studied. Hospitals had a mean of about 14 personal protective suits, 21 critical care beds, 12 mechanical ventilators, 7 negative pressure isolation rooms, and 2 decontamination showers each. Hospital bed capacity was the factor most consistently associated with emergency response planning and availability of resources.

  15. Interim guidance on the Standard Review Plan for the review of financial assurance mechanisms for decommissioning under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, and 70

    1988-12-01

    Interim Guidance on the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of Financial Assurance Mechanisms for Decommissioning under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, and 70 is prepared for the guidance of Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff reviewers in performing reviews of applications from material licensees affected by the decommissioning regulations established June 27, 1988 (53FR24018). The principal purpose of the SRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of staff reviews and to present a base from which to evaluate the financial assurance aspects of the applications. NUREG-1337, identifies who performs the review, the matters that are reviewed, the basis of the review, how the review is performed, and the conclusions that are sought. 3 refs

  16. Sites Requiring Facility Response Plans, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2006) [facility_response_plan_sites_la_EPA_2007

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Locations of facilities in Louisiana requiring Oil Pollution Act (OPA) Facility Response Plans (FRP). The dataset was provided by the Region 6 OSCARS program....

  17. Samen werken aan Automatische VoertuigGeleiding: aanzet tot een businessplan [Working together on Automated Vehicle Guidance; Preliminary business plan

    Coemet, M.J.; Vos, A.P. de; Arem, B. van; Brookhuis, K.A.; Heijer, T.; Marchau, V.A.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Automated Vehicle Guidance (AVG) systems are expected to have a major impact on traffic and transport. In order to reap the benefits and offset or avoid the disadvantages of AVG, correct and timely choices will have to be made. The Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Manage-ment, the

  18. Radiological Protection Plan an ethic responsibility

    Huhn, Andrea; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The Radiological Protection Plan - PPR, quoted by the Regulatory Standard 32, requires to be maintained at the workplace and at the disposal of the worker's inspection the PPR, for it to be aware of their work environment and the damage that can be caused by misuse of ionizing radiation. Objective: to discuss the interface between PPR and ethical reflection. Method: this is a reflective study. Discussion and results: regulatory norm 32 points out that the worker who conducts activities in areas where there are sources of ionizing radiation should know the risks associated with their work. However, it is considered that the sectors of hospital radiology the multidisciplinary health team is exposed to ionizing radiation and has not always aware of the harm caused by it, so end up unprotected conduct their activities. Concomitantly, recent studies emphasize the radiological protection and concern for the dangers of radiation on humans, but rather refer to the legislation about the radiological protection. In this context an ethical reflection is necessary, seeking to combine work ethics liability to care in protecting themselves and the other with the institutional conditions for this protection becomes effective

  19. Responsive consumerism: empowerment in markets for health plans.

    Elbel, Brian; Schlesinger, Mark

    2009-09-01

    American health policy is increasingly relying on consumerism to improve its performance. This article examines a neglected aspect of medical consumerism: the extent to which consumers respond to problems with their health plans. Using a telephone survey of five thousand consumers conducted in 2002, this article assesses how frequently consumers voice formal grievances or exit from their health plan in response to problems of differing severity. This article also examines the potential impact of this responsiveness on both individuals and the market. In addition, using cross-group comparisons of means and regressions, it looks at how the responses of "empowered" consumers compared with those who are "less empowered." The vast majority of consumers do not formally voice their complaints or exit health plans, even in response to problems with significant consequences. "Empowered" consumers are only minimally more likely to formally voice and no more likely to leave their plan. Moreover, given the greater prevalence of trivial problems, consumers are much more likely to complain or leave their plans because of problems that are not severe. Greater empowerment does not alleviate this. While much of the attention on consumerism has focused on prospective choice, understanding how consumers respond to problems is equally, if not more, important. Relying on consumers' responses as a means to protect individual consumers or influence the market for health plans is unlikely to be successful in its current form.

  20. Emergency response guidance for the first 48 hours after the outdoors detonation of an explosive radiological dispersal device

    Harper, Frederick Taylor; Musolino, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01

    Strategies and decisions to protect emergency responders, the public, and critical infrastructure against the effects of a radiological dispersal device detonated outdoors must be made in the planning stage, not in the early period just after an attack. This contrasts with planning for small-scale types of radiological or nuclear emergencies, or for a large-scale nuclear-power-type accident that evolves over many hours or days before radioactivity is released to the environment, such that its effects can be prospectively modeled and analyzed. By the time it is known an attack has occurred, most likely there will have been casualties, all the radioactive material will have been released, plume growth will be progressing, and there will be no time left for evaluating possible countermeasures. This paper offers guidance to planners, first responders, and senior decision makers to assist them in developing strategies for protective actions and operational procedures for the first 48 hours after an explosive radiological dispersal device has been detonated

  1. WE-E-BRF-01: The ESTRO-AAPM Joint Symposium On Imaging for Proton Treatment Planning and Guidance

    Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Garching, Bavaria (Germany); Dauvergne, D [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kruse, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    beam scale for active proton beam delivery in homogenous targets. The development of gamma cameras, that has been studied by several groups worldwide over the last years, now reaches - for some of them - the stage of being applicable in clinical conditions, with real size prototypes and count rate capability matching the therapeutic beam intensities. We will review the different concepts of gamma cameras, the advantages and limitations of this method, and the main challenges that should still be overcome before the widespread of prompt gamma quality assurance for proton and hadrontherapy. Jon Kruse (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA) Treatment simulation images for proton therapy are used to determine proton stopping power and range in the patient. This talk will discuss the careful control of CT numbers and conversion of CT number to stopping power required in proton therapy. Imaging for treatment guidance of proton therapy also presents unique challenges which will be addressed. Among them are the enhanced relationship between internal anatomy changes and dosimetry, the need for imaging to support adaptive planning protocols, and high operational efficiency. Learning Objectives: To learn about the possibilities of using activation products to determine the range of particle beams in a patient treatment setting To be informed on an alternative methodology using prompt gamma detectors To understand the impact of the accuracy of the knowledge of the patient information with respect to the delivered treatment.

  2. Ethics and professional responsibility: Essential dimensions of planned home birth.

    McCullough, Laurence B; Grünebaum, Amos; Arabin, Birgit; Brent, Robert L; Levene, Malcolm I; Chervenak, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    Planned home birth is a paradigmatic case study of the importance of ethics and professionalism in contemporary perinatology. In this article we provide a summary of recent analyses of the Centers for Disease Control database on attendants and birth outcomes in the United States. This summary documents the increased risks of neonatal mortality and morbidity of planned home birth as well as bias in Apgar scoring. We then describe the professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics, which is based on the professional medical ethics of two major figures in the history of medical ethics, Drs. John Gregory of Scotland and Thomas Percival of England. This model emphasizes the identification and careful balancing of the perinatologist's ethical obligations to pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients. This model stands in sharp contrast to one-dimensional maternal-rights-based reductionist model of obstetric ethics, which is based solely on the pregnant woman's rights. We then identify the implications of the professional responsibility model for the perinatologist's role in directive counseling of women who express an interest in or ask about planned home birth. Perinatologists should explain the evidence of the increased, preventable perinatal risks of planned home birth, recommend against it, and recommend planned hospital birth. Perinatologists have the professional responsibility to create and sustain a strong culture of safety committed to a home-birth-like experience in the hospital. By routinely fulfilling these professional responsibilities perinatologists can help to prevent the documented, increased risks planned home birth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Flight plan: taking responsibility for aviation emissions

    Kimber, Hugo

    2007-07-01

    Aviation emissions make up less than 2 per cent of the world total, but are rising fast. These environmental costs must be balanced with development gains, however: air travel can hugely benefit poor countries' economies. The good news is that much can be done to curb emissions while keeping those benefits on board. Workable tools and guidelines for passengers, travel providers, government and airlines are waiting in the wings. A vital area for improvement is the way emissions are reported and calculated. Airlines, travel providers and carbon companies currently report emissions using a hotchpotch of methods, all producing varying results. Basing reports on fuel usage will make standardised ecolabelling possible. With an informed choice, passengers can buy tickets strategically and so encourage airlines to use more efficient technology. Airports can integrate ways of limiting emissions into their daily operations, while governments can invest in better air traffic control. Collective responsibility — and action — could make flying a much more sustainable means of travel.

  4. Guidance for implementing an environmental, safety, and health-assurance program. Volume 15. A model plan for line organization environmental, safety, and health-assurance programs

    Ellingson, A.C.; Trauth, C.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This is 1 of 15 documents designed to illustrate how an Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) Assurance Program may be implemented. The generic definition of ES and H Assurance Programs is given in a companion document entitled An Environmental, Safety and Health Assurance Program Standard. This particular document presents a model operational-level ES and H Assurance Program that may be used as a guide by an operational-level organization in developing its own plan. The model presented here reflects the guidance given in the total series of 15 documents.

  5. Is the faculty of family planning and reproductive health care guidance on emergency contraception being followed in general practice? An audit in the West Midlands, UK.

    Bannister, Lisa; Macve, Joanna; Pinkey, Benjamin; Webberley, Helen

    2007-07-01

    In 2003, the Faculty of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care (FFPRHC) of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists published guidance on emergency contraception (EC). A literature search revealed no published work describing doctors' actions when prescribing EC. In order to assess the extent to which the FFPRHC Guidance is being followed in general practice, an audit of the medical notes of women requesting EC between January 2003 and December 2004 in six general practice surgeries located in the West Midlands, UK was conducted. From the medical notes, discussions between health care professionals and patients requesting EC regarding ongoing contraceptive needs, the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the availability of the emergency intrauterine device (IUD) were recorded. A total of 718 emergency contraceptive pill consultations were analysed. The median age for presentation was 24 years. The 20-24 years age group accounted for the most consultations (30.9%). In 40% of consultations there was no evidence of future contraceptive needs having been discussed. Only 20 (2.8%) consultation notes contained evidence that STIs had been discussed. Chlamydia tests were undertaken in only 15/718 (1.7%) consultations. In only 10 (1.4%) of the consultations was the IUD discussed with the patient as an alternative form of EC. This audit suggests that the FFPRHC Guidance on EC is not being followed in general practice, and therefore patients requesting EC may not be receiving the highest standard of care.

  6. Planificación y desarrollo de un mapa de habilidades TIC en Orientación Planning and Development of an ICT-skills Map in Guidance

    Luis Martín Sobrado Fernández

    2010-10-01

    Vocational Guidance: evaluation, educational guidance, career development, counselling, information management, research and evaluation and placement. It also took into account three types of approaches to the counsellor regarding the use of ICT in guidance, as a resource, medium and development of guidance materials and two of these tools (websites and e-mail. The effective integration of Information and Communication Technologies and effective use of them, by guidance professional is based on their competences in them. This resource, open and flexible, requires a continuous updating in order to be useful in the implementation of guidance tasks, in self-assessment of competence by professionals; diagnosis of deficits in the design, planning and development training and guidance actions. It is also an instrument of great relevance and usefulness to guidance practitioners to explore the training needs and their occupational profile and to motivate their professional development.

  7. A Response to Papatola and Lustig's Paper on Navigating a Managed Care Peer Review: Guidance for Clinicians Using Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Children on the Autism Spectrum.

    Kornack, Julie; Herscovitch, Brandon; Williams, Ashley L

    2017-12-01

    In their 2016 article, "Navigating a Managed Care Peer Review: Guidance for Clinicians Using Applied Behavior Analysis [ABA] in the Treatment of Children on the Autism Spectrum," Papatola and Lustig provide an overview of the managed care process, discuss the medical necessity of ABA, and offer guidance to clinicians on how to navigate the managed care peer review process. Given that the authors are employed by a large international health insurance carrier and conduct peer reviews on behalf of that organization, this response seeks to provide guidance from both the clinical and public policy perspectives that reflect best practices in the field of autism treatment. This response is not written with the intention of providing or replacing legal advice; rather, this paper offers health care providers of ABA an essential understanding of some of the laws that govern and support their efforts to secure medically necessary treatment and the mechanisms in place with which to challenge decisions by managed care organizations, health plans, and health insurance issuers that may be contrary to best practices. Finally, suggestions are offered on how to navigate a peer review to ensure optimal outcomes and, when necessary, to lay the groundwork to overturn a funding source decision that does not reflect best practices or the standard of care in ABA-based autism treatment.

  8. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands after Chernobyl

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Kerkhoven, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    After Chernobyl an extensive project on nuclear emergency planning and response was started in the Netherlands. The objective of this project was to develop a (governmental) structure to cope with accidents with radioactive materials, that can threaten the Dutch community and neighbouring countries. The project has resulted in a new organizational structure for nuclear emergency response, that differs on major points from the existing plans and procedures. In this paper an outline of the new structure is given. Emphasis is placed on accidents with nuclear power plants

  9. 77 FR 69631 - Draft Guidance for IRBs, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB Responsibilities for Reviewing...

    2012-11-20

    ...) is needed in order to assure the protection of the rights and welfare of human subjects in clinical... responsibilities. To enhance human subject protection and reduce regulatory burden, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) and FDA have been actively working to...

  10. Guidance document for the preparation of waste management plans for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Clark, C. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A project waste management (WM) plan is required for all Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program remedial investigation, decommission and decontamination (D ampersand D), and remedial action (RA) activities. The project WM plan describes the strategy for handling, packaging, treating, transporting, characterizing, storing, and/or disposing of waste produced as part of ORNL ER Program activities. The project WM plan also contains a strategy for ensuring worker and environmental protection during WM activities

  11. Computer Security Incident Response Planning at Nuclear Facilities

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to assist Member States in developing comprehensive contingency plans for computer security incidents with the potential to impact nuclear security and/or nuclear safety. It provides an outline and recommendations for establishing a computer security incident response capability as part of a computer security programme, and considers the roles and responsibilities of the system owner, operator, competent authority, and national technical authority in responding to a computer security incident with possible nuclear security repercussions

  12. Otter Brook Lake, New Hampshire Connecticut River Basin, Flood Control Project, Solid Waste Management Plan

    1996-01-01

    .... This plan provides guidance to establish policies, and responsibilities, procedures, and instructions for proper handling, storage, disposal and recycling of solid waste generated at the flood control project...

  13. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a (60)Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    : The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup...

  14. 45 CFR 673.5 - Emergency response plan.

    2010-10-01

    ... ensure that: (a) The vessel owner's or operator's shipboard oil pollution emergency plan, prepared and... Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78), has provisions for prompt and effective response action to such emergencies as might arise in the performance of...

  15. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    All water services systems, irrespective of size, location etc., should have emergency response plans (ERPs) to guide officials, stakeholders and consumers through emergencies, as part of managing risks in the water supply system. Emergencies in the water supply system may result from, among other causes, natural ...

  16. SCLC extensive disease – treatment guidance by extent or/and biology of response?

    Eckert, Franziska; Müller, Arndt-Christian

    2008-01-01

    In extensive disease of small cell lung cancer a doubling of the one-year-survival rate was reported in August 2007 by prophylactic cranial irradiation applied to patients who experienced any response to initial chemotherapy. We discuss the treatment concept of extensive disease in the face of the latest results and older studies with additional thoracic irradiation in this subgroup. A randomized trial with prophylactic cranial irradiation published in 1999 demonstrated an improvement of 5-year-overall-survival for complete responders (at least at distant levels) receiving additional thoracic radiochemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone (9.1% vs. 3.7%). But, these results were almost neglected and thoracic radiotherapy was not further investigated for good responders of extensive disease. However, in the light of current advances by prophylactic cranial irradiation these findings are noteworthy on all accounts. Considering both, a possible interpretation of these data could be a survival benefit of local control by simultaneous thoracic radiochemotherapy in the case of improved distant control due to chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation. Furthermore the question arises whether the tumor biology indicated by the response to chemotherapy should be integrated in the present classification

  17. Emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia

    Nur Rahmah Hidayati; Pande Made Udiyani

    2009-01-01

    All nuclear facilities in Indonesia are owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). The programs and activities of emergency planning and preparedness in Indonesia are based on the existing nuclear facilities, i.e. research reactors, research reactor fuel fabrication plant, radioactive waste treatment installation and radioisotopes production installation. The assessment is conducted to learn of status of emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia and to support the preparation of future Nuclear Power Plant. The assessment is conducted by comparing the emergency preparedness and response system in Indonesia to the system in other countries such as Japan and Republic of Korea, since the countries have many Nuclear Power Plants and other nuclear facilities. As a result, emergency preparedness response plan for existing nuclear facility in Indonesia has been implemented in many activities such as environmental monitoring program, facility monitoring equipment, and the continuous exercise of emergency preparedness and response. However, the implementation need law enforcement for imposing the responsibility of the coordinators in National Emergency Preparedness Plan. It also needs some additional technical support systems which refer to the system in Japan or Republic of Korea. The systems must be completed with some real time monitors which will support the emergency preparedness and response organization. The system should be built in NPP site before the first NPP will be operated. The system should be connected to an Off Site Emergency Center under coordination of BAPETEN as the regulatory body which has responsibility to control of nuclear energy in Indonesia. (Author)

  18. Transformation Planning of Ecotourism Systems to Invigorate Responsible Tourism

    Yun Eui Choi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to introduce transformation plans that can stimulate responsible ecotourism by using systems thinking to solve ecotourism problems in Korea. Systems thinking is a research method used to understand the operating mechanisms of the variables that influence an entire system, in order to identify its problems. The four types of ecotourism systems are classified as follows: low-infrastructure and resident-initiated, high-infrastructure and resident-initiated, high-infrastructure and government-initiated and low-infrastructure and government-initiated. These systems vary based on the need for tourism facilities and the form of governance. Each type of system is analyzed using the systems thinking process (dynamic thinking, causal thinking, feedback thinking, strategic thinking at representative ecotourism sites in Jeollanam-do and the following transformation plans are proposed to improve the responsibility at the tourism sites: First, local residents will develop a system to manage and operate ecotourism ventures and establish cooperative governance structures to strengthen the local capacity. Second, ecotourism operators will improve the quality of their educational and interpretative programs and tourist information platforms in order to raise awareness of the responsibilities of ecotourists. Third, ecotourism systems that are improved through ecotourists’ and tour operators' heightened senses of responsibility can sustain ecotourism independently. These transformation plans can be applied to policy proposals for revitalizing ecotourism, to guidelines for improving community resilience and to biological habitat protection plans. This study is meaningful in that it discusses the role of stakeholders in ecotourism planning and promoting responsible tourism and their role in utilizing and conserving natural resources accordingly.

  19. Time orientation, planning horizons and responsibility into the future

    Svenson, O.; Nilsson, G.

    1988-01-01

    Subjects of four categories (social science students, engineering students, retired people and nuclear waste experts) were asked about past events, planning, risks and future time with emphasis on energy related issues and in particular questions concerning spent nuclear waste. Among, the results reported it was found that events in the past were located more or less correctly and that events further back systematically too close to the present. Today's responsibility into the future was judged to cover 3 to 6 generations ahead and an adequate planning horizon for a local community to be on the average 11 to 14 years. Adequate planning horizons for the handling of spent nuclear fuel were judged to be from 100 to 500 years. The responsibility for effects of today's decisions was judged to be from about 100 to 300 years into the future for environmental pollution and from about 50 to 600 years for nuclear waste. However, non-negliqable proportions of the subjects choose a more moral standpoint and gave answers indicating that responsibility had to be unlimited. Some sex differences were found and an interaction with age offered as a hypothesis to be investigated in the future. Interrelations between clusters of questions revealed some links from past time and planning to judgements of environmental and nuclear power related risks. (orig.)

  20. RE-PLAN: An Extensible Software Architecture to Facilitate Disaster Response Planning

    O’Neill, Martin; Mikler, Armin R.; Indrakanti, Saratchandra; Tiwari, Chetan; Jimenez, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Computational tools are needed to make data-driven disaster mitigation planning accessible to planners and policymakers without the need for programming or GIS expertise. To address this problem, we have created modules to facilitate quantitative analyses pertinent to a variety of different disaster scenarios. These modules, which comprise the REsponse PLan ANalyzer (RE-PLAN) framework, may be used to create tools for specific disaster scenarios that allow planners to harness large amounts of disparate data and execute computational models through a point-and-click interface. Bio-E, a user-friendly tool built using this framework, was designed to develop and analyze the feasibility of ad hoc clinics for treating populations following a biological emergency event. In this article, the design and implementation of the RE-PLAN framework are described, and the functionality of the modules used in the Bio-E biological emergency mitigation tool are demonstrated. PMID:25419503

  1. Emergency planning and response - role nad responsibilities of the regulatory body

    Nizamska, M.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a emergency plan and organisation of adequate emergency preparedness in case of radiological accident in NPP cannot be effective without the appropriate preparatory work. In most countries, also in Republic of Bulgaria, several organisations are identified to have a potential role to play in a radiological emergency. For these reason is very important to have a national organisation, with a mandate to organise, inspect and co-ordinate the possibility of ministries and institution to react in case of radiological emergency, i.e. to quarantine the possibility for implementation of adequate counter measure for protection of the population and environment in case of radiological emergency in NPP. For the purposes of the emergency planning and response the NPP operator, ministries and the institutions developed an Emergency plan - NPP Emergency Plan and National Emergency Plan. The development of the emergency plans will be impossible without the good co-operation of the organisations which have a responsibilities in a radiological emergency. Once emergency plans are adopted, each individual organisation, also the NPP operator, must ensure that in can carry out its role effectively in accordance with the emergency plan and can develop the appropriate organisation for action and implementation of protection counter measures. For testing the emergency plans a regular exercise must be organised. Periodic reviews of the plan and modifications, based on actual events and exercise experience must be performed. The main aim of these report is to present the Bulgarian emergency planning organisation and response by explaining the national emergency panning and response legislation, implementation of IAEA recommendations and exercise experience

  2. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  3. Image Guidance

    Guidance that explains the process for getting images approved in One EPA Web microsites and resource directories. includes an appendix that shows examples of what makes some images better than others, how some images convey meaning more than others

  4. 33 CFR Appendix D to Part 154 - Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix D to Part 154—Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans 1. General 1.1The portion of the plan dealing with training is one of the key elements of a response plan. This concept is clearly expressed by... that the plans often do not provide sufficient information in the training section of the plan for...

  5. 77 FR 43405 - Final Standard Review Plan, Branch Technical Position 7-19 on Guidance for Evaluation of...

    2012-07-24

    ... in the Standard Review Plan (SRP), Chapter 7, for those standard reactor designs that have not been... methods: Federal Rulemaking Web site: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC-2010... search, select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and then select ``Begin Web- based ADAMS Search.'' For problems...

  6. Transformation Planning of Ecotourism Systems to Invigorate Responsible Tourism

    Yun Eui Choi; Minsun Doh; Samuel Park; Jinhyung Chon

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce transformation plans that can stimulate responsible ecotourism by using systems thinking to solve ecotourism problems in Korea. Systems thinking is a research method used to understand the operating mechanisms of the variables that influence an entire system, in order to identify its problems. The four types of ecotourism systems are classified as follows: low-infrastructure and resident-initiated, high-infrastructure and resident-initiated, high-infr...

  7. 33 CFR Appendix C to Part 155 - Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans

    2010-07-01

    .... 155, App. C Appendix C to Part 155—Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans 1. General 1.1The portion of the plan dealing with training is one of the key elements of a response plan. This concept is... included training as one of the sections required in a vessel or facility response plan. In reviewing...

  8. MO-A-BRD-08: Radiosurgery Beyond Cancer: Real-Time Target Localization and Treatment Planning for Cardiac Radiosurgery Under MRI Guidance

    Ipsen, S [University of Luebeck, Luebeck, SH (Germany); University of Sydney, Camperdown (Australia); Blanck, O [CyberKnife Zentrum Norddeutschland, Guestrow, MV (Germany); Oborn, B [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Bode, F [Medical Clinic II, Section for Electrophysiology, UKSH, Luebeck, SH (Germany); Liney, G [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting >2.5M Americans and >4.5M Europeans. AF is usually treated with minimally-invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. Radiosurgery of the pulmonary veins (PV) has been proposed for AF treatment, however is challenging due to the complex respiratory and cardiac motion patterns. We hypothesize that an MRI-linac could solve the difficult real-time targeting and adaptation problem. In this study we quantified target motion ranges on cardiac MRI and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time MRI tracking was applied. Methods: For the motion study, four human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion on coronal and axial cine planes was analyzed using a template matching algorithm. For the planning study, an ablation line at each PV antrum was defined as target on an AF patient scheduled for catheter ablation. Various safety margins ranging from 0mm (perfect tracking) to 8mm (untracked motion) were added to the target defining the PTV. 30Gy single fraction IMRT plans were then generated. Finally, the influence of a 1T magnetic field on treatment beam delivery was calculated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance. Results: The motion study showed the mean respiratory motion of the target area on MRI was 8.4mm (SI), 1.7mm (AP) and 0.3mm (LR). Cardiac motion was small (<2mm). The planning study showed that with increasing safety margins to encompass untracked motion, dose tolerances for OARs such as the esophagus and airways were exceeded by >100%. The magnetic field had little impact on the dose distribution. Conclusion: Our results indicate that real-time MRI tracking of the PVs seems feasible. Accurate image guidance for high-dose AF radiosurgery is essential since safety margins covering untracked target motion will result in unacceptable treatment plans.

  9. 21 CFR 7.59 - General industry guidance.

    2010-04-01

    ... Responsibilities § 7.59 General industry guidance. A recall can be disruptive of a firm's operation and business... and maintain a current written contingency plan for use in initiating and effecting a recall in... such product distribution records as are necessary to facilitate location of products that are being...

  10. ISS Payload Operations: The Need for and Benefit of Responsive Planning

    Nahay, Ed; Boster, Mandee

    2000-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) payload operations are controlled through implementation of a payload operations plan. This plan, which represents the defined approach to payload operations in general, can vary in terms of level of definition. The detailed plan provides the specific sequence and timing of each component of a payload's operations. Such an approach to planning was implemented in the Spacelab program. The responsive plan provides a flexible approach to payload operations through generalization. A responsive approach to planning was implemented in the NASA/Mir Phase 1 program, and was identified as a need during the Skylab program. The current approach to ISS payload operations planning and control tends toward detailed planning, rather than responsive planning. The use of detailed plans provides for the efficient use of limited resources onboard the ISS. It restricts flexibility in payload operations, which is inconsistent with the dynamic nature of the ISS science program, and it restricts crew desires for flexibility and autonomy. Also, detailed planning is manpower intensive. The development and implementation of a responsive plan provides for a more dynamic, more accommodating, and less manpower intensive approach to planning. The science program becomes more dynamic and responsive as the plan provides flexibility to accommodate real-time science accomplishments. Communications limitations and the crew desire for flexibility and autonomy in plan implementation are readily accommodated with responsive planning. Manpower efficiencies are accomplished through a reduction in requirements collection and coordination, plan development, and maintenance. Through examples and assessments, this paper identifies the need to transition from detailed to responsive plans for ISS payload operations. Examples depict specific characteristics of the plans. Assessments identify the following: the means by which responsive plans accommodate the dynamic nature of

  11. New Structure of Emergency Response Plan in Croatia

    Valcic, I.; Subasic, D.; Cavlina, N.

    1998-01-01

    The new structure of a national emergency response plan in the case of nuclear accident is based on general requirements of modernization according to international recommendations, with a new Technical Support Center as a so-called lead technical agency, with the plan adapted to the organization of the Civil Protection, with all necessary elements of preparedness for the event of a nuclear accident in Krsko NPP and Paks NPP and with such a plan of procedures that will, to greatest possible extent, be compatible with the existing plan in neighboring countries Slovenia and Hungary. The main requirement that direct s a new organization scheme for taking protective actions in the event of a nuclear accident, is the requirement of introducing a Technical Support Center. The basic role of TSC is collecting data and information on nuclear accident, analyzing and estimating development of an accident, and preparing proposals for taking protective actions and for informing the public. TSC is required to forward those proposals to the Civil Protection, which on the basis of evaluation of proposals makes decisions on implementation and surveillance of implementation of protective measures. (author)

  12. 33 CFR 155.1045 - Response plan requirements for vessels carrying oil as a secondary cargo.

    2010-07-01

    ... PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155.1045 Response plan requirements... actions. (4) The organizational structure that will be used to manage the response actions. This structure... with government agencies; (v) Spill response operations; (vi) Planning; (vii) Logistics support; and...

  13. Non-cable vehicle guidance

    Daugela, G.C.; Willott, A.M.; Chopiuk, R.G.; Thornton, S.E.

    1988-06-01

    The purpose is to determine the most promising driverless mine vehicle guidance systems that are not dependent on buried cables, and to plan their development. The project is presented in two phases: a preliminary study and literature review to determine whether suitable technologies exist to justify further work; and an in-depth assessment and selection of technologies for vehicle guidance. A large number of guidance elements are involved in a completely automated vehicle. The technologies that hold the best potential for development of guidance systems for mine vehicles are ultrasonics, radar, lasers, dead reckoning, and guidance algorithms. The best approach to adaptation of these technologies is on a step by step basis. Guidance modules that are complete in themselves and are designed to be integrated with other modules can provide short term benefits. Two modules are selected for development: the dragline operations monitor and automated machine control for optimized mining (AMCOM). 99 refs., 20 figs., 40 tabs.

  14. Emergency response plan for accidents in Saudi Arabia

    Al-Solaiman, K.M.; Al-Arfaj, A.M.; Farouk, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the general emergency plan for accidents involving radioactive materials in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Uses of radioactive materials and radiation sources and their associated potential accident are specified. Most general accident scenarios of various levels have been determined. Protective measures have been specified to reduce individual and collective doses arising during accident situations. Intervention levels for temporary exposure situations, as established in the IAEA's basic safety standards for protection against ionising radiation and for the safety of radiation sources, are adopted as national intervention levels. General procedures for implementation of the response plan, including notification and radiological monitoring instrumentation and equipment, are described and radiation monitoring teams are nominated. Training programs for the different parties which may be called upon to respond are studied and will be started. (author)

  15. Food selection criteria for disaster response planning in urban societies.

    Wien, Michelle; Sabaté, Joan

    2015-05-12

    Nutrition professionals that have menu planning and disaster management responsibilities should consider factors that have transcended from ancient to current times, in addition to recognizing societal trends that have led to our current increased vulnerability in the event of a disaster. Hence, we proceeded to develop a set of "Disaster Response Diets" (DRDs) for use in urban societies inclusive of the aforementioned considerations. A three-phase multidimensional approach was used to identify food groups suitable for creating a set of DRDs. Phase One consisted of calculating the percent daily nutrient intake and Drewnowski's naturally nutrient rich (NNR) score for an individual or mean composite for one serving of food from 11 specific food groups. In Phase Two, in addition to nutrient density, the 11 food groups were evaluated and scored based on the following DRD planning criteria: storage and handling properties, preparation ease and, cultural acceptance/individual tolerance. During Phase Three, three DRDs were developed based upon the data retrieved from Phases one and two. In Phase One, the NNR scores ranged from 2.1 for fresh fruits to 28.1 for dry cereals, a higher score indicating a higher nutrient density. During Phase Two, a maximum score of 12 was possible based on appropriateness for a disaster situation. Five plant-based food groups (dry cereals, nuts, dried fruits, grains and legumes) achieved a score ranging between 7 and 12, whereas the five fresh food groups were deemed ineligible due to sanitation and perishability concerns. During Phase Three, three DRDs (milk-inclusive, milk-free and Grab-and-Go) were developed as benchmarks for disaster response planning. Plant-based DRDs are universally acceptable and tolerated across cultures and religions. Therefore, we suggest nutrition professionals consider using a plant-based approach for creating DRDs for public health institutions and organizations.

  16. International guidance activities

    Richardson, Allan C.B.

    1989-01-01

    International principles for setting Protective Action Guides (PAGs) are contained in two key documents that contain identical statements. One is Publication Number 40 of the ICRP, which was issued in 1985. The title is 'Protection of the Public in the Event of Major Radiation Accidents, Principles for Planning'. The other is the IAEA's Safety Series Publication Number 72, also issued in 1985, written by many of the same authors and titled, 'Principles for Establishing Intervention Levels'. The principles that were set forth in these documents were identical, were incomplete, and they are, unfortunately, the only principles that are now in effect, while proposed revisions go through one draft after another. There are several such draft revisions that are of significance. The most important is that of the ICRP. The basic guidance that applies to most planned exposure to radiation is ICRP Publication 26. That document has been under revision by the Commission for a number of years, and the new version will, for the first time, include recommendations for emergency response. They are now getting close to closure, and I think it should be a very much improved and useful document. But it isn't finished yet. Such guidance doesn't get developed in a vacuum, and there have been a couple of parallel efforts which have provided significant input to the ICRP, which is essentially a behind-closed-doors effort. These other efforts are more open. One of these is being carried out within the IAEA, which has convened annual meetings of national experts for a number of years in Vienna, to generate a replacement for Safety Series No. 72, mentioned earlier. There is a meeting scheduled this December to complete this effort; and, hopefully, we will reach closure at that meeting on at least the basic principles. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has also been at work. It has convened a group of experts from member nations that have been developing recommendations. There is an overlap

  17. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen

    2011-01-01

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  18. Providing Career Guidance for Young Women.

    Colby, Pamela G.

    This module is directed at personnel working or planning to work in the areas of guidance, counseling, placement and follow-through in junior and senior high school settings, grades 7-12. The module topic is career guidance for young women of junior and senior high school age, aand the focus will be on providing nonbiased career guidance which…

  19. The One Plan Project: A cooperative effort of the National Response Team and the Region 6 Regional Response Team to simplify facility emergency response planning

    Staves, J.; McCormick, K.

    1997-01-01

    The National Response Team (NRT) in coordination with the Region 6 Response Team (RRT) have developed a facility contingency plan format which would integrate all existing regulatory requirements for contingency planning. This format was developed by a multi-agency team, chaired by the USEPA Region 6, in conjunction with various industry, labor, and public interest groups. The impetus for this project came through the USEPA Office of Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention (CEPPO). The current national oil and hazardous material emergency preparedness and response system is an amalgam of federal, state, local, and industrial programs which are often poorly coordinated. In a cooperative effort with the NRT, the CEPPO conducted a Presidential Review of federal agency authorities and coordination responsibilities regarding release prevention, mitigation, and response. Review recommendations led to a Pilot Project in USEPA Region 6. The Region 6 Pilot Project targeted end users in the intensely industrialized Houston Ship Channel (HSC) area, which is comprised of petroleum and petrochemical companies

  20. Ontario Hydro's transportation of radioactive material and emergency response plan

    Karmali, N.

    1993-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has been transporting radioactive material for almost 30 years without any exposure to the public or release to the environment. However, there have been three accidents involving Hydro's shipments of radioactive material. In addition to the quality packaging and shipping program, Ontario Hydro has an Emergency Response Plan and capability to deal with an accident involving a shipment of radioactive material. The Corporation's ability to respond, to effectively control and contain the situation, site remediation, and to provide emergency public information in the event of a road accident minimizes the risk to the public and the environment. This emphasizes their commitment to worker safety, public safety and impact to the environment. Response capability is mandated under various legislation and regulations in Canada

  1. 77 FR 31858 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pathologic Complete Response in Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk...

    2012-05-30

    ... of the drug. This draft guidance is intended to assist applicants in designing trials to support...., Bldg. 51, Rm. 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that... Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tatiana...

  2. Innovations in emergency response plans : making the useful application of the 2007 CDA guidelines for emergency response plans

    Stevenson, A.J. [Columbia Power Corp., Castlegar, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Columbia Power Corporation (CPC) changed its perspective and approach to emergency response plans (ERP) between 2002 and 2007 from one of administrative necessity to one of important functional reference. The new 2007 Canadian Dam Association Guidelines helped facilitate that transition for both CPC and all dam owners. As part of the licensing requirements for its new facility, CPC had an ERP commissioned and developed in 2002. A potential dam safety event occurred in 2004, which necessitated the need for the ERP to be put to use. However, at the time, it was found to be lacking in functionality for field personnel. As a result, CPC recognized the significance of having a functional ERP for field staff and undertook a substantial redraft between 2005 and 2007. This paper discussed the development of the ERP with particular reference to assessing the top potential emergency scenarios for the facility; development of response plans for the identified scenarios; a flow chart to guide personnel through the required actions; response checklist; detailed inspection checklists and any required forms, photos or specific information. It was concluded that the new ERP has been well received and has improved facility awareness and emergency preparedness. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  3. National response plan - Major nuclear or radiological accidents

    2014-02-01

    France has been implementing stringent radiation protection and nuclear safety and security measures for many years. However, this does not mean that the country is exempt from having to be prepared to deal with an emergency. Changes in France, Europe and other parts of the globe have made it necessary for France to reconsider how it responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies. As the potential impact of a nuclear or radiological accident can affect a wide range of activities, the plan described herein is based on a cross-sector and inter-ministerial approach to emergency response. The Chernobyl and Fukushima-Daiichi disasters are proof that the consequences of a major nuclear or radiological accident can affect all levels of society. These challenges are substantial and relate to: public health: An uncontrolled nuclear accident can have immediate consequences (death, injury, irradiation) as well as long-term consequences that can lead to increased risk of developing radiation-induced diseases (such as certain types of cancer); environmental quality: Radiation contamination can last for several decades and, in some cases, can result in an area being closed off permanently to the public; economic and social continuity: Nuclear accidents bring human activity to a halt in contaminated areas, disrupting the economic and social order of the entire country. It may therefore be necessary to adapt economic and social systems and carry out clean-up operations if people and businesses have been displaced; quality of international relations: Related to fulfillment of obligations to alert and inform European and international partners. This international dimension also covers the protection of French nationals present in countries stricken by a nuclear accident. This national plan provides reference information on how to prepare for a nuclear or radiological emergency and make the appropriate decisions in the event of an emergency. It covers the emergency phase (including

  4. 30 CFR 254.7 - How do I submit my response plan to the MMS?

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I submit my response plan to the MMS... do I submit my response plan to the MMS? You must submit the number of copies of your response plan that the appropriate MMS regional office requires. If you prefer to use improved information technology...

  5. Significant achievements in '10th five-year plan' period and primary guidance in '11th five-year plan' period on uranium exploration

    Zhang Jindai; Li Youliang; Jian Xiaofei; Peng Xinjian; Jiang Deying

    2007-01-01

    During the '10th five-year-plane' period, uranium resource had attracted high attention and concentration from related organization of the CCPC and the central government because of the state's manifestation on the development goal for nuclear power, efforts on uranium research and exploration were intensified accordingly. In that five years, both uranium exploration, regional assessment and prognostication for the Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin in North China and research on uranium metallogeny theory and prospecting method had made fairly great progress and reached important fruits. Due to the improvement of prospecting theory and technology for ISL amenable sandstone hosted U-deposits, uranium exploration efficiency was great enhanced and had prompted the sustainable development for China's uranium exploration. This paper have briefly expounded the general deploy for the uranium geology research and exploration in the '11th five-year plan' period. (authors)

  6. Environmental emergency response plans (EERPs): A single plan approach to satisfy multiple regulations

    Muzyka, L.

    1995-01-01

    Conrail is a freight railroad operating in twelve northeast and midwestern states transporting goods and materials over 11,700 miles of railroad. To repair, maintain, rebuild, and manufacture locomotives and rail cars, and to maintain the track, right of way, bridges, tunnels and other structures, Conrail uses petroleum products, solvents and cleaners. These products are stored in hundreds of storage tanks in and around the yards and right of way. To power the trains, locomotives are fueled with diesel fuel. With large volumes of fuel, lubricants, solvents and cleaners, safe and efficient handling of petroleum and chemicals is crucial to avoid negative impacts on the environment. Conrail recently revisited the issue of environmental emergency response planning. In an attempt to assure full compliance with a myriad of federal, state, and local regulation, a ''single plan approach'' was chosen. Single plans for each facility, coined EERPs, were decided on after careful review of the regulations, and evaluation of the company's operational and organizational needs

  7. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  8. Nuclear emergency response planning based on participatory decision analytic approaches

    Sinkko, K.

    2004-10-01

    This work was undertaken in order to develop methods and techniques for evaluating systematically and comprehensively protective action strategies in the case of a nuclear or radiation emergency. This was done in a way that the concerns and issues of all key players related to decisions on protective actions could be aggregated into decision- making transparently and in an equal manner. An approach called facilitated workshop, based on the theory of Decision Analysis, was tailored and tested in the planning of actions to be taken. The work builds on case studies in which it was assumed that a hypothetical accident in a nuclear power plant had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore different types of protective actions should be considered. Altogether six workshops were organised in which all key players were represented, i.e., the authorities, expert organisations, industry and agricultural producers. The participants were those responsible for preparing advice or presenting matters for those responsible for the formal decision-making. Many preparatory meetings were held with various experts to prepare information for the workshops. It was considered essential that the set-up strictly follow the decision- making process to which the key players are accustomed. Key players or stakeholders comprise responsible administrators and organisations, politicians as well as representatives of the citizens affected and other persons who will and are likely to take part in decision-making in nuclear emergencies. The realistic nature and the disciplined process of a facilitated workshop and commitment to decision-making yielded up insight in many radiation protection issues. The objectives and attributes which are considered in a decision on protective actions were discussed in many occasions and were defined for different accident scenario to come. In the workshops intervention levels were derived according justification and optimisation

  9. 33 CFR 154.1030 - General response plan contents.

    2010-07-01

    ... and health plan. (vi) List of acronyms and definitions. (vii) A geographic-specific appendix for each... the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (40 CFR part 300) and the Area Contingency Plan(s) (ACP) covering the area in which the facility operates. Facility owners or...

  10. Regulatory guidance for license renewal

    Thoma, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed 10 CFR Part 54 rule proceduralizes the process for license renewal by identifying both the administrative and technical requirements for a renewal application. To amplify and support this regulation, written guidance has been provided in the form of a draft Regulatory Guide (DG 1009) and a draft Standard Review Plan for License Renewal (NUREG 1299). This guidance is scheduled to be finalized in 1992. Similar guidance will be provided for the proposed revisions to 10 CFR Part 51 concerning the environmental aspects of license renewal. (author)

  11. Radiological Assistance Program, DOE Region 6 response plan

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1993-02-01

    This program plan meets all the requirements identified in DOE Order 5530.3, Radiological Assistance Program and supports those requirements leading to the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) as required by DOE 5530-5. Requests for radiological assistance may come from other DOE facilities, Federal or state agencies, tribal officials, or from any private corporation or individual. Many of the requests will be handled by a telephone call, a conference or a letter, teletype or memorandum. Other requests for assistance may involve radioactive material in serious accidents, fire, personal injuries, contamination or possible hazards to the general public. Some occurrences may require the dispatch of trained personnel equipped with radiation monitoring instruments and related equipment necessary to evaluate, control and neutralize the hazard. The primary responsibility for incidents involving radioactive material always remains with the party having custody of the radioactive materials. In addition, the DOE recognizes that the assistance provided shall not in any way preempt state, tribal, or local authority and/or responsibility on state or tribal properties. Toward this end, DOE assistance for non-DOE radioactive materials, is limited to technical assistance, advice, measurement and other resources as deemed necessary by the local authorities but excludes DOE interface with the public media. This is a function handled by the local or state Incident Commander

  12. Rural transit emergency planning guidance.

    2008-07-01

    Providing safe, reliable transportation has long been a priority at all levels of the transit industry including the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and individual transit providers. Over the l...

  13. Response to Request for Guidance on Use of Pre-1990 ERC' s and Adjusting for RACT at Time of Use

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  14. Response to Request for Guidance on PSD Definition Referencing Cogeneration Gas Turbines that are Separated by One-Half Mile

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. SU-F-J-71: Improving CT Quality for Radiation Therapy Planning and Delivery Guidance Using a Non-Linear Contrast Enhancement Technique

    Noid, G; Tai, A; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Advanced image post-processing techniques which enhance soft-tissue contrast in CT have not been widely employed for RT planning or delivery guidance. The purpose of this work is to assess the soft-tissue contrast enhancement from non-linear contrast enhancing filters and its impact in RT. The contrast enhancement reduces patient alignment uncertainties. Methods: Non-linear contrast enhancing methods, such as Best Contrast (Siemens), amplify small differences in X-ray attenuation between two adjacent structure without significantly increasing noise. Best Contrast (BC) separates a CT into two frequency bands. The low frequency band is modified by a non-linear scaling function before recombination with the high frequency band. CT data collected using a CT-on-rails (Definition AS Open, Siemens) during daily CT-guided RT for 6 prostate cancer patients and an image quality phantom (The Phantom Laboratory) were analyzed. Images acquired with a standard protocol (120 kVp, 0.6 pitch, 18 mGy CTDIvol) were processed before comparison to the unaltered images. Contrast and noise were measured in the the phantom. Inter-observer variation was assessed by placing prostate contours on the 12 CT study sets, 6 enhanced and 6 unaltered, in a blinded study involving 8 observers. Results: The phantom data demonstrate that BC increased the contrast between the 1.0% supra-slice element and the background substrate by 46.5 HU while noise increased by only 2.3 HU. Thus the contrast to noise ratio increased from 1.28 to 6.71. Furthermore, the variation in centroid position of the prostate contours was decreased from 1.3±0.4 mm to 0.8±0.3 mm. Thus the CTV-to-PTV margin was reduced by 1.1 mm. The uncertainty in delineation of the prostate/rectum edge decreased by 0.5 mm. Conclusion: As demonstrated in phantom and patient scans the BC filter accentuates soft-tissue contrast. This enhancement leads to reduced inter-observer variation, which should improve RT planning and delivery

  16. 76 FR 61098 - Guidance for 1-Hour SO2

    2011-10-03

    ...Notice is hereby given that the EPA has posted its draft non- binding guidance titled, ``Guidance for 1-Hour SO2 NAAQS SIP Submissions'' on its Web site. The EPA invites public comments on this guidance document during the comment period specified below, and plans to issue an updated version of the guidance after reviewing timely submitted comments.

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility and Tax Planning : Rules and Principles

    Gribnau, Hans; Salter, David; Oats, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Taxpayers have to plan their tax affairs to plan their life or develop their business strategy. Often tax planning is encouraged and intended by tax legislation. Tax incentives are often used to steer (corporate) citizens’ behaviour to achieve all kind of policy goals. In this way, the tax

  18. Corporate social responsibility and tax planning : Not by rules alone

    Gribnau, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Taxpayers have to plan their tax affairs to plan their life or develop their business strategy. Often tax planning is encouraged and intended by tax legislation, but sometimes it is not. By way of tax incentives the tax legislator often tries to steer citizens’ behaviour to achieve all kind of

  19. Guidance system operations plan for manned CSM earth orbital and lunar missions using program COLOSSUS 3. Section 7: Erasable memory programs

    Hamilton, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Erasable-memory programs designed for guidance computers used in command and lunar modules are presented. The purpose, functional description, assumptions, restrictions, and imitations are given for each program.

  20. An electricity generation planning model incorporating demand response

    Choi, Dong Gu; Thomas, Valerie M.

    2012-01-01

    Energy policies that aim to reduce carbon emissions and change the mix of electricity generation sources, such as carbon cap-and-trade systems and renewable electricity standards, can affect not only the source of electricity generation, but also the price of electricity and, consequently, demand. We develop an optimization model to determine the lowest cost investment and operation plan for the generating capacity of an electric power system. The model incorporates demand response to price change. In a case study for a U.S. state, we show the price, demand, and generation mix implications of a renewable electricity standard, and of a carbon cap-and-trade policy with and without initial free allocation of carbon allowances. This study shows that both the demand moderating effects and the generation mix changing effects of the policies can be the sources of carbon emissions reductions, and also shows that the share of the sources could differ with different policy designs. The case study provides different results when demand elasticity is excluded, underscoring the importance of incorporating demand response in the evaluation of electricity generation policies. - Highlights: ► We develop an electric power system optimization model including demand elasticity. ► Both renewable electricity and carbon cap-and-trade policies can moderate demand. ► Both policies affect the generation mix, price, and demand for electricity. ► Moderated demand can be a significant source of carbon emission reduction. ► For cap-and-trade policies, initial free allowances change outcomes significantly.

  1. Commercial radioactive waste minimization program development guidance

    Fischer, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    This document is one of two prepared by the EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., Waste Management Technical Support Program Group, National Low-Level Waste Management Program Unit. One of several Department of Energy responsibilities stated in the Amendments Act of 1985 is to provide technical assistance to compact regions Host States, and nonmember States (to the extent provided in appropriations acts) in establishing waste minimization program plans. Technical assistance includes, among other things, the development of technical guidelines for volume reduction options. Pursuant to this defined responsibility, the Department of Energy (through EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc.) has prepared this report, which includes guidance on defining a program, State/compact commission participation, and waste minimization program plans

  2. Environmental guidance regulatory bulletin

    1997-01-01

    This document describes the background on expanding public participation in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and DOE's response. The bulletin also describes the changes made by the final rule to existing regulations, guidance provided by EPA in the preamble and in the revised RCRA Public Participation Manual, the relationship between public participation and environmental justice, and DOE's recent public participation and environmental justice initiatives

  3. Draft Guidance for Protective Action Strategies Development

    Park, Sang Hyun; Jeong, Seung Young; Kim, Wanjoo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    National nuclear emergency preparedness and response (EPR) framework has been improved since the Fukushima accident in 2011. There are still many needs to be amended and improved in regulatory requirements and technical criteria to warrant efficacy of the EPR framework. As an important part of the framework, protective actions have to be implemented with optimized and justified manner during whole emergency phases. In this study, to enhance protective action strategies in response to severe accident or general emergency, existing procedures were reviewed. And generic guidance to develop protective action recommendations (PARs) was proposed considering revised EPZ and recent technical information on protective action strategies. The generic guidance for PARs based on facility status was introduced. Revision of EPZ and some recent information on protective action strategies, such as staged evacuation, specific approach for rapidly progressing accident were considered. It would be employed as a basis to develop site-specific strategies of PARs and regulatory guidance for emergency plan by nuclear licensee. It was focused on an early phase of nuclear emergency. Further efforts to develop site specific strategies of PARs and strategies which cover full range of nuclear emergency would be followed by several stake holders.

  4. The Impact of Law and Lawyers on Operations and Planning

    Hollingshead, Christopher M

    2007-01-01

    .... It is important for the SJA to fully participate in the development of plans, guidance, and ROE, but it is the commander's responsibility to ensure that these documents do not become so over drafted...

  5. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  6. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi 2 (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives

  7. Dissecting Attending Surgeons' Operating Room Guidance: Factors That Affect Guidance Decision Making.

    Chen, Xiaodong Phoenix; Williams, Reed G; Smink, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    The amount of guidance provided by the attending surgeon in the operating room (OR) is a key element in developing residents' autonomy. The purpose of this study is to explore factors that affect attending surgeons' decision making regarding OR guidance provided to the resident. We used video-stimulated recall interviews (VSRI) throughout this 2-phase study. In Phase 1, 3 attending surgeons were invited to review separately 30 to 45 minute video segments of their prerecorded surgical operations to explore factors that influenced their OR guidance decision making. In Phase 2, 3 attending surgeons were observed and documented in the OR (4 operations, 341min). Each operating surgeon reviewed their videotaped surgical performance within 5 days of the operation to reflect on factors that affected their decision making during the targeted guidance events. All VSRI were recorded. Thematic analysis and manual coding were used to synthesize and analyze data from VSRI transcripts, OR observation documents, and field notes. A total of 255 minutes of VSRI involving 6 surgeons and 7 surgical operations from 5 different procedures were conducted. A total of 13 guidance decision-making influence factors from 4 categories were identified (Cohen's κ = 0.674): Setting (case schedule and patient morbidity), content (procedure attributes and case progress), resident (current competency level, trustworthiness, self-confidence, and personal traits), and attending surgeon (level of experience, level of comfort, preferred surgical technique, OR training philosophy, and responsibility as surgeon). A total of 5 factors (case schedule, patient morbidity, procedure attributes, resident current competency level, and trustworthiness) influenced attending surgeons' pre-OR guidance plans. "OR training philosophy" and "responsibility as surgeon" were anchor factors that affected attending surgeons' OR guidance decision-making patterns. Surgeons' OR guidance decision making is a dynamic process

  8. Operational guidance for radiation emergency response organisations in Europe for using biodosimetric tools developed in EU MULTIBIODOSE project.

    Jaworska, Alicja; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Fattibene, Paola; Lindholm, Carita; Oestreicher, Ursula; Rothkamm, Kai; Romm, Horst; Thierens, Hubert; Trompier, Francois; Voisin, Philippe; Vral, Anne; Woda, Clemens; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    In the event of a large-scale radiological emergency, the triage of individuals according to their degree of exposure forms an important initial step of the accident management. Although clinical signs and symptoms of a serious exposure may be used for radiological triage, they are not necessarily radiation specific and can lead to a false diagnosis. Biodosimetry is a method based on the analysis of radiation-induced changes in cells of the human body or in portable electronic devices and enables the unequivocal identification of exposed people who should receive medical treatment. The MULTIBIODOSE (MBD) consortium developed and validated several biodosimetric assays and adapted and tested them as tools for biological dose assessment in a mass-casualty event. Different biodosimetric assays were validated against the 'gold standard' of biological dosimetry-the dicentric assay. The assays were harmonised in such a way that, in an emergency situation, they can be run in parallel in a network of European laboratories. The aim of this guidance is to give a concise overview of the developed biodosimetric tools as well as how and when they can be used in an emergency situation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Operational guidance for radiation emergency response organisations in Europe for using bio-dosimetric tools developed in EU MULTIBIODOSE project

    Jaworska, Alicja; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Rothkamm, Kai; Fattibene, Paola; Lindholm, Carita; Oestreicher, Ursula; Romm, Horst; Thierens, Hubert; Vral, Anne; Trompier, Francois; Voisin, Philippe; Woda, Clemens; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale radiological emergency, the triage of individuals according to their degree of exposure forms an important initial step of the accident management. Although clinical signs and symptoms of a serious exposure may be used for radiological triage, they are not necessarily radiation specific and can lead to a false diagnosis. Biodosimetry is a method based on the analysis of radiation-induced changes in cells of the human body or in portable electronic devices and enables the unequivocal identification of exposed people who should receive medical treatment. The MULTIBIODOSE (MBD) consortium developed and validated several bio-dosimetric assays and adapted and tested them as tools for biological dose assessment in a mass-casualty event. Different bio-dosimetric assays were validated against the 'gold standard' of biological dosimetry-the dicentric assay. The assays were harmonised in such a way that, in an emergency situation, they can be run in parallel in a network of European laboratories. The aim of this guidance is to give a concise overview of the developed bio-dosimetric tools as well as how and when they can be used in an emergency situation. (authors)

  10. Environmental Guidance Regulatory Bulletin

    1995-01-01

    On September 15, 1994, EPA promulgated a Final Rule revising 40 CFR Part 300: the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). NCP establishes a national response system for responding to discharges of oil and releases of hazardous substances. Figures illustrate the roles of the national response system. Response operations, planning and preparation, and designation of federal trustees are discussed, followed by definitions

  11. 76 FR 66925 - Guidance for 1-Hour SO2

    2011-10-28

    ...The EPA is announcing an extension of the public comment period for its draft non-binding guidance titled, ``Guidance for 1-Hour SO2 SIP Submissions.'' The draft of the guidance document is currently on the EPA's Web site. The EPA is extending the comment period for an additional 30-day period and invites public comments on this guidance during this period. The EPA plans to issue an updated version of the guidance after reviewing timely submitted comments.

  12. National Environmental Policy Act guidance: A model process

    Angle, B.M.; Lockhart, V.A.T.; Sema, B.; Tuott, L.C.; Irving, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    The ''Model National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process'' includes: References to regulations, guidance documents, and plans; training programs; procedures; and computer databases. Legislative Acts and reference documents from Congress, US Department of Energy, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company provide the bases for conducting NEPA at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) NEPA / Permitting Department, the Contractor Environmental Organization (CEO) is responsible for developing and maintaining LITCO NEPA and permitting policies, guidance, and procedures. The CEO develops procedures to conduct environmental evaluations based on NEPA, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations, and DOE guidance. This procedure includes preparation or support of environmental checklists, categorical exclusion determinations, environmental assessment determinations, environmental assessments, and environmental impact statements. In addition, the CEO uses this information to train personnel conducting environmental evaluations at the INEL. Streamlining these procedures fosters efficient use of resources, quality documents, and better decisions on proposed actions

  13. Dynamic sensorimotor planning during long-term sequence learning: the role of variability, response chunking and planning errors.

    Verstynen, Timothy; Phillips, Jeff; Braun, Emily; Workman, Brett; Schunn, Christian; Schneider, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Many everyday skills are learned by binding otherwise independent actions into a unified sequence of responses across days or weeks of practice. Here we looked at how the dynamics of action planning and response binding change across such long timescales. Subjects (N = 23) were trained on a bimanual version of the serial reaction time task (32-item sequence) for two weeks (10 days total). Response times and accuracy both showed improvement with time, but appeared to be learned at different rates. Changes in response speed across training were associated with dynamic changes in response time variability, with faster learners expanding their variability during the early training days and then contracting response variability late in training. Using a novel measure of response chunking, we found that individual responses became temporally correlated across trials and asymptoted to set sizes of approximately 7 bound responses at the end of the first week of training. Finally, we used a state-space model of the response planning process to look at how predictive (i.e., response anticipation) and error-corrective (i.e., post-error slowing) processes correlated with learning rates for speed, accuracy and chunking. This analysis yielded non-monotonic association patterns between the state-space model parameters and learning rates, suggesting that different parts of the response planning process are relevant at different stages of long-term learning. These findings highlight the dynamic modulation of response speed, variability, accuracy and chunking as multiple movements become bound together into a larger set of responses during sequence learning.

  14. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory's previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory's Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  15. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory`s previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory`s Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, ``Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  16. Using principles from emergency management to improve emergency response plans for research animals.

    Vogelweid, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    Animal research regulatory agencies have issued updated requirements for emergency response planning by regulated research institutions. A thorough emergency response plan is an essential component of an institution's animal care and use program, but developing an effective plan can be a daunting task. The author provides basic information drawn from the field of emergency management about best practices for developing emergency response plans. Planners should use the basic principles of emergency management to develop a common-sense approach to managing emergencies in their facilities.

  17. Homeland security is hometown security: comparison and case studies of vertically synchronized catastrophe response plans

    Liquorie, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited National preparedness doctrine has constantly evolved to address the pressing hazards and threats the country faces. Although arguably centered on terrorism, the current status of national policy attempts to have an all-hazards focus. While the contemporary version provides all tiers of government more guidance and structure than ever before, it still remains largely disjointed and lacks an effective overall operational response framew...

  18. Emergency planning, response and assessment: a concept for a center of excellence

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a general concept for a center of excellence devoted to emergency planning, response and assessment. A plan is presented to implement the concept, based on experience gained from emergency response as it relates to the nuclear and toxic chemical industries. The role of the World Laboratory in this endeavor would complement and enhance other organizations than are involved in related activities

  19. Guidance system operations plan for manned LM earth orbital and lunar missions using program luminary 1E. Section 2: Data links

    Hamilton, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Data links for the guidance system of manned lunar module orbital and lunar missions are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) digital uplink to lunar module, (2) lunar module liftoff time increment, (3) lunar module contiguous block update, (4) lunar module scatter update, (5) lunar module digital downlink, and (6) absolute addresses for update program.

  20. Consensus standard requirements and guidance

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents information from the ANS Criticality Alarm System Workshop relating to the consensus standard requirements and guidance. Topics presented include: definition; nomenclature; requirements and recommendations; purpose of criticality alarms; design criteria; signal characteristics; reliability, dependability and durability; tests; and emergency preparedness and planning

  1. Federal, provincial and territorial public health response plan for biological events.

    McNeill, R; Topping, J

    2018-01-04

    The Federal/Provincial/Territorial (FPT) Public Health Response Plan for Biological Events was developed for the Public Health Network Council (PHNC). This plan outlines how the national response to public health events caused by biological agents will be conducted and coordinated, with a focus on implementation of responses led by senior-level FPT public health decision-makers. The plan was developed by an expert task group and was approved by PHNC in October, 2017. The plan describes roles, responsibilities and authorities of FPT governments for public health and emergency management, a concept of operations outlining four scalable response levels and a governance structure that aims to facilitate an efficient, timely, evidence-informed and consistent approach across jurisdictions. Improving effective engagement amongst public health, health care delivery and health emergency management authorities is a key objective of the plan.

  2. HANDBOOK: HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE

    This publication, Volume III of the Hazardous Waste Incineration Guidance Series, contains general guidance to permit writers in reviewing hazardous waste incineration permit applications and trial burn plans. he handbook is a how-to document dealing with how incineration measure...

  3. The national response plan and radioactive incident monitoring network (RIMNET)

    Jones, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of the Environment is responsible through Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution for co-ordination of the Government's response to overseas nuclear incidents. This paper describes the contingency arrangements that have been set up for this purpose. (author)

  4. Developing a highway emergency response plan for incidents involving hazardous materials, second edition, March 1992

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This provides minimum guidelines for developing an emergency response plan for incidents involving hazardous liquid hydrocarbons, such as gasoline and crude oil, transported in MC 306/DOT 406 and MC 307/DOT 407 aluminum cargo tanks and for coordinating and cooperating with local, state, and federal officials. This publication covers response plan priorities, personnel training, special equipment, media relations, environmental relations, and post-response activities. The apprendixes to this recommended practice outline a highway emergency response plan and suggest a procedure for removing liquid hydrocarbons from overturned cargo tanks and righting the tank vehicles

  5. 49 CFR 194.107 - General response plan requirements.

    2010-10-01

    ...'s clear understanding of the function of the Federal response structure, including procedures to... organization's role and the Federal On Scene Coordinator's role in pollution response; (ii) Establish... mitigation procedures, (iv) The name, address, and telephone number of the oil spill response organization...

  6. Method for Developing a Communication Strategy and Plan for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response. Publication Date: July 2015

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical resource for emergency planning in the area of public communication in the development of a radiation emergency communication plan (RECP). The term 'public communication' is defined as any activity that communicates information to the public and the media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. To avoid confusion, the term public communication has been used in this publication rather than public information, which may be used in other IAEA publications and documents to ensure consistency with the terminology used in describing the command and control system. This publication also aims to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(11) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research with regard to the response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. This publication is intended to provide guidance to national and local authorities on developing an RECP which incorporates the specific functions, arrangements and capabilities that will be required for public communication during a nuclear or radiological emergency. The two main features of this publication are the template provided to develop an RECP and detailed guidance on developing a communication strategy for emergency preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The template is consistent with the outline of the national radiation emergency plan proposed in Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (EPR-Method 2003). This publication is part of the IAEA

  7. Remedial design and remedial action guidance for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region X (EPA), and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) have developed this guidance on the remedial design and remedial action (RD/RA) process. This guidance is applicable to activities conducted under the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) and Action Plan. The INEL FFA/CO and Action Plan provides the framework for performing environmental restoration according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The guidance is intended for use by the DOE-ID, the EPA, and the IDHW Waste Area Group (WAG) managers and others involved in the planning and implementation of CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The scope of the guidance includes the RD/RA strategy for INEL environmental restoration projects and the approach to development and review of RD/RA documentation. Chapter 2 discusses the general process, roles and responsibilities, and other elements that define the RD/RA strategy. Chapters 3 through 7 describe the RD/RA documents identified in the FFA/CO and Action Plan. Chapter 8 provides examples of how this guidance can be applied to restoration projects. Appendices are included that provide excerpts from the FFA/CO pertinent to RD/RA (Appendix A), a applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) orders (Appendix B), and an EPA Engineering ''Data Gaps in Remedial Design'' (Appendix C)

  8. Detecting and Responding to a Dengue Outbreak: Evaluation of Existing Strategies in Country Outbreak Response Planning

    Julia Harrington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dengue outbreaks are occurring with increasing frequency and intensity. Evidence-based epidemic preparedness and effective response are now a matter of urgency. Therefore, we have analysed national and municipal dengue outbreak response plans. Methods. Thirteen country plans from Asia, Latin America and Australia, and one international plan were obtained from the World Health Organization. The information was transferred to a data analysis matrix where information was extracted according to predefined and emerging themes and analysed for scope, inconsistencies, omissions, and usefulness. Findings. Outbreak response planning currently has a considerable number of flaws. Outbreak governance was weak with a lack of clarity of stakeholder roles. Late timing of responses due to poor surveillance, a lack of combining routine data with additional alerts, and lack of triggers for initiating the response weakened the functionality of plans. Frequently an outbreak was not defined, and early response mechanisms based on alert signals were neglected. There was a distinct lack of consideration of contextual influences which can affect how an outbreak detection and response is managed. Conclusion. A model contingency plan for dengue outbreak prediction, detection, and response may help national disease control authorities to develop their own more detailed and functional context specific plans.

  9. Non-Participation in Guidance: An Opportunity for Development?

    Thomsen, Rie

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses how new opportunities for guidance can emerge from an analysis of the interplay between the participation (or lack of participation) of the individuals in career guidance, and the career guidance practitioner's response. The article suggests critical psychology as a framework for career guidance research and presents…

  10. Interpretation of 2017 Japan Imported Foods Monitoring and Guidance Plan%解读2017年日本进口食品监控检查指导计划

    边红彪

    2017-01-01

    本文主要分析了2017年度日本进口食品监控指导计划的主要内容,作为政府食品主管部门管理出口食品的依据,企业规避贸易风险的重要参考.%This paper analyses the main content of 2017 Japan Imported Foods Monitoring and Guidance Plan as the basis for the management of imported foods by food authorities and an important reference for enterprises to avoid trade risk.

  11. Introduction to Japan Imported Foods Monitoring and Guidance Plan of 2015%解读2015年日本进口食品监控检查指导计划

    边红彪

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the main content of "2015 Japan Imported Foods Monitoring and Guidance Plan", which is the basis for food department managing imported foods and an important reference for enterprises avoiding trade risk.%本文主要分析了2015年度日本进口食品监控指导计划的主要内容,作为政府食品主管部门管理出口食品的依据,企业规避贸易风险的重要参考.

  12. Dissection of 2014 Japan Monitoring and Guidance Plan of Imported Foods%解读2014年日本进口食品监控检查指导计划

    边红彪

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the main content of 2014 Japan Monitoring and Guidance Plan of Imported Foods, which is used as management basis of governmental management departments of imported food and an important reference for enterprises to avoid trade risk.%本文主要分析了2014年度日本进口食品监控指导计划的主要内容,作为政府食品主管部门管理出口食品的依据,企业规避贸易风险的重要参考。

  13. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 748 - Guidance on Response Programs for Unauthorized Access to Member Information and Member Notice

    2010-01-01

    ..., SUSPICIOUS TRANSACTIONS, CATASTROPHIC ACTS AND BANK SECRECY ACT COMPLIANCE Pt. 748, App. B Appendix B to Part... Catastrophic Act and Bank Secrecy Act Compliance regulation, 29 interprets section 501(b) of the Gramm-Leach... response program. 38 See FFIEC Information Technology Examination Handbook, Outsourcing Technology Services...

  14. Oil spill response planning under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990

    Lees, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound on March 24, 1989 illustrated the need for more resources, better planning, and better command and control to efficiently and effectively respond to, contain and cleanup catastrophic oil spills. In response to public concern and industry initiatives to resolve existing oil spill response problems. Congress enacted the comprehensive Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA-90) on August 18, 1990. OPA-90 mandates comprehensive changes in vessel and facility response planning, envisioning a comprehensive and integrated oil spill response planning scheme, with revisions to reflect OPA-90's new requirements. Area Committees comprised of federal, state and local officials and others will prepare Area Contingency Plans for Coast Guard approval, which set forth the framework for responding to open-quotes worst case dischargesclose quotes. Owners and operators of tank vessels and onshore and offshore facilities must submit individual response plans for federal approval by February 18, 1993, identifying and ensuring availability of private personnel and equipment necessary to remove to the maximum extent practicable a open-quotes worst case discharge.close quotes The Coast Guard is considering rules to implement these requirements. Major challenges exist to meet the statutory requirements, including response times, skimming efficiencies, adverse weather and others that affect emergency response capability. This paper focuses on: (1) oil spill response problems identified and lessons learned from the Prince William Sound spill; (2) OPA-90's complex and technical oil spill response planning requirements and their effect on response planning for marine operations; (3) the federal regulatory program to implement OPA-90, defining spill response capability for a open-quotes worst case discharge,close quotes considering existing response resources and the new capabilities by the industry-supported Marine Spill Response Corporation

  15. The implementation of the IAEA accident response plan in Yugoslav practice

    Orlic, M.; Pavlovic, R.; Markovic, S.; Pavlovic, S.

    1996-01-01

    One of the important lessons from the Chernobyl accident is the necessity of existence of operational national emergency response plan. Summarizing consequences and experiences after Chernobyl accident, expert groups from IAEA, ICRP and other international scientific organizations, have been extensively worked on reviewing old ones, and preparing new radiation protection and nuclear safety principals and codes. One of the important issue is national emergency response plan for radiological accident. The nuclear accident response plan in Yugoslavia is presented in this paper. It is essentially based on IAEA model national response plan for radiological accident. This model has to be adjusted to the specificity of member states. The optimum society organization for emergency management in the case of accidents in ionizing radiation sources practices is suggested in this paper. Specific characteriztics of Yugoslav state organization relating to accident response are emphasised. (author)

  16. Planning the bioterrorism response supply chain: learn and live.

    Brandeau, Margaret L; Hutton, David W; Owens, Douglas K; Bravata, Dena M

    2007-01-01

    Responses to bioterrorism require rapid procurement and distribution of medical and pharmaceutical supplies, trained personnel, and information. Thus, they present significant logistical challenges. On the basis of a review of the manufacturing and service supply chain literature, the authors identified five supply chain strategies that can potentially increase the speed of response to a bioterrorism attack, reduce inventories, and save money: effective supply chain network design; effective inventory management; postponement of product customization and modularization of component parts; coordination of supply chain stakeholders and appropriate use of incentives; and effective information management. The authors describe how concepts learned from published evaluations of manufacturing and service supply chains, as well as lessons learned from responses to natural disasters, naturally occurring outbreaks, and the 2001 US anthrax attacks, can be applied to design, evaluate, and improve the bioterrorism response supply chain. Such lessons could also be applied to the response supply chains for disease outbreaks and natural and manmade disasters.

  17. Response planning and environmental risk analysis, state of Alaska

    Gundlach, E.R.; Marben, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Alaska Dept. of Environmental Conservation (ADEC), a multitasked study was undertaken to determine the relative risk of noncrude oil transport (including marine and freshwater), the status of spill response capability in the state, and the need and most appropriate locations for siting spill response deposits. The project used multidisciplinary transport and environmental data analyzed in a geographic information system (GIS) to enable various scenarios and data changes to be easily visualized. The evaluation concerned (a) designation of significant environmental risk areas, (b) environmentally sensitive areas and fish and wildlife likely to be affected, (c) the level of response capability appropriate for protecting the environment, (d) the adequacy of current capabilities for noncrude vessels, (e) the feasibility of establishing one or more response cooperatives for use by multiple carriers, and (f) other steps that could be taken to reduce the risk of a spill and facilitate control and cleanup

  18. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  19. Constraining Influence Diagram Structure by Generative Planning: An Application to the Optimization of Oil Spill Response

    Agosta, John Mark

    2013-01-01

    This paper works through the optimization of a real world planning problem, with a combination of a generative planning tool and an influence diagram solver. The problem is taken from an existing application in the domain of oil spill emergency response. The planning agent manages constraints that order sets of feasible equipment employment actions. This is mapped at an intermediate level of abstraction onto an influence diagram. In addition, the planner can apply a surveillance operator that...

  20. Characteristics of Effective Collaboration in Response to Diversified Transportation Planning Authority

    John S. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Advantages of decentralized transportation planning responsibilities may include reduced project delivery cost, the integration of comprehensive long-range planning with regional land use, and greater accountability regarding local concerns. Yet disadvantages may include a tendency for operations to dominate longer-term planning, inconsistent operational standards, and difficulty in achieving network benefits, since some transportation links may provide benefits to the entire system but not ...

  1. Field assessment of a model tuberculosis outbreak response plan for low-incidence areas

    Pascopella Lisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For a regional project in four low-incidence states, we designed a customizable tuberculosis outbreak response plan. Prior to dissemination of the plan, a tuberculosis outbreak occurred, presenting an opportunity to perform a field assessment of the plan. The purpose of the assessment was to ensure that the plan included essential elements to help public health professionals recognize and respond to outbreaks. Methods We designed a semi-structured questionnaire and interviewed all key stakeholders involved in the response. We used common themes to assess validity of and identify gaps in the plan. A subset of participants provided structured feedback on the plan. Results We interviewed 11 public health and six community stakeholders. The assessment demonstrated that (1 almost all of the main response activities were reflected in the plan; (2 the plan added value by providing a definition of a tuberculosis outbreak and guidelines for communication and evaluation. These were areas that lacked written protocols during the actual outbreak response; and (3 basic education about tuberculosis and the interpretation and use of genotyping data were important needs. Stakeholders also suggested adding to the plan questions for evaluation and a section for specific steps to take when an outbreak is suspected. Conclusion An interactive field assessment of a programmatic tool revealed the value of a systematic outbreak response plan with a standard definition of a tuberculosis outbreak, guidelines for communication and evaluation, and response steps. The assessment highlighted the importance of education and training for tuberculosis in low-incidence areas.

  2. Restoring stakeholders’ trust in multinationals’ tax planning practices with corporate social responsibility (CSR)

    Jallai, Ave-Geidi; Peeters, Bruno; Gribnau, Hans; Badisco, Jo

    2017-01-01

    This contribution discusses the tax planning behaviour of big corporations and investigates Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as a tool to battle the issue. It will be argued that certain legal tax planning strategies of multinationals are not acceptable to local communities and the public in

  3. Facility Response Plan (FRP) Points, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  4. Facility Response Plan (FRP) Points, Region 9, 2013, US EPA Region 9

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  5. Facility Response Plan (FRP) Points, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  6. Lower Colorado River Geographic Response Plan Web Mapping Service, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service is comprised of data related to Geographic Response Plans (GRPs) for the Lower Colorado River. Data layers were obtained from nationwide GIS...

  7. Facility Response Plan (FRP) Inspected Points, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  8. Emergency response planning and preparedness for transport accidents involving radioactive material

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this Guide is to provide assistance to public authorities and others (including consignors and carriers of radioactive materials) who are responsible for ensuring safety in establishing and developing emergency response arrangements for responding effectively to transport accidents involving radioactive materials. This Guide is concerned mainly with the preparation of emergency response plans. It provides information which will assist those countries whose involvement with radioactive materials is just beginning and those which have already developed their industries involving radioactive materials and attendant emergency plans, but may need to review and improve these plans. The need for emergency response plans and the ways in which they are implemented vary from country to country. In each country, the responsible authorities must decide how best to apply this Guide, taking into account the actual shipments and associated hazards. In this Guide the emergency response planning and response philosophy are outlined, including identification of emergency response organizations and emergency services that would be required during a transport accident. General consequences which could prevail during an accident are described taking into account the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 43 refs, figs and tabs

  9. Corporate Social Responsibility, Taxation and Aggressive Tax Planning

    Knuutinen Reijo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Society expects companies to take into account the economic, environmental, and social effects of their operations and activities. The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR refers to the operations or actions of companies that are above or independent of the limits or minimum requirements set by legislation.

  10. 77 FR 12086 - Final Staff Guidance, Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric Power-Introduction

    2012-02-28

    ... Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric Power--Introduction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. [[Page 12087... Nuclear Power Plants,'' Standard Review Plan (SRP) Section 8.1 on ``Electric Power--Introduction,'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) Accession No. ML113640121), and the Branch...

  11. An integrated approach to shoreline mapping for spill response planning

    Owens, E.H.; LeBlanc, S.R.; Percy, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    A desktop mapping package was introduced which has the capability to provide consistent and standardized application of mapping and data collection/generation techniques. Its application in oil spill cleanup was discussed. The data base can be updated easily as new information becomes available. This provides a response team with access to a wide range of information that would otherwise be difficult to obtain. Standard terms and definitions and shoreline segmentation procedures are part of the system to describe the shore-zone character and shore-zone oiling conditions. The program that is in place for Atlantic Canada involves the integration of (1) Environment Canada's SCAT methodology in pre-spill data generation, (2) shoreline segmentation, (3) response management by objectives, (4) Environment Canada's national sensitivity mapping program, and (5) Environment Canada's field guide for the protection and treatment of oiled shorelines. 7 refs., 6 figs

  12. Implementation Plan for a Common Nordic Retail Market. Evaluation of the responses on the public consultation

    2010-09-15

    Draft implementation plan for a common Nordic Retail Market was developed in close cooperation with relevant stakeholders in the Nordic electricity market during winter and spring 2010. The implementation plan outlines what should be done, by whom and when in order to create a common Nordic end user market over the coming years. NordREG organised a public consultation on the draft implementation plan from the end of June until the beginning of the August, 2010 and received 25 responses from stakeholders. This evaluation report includes summary of stakeholders' responses and NordREG comments on stakeholders' views. The evaluation of the responses has been taken into account during the finalization of the implementation plan

  13. Approach to downstream planning for nearshore response and sensitive areas protection outside Prince William Sound, Alaska

    DeCola, E.G.; Robertson, T.L.; Robertson, R.; Banta, J.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the need for an oil spill response plan for downstream coastal communities that could be affected by oil spilled from tankers travelling in Prince William Sound, Alaska. For the purpose of oil spill contingency planning, the State of Alaska has been divided into the Kodiak and Cook Inlet sub-areas that are at risk for downstream impacts from a Prince William Sound oil spill. The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill provided an example of a worst-case scenario oil spill from a tanker in Prince William Sound, but the oil spill planning system that has evolved in Alaska does not adequately plan for on oil spill that originates in one sub-area of the state, but impacts other sub-areas in the downstream spill path. This study analyzed the gaps that exist in the current response planning system in the Prince William Sound, Cook Inlet and Kodiak sub-areas. A method was proposed to improve the existing response plans so that emergency response teams are better prepared to manage cross-boundary oil spills originating in Prince William Sound. The proposed method focuses on nearshore response and sensitive areas protection for coastlines and communities that are at risk for oil spills from a tanker travelling the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). 11 refs., 3 figs

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    1991-01-01

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs

  15. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  16. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  17. Career guidance in communities

    Thomsen, Rie

    for the development of a critically reflexive career guidance practice. The considerations are organised around seven elements. 1. Creating opportunity, structure and access 2. Entering a community and increasing visibility 3. Providing guidance in communities 4. Exploring potentials in guidance situations 5...... in career guidance practices as well as in the lives of the people in the communities. This paper falls into two parts: The first part considers the collective as the starting point for the development of meaningful career guidance activities. Based on previous research on career guidance in communities......The aim of this paper is to inspire practitioners and professionals to leave their offices to bring career guidance into communities that might not identify with career guidance in the first instance. By making the effort to engage with communities, practitioners may bring about a critical change...

  18. Yes. No. Maybe. That's about as firm as the guidance gets over launching a provider-sponsored health plan. Strategy roundtable.

    Crews, J; Ehlen, K J; Goodwin, P; Guy, A; Morrison, G; Parker, S; Peddie, E

    Few participants in our roundtable on provider-sponsored health plans see them the same way. Some are gearing up new products, others are scaling back or getting out. Yet they agreed on one thing: The financial risks are tremendous.

  19. Problems related to public perceptions of radiological emergency planning and response

    Reilly, Margaret A.

    1989-01-01

    Beyond the scientific, the administrative and procedural issues of radiological emergency planning and response there is the issue of public perception. This paper emphasises that, radiation crises being a rare occurrence there is no enough database for generating scholarly quantitative reports. It suggests the need for disseminating timely and accurate information through a single spokesman from a responsible public agency

  20. The BUMP model of response planning: intermittent predictive control accounts for 10 Hz physiological tremor.

    Bye, Robin T; Neilson, Peter D

    2010-10-01

    Physiological tremor during movement is characterized by ∼10 Hz oscillation observed both in the electromyogram activity and in the velocity profile. We propose that this particular rhythm occurs as the direct consequence of a movement response planning system that acts as an intermittent predictive controller operating at discrete intervals of ∼100 ms. The BUMP model of response planning describes such a system. It forms the kernel of Adaptive Model Theory which defines, in computational terms, a basic unit of motor production or BUMP. Each BUMP consists of three processes: (1) analyzing sensory information, (2) planning a desired optimal response, and (3) execution of that response. These processes operate in parallel across successive sequential BUMPs. The response planning process requires a discrete-time interval in which to generate a minimum acceleration trajectory to connect the actual response with the predicted future state of the target and compensate for executional error. We have shown previously that a response planning time of 100 ms accounts for the intermittency observed experimentally in visual tracking studies and for the psychological refractory period observed in double stimulation reaction time studies. We have also shown that simulations of aimed movement, using this same planning interval, reproduce experimentally observed speed-accuracy tradeoffs and movement velocity profiles. Here we show, by means of a simulation study of constant velocity tracking movements, that employing a 100 ms planning interval closely reproduces the measurement discontinuities and power spectra of electromyograms, joint-angles, and angular velocities of physiological tremor reported experimentally. We conclude that intermittent predictive control through sequential operation of BUMPs is a fundamental mechanism of 10 Hz physiological tremor in movement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. N Springs expedited response action performance monitoring plan. Revision 1

    1995-08-01

    Groundwater contained in the 100-NR-2 Operable Unit is contaminated with various radionuclides derived from waste water disposal practices and spills associated with 100-N Reactor operations. Of primary concern is the presence of high levels of 90 Sr in the groundwater and the discharge of 90 Sr-contaminated groundwater to the nearby Columbia River through historic river bank seeps known as ''N Springs.'' A pump-and-treat system is being installed to remove 90 Sr contamination from the groundwater as part of the N Springs expedited response action (ERA). The groundwater extraction system will consist of four extraction and two injection wells with a proposed initial treatment capacity of 50 gal/min. The proposed location of the groundwater extraction system relative to the 90 Sr groundwater plume is presented

  2. Biological and chemical terrorism: strategic plan for preparedness and response. Recommendations of the CDC Strategic Planning Workgroup.

    2000-04-21

    The U.S. national civilian vulnerability to the deliberate use of biological and chemical agents has been highlighted by recognition of substantial biological weapons development programs and arsenals in foreign countries, attempts to acquire or possess biological agents by militants, and high-profile terrorist attacks. Evaluation of this vulnerability has focused on the role public health will have detecting and managing the probable covert biological terrorist incident with the realization that the U.S. local, state, and federal infrastructure is already strained as a result of other important public health problems. In partnership with representatives for local and state health departments, other federal agencies, and medical and public health professional associations, CDC has developed a strategic plan to address the deliberate dissemination of biological or chemical agents. The plan contains recommendations to reduce U.S. vulnerability to biological and chemical terrorism--preparedness planning, detection and surveillance, laboratory analysis, emergency response, and communication systems. Training and research are integral components for achieving these recommendations. Success of the plan hinges on strengthening the relationships between medical and public health professionals and on building new partnerships with emergency management, the military, and law enforcement professionals.

  3. On the need for a national radiological response plan in Egypt

    Gant, K.D.; Salama, M.; Ghani, A.H.A.; Sharnouby, A.E.; Hamouda, I.

    1997-01-01

    Use of radioactive materials and sources is increasing within the Arab Republic of Egypt. With this increase comes a need to prepare for accidents involving these materials. For years there has been an informal agreement between the National Centre for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC), one of the four centers operated by the Atomic Energy Agency (AEA), and the Civil Defense Authority (CDA) to cooperate in a radiological emergency. CDA currently has the responsibility for responding to all types of emergencies. The increasing use of radioactive materials and the complexity of the response required by accidents creates a need for a more formal arrangement. In response to the increasing possibility of radiation accidents in or near Egypt, the government is preparing the Egyptian Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents to coordinate the response efforts of the national agencies. This plan, which is now being finalized, provides information on agency roles and responsibilities during a response. The plan will also provide a basis for initiating training, planning for emergency public information, and developing public education efforts

  4. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    Bentz, A

    2008-07-31

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

  5. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    Bentz, A.

    2008-01-01

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation

  6. Exotic mosquito threats require strategic surveillance and response planning.

    Webb, Cameron E; Doggett, Stephen L

    2016-12-14

    Mosquito-borne diseases caused by endemic pathogens such as Ross River, Barmah Forest and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses are an annual concern in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. More than a dozen mosquito species have been implicated in the transmission of these pathogens, with each mosquito occupying a specialised ecological niche that influences their habitat associations, host feeding preferences and the environmental drivers of their abundance. The NSW Arbovirus Surveillance and Mosquito Monitoring Program provides an early warning system for potential outbreaks of mosquito-borne disease by tracking annual activity of these mosquitoes and their associated pathogens. Although the program will effectively track changes in local mosquito populations that may increase with a changing climate, urbanisation and wetland rehabilitation, it will be less effective with current surveillance methodologies at detecting or monitoring changes in exotic mosquito threats, where different surveillance strategies need to be used. Exotic container-inhabiting mosquitoes such as Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus pose a threat to NSW because they are nuisance-biting pests and vectors of pathogens such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses. International movement of humans and their belongings have spread these mosquitoes to many regions of the world. In recent years, these two mosquitoes have been detected by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources at local airports and seaports. To target the detection of these exotic mosquitoes, new trapping technologies and networks of surveillance locations are required. Additionally, incursions of these mosquitoes into urban areas of the state will require strategic responses to minimise substantial public health and economic burdens to local communities.

  7. Putting the t in tools: a roadmap for implementation of new global and regional transgender guidance.

    Wolf, R Cameron; Adams, Darrin; Dayton, Robyn; Verster, Annette; Wong, Joe; Romero, Marcela; Mazin, Rafael; Settle, Edmund; Sladden, Tim; Keatley, JoAnne

    2016-01-01

    Transgender (trans) activists and global health partners have collaborated to develop new tools and guidance for assessing and addressing HIV and other health needs within trans populations. Trans women experience a heavy burden of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), high incidence of violence and difficulties accessing gender-affirming services. At the same time, little has been published on trans men's health, HIV issues, needs and experiences. Young trans people are especially marginalized and vulnerable, with few programmes and services specifically tailored to their needs. Trans-specific data and guidance are needed to adapt the global response to HIV to meet the needs of the trans population. While the needs of this group have only recently received attention, global, regional and other technical guidance documents are being developed to address these gaps. Regional blueprints for comprehensive care for trans people in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia and the Pacific are now available. These tools - supported by the Pan American Health Organization, World Health Organization, US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the United Nations Development Programme, in collaboration with regional trans groups - provide a contextual map, indicating opportunities for interventions in health, HIV, violence, stigma and discrimination, social protection and human rights. Global guidance includes the World Health Organization's Policy Brief: Transgender People and HIV, and the interagency publication, Implementing Comprehensive HIV and STI Programmes with Transgender People. Community empowerment and capacity building are the focus of the new tools for global and regional transgender guidance. The goal is to strengthen and ensure community-led responses to the HIV challenge in trans populations. This article describes the new tools and guidance and considers the steps needed to use them to appropriately support and engage transgender

  8. Savannah River Site management response plan for chemical safety vulnerability field assessment. Revision 1

    Kahal, E.J.; Murphy, S.L.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to identify potential chemical safety vulnerabilities in the DOE complex, the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Core Working Group issued a field verification assessment report. While the report concluded that Savannah River Site (SRS) is moving in a positive direction, the report also identified five chemical safety vulnerabilities with broad programmatic impact that are not easily nor quickly remedied. The May 1994 SRS Management Response Plan addressed the five SRS vulnerabilities identified in the field assessment report. The SRS response plan listed observations supporting the vulnerabilities and any actions taken or planned toward resolution. Many of the observations were resolved by simple explanations, such as the existence of implementation plans for Safety Analysis Report updates. Recognizing that correcting individual observations does not suffice in remedying the vulnerabilities, a task team was assembled to address the broader programmatic issues and to recommend corrective actions

  9. Compliance with federal and state regulations regarding the emergency response plan and physical security plan at the Oregon State TRIGA reactor

    Johnson, A.G.; Ringle, J.C.; Anderson, T.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent legislative actions within the State of Oregon have had a significant impact upon the OSU TRIGA Emergency Response Plan, and to a lesser extent upon the Physical Security Plan. These state imposed changes will be reviewed in light of existing federal requirements. With the upcoming acquisition of FLIP fuel in August 1976, NRC required several major changes to the existing Physical Security Plan. Within the limitations of public disclosure, these changes will be contrasted to the present plan. (author)

  10. DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance

    Kirkpatrick, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level.

  11. DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance

    Kirkpatrick, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level

  12. First testing of an AUV mission planning and guidance system for water quality monitoring and fish behavior observation in net cage fish farming

    D. Karimanzira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, underwater vehicles have become low cost, reliable and affordable platforms for performing various underwater tasks. While many aquaculture systems are closed with no harmful output, open net cage fish farms and land-based fish farms can discharge significant amounts of wastewater containing nutrients, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals that impact on the surrounding environment. Although aquaculture development has often occurred outside a regulatory framework, government oversight is increasingly common at both the seafood quality control level, and at baseline initiatives addressing the basic problem of pollution generated by culture operations, e.g. the European marine and maritime directives. This requires regular, sustainable and cost-effective monitoring of the water quality. Such monitoring needs devices to detect the water quality in a large sea area at different depths in real time. This paper presents a concept for a guidance system for a carrier (an autonomous underwater vehicle of such devices for the automated detection and analysis of water quality parameters.

  13. Development of quantitative methods for spill response planning: a trajectory analysis planner

    Galt, J.A.; Payton, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    In planning for response to oil spills, a great deal of information must be assimilated. Typically, geophysical flow patterns, ocean turbulence, complex chemical processes, ecological setting, fisheries activities, economics of land use, and engineering constraints on response equipment all need to be considered. This presents a formidable analysis problem. It can be shown, however, that if an appropriate set of evaluation data is available, an objective function and appropriate constraints can be formulated. From these equations, the response problem can be cast in terms of game theory of decision analysis and an optimal solution can be obtained using common scarce-resource allocation methods. The optimal solution obtained by this procedure maximises the expected return over all possible implementations of a given set of response options. While considering the development of an optimal spill response, it is useful to consider whether (in the absence of complete data) implementing some subset of these methods is possible to provide relevant and useful information for the spill planning process, even though it may fall short of a statistically optimal solution. In this work we introduce a trajectory analysis planning (TAP) methodology that can provide a cohesive framework for integrating physical transport processes, environmental sensitivity of regional sites, and potential response options. This trajectory analysis planning methodology can be shown to implement a significant part of the game theory analysis and provide 'minimum regret' strategy advice, without actually carrying out the optimisation procedures. (Author)

  14. The management of acute risks. Oil spill contingency planning and response

    Monk, D.C.; Cormack, D.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that the risks of environmental damage can be best minimized by preventing oil spills from occurring at all. Since absolute prevention is unrealistic, however, early detection is essential and aerial surveillance techniques are of great value in this connection. If spills do occur, proper contingency planning and clean-up techniques can minimize impacts, but will rarely avoid them completely if the spilled oil reaches the coastline. It is evident that a main priority should be to prevent spilled oil reaching the coastline. The way in which oil spill response strategy is implemented is discussed in detail. It is based on four key elements: the allocation of responsibilities; contingency planning; training and exercises; regular audit of plans and response mechanisms. A case study of the oil spill strategy employed at the Sullom Voe oil terminal in Shetland is used as an illustration. (UK)

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    1991-01-01

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  17. The implementation of the Plan Esperanza and response to the imPACT Review.

    Vidaurre, Tatiana; Santos, Carlos; Gómez, Henry; Sarria, Gustavo; Amorin, Edgar; López, Marga; Regalado, Roxana; Manrique, Javier; Tarco, Duniska; Ayestas, Carlos; Calderón, Mónica; Mas, Luis; Neciosup, Silvia; Salazar, Miriam; Chávez, Juan Carlos; Ubillus, Milward; Limache, Abel; Ubillus, José Carlos; Navarro, Jeannie; Sarwal, Kavita; Sutcliffe, Simon; Gutiérrez-Aguado, Alfonso; Silva, Marianela; Mena, Amalia; Guillén, María Eugenia; Castañeda, Carlos; Abugattas, Julio

    2017-10-01

    Following the implementation of the National Cancer Prevention and Control Results-based Budget Programme (PpR Cancer-024) in 2011, the Peruvian Government approved the Plan Esperanza-a population-based national cancer control plan-in 2012. Legislation that ensured full government-supported funding for people who were otherwise unable to access or afford care and treatment accompanied the Plan. In 2013, the Ministry of Health requested an integrated mission of the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (imPACT) report to strengthen cancer control in Peru. The imPACT Review, which was executed in 2014, assessed Peru's achievements in cancer control, and areas for improvement, including cancer control planning, further development of population-based cancer registration, increased prevention, early diagnosis, treatment and palliative care, and the engagement and participation of civil society in the health-care system. This Series paper gives a brief history of the development of the Plan Esperanza, describes the innovative funding model that supports it, and summarises how funds are disseminated on the basis of disease, geography, and demographics. An overview of the imPACT Review, and the government's response in the context of the Plan Esperanza, is provided. The development and execution of the Plan Esperanza and the execution of and response to the imPACT Review demonstrates the Peruvian Government's commitment to fighting cancer across the country, including in remote and urban areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual (FY 88). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices

    1988-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices

  19. Public comments and responses to the 1991 Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan

    1992-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) updated its Site-Specific Plan (DOE-RL 1991a) dealing with cleanup and operation of the Hanford Site in September 1991. The plan provides direction as to how DOE will carry out the national strategy for managing and cleaning up the Hanford Site wastes resulting from production of nuclear weapons. The plan is updated annually. We asked the public to comment on the plan during its 60-day public comment period. This report presents the comments and provides responses. The introduction explains how the comments were gathered and how we responded. This report is in four main sections: (1) comments and responses addressed locally; (2) comments forwarded to DOE-Headquarters for their response (these responses will appear in the National Five-Year Plan [DOE 1991a]); (3) comments we did not respond to here because they were outside the scope, or about how we gathered the public's comments; and (4) the appendices, which include a glossary, a list of acronyms used in the document, and the letters and cards we received reproduced in their entirety

  20. Action plan in response to March 1981 report to NFPQT Committee

    1981-03-01

    This plan of action has been prepared at the direction of the Acting Under Secretary in response to the report of the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualifications and Training (NFPQT) Committee on A Safety Assessment of Department of Energy Nuclear Reactors. Senior Department officials with Headquarters responsibilities for the safety of nuclear facilities owned by and operated for the Department have developed this plan with input from the operations office managers having operational responsibility for such facilities. A summary of the plan's objectives and a cross-reference to the findings of the NFPQT Committee Report is attached to the plan. Appendix A contains implementing actions and Appendix B contains a summary of actions responsive to lessons learned from the TMI accident that have been completed or are well underway. Although the plan is written in definitive language, the specific actions (such as organization realignments and proposals) will be subject to appropriate review and approval. Also, other adjustments may be required as the actions are implemented

  1. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site

  2. Marine spill response planning for the non-persistent oil transportation industry in Alaska

    Taylor, E.; Egland, L.

    1998-01-01

    The unique difficulties that face oil spill response planning for the oil transportation industry in Alaska were discussed. Three levels of response strategies and actions proposed by the Alaska Petroleum Distributors and Transporters (APD and T) member companies were reviewed. They were: (1) immediate response (on-board resources), (2) in-region response (caches in Subareas), and (3) out-of-region cascaded resources (from Anchorage and other sources). The strategies and levels of capability were proposed as emergency measures in addition to the more important prevention measures already instituted to prevent discharges of non-persistent oil. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs

  3. Introduction of an Emergency Response Plan for flood loading of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in Malaysia

    Said, N. F. Md; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Muda, R. S.; Razad, A. Z. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Sultan Abu Bakar Dam Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is designed to assist employees for identifying, monitoring, responding and mitigation dam safety emergencies. This paper is outlined to identification of an organization chart, responsibility for emergency management team and triggering level in Sultan Abu Bakar Dam ERP. ERP is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in respond to emergency incidents affecting the dam. Based on this study four major responsibilities are needed for Abu Bakar Dam owing to protect any probable risk for downstream which they can be Incident Commander, Deputy Incident Commander, On-Scene Commander, Civil Engineer. In conclusion, having organization charts based on ERP studies can be helpful for decreasing the probable risks in any projects such as Abu Bakar Dam and it is a way to identify and suspected and actual dam safety emergencies.

  4. 33 CFR 155.1040 - Response plan requirements for unmanned tank barges carrying oil as a primary cargo.

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155.1040 Response plan...-based support or advice; (ii) The individuals who shall be notified of a casualty potentially affecting... coordinator responsible for overseeing or directing those actions. (4) The organizational structure that will...

  5. Guidance for implementing an environmental, safety and health assurance program. Volume 2. A model plan for environmental, safety and health staff audits and appraisals

    Ellingson, A.C.

    1980-09-01

    This is 1 of 15 documents designed to illustrate how an Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) Assurance Program may be implemented. The generic definition of ES and H Assurance Programs is given in a companion document entitled An Environmental, Safety and Health Assurance Program Standard. This document is concerned with ES and H audit and appraisal activities of an ES and H Staff Organization as they might be performed in an institution whose ES and H program is based upon the ES and H Assurance Program Standard. An annotated model plan for ES and H Staff audits and appraisals is presented and discussed

  6. Homeland Security is Hometown Security: Comparison and Case Studies of Vertically Synchronized Catastrophe Response Plans

    2015-09-01

    Hurricanes Andrew, Hugo , and Katrina resonate as failures where there was little, if any, federal response in the initial hours, which left the depleted...was also initiated by several large scale incidents, including the Three Mile Island Disaster and Hurricanes Hugo and Andrew.67 This evolved at the...persist during large scale disasters, as was demonstrated during Hurricane Katrina and Super Storm Sandy. Catastrophe response planning at the

  7. Legislative framework on establishing emergency response plan in the case of a nuclear accident

    Novosel, N.; Valcic, I.; Biscan, R.

    2000-01-01

    To give an overview of the legislative framework, which defined emergency planning in Croatia in the case of a nuclear accident, it's necessary to look at all international recommendations and obligations and the national legislation, acts and regulations. It has to be emphasized that Croatia signed three international conventions in this field, and by that took over some responsibilities and obligations. Beside that, it is also in Croatian interest to follow the recommendations of international institutions such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA standards and technical documents). On the other hand, national legislation in this field consists of several laws, which cover nuclear safety measures, governmental organization, natural disasters and acts (decree, decisions) of responsible authority for emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident (Ministry of Economy). This paper presents an overview of the international and Croatian legislation which influenced the emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident. (author)

  8. Public comments and responses to the 1993 Hanford cleanup five-year plan

    1993-08-01

    In March 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) published its annual Site-Specific Five-Year Plan. The Site-Specific Plan is published to inform the public about the background, status, and plans for Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) activities at the Hanford site. It is the only document that seeks to bring all ER and WM elements together in one document. The Site-Specific Plan is a companion document to the National Five-Year Plan that deals with all the sites within the DOE complex on a summary level. This Response to Comments document does not try to address every question or concern raised during the public comment period. Some questions were outside the scope of the Five-Year Plan, some we could not decipher, others were variations of the same question. The initial round of public meetings was held in Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Pasco, and Olympia, Washington. At the request of the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a second round of meetings was held in Portland and Olympia. Both agencies felt that the first two meetings were held with too little advance notice, and before the Plan could be distributed. Once the public meetings were over and the comment period closed, we then compiled the public comments, largely from audio tapes of the meetings. Individual functions within Hanford were asked to consider and respond to the comments

  9. 40 CFR 300.440 - Procedures for planning and implementing off-site response actions.

    2010-07-01

    ... unless the Remedial Project Manager or OSC assures the proper management of the CERCLA waste samples or... OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Hazardous Substance Response § 300.440... § 300.440(d). (5) Off-site transfers of those laboratory samples and treatability study CERCLA wastes...

  10. Integrating ecosystem services and climate change responses in coastal wetlands development plans for Bangladesh

    Sarwar, M.H.; Hein, L.G.; Rip, F.I.; Dearing, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the integration of ecosystem services and climate change adaptation in development plans for coastal wetlands in Bangladesh. A new response framework for adaptation is proposed, based on an empirical analysis and consultations with stakeholders, using a modified version of the

  11. Interagency Communication and Collaboration on School Crisis Response Planning and Management

    Skavdahl, Britta M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine what research-based and federally recommended practices in the area of school crisis response planning and management were being implemented in K-8 school districts in Northern California, as well as the degree with which the recommended practices were being implemented. Finally, the study…

  12. 33 CFR 155.1230 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria.

    2010-07-01

    ... impact; (2) Oil recovery devices appropriate for the type of animal fats or vegetable oils carried; and (3) Other appropriate equipment necessary to respond to a discharge involving the type of animal fats... VESSELS Response plan requirements for vessels carrying animal fats and vegetable oils as a primary cargo...

  13. Predicting People's Environmental Behaviour: Theory of Planned Behaviour and Model of Responsible Environmental Behaviour

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2012-01-01

    Using different measures of self-reported and other-reported environmental behaviour (EB), two important theoretical models explaining EB--Hines, Hungerford and Tomera's model of responsible environmental behaviour (REB) and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour (TPB)--were compared regarding the fit between model and data, predictive ability,…

  14. Culturally Responsive Education: Developing Lesson Plans for Vietnamese Students in the American Diaspora

    Douglas, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the application of the philosophical principles of John Dewey and Culturally Responsive Education in the creation of lesson plans for Vietnamese students in the American Diaspora. Through a Fulbright-Hayes Program a group of teachers from the New York City Public School System and Long Island spent six weeks in Vietnam…

  15. Stakeholder insights on the planning and development of an independent benchmark standard for responsible food marketing.

    Cairns, Georgina; Macdonald, Laura

    2016-06-01

    A mixed methods qualitative survey investigated stakeholder responses to the proposal to develop an independently defined, audited and certifiable set of benchmark standards for responsible food marketing. Its purpose was to inform the policy planning and development process. A majority of respondents were supportive of the proposal. A majority also viewed the engagement and collaboration of a broad base of stakeholders in its planning and development as potentially beneficial. Positive responses were associated with views that policy controls can and should be extended to include all form of marketing, that obesity and non-communicable diseases prevention and control was a shared responsibility and an urgent policy priority and prior experience of independent standardisation as a policy lever for good practice. Strong policy leadership, demonstrable utilisation of the evidence base in its development and deployment and a conceptually clear communications plan were identified as priority targets for future policy planning. Future research priorities include generating more evidence on the feasibility of developing an effective community of practice and theory of change, the strengths and limitations of these and developing an evidence-based step-wise communications strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Experience Report: Constraint-Based Modelling and Simulation of Railway Emergency Response Plans

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sandberg, Lene

    2016-01-01

    ways to proceed, including ways not necessarily anticipated in the paper-based emergency response plans. The case study was undertaken as part of a short research, ProSec, project funded by the Danish Defence Agency, with the aim of applying and developing methods for collaborative mapping of emergency...

  17. Nuclear accident/radiological emergency assistance plan. NAREAP - edition 2000. Emergency preparedness and response

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Nuclear Accident/Radiological Emergency Assistance Plan (NAREAP) is to describe the framework for systematic, integrated, co-ordinated, and effective preparedness and response for a nuclear accident or radiological emergency involving facilities or practices that may give rise to a threat to health, the environment or property. The purpose of the NAREAP is: to define the emergency response objectives of the Agency's staff in a nuclear accident or a radiological emergency; to assign responsibilities for performing the tasks and authorities for making the decisions that comprise the Agency staff's response to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; to guide the Agency managers who must ensure that all necessary tasks are given the necessary support in discharging the Agency staff responsibilities and fulfilling its obligations in response to an emergency; to ensure that the development and maintenance of detailed and coherent response procedures are well founded; to act as a point of reference for individual Agency staff members on their responsibilities (as an individual or a team member) throughout a response; to identify interrelationships with other international intergovernmental Organizations; and to serve as a training aid to maintain readiness of personnel. The NAREAP refers to the arrangements of the International Atomic Energy Agency and of the United Nations Security and Safety Section at the Vienna International Centre (UNSSS-VIC) that may be necessary for the IAEA to respond to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, as defined in the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions. It covers response arrangements for any situation that may have actual, potential or perceived radiological consequences and that could require a response from the IAEA, as well as the arrangements for developing, maintaining and exercising preparedness. The implementing procedures themselves are not included in the NAREAP, but they are required

  18. Addressing the gap between public health emergency planning and incident response

    Freedman, Ariela M; Mindlin, Michele; Morley, Christopher; Griffin, Meghan; Wooten, Wilma; Miner, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Since 9/11, Incident Command System (ICS) and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) are relatively new concepts to public health, which typically operates using less hierarchical and more collaborative approaches to organizing staff. This paper describes the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak in San Diego County to explore the use of ICS and EOC in public health emergency response. Methods: This study was conducted using critical case study methodology consisting of document review and 18 key-informant interviews with individuals who played key roles in planning and response. Thematic analysis was used to analyze data. Results: Several broad elements emerged as key to ensuring effective and efficient public health response: 1) developing a plan for emergency response; 2) establishing the framework for an ICS; 3) creating the infrastructure to support response; 4) supporting a workforce trained on emergency response roles, responsibilities, and equipment; and 5) conducting regular preparedness exercises. Conclusions: This research demonstrates the value of investments made and that effective emergency preparedness requires sustained efforts to maintain personnel and material resources. By having the infrastructure and experience based on ICS and EOC, the public health system had the capability to surge-up: to expand its day-to-day operation in a systematic and prolonged manner. None of these critical actions are possible without sustained funding for the public health infrastructure. Ultimately, this case study illustrates the importance of public health as a key leader in emergency response. PMID:28228983

  19. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Geographic Response Information Network : a new tool to manage community information for oil spill contingency planning and response operations

    Munger, M.; Bryant, T. [Cook Inlet Regional Citizen' s Advisory Council, Kenai, AK (United States); Haugstad, E.; Kwietniak, J. [Tesora Alaska Petroleum, Kenai, AK (United States); DeCola, E.; Robertson, T. [Nuka Research and Planning Group, Seldovia, AK (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper described the Geographic Response Information Network (GRIN) project which was launched to address some of the logistical challenges that often complicate oil spill and emergency response operations. The objective of the project was to develop a computer-based tool for incident logistics to organize maps and data related to oil spills, safety, public relations and basic community resources. In addition to its use for oil spill response planning, the data available can be useful for all-hazards emergency response planning. Early prototypes of the GRIN used PowerPoint slides to organize basic information about coastal communities in Alaska. With time, hyper text markup language (html) was used as the programming format because it can be more readily hyper-linked. Currently, GRIN is organized as a web page with the following 5 categories of information: general, liaison, public information, logistics and safety. There are several sub-headings under each category, such as location, people, economy, subsistence and transportation. This general information allows incident management personnel to obtain a community profile to better understand the cultural, social and economic basis of the community. The GRIN prototype was developed for the Kodiak urban area, but it may be expanded in the future to include other coastal communities in Alaska. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Geographic Response Information Network : a new tool to manage community information for oil spill contingency planning and response operations

    Munger, M.; Bryant, T.; Haugstad, E.; Kwietniak, J.; DeCola, E.; Robertson, T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper described the Geographic Response Information Network (GRIN) project which was launched to address some of the logistical challenges that often complicate oil spill and emergency response operations. The objective of the project was to develop a computer-based tool for incident logistics to organize maps and data related to oil spills, safety, public relations and basic community resources. In addition to its use for oil spill response planning, the data available can be useful for all-hazards emergency response planning. Early prototypes of the GRIN used PowerPoint slides to organize basic information about coastal communities in Alaska. With time, hyper text markup language (html) was used as the programming format because it can be more readily hyper-linked. Currently, GRIN is organized as a web page with the following 5 categories of information: general, liaison, public information, logistics and safety. There are several sub-headings under each category, such as location, people, economy, subsistence and transportation. This general information allows incident management personnel to obtain a community profile to better understand the cultural, social and economic basis of the community. The GRIN prototype was developed for the Kodiak urban area, but it may be expanded in the future to include other coastal communities in Alaska. 3 refs., 6 figs

  2. Agent Based Individual Traffic guidance

    Wanscher, Jørgen Bundgaard

    2004-01-01

    When working with traffic planning or guidance it is common practice to view the vehicles as a combined mass. >From this models are employed to specify the vehicle supply and demand for each region. As the models are complex and the calculations are equally demanding the regions and the detail...... of the road network is aggregated. As a result the calculations reveal only what the mass of vehicles are doing and not what a single vehicle is doing. This is the crucial difference to ABIT (Agent Based Individual Trafficguidance). ABIT is based on the fact that information on the destination of each vehicle...

  3. Public comments and responses to the 1989 Hanford cleanup five-year plan

    1991-06-01

    In April 1990 the US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a site- specific Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989a) on Hanford's cleanup for public review and comment. The plan guides Hanford in carrying out DOE's national plan for environmental restoration and waste management. During the 90-day public comment period, DOE held nine public meetings to answer questions and gather comments on the plan. This report is in three main sections. The first presents consolidated public comments and responses. These were compiled from both verbal comments from public meetings and written comments. The second section contains comments not responded to in this plan. Those comments were outside this plan's scope, related to how we gathered public comments, or intended for and directed to DOE-Headquarters. In the appendixes are the written comment letters we received and a short glossary and list of special terms we use. The source of comments is shown in parentheses after the comment. The individual who made the comment, the city of the public meeting, or the organization name is generally used. When several sources gave the same comment, a source was not listed. 26 refs

  4. Guidance for the design and management of a maintenance plan to assure safety and improve the predictability of a DOE nuclear irradiation facility. Final report

    Booth, R.S.; Kryter, R.C.; Shepard, R.L.; Smith, O.L.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Rowan, W.J.

    1994-10-01

    A program is recommended for planning the maintenance of DOE nuclear facilities that will help safety and enhance availability throughout a facility's life cycle. While investigating the requirements for maintenance activities, a major difference was identified between the strategy suitable for a conventional power reactor and one for a research reactor facility: the latter should provide a high degree of predicted availability (referred to hereafter as ''predictability'') to its users, whereas the former should maximize total energy production. These differing operating goals necessitate different maintenance strategies. A strategy for scheduling research reactor facility operation and shutdown for maintenance must balance safety, reliability,and predicted availability. The approach developed here is based on three major elements: (1) a probabilistic risk analysis of the balance between assured reliability and predictability (presented in Appendix C), (2) an assessment of the safety and operational impact of maintenance activities applied to various components of the facility, and (3) a data base of historical and operational information on the performance and requirements for maintenance of various components. These factors are integrated into a set of guidelines for designing a new highly maintainable facility, for preparing flexible schedules for improved maintenance of existing facilities, and for anticipating the maintenance required to extend the life of an aging facility. Although tailored to research reactor facilities, the methodology has broader applicability and may therefore be used to improved the maintenance of power reactors, particularly in anticipation of peak load demands

  5. Guidance for Facilities on Risk Management Programs (RMP)

    Includes supplemental guidance specific to ammonia refrigeration, wastewater treatment, propane storage, warehouses, chemical distributors, offsite consequence analysis, retail agriculture, applicability of program levels, prevention, emergency response.

  6. 20 CFR 1002.261 - Who is responsible for funding any plan obligation to provide the employee with pension benefits?

    2010-04-01

    ... obligation to provide the employee with pension benefits? 1002.261 Section 1002.261 Employees' Benefits... and Benefits Pension Plan Benefits § 1002.261 Who is responsible for funding any plan obligation to provide the employee with pension benefits? With the exception of multiemployer plans, which have separate...

  7. The response to a worst-case scenario - the national emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    Cunningham D, John [Radiological Protection Inst. of Ireland (Ireland)

    1996-10-01

    The Chernobyl accident in 1986 highlighted many deficiencies in the preparedness of countries to deal with a major accident. It demonstrated how vulnerable countries are to transboundary contamination. Ireland had no emergency plan at the time of the accident and only minimal facilities with which to assess the consequences of the accident. Nonetheless, the then Nuclear Energy Board with the assistance of Government Departments and the Civil Defence organisation reacted quickly to assess the situation despite the complete lack of information about the accident from the then USSR. Even countries with advanced nuclear technologies faced similar difficulties. It was quickly recognised by Government that the national laboratory facilities were totally inadequate. The Nuclear Energy Board was provided with additional resources to assist it to cope in the short term with the very large demand for monitoring. In the longer term a new national radiation laboratory was provided and the Board was formally replaced by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. It was given statutory responsibility to monitor radiation levels, to advise measures to be taken for the protection of the public and to provide information for the public. An emergency plan based on the Chernobyl experience was drafted in 1987, amended and published in 1992. Certain features of this plan were implemented from 1987 onwards, notably the classification of responsibilities and the installation of a national continuous radiation monitoring system. The paper outlines the responsibilities of those who could be involved in a response to a nuclear incident, the procedures used to evaluate its consequences and the provision of information for the public. The plan provides an integrated management system which has sufficient flexibility to enable a rapid response to be made to a major or minor crisis, either foreseen or unforeseen and whatever its cause.

  8. Experience from implementing international standards in national emergency response planning national adjustments and suggestions for improvements

    Naadland Holo, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A process has been going on for some time in Norway to establish a harmonized background for emergency response planning for any kind of nuclear or radiological accident. The national emergency preparedness organisation with the crisis committee for nuclear accident, consisting of representatives from civil defence, defence, police-, health-, and food control authorities, has the authority to implement countermeasures to protect health, environment and national interests in case of an accident or in case of nuclear terrorism. However, in an early phase, the response plans need to be fully harmonized to ensure that every operational level knows their responsibility and the responsibilities of others. Our intention is to implement the IAEA standard 'preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency'. We believe this will simplify national and international communication and also simplify the crisis management if an accident occurs. In revising the national plans, and also the planning basis at regional and local level, as well as the planning basis for response to accidents at national nuclear facilities and in connection with arrival of nuclear submarines in Norwegian harbours, we have seen the need to make national adjustments to the international standards. In addition to the standard, there exist several other processes and routines for reporting different kinds of incidents. We have seen a need to coordinate this internally at the competent authority to simplify the routines. This paper will focus on the challenges we have met, our national solutions and some suggestions for simplification. National adjustments to the international standard. - Firstly, the threat categorization needs to be adjusted. First of all, we do not have nuclear power plants in Norway. In the aftermath of 11 September 2001 we also have focused more an the potential for nuclear terrorism. Nuclear terrorism is unlikely but puts up some new requirements in the

  9. Application of Group-Level Item Response Models in the Evaluation of Consumer Reports about Health Plan Quality

    Reise, Steven P.; Meijer, Rob R.; Ainsworth, Andrew T.; Morales, Leo S.; Hays, Ron D.

    2006-01-01

    Group-level parametric and non-parametric item response theory models were applied to the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS[R]) 2.0 core items in a sample of 35,572 Medicaid recipients nested within 131 health plans. Results indicated that CAHPS responses are dominated by within health plan variation, and only weakly…

  10. A bi-level integrated generation-transmission planning model incorporating the impacts of demand response by operation simulation

    Zhang, Ning; Hu, Zhaoguang; Springer, Cecilia; Li, Yanning; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We put forward a novel bi-level integrated power system planning model. • Generation expansion planning and transmission expansion planning are combined. • The effects of two sorts of demand response in reducing peak load are considered. • Operation simulation is conducted to reflect the actual effects of demand response. • The interactions between the two levels can guarantee a reasonably optimal result. - Abstract: If all the resources in power supply side, transmission part, and power demand side are considered together, the optimal expansion scheme from the perspective of the whole system can be achieved. In this paper, generation expansion planning and transmission expansion planning are combined into one model. Moreover, the effects of demand response in reducing peak load are taken into account in the planning model, which can cut back the generation expansion capacity and transmission expansion capacity. Existing approaches to considering demand response for planning tend to overestimate the impacts of demand response on peak load reduction. These approaches usually focus on power reduction at the moment of peak load without considering the situations in which load demand at another moment may unexpectedly become the new peak load due to demand response. These situations are analyzed in this paper. Accordingly, a novel approach to incorporating demand response in a planning model is proposed. A modified unit commitment model with demand response is utilized. The planning model is thereby a bi-level model with interactions between generation-transmission expansion planning and operation simulation to reflect the actual effects of demand response and find the reasonably optimal planning result.

  11. Report to Congress on status of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants

    1981-03-01

    This report responds to a request (Public Law 96-295, Section 109) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to report to Congress on the status of emergency response planning in support of nuclear power reactors. The report includes information on the status of this planning as well as on the Commission actions relating to emergency preparedness. These actions include a summary of the new regulatory requirements and the preliminary results of two comprehensive Evacuation Time Estimate studies; one requested by the NRC including 50 nuclear power plant sites and one conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for 12 high population density sites. FEMA provided the information in this report on the status of State and local planning, including projected schedules for joint State/county/licensee emergency preparedness exercises. Included as Appendicies are the NRC Emergency Planning Final Regulations, 10 CFR Part 50 (45 FR 55402), the FEMA Proposed Rule, 'Review and Approval of State and Local Radiological Emergency Plans and Preparedness', 44 CFR Part 350 (45 FR 42341) and the NRC/FEMA Memorandums of Understanding

  12. Foreign Affairs: Specific Action Plan Needed to Improve Response to Parental Child Abductions

    2000-03-01

    the child or prejudice to interested parties; (3) secure the voluntary return of the child or to bring about an amicable resolution of the issues, and...FOREIGN AFFAIRS Specific Action Plan Needed to Improve Response to Parental Child Abductions DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release...International Parental Child Abduction 17 Page 1 GAO/NSIAD-00-10 Parental Child Abduction Page 2 GAO/NSIAD-00-10 Parental Child Abduction GAP

  13. Assessing the integration of health center and community emergency preparedness and response planning.

    Wineman, Nicole V; Braun, Barbara I; Barbera, Joseph A; Loeb, Jerod M

    2007-11-01

    To assess the state of health center integration into community preparedness, we undertook a national study of linkages between health centers and the emergency preparedness and response planning initiatives in their communities. The key objectives of this project were to gain a better understanding of existing linkages in a nationally representative sample of health centers, and identify health center demographic and experience factors that were associated with strong linkages. The objectives of the study were to gain a baseline understanding of existing health center linkages to community emergency preparedness and response systems and to identify factors that were associated with strong linkages. A 60-item questionnaire was mailed to the population of health centers supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Bureau of Primary Health Care in February 2005. Results were aggregated and a chi square analysis identified factors associated with stronger linkages. Overall performance on study-defined indicators of strong linkages was low: 34% had completed a hazard vulnerability analysis in collaboration with the community emergency management agency, 30% had their role documented in the community plan, and 24% participated in community-wide exercises. Stronger linkages were associated with experience responding to a disaster and a perception of high risk for experiencing a disaster. The potential for health centers to participate in an integrated response is not fully realized, and their absence from community-based planning leaves an already vulnerable population at greater risk. Community planners should be encouraged to include health centers in planning and response and centers should receive more targeted resources for community integration.

  14. Radiological emergency response planning: Handbook for Federal Assistance to State and Local Governments

    1978-12-01

    The handbook is directed toward those federal agencies involved in providing direct field assistance to state and local governments in radiological emergency response planning. Its principal purpose is to optimize the effectiveness of this effort by specifying the functions of the following federal agencies: Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of Transportation, Defense Civil Preparedness Agency, Federal Disaster Assistance Administration, and Federal Preparedness Agency

  15. Guidance on Port Biological Baseline Surveys (PBBS)

    Awad, A.; Haag, F.; Anil, A.C.; Abdulla, A.

    This publication has been prepared by GBP, IOI, CSIR-NIO and IUCN in order to serve as guidance to those who are planning to carry out a port biological baseline survey, in particular in the context of Ballast Water Management. It has been drafted...

  16. Guidance of eruption for general practitioners.

    Ngan, Peter W; Kao, Elizabeth C; Wei, Stephen H

    2003-04-01

    The principle of early treatment through well-planned extraction of primary teeth followed by removal of permanent teeth has stood the test of time. The objective of this article is to develop some simple guidelines for general dental practitioners to perform 'guidance of eruption' in malocclusion with severe crowding.

  17. Development of urban planning guidelines for improving emergency response capacities in seismic areas of Iran.

    Hosseini, Kambod Amini; Jafari, Mohammad Kazem; Hosseini, Maziar; Mansouri, Babak; Hosseinioon, Solmaz

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of research carried out to improve emergency response activities in earthquake-prone areas of Iran. The research concentrated on emergency response operations, emergency medical care, emergency transportation, and evacuation-the most important issues after an earthquake with regard to saving the lives of victims. For each topic, some guidelines and criteria are presented for enhancing emergency response activities, based on evaluations of experience of strong earthquakes that have occurred over the past two decades in Iran, notably Manjil (1990), Bam (2003), Firouz Abad-Kojour (2004), Zarand (2005) and Broujerd (2006). These guidelines and criteria are applicable to other national contexts, especially countries with similar seismic and social conditions as Iran. The results of this study should be incorporated into comprehensive plans to ensure sustainable development or reconstruction of cities as well as to augment the efficiency of emergency response after an earthquake.

  18. Indian Point Nuclear Power Station: verification analysis of County Radiological Emergency-Response Plans

    Nagle, J.; Whitfield, R.

    1983-05-01

    This report was developed as a management tool for use by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region II staff. The analysis summarized in this report was undertaken to verify the extent to which procedures, training programs, and resources set forth in the County Radiological Emergency Response Plans (CRERPs) for Orange, Putnam, and Westchester counties in New York had been realized prior to the March 9, 1983, exercise of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station near Buchanan, New York. To this end, a telephone survey of county emergency response organizations was conducted between January 19 and February 22, 1983. This report presents the results of responses obtained from this survey of county emergency response organizations

  19. Connected vehicle impacts on transportation planning technical memorandum #2 : connected vehicle planning processes and products and stakeholder roles and responsibilities.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project, Connected Vehicle Impacts on Transportation Planning, is to comprehensively assess how connected vehicles should : be considered across the range of transportation planning processes and products developed by Stat...

  20. Optimal Aerocapture Guidance

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main goal of my research is to develop, implement, verify, and validate an optimal numerical predictor-corrector aerocapture guidance algorithm that is...

  1. Coral Reef Guidance

    Guidance prepared by EPA and Army Corps of Engineers concerning coral reef protection under the Clean Water Act, Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act, Rivers and Harbors Act, and Federal Project Authorities.

  2. Laser Guidance Analysis Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, which provides for real time, closed loop evaluation of semi-active laser guidance hardware, has and continues to be instrumental in the development...

  3. An Evaluation of Guidance and Counselling Services Offered to ...

    This paper sought to evaluate the guidance and counselling services offered to students in Gwanda urban and peri-urban secondary schools. Guidance and counselling is regarded as a programme and service in the education system, providing advice with regards to students' education, career planning, social issues or ...

  4. Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities

    Jolley, Robert L.; Morris, Michael I.; Singh, Suman P.N.

    1991-12-01

    This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety.

  5. Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities

    Jolley, R.L.; Morris, M.I.; Singh, S.P.N.

    1991-12-01

    This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety

  6. Office of Legacy Management. Information and Records Management. Transition Guidance

    2004-01-01

    responsibilities. The DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) has a central role in DOE records management by providing guidance, expertise, and coordination to all DOE offices and organizations and coordination with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). LM and the transfer site will complete an integrated transition plan which will integrate all transition elements including information and records. As part of the overall transition plan, an Information and Records Transition Plan will be developed consistent with the integrated transition plan for the site transfer and included as an attachment. The Information and Records Management Transition Plan will be developed to assist both organizations in organizing the tasks; establishing a timetable and milestones for their completion; and identifying manpower, funding and other resources that will be needed to complete the ownership transfer. In addition, the plan will provide a valuable exchange of institutional knowledge that will assist LM in meeting the obligations of responsibly managing legacy records. Guidance for the development of the plan is included in this document. Records management concerns that may arise during site closure, such as management support, contract language and agreements, interactions with the OCIO and NARA, resource and budget considerations, and procedures to safeguard records are addressed. Guidelines and criteria for records management transition activities are also provided. These include LM expectations for the inventory, scheduling, and disposition of records; the management and transfer of electronic files, including databases and software; records finding aids, indices, and recordkeeping systems; and the process for the transfer of hard copy and electronic records to LM

  7. Office of Legacy Management. Information and Records Management. Transition Guidance

    None

    2004-03-01

    information responsibilities. The DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) has a central role in DOE records management by providing guidance, expertise, and coordination to all DOE offices and organizations and coordination with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). LM and the transfer site will complete an integrated transition plan which will integrate all transition elements including information and records. As part of the overall transition plan, an Information and Records Transition Plan will be developed consistent with the integrated transition plan for the site transfer and included as an attachment. The Information and Records Management Transition Plan will be developed to assist both organizations in organizing the tasks; establishing a timetable and milestones for their completion; and identifying manpower, funding and other resources that will be needed to complete the ownership transfer. In addition, the plan will provide a valuable exchange of institutional knowledge that will assist LM in meeting the obligations of responsibly managing legacy records. Guidance for the development of the plan is included in this document. Records management concerns that may arise during site closure, such as management support, contract language and agreements, interactions with the OCIO and NARA, resource and budget considerations, and procedures to safeguard records are addressed. Guidelines and criteria for records management transition activities are also provided. These include LM expectations for the inventory, scheduling, and disposition of records; the management and transfer of electronic files, including databases and software; records finding aids, indices, and recordkeeping systems; and the process for the transfer of hard copy and electronic records to LM.

  8. 76 FR 9583 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Clinical Pharmacogenomics: Premarketing Evaluation in Early Phase...

    2011-02-18

    ... final version of the guidance, submit either electronic or written comments on the draft guidance by... electronic access to the guidance document. Submit electronic comments on the draft guidance to http://www... body tissue or fluid (e.g., blood, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid). Drug response results from the...

  9. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) compliance program guidance manual and updates (FY 86). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices. Irregular report

    1986-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices

  10. Rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for postfire debris-flow emergency-response planning

    Cannon, S.H.; Boldt, E.M.; Laber, J.L.; Kean, J.W.; Staley, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Following wildfires, emergency-response and public-safety agencies can be faced with evacuation and resource-deployment decisions well in advance of coming winter storms and during storms themselves. Information critical to these decisions is provided for recently burned areas in the San Gabriel Mountains of southern California. A compilation of information on the hydrologic response to winter storms from recently burned areas in southern California steeplands is used to develop a system for classifying magnitudes of hydrologic response. The four-class system describes combinations of reported volumes of individual debris flows, consequences of debris flows and floods in an urban setting, and spatial extents of the hydrologic response. The range of rainfall conditions associated with different magnitude classes is defined by integrating local rainfall data with the response magnitude information. Magnitude I events can be expected when within-storm rainfall accumulations (A) of given durations (D) fall above the threshold A = 0.4D0.5 and below A = 0.5D0.6 for durations greater than 1 h. Magnitude II events will be generated in response to rainfall accumulations and durations between A = 0.4D0.5 and A = 0.9D0.5 for durations less than 1 h, and between A = 0.5D0.6 and A = 0.9D0.5 or durations greater than 1 h. Magnitude III events can be expected in response to rainfall conditions above the threshold A = 0.9D0.5. Rainfall threshold-magnitude relations are linked with potential emergency-response actions as an emergency-response decision chart, which leads a user through steps to determine potential event magnitudes and identify possible evacuation and resource-deployment levels. Use of this information in planning and response decision-making process could result in increased safety for both the public and emergency responders. ?? 2011 US Government.

  11. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal topographic and bathymetric data to support hurricane impact assessment and response

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: • Coastal topography and bathymetry • Impacts to coastal beaches and barriers • Impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology • Impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures • Impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife This fact sheet focuses on coastal topography and bathymetry. This fact sheet focuses on coastal topography and bathymetry.

  12. Oil spill response planning, training and facilities for wildlife in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Hillman, S.O.

    1996-01-01

    The special provisions of the SERVS System of the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company concerning the treatment of wildlife in the event of an oil spill, were described. The Company is prepared to mobilize a rapid response for protection and treatment of wildlife in the event of an oil spill anywhere along the trans-Alaska pipeline or in Prince William Sound. Equipment for hazing, capture, and treatment is pre-assembled and staged at facilities at the Valdez Marine Terminal. Veterinarians and wildlife treatment specialists are under contract for treating oiled birds. This complex of wildlife response capabilities meets or exceeds the guidelines and response planning standards set by wildlife agencies. 7 refs., 6 figs

  13. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites

  14. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

  15. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance

    1993-12-01

    This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

  16. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    Washington TRU Solutions, LLC

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. The C of C states: ''...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, ''Operating Procedures,'' of the application.'' It further states: ''...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, ''Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M and O) contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR (section) 71.11, ''Deliberate Misconduct.'' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARP. This document is available on the Internet at: ttp://www.ws/library/t2omi/t2omi.htm. Users are responsible for ensuring they are using the current revision and change notices. Sites may prepare their own document using the word

  17. FY 1996 annual work plan

    NONE

    1995-09-30

    In April 1994, the Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Plan was issued. This Plan presents the Department`s strategic outlook in response to a changing world. It discusses the Department`s unique capabilities; its mission, vision, and core values; and key customer and stakeholder considerations. The DOE Strategic Plan lists business strategies and critical success factors which are intended to aid the Department in accomplishing its mission and reaching its vision of itself in the future. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has an important role in carrying out the goals and objectives of the Secretary`s Strategic Plan. The ultimate goal of the OIG is to facilitate positive change by assisting its customers, responsible Government officials, in taking actions to improve programs and operations. The Inspector General annually issues his own Strategic Plan that contains program guidance for the next fiscal year. As part of its responsibility in carrying out the OIG mission, the Office of the Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services (Office of Audit Services) publishes an Annual Work Plan that sets forth audits that are planned for the next fiscal year. Selection of these audits is based on the overall budget of the Department, analyses of trends in Departmental operations, guidance contained in the agency`s strategic plans, statutory requirements, and the expressed needs and audit suggestions of Departmental program managers and OIG managers and staff. This work plan includes audits that are carried over from FY 1995 and audits scheduled to start during FY 1996. Audits included in the plan will be performed by OIG staff.

  18. Study plan for the sensitivity analysis of the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC)

    Restrepo, L.F.; Deitesfeld, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado is presently developing a computer code to model the dispersion of potential or actual releases of radioactive or toxic materials to the environment, along with the public consequences from these releases. The model, the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC), considers several complex features which could affect the overall dispersion and consequences. To help validate TRAC, a sensitivity analysis is being planned to determine how sensitive the model's solutions are to input variables. This report contains a brief description of the code, along with a list of tasks and resources needed to complete the sensitivity analysis

  19. Design basis of off-site emergency response plans for fuel cycle installations

    Rzepka, J.P.; Dubiau, Ph.; Jouve, A.C.; Charles, T.; Mercier, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    In France, the term 'off-site emergency response plan' refers to all the arrangements which should be made by the government authorities to protect the population in the event of an accident affecting the installations of the site considered. The outline of the method of defining typical accidents, evaluation of 'source-terms' and health consequences is presented. Two applications to installations from the front-end and from the back-end of the fuel cycle are discussed. (K.A.). 1 tab

  20. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document

  1. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document.

  2. Ecological Restoration: Guidance from Theory

    Joy Zedler

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of the science and practice of ecosystem restoration led me to identify key ecological theories and concepts that are relevant to planning, implementing, and sustaining restoration efforts. From experience with actual restoration projects, I provide guidance for improving the restoration process. Despite an abundance of theory and guidance, restoration goals are not always achieved, and pathways toward targets are not highly predictable. This is understandable, since each restoration project has many constraints and unique challenges. To improve restoration progress, I advise that sites be designed as experiments to allow learning while doing. At least the larger projects can be restored in phases, each designed as experimental treatments to test alternative restoration approaches. Subsequent phases can then adopt one or more of the treatments that best achieved goals in earlier phases while applying new tests of other restoration measures. Both science and restoration can progress simultaneously. This phased, experimental approach (called “adaptive restoration” is an effective tool for improving restoration when monitoring, assessment, interpretation and research are integrated into the process.

  3. Application of wildfire risk assessment results to wildfire response planning in the southern Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    Matthew P. Thompson; Phil Bowden; April Brough; Joe H. Scott; Julie Gilbertson-Day; Alan Taylor; Jennifer Anderson; Jessica Haas

    2016-01-01

    How wildfires are managed is a key determinant of long-term socioecological resiliency and the ability to live with fire. Safe and effective response to fire requires effective pre-fire planning, which is the main focus of this paper. We review general principles of effective federal fire management planning in the U.S., and introduce a framework for incident...

  4. 20 CFR 641.310 - May the Governor delegate responsibility for developing and submitting the State Plan?

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May the Governor delegate responsibility for developing and submitting the State Plan? 641.310 Section 641.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... developing and submitting the State Plan, provided that any such delegation is consistent with State law and...

  5. DOE responses to Ecology review comments for ''Sampling and analysis plans for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project''

    1996-01-01

    The Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds at the Hanford Reservation. This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to Ecology review for ''Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 100-D Ponds Voluntary Remediation Project.''

  6. Lower Colorado River Geographic Response Plan Restricted Web Mapping Service, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service is comprised of data related to Geographic Response Plans (GRPs) for the Lower Colorado River. Data layers were contributed by various stakeholders...

  7. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations

  8. Applications of the new program system UFOMOD in the field of emergency response planning

    Burkart, K.; Ehrhardt, J.; Hasemann, I.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to the main purpose of assessing the consequences of nuclear accidents, the new program system UFOMOD is designed to be a very flexible tool for investigation of alternatives in emergency response planning and emergency management, and for studies of the differences in collective exposure due to different response of parts of the population (disregard or misinterpretation of alarms, spontaneous evacuation etc.). After a brief summary of the main features of the countermeasures submodel, scope, flexibility and variety of results are demonstrated by means of calculations with both an early short and a slightly delayed longer lasting release. Risks and benefits of 3 types of evacuation, i.e. prophylactic, during release and after passage of the plume, are discussed by comparing CCFDs of early fatalities. The number of injuries and fatalities as well as areas and numbers of persons affected by countermeasures may depend considerably on the intervention levels applied. Correlations between these quantities obtained within a parameter study are presented

  9. The national radiological emergency preparedness and response plan in the Philippines

    Valdezco, Eulinia Mendoza

    2007-01-01

    The use of radiation sources of various types and activities is now widespread in the fields of industry, medicine, research and education in the Philippines. These radiation sources have been under the regulatory control of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) to ensure that these materials are used in a safe manner and stored in a safe and secure location, and that those which have exceeded their useful life are appropriately disposed of. And while the safety record of the nuclear industry remains admirable compared to other industries, the occurrence of an accident affecting members of the public is always a possibility but with very low probability. In 2001, the National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC) approved the revised National Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan (RADPLAN). This plan outlines the activities and organizations necessary to mitigate the effects of nuclear emergencies or radiation related accidents. An important component of this plan is the education of the public as well as the emergency responders such as the police authorities fire emergency personnel, medical responders, community leaders and the general public. The threat of nuclear terrorism as an aftermath of the September 11 incident in the United States has also been considered in the latest revision of this document. (author)

  10. Characteristics of Effective Collaboration in Response to Diversified Transportation Planning Authority

    John S. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advantages of decentralized transportation planning responsibilities may include reduced project delivery cost, the integration of comprehensive long-range planning with regional land use, and greater accountability regarding local concerns. Yet disadvantages may include a tendency for operations to dominate longer-term planning, inconsistent operational standards, and difficulty in achieving network benefits, since some transportation links may provide benefits to the entire system but not to the immediate area where the link is located. To surmount these challenges in a decentralized environment, agencies need to cooperate effectively. Characteristics of effective collaboration include (1 experienced personnel, (2 credibility of the deciding entity, (3 transparency of decision-making processes, (4 an authority with sufficient power and/or funding to encourage implementation of key initiatives, (5 clear incentives for cooperation, and, of special importance given limited resources, and (6 an ability to evaluate tradeoffs. An access management case study demonstrates how agencies may use these characteristics to advance challenging projects in a decentralized environment.

  11. Assessment of therapeutic response and treatment planning for brain tumors using metabolic and physiological MRI.

    Nelson, Sarah J

    2011-07-01

    MRI is routinely used for diagnosis, treatment planning and assessment of response to therapy for patients with glioma. Gliomas are spatially heterogeneous and infiltrative lesions that are quite variable in terms of their response to therapy. Patients classified as having low-grade histology have a median overall survival of 7 years or more, but need to be monitored carefully to make sure that their tumor does not upgrade to a more malignant phenotype. Patients with the most aggressive grade IV histology have a median overall survival of 12-15 months and often undergo multiple surgeries and adjuvant therapies in an attempt to control their disease. Despite improvements in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of anatomic images, there remain considerable ambiguities in the interpretation of changes in the size of the gadolinium-enhancing lesion on T(1) -weighted images as a measure of treatment response, and in differentiating between treatment effects and infiltrating tumor within the larger T(2) lesion. The planning of focal therapies, such as surgery, radiation and targeted drug delivery, as well as a more reliable assessment of the response to therapy, would benefit considerably from the integration of metabolic and physiological imaging techniques into routine clinical MR examinations. Advanced methods that have been shown to provide valuable data for patients with glioma are diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric examinations that include the acquisition of such data are able to assess tumor cellularity, hypoxia, disruption of normal tissue architecture, changes in vascular density and vessel permeability, in addition to the standard measures of changes in the volume of enhancing and nonenhancing anatomic lesions. This is particularly critical for the interpretation of the results of Phase I and Phase II clinical trials of novel therapies, which are increasingly including agents that are designed to have anti-angiogenic and anti

  12. UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project's ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors' evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations

  13. Implementation of Capacity Planning Agent of Demand Responsive Planning Framework : Master’s Thesis in Production Engineering of The Royal Institute of Technology

    Juhong, Nirut

    2013-01-01

    This master’s thesis is conducted as a conclusion of Master degree of Science in Production Engineering and Management at The Royal Institute of Technology. The focus of this thesis work is to implement a Capacity planning agent. Nowadays, companies need to adapt themselves to be as responsive to customers’ demand as possible. However, the responsiveness is usually limited by the fixed capacity of the production. Evolvable Production System (EPS), motivated by the limitation mentioned above, ...

  14. Threshold guidance update

    Wickham, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the concept of threshold quantities for use in determining which waste materials must be handled as radioactive waste and which may be disposed of as nonradioactive waste at its sites. Waste above this concentration level would be managed as radioactive or mixed waste (if hazardous chemicals are present); waste below this level would be handled as sanitary waste. Last years' activities (1984) included the development of a threshold guidance dose, the development of threshold concentrations corresponding to the guidance dose, the development of supporting documentation, review by a technical peer review committee, and review by the DOE community. As a result of the comments, areas have been identified for more extensive analysis, including an alternative basis for selection of the guidance dose and the development of quality assurance guidelines. Development of quality assurance guidelines will provide a reasonable basis for determining that a given waste stream qualifies as a threshold waste stream and can then be the basis for a more extensive cost-benefit analysis. The threshold guidance and supporting documentation will be revised, based on the comments received. The revised documents will be provided to DOE by early November. DOE-HQ has indicated that the revised documents will be available for review by DOE field offices and their contractors

  15. PIV Logon Configuration Guidance

    Lee, Glen Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-04

    This document details the configurations and enhancements implemented to support the usage of federal Personal Identity Verification (PIV) Card for logon on unclassified networks. The guidance is a reference implementation of the configurations and enhancements deployed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Network and Infrastructure Engineering – Core Services (NIE-CS).

  16. Ionospheric Response to Extremes in the Space Environment: Establishing Benchmarks for the Space Weather Action Plan.

    Viereck, R. A.; Azeem, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    One of the goals of the National Space Weather Action Plan is to establish extreme event benchmarks. These benchmarks are estimates of environmental parameters that impact technologies and systems during extreme space weather events. Quantitative assessment of anticipated conditions during these extreme space weather event will enable operators and users of affected technologies to develop plans for mitigating space weather risks and improve preparedness. The ionosphere is one of the most important regions of space because so many applications either depend on ionospheric space weather for their operation (HF communication, over-the-horizon radars), or can be deleteriously affected by ionospheric conditions (e.g. GNSS navigation and timing, UHF satellite communications, synthetic aperture radar, HF communications). Since the processes that influence the ionosphere vary over time scales from seconds to years, it continues to be a challenge to adequately predict its behavior in many circumstances. Estimates with large uncertainties, in excess of 100%, may result in operators of impacted technologies over or under preparing for such events. The goal of the next phase of the benchmarking activity is to reduce these uncertainties. In this presentation, we will focus on the sources of uncertainty in the ionospheric response to extreme geomagnetic storms. We will then discuss various research efforts required to better understand the underlying processes of ionospheric variability and how the uncertainties in ionospheric response to extreme space weather could be reduced and the estimates improved.

  17. [How to carry out work on family planning after adopting production responsibility systems in rural areas].

    Xiao, S H

    1982-05-29

    After the Third Meeting of the Eleventh People's Congress, the entire responsibility for agricultural production was transferred to a lower level. Peasants in various areas have adopted the so called production responsibility system, and the phenomenon of an increased population rate has also appeared in some areas. In this article, the author discusses how to solve these problems created by the new situation. The 1st step is try to control population growth through socialist propaganda education, administrative measures, economic incentives and punishments, and family planning work. The 2nd step is to popularize the practice of having only 1 child per household in the rural areas. The 2nd and 3rd child in each family should be controlled and prohibited. This policy formulated by the Central Government should be carried out thoroughly. Families which follow the policy and have only 1 child should be encouraged with economic rewards, and those families which have 2 or more children should be punished economically. The 3rd step is to establish a national work team to be in charge of family planning and birth control. There should be an ideological unity among the nation's leadership. Party members and cadres should establish themselves as good examples for the people so that the population control work may become successful.

  18. CANDU severe accident management guidance update

    Jones, L.; Popov, N.; Gilbert, L.; Weed, J.

    2014-01-01

    The CANDU Owners Group (COG) developed a set of generic and initial station-specific Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) documents to mitigate the consequences to the public in the event of a severe accident. The generic portion of the COG SAMG was completed in 2006; the overall project including the station-specific phase was completed in April 2007. Over the years, the CANDU industry and utilities have continuously increased the knowledge base for SAMG and have incorporated various engineered features based on the knowledge obtained. As a result of the event that occurred at the Fukushima Daiiachi nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) established the CNSC Fukushima Task Force. The results of the task force were documented in INFO-0828, CNSC Staff Action Plan on the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Recommendations. Among the recommendation documented in INFO-828 were Fukushima Action Items (FAIs) directed towards the CANDU utilities in Canada; a portion of which are related to SAMG documentation updates and directed at enhancing SAM response. A COG joint project was established to support the closure of the CNSC FAIs and to revise the current CANDU documentation accordingly. This paper provides a high level summary of the COG project scope and results. It also demonstrates that the CANDU SAMG programs in Canada provide robust protection and mitigation of severe accidents. (author)

  19. CANDU severe accident management guidance update

    Jones, L., E-mail: lisa.m.jones@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, ON (Canada); Popov, N., E-mail: nik.popov@rogers.com [Candu Owners Group, Toronto, ON (Canada); Gilbert, L., E-mail: lovell.gilbert@brucepower.com [Bruce Power, Tiverton, ON (Canada); Weed, J., E-mail: jeff.weed@candu.gov [Candu Owners Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The CANDU Owners Group (COG) developed a set of generic and initial station-specific Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) documents to mitigate the consequences to the public in the event of a severe accident. The generic portion of the COG SAMG was completed in 2006; the overall project including the station-specific phase was completed in April 2007. Over the years, the CANDU industry and utilities have continuously increased the knowledge base for SAMG and have incorporated various engineered features based on the knowledge obtained. As a result of the event that occurred at the Fukushima Daiiachi nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) established the CNSC Fukushima Task Force. The results of the task force were documented in INFO-0828, CNSC Staff Action Plan on the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Recommendations. Among the recommendation documented in INFO-828 were Fukushima Action Items (FAIs) directed towards the CANDU utilities in Canada; a portion of which are related to SAMG documentation updates and directed at enhancing SAM response. A COG joint project was established to support the closure of the CNSC FAIs and to revise the current CANDU documentation accordingly. This paper provides a high level summary of the COG project scope and results. It also demonstrates that the CANDU SAMG programs in Canada provide robust protection and mitigation of severe accidents. (author)

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1

    Ramsey, G.F.

    1998-07-15

    The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

  1. The segment as the minimal planning unit in speech production: evidence based on absolute response latencies.

    Kawamoto, Alan H; Liu, Qiang; Lee, Ria J; Grebe, Patricia R

    2014-01-01

    A minimal amount of information about a word must be phonologically and phonetically encoded before a person can begin to utter that word. Most researchers assume that the minimum is the complete word or possibly the initial syllable. However, there is some evidence that the initial segment is sufficient based on longer durations when the initial segment is primed. In two experiments in which the initial segment of a monosyllabic word is primed or not primed, we present additional evidence based on very short absolute response times determined on the basis of acoustic and articulatory onset relative to presentation of the complete target. We argue that the previous failures to find very short absolute response times when the initial segment is primed are due in part to the exclusive use of acoustic onset as a measure of response latency, the exclusion of responses with very short acoustic latencies, the manner of articulation of the initial segment (i.e., plosive vs. nonplosive), and individual differences. Theoretical implications of the segment as the minimal planning unit are considered.

  2. Particular intervention plan of the Civaux Nuclear Power Plant. Public version. Special provision of the organisation plan for civil protection response

    2016-04-01

    The Particular intervention plan (PPI in French) is an emergency plan which foresees the measures and means to be implemented to address the potential risks of the presence and operation of a nuclear facility. This plan is implemented and developed by the Prefect in case of nuclear accident (or incident leading to a potential accident), the impact of which extending beyond the facility perimeter. It represents a special section of the organisation plan for civil protection response (ORSEC plan). The PPI foresees the necessary measures and means for crisis management during the first hours following the accident and is triggered by the Department Prefect according to the information provided by the facility operator. Its aim is to protect the populations leaving within 10 km of the facility against a potential radiological hazard. The PPI describes: the facility, the intervention area, the protection measures for the population, the conditions of emergency plan triggering, the crisis organisation, the action forms of the different services, and the post-accident stage. This document is the public version of the Particular intervention plan of the Civaux nuclear power plant (Vienne, France)

  3. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-31

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  4. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  5. Joint Planning Of Energy Storage and Transmission Considering Wind-Storage Combined System and Demand Side Response

    Huang, Y.; Liu, B. Z.; Wang, K. Y.; Ai, X.

    2017-12-01

    In response to the new requirements of the operation mode of wind-storage combined system and demand side response for transmission network planning, this paper presents a joint planning of energy storage and transmission considering wind-storage combined system and demand side response. Firstly, the charge-discharge strategy of energy storage system equipped at the outlet of wind farm and demand side response strategy are analysed to achieve the best comprehensive benefits through the coordination of the two. Secondly, in the general transmission network planning model with wind power, both energy storage cost and demand side response cost are added to the objective function. Not only energy storage operation constraints and but also demand side response constraints are introduced into the constraint condition. Based on the classical formulation of TEP, a new formulation is developed considering the simultaneous addition of the charge-discharge strategy of energy storage system equipped at the outlet of the wind farm and demand side response strategy, which belongs to a typical mixed integer linear programming model that can be solved by mature optimization software. The case study based on the Garver-6 bus system shows that the validity of the proposed model is verified by comparison with general transmission network planning model. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the joint planning model can gain more economic benefits through setting up different cases.

  6. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    O' Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  7. The Defined Benefit Pension Plan System: Financial Problems and Policy Responses

    Lang, Joel

    2004-01-01

    .... This thesis examines the challenges facing the DB pension plan system, beginning with an overview of the DB plan system, a review of the different plan types, the benefits received, and funding rules...

  8. Chinese Human Rights Guidance on Minerals Sourcing

    Buhmann, Karin

    2017-01-01

    in the minerals sector and due diligence to ensure socially responsible sourcing of minerals with a particular focus on human rights, the guidelines refer to international human rights standards and are designed to be consistent with guidance issued by the OECD. The article discusses the Chinese guidelines...

  9. 33 CFR 155.1050 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying groups I through IV...

    2010-07-01

    ... qualified individual; and (2) Within 30 minutes of a discovery of a discharge or substantial threat of... a discharge in advance of the arrival of response resources identified in the plan for tiers 1, 2... shoreline protection operations. (1) The response resources must include the quantities of boom listed in...

  10. National plan of response to a major nuclear or radiological accident

    2014-02-01

    The first part of this document presents the response strategies and principles to be applied in the case of a major nuclear or radiological accident. It presents the general framework and the 8 reference situations which are used as references for the plan. It presents the general organisation of crisis management by the State (initial organisation, organisation at the national level, communication channel, international channels, case of transport of radioactive materials, responsibility of the various actors). Then, it presents the strategies of response, i.e., a global strategy and more specific strategies applicable in different sectors or fields: for the control of the concerned installation or transport, in the case of transport of radioactive materials, for the protection of the population, for the taking into care, for communication, for the continuity of social and economic life, at the European level, for the post-accidental management. The second part is a guide which contains sheets describing reactions in different situations: uncertainty, accident in an installation resulting in an either immediate and short, or immediate and long, or delayed and long release, accident in a transport of radioactive materials with potential release, accident occurring abroad which may have a more or less significant impact in France, and accident at sea

  11. Automatic guidance and control laws for helicopter obstacle avoidance

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Lam, T.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the implementation of a full-function guidance and control system for automatic obstacle avoidance in helicopter nap-of-the-earth (NOE) flight. The guidance function assumes that the helicopter is sufficiently responsive so that the flight path can be readily adjusted at NOE speeds. The controller, basically an autopilot for following the derived flight path, was implemented with parameter values to control a generic helicopter model used in the simulation. Evaluation of the guidance and control system with a 3-dimensional graphical helicopter simulation suggests that the guidance has the potential for providing good and meaningful flight trajectories.

  12. Career Guidance and Social Exclusion: A Cautionary Tale.

    Watts, A. G.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationship of career guidance to public-policy interventions designed to address social exclusion. Analyzes the nature and origin of the concept of social exclusion and reviews the roles of career guidance in response to it, particularly in relation to young people who have dropped out of formal education or are at high risk of…

  13. Overdose Problem Associated with Treatment Planning Software for High Energy Photons in Response of Panama's Accident

    Attalla, E.M.; Lotayef, M.M.; Khalil, E.M.; El-Hosiny, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify dose distribution errors by comparing actual dose measurements with the calculated values done by the software. To evaluate the outcome of radiation overexposure related to Panama's accident and in response to ensure that the treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) are being operated in accordance with the appropriate quality assurance programme, we studied the central axis and pripheral depth dose data using complex field shaped with blocks to quantify dose distribution errors. Material and Methods: Multi data T.P.S. software versions 2.35 and 2.40 and Helax T.P.S. software version 5.1 B were assesed. The calculated data of the software treatment planning systems were verified by comparing these data with the actual dose measurements for open and blocked high energy photon fields (Co-60, 6MV and 18MV photons). Results: Close calculated and measured results were obtained for the 2-D (Multi data) and 3-D treatment planning (TMS Helax). These results were correct within 1 to 2% for open fields and 0.5 to 2.5% for peripheral blocked fields. Discrepancies between calculated and measured data ranged between 13. to 36% along the central axis of complex blocked fields when normalisation point was selected at the Dmax, when the normalisation point was selected near or under the blocks, the variation between the calculated and the measured data was up to 500% difference. Conclusions: The present results emphasize the importance of the proper selection of the normalization point in the radiation field, as this facilitates detection of aberrant dose distribution (over exposure or under exposure)

  14. Overdose problem associated with treatment planning software for high energy photons in response of Panama's accident.

    Attalla, Ehab M; Lotayef, Mohamed M; Khalil, Ehab M; El-Hosiny, Hesham A; Nazmy, Mohamed S

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify dose distribution errors by comparing actual dose measurements with the calculated values done by the software. To evaluate the outcome of radiation overexposure related to Panama's accident and in response to ensure that the treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) are being operated in accordance with the appropriate quality assurance programme, we studied the central axis and pripheral depth dose data using complex field shaped with blocks to quantify dose distribution errors. Multidata T.P.S. software versions 2.35 and 2.40 and Helax T.P.S. software version 5.1 B were assesed. The calculated data of the software treatment planning systems were verified by comparing these data with the actual dose measurements for open and blocked high energy photon fields (Co-60, 6MV & 18MV photons). Close calculated and measured results were obtained for the 2-D (Multidata) and 3-D treatment planning (TMS Helax). These results were correct within 1 to 2% for open fields and 0.5 to 2.5% for peripheral blocked fields. Discrepancies between calculated and measured data ranged between 13. to 36% along the central axis of complex blocked fields when normalisation point was selected at the Dmax, when the normalisation point was selected near or under the blocks, the variation between the calculated and the measured data was up to 500% difference. The present results emphasize the importance of the proper selection of the normalization point in the radiation field, as this facilitates detection of aberrant dose distribution (over exposure or under exposure).

  15. Experiences in planning and response for the radiological emergencies in a radioactive facility

    Amador B, Z.H.; Perez P, S.; Torres B, M.B.; Ayra P, F.E.

    2006-01-01

    It is internationally recognized the importance of the planning and the assurance for the effective response to the radiological emergencies. In the work those experiences on this thematic one in the Isotopes Center (CENTIS), the radioactive facility where the biggest radioactive inventory is manipulated in Cuba are presented. Due to CENTIS is also the sender and main transport of radioactive materials, it is included this practice. The revision of the abnormal situations during the years 1997 at the 2005, starting from the classification adopted by the Regulatory Authority of the country is carried out. Its are register the details of these occurrences in the Radiological Events Database (BDSR). A correspondence among the radiological impact evaluated in the Emergency Plan for the possible events and that of the registered ones is obtained. The complete training programs and realization of the exercises are carried out. Those results of 3 mockeries made to full scale are picked up. It was concluded that the operational experience and the maintained infrastructure, determine the answer capacity for radiological emergencies in the CENTIS. (Author)

  16. Responsive partisanship: public support for the clinton and obama health care plans.

    Kriner, Douglas L; Reeves, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    We examine the contours of support for the Clinton and Obama health care plans during the 1990s and 2000s based on our own compilation of 120,000 individual-level survey responses from throughout the debates. Despite the rise of the Tea Party, and the racialization of health care politics, opinion dynamics are remarkably similar in both periods. Party ID is the single most powerful predictor of support for reform and the president's handling of it. Contrary to prominent claims, after controlling for partisanship, demographic characteristics are at best weak predictors of support for reform. We also show that Clinton and Obama did not "lose" blacks, seniors, or wealthy voters over the course of the debate. The small and often nonexistent relationship between these characteristics and support for the plan are constant over time. Instead, the modest fluctuations in support for reform appear to follow the ebb and flow of elite rhetoric. Both mean levels of support and its volatility over time covary with elite partisan discourse. These findings suggest that presidents courting public opinion should seek consensus among their own party's elites before appealing to other narrower interests. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  17. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation

  18. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands: Experiences obtained from large scale exercises

    Smetsers, R.C.G.M.; Pruppers, M.J.M.; Sonderen, J.F. van

    2000-01-01

    In 1986 the Chernobyl accident led the Dutch Government to a reconsideration of their possibilities for managing nuclear emergencies. It was decided to improve both the national emergency management organization and the infrastructure for collecting and presenting technical information. The first improvement resulted in the National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response (EPR) and the second in a series of technical facilities for the assessment of radiation doses. Since 1990, following the implementation of the EPR and most of the technical facilities, several emergency exercises have taken place to test the effectiveness of organization and infrastructure. Special emphasis has been given to the early phase of the simulated accidents. This paper summarises the experiences obtained from these exercises. Major obstacles appear to be: (1) keeping all participants properly informed during the process, (2) the difference in working attitude of technical experts and decision-makers, (3) premature orders for countermeasures and (4) the (too) large number of people involved in the decision-making process. From these experiences requirements for instruments can be deduced. Such instruments include predictive models, to be used for dose assessment in the early phase of an accident which, apart from being fast, should yield uncomplicated results suitable for decision-makers. Refinements of models, such as taking into account the specific nature of the (urban) environment, are not needed until the recovery phase of a nuclear accident. (author)

  19. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response

  20. Can Differentiated Production Planning and Control enable both Responsiveness and Efficiency in Food Production?

    Anita Romsdal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the complex production planning and control (PPC challenges in food supply chains. The study illustrates how food producers' traditional make‐to‐stock (MTS approach is not well suited to meet the trends of increasing product variety, higher demand uncertainty, increasing sales of fresh food products and more demanding customers. The paper proposes a framework for differentiated PPC that combines MTS with make‐to‐order (MTO.The framework matches products with the most appropriate PPC approaches and buffering techniques depending on market and product characteristics. The core idea is to achieve more volume flexibility in the production system by exploiting favourable product and market characteristics (high demand predictability, long customer order leadtime allowances and low product perishability. A case study is used to demonstrate how the framework can enable food producers to achieve efficiency in production, inventory and PPC processes – and simultaneously be responsive to market requirements.

  1. Contingency planning and emergency response in construction activities: Training the construction worker

    Jones, E.

    1987-01-01

    Construction activities have the potential for environmental and/or health impacts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) particularly as site cleanup and restoration plans are initiated. ORNL has instituted special training for all construction workers and related contractors. Individuals learn how construction activities at ORNL can potentially have adverse effects on the environment and their health, and to learn how to respond to potential chemical and radiation hazards. Workers are given a review of basic information on radiation and chemicals in a framework that emphasizes the situations in which workers or the environment may be exposed to potential risk. Specific instructions are presented on what to do when contamination is suspected, with identification of emergency procedures and response personnel. 5 refs., 1 fig

  2. Failed fuel action plan guidelines: Special report

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a generic guideline that can be used to formulate a failed fuel action plan (FFAP) for specific application by a utility. This document is intended to be part of a comprehensive fuel reliability monitoring, management, and improvement program. The utilities may utilize this document as one resource in developing a failed fuel action plan. This document is not intended to be used as a failed fuel action plan standard. This document is intended to provide guidance on: management responsibilities; fuel performance parameters; cost/benefit analysis; action levels; long-term improvement methods; and data collection, analysis, and trending. 3 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Emergency planning for fuel cycle facilities

    Lacey, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    In April 1989, NRC published new emergency planning regulations which apply to certain by-product, source, and special nuclear materials licensees including most fuel cycle facilities. In addition to these NRC regulations, other regulatory agencies such as EPA, OSHA, and DOT have regulations concerning emergency planning or notification that may apply to fuel cycle facilities. Emergency planning requirements address such areas as emergency classification, organization, notification and activation, assessment, corrective and protective measures, emergency facilities and equipment, maintaining preparedness, records and reports, and recovery. This article reviews applicable regulatory requirements and guidance, then concentrates on implementation strategies to produce an effective emergency response capability

  4. Corrective Action Plan in response to the March 1992 Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    1992-01-01

    On March 5, 1992, a Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team completed an assessment of the Ames Laboratory, located in Ames, Iowa. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with a report on the status and performance of Environment, Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) programs at Ames Laboratory. Detailed findings of the assessment are presented in the report, DOE/EH-0237, Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory. This document, the Ames Laboratory Corrective Action Plan (ALCAP), presents corrective actions to overcome deficiencies cited in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Tiger Team identified 53 Environmental findings, from which the Team derived four key findings. In the Safety and Health (S ampersand H) area, 126 concerns were identified, eight of which were designated Category 11 (there were no Category I concerns). Seven key concerns were derived from the 126 concerns. The Management Subteam developed 19 findings which have been summarized in four key findings. The eight S ampersand H Category 11 concerns identified in the Tiger Team Assessment were given prompt management attention. Actions to address these deficiencies have been described in individual corrective action plans, which were submitted to DOE Headquarters on March 20, 1992. The ALCAP includes actions described in this early response, as well as a long term strategy and framework for correcting all remaining deficiencies. Accordingly, the ALCAP presents the organizational structure, management systems, and specific responses that are being developed to implement corrective actions and to resolve root causes identified in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Chicago Field Office (CH), IowaState University (ISU), the Institute for Physical Research and Technology (IPRT), and Ames Laboratory prepared the ALCAP with input from the DOE Headquarters, Office of Energy Research (ER)

  5. Geographic Information System Technology Leveraged for Crisis Planning, Emergency, Response, and Disaster Management

    Ross, A.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can be leveraged for crisis planning, emergency response, and disaster management/awareness. Many different organizations currently use GIS tools and geospatial data during a disaster event. ASDC datasets have not been fully utilized by this community in the past due to incompatible data formats that ASDC holdings are archived in. Through the successful implementation of this pilot effort and continued collaboration with the larger Homeland Defense and Department of Defense emergency management community through the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG), our data will be easily accessible to those using GIS and increase the ability to plan, respond, manage, and provide awareness during disasters. The HIFLD WG Partnership has expanded to include more than 5,900 mission partners representing the 14 executive departments, 98 agencies, 50 states (and 3 territories), and more than 700 private sector organizations to directly enhance the federal, state, and local government's ability to support domestic infrastructure data gathering, sharing and protection, visualization, and spatial knowledge management.The HIFLD WG Executive Membership is lead by representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs - OASD (HD&ASA); the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate's Office of Infrastructure Protection (NPPD IP); the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Integrated Working Group - Readiness, Response and Recovery (IWG-R3); the Department of Interior (DOI) United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), and DHS Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  6. Contextual cueing improves attentional guidance, even when guidance is supposedly optimal.

    Harris, Anthony M; Remington, Roger W

    2017-05-01

    Visual search through previously encountered contexts typically produces reduced reaction times compared with search through novel contexts. This contextual cueing benefit is well established, but there is debate regarding its underlying mechanisms. Eye-tracking studies have consistently shown reduced number of fixations with repetition, supporting improvements in attentional guidance as the source of contextual cueing. However, contextual cueing benefits have been shown in conditions in which attentional guidance should already be optimal-namely, when attention is captured to the target location by an abrupt onset, or under pop-out conditions. These results have been used to argue for a response-related account of contextual cueing. Here, we combine eye tracking with response time to examine the mechanisms behind contextual cueing in spatially cued and pop-out conditions. Three experiments find consistent response time benefits with repetition, which appear to be driven almost entirely by a reduction in number of fixations, supporting improved attentional guidance as the mechanism behind contextual cueing. No differences were observed in the time between fixating the target and responding-our proxy for response related processes. Furthermore, the correlation between contextual cueing magnitude and the reduction in number of fixations on repeated contexts approaches 1. These results argue strongly that attentional guidance is facilitated by familiar search contexts, even when guidance is near-optimal. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. 76 FR 72431 - Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness...

    2011-11-23

    ... national preparedness terms and concepts found in the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/ Incident... many of the REP Program's operative guidance and policy documents into one location, and [[Page 72432... for alert and notification systems. In addition, Supplement 4 revises and adds evaluation criteria and...

  8. A Formal Investigation of the Organization of Guidance Behavior: Implications for Humans and Autonomous Guidance

    Kong, Zhaodan

    Guidance behavior generated either by artificial agents or humans has been actively studied in the fields of both robotics and cognitive science. The goals of these two fields are different. The former is the automatic generation of appropriate or even optimal behavior, while the latter is the understanding of the underlying mechanism. Their challenges, though, are closely related, the most important one being the lack of a unified, formal and grounded framework where the guidance behavior can be modeled and studied. This dissertation presents such a framework. In this framework, guidance behavior is analyzed as the closed-loop dynamics of the whole agent-environment system. The resulting dynamics give rise to interaction patterns. The central points of this dissertation are that: first of all, these patterns, which can be explained in terms of symmetries that are inherent to the guidance behavior, provide building blocks for the organization of behavior; second, the existence of these patterns and humans' organization of their guidance behavior based on these patterns are the reasons that humans can generate successful behavior in spite of all the complexities involved in the planning and control. This dissertation first gives an overview of the challenges existing in both scientific endeavors, such as human and animal spatial behavior study, and engineering endeavors, such as autonomous guidance system design. It then lays out the foundation for our formal framework, which states that guidance behavior should be interpreted as the collection of the closed-loop dynamics resulting from the agent's interaction with the environment. The following, illustrated by examples of three different UAVs, shows that the study of the closed-loop dynamics should not be done without the consideration of vehicle dynamics, as is the common practice in some of the studies in both autonomous guidance and human behavior analysis. The framework, the core concepts of which are

  9. Risk management and participation planning of electric vehicles in smart grids for demand response

    Nezamoddini, Nasim; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Demand response (DR) can serve as an effective tool to better balance the electricity demand and supply in the smart grid. It is defined as 'the changes in electricity usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns' in response to pricing and incentive payments. This paper focuses on new opportunities for DR with electric vehicles (EVs). EVs are potential distributed energy resources that support both the grid-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-grid modes. Their participation in the time-based (e.g., time-of-use) and incentive-based (e.g., regulation services) DR programs helps improve the stability and reduce the potential risks to the grid. Smart scheduling of EV charging and discharging activities also supports high penetration of renewables with volatile energy generation. This paper proposes a novel stochastic model from the Independent System Operator's perspective for risk management and participation planning of EVs in the smart grid for DR. The risk factors considered in this paper involve those caused by uncertainties in renewables (wind and solar), load patterns, parking patterns, and transmission lines' reliability. The effectiveness of the model in response to various settings such as the area type (residential, commercial, and industrial), the EV penetration level, and the risk level has been investigated. - Highlights: • We identify new opportunities for demand response (DR) using electric vehicles (EVs). • We integrate EVs in both grid-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-grid modes in smart grids. • EV participation for both time- and incentive-based DR programs are modelled. • We consider uncertainties in renewables, load, parking, and transmission lines. • Model case studies are demonstrated in residential, commercial, and industrial areas.

  10. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance

    1996-05-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities

  11. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Technology Preparedness and Status Report Guidance

    Blacker, P.B.; Bonnenberg, R.W.; Cannon, P.G.; Hyde, R.A.; Watson, L.R.

    1994-04-01

    A Technology Preparedness and Status Report is required for each Technical Task Plan funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. This document provides guidance for the preparation of that report. Major sections of the report will include a subset of the need for the technology, objectives of the demonstration, technology description and readiness evaluation, demonstration requirements, and preparedness checklist and action plan

  12. Broader Impact Guidance for Florida Ocean Scientists: Process, Products and Outcomes

    Cook, S.

    2016-02-01

    In response to the 2011 National Science Board report National Science Foundation's Merit Review Criteria: Review and Revision, in 2012 significant changes were made to the portions of the National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Grant Proposal Guide that describe the Foundation's expectations with respect to the Broader Impacts (BI) criterion and what reviewers should look for in assessing the quality of the required BI components of proposals. Over the past 5 years, COSEE Florida (the Florida Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence) has provided individualized content and editorial `coaching' on Broader Impacts for Florida scientists and educators submitting proposals to NSF. As of September 2015, 32% of the plans prepared with our guidance have been associated with projects that have received support. This presentation will review 1) the current BI guidance provided by NSF in the 2012 and subsequent editions of the Grant Proposal Guide, 2) the administrative process used by COSEE Florida to identify and assist scientists in understanding these changes and preparing fundable BI plans, 3) the characteristics of submitted plans in terms of type of plan, PI career stage and demographics 4) `lessons learned' about plan strengths and weaknesses and 5) the products developed (or currently under development) as COSEE Florida legacy documents to guide current and future scientists in addressing the Broader Impacts criterion. Resources developed by other Centers in the national COSEE network and the new National Alliance for Broader Impacts (NABI) will also be described.

  13. Contingency plans and successful response strategies for oil spills into rivers

    Owens, Edward H. [Polaris Applied Sciences Inc., Bainbridge Island, WA (United States)]. E-mail: ehowens@polarisappliedsciences.com

    2003-07-01

    Oil spilled into a river enters a dynamic environment. An effective response can only succeed if the dynamics of the river system are understood and if the strategies and tactics are designed to match these conditions. Oil is transported downstream at the speed of the current, therefore, an estimate of the rate of movement is essential to identify effective intercept locations. Boom performance is affected by local surface water velocities as entrainment of oil typically begins when velocities exceed 0.4 m/s. However, boom configurations can be effective in current velocities as great as 2.5 m/s. Response operations can be successful if staging or control locations have been identified as part of contingency planning and if booms are deployed to take into account local surface current characteristics. Tracking and control of submerged or sunken oil is difficult and may not be practical. Recovery operations for sunken oil depend on the channel depth, current velocities, and on the distribution and concentration of the oil. (author)

  14. The production and operation of the nuclear industry road emergency response plan (NIREP)

    Higson, J.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, radioactive material, ranging from small sources used for medical and commercial purposes to large consignments of irradiated fuel, has been safely moved by road in Great Britain. All such movements are controlled by law and have to meet clearly specified safety requirements concerning packaging and shielding to ensure that if the transporting vehicle is involved in an accident, there is no increase in the hazards involved because of the nature of its load. There are currently some 40,000 movements by road every year, but over more than 25 years, there has never been an accident which has led to any significant radiological impact to members of the public. A national scheme to provide contingency arrangements in the event of a road accident involving radioactive materials has now been set up by the major users and consignors of radioactive material. Called NIREP (Nuclear Industry Road Emergency Response Plan), the member industries have agreed immediately to despatch, from the nearest organisation to the incident, qualified health physicist personnel to deal with any incident involving radioactive material belonging to (or consigned by) any of the participating companies. With their widespread location of establishments, all parts of the UK mainland are covered. Vehicles covered by the scheme will display a NIREP placard, thus giving the Police, or other emergency services, an emergency telephone number of a coordinating centre and information on the site responsible for the load. (author)

  15. Guidance for closure of existing DOE LLW disposal sites

    Blanchfield, L.

    1987-01-01

    During FY 1986, a closure guidance document was developed. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance in support of DOE Order 5820.2 to site operating contractors for the stabilization and closure of existing low-level waste (LLW) shallow land disposal sites at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Guidance is provided to aid operators in placing existing LLW sites in a closed conditions, i.e., a condition in which a nonoperational site meets postclosure performance requirements and can be shown, within a high degree of confidence, to perform as anticipated in the future, under the most cost-effective maintenance approach. Guidance is based on the philosophy that closure should be planned and performed using a systems approach. Plans for FY 1987 call for revision of the document to incorporate more information on closure of LLW sites also containing radioactive mixed waste and/or transuranic waste. 4 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  16. Comment and response document for the long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas

    1996-11-01

    This is the Comment and Response Document dated November 1996 for the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Falls City Disposal Site in Falls City, Texas. The site is part of the U.S. DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). Several comments regarding the hydrology and surface erosion described in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan are addressed in this document

  17. 78 FR 71532 - Amendments to Material Control and Accounting Regulations and Proposed Guidance for Fuel Cycle...

    2013-11-29

    ... Accounting Regulations and Proposed Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Material Control and Accounting Plans... material control and accounting (MC&A) of special nuclear material (SNM) and the proposed guidance... and how the NRC will review and inspect these plans. DATES: The public meeting will be held on...

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 1, Revision 5

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  19. Social responsibility of the head in the system of staff planning of the enterprise

    O. S. Reznikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The principles of social partnership when changing the bases of social and labor relations become an important element in the work of the modern leader. In Russia, on the part of the state for 2016–2021 years, it is planned to form a new model for the sphere of labor relations in the form of effective cooperation between employers and employees through the introduction of innovative principles. In conditions of objective competitive restrictions, the implementation of the principles of social responsibility is difficult. Toughening of legal norms with regard to the responsibility of managers in the system of collective social and labor relations, on the one hand, is intended to reduce the share of offenses in the organization of labor remuneration, unjustified its differentiation, on the other, reduces the management motivation caused by the increased risk of such liability. The social responsibility of the enterprise manager as a phenomenon alters the content of the mechanism of its distribution. Providing the Russian economy with highly competitive jobs implies a significant increase in labor productivity, therefore, the growth of wages and staff development is stipulated. Effective leadership aimed at the strategic development of the enterprise, not in all situations is able to solve unstructured tasks, even with sufficient attention to the staff and the right style of behavior. The tool for implementing strategic goals in this case is the personnel policy of the enterprise, which is proposed to be implemented in accordance with the developed professional-qualification model. The growth of the efficiency of the enterprise should be ensured with the use of internal reserves without attracting new personnel due to the renewal of production capacities, retraining of the staff for the purpose of acquiring higher skills and the ability to efficiently and efficiently employ flexible employment.

  20. Development of Krsko Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG)

    Cizel, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture development of severe accident management guidances for Krsko NPP are described. Author deals with the history of severe accident management and implementation of issues (validation, review of E-plan and other aspects SAMG implementation guidance). Methods of Westinghouse owners group, of Combustion Engineering owners group, of Babcock and Wilcox owners group, of the BWR owners group, as well as application of US SAMG methodology in Europe and elsewhere are reviewed

  1. PSD Increment Consumption Guidance

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Integrating mechanisms of visual guidance in naturalistic language production.

    Coco, Moreno I; Keller, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Situated language production requires the integration of visual attention and linguistic processing. Previous work has not conclusively disentangled the role of perceptual scene information and structural sentence information in guiding visual attention. In this paper, we present an eye-tracking study that demonstrates that three types of guidance, perceptual, conceptual, and structural, interact to control visual attention. In a cued language production experiment, we manipulate perceptual (scene clutter) and conceptual guidance (cue animacy) and measure structural guidance (syntactic complexity of the utterance). Analysis of the time course of language production, before and during speech, reveals that all three forms of guidance affect the complexity of visual responses, quantified in terms of the entropy of attentional landscapes and the turbulence of scan patterns, especially during speech. We find that perceptual and conceptual guidance mediate the distribution of attention in the scene, whereas structural guidance closely relates to scan pattern complexity. Furthermore, the eye-voice span of the cued object and its perceptual competitor are similar; its latency mediated by both perceptual and structural guidance. These results rule out a strict interpretation of structural guidance as the single dominant form of visual guidance in situated language production. Rather, the phase of the task and the associated demands of cross-modal cognitive processing determine the mechanisms that guide attention.

  3. Responsibilities of the exporting state derived from the application of the code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources and the guidance on the import and export

    Vidal, Dora

    2008-01-01

    Full text: 'The exporting state in deciding whether to authorize an export of radioactive sources should satisfy itself, insofar as practicable: 1) That the recipient is authorized by the importing state to receive and possess the source in accordance with its laws and regulations; 2) That the importing state has the appropriate technical and administrative capability, resources and regulatory structure needed for the management of the source(s) in a manner consistent with the guidance in the code, and consider, based upon available information: i) Whether the recipient has been engaged in clandestine or illegal procurement of radioactive sources; ii) Whether an import or export authorization for radioactive sources has been denied to the recipient or importing state, or whether the recipient or importing state has made diverted for purposes inconsistent with the code any import or export of radioactive sources previously authorized; and iii) The risk of diversion or malicious acts involving radioactive sources'. It also should take, once it has decided to authorize the export, 'appropriate steps to ensure that the export is conducted in a manner consistent with existing relevant international standards relating to the transport of radioactive materials an the importing State is notified in advance of each shipment'. The Guidance has done a great effort in fixing the requirements that the importing State has to fulfill and it is the exporting State which has to verify, satisfy, and consider if these requirements are in place. It is remarkable the responsibility of the exporting state in analyzing the export from the point of view of the capabilities of the importing State to manage the sources with the purpose of use it has and even once it is not useful any more. This paper has the intention of bringing to reflect the responsibility of the exporting State in relation to those radioactive sources that are exported or are to be exported and have to fulfill with the

  4. 78 FR 76297 - Social Media: Consumer Compliance Risk Management Guidance

    2013-12-17

    ... encourage the application of uniform examination principles and standards by state and federal supervisory... marketing, providing incentives, facilitating applications for new accounts, inviting feedback from the... responsibilities. The revised Guidance clarifies and points to the longstanding principle that financial...

  5. Workplace Disruption following Psychological Trauma: Influence of Incident Severity Level on Organizations' Post-Incident Response Planning and Execution.

    DeFraia, G S

    2016-04-01

    Psychologically traumatic workplace events (known as critical incidents), which occur globally, are increasing in prevalence within the USA. Assisting employers in their response is a growing practice area for occupational medicine, occupational social work, industrial psychology and other occupational health professions. Traumatic workplace events vary greatly in their level of organizational disruption. To explore whether extent of workplace disruption influences organizations' decisions for post-incident response planning and plan execution. Administrative data mining was employed to examine practice data from a workplace trauma response unit in the USA. Bivariate analyses were conducted to test whether scores from an instrument measuring extent of workplace disruption associated with organizational decisions regarding post-incident response. The more severe and disruptive the incident, the more likely organizations planned for and followed through to deliver on-site interventions. Following more severe incidents, organizations were also more likely to deliver group sessions and to complete follow-up consultations to ensure ongoing worker recovery. Increasing occupational health practitioners' knowledge of varying levels of organizational disruption and familiarity with a range of organizational response strategies improves incident assessment, consultation and planning, and ensures interventions delivered are consistent with the level of assistance needed on both worker and organizational levels.

  6. Workplace Disruption following Psychological Trauma: Influence of Incident Severity Level on Organizations' Post-Incident Response Planning and Execution

    GS DeFraia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychologically traumatic workplace events (known as critical incidents, which occur globally, are increasing in prevalence within the USA. Assisting employers in their response is a growing practice area for occupational medicine, occupational social work, industrial psychology and other occupational health professions. Traumatic workplace events vary greatly in their level of organizational disruption. Objective: To explore whether extent of workplace disruption influences organizations' decisions for post-incident response planning and plan execution. Methods: Administrative data mining was employed to examine practice data from a workplace trauma response unit in the USA. Bivariate analyses were conducted to test whether scores from an instrument measuring extent of workplace disruption associated with organizational decisions regarding post-incident response. Results: The more severe and disruptive the incident, the more likely organizations planned for and followed through to deliver on-site interventions. Following more severe incidents, organizations were also more likely to deliver group sessions and to complete follow-up consultations to ensure ongoing worker recovery. Conclusion: Increasing occupational health practitioners' knowledge of varying levels of organizational disruption and familiarity with a range of organizational response strategies improves incident assessment, consultation and planning, and ensures interventions delivered are consistent with the level of assistance needed on both worker and organizational levels.

  7. 24 CFR 108.20 - Monitoring office responsibility for monitoring plans and reports.

    2010-04-01

    ... documenting the implementation of the AFHM plan, including sales or rental reports, as required by the.... When sales or rental reports show that 20% of the units covered by the AFHM plan have been sold or... for monitoring plans and reports. 108.20 Section 108.20 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...

  8. A better-response strategy for self-interested planning agents

    Jordan Prunera, J.M.; Torreño, Alejandro; de Weerdt, M.M.; Onaindia, Eva

    2018-01-01

    When self-interested agents plan individually, interactions that prevent them from executing their actions as planned may arise. In these coordination problems, game-theoretic planning can be used to enhance the agents’ strategic behavior considering the interactions as part of the agents’

  9. Analysis of the implementation of guidance and counseling supervision at senior high schools

    Abdul Basith

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is: (1 to analyze the implementation of guidance and counseling supervision, and (2 to find main factors inhibiting the implementation of guidance and counseling supervisory at the Senior High Schools of Singkawang City. The results show that: (1 the implementation of the guidance and counseling supervision has still many weaknesses on each stage done by the supervisors, such as unidentified guidance and counseling teachers‘ needs, the program planning is not yet organized well, the supervisors do not use particular approaches, and they do not control the supervisions carried out, (2 some factors inhibiting the implementation of guidance and counseling supervision include lack of guidance and counseling supervision forces that so many guidance and counseling teachers are not supervised optimally, lack of knowledge and understanding by the supervisors on the implementation, and also minimal development of supervisory competencies in the guidance and counseling field.

  10. From myth to science in urban and transport planning: from uncontrolled to controlled and responsible urban development in transport planning.

    Knoflacher, Hermann

    2009-03-01

    Fossil energy use for mechanical transport modes enhanced travel speed far above human evolutionary experience, which is walking speed. Transport became faster and more convenient for people and industry. But planning had to be done without knowing the effects of these new modes. Individual experiences were extrapolated to the system and myths were created, like 'growth of mobility', 'time saving by speed' and 'freedom of modal choice'. Scientific based analysis show that these are real myths. These effects do not exist in the system. The number of trips is constant, travel time can not be saved in the system; speed lengthens distances and freedom of choice is limited by human evolution. Benefits from time saving can not be calculated any more and car traffic flow is only the effect of mistakes in parking organisation.

  11. Assessment of emergency response planning and implementation in the aftermath of major natural disasters and technological accidents

    Milligan, Patricia A.; Jones, Joseph; Walton, F.; Smith, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency planning around nuclear power plants represents some of the most mature and well developed emergency planning in the United States. Since the implementation of NUREG-0654 / FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, A Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants (NRC, 1980a) the licensees, local, and State agencies have developed detailed Radiological Emergency Response Programs. An important component of these plans is the evacuation of the population in the event of a general emergency condition at the plant. In January 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the landmark report, 'Identification and Analysis of Factors Affecting Emergency Evacuations' (NUREG/CR 6864/), which represented the most comprehensive investigation of public evacuations in the United States in more than 15 years. Since the completion of this research, several high profile evacuations have occurred, including Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Hurricane Rita in Houston, as well as major wildfires across the western U.S. The NRC commissioned an update to its 2005 evacuation case study publication to evaluate the evacuation experience of the selected communities (e.g., timeliness, related injuries, hazard avoidance); the level of preplanning that was in place for the affected areas and extent that the pre planned requirements were implemented during the emergency response; the critical factors contributing to the efficiency of or impediments to the evacuations (e.g., training, drills, preparedness, experience, resources, facilities, and organizational structure); and additional factors that may have contributed to less than satisfactory public response (i.e., availability of personal transportation, use of public transportation, lack of availability of shelters, etc.). The comprehensive report will be published in fall of 2008 as NUREG/CR-6981, Assessment of Emergency Response Planning and

  12. 76 FR 42735 - Comment Request for Information Collection for State Integrated Workforce Plan Requirements for...

    2011-07-19

    .../Wagner- Peyser ``stand-alone'' planning guidance, formerly entitled ``Planning Guidance and Instructions... Seasonal Farmworker (MSFW) Annual Outreach Plan (AOP), Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), and Senior... integrate DOL-funded programs into a single plan, it does not replace Unified Plan guidance that exists...

  13. Urban Farm Business Plan Handbook

    The Urban Farm Business Plan Handbook (this document) provides guidance for developing a business plan for the startup and operation of an urban farm. It focuses on food and non-food related cultivated agriculture.

  14. ARAC: a centralized computer-assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of 85 Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF 6 accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material

  15. ARAC: a centralized computer assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1986-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of 85 Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF 6 accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material

  16. A neighborhood susceptibility index for planning of local physical interventions in response to pandemic influenza outbreaks

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Strömgren, Magnus; Eriksson, Olle; Ekberg, Joakim; Grimvall, Anders; Nyce, James; Gursky, Elin; Holm, Einar

    2010-01-01

    The global spread of a novel A (H1N1) influenza virus in 2009 has highlighted the possibility of a devastating pandemic similar to the ‘Spanish flu’ of 1917–1918. Responding to such pandemics requires careful planning for the early phases where there is no availability of pandemic vaccine. We set out to compute a Neighborhood Influenza Susceptibility Index (NISI) describing the vulnerability of local communities of different geo-socio-physical structure to a pandemic influenza outbreak. We used a spatially explicit geo-physical model of Linköping municipality (pop. 136,240) in Sweden, and employed an ontology-modeling tool to define simulation models and transmission settings. We found considerable differences in NISI between neighborhoods corresponding to primary care areas with regard to early progress of the outbreak, as well as in terms of the total accumulated share of infected residents counted after the outbreak. The NISI can be used in local preparations of physical response measures during pandemics. PMID:21347087

  17. 77 FR 6625 - Meeting the Challenge of Pandemic Influenza: Ethical Guidance for Leaders and Health Care...

    2012-02-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Meeting the Challenge of Pandemic Influenza: Ethical Guidance for... guidance document entitled ``Meeting the Challenge of Pandemic Influenza: Ethical Guidance for Leaders and... should indicate that they are submitted in response to ``Meeting the Challenge of Pandemic Influenza...

  18. Bridge removal plan requirements.

    2011-04-15

    This report provides resources that detail specifications and guidelines related to bridge removal plans across the : United States. We have organized the information into three sections: : ! National Guidance : Includes language from AASHTO specific...

  19. Risk Management Plan Rule

    RMP implements Section 112(r) of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, and requires facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop a Risk Management Plan and revise/resubmit every five years. Find guidance, factsheets, training, and assistance.

  20. 75 FR 36773 - Pipeline Safety: Updating Facility Response Plans in Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    2010-06-28

    ... have been, or are subsequently relocated to the Gulf to respond to the Deepwater Horizon event should.... PHMSA-2010-0175] Pipeline Safety: Updating Facility Response Plans in Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil... 194. In light of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, which has resulted in the...

  1. A dynamic dispatching and routing model to plan/replan the logistical activities in the response phase of an earthquake

    Najafi, M.; Eshgi, K.; de Leeuw, S.L.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The unpredictable nature and devastating impact of earthquakes enforce governments of disaster-prone regions to provide practical response plans to minimize damage and losses resulting from earthquakes. Logistics management is one of the key issues that should be considered for an appropriate

  2. 33 CFR 155.1052 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a...

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo. 155.1052 Section 155.1052....1052 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo. (a) Owners and operators of vessels that carry group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo...

  3. Contribution of Reactive and Proactive Control to Children's Working Memory Performance: Insight from Item Recall Durations in Response Sequence Planning

    Chevalier, Nicolas; James, Tiffany D.; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2014-01-01

    The present study addressed whether developmental improvement in working memory span task performance relies upon a growing ability to proactively plan response sequences during childhood. Two hundred thirteen children completed a working memory span task in which they used a touchscreen to reproduce orally presented sequences of animal names.…

  4. Developing strategic plans for effective utilization of research reactors

    Ridikas, Danas [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Sciences and Applications

    2015-12-15

    Strategic plans are indispensable documents for research reactors (RRs) to ensure their efficient, optimized and well managed utilization. A strategic plan provides a framework for increasing utilization, while helping to create a positive safety culture, a motivated staff, a clear understanding of real costs and a balanced budget. A strategic plan should be seen as an essential tool for a responsible manager of any RR, from the smallest critical facility to the largest reactor. Results and lessons learned are shown from the IAEA efforts to help the RR facilities developing strategic plans, provide review and advise services, organize national and regional stakeholder/user workshops, prepare further guidance and recommendations, document and publish guidance documents and other supporting materials.

  5. Developing strategic plans for effective utilization of research reactors

    Ridikas, Danas

    2015-01-01

    Strategic plans are indispensable documents for research reactors (RRs) to ensure their efficient, optimized and well managed utilization. A strategic plan provides a framework for increasing utilization, while helping to create a positive safety culture, a motivated staff, a clear understanding of real costs and a balanced budget. A strategic plan should be seen as an essential tool for a responsible manager of any RR, from the smallest critical facility to the largest reactor. Results and lessons learned are shown from the IAEA efforts to help the RR facilities developing strategic plans, provide review and advise services, organize national and regional stakeholder/user workshops, prepare further guidance and recommendations, document and publish guidance documents and other supporting materials.

  6. Management plan -- Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. Revision 1

    Fritz, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    This Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Management Plan provides guidance for execution WHC MWTF Project activities related to design, procurement, construction, testing, and turnover. This Management Plan provides a discussion of organizational responsibilities, work planning, project management systems, quality assurance (QA), regulatory compliance, personnel qualifications and training, and testing and evaluations. Classified by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a major systems acquisition (MSA), the MWTF mission is to provide a safe, cost-effective, and environmentally sound method for interim storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes. This Management Plan provides policy guidance and direction to the Project Office for execution of the project activities

  7. Management plan -- Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. Revision 1

    Fritz, R.L.

    1995-01-11

    This Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Management Plan provides guidance for execution WHC MWTF Project activities related to design, procurement, construction, testing, and turnover. This Management Plan provides a discussion of organizational responsibilities, work planning, project management systems, quality assurance (QA), regulatory compliance, personnel qualifications and training, and testing and evaluations. Classified by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a major systems acquisition (MSA), the MWTF mission is to provide a safe, cost-effective, and environmentally sound method for interim storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes. This Management Plan provides policy guidance and direction to the Project Office for execution of the project activities.

  8. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    2002-11-01

    directives and regulations that bear on emergency response arrangements among some States. There are also bilateral agreements between some international organizations that also have relevance to preparedness and response arrangements. In March 2002, the IAEA Board of Governors approved a Safety Requirements document to be issued according to the IAEA's statutory function 'to establish ... standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. These Safety Requirements, entitled 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2), are being jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD), the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and WHO. These safety standards imply additional expectations with regard to operational emergency response arrangements. It has been recognized by the organizations responsible for emergency response, and reflected in the above requirements, that good planning in advance of an emergency can substantially improve the response. Moreover, one of the most important features of emergency response plans is to have clear lines of responsibility and authority. With this in mind, the IAEA, the organizations party to the Conventions, and some other international organizations that participate in the activities of the IACRNA develop and maintain this 'Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations' (the Joint Plan), which describes: the objectives of response; the organizations involved in response, their roles and responsibilities, and the interfaces among them and between them and States; operational concepts; and preparedness arrangements. These practical arrangements are reflected in the various organizations own emergency plans. The IAEA is the main co-ordinating body for development and maintenance of the

  9. Application of Wildfire Risk Assessment Results to Wildfire Response Planning in the Southern Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    Matthew P. Thompson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available How wildfires are managed is a key determinant of long-term socioecological resiliency and the ability to live with fire. Safe and effective response to fire requires effective pre-fire planning, which is the main focus of this paper. We review general principles of effective federal fire management planning in the U.S., and introduce a framework for incident response planning consistent with these principles. We contextualize this framework in relation to a wildland fire management continuum based on federal fire management policy in the U.S. The framework leverages recent advancements in spatial wildfire risk assessment—notably the joint concepts of in situ risk and source risk—and integrates assessment results with additional geospatial information to develop and map strategic response zones. We operationalize this framework in a geographic information system (GIS environment based on landscape attributes relevant to fire operations, and define Potential wildland fire Operational Delineations (PODs as the spatial unit of analysis for strategic response. Using results from a recent risk assessment performed on several National Forests in the Southern Sierra Nevada area of California, USA, we illustrate how POD-level summaries of risk metrics can reduce uncertainty surrounding potential losses and benefits given large fire occurrence, and lend themselves naturally to design of fire and fuel management strategies. To conclude we identify gaps, limitations, and uncertainties, and prioritize future work to support safe and effective incident response.

  10. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  11. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R., E-mail: vshukla@aerb.gov.in [Operating Plants Safety Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  12. LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan

    1990-01-01

    This document is the February 14, 1990 version of the LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan (WMPP). The Waste Minimization Policy field has undergone continuous changes since its formal inception in the 1984 HSWA legislation. The first LLNL WMPP, Revision A, is dated March 1985. A series of informal revision were made on approximately a semi-annual basis. This Revision 2 is the third formal issuance of the WMPP document. EPA has issued a proposed new policy statement on source reduction and recycling. This policy reflects a preventative strategy to reduce or eliminate the generation of environmentally-harmful pollutants which may be released to the air, land surface, water, or ground water. In accordance with this new policy new guidance to hazardous waste generators on the elements of a Waste Minimization Program was issued. In response to these policies, DOE has revised and issued implementation guidance for DOE Order 5400.1, Waste Minimization Plan and Waste Reduction reporting of DOE Hazardous, Radioactive, and Radioactive Mixed Wastes, final draft January 1990. This WMPP is formatted to meet the current DOE guidance outlines. The current WMPP will be revised to reflect all of these proposed changes when guidelines are established. Updates, changes and revisions to the overall LLNL WMPP will be made as appropriate to reflect ever-changing regulatory requirements. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Site specific plan

    Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs

  14. Remedial investigation plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Responses to regulator comments

    1991-05-01

    This document, ES/ER-6 ampersand D2, is a companion document to ORNL/RAP/Sub-87/99053/4 ampersand R1, Remedial Investigation Plan for ORNL Waste Area Grouping 1, dated August 1989. This document lists comments received from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) and responses to each of these comments. As requested by EPA, a revised Remedial Investigation (RI) Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 will not be submitted. The document is divided into two Sections and Appendix. Section I contains responses to comments issued on May 22, 1990, by EPA's Region 4 program office responsible for implementing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Section 2 contains responses to comments issued on April 7, 1989, by EPA's program office responsible for implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); these comments include issues raised by the TDHE. The Appendix contains the attachments referenced in a number of the responses. 35 refs

  15. Research on the Frequency Aliasing of Resistance Acceleration Guidance for Reentry Flight

    Han Pengxin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the special response of resistance acceleration during hypersonic reentry flight, different guidance frequency will result to very different flight and control response. The analysis model for the response of resistance acceleration to the attack angle and dynamic press is put forward respectively in this paper. And the frequency aliasing phenomenon of guidance is revealed. The simulation results to the same vehicle sufficiently substantiate the frequency aliasing of resistance acceleration during reentry guidance.

  16. Human Guidance Behavior Decomposition and Modeling

    Feit, Andrew James

    Trained humans are capable of high performance, adaptable, and robust first-person dynamic motion guidance behavior. This behavior is exhibited in a wide variety of activities such as driving, piloting aircraft, skiing, biking, and many others. Human performance in such activities far exceeds the current capability of autonomous systems in terms of adaptability to new tasks, real-time motion planning, robustness, and trading safety for performance. The present work investigates the structure of human dynamic motion guidance that enables these performance qualities. This work uses a first-person experimental framework that presents a driving task to the subject, measuring control inputs, vehicle motion, and operator visual gaze movement. The resulting data is decomposed into subspace segment clusters that form primitive elements of action-perception interactive behavior. Subspace clusters are defined by both agent-environment system dynamic constraints and operator control strategies. A key contribution of this work is to define transitions between subspace cluster segments, or subgoals, as points where the set of active constraints, either system or operator defined, changes. This definition provides necessary conditions to determine transition points for a given task-environment scenario that allow a solution trajectory to be planned from known behavior elements. In addition, human gaze behavior during this task contains predictive behavior elements, indicating that the identified control modes are internally modeled. Based on these ideas, a generative, autonomous guidance framework is introduced that efficiently generates optimal dynamic motion behavior in new tasks. The new subgoal planning algorithm is shown to generate solutions to certain tasks more quickly than existing approaches currently used in robotics.

  17. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.' It further states: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M and O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1.8, 'Deliberate Misconduct.' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, 'Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material,' certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, 'Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance,' regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these

  18. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the 'RH-TRU 72-B cask') and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.' It further states: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M and O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8, 'Deliberate Misconduct.' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, 'Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material,' certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, 'Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance,' regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous

  19. Environmental restoration value engineering guidance document

    1995-07-01

    This document provides guidance on Value Engineering (VE). VE is an organized team effort led by a person trained in the methodology to analyze the functions of projects, systems, equipment, facilities, services, and processes for achieving the essential functions at the lowest life cycle cost while maintaining required performance, reliability, availability, quality, and safety. VE has proven to be a superior tool to improve up-front project planning, cut costs, and create a better value for each dollar spent. This document forms the basis for the Environmental Restoration VE Program, describes the VE process, and provides recommendations on when it can be most useful on ER projects

  20. Project Management Using Modern Guidance, Navigation and Control Theory

    Hill, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The idea of control theory and its application to project management is not new, however literature on the topic and real-world applications is not as readily available and comprehensive in how all the principals of Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) apply. This paper will address how the fundamental principals of modern GN&C Theory have been applied to NASA's Constellation Space Suit project and the results in the ability to manage the project within cost, schedule and budget. A s with physical systems, projects can be modeled and managed with the same guiding principles of GN&C as if it were a complex vehicle, system or software with time-varying processes, at times non-linear responses, multiple data inputs of varying accuracy and a range of operating points. With such systems the classic approach could be applied to small and well-defined projects; however with larger, multi-year projects involving multiple organizational structures, external influences and a multitude of diverse resources, then modern control theory is required to model and control the project. The fundamental principals of G N&C stated that a system is comprised of these basic core concepts: State, Behavior, Control system, Navigation system, Guidance and Planning Logic, Feedback systems. The state of a system is a definition of the aspects of the dynamics of the system that can change, such as position, velocity, acceleration, coordinate-based attitude, temperature, etc. The behavior of the system is more of what changes are possible rather than what can change, which is captured in the state of the system. The behavior of a system is captured in the system modeling and if properly done, will aid in accurate system performance prediction in the future. The Control system understands the state and behavior of the system and feedback systems to adjust the control inputs into the system. The Navigation system takes the multiple data inputs and based upon a priori knowledge of the input

  1. Lifelong guidance: How guidance and counselling support lifelong learning in the contrasting contexts of China and Denmark

    Zhang, Zhixin

    2016-10-01

    Due to the effects of globalisation and rapid technological development, traditional linear life course patterns of the past are gradually disappearing, and this affects education and learning systems as well as labour markets. Individuals are forced to develop lifestyles and survival strategies to manage job insecurity and make their skills and interests meet labour market needs. In modern attempts to develop and implement institutional provision for lifelong learning, guidance and counselling play an important role. The current Danish guidance system is well-organised, highly structured and professionalised. By contrast, Chinese guidance is still fragmented and "sectorisational". This paper explores whether elements of the highly structured and professionalised Danish guidance system and practice might be applicable to the Chinese context. The author begins by outlining international and national factors which are affecting citizens' life and career planning. She then presents and discusses the evolution of guidance and the different elements of provision in each of the two countries. Next, She compares the concepts and goals of "lifelong guidance" in Denmark and China, pointing out their similarities and differences and their respective strengths and weaknesses. The paper concludes with some suggestions for the further development of guidance in China.

  2. Plowshare radiation protection guidance

    Parker, H.M.

    1969-01-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP and the NCRP were developed primarily for occupational radiation exposures. They were later modified and applied to non-occupational exposures of populations. These, with appropriate interpretations, can be used to provide Plowshare radiation protection guidance. Exposures from Plowshare operations will tend to be acute, arising from radionuclides of relatively short half-life, but will have some chronic aspects due to small amounts of long-lived radionuclides generated. In addition, the neutron activation process of Plowshare technology will produce radionuclides not commonly encountered in routine nuclear energy programs. How these radionuclides contribute to personnel exposure is known for only a few situations that may not be representative of Plowshare exposure. Further complications arise from differences in radionuclide deposition and physiological sensitivity among individuals of different ages and states of health in the exposed population. All parameters necessary to evaluate such exposures are not available, even for good quantitative approximations, resulting in the need for interpretive experience. (author)

  3. Plowshare radiation protection guidance

    Parker, H M [Environmental and Life Sciences Division, Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP and the NCRP were developed primarily for occupational radiation exposures. They were later modified and applied to non-occupational exposures of populations. These, with appropriate interpretations, can be used to provide Plowshare radiation protection guidance. Exposures from Plowshare operations will tend to be acute, arising from radionuclides of relatively short half-life, but will have some chronic aspects due to small amounts of long-lived radionuclides generated. In addition, the neutron activation process of Plowshare technology will produce radionuclides not commonly encountered in routine nuclear energy programs. How these radionuclides contribute to personnel exposure is known for only a few situations that may not be representative of Plowshare exposure. Further complications arise from differences in radionuclide deposition and physiological sensitivity among individuals of different ages and states of health in the exposed population. All parameters necessary to evaluate such exposures are not available, even for good quantitative approximations, resulting in the need for interpretive experience. (author)

  4. NGST fine guidance sensor

    Rowlands, Neil; Hutchings, John; Murowinski, Richard G.; Alexander, Russ

    2003-03-01

    Instrumentation for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is currently in the Phase A definition stage. We have developed a concept for the NGST Fine Guidance Sensor or FGS. The FGS is a detector array based imager which resides in the NGST focal plane. We report here on tradeoff studies aimed at defining an overall configuration of the FGS which will meet the performance and interface requirements. A key performance requirement is a noise equivalent angle of 3 milli-arcseconds to be achieved with 95% probability for any pointing of the observatory in the celestial sphere. A key interface requirement is compatibility with the architecture of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). The concept developed consists of two independent and redundant FGS modules, each with a 4' x 2' field of view covered by two 2048 x 2048 infrared detector arrays, providing 60 milli-arcsecond sampling. Performance modeling supporting the choice of this architecture and the trade space considered is presented. Each module has a set of readout electronics which perform star detection, pixel-by-pixel correction, and in fine guiding mode, centroid calculation. These readout electronics communicate with the ISIM Command &Data Handling Units where the FGS control software is based. Rationale for this choice of architecture is also presented.

  5. Advertising family planning in the press: direct response results from Bangladesh.

    Harvey, P D

    1984-01-01

    In 1977 and again in 1982, a series of couponed ads were run in three major Bangladeshi newspapers to test the relative effectiveness of different family planning themes. The ads offered a free booklet about methods of family planning (1977) or "detailed information on contraceptives" (1982) in the context of family health, the wife's happiness, the children's future, and family economics. The most effective ads, by a highly significant margin, were those stressing the importance of family economics (food and shelter) and the children's (sons') future. The least effective ads stressed the benefits of family planning for the wife.

  6. Nuclear power: Accidental releases - practical guidance for public health action

    1987-01-01

    The disaster at Chernobyl, USSR, has caused a major crisis of confidence in nuclear safety, and highlighted the need for comprehensive contingency planning for - and emergency response to - such accidents. This report gives practical guidance on how the authorities should deal with an accident in any type of nuclear installation, whether it involves accidental releases to the air or into water. It is based on principles developed in a previous WHO report published in 1984. It summarizes the range of accidents for which plans need to be made to protect the public, the measures to be taken and the levels of dose at which they should be applied. It indicates how to measure the levels of exposure and what are the most likely routes of exposure. It then outlines the problems faced by public health authorities and medical practitioners, and the administrative arrangements that will have to be made. The example used is of a standard pressurized light water reactor of the type currently used for electricity generation, but many of the features will be common to other nuclear installations as well. This report is addressed to those organizations and individuals responsible for public health in the event of a nuclear accident. It will also be of use to those medical practitioners who are not administratively responsible in an accident, but who may need to be aware of the consequences and of the action to be taken in the aftermath of an accident. Coordination is vital between the public health administration and the organizations with direct responsibilities in the event of an accident, and this report is essential reading for them all. 29 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  7. Workshop on meteorological aspects of emergency-response plans for nuclear power plants

    SethuRaman, S.; Tichler, J.; Patrinos, A.; Dabbert, W.F.; Ludwig, F.L.; Ruff, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    The workshop was organized into five short introductory technical sessions, followed by working sessions. The technical sessions provided an overview of the state of the art in health physics; release characteristics; transport, diffusion, and deposition; and operational aspects. Three working groups of approximately 15 members each met for two days to develop specific recommendations and guidance for implementation of the regulatory requirements. The three working groups addressed the themes of health physics and meteorology, release characteristics and meteorology, and dispersion and deposition. This report summarizes the activities and results of both parts of the workshop. The main body of the report is organized in three chapters: an introduction; detailed recommendations of the three working groups; and a summary of the recommendations

  8. Emergency Response Planning to Reduce the Impact of Contaminated Drinking Water during Natural Disasters

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water system...

  9. Wave Climate and Wave Response, 2025 Plan, Kahului Harbor, Maui, Hawaii

    Thompson, Edward

    2002-01-01

    ... (wind waves and swell) and long waves (harbor oscillations), was used to evaluate the technical feasibility of three alternative modifications to the harbor, including the Kahului Commercial Harbor 2025 Master Plan...

  10. Optimal Scheduling and Operating Target (OPTAR) Cost Model for Aircraft Carriers in the Fleet Response Plan

    York, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    .... This capability is developed through the Fleet Readiness Training Plan (FRTP) where the Navy's carriers are scheduled in staggered 32-month cycles consisting of four phases of progressive readiness levels...

  11. When a disaster strikes without warning: how effective is your response plan?

    Steiner, P J

    2001-01-01

    When an outside high-pressure natural gas line was cut near the intakes to a hospital's ventilation system, gas was quickly dispersed throughout the building. The facility's disaster management plan faced a real-life test.

  12. Key performance indicators for the assessment of pediatric pharmacotherapeutic guidance.

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Patel, Dimple; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Narayan, Mahesh; Zuppa, Athena

    2008-07-01

    Given the paucity of actual guidance provided for managing pediatric drug therapy, prescribing caregivers must be able to draw on the limited published information in pediatrics and/or guidance provided in adults with some account for expected pediatric response. Guidance for managing drug therapy in children is clearly desirable. Our objectives were to construct key performance indicators (KPIs) for pediatric pharmacotherapy guidance to identify drugs where pharmacotherapy guidance would be most beneficial. A pilot survey to assess variation in caregiver appreciation for pediatric dosing guidance has also been constructed to provide a complementary subjective assessment. Three KPI categories, drug utilization (based on hospital admission and billing data collected from 2001 through 2006), medical need, and guidance outcome value along with a KPI composite score have been proposed. Low scores are favored with respect to prioritization for pharmacotherapy guidance. The pilot survey consisted of 15 questions to assess 1) physician knowledge regarding dosing guidance, 2) attitudes toward dose modification and patient individualization, 3) the accessibility, ease of use and appropriateness of existing data stores, and 4) frequency of dosing modification, consultation of dosing compendiums and estimate of success rate in dosing guidance. Pilot results suggest that dosing guidance is generally viewed as important and that the existing resources are insufficient to guide recommendations for all drugs. While the majority of respondents check more than one resource less than 25% of the time, at least 25% of the respondents check more than one resource 25-50% of the time. The majority viewed the relevance of dosing guidance very important to the management of drug therapy. The questionnaire is being extended to the primary care centers, the Kids First Network and specialty care centers. Results will guide the development of decision support systems (DSS) that provide patient

  13. Emergency planning and long-term care: least paid, least powerful, most responsible.

    Covan, Eleanor Krassen; Fugate-Whitlock, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    As disasters can occur anywhere, planning to avoid emergencies is an international concern. Our research specifically addresses planning for the needs and safety of a vulnerable population, long-term care residents. Our initial purposes in this evaluation research were to assess the utility of a template to gather emergency management information for individual long-term care communities, to report on how prepared they are to cope with emergencies that have occurred elsewhere in areas like ours, and to assess the effectiveness of employing gerontology students in the planning process. As we began analyzing our data, we realized that it is imperative to consider whether it is possible for long-term care communities to respond effectively to disasters. In our findings we focus on the impact of gender in the planning process, the importance of size with regard to template utility, the positive and negative consequences of student aid, and the fact that gathering plans for individual long-term care communities may have detracted from collaborative community planning.

  14. The View from the Trenches Part 1: Emergency Medical Response Plans and the Need for EPR Screening

    Gougelet, Robert M.; Rea, Michael E.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Geiling, James A.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-01-01

    Few natural disasters or intentional acts of war or terrorism have the potential for such severe impact upon a population and infrastructure as the intentional detonation of a nuclear device within a major U.S. city. In stark contrast to other disasters or even a “dirty bomb,” hundreds of thousands will be affected and potentially exposed to a clinically significant dose of ionizing radiation. This will result in immediate deaths and injuries and subsequently the development of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS). Additionally, millions more who are unlikely to develop ARS will seek medical evaluation and treatment, overwhelming the capacity of an already compromised medical system. In this paper, we propose that in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry be utilized to screen large numbers of potentially exposed victims, and that this screening process be incorporated into the medical-surge framework that is currently being implemented across the nation for other catastrophic public health emergencies. The National Incident Management System (NIMS), the National Response Framework (NRF), the Target Capabilities list (TCL), Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD), as well as additional guidance from multiple federal agencies provides a solid framework for this response. The effective screening of potentially exposed victims directly following a nuclear attack could potentially decrease the number of patients seeking immediate medical care by greater than 90%. PMID:20065673

  15. Planning principles for medical assistance of persons who have been overexposured to ionizing radiation

    Gisone, P.; Perez, M.R.; Dubner, D.; Di Trano, J.L.; Rojo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Planning of medical response in radiological accidents or incidents, plays an essential role in facing these sort of events. In the present communication, guidance on the organizational structure for medical assistance of overexposured persons along with a medical interconsult system is proposed. Finally, an integrated system of Radiopathology Groups in Latin America is proposed. (author). 3 refs

  16. 77 FR 46952 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Wisconsin; Regional Haze

    2012-08-07

    ... July 31, 2018. Wisconsin submitted its regional haze plan on January 18, 2012, with a supplemental.... Response: In cases like this where a subject is addressed by both the general guidance in the draft... option at that time. Further, this approach does not require an election of one set of mass caps by July...

  17. General RMP Guidance - Appendix D: OSHA Guidance on PSM

    OSHA's Process Safety Management (PSM) Guidance on providing complete and accurate written information concerning process chemicals, process technology, and process equipment; including process hazard analysis and material safety data sheets.

  18. Recertification Project Plan

    2001-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Recertification Project was established to meet the requirement placed in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) to demonstrate WIPP's continued compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) disposal regulations at five-year intervals. This plan delineates the end goal of the effort, sets out interim goals, and offers up guiding assumptions. In general, it sets the overall direction for a highly complex and interdependent set of tasks leading to recertification of the repository in the spring of 2004. In addition, this plan establishes the institutional roles and responsibilities of WIPP project participants in the recertification effort and lays out a high-level schedule for producing the Compliance Recertification Application (CRA). Detailed plans from each organization supporting this project have been included with this document as attachments. Each participant plan provides significantly more detail with descriptions of activities that are designed to ensure a successful outcome. Woven throughout this plan are the elements of guidance and direction gained from technical exchanges with EPA managers and staff. An important principle on which this plan is built is that the process of recertification will not involve modification to the certification baseline, nor will it involve rule making of any kind. Only changes previously approved by the EPA will be detailed in the CRA. EPA-approved changes to the WIPP certification will be accepted through modification or will be approved through the annual change reporting process. For any compliance areas that have not changed since the submission of the Compliance Certification Application(CCA), these will merely be incorporated in the CRA by reference. The CRA will cover all information since the October 1996 submittal of the CCA. A second major principle on which this plan is built stems from the EPA WIPP Recertification Guidance. That guidance makes it clear that, if

  19. CAREER GUIDANCE EXPERIENCE ABROAD

    Sergey N. Tolstoguzov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of careeroriented activities carried out with students of schools in developed and developing countries. Career Guidance in Russia, despite the vast experience of its implementation, is experiencing serious difficulties. In this regard, it is important to take into account the international experience career-oriented activities, such as in the developed countries of North America and the European Union as well as in several Asian countries with rapidly growing economies and a large demographic potential, taking into account the best variants for the Russian education system. Methods. The experience of career-oriented work undertaken with pupils of the USA, Canada, Israel, France, UK, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Japan, Singapore, China and India is shown on the basis of the comparative analysis of different publications and information sources. The author has made an attempt to generalize the principles of psycho-pedagogical and administrative assistance in professional self-determination of senior pupils abroad. Scientific novelty. The approaches to career-oriented activities in countries with different levels of economic development are compared for the first time. Some principles are revealed. Firstly, the higher the income level per capita in the country, the greater attention is given to vocational guidance. The politics in the developed countries is based on interests of the individual: children’s acquaintance with the world of professions begins already at younger school and the moment of definitive selfdetermination is postponed till the end of their senior stage of education; the possibility of direction change of professional preparation in case of detection of discrepancy of qualities of the pupil to originally selected profile is provided. Career-oriented activity in developing countries, on the contrary, is rigidly coordinated to requirements of economy and a labour market

  20. The continuum of behavior guidance.

    Nelson, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Behavior guidance is a continuum of techniques, basic and advanced, fundamental to the provision of quality dental care for pediatric patients. This practice must be individualized, pairing the correct method of behavior guidance with each child. To select the appropriate technique, the clinician must have a thorough understanding of each aspect of the continuum and anticipate parental expectations, child temperament, and the technical procedures necessary to complete care. By effectively using techniques within the continuum of behavior guidance, a healing relationship with the family is maintained while addressing dental disease and empowering the child to receive dental treatment throughout their lifetime. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The response of the Government of Ontario to the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning

    1981-05-01

    In March 1980, after nearly five years of hearings and research, the Ontario Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning submitted the first volume of its final report. The remaining eight volumes were submitted in April 1980. The Commission made 88 recommendations on technical, operational, and policy issues. The present document sets out the Ontario government's response to the recommendations. The government accepts and is implementing 77 recommendations. Four recommendations require further study, and six have been rejected

  2. Meninges-derived cues control axon guidance.

    Suter, Tracey A C S; DeLoughery, Zachary J; Jaworski, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The axons of developing neurons travel long distances along stereotyped pathways under the direction of extracellular cues sensed by the axonal growth cone. Guidance cues are either secreted proteins that diffuse freely or bind the extracellular matrix, or membrane-anchored proteins. Different populations of axons express distinct sets of receptors for guidance cues, which results in differential responses to specific ligands. The full repertoire of axon guidance cues and receptors and the identity of the tissues producing these cues remain to be elucidated. The meninges are connective tissue layers enveloping the vertebrate brain and spinal cord that serve to protect the central nervous system (CNS). The meninges also instruct nervous system development by regulating the generation and migration of neural progenitors, but it has not been determined whether they help guide axons to their targets. Here, we investigate a possible role for the meninges in neuronal wiring. Using mouse neural tissue explants, we show that developing spinal cord meninges produce secreted attractive and repulsive cues that can guide multiple types of axons in vitro. We find that motor and sensory neurons, which project axons across the CNS-peripheral nervous system (PNS) boundary, are attracted by meninges. Conversely, axons of both ipsi- and contralaterally projecting dorsal spinal cord interneurons are repelled by meninges. The responses of these axonal populations to the meninges are consistent with their trajectories relative to meninges in vivo, suggesting that meningeal guidance factors contribute to nervous system wiring and control which axons are able to traverse the CNS-PNS boundary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Energy and nuclear power planning study for Pakistan (covering the period 1993-2023). Report prepared by a team of experts from Pakistan with the guidance of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    1998-07-01

    The study is the first of its kind in terms of its coverage. It analyses the entire energy system of Pakistan including: the analysis of future evolution of energy and electricity demand, evaluation of future supply potential of indigenous energy resources and import possibilities, development of overall energy demand and supply balance, formulation of least cost expansion plans for the electricity generation system, environmental analysis of electricity generation and financial analysis of envisaged nuclear power development plan

  4. From deposit modelling to the mine plan engineering guidance in a Greenfield project for the opening of a lignite open-cast mine during the preparation and development phase

    Hertling, H.

    2010-01-01

    In order to supply the nearby power plant Elbistan B, a new open-cast mine is being developed at the Collolar Field in Turkey. Initial fieldwork began in mid-2007, followed by overburden removal in early 2008 and lignite production in 2009. Several planning studies have been undertaken in order to prepare and undertake the initial work in just under two years, including the establishment of a geological model as a basis for calculating reserves, and for hydrological and geotechnical calculations, leading to a drainage concept and the formulation of requirements made on the slope stability. This paper presented the framework concept for the modelling and discussed the geological modelling and selection of a suitable development plan. The hydrological calculations and planning of drainage measures were also outlined. The more detailed plans for phase two, including the database for hydro-geological modelling, pumping tests and laboratory tests, ground water modelling, and the dewatering concept were also presented. The paper also discussed the determination of geotechnical parameters, calculation methods, and the slope stabilities at the mining and dumping site. It was concluded that regular comparison to plans and calculations on drainage and slope stability must be conducted when planning and operating a mine. 3 figs.

  5. SPLC Sustainable Purchasing Guidance Profile

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  6. Guidance at the educational marketplace

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    in educational policies and institutions. As educational systems have expanded and, further, have been restructured with the expansion of choice opportunities since the 1980s, guidance has become prioritized as a form of counseling or coaching, which can support students. Thus, guidance has become an important...... `agent´ on the educational "market´, assisting (potential) students into and around the `marketplace´. Consequently, guidance is also an important `agent´ for educational institutions that increasingly use marketing strategies to promote themselves on the market to attract and hold on to their “customers......” in order for the institutions to increase their ´market value´, `sales” and “turnover”. Thus, the expansion of guidance is nurtured by the expansion of the logic of marketization and consumerism. Drawing on Foucauldian perspectives in educational research, which highlight the expansion of powerful...

  7. Ethics-sensitivity of the Ghana national integrated strategic response plan for pandemic influenza.

    Laar, Amos; DeBruin, Debra

    2015-05-07

    Many commentators call for a more ethical approach to planning for influenza pandemics. In the developed world, some pandemic preparedness plans have already been examined from an ethical viewpoint. This paper assesses the attention given to ethics issues by the Ghana National Integrated Strategic Plan for Pandemic Influenza (NISPPI). We critically analyzed the Ghana NISPPI's sensitivity to ethics issues to determine how well it reflects ethical commitments and principles identified in our review of global pandemic preparedness literature, existing pandemic plans, and relevant ethics frameworks. This paper reveals that important ethical issues have not been addressed in the Ghana NISPPI. Several important ethical issues are unanticipated, unacknowledged, and unplanned for. These include guidelines on allocation of scarce resources, the duties of healthcare workers, ethics-sensitive operational guidelines/protocols, and compensation programs. The NISPPI also pays scant attention to use of vaccines and antivirals, border issues and cooperation with neighboring countries, justification for delineated actions, and outbreak simulations. Feedback and communication plans are nebulous, while leadership, coordination, and budgeting are quite detailed. With respect to presentation, the NISPPI's text is organized around five thematic areas. While each area implicates ethical issues, NISPPI treatment of these areas consistently fails to address them. Our analysis reveals a lack of consideration of ethics by the NISPPI. We contend that, while the plan's content and fundamental assumptions provide support for implementation of the delineated public health actions, its consideration of ethical issues is poor. Deficiencies include a failure to incorporate guidelines that ensure fair distribution of scarce resources and a lack of justification for delineated procedures. Until these deficiencies are recognized and addressed, Ghana runs the risk of rolling out unjust and ethically

  8. [Anterior guidance in complete dentures].

    Dubreuil, J; Trevelo, A

    1990-01-01

    Although the anterior guidance in complete dentures is not really a guide, the arrangement of the anterior maxillary and mandibular prosthetic teeth, defines a propulsive line called the virtual anterior guidance, a part from the cinematic criterias. The influence of this guide on cuspal movement is superior, in all mandibular points, to the influence of the condylar pathway. If this line is not respected, the practitioner may have to do excessive grindings during occlusal adjustments.

  9. Men Too--a retrospective view of the Family Planning Association's male responsibility campaign.

    Wellings, K

    1986-01-01

    England's Family Planning Association's (FPA) MEN TOO campaign evolved from the recognition that men seemed to receive less support and encouragement than women in their involvement in the emotional aspects of relationships, family planning, and child rearing. Created out of a concern for balancing the selective attention given to men and women, the longterm goal of the MEN TOO campaign was to support the growing number of men who are concerned about increasing their participation in emotional expression, family planning, child rearing and related areas and to explore ways of improving the information and education services that contribute to a better understanding of these issues. The shortterm project goals were to: raise the "unspoken issues" for public debate; encourage more communication and an improved quality in personal and sexual relationships; and raise the support for effective contraceptive use in sexual relationships. Prior to the publicity campaign a select bibliography, a document outlining the need for and general aims of the MEN TOO project, and a report indicating that family planning services needed to be more flexible and accommodating to men were prepared. A press conference officially launched the MEN TOO project. During the autumn of 1984 and the spring of 1985 public service announcements were transmitted on all 9 of the independent television stations participating in the scheme. The FPA's 1-day conference, "Men, Sex and Relationships" in March 1985, in London. 400 delegates, attended both professional and laypersons, about 1/3 of them men. To give the initial impetus to changing the general atmosphere within family planning clinics and to changing staff attitudes toward men, a letter was sent from the FPA's Secretary General to all District Medical Officers, with copies to Senior Family Planning Officers and to District Health Education Officers, describing the campaign and expressing the hope that more men would come forward to seek

  10. Aggressive International Tax Planning by Multinational Corporations: The Canadian Context and Possible Responses

    Brian J. Arnold

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive international tax planning by multinational corporations has lately fallen under intense political scrutiny. U.S. politicians have called out some American multinationals, including Apple, Amazon, Starbucks and Google, for relocating profits abroad to avoid American taxes. More recently, politicians accused Burger King of being unpatriotic for its own purported “tax inversion” maneuver, in which it would acquire Canada’s Tim Hortons and shift the head office from Florida to Ontario, benefitting from the lower northern tax rates. The Chicago-based Walgreens pharmacy chain recently backed off a “tax inversion” plan to relocate to Switzerland (the former headquarters of Alliance Boots, a company acquired by Walgreens, apparently having assessed the political risk as too high. This sort of aggressive international tax planning by multinational corporations was what G20 members had committed to fighting against when they endorsed the OECD’s “action plan” against base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS. Canada has been vigilant about improving its tax framework to prevent non-resident corporations from eroding the Canadian tax base, having enacted thin-capitalization rules and, more recently, foreign-affiliate-dumping rules, as well as proposing anti-treaty-shopping measures. But despite Canada’s commitment to the OECD’s BEPS Action Plan, the Canadian government has been reluctant to follow through on implementing rules that might affect its own resident corporations and their international competitiveness. This is most notably visible in the generous participation exemption for dividends from foreign affiliates, the absence of rules restricting the deductibility of interest expenses incurred to earn exempt dividends from foreign affiliates. Canada may be reluctant to fully follow through on all aspects of the OECD’s BEPS Action Plan. As the examples of Apple, Amazon, Google and Starbucks demonstrate, the American

  11. Comparison of ISO 9000 and recent software life cycle standards to nuclear regulatory review guidance

    Preckshot, G.G.; Scott, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with the assessment of certain quality and software life cycle standards to determine whether additional guidance for the U.S. nuclear regulatory context should be derived from the standards. This report describes the nature of the standards and compares the guidance of the standards to that of the recently updated Standard Review Plan

  12. Track 2 sites: Guidance for assessing low probability hazard sites at the INEL. Revision 6

    1994-01-01

    This document presents guidance for assessment of Track 2 low probability hazard sites (LPHS) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Track 2 classification was developed specifically for the INEL to streamline the implementation of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Track 2 LPHSs are described as sites where insufficient data are available to make a decision concerning the risk level or to select or design a remedy. As such, these types of sites are not described in the National Contingency Plan or existing regulatory guidance. The goal of the Track 2 process is to evaluate LPHSs using existing qualitative and quantitative data to minimize the collection of new environmental data. To this end, this document presents a structured format consisting of a series of questions and tables. A qualitative risk assessment is used. The process is iterative, and addresses an LPHS from multiple perspectives (i.e., historical, empirical, process) in an effort to generate a reproducible and defensible method. This rigorous approach follows the data quality objective process and establishes a well organized, logical approach to consolidate and assess existing data, and set decision criteria. If necessary, the process allows for the design of a sampling and analysis strategy to obtain new environmental data of appropriate quality to support decisions for each LPHS. Finally, the guidance expedites consensus between regulatory parties by emphasizing a team approach to Track 2 investigations.

  13. Track 2 sites: Guidance for assessing low probability hazard sites at the INEL

    1994-01-01

    This document presents guidance for assessment of Track 2 low probability hazard sites (LPHS) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Track 2 classification was developed specifically for the INEL to streamline the implementation of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Track 2 LPHSs are described as sites where insufficient data are available to make a decision concerning the risk level or to select or design a remedy. As such, these types of sites are not described in the National Contingency Plan or existing regulatory guidance. The goal of the Track 2 process is to evaluate LPHSs using existing qualitative and quantitative data to minimize the collection of new environmental data. To this end, this document presents a structured format consisting of a series of questions and tables. A qualitative risk assessment is used. The process is iterative, and addresses an LPHS from multiple perspectives (i.e., historical, empirical, process) in an effort to generate a reproducible and defensible method. This rigorous approach follows the data quality objective process and establishes a well organized, logical approach to consolidate and assess existing data, and set decision criteria. If necessary, the process allows for the design of a sampling and analysis strategy to obtain new environmental data of appropriate quality to support decisions for each LPHS. Finally, the guidance expedites consensus between regulatory parties by emphasizing a team approach to Track 2 investigations

  14. Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment. A guidance manual for Local Government in New Zealand

    Wratt, D.; Mullan, B.; Salinger, J.; Allan, S.; Morgan, T.; Kenny, G.

    2004-05-01

    Climate change is a real and internationally recognised outcome of increased amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It will have effects over the next decades that are predictable with some level of certainty, but which will vary from place to place throughout New Zealand. The climate will also change from year to year and decade to decade due to natural processes. For example, some parts of the country often have dry summers and autumns when an El Nino climate pattern is present. Both natural fluctuations and human-induced climate changes need to be considered when developing adaptation plans and policies, rather than just 'greenhouse warming' effects on their own. Councils already address extreme weather events and climate variations as they develop plans and provide services. Climate change effects need also to be considered as part of these regulatory, assessment and planning activities. It is not necessary to develop a set of procedures for dealing separately with effects and impacts of climate change - they can be built into existing practices. Over time, climate change responses will involve iterative planning processes, keeping up-to-date with new information, monitoring changes, and reviewing the effectiveness of responses. The response to climate change involves international, national, regional, district and community consideration and action. The Guidance Manual aims to assist local government in working with its communities and making appropriate decisions.

  15. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 January 2007

    2007-01-01

    binding treaties and have directives and regulations that bear on emergency response arrangements among some States. There are also bilateral agreements between some international organizations that also have relevance to preparedness and response arrangements. In March 2002, the IAEA issued Safety Requirements, entitled 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2), jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and WHO. These safety standards imply additional expectations with regard to operational emergency response arrangements. It is recognized by the participating organizations, and reflected in the above requirements, that good planning in advance of an emergency can substantially improve the response. With this in mind, the IAEA, the organizations party to the Conventions, and some other international organizations that participate in the activities of the IACRNA develop and maintain this 'Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations' (the Joint Plan), which describes: the objectives of response; the organizations involved in response, their roles and responsibilities, and the interfaces among them and between them and States; operational concepts; and preparedness arrangements. The various organizations reflect these arrangements in their own emergency plans. The IAEA is the main co-ordinating body for development and maintenance of the Joint Plan. All States irrespective whether they are party to one or other of the two Conventions are invited to adopt arrangements that are compatible with those described here when providing relevant information about nuclear or radiological emergencies to relevant international organizations, in order to minimize the radiological consequences and to facilitate the

  16. Training Community Modeling and Simulation Business Plan, 2007 Edition. Volume 2: Data Call Responses and Analysis

    2009-02-01

    services; and • Other reconstruction assistance. D-14 17. Train Forces on Military Assistance to Civil Authorities ( MACA ) Develop environments...for training in the planning and execution of MACA in support of disaster relief (natural and man-made), military assistance for civil disturbances

  17. Hurricane Hugo: Emergency Preparedness Planning and Response for Mental Health Services.

    Carter, Nancy C.; And Others

    This report describes how, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, the South Carolina Department of Mental Health activated its Emergency Preparedness Plan to assist mental health centers and their staff in providing crisis counseling services to the general public. The first section explains the history and structure of the involvement by the…

  18. Modeling plan-form deltaic response to changes in fluvial sediment supply

    Nienhuis, J.H.; Ashton, A.D.; Roos, Pieter C.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Giosan, L.; Kranenburg, W.M.; Horstman, E.M.; Wijnberg, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of changes in fluvial sediment supply on the plan-form shape of wave-dominated deltas. We apply a one-line numerical shoreline model to calculate shoreline evolution after (I) elimination and (II) time-periodic variation of fluvial input. Model results suggest four

  19. 9 CFR 56.10 - Initial State response and containment plan.

    2010-01-01

    ... committee, regular meetings, and exercises, including coordination with any tribal governments that may be... monitoring activities in control zones; (12) If vaccination is considered as an option, a written plan for...) Public awareness and education programs regarding avian influenza. (b) If a State is designated a U.S...

  20. 45 CFR 261.12 - What is an individual responsibility plan?

    2010-10-01

    ...: (a) Should set an employment goal and a plan for moving immediately into private-sector employment... doing other things that will help the individual become or remain employed in the private sector; (c) Should be designed to move the individual into whatever private-sector employment he or she is capable of...