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Sample records for respondent conditioning experiments

  1. The acquisition of conditioned responding.

    Harris, Justin A

    2011-04-01

    This report analyzes the acquisition of conditioned responses in rats trained in a magazine approach paradigm. Following the suggestion by Gallistel, Fairhurst, and Balsam (2004), Weibull functions were fitted to the trial-by-trial response rates of individual rats. These showed that the emergence of responding was often delayed, after which the response rate would increase relatively gradually across trials. The fit of the Weibull function to the behavioral data of each rat was equaled by that of a cumulative exponential function incorporating a response threshold. Thus, the growth in conditioning strength on each trial can be modeled by the derivative of the exponential--a difference term of the form used in many models of associative learning (e.g., Rescorla & Wagner, 1972). Further analyses, comparing the acquisition of responding with a continuously reinforced stimulus (CRf) and a partially reinforced stimulus (PRf), provided further evidence in support of the difference term. In conclusion, the results are consistent with conventional models that describe learning as the growth of associative strength, incremented on each trial by an error-correction process.

  2. Psychotic experiences and general medical conditions: a cross-national analysis based on 28 002 respondents from 16 countries in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys.

    Scott, Kate M; Saha, Sukanta; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Alonso, Jordi; Benjet, Corina; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Degenhardt, Louisa; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep M; Hu, Chiyi; Karam, Elie G; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Mneimneh, Zeina; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Sampson, Nancy A; Stagnaro, Juan Carlos; Kessler, Ronald C; McGrath, John J

    2018-02-26

    Previous work has identified associations between psychotic experiences (PEs) and general medical conditions (GMCs), but their temporal direction remains unclear as does the extent to which they are independent of comorbid mental disorders. In total, 28 002 adults in 16 countries from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys were assessed for PEs, GMCs and 21 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) mental disorders. Discrete-time survival analyses were used to estimate the associations between PEs and GMCs with various adjustments. After adjustment for comorbid mental disorders, temporally prior PEs were significantly associated with subsequent onset of 8/12 GMCs (arthritis, back or neck pain, frequent or severe headache, other chronic pain, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and peptic ulcer) with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-1.5] to 1.9 (95% CI 1.4-2.4). In contrast, only three GMCs (frequent or severe headache, other chronic pain and asthma) were significantly associated with subsequent onset of PEs after adjustment for comorbid GMCs and mental disorders, with ORs ranging from 1.5 (95% CI 1.2-1.9) to 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4). PEs were associated with the subsequent onset of a wide range of GMCs, independent of comorbid mental disorders. There were also associations between some medical conditions (particularly those involving chronic pain) and subsequent PEs. Although these findings will need to be confirmed in prospective studies, clinicians should be aware that psychotic symptoms may be risk markers for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Whether PEs are causal risk factors will require further research.

  3. Repeated Activation of a CS-US-Contingency Memory Results in Sustained Conditioned Responding.

    Joos, Els; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Individuals seem to differ in conditionability, i.e., the ease by which the contingent presentation of two stimuli will lead to a conditioned response. In contemporary learning theory, individual differences in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders are, among others, explained by individual differences in temperamental variables (Mineka and Zinbarg, 2006). One such individual difference variable is how people process a learning experience when the conditioning stimuli are no longer present. Repeatedly thinking about the conditioning experience, as in worry or rumination, might prolong the initial (fear) reactions and as such, might leave certain individuals more vulnerable to developing an anxiety disorder. However, in human conditioning research, relatively little attention has been devoted to the processing of a memory trace after its initial acquisition, despite its potential influences on subsequent performance. Post-acquisition processing can be induced by mental reiteration of a conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US)-contingency. Using a human conditioned suppression paradigm, we investigated the effect of repeated activations of a CS-US-contingency memory on the level of conditioned responding at a later test. Results of three experiments showed more sustained responding to a "rehearsed" CS+ as compared to a "non-rehearsed" CS+. Moreover, the second experiment showed no effect of rehearsal when only the CS was rehearsed instead of the CS-US-contingency. The third experiment demonstrated that mental CS-US-rehearsal has the same effect regardless of whether it was cued by the CS and a verbal reference to the US or by a neutral signal, making the rehearsal "purely mental." In sum, it was demonstrated that post-acquisition activation of a CS-US-contingency memory can impact conditioned responding, underlining the importance of post-acquisition processes in conditioning. This might indicate that individuals who are more prone to mentally

  4. Repeated Activation of a CS-US-Contingency Memory Results in Sustained Conditioned Responding

    Joos, Els; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Individuals seem to differ in conditionability, i.e., the ease by which the contingent presentation of two stimuli will lead to a conditioned response. In contemporary learning theory, individual differences in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders are, among others, explained by individual differences in temperamental variables (Mineka and Zinbarg, 2006). One such individual difference variable is how people process a learning experience when the conditioning stimuli are no longer present. Repeatedly thinking about the conditioning experience, as in worry or rumination, might prolong the initial (fear) reactions and as such, might leave certain individuals more vulnerable to developing an anxiety disorder. However, in human conditioning research, relatively little attention has been devoted to the processing of a memory trace after its initial acquisition, despite its potential influences on subsequent performance. Post-acquisition processing can be induced by mental reiteration of a conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US)-contingency. Using a human conditioned suppression paradigm, we investigated the effect of repeated activations of a CS-US-contingency memory on the level of conditioned responding at a later test. Results of three experiments showed more sustained responding to a “rehearsed” CS+ as compared to a “non-rehearsed” CS+. Moreover, the second experiment showed no effect of rehearsal when only the CS was rehearsed instead of the CS-US-contingency. The third experiment demonstrated that mental CS-US-rehearsal has the same effect regardless of whether it was cued by the CS and a verbal reference to the US or by a neutral signal, making the rehearsal “purely mental.” In sum, it was demonstrated that post-acquisition activation of a CS-US-contingency memory can impact conditioned responding, underlining the importance of post-acquisition processes in conditioning. This might indicate that individuals who are more prone

  5. Repeated activation of a CS-US-contingency memory results in sustained conditioned responding

    Els eJoos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals seem to differ in conditionability, i.e., the ease by which the contingent presentation of two stimuli will lead to a conditioned response. In contemporary learning theory, individual differences in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders are, among others, explained by individual differences in temperamental variables (Mineka & Zinbarg, 2006. One such individual difference variable is how people process a learning experience when the conditioning stimuli are no longer present. Repeatedly thinking about the conditioning experience, as in worry or rumination, might prolong the initial (fear reactions and as such, might leave certain individuals more vulnerable to developing an anxiety disorder.However, in human conditioning research, relatively little attention has been devoted to the processing of a memory trace after its initial acquisition, despite its potential influences on subsequent performance. Post-acquisition processing can be induced by mental reiteration of a CS-US-contingency. Using a human conditioned suppression paradigm, we investigated the effect of repeated activations of a CS-US-contingency memory on the level of conditioned responding at a later test. Results of three experiments showed more sustained responding to a ‘rehearsed’ CS+ as compared to a ‘non-rehearsed’ CS+. Moreover, the second experiment showed no effect of rehearsal when only the CS was rehearsed instead of the CS-US-contingency. The third experiment demonstrated that mental CS-US-rehearsal has the same effect regardless of whether it was cued by the CS and a verbal reference to the US or by a neutral signal, making the rehearsal ‘purely mental’. In sum, it was demonstrated that post-acquisition activation of a CS-US-contingency memory can impact conditioned responding, underlining the importance of post-acquisition processes in conditioning. This might indicate that individuals who are more prone to mentally rehearse

  6. Effects of sucrose concentration and water deprivation on Pavlovian conditioning and responding for conditioned reinforcement.

    Tabbara, Rayane I; Maddux, Jean-Marie N; Beharry, Priscilla F; Iannuzzi, Jessica; Chaudhri, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    An appetitive Pavlovian conditioned stimulus (CS) can predict an unconditioned stimulus (US) and acquire incentive salience. We tested the hypothesis that US intensity and motivational state of the subject would influence Pavlovian learning and impact the attribution of incentive salience to an appetitive Pavlovian CS. To this end, we examined the effects of sucrose concentration and water deprivation on the acquisition of Pavlovian conditioning and responding for a conditioned reinforcer. Male Long-Evans rats (Harlan; 220-240 g) receiving 3% (3S) or 20% (20S) sucrose were either non-water deprived or given water for 1 hr per day. During Pavlovian conditioning sessions, half the rats in each concentration and deprivation condition received a 10-s CS paired with 0.2 ml of sucrose (16 trials/session; 3.2 ml/session). The remainder received unpaired CS and US presentations. Entries into a port where sucrose was delivered were recorded. Next, responding for conditioned reinforcement was tested, wherein pressing an active lever produced the CS and pressing an inactive lever had no consequences. CS-elicited port entries increased, and latency to the first CS-elicited port entry decreased across sessions in paired groups. Water deprivation augmented these effects, whereas sucrose concentration had no significant impact on behavior. Responding for conditioned reinforcement was observed in the 20S water-deprived, paired group. Thus, water deprivation can facilitate the acquisition of Pavlovian conditioning, potentially by enhancing motivational state, and a high-intensity US and a high motivational state can interact to heighten the attribution of incentive salience to an appetitive Pavlovian CS. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Conditioning experiences and phobias

    Merckelbach, H.; de Ruiter, C.; van den Hout, M.A.; Hoekstra, R.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to examine the extent to which phobias are associated with a conditioning pathway to fear. The Phobic Origin Questionnaire (Öst and Hugdahl, Behav. Res. Ther. 19, 439-477, 1981) was administered to a sample of 91 phobic outpatients (patients with panic disorder

  8. Emergency First Responders' Experience with Colorimetric Detection Methods

    Sandra L. Fox; Keith A. Daum; Carla J. Miller; Marnie M. Cortez

    2007-10-01

    Nationwide, first responders from state and federal support teams respond to hazardous materials incidents, industrial chemical spills, and potential weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks. Although first responders have sophisticated chemical, biological, radiological, and explosive detectors available for assessment of the incident scene, simple colorimetric detectors have a role in response actions. The large number of colorimetric chemical detection methods available on the market can make the selection of the proper methods difficult. Although each detector has unique aspects to provide qualitative or quantitative data about the unknown chemicals present, not all detectors provide consistent, accurate, and reliable results. Included here, in a consumer-report-style format, we provide “boots on the ground” information directly from first responders about how well colorimetric chemical detection methods meet their needs in the field and how they procure these methods.

  9. Mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and dextromethorphan block conditioned responding evoked by the conditional stimulus effects of nicotine

    Struthers, Amanda M.; Wilkinson, Jamie L.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Crooks, Peter A.; Bevins, Rick A.

    2009-01-01

    Current smokers express the desire to quit. However, the majority find it difficult to remain abstinent. As such, research efforts continually seek to develop more effective treatment. One such area of research involves the interoceptive stimulus effects of nicotine as either a discriminative stimulus in an operant drug discrimination task, or more recently as a conditional stimulus (CS) in a discriminated goal-tracking task. The present work investigated the potential role nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the CS effects of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) using antagonists with differential selectivity for β2*, α7*, α6β2*, and α3β4* receptors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA) had no effect on nicotine-evoked conditioned responding. Mecamylamine and dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) dose dependently blocked responding evoked by the nicotine CS. In a time-course assessment of mecamylamine and DHβE, each blocked conditioned responding when given 5 min before testing and still blocked conditioned responding when administered 200 min before testing. Two novel bis-picolinium analogs (N, N’-(3, 3′-(dodecan-1,12-diyl)-bis-picolinium dibromide [bPiDDB], and N, N’-(decan-1,10-diyl)-bis-picolinium diiodide [bPiDI]) did not block nicotine-evoked conditioned responding. Finally, pretreatment with low dose combinations of mecamylamine, dextromethorphan, and/or bupropion were used to target α3β4* receptors. No combination blocked conditioned responding evoked by the training dose of nicotine. However, a combination of mecamylamine and dextromethorphan partially blocked nicotine-evoked conditioned responding to a lower dose of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg). These results indicate that β2* and potentially α3β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play a role in the CS effects of nicotine and are potential targets for the development of nicotine cessation aids. PMID:19778551

  10. Fear conditioning following a unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy: reduced autonomic responding and stimulus contingency knowledge.

    Coppens, Evelien; van Paesschen, Wim; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vansteenwegen, Debora

    2010-03-01

    Animal research demonstrated that during fear conditioning the amygdala plays a central role in forming an association between the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US). Lesion studies conducted in patients who underwent a unilateral anterior temporal lobe resection, however; yielded contradictory findings. To date, it remains unclear whether amygdala damage only affects fear-conditioned startle responding or impairs both the latter and fear-conditioned skin conductance responding (SCR). Moreover inconsistency exists regarding the preservation of contingency knowledge in amygdala-damaged patients. In the current study, a differential fear conditioning task was presented to a unilaterally amygdala-damaged patient group and a healthy control group, recording fear-potentiated startle responses along with SCRs. Retrospectively, the valence of the CSs and contingency awareness was assessed. Unlike the control group, unilaterally amygdala-damaged patients showed neither in their SCRs nor in their valence ratings an effect of fear conditioning. The startle data, however, yielded in none of the two test groups fear-conditioned responding. Finally, considerably fewer patients (37.5%) than controls (95%) acquired correct memory of the presented contingency. Based on these findings we concluded that the fear conditioning impairment in amygdala-damaged patients was not restricted to SCRs, but also affected valence ratings and memory of the presented contingency. A broader theory of the amygdala as relevance detector is proposed in order to account for the diverse neurological findings obtained so far.

  11. Nucleus accumbens core and shell are necessary for reinforcer devaluation effects on Pavlovian conditioned responding

    Teghpal eSingh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens (NA has been hypothesized to be part of a circuit in which cue-evoked information about expected outcomes is mobilized to guide behavior. Here we tested this hypothesis using a Pavlovian reinforcer devaluation task, previously applied to assess outcome-guided behavior after damage to regions such as the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala that send projections to NA. Rats with sham lesions or neurotoxic lesions of either the core or shell subdivision of NA were trained to associate a 10 sec CS+ with delivery of three food pellets. After training, half of the rats in each lesion group received food paired with illness induced by LiCl injections; the remaining rats received food and illness unpaired. Subsequently, responding to the CS+ was assessed in an extinction probe test. Both sham and lesioned rats conditioned to the CS+ and formed a conditioned taste aversion. However only sham rats reduced their conditioned responding as a result of reinforcer devaluation; devalued rats with lesions of either core or shell showed levels of responding that were similar to lesioned, non-devalued rats. This impairment was not due to the loss of motivational salience conferred to the CS+ in lesioned rats as both groups responded similarly for the cue in conditioned reinforcement testing. These data suggest that NA core and shell are part of a circuit necessary for the use of cue-evoked information about expected outcomes to guide behavior.

  12. Wilderness experience in Rocky Mountain National Park 2002; report to respondents

    Schuster, Elke; Johnson, S. Shea; Taylor, Jonathan G.

    2003-01-01

    A substantial amount of backcountry (about 250,000 acres) in Rocky Mountain National Park [RMNP of the Park] may be designated as wilderness areas in the coming years. Currently, over 3 million visitors drives through the park on Trail Ridge Road, camp in designated campgrounds, day hike, etc. each year. Many of those visitors also report using the backcountry-wilderness areas that are not easily accessible by roads or trails. Use of the backcountry is growing at RMNP and is accompanied by changing visitor expectations and preferences for wilderness management. For these reasons it is of great importance for the Park to periodically assess what types of environments and conditions wilderness users seek to facilitate a quality experience. To assist in this effort, the Political Analysis and Science Assistance [PSAS] program / Fort Collins Center / U.S. Geological Survey, in close collaboration with personnel and volunteers from RMNP, as well as the Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism [NRRT] Department at Colorado State University, launched a research effort in the summer of 2002 to investigate visitorsa?? wilderness experiences in the Park. Specifically, the purpose of this research was: (1) To determine what constitutes a wilderness experience; (2) To identify important places, visual features, and sounds essential to a quality wilderness experience and; (3) To determine what aspects may detract from wilderness experience. Thus, answers to these questions should provide insight for Park managers about visitorsa?? expectation for wilderness recreation and the conditions they seek for quality wilderness experiences. Ultimately, this information can be used to support wilderness management decisions within RMNP. The social science technique of Visitor Employed Photography [VEP] was used to obtain information from visitors about wilderness experiences. Visitors were selected at random from Park-designated wilderness trails, in proportion to their use, and asked to

  13. Using respondent uncertainty to mitigate hypothetical bias in a stated choice experiment

    Richard C. Ready; Patricia A. Champ; Jennifer L. Lawton

    2010-01-01

    In a choice experiment study, willingness to pay for a public good estimated from hypothetical choices was three times as large as willingness to pay estimated from choices requiring actual payment. This hypothetical bias was related to the stated level of certainty of respondents. We develop protocols to measure respondent certainty in the context of a choice...

  14. Contextual Change After Fear Acquisition Affects Conditioned Responding and the Time Course of Extinction Learning-Implications for Renewal Research.

    Sjouwerman, Rachel; Niehaus, Johanna; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2015-01-01

    Context plays a central role in retrieving (fear) memories. Accordingly, context manipulations are inherent to most return of fear (ROF) paradigms (in particular renewal), involving contextual changes after fear extinction. Context changes are, however, also often embedded during earlier stages of ROF experiments such as context changes between fear acquisition and extinction (e.g., in ABC and ABA renewal). Previous studies using these paradigms have however focused exclusively on the context switch after extinction (i.e., renewal). Thus, the possibility of a general effect of context switch on conditioned responding that may not be conditional to preceding extinction learning remains unstudied. Hence, the current study investigated the impact of a context switch between fear acquisition and extinction on immediate conditioned responding and on the time-course of extinction learning by using a multimodal approach. A group that underwent contextual change after fear conditioning (AB; n = 36) was compared with a group without a contextual change from acquisition to extinction (AA; n = 149), while measuring physiological (skin conductance and fear potentiated startle) measures and subjective fear ratings. Contextual change between fear acquisition and extinction had a pronounced effect on both immediate conditioned responding and on the time course of extinction learning in skin conductance responses and subjective fear ratings. This may have important implications for the mechanisms underlying and the interpretation of the renewal effect (i.e., contextual switch after extinction). Consequently, future studies should incorporate designs and statistical tests that disentangle general effects of contextual change from genuine ROF effects.

  15. Conditioning of primates for experiments

    Legeay, G.; Geneste, M.; Brawers, G.

    1965-01-01

    The preparation of the monkey for experiments is one branch of zootechny applied to laboratory animals. The construction of a monkey-house at the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre has made it possible to study the hygiene rules necessary for obtaining subjects with relatively stable biological parameters. This hygiene includes: - prophylactic treatment, because the animals received lived originally in the wild state, - a balanced diet according to modern dietetic standards, - a habitat hygiene which recreates the original living conditions of the species. The possibility of reproduction has been used as a criterion of the efficiency of the methods applied. (authors) [fr

  16. Occluded object reconstruction for first responders with augmented reality glasses using conditional generative adversarial networks

    Yun, Kyongsik; Lu, Thomas; Chow, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Firefighters suffer a variety of life-threatening risks, including line-of-duty deaths, injuries, and exposures to hazardous substances. Support for reducing these risks is important. We built a partially occluded object reconstruction method on augmented reality glasses for first responders. We used a deep learning based on conditional generative adversarial networks to train associations between the various images of flammable and hazardous objects and their partially occluded counterparts....

  17. Emotional eating and Pavlovian learning: evidence for conditioned appetitive responding to negative emotional states.

    Bongers, Peggy; Jansen, Anita

    2017-02-01

    Appetitive learning has been demonstrated several times using neutral cues or contexts as a predictor of food intake and it has been shown that humans easily learn cued desires for foods. It has, however, never been studied whether internal cues are also capable of appetitive conditioning. In this study, we tested whether humans can learn cued eating desires to negative moods as conditioned stimuli (CS), thereby offering a potential explanation of emotional eating (EE). Female participants were randomly presented with 10 different stimuli eliciting either negative or neutral emotional states, with one of these states paired with eating chocolate. Expectancy to eat, desire to eat, salivation, and unpleasantness of experiencing negative emotions were assessed. After conditioning, participants were brought into a negative emotional state and were asked to choose between money and chocolate. Data showed differential conditioned responding on the expectancy and desire measures, but not on salivation. Specific conditioned effects were obtained for participants with a higher BMI (body mass index) on the choice task, and for participants high on EE on the unpleasantness ratings. These findings provide the first experimental evidence for the idea that negative emotions can act as conditioned stimuli, and might suggest that classical conditioning is involved in EE.

  18. Contextual change after fear acquisition affects conditioned responding and the time course of extinction learning – Implications for renewal research

    Rachel eSjouwerman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context plays a central role in retrieving (fear memories. Accordingly, context manipulations are inherent to most return of fear (ROF paradigms (in particular renewal, involving contextual changes after fear extinction. Context changes are, however, also often embedded during earlier stages of ROF experiments such as context changes between fear acquisition and extinction (e.g. in ABC and ABA renewal. Previous studies using these paradigms have however focused exclusively on the context switch after extinction (i.e. renewal. Thus, the possibility of a general effect of a context switch on conditioned responding that may not be conditional to preceding extinction learning remains unstudied.Hence, the current study investigated the impact of a context switch between fear acquisition and extinction on immediate conditioned responding and on the time-course of extinction learning by using a multimodal approach. A group that underwent contextual change after fear conditioning (AB; n = 36 was compared with a group without a contextual change from acquisition to extinction (AA; n = 149, while measuring autonomic (skin conductance and fear potentiated startle measures and subjective fear ratings. Contextual change between fear acquisition and extinction had a pronounced effect on both immediate conditioned responding and on the time course of extinction learning in skin conductance responses and subjective fear ratings. This may have important implications for the mechanisms underlying and the interpretation of the renewal effect (i.e. contextual switch after extinction. Consequently, future studies should incorporate designs and statistical tests that disentangle general effects of contextual change from genuine ROF effects.

  19. Lesions of the amygdala central nucleus abolish lipoprivic-enhanced responding during oil-predicting conditioned stimuli.

    Benoit, S C; Morell, J R; Davidson, T L

    1999-12-01

    T. L. Davidson, A. M. Altizer, S. C. Benoit, E. K. Walls, and T. L. Powley (1997) reported that rats show facilitated responding to conditioned stimuli (CSs) that predict oil, after administration of the lipoprivic agent, Na-2-mercaptoacetate (MA). This facilitation was blocked by vagal deafferentation. The present article extends that investigation to another structure, the amygdala central nucleus (CN). The CN receives inputs from dorsal vagal nuclei, and neurotoxic lesions of this nucleus are reported to abolish feeding in response to lipoprivic challenges. In Experiment 1, rats with ibotenic acid (IBO) lesions of the CN failed to show enhanced appetitive responding during oil-predicting CSs after administration of MA. Experiment 2 used a conditioned taste-aversion procedure to establish that rats with IBO lesions of the CN were able to discriminate the tastes of sucrose and peanut oil and had intact CS-US representations. It is concluded that the amygdala CN is a necessary structure for the detection of lipoprivic challenges.

  20. Conditioned Microplitis croceipes Cresson (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) detect and respond to 2,4-DNT: development of a biological sensor.

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Tertuliano, Moukaram; Rains, Glen; Lewis, W Joe

    2005-09-01

    We examined the ability of M. croceipes to learn, detect, and respond to 2,4-DNT, which is a volatile discriminator of trinitrotoluene (TNT). The percentage of conditioned wasps to detect and respond to the various concentrations of 2,4-DNT for > or = 15 sec was measured. Significantly more of the conditioned wasps responded to the concentration of 2,4-DNT used for conditioning than other concentrations examined. Accordingly, percent conditioned wasps to respond > or = 15 sec could be used as a suitable measure to screen air samples and distinguish between samples with or without the target odorant. The data recorded in this study indicate the measured behavior could be used to estimate the concentration of target odorants. Data in this study indicate M. croceipes can detect and respond to this compound, which provide further support for its development as a biological sensor.

  1. Systolic peak detection in acceleration photoplethysmograms measured from emergency responders in tropical conditions.

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Norton, Ian; Brearley, Matt; Abbott, Derek; Schuurmans, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Photoplethysmogram (PPG) monitoring is not only essential for critically ill patients in hospitals or at home, but also for those undergoing exercise testing. However, processing PPG signals measured after exercise is challenging, especially if the environment is hot and humid. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm that can detect systolic peaks under challenging conditions, as in the case of emergency responders in tropical conditions. Accurate systolic-peak detection is an important first step for the analysis of heart rate variability. Algorithms based on local maxima-minima, first-derivative, and slope sum are evaluated, and a new algorithm is introduced to improve the detection rate. With 40 healthy subjects, the new algorithm demonstrates the highest overall detection accuracy (99.84% sensitivity, 99.89% positive predictivity). Existing algorithms, such as Billauer's, Li's and Zong's, have comparable although lower accuracy. However, the proposed algorithm presents an advantage for real-time applications by avoiding human intervention in threshold determination. For best performance, we show that a combination of two event-related moving averages with an offset threshold has an advantage in detecting systolic peaks, even in heat-stressed PPG signals.

  2. Modulation of instrumental responding by a conditioned threat stimulus requires lateral and central amygdala

    Vincent eCampese

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two studies explored the role of the amygdala in response modulation by an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS in rats. Experiment 1 investigated the role of amygdala circuitry in conditioned suppression using a paradigm in which licking for sucrose was inhibited by a tone CS that had been previously paired with footshock. Electrolytic lesions of the lateral amygdala impaired suppression relative to sham-operated animals, and produced the same pattern of results when applied to central amygdala. In addition, disconnection of the lateral and central amygdala, by unilateral lesion of each on opposite sides of the brain, also impaired suppression relative to control subjects that received lesions of both areas on the same side. In each case, lesions were placed following Pavlovian conditioning and instrumental training, but before testing. This procedure produced within-subjects measures of the effects of lesion on freezing and between-group comparisons for the effects on suppression. Experiment 2 extended this analysis to a task where an aversive CS suppressed shuttling responses that had been previously food reinforced and also found effects of bilateral lesions of the central amygdala in a pre-post design. Together, these studies demonstrate that connections between the lateral and central amygdala constitute a serial circuit involved in processing aversive Pavlovian stimuli, and add to a growing body of findings implicating central amygdala in the modulation of instrumental behavior.

  3. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10 14 W cm −2 to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code

  4. Perseverative instrumental and Pavlovian responding to conditioned stimuli in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    Nonkes, L.J.P.; Homberg, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stimuli can influence behavior via the process of Pavlovian conditioning. Recent genetic research suggests that some individuals are more sensitive to environmental stimuli for behavioral guidance than others. One important mediator of this effect is serotonin transporter (5-HTT)

  5. Examination of the effects of varenicline, bupropion, lorcaserin, or naltrexone on responding for conditioned reinforcement in nicotine-exposed rats.

    Guy, Elizabeth G; Fisher, Daniel C; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    Smoking tobacco remains one of the leading causes of preventable deaths in North America. Nicotine reinforces smoking behavior, in part, by enhancing the reinforcing properties of reward-related stimuli, or conditioned stimuli (CSs), associated with tobacco intake. To investigate how pharmaceutical interventions may affect this property of nicotine, we examined the effect of four US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs on the ability of nicotine to enhance operant responding for a CS as a conditioned reinforcer. Thirsty rats were exposed to 13 Pavlovian sessions where a CS was paired with water delivery. Nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) injections were administered before each Pavlovian session. Then, in separate groups of rats, the effects of varenicline (1 mg/kg), bupropion (10 and 30 mg/kg), lorcaserin (0.6 mg/kg), and naltrexone (2 mg/kg), and their interaction with nicotine on responding for conditioned reinforcement were examined. Varenicline and lorcaserin each reduced nicotine-enhanced responding for conditioned reinforcement, whereas naltrexone had a modest effect of reducing response enhancements by nicotine. In contrast, bupropion enhanced the effect of nicotine on this measure. The results of these studies may inform how pharmaceutical interventions can affect smoking cessation attempts and relapse through diverse mechanisms, either substituting for, or interacting with, the reinforcement-enhancing properties of nicotine.

  6. International experience in conditioning spent fuel elements

    Ashton, P.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to compile and present in a clear form international experience (USA, Canada, Sweden, FRG, UK, Japan, Switzerland) gained to date in conditioning spent fuel elements. The term conditioning is here taken to mean the handling and packaging of spent fuel elements for short- or long-term storage or final disposal. Plants of a varying nature fall within this scope, both in terms of the type of fuel element treated and the plant purpose eg. experimental or production plant. Emphasis is given to plants which bear some similarity to the concept developed in Germany for direct disposal of spent fuel elements. Worldwide, however, relatively few conditioning plants are in existence or have been conceived. Hence additional plants have been included where aspects of the experience gained are also of relevance eg. plants developed for the consolidation of spent fuel elements. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Training and experience of nurses in responding to alcohol misuse in rural communities.

    Kennedy, Alison J; Mellor, David; McCabe, Marita P; Ricciardelli, Lina A; Brumby, Susan A; Head, Alexandra; Mercer-Grant, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol misuse by farmers continues to challenge rural nurses. This article reports on the experiences of Australian nurses participating in the Alcohol Intervention Training Program (AITP). Qualitative interviews of 15 rural and remote nurses. Semi-structured phone interviews were utilized to assess the response to and implementation of the AITP-an intervention designed to build nurses' knowledge, confidence and skills when responding to alcohol misuse. It comprises practical and theoretical components and was designed for rural and remote settings where nurses encounter alcohol misuse. Nurses found the training provided new-or built on existing-knowledge of alcohol misuse and offered practical hands-on "real life" skills. A range of workplace and personal situations where the content of the training was now being utilized were identified, and future use anticipated. Barriers to using the new knowledge and skills included both rural and generic issues. Constructive feedback to increasingly target the training to rural settings was recommended. The AITP is an effective training program. It can be further tailored to meet common needs of rural and remote nurses working with farmers who misuse alcohol, while recognizing diversity in rural practice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Responding to abuse: Children's experiences of child protection in a central district, Uganda.

    Child, Jennifer Christine; Naker, Dipak; Horton, Jennifer; Walakira, Eddy Joshua; Devries, Karen M

    2014-10-01

    Part of a comprehensive response to violence against children involves child protection systems, but there are few data available on such systems in low-income countries. This study describes the characteristics and help seeking behavior of children referred to local child protection services and the quality of the first-line response in one district in Uganda. Participants included 3,706 children from 42 primary schools who participated in a baseline survey on violence as part of the Good Schools Study (NCT01678846, clinicaltrial.gov). Children who disclosed violence were referred according to predefined criteria based on the type, severity, and timeframe of their experiences. Children were followed up to 4 months after the study ended. First-line responses by receiving agencies were classified into 3 categories: plan for action only, some action taken, and no plan and no action taken. Appropriateness of responses was based on which agency responded, timeliness of the response, quality of the documentation, and final status of the case. From the baseline survey, 529 children (14%) were referred. Girls were more likely to be referred and to meet the criteria for a serious case (9% girls, 4% boys). In total, 104 referrals (20%) had some kind of concrete action taken, but only 20 (3.8%) cases met all criteria for having received an adequate response. Nearly half (43%) of referred children had ever sought help by disclosing their experiences of violence prior to the baseline survey. In our study areas, the first-line response to children's reports of abuse was poor even though some referral structures are in place. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Learning Together: How Families Responded to Education Incentives in New York City's Conditional Cash Transfer Program

    Greenberg, David; Dechausay, Nadine; Fraker, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, New York City's Center for Economic Opportunity launched Opportunity NYC-Family Rewards, an experimental, privately funded, conditional cash transfer (CCT) program to help families break the cycle of poverty. Family Rewards provided payments to low-income families in six of the city's poorest communities for achieving specific goals…

  10. "On-off-on" switchable sensor: a fluorescent spiropyran responds to extreme pH conditions and its bioimaging applications.

    Wan, Shulin; Zheng, Yang; Shen, Jie; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2014-11-26

    A novel spiropyran that responds to both extreme acid and extreme alkali and has an "on-off-on" switch is reported. Benzoic acid at the indole N-position and carboxyl group at the indole 6-position contribute to the extreme acid response. The ionizations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups cause the extreme alkali response. Moreover, the fluorescent imaging in bacterial cells under extreme pH conditions supports the mechanism of pH response.

  11. Emotion experience and regulation in China and the United States: how do culture and gender shape emotion responding?

    Davis, Elizabeth; Greenberger, Ellen; Charles, Susan; Chen, Chuansheng; Zhao, Libo; Dong, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Culture and gender shape emotion experience and regulation, in part because the value placed on emotions and the manner of their expression is thought to vary across these groups. This study tested the hypothesis that culture and gender would interact to predict people's emotion responding (emotion intensity and regulatory strategies). Chinese (n=220; 52% female) and American undergraduates (n=241; 62% female) viewed photos intended to elicit negative emotions after receiving instructions to either "just feel" any emotions that arose (Just Feel), or to "do something" so that they would not experience any emotion while viewing the photos (Regulate). All participants then rated the intensity of their experienced emotions and described any emotion-regulation strategies that they used while viewing the photos. Consistent with predictions, culture and gender interacted with experimental condition to predict intensity: Chinese men reported relatively low levels of emotion, whereas American women reported relatively high levels of emotion. Disengagement strategies (especially distancing) were related to lower emotional intensity and were reported most often by Chinese men. Taken together, findings suggest that emotion-regulation strategies may contribute to differences in emotional experience across Western and East Asian cultures.

  12. Reproductive parameters of tropical lesser noddies respond to local variations in oceanographic conditions and weather

    Monticelli, David; Ramos, Jaime A.; Catry, Teresa; Pedro, Patricia; Paiva, Vitor H.

    2014-02-01

    Most attempts to link seabirds and climate/oceanographic effects have concerned the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with comparatively few studies in the tropical Indian Ocean. This paper examines the reproductive response of the lesser noddy Anous tenuirostris to temporal fluctuations in oceanographic and climatic conditions using 8 years of monitoring data from Aride Island (Seychelles), tropical Western Indian Ocean. We tested the hypothesis that breeding parameters (mean hatching date, mean egg size, hatching and fledging successes) and chick growth are influenced by local, seasonal oceanographic conditions as expressed by ocean primary productivity (surface chlorophyll-a concentrations; CC), sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed. We also examined the relationship between lesser noddy breeding parameters and climate conditions recorded at the basin-wide scale of the Indian Ocean (Indian Ocean Dipole Mode Index, DMI). Our findings suggest that birds had a tendency to lay slightly larger eggs during breeding seasons (years) with higher CC during April-June (pre-laying, laying and incubation periods). Hatching date was positively related to SST in April-June, with the regression parameters suggesting that each 0.5 °C increase in SST meant a delay of approx.10 days in hatching date. A negative linear relationship was also apparent between hatching success and SST in June-August (hatching and chick-rearing periods), while the quadratic regression models detected a significant effect of wind speed in June-August on fledging success. Body mass increments of growing chicks averaged over 7-day periods were positively related with (2-week) lagged CC values and negatively related with (2-week) lagged SST values. No significant relationship between DMI and lesser noddy breeding parameters was found, but DMI indices were strongly correlated with local SST. Altogether, our results indicate that the reproduction of this top marine predator is dictated by fluctuations in

  13. nirS-type denitrifying bacterial assemblages respond to environmental conditions of a shallow estuary.

    Lisa, Jessica A; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B; Song, Bongkeun

    2017-12-01

    Molecular analysis of dissimilatory nitrite reductase genes (nirS) was conducted using a customized microarray containing 165 nirS probes (archetypes) to identify members of sedimentary denitrifying communities. The goal of this study was to examine denitrifying community responses to changing environmental variables over spatial and temporal scales in the New River Estuary (NRE), NC, USA. Multivariate statistical analyses revealed three denitrifier assemblages and uncovered 'generalist' and 'specialist' archetypes based on the distribution of archetypes within these assemblages. Generalists, archetypes detected in all samples during at least one season, were commonly world-wide found in estuarine and marine ecosystems, comprised 8%-29% of the abundant NRE archetypes. Archetypes found in a particular site, 'specialists', were found to co-vary based on site specific conditions. Archetypes specific to the lower estuary in winter were designated Cluster I and significantly correlated by sediment Chl a and porewater Fe 2+ . A combination of specialist and more widely distributed archetypes formed Clusters II and III, which separated based on salinity and porewater H 2 S respectively. The co-occurrence of archetypes correlated with different environmental conditions highlights the importance of habitat type and niche differentiation among nirS-type denitrifying communities and supports the essential role of individual community members in overall ecosystem function. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Breathing conditions for animals in radiobiological experiments

    Stevens, G.N.; Michael, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    In the course of experiments designed to determine the influence of redox agents on the radiosensitivity of murine normal tissues, an unexpected scatter of data points relating to jejunal crypt regeneration was found in mice irradiated under supposedly air-breathing conditions. One possible explanation for the scatter in the data related to variation in the oxygen tension within the jig at the time of irradiation, and the jig modified accordingly. (author)

  15. Perception, experience, and response to genetic discrimination in Huntington disease: the international RESPOND-HD study.

    Erwin, Cheryl; Williams, Janet K; Juhl, Andrew R; Mengeling, Michelle; Mills, James A; Bombard, Yvonne; Hayden, Michael R; Quaid, Kimberly; Shoulson, Ira; Taylor, Sandra; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-07-01

    Genetic discrimination-defined as the denial of rights, privileges, or opportunities or other adverse treatment based solely on genetic information (including family history)-is an important concern to patients, healthcare professionals, lawmakers, and family members at risk for carrying a deleterious gene. Data from the United States, Canada, and Australia were collected from 433 individuals at risk for Huntington disease (HD) who have tested either positive or negative for the gene that causes HD and family members of affected individuals who have a 50% risk for developing the disorder but remain untested. Across all three countries, a total of 46.2% of respondents report genetic discrimination or stigma based on either their family history of HD or genetic testing for the HD gene mutation. We report on the overall incidence of discrimination and stigma in the domains of insurance (25.9%), employment (6.5%), relationships (32.9%), and other transactions (4.6%) in the United States, Canada, and Australia combined. The incidence of self-reported discrimination is less than the overall worry about the risk of discrimination, which is more prevalent in each domain. Despite a relatively low rate of perceived genetic discrimination in the areas of health insurance and employment, compared to the perception of discrimination and stigma in personal relationships, the cumulative burden of genetic discrimination across all domains of experience represents a challenge to those at risk for HD. The effect of this cumulative burden on daily life decisions remains unknown. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Impact of combat events on first responders : Experiences of the armed conflict in Uruzgan, Afghanistan

    Hoencamp, Rigo; Idenburg, Floris J.; Vermetten, Eric; Tan, Edward; Plat, Marie Christine; Hoencamp, Erik; Leenen, Luke P H; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Care for battle casualties demands special skills from medics, nurses, and tactical commanders. To date, no inventory has been performed evaluating the first responders (medics, nurses and tactical commanders) around battle casualties. Method This observational cohort study was

  17. Metrology for fire experiments in outdoor conditions

    Silvani, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Natural fires can be considered as scale-dependant, non-linear processes of mass, momentum and heat transport, resulting from a turbulent reactive and radiative fluid medium flowing over a complex medium, the vegetal fuel. In natural outdoor conditions, the experimental study of natural fires at real scale needs the development of an original metrology, one able to capture the large range of time and length scales involved in its dynamic nature and also able to resist the thermal, mechanical and chemical aggression of flames on devices. Robust, accurate and poorly intrusive tools must be carefully set-up and used for gaining very fluctuating data over long periods. These signals also need the development of original post-processing tools that take into account the non-steady nature of their stochastic components. Metrology for Fire Experiments in Outdoor Conditions closely analyzes these features, and also describes measurements techniques, the thermal insulation of fragile electronic systems, data acquisitio...

  18. Conditions Database for the Belle II Experiment

    Wood, L.; Elsethagen, T.; Schram, M.; Stephan, E.

    2017-10-01

    The Belle II experiment at KEK is preparing for first collisions in 2017. Processing the large amounts of data that will be produced will require conditions data to be readily available to systems worldwide in a fast and efficient manner that is straightforward for both the user and maintainer. The Belle II conditions database was designed with a straightforward goal: make it as easily maintainable as possible. To this end, HEP-specific software tools were avoided as much as possible and industry standard tools used instead. HTTP REST services were selected as the application interface, which provide a high-level interface to users through the use of standard libraries such as curl. The application interface itself is written in Java and runs in an embedded Payara-Micro Java EE application server. Scalability at the application interface is provided by use of Hazelcast, an open source In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) providing distributed in-memory computing and supporting the creation and clustering of new application interface instances as demand increases. The IMDG provides fast and efficient access to conditions data via in-memory caching.

  19. Experience with simulator training for emergency conditions

    1987-12-01

    The training of operators by the use of simulators is common to most countries with nuclear power plants. Simulator training programmes are generally well developed, but their value can be limited by the age, type, size and capability of the simulator. Within these limits, most full scope simulators have a capability of training operators for a range of design basis accidents. It is recognized that human performance under accident conditions is difficult to predict or analyse, particularly in the area of severe accidents. These are rare events and by their very nature, unpredictable. Of importance, therefore, is to investigate the training of operators for severe accident conditions, and to examine ways in which simulators may be used in this task. The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) has reviewed this field and the associated elements of human behaviour. It has recommended that activities are concentrated on this area. Initially it is encouraging the following objectives: i) To train operators for accident conditions including severe accidents and to strongly encourage the development and use of simulators for this purpose; ii) To improve the man-machine interface by the use of computer aids to the operator; iii) To develop human performance requirements for plant operating staff. As part of this work, the IAEA convened a technical committee on 15-19 September 1986 to review the experience with simulator training for emergency conditions, to review simulator modelling for severe accident training, to examine the role of human cognitive behaviour modelling, and to review guidance on accident scenarios. A substantial deviation may be a major fuel failure, a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), etc. Examples of engineered safety features are: an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), and Containment Systems. This report was prepared by the participants during the meeting and reviewed further in a Consultant's Meeting. It also includes papers which were

  20. Characteristics and experiences of interns in strength and conditioning.

    Read, Paul; Hughes, Jonathan D; Blagrove, Richard; Jeffreys, Ian; Edwards, Mike; Turner, Anthony N

    2017-02-01

    Student coaches undertake internships to develop practical skills and gain experience to improve employability prospects. The characteristics of the coaches who undertake these internships, their experiences and the nature of the work being performed are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to report the characteristics of strength and conditioning (S&C) coaches who have undertaken internships and their experiences during their respective placements. A total of 113 men and 6 women completed an online survey. Placements generally lasted 6-12 months (66%), were unpaid (93%) and took place at professional teams (63%). All respondents had a standard of experience prior to commencement (82%); a higher-education degree (bachelor's degree 56%; master's degree 18%) and others were qualified S&C coaches (16%). Activities consisted largely of coaching (47%), data collection (22%) and equipment set-up (25%) but lacked provision of appropriate training. Mentors were allocated to interns; however, often developmental objectives were not discussed, meetings were rarely documented, and in some cases, no meetings took place. This study suggests that internships offer worthwhile experiences and assistance in skill development to progress in S&C. However, clearer guidelines are required to define the responsibilities of employers and interns, to maximise these experiential learning opportunities and avoid the exploitation of willing students.

  1. Copper corrosion experiments under anoxic conditions

    Ollila, Kaija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-06-15

    This report gives results from the corrosion experiments with copper under anoxic conditions. The objective was to study whether hydrogen-evolving corrosion reaction could occur. Copper foil samples were exposed in deaerated deionized water in Erlenmeyer flasks in the glove box with inert atmosphere. Four corrosion experiments (Cu1, Cu2, Cu3 and Cu4) were started, as well as a reference test standing in air. Cu1 and Cu2 had gas tight seals, whereas Cu3 and Cu4 had palladium foils as hydrogen permeable enclosure. The test vessels were stored during the experiments in a closed stainless steel vessel to protect them from the trace oxygen of the gas atmosphere and light. After the reaction time of three and a half years, there were no visible changes in the copper surfaces in any of the tests in the glove box, in contrast the Cu surfaces looked shiny and unaltered. The Cu3 test was terminated after the reaction time of 746 days. The analysis of the Pd-membrane showed the presence of H2 in the test system. If the measured amount of 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 5} mol H{sub 2} was the result of formation of Cu{sub 2}O this would correspond to a 200 nm thick corrosion layer. This was not in agreement with the measured layer thickness with SIMS, which was 6{+-}1 nm. A clear weight loss observed for the Cu3 test vessel throughout the test period suggests the evaporation of water through the epoxy sealing to the closed steel vessel. If this occurred, the anaerobic corrosion of steel surface in humid oxygen-free atmosphere could be a source of hydrogen. A similar weight loss was not observed for the parallel test (Cu4). The reference test standing in air showed visible development of corrosion products.

  2. Reaction Norms in Natural Conditions: How Does Metabolic Performance Respond to Weather Variations in a Small Endotherm Facing Cold Environments?

    Petit, Magali; Vézina, François

    2014-01-01

    Reaction norms reflect an organisms' capacity to adjust its phenotype to the environment and allows for identifying trait values associated with physiological limits. However, reaction norms of physiological parameters are mostly unknown for endotherms living in natural conditions. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) increase their metabolic performance during winter acclimatization and are thus good model to measure reaction norms in the wild. We repeatedly measured basal (BMR) and summit (Msum) metabolism in chickadees to characterize, for the first time in a free-living endotherm, reaction norms of these parameters across the natural range of weather variation. BMR varied between individuals and was weakly and negatively related to minimal temperature. Msum varied with minimal temperature following a Z-shape curve, increasing linearly between 24°C and −10°C, and changed with absolute humidity following a U-shape relationship. These results suggest that thermal exchanges with the environment have minimal effects on maintenance costs, which may be individual-dependent, while thermogenic capacity is responding to body heat loss. Our results suggest also that BMR and Msum respond to different and likely independent constraints. PMID:25426860

  3. Emotion experience and regulation in China and the United States: How do culture and gender shape emotion responding?

    Davis, E; Greenberger, E; Charles, S; Chen, C; Zhao, L; Dong, Q

    2012-01-01

    Culture and gender shape emotion experience and regulation, in part because the value placed on emotions and the manner of their expression is thought to vary across these groups. This study tested the hypothesis that culture and gender would interact to predict people's emotion responding (emotion intensity and regulatory strategies). Chinese (n = 220; 52% female) and American undergraduates (n = 241; 62% female) viewed photos intended to elicit negative emotions after receiving instructions...

  4. The comparison respond of braking torque control between PID and SMC controller for electric powered wheelchair descending on slope condition

    Asyraf, S. M.; Heerwan, P. M.; Izhar, I. M.

    2018-04-01

    During descending on a slope, the speed of Electric Powered Wheelchair (EPW) tends to changed rapidly. Normally, most EPW is provided with mechanical braking system which transfers human pulling force of the lever creating friction at the tire. However, the task is difficult for the users are elderly or paralyses. However, even for normal user with good strength, in fear condition they tend to give sudden braking which leads to tire locking up and skidding, eventually EPW unstable. These problems will cause accident and injuries to the users if speed does not properly control. In this paper, the automated braking torque control method was proposed in EPW as alternative to solve this problem and increase the mobility and stability especially during descending on slope in other to help the user of the EPW as their daily transportation. In this research, Proportional-Integral-Derivative and Sliding Mode Control controller are compared to determine the best response for torque braking control. The rapid change of speed can be controlled by the braking torque using proposed controllers based on the desired constant speed set by the control designer. Moreover, the sudden braking that caused tire to lock up and skid can be avoided. Furthermore, result from SMC shows this controller have good time respond to maintain the speed based on desired value when descending at slope condition by controlling the braking torque compared to the PID controller.

  5. Managing for wilderness experiences in the 21st Century: Responding to the recent wilderness critique

    Joseph W. Roggenbuck

    2012-01-01

    This essay describes five major critiques of the wilderness idea and how wilderness managers might shape experience opportunities in wilderness in response. These challenges include the notions that the wilderness idea separates people from nature, that it denies the human story in "pristine" lands, that it privileges a kind of recreation favored by elites...

  6. Responding to teacher shortages : Relationships among mobility experiences, attitudes, and intentions of Dutch teachers

    van Geffen, R.E.; Poell, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    From all over the world there have been calls from governmental institutions to address a shortage of high quality teachers. As changing jobs generates new experiences, job mobility could be a way for teachers to adhere to the government’s call to develop themselves into the teaching force needed.

  7. Responding to teacher shortages: relationships among mobility experiences, attitudes, and intentions of Dutch teachers

    van Geffen, R.E.; Poell, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    From all over the world there have been calls from governmental institutions to address a shortage of high quality teachers. As changing jobs generates new experiences, job mobility could be a way for teachers to adhere to the government’s call to develop themselves into the teaching force needed.

  8. Are Survey Respondents Lying about Their Support for Same-Sex Marriage? Lessons from a List Experiment

    Lax, Jeffrey R.; Phillips, Justin H.; Stollwerk, Alissa F.

    2016-01-01

    Public opinion polls consistently show that a growing majority of Americans support same-sex marriage. Critics, however, raise the possibility that these polls are plagued by social desirability bias, and thereby may overstate public support for gay and lesbian rights. We test this proposition using a list experiment embedded in the 2013 Cooperative Congressional Election Study. List experiments afford respondents an anonymity that allows them to provide more truthful answers to potentially sensitive survey items. Our experiment finds no evidence that social desirability is affecting overall survey results. If there is social desirability in polling on same-sex marriage, it pushes in both directions. Indeed, our efforts provide new evidence that a national opinion majority favors same-sex marriage. To evaluate the robustness of our findings, we analyze a second list experiment, this one focusing on the inclusion of sexual orientation in employment nondiscrimination laws. Again, we find no overall evidence of bias. PMID:27274575

  9. Using Web2.0 social network technology for sampling framework identification and respondent recruitment: experiences with a small-scale experiment

    Grigolon, A.B.; Kemperman, A.D.A.M.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a small–scale experiment to explore the potential of using social network technology for respondent recruitment. Of particular interest are the following questions (i) can social media be used for the identification of sampling frames, (ii) what response rates

  10. Perception, experience, and response to genetic discrimination in Huntington's disease: the Australian results of The International RESPOND-HD study.

    Goh, Anita M Y; Chiu, Edmond; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; Erwin, Cheryl; Williams, Janet K; Juhl, Andrew R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2013-02-01

    This study examines elements of genetic discrimination among an at-risk, clinically undiagnosed Huntington's disease (HD) population. Sixty at-risk individuals, either positive or negative for the HD genetic mutation, completed a survey regarding their experiences of genetic discrimination, adverse and unfair treatment, and knowledge about existing laws and policies surrounding genetic discrimination. Sixty eight percent of participants reported feeling "Great benefit" from knowing their genetic test results. Reported benefits of knowledge included planning for the future, making decisions, and many individuals found meaning in active participation in the HD community and in advocating for themselves or families at risk for HD. Many individuals found personal meaning and a sense of community from knowledge of this information and from the ability to participate in research. Despite these positive feelings toward gene testing, results demonstrated that 33% of participants perceived experiences of genetic discrimination, which occurred repeatedly and caused great self-reported distress. Significantly, more gene-positive respondents reported experiencing incidents of genetic discrimination, compared to gene-negative respondents. At least 58 separate incidents of discrimination were reported, the number of incidents ranged from 1 to 10, with 45% of individuals (9/20 respondents) indicating more than one event. Of the most significant events of discrimination, 58% were related to insurance, 21% to employment, 16% to transactions of daily life, and 5% to relationships. Results contribute toward validation of empirical data regarding genetic discrimination.

  11. An African grassland responds similarly to long-term fertilization to the Park Grass experiment.

    David Ward

    Full Text Available We compared the results of a long-term (65 years experiment in a South African grassland with the world's longest-running ecological experiment, the Park Grass study at Rothamsted, U.K. The climate is warm and humid in South Africa and cool and temperate in England. The African grassland has been fertilized with two forms of nitrogen applied at four levels, phosphorus and lime in a crossed design in 96 plots. In 1951, about 84% of plant cover consisted of Themeda triandra, Tristachya leucothrix and Setaria nigrirostris. Currently, the dominant species are Panicum maximum, Setaria sphacelata and Eragrostis curvula, making up 71% of total biomass. As in the Park Grass experiment, we found a significant (additive interaction effect on ANPP of nitrogen and phosphorus, and a (marginally significant negative correlation between ANPP and species richness. Unlike the Park Grass experiment, there was no correlation between ANPP and species richness when pH was included as a covariate. There was also a significant negative effect of nitrogen amount and nitrogen form and a positive effect of lime on species richness and species diversity. Soil pH had an important effect on species richness. Liming was insufficient to balance the negative effects on species richness of nitrogen fertilization. There was a significant effect of pH on biomass of three abundant species. There were also significant effects of light on the biomass of four species, with only Panicum maximum having a negative response to light. In all of the abundant species, adding total species richness and ANPP to the model increased the amount of variance explained. The biomass of Eragrostis curvula and P. maximum were negatively correlated with species richness while three other abundant species increased with species richness, suggesting that competition and facilitation were active. Consistent with the results from the Park Grass and other long-term fertilization experiments of grasslands

  12. Reporting on first sexual experience: The importance of interviewer-respondent interaction

    Michelle Poulin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Survey methodologists typically seek to improve data on sensitive topics by standardizing surveys and avoiding the use of human interviewers. This study uses data collected from 90 never-married young adults in rural Malawi to compare reports on first sexual encounters between a standard survey and an in-depth interview. A significant fraction of young women who claimed in the survey to have never been sexually active affirmed sexual experience during the in-depth interview, fielded shortly thereafter. Two elements of the in-depth interview, flexibility and reciprocal exchange, foster trust and more truthful reporting. The findings contradict the long-standing presumption that face-to-face interviews are inherently threatening when the topic is sex.

  13. Conditioning experience for spent radium sources

    Kang, I. S.; Shon, J. S.; Kim, K. J.; Min, D. K.

    2001-01-01

    In order to avoid accidents that could be resulted from improper storage of spent radium sources, it is necessary to condition and store them safely. The program for safe conditioning of spent radium sources by IAEA has been established to assist the developing countries. The main object of this paper is to apply the technology that was adapted by IAEA for the conditioning the national inventory of Ra-226 sources in member states, as a part of IAEA's project with the Korean expert team. This paper is the result that the Korean expert team carried out spent radium conditioning, under the project title 'Radium Conditioning in Myanmar(INT4131-06646C)'. The whole inventory of spent radium sources 1,429.5mCi, was safely conditioned by the Korean expert team according to the manual under the supervision of IAEA's technical officer and the control of Myanmar authority on behalf of Myanmar. These sources were encapsuled and welded into 27 small capsules and 3 large capsules, and conditioned in 3 lead shields, producing 3 concrete-shielded drums. The inventories were distributed into 3 shielding devices, holding 500mCi, 459.5mCi, and 470mCi

  14. Bed roughness experiments in supply limited conditions

    Spekkers, Matthieu; Tuijnder, Arjan; Ribberink, Jan S.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Parsons, D.R.; Garlan, T.; Best, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable roughness models are of great importance, for example, when predicting water levels in rivers. The currently available roughness models are based on fully mobile bed conditions. However, in rivers where widely graded sediments are present more or less permanent armour layers can develop

  15. Do Students Experience Flow Conditions Online?

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Jones, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study asked graduate students enrolled in higher education programs at two institutions to ascertain whether and to what extent they experienced nine flow-related conditions in two settings: (1) online courses or (2) surfing or gaming online. In both settings, flow was experienced "sometimes," although no significant…

  16. Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    1997-03-01

    Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration's actions to respond to the ACHRE's findings and recommendations

  17. Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration`s actions to respond to the ACHRE`s findings and recommendations.

  18. Geomagnetic storm under laboratory conditions: randomized experiment

    Gurfinkel, Yu I.; Vasin, A. L.; Pishchalnikov, R. Yu; Sarimov, R. M.; Sasonko, M. L.; Matveeva, T. A.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the previously recorded geomagnetic storm (GS) on human cardiovascular system and microcirculation has been studied under laboratory conditions. Healthy volunteers in lying position were exposed under two artificially created conditions: quiet (Q) and storm (S). The Q regime playbacks a noise-free magnetic field (MF) which is closed to the natural geomagnetic conditions on Moscow's latitude. The S regime playbacks the initially recorded 6-h geomagnetic storm which is repeated four times sequentially. The cardiovascular response to the GS impact was assessed by measuring capillary blood velocity (CBV) and blood pressure (BP) and by the analysis of the 24-h ECG recording. A storm-to-quiet ratio for the cardio intervals (CI) and the heart rate variability (HRV) was introduced in order to reveal the average over group significant differences of HRV. An individual sensitivity to the GS was estimated using the autocorrelation function analysis of the high-frequency (HF) part of the CI spectrum. The autocorrelation analysis allowed for detection a group of subjects of study which autocorrelation functions (ACF) react differently in the Q and S regimes of exposure.

  19. Geomagnetic storm under laboratory conditions: randomized experiment.

    Gurfinkel, Yu I; Vasin, A L; Pishchalnikov, R Yu; Sarimov, R M; Sasonko, M L; Matveeva, T A

    2018-04-01

    The influence of the previously recorded geomagnetic storm (GS) on human cardiovascular system and microcirculation has been studied under laboratory conditions. Healthy volunteers in lying position were exposed under two artificially created conditions: quiet (Q) and storm (S). The Q regime playbacks a noise-free magnetic field (MF) which is closed to the natural geomagnetic conditions on Moscow's latitude. The S regime playbacks the initially recorded 6-h geomagnetic storm which is repeated four times sequentially. The cardiovascular response to the GS impact was assessed by measuring capillary blood velocity (CBV) and blood pressure (BP) and by the analysis of the 24-h ECG recording. A storm-to-quiet ratio for the cardio intervals (CI) and the heart rate variability (HRV) was introduced in order to reveal the average over group significant differences of HRV. An individual sensitivity to the GS was estimated using the autocorrelation function analysis of the high-frequency (HF) part of the CI spectrum. The autocorrelation analysis allowed for detection a group of subjects of study which autocorrelation functions (ACF) react differently in the Q and S regimes of exposure.

  20. Academics respond

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  1. Preliminary experiments on quantification of skin condition

    Kitajima, Kenzo; Iyatomi, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated a preliminary assessment method for skin conditions such as a moisturizing property and its fineness of the skin with an image analysis only. We captured a facial images from volunteer subjects aged between 30s and 60s by Pocket Micro (R) device (Scalar Co., Japan). This device has two image capturing modes; the normal mode and the non-reflection mode with the aid of the equipped polarization filter. We captured skin images from a total of 68 spots from subjects' face using both modes (i.e. total of 136 skin images). The moisture-retaining property of the skin and subjective evaluation score of the skin fineness in 5-point scale for each case were also obtained in advance as a gold standard (their mean and SD were 35.15 +/- 3.22 (μS) and 3.45 +/- 1.17, respectively). We extracted a total of 107 image features from each image and built linear regression models for estimating abovementioned criteria with a stepwise feature selection. The developed model for estimating the skin moisture achieved the MSE of 1.92 (μS) with 6 selected parameters, while the model for skin fineness achieved that of 0.51 scales with 7 parameters under the leave-one-out cross validation. We confirmed the developed models predicted the moisture-retaining property and fineness of the skin appropriately with only captured image.

  2. Proboscis conditioning experiments with honeybees, Apis mellifera caucasica, with butyric acid and DEET mixture as conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

    Abramson, Charles I; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee.

  3. Designing a future Conditions Database based on LHC experience

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00064378; Formica, Andrea; Gallas, Elizabeth; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Pfeiffer, A.; Govi, G.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a proposal for a new Conditions Database infrastructure that ATLAS and CMS (or other) experiments could use starting on the timescale of Run 3. This proposal is based on the experience that both experiments accumulated during Run 1. We will present the identified relevant data flows for conditions data and underline the common use cases that lead to a joint effort for the development of a new system. Conditions data are needed in any scientific experiment. It includes any ancillary data associated with primary data taking such as detector configuration, state or calibration or the environment in which the detector is operating. In any non-trivial experiment, conditions data typically reside outside the primary data store for various reasons (size, complexity or availability) and are best accessed at the point of processing or analysis (including for Monte Carlo simulations). The ability of any experiment to produce correct and timely results depends on the complete and efficient availability of ne...

  4. The effect of interviewer experience, attitudes, personality and skills on respondent co-operation with face-to-face surveys

    Jäckle, Annette; Lynn, Peter; Sinibaldi, Jennifer; Tipping, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    "This paper examines the role of interviewers' experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills in determining survey co-operation, conditional on contact. The authors take the perspective that these characteristics influence interviewers' behavior and hence influence the doorstep interaction between interviewer and sample member. Previous studies of the association between doorstep behavior and co-operation have not directly addressed the role of personality traits and int...

  5. The Gerbil Jar: A Basic Home Experience in Operant Conditioning.

    Plant, L.

    1980-01-01

    Explains how a teaching method such as allowing students to raise gerbils at home can encourage students to gain experience with the fundamental techniques of operant conditioning which are otherwise generally unavailable to students in large introductory psychology courses. (DB)

  6. Learning Together: How Families Responded to Education Incentives in New York City's Conditional Cash Transfer Program. Executive Summary

    Greenberg, David; Dechausay, Nadine; Fraker, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, New York City's Center for Economic Opportunity launched Opportunity NYC-Family Rewards, an experimental, privately funded, conditional cash transfer (CCT) program to help families break the cycle of poverty. Family Rewards provided payments to low-income families in six of the city's poorest communities for achieving specific goals…

  7. Conditional cooperation in public goods experiments and its behavioral foundations

    Kocher, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    With the help of a novel design we explicitly test for the extent of conditional cooperation in a repeated public goods game. Participants in the experiment can decide whether they want to condition their voluntary contribution on the average contribution of other group members or not. About 35% of

  8. The Effect of Interviewer Experience, Attitudes, Personality and Skills on Respondent Co-operation with Face-to-Face Surveys

    Annette Jäckle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of interviewers' experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills in determining survey co-operation, conditional on contact. We take the perspective that these characteristics influence interviewers' behaviour and hence influence the doorstep interaction between interviewer and sample member. Previous studies of the association between doorstep behaviour and co-operation have not directly addressed the role of personality traits and inter-personal skills and most have been based on small samples of interviewers. We use a large sample of 842 face-to-face interviewers working for a major survey institute and analyse co-operation outcomes for over 100,000 cases contacted by those interviewers over a 13-month period. We find evidence of effects of experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills on co-operation rates. Several of the effects of attitudes and inter-personal skills are explained by differences in experience, though some independent effects remain. The role of attitudes, personality and skills seems to be greatest for the least experienced interviewers.

  9. Ruthenium transport experiments in air ingress accident conditions

    Teemu, Karkele; Ulrika, Backman; Ari, Auvinen; Unto, Tapper; Jorma, Jokiniemi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Fine Particles (Finland); Riitta, Zilliacus; Maija, Lipponen; Tommi, Kekki [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Accident Management (Finland); Jorma, Jokiniemi [Kuopio Univ., Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Fine Particle and Aerosol Technology Lab. (Finland)

    2007-07-01

    In this study the release, transport and speciation of ruthenium in conditions simulating an air ingress accident was studied. Ruthenium dioxide was exposed to oxidising environment at high temperature (1100-1700 K) in a tubular flow furnace. At these conditions volatile ruthenium species were formed. A large fraction of the released ruthenium was deposited in the tube as RuO{sub 2}. Depending on the experimental conditions 1-26 wt% of the released ruthenium was trapped in the outlet filter as RuO{sub 2} particles. In stainless steel tube 0-8.8 wt% of the released ruthenium reached the trapping bottle as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. A few experiments were carried out, in which revaporization of ruthenium deposited on the tube walls was studied. In these experiments, oxidation of RuO{sub 2} took place at a lower temperature. During revaporization experiments 35-65 % of ruthenium was transported as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution 4 experiments were carried out using a radioactive tracer. In these experiments ruthenium profiles were measured. These experiments showed that the most important retention mechanism was decomposition of gaseous RuO{sub 3} into RuO{sub 2} as the temperature of the furnace was decreasing. In these experiments the transport rate of gaseous ruthenium was decreasing while the release rate was constant.

  10. Designing a future Conditions Database based on LHC experience

    Formica, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration; Gallas, Elizabeth; Govi, Giacomo; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Pfeiffer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS Conditions Database infrastructures have served each of the respective experiments well through LHC Run 1, providing efficient access to a wide variety of conditions information needed in online data taking and offline processing and analysis. During the long shutdown between Run 1 and Run 2, we have taken various measures to improve our systems for Run 2. In some cases, a drastic change was not possible because of the relatively short time scale to prepare for Run 2. In this process, and in the process of comparing to the systems used by other experiments, we realized that for Run 3, we should consider more fundamental changes and possibilities. We seek changes which would streamline conditions data management, improve monitoring tools, better integrate the use of metadata, incorporate analytics to better understand conditions usage, as well as investigate fundamental changes in the storage technology, which might be more efficient while minimizing maintenance of the data as well as simplif...

  11. Wall conditioning experiments on TFTR using impurity pellet injection

    Strachan, J.D.; Mansfield, D.K.; Bell, M.G.; Collins, J.; Ernst, D.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.; Timberlake, J.; Ulrickson, M.; Terry, J.; Marmar, E.; Snipes, J.

    1994-01-01

    This work describes experiments intended to optimize the limiter conditioning for TFTR supershots. It is shown that deposition of thin layers of lithium on the limiters by impurity pellet injection changes the plasma-wall interaction and improves supershot performance. Series of up to ten Ohmic plasmas each with two lithium pellets were useful in pre-conditioning the limiter. Generally, plasma performance increased with the amount of lithium deposited up to the maximal amount which could be deposited. Experiments were performed with different materials being deposited (carbon, boron and lithium) and with different methods of deposition. ((orig.))

  12. Interviewer and respondent interaction in survey interviews : Empirical evidence from behavior coding studies and question wording experiments

    Ongena, Yfke

    2010-01-01

    This book sheds light on verbal interaction problems in survey interviews. It is shown how behavior coding, i.e., coding the utterances of interviewer and respondent while they are answering survey questions, can be used to detect interactional problems. Several empirical studies using behavior

  13. A Conditions Data Management System for HEP Experiments

    Laycock, P. J. [CERN; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Formica, A. [Saclay; Govi, G. [Fermilab; Pfeiffer, A. [CERN; Roe, S. [CERN; Sipos, R. [Eotvos U.

    2017-01-01

    Conditions data infrastructure for both ATLAS and CMS have to deal with the management of several Terabytes of data. Distributed computing access to this data requires particular care and attention to manage request-rates of up to several tens of kHz. Thanks to the large overlap in use cases and requirements, ATLAS and CMS have worked towards a common solution for conditions data management with the aim of using this design for data-taking in Run 3. In the meantime other experiments, including NA62, have expressed an interest in this cross- experiment initiative. For experiments with a smaller payload volume and complexity, there is particular interest in simplifying the payload storage. The conditions data management model is implemented in a small set of relational database tables. A prototype access toolkit consisting of an intermediate web server has been implemented, using standard technologies available in the Java community. Access is provided through a set of REST services for which the API has been described in a generic way using standard Open API specications, implemented in Swagger. Such a solution allows the automatic generation of client code and server stubs and further allows changes in the backend technology transparently. An important advantage of using a REST API for conditions access is the possibility of caching identical URLs, addressing one of the biggest challenges that large distributed computing solutions impose on conditions data access, avoiding direct DB access by means of standard web proxy solutions.

  14. Rotor experiments in controlled conditions continued: New Mexico

    Boorsma, K.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    To validate and reduce the large uncertainty associated with rotor aerodynamic and acoustic models, there is a need for detailed force, noise and surrounding flow velocity measurements on wind turbines under controlled conditions. However, high quality wind tunnel campaigns on horizontal axis wind turbine models are scarce due to the large wind tunnel size needed and consequently high associated costs. To serve this purpose an experiment using the Mexico turbine was set-up in the large low speed facility of the DNW wind tunnel. An overview of the experiments is given including a selection of results. A comparison of calculations to measurements for design conditions shows a satisfactory agreement. In summary, after years of preparation, ECN and partners have performed very successful aerodynamic experiments in the largest wind tunnel in Europe. The comprehensive high quality database that has been obtained will be used in the international Mexnext consortium to further develop wind energy aerodynamic and acoustic modeling.

  15. 'You've got your own demons that you've got to fight every day': A qualitative exploration of how people respond to the experience of psychosis.

    Tully, Sarah; Wells, Adrian; Morrison, Anthony P

    2017-12-01

    Cognitive models of psychosis implicate how people respond to their distressing experiences in the maintenance of such experiences. Safety-seeking behaviours, which are employed in response to a catastrophic misinterpretation of threat, are viewed as unhelpful maintenance factors. However, the concept of safety seeking was developed in relation to anxiety disorders, and there may be additional complexities that apply in relation to the experience of psychosis. The ways in which people respond to their distressing experiences of psychosis are complex, multifaceted, and changeable, and qualitative research is needed to further the understanding of this process. A qualitative study was conducted using grounded theory methodology. In-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen participants who had experience of psychosis. A core category of fighting a daily battle to maintain functioning was identified. Related to this, three main themes also emerged. These were the perceived importance of responses, appraisal of threat, and perceived ability to control experiences. These categories are interrelated in that an increase in one is likely to result in increases in the others. Although these results provide partial support for the traditional view of safety-seeking behaviours, they also demonstrate further complexities in the way that distressing psychotic experiences are responded to. This has implications for cognitive behavioural therapy where emphasis is often placed on dropping safety-seeking behaviours. The traditional emphasis in cognitive behavioural therapy on dropping safety-seeking behaviours may not always be appropriate. This approach could have an impact on engagement in therapy and have the effect of reducing the client's feelings of choice and control. A detailed assessment of strategies used historically and how these may have been helpful previously, for example, suspiciousness, and withdrawal as a survival strategy should be conducted. The therapist

  16. Determination of the propellant combustion law under ballistic experiment conditions

    Ishchenko, A. N.; Diachkovskii, A. S.; Zykova, A. I.; Kasimov, VZ; Samorokova, N. M.

    2017-11-01

    The main characteristics of ballistic experiment are the maximum pressure in the combustion chamber P max and the projectile velocity at the time of barrel leaving U M. During the work the burning law of the new high-energy fuel was determined in a ballistic experiment. This burning law was used for a parametric study of depending P max and U M from a powder charge mass and a traveling charge at initial temperature of + 20 °C was carried out. The optimal conditions for loading were obtained for improving the muzzle velocity by 14.9 %. Under optimal loading, there is defined the conditions, which is possible to get the greatest value muzzle velocity projectile at pressures up to 600 MPa.

  17. Controlled damping of a physical pendulum: experiments near critical conditions

    Gonzalez, Manuel I; Bol, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental device for the study of damped oscillatory motion along with three associated experiments. Special emphasis is given on both didactic aspects and the interactivity of the experimental set-up, in order to assist students in understanding fundamental aspects of damped oscillatory motion and allow them to directly compare their experimental results with the well-known theory they can find in textbooks. With this in mind, a physical pendulum was selected with an eddy-current damping system that allows the damping conditions to be controlled with great precision. The three experiments examine accurate control of damping, frequency shift near critical damping and the transition from underdamped to overdamped conditions

  18. A Conditions Data Management System for HEP Experiments

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00037318; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Conditions data infrastructure for both ATLAS and CMS have to deal with the management of several Terabytes of data. Distributed computing access to this data requires particular care and attention to manage request-rates of up to several tens of kHz. Thanks to the large overlap in use cases and requirements, ATLAS and CMS have worked towards a common solution for conditions data management with the aim of using this design for data-taking in Run 3. In the meantime other experiments, including NA62, have expressed an interest in this cross-experiment initiative. For experiments with a smaller payload volume and complexity, there is particular interest in simplifying the payload storage. The conditions data management model is implemented in a small set of relational database tables. A prototype access toolkit consisting of an intermediate web server has been implemented, using standard technologies available in the Java community. Access is provided through a set of REST services for which the API has been de...

  19. Effective Responder Communication Improves Efficiency and Psychological Outcomes in a Mass Decontamination Field Experiment: Implications for Public Behaviour in the Event of a Chemical Incident

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) ‘Theory-based communication’: Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) ‘Standard practice communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) ‘Brief communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  20. Effective responder communication improves efficiency and psychological outcomes in a mass decontamination field experiment: implications for public behaviour in the event of a chemical incident.

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) 'Theory-based communication': Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) 'Standard practice communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) 'Brief communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased identification with

  1. Effective responder communication improves efficiency and psychological outcomes in a mass decontamination field experiment: implications for public behaviour in the event of a chemical incident.

    Holly Carter

    Full Text Available The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour. All participants (n = 111 were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1 'Theory-based communication': Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2 'Standard practice communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3 'Brief communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  2. Leaching experiment of cement solidified waste form under unsaturated condition

    Wang Zhiming; Yao Laigen; Li Shushen; Zhao Yingjie; Cai Yun; Li Dan; Han Xinsheng; An Yongfeng

    2003-01-01

    A device for unsaturated leaching experiments was designed and built up. 8 different sizes, ranging from 40.2 cm 3 to 16945.5 cm 3 , of solidified waste form were tested in the experiment. 5 different water contents, from 0.15 to 0.40, were used for the experiment. The results show that the cumulative leaching fraction increases with water content when the sizes of the forms are equal to and less than 4586.7 cm 3 , for example, the ratios of the cumulative leaching fractions are between 1.24-1.41 under water content of 0.35 and 0.15 on 360 day of Teaching. It can also be seen that the cumulative leaching fraction under higher water content is close to that under saturated condition. The cumulative leaching fraction decreases with size of the form. Maximum leached depth of the solidified waste forms is about 2.25 cm after one year Teaching. Moreover, it has no clear effect on cumulative leaching fraction that sampling or non-sampling during the experiment

  3. For Worse, for Poorer and in Ill Health: How Women Experience, Understand and Respond to a Partner's Gambling Problems

    Patford, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Gambling is now big business in Australia and public expenditure on gambling is high. Some individuals gamble to excess with adverse consequences for themselves and their partner. The present study targeted women who had concerns about a current or previous partner's gambling and employed a qualitative methodology to explore their experiences,…

  4. Do Teenagers Respond to HIV Risk Information? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya. NBER Working Paper No. 14707

    Dupas, Pascaline

    2009-01-01

    I use a randomized experiment to test whether information can change sexual behavior among teenagers in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28% decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away…

  5. Acoustic Conditioning System Development and Conditioning Experiments on Black Seabreams in the Xiangshan Bay Sea Ranch

    Hu, Qingsong; Rahman, Hafiz Abd ur; Jiang, Yazhou; Zhang, Shouyu; Shentu, Jikang

    2018-06-01

    Attracting released hatchery-reared fish to designated areas during the growth process is vital to realize the objectives of sea ranching. Based on the bottom artificial reefs and surface kelp culture facilities in the Xiangshan Bay sea ranch, we proposed systematic techniques related to acoustic conditioning of the black seabream ( Sparus macrocephalus). Experiments conducted in 12 m × 10 m × 1.6 m ponds on Xixuan Island showed that black seabream was positively sensitive to 500-600 Hz periodic signals. Conditioned responses were apparent after 8 d. Two to three days were required for recovery of the memory of a conditioned response after a 20-day interval. According to the practical application requirements in the open sea, unattended acoustic conditioning equipment was developed. The ranching equipment was used in 12 m × 12 m × 2.5 m cages, and the behavior of black seabream juveniles was successfully guided after 7 days. Of the 16000 released fish, 82.5% of them were conditioned with a flexible grading net. To avoid inducing a stress response, the juveniles were released into the sea ranch in situ from the net cage. The acoustic conditioning equipments were moved into the open sea and the aggregation phenomenon of the released fish was observed when the sound was played. After 6 months of investigation and based on Sr+ marking, only one acoustically conditioned fish was found outside the 3.5-km2 sea ranch area, thereby reached the goal of guiding activity. The practical effect in the Xiangshan Bay sea ranch showed the validity of the acoustic conditioning system, which may contribute to improve the operation of the sea ranches in the East China Sea.

  6. LCROSS Impact Conditions and Ejecta Evolution: Insight from Experiments

    Hermalyn, B.; Schultz, P. H.; Colaprete, A.

    2009-12-01

    The ejecta distribution resulting from an impact event reflects the impact conditions and target material properties. The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission will provide a rare look at subsurface materials. The LCROSS impact will excavate regolith from a permanently shadowed crater on the south pole of the moon. The impactor, named the Earth-Departure-Upper-Stage (EDUS), will impact the surface at ~2.5km/s at an angle of greater than 80° from horizontal. The trailing Shepherding Spacecraft (SSc) will record the impact and take measurements of the ejecta in coordination with a comprehensive earth-based observational campaign. Prior studies have explored the predicted ejecta mass/velocity distribution and general ejecta dynamics through computational modeling (Korycansky, et al 2009) and scaling laws(Schultz, 2006, Heldmann et al 2007). At very early times, however, these models and scaling laws break down. It is this high-speed component of the ejected material that will reach the sunlight horizon first and will be recorded by the SSc. Thus to interpret the initial conditions of the impact from the LCROSS ejecta plume, the early-time ejecta distribution must be understood. A suite of impact experiments (performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range, or AVGR) were designed to interpret LCROSS conditions. These experiments reveal that early in the cratering process, when the projectile is still coupling its energy and momentum to the target surface, ejection velocity is higher than predicted by dimensional scaling laws (Housen, et al 1983). Moreover, the ejection angles of this early-time component are initially lower than predicted, and sweep upward tens of degrees to reach nominal ejection angles (~45° for impacts into sand). Low-density projectiles (such as the EDUS) yield even lower ejection angles throughout much of crater growth, thereby indicating a shallower depth of coupling. An estimate of mass above a given height calculated

  7. Do people with and without medical conditions respond similarly to the short health anxiety inventory? An assessment of differential item functioning using item response theory.

    LeBouthillier, Daniel M; Thibodeau, Michel A; Alberts, Nicole M; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with medical conditions are likely to have elevated health anxiety; however, research has not demonstrated how medical status impacts response patterns on health anxiety measures. Measurement bias can undermine the validity of a questionnaire by overestimating or underestimating scores in groups of individuals. We investigated whether the Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI), a widely-used measure of health anxiety, exhibits medical condition-based bias on item and subscale levels, and whether the SHAI subscales adequately assess the health anxiety continuum. Data were from 963 individuals with diabetes, breast cancer, or multiple sclerosis, and 372 healthy individuals. Mantel-Haenszel tests and item characteristic curves were used to classify the severity of item-level differential item functioning in all three medical groups compared to the healthy group. Test characteristic curves were used to assess scale-level differential item functioning and whether the SHAI subscales adequately assess the health anxiety continuum. Nine out of 14 items exhibited differential item functioning. Two items exhibited differential item functioning in all medical groups compared to the healthy group. In both Thought Intrusion and Fear of Illness subscales, differential item functioning was associated with mildly deflated scores in medical groups with very high levels of the latent traits. Fear of Illness items poorly discriminated between individuals with low and very low levels of the latent trait. While individuals with medical conditions may respond differentially to some items, clinicians and researchers can confidently use the SHAI with a variety of medical populations without concern of significant bias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Responding to Children's Drawings

    Watts, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to explore the issues that face primary school teachers when responding to children's drawings. Assessment in art and design is an ongoing concern for teachers with limited experience and confidence in the area and, although children's drawings continue to be a focus of much research, the question of what it is that teachers say…

  9. The soil microbiome at the Gi-FACE experiment responds to a moisture gradient but not to CO2 enrichment.

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Müller, Christoph; Clipson, Nicholas; Doyle, Evelyn

    2016-09-01

    The soil bacterial community at the Giessen free-air CO2 enrichment (Gi-FACE) experiment was analysed by tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. No substantial effects of CO2 levels on bacterial community composition were detected. However, the soil moisture gradient at Gi-FACE had a significant effect on bacterial community composition. Different groups within the Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia phyla were affected differently by soil moisture content. These results suggest that modest increases in atmospheric CO2 may cause only minor changes in soil bacterial community composition and indicate that the functional responses of the soil community to CO2 enrichment previously reported at Gi-FACE are due to factors other than changes in bacterial community composition. The effects of the moisture gradient revealed new information about the relationships between poorly known Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and soil moisture content. This study contrasts with the relatively small number of other temperate grassland free-air CO2 enrichment microbiome studies in the use of moderate CO2 enrichment and the resulting minor changes in the soil microbiome. Thus, it will facilitate the development of further climate change mitigation studies. In addition, the moisture gradient found at Gi-FACE contributes new knowledge in soil microbial ecology, particularly regarding the abundance and moisture relationships of the soil Verrucomicrobia.

  10. Conditions and configuration metadata for the ATLAS experiment

    Gallas, E J; Pachal, K E; Tseng, J C L; Albrand, S; Fulachier, J; Lambert, F; Zhang, Q

    2012-01-01

    In the ATLAS experiment, a system called COMA (Conditions/Configuration Metadata for ATLAS), has been developed to make globally important run-level metadata more readily accessible. It is based on a relational database storing directly extracted, refined, reduced, and derived information from system-specific database sources as well as information from non-database sources. This information facilitates a variety of unique dynamic interfaces and provides information to enhance the functionality of other systems. This presentation will give an overview of the components of the COMA system, enumerate its diverse data sources, and give examples of some of the interfaces it facilitates. We list important principles behind COMA schema and interface design, and how features of these principles create coherence and eliminate redundancy among the components of the overall system. In addition, we elucidate how interface logging data has been used to refine COMA content and improve the value and performance of end-user reports and browsers.

  11. Conditions and configuration metadata for the ATLAS experiment

    Gallas, E J; Albrand, S; Fulachier, J; Lambert, F; Pachal, K E; Tseng, J C L; Zhang, Q

    2012-01-01

    In the ATLAS experiment, a system called COMA (Conditions/Configuration Metadata for ATLAS), has been developed to make globally important run-level metadata more readily accessible. It is based on a relational database storing directly extracted, refined, reduced, and derived information from system-specific database sources as well as information from non-database sources. This information facilitates a variety of unique dynamic interfaces and provides information to enhance the functionality of other systems. This presentation will give an overview of the components of the COMA system, enumerate its diverse data sources, and give examples of some of the interfaces it facilitates. We list important principles behind COMA schema and interface design, and how features of these principles create coherence and eliminate redundancy among the components of the overall system. In addition, we elucidate how interface logging data has been used to refine COMA content and improve the value and performance of end-user...

  12. Inequalities in reported cancer patient experience by socio-demographic characteristic and cancer site: evidence from respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey.

    Saunders, C L; Abel, G A; Lyratzopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience is a critical dimension of cancer care quality. Understanding variation in experience among patients with different cancers and characteristics is an important first step for designing targeted improvement interventions. We analysed data from the 2011/2012 English Cancer Patient Experience Survey (n = 69,086) using logistic regression to explore inequalities in care experience across 64 survey questions. We additionally calculated a summary measure of variation in patient experience by cancer, and explored inequalities between patients with cancers treated by the same specialist teams. We found that younger and very old, ethnic minority patients and women consistently reported worse experiences across questions. Patients with small intestine/rarer lower gastrointestinal, multiple myeloma and hepatobiliary cancers were most likely to report negative experiences whereas patients with breast, melanoma and testicular cancer were least likely (top-to-bottom odds ratio = 1.91, P patients with cancers treated by the same specialty for five of nine services (P patients with ovarian, multiple myeloma, anal, hepatobiliary and renal cancer reported notably worse experiences than patients with other gynaecological, haematological, gastrointestinal and urological malignancies respectively. Initiatives to improve cancer patient experience across oncology services may be suitably targeted on patients at higher risk of poorer experience. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Conditional cooperation and confusion in public-goods experiments.

    Burton-Chellew, Maxwell N; El Mouden, Claire; West, Stuart A

    2016-02-02

    Economic experiments are often used to study if humans altruistically value the welfare of others. A canonical result from public-good games is that humans vary in how they value the welfare of others, dividing into fair-minded conditional cooperators, who match the cooperation of others, and selfish noncooperators. However, an alternative explanation for the data are that individuals vary in their understanding of how to maximize income, with misunderstanding leading to the appearance of cooperation. We show that (i) individuals divide into the same behavioral types when playing with computers, whom they cannot be concerned with the welfare of; (ii) behavior across games with computers and humans is correlated and can be explained by variation in understanding of how to maximize income; (iii) misunderstanding correlates with higher levels of cooperation; and (iv) standard control questions do not guarantee understanding. These results cast doubt on certain experimental methods and demonstrate that a common assumption in behavioral economics experiments, that choices reveal motivations, will not necessarily hold.

  14. Development of Beam Conditions Monitor for the ATLAS experiment

    Dolenc Kittelmann, Irena; Mikuž, M

    2008-01-01

    If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator the resulting beam losses could cause damage to the inner tracking devices of the experiments. This thesis presents the work performed during the development phase of a protection system for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) system is a stand-alone system designed to detect early signs of beam instabilities and trigger a beam abort in case of beam failures. It consists of two detector stations positioned at z=±1.84m from the interaction point. Each station comprises four BCM detector modules installed symmetrically around the beam pipe with sensors located at r=55 mm. This structure will allow distinguishing between anomalous events (beam gas and beam halo interactions, beam instabilities) and normal events due to proton-proton interaction by measuring the time-of-flight as well as the signal pulse amplitude from detector modules on the timescale of nanoseconds. Additionally, the BCM system aims to provide a coarse instan...

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on scattering experiments under extreme conditions

    Sakai, N.; Ikeda, H.; Ando, M.

    1991-10-01

    In the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), as the research facilities, there are Photon Factory, the facility for utilizing the booster and University of Tokyo Meson Science Research Center. For the research on physical properties, it is very important to do structural analysis in a broad sense and to observe the behavior of quasiparticles in solids. The X-ray and pulsed neutrons required for these researches can be obtained in a single laboratory in KEK, and it is rare in the world. At this opportunity of the workshop on scattering experiments under extreme conditions, it is hoped that the positive interchange between both PF and booster groups will be carried out. The research on magnetic substances using X-ray is a most noteworthy utilization of synchrotron radiation. The discovery of X-ray resonance magnetic scattering by K. Namikawa is one of the remarkable researches using synchrotron radiation in the world. When the extreme conditions around samples are prepared, the quality of signals for the research on physical properties is to be heightened. In this report, the researches on physical properties under ultrahigh pressure and ultralow temperature are reported. (K.I.)

  16. How people from Chinese backgrounds make sense of and respond to the experiences of mental distress: Thematic analysis.

    Yeung, E Y W; Irvine, F; Ng, S M; Tsang, K M S

    2017-10-01

    Many Chinese people do not contact mental health services when they first develop mental health problems. It is therefore important to find out reasons for low uptake of services so that strategies can be identified to promote early intervention. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC?: Most Chinese people only come into contact with mental health services during crisis situations. Language difference, lack of knowledge of mainstream services and stigma attached to mental health problems are barriers to access and utilize mental health services. WHAT THE STUDY ADDS TO THE INTERNATIONAL EVIDENCE?: Chinese people apply both Western medication and traditional healing to manage distress caused by mental health problems. Because of the extreme stigma associated with mental health problems, Chinese people are reluctant to accept support from their own cultural groups outside their family. Family plays a major role in caring for relatives with mental health problems. Families are prepared to travel across the world in search of folk healing if not available in Western societies. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: It is important to recognize the different approaches to understanding and managing mental health problems among Chinese people, otherwise they will be dissuaded from engaging with mental health services if their beliefs are disregarded and invalidated. Services that involve Chinese speaking mental health workers can address the issue of language differences and sensitive mental health issues within the Chinese community. Introduction Late presentation and low utilization of mental health services are common among Chinese populations. An understanding of their journey towards mental health care helps to identify timely and appropriate intervention. Aim We aimed to examine how Chinese populations make sense of the experiences of mental distress, and how this understanding influences their pathways to mental health care. Method We undertook in-depth interviews

  17. Advanced Scale Conditioning Agent (ASCA) Applications: 2012 Experience Update

    Little, Michael-J.; Varrin, Robert-D.; Pellman, Aaron-T.; Kreider, Marc A.

    2012-09-01

    ASCAs are a group of dilute chemical treatments for removing deposited corrosion products from the secondary side of PWR steam generators (SGs). Each ASCA formulation is customized to achieve plant-specific goals that can include: - Partial dissolution and structural modification of the tube scale present on free span surfaces through full bundle treatment, lowering the deposit loading and enhancing SG thermal performance levels through creation of a scale structure marked by increased boiling efficiency, - Softening and partial removal of deposits present in the broached flow holes in the tube support plates, reducing the risks of level oscillations and flow-induced vibration (FIV), - Chemical removal of copper from tube scale and tube sheet deposits, reducing the risk of rapid tube corrosion caused by the oxidized conditions promoted by some copper species, and - Dissolution of hardness species from consolidated top-of-tube sheet (TTS) collars to enhance collar removal through water-jetting and other mechanical cleaning techniques. Regardless of the cleaning objectives for a particular plant, all ASCA processes are designed to minimize corrosion, waste disposal costs, and impact on the outage schedule. To date, about 40 ASCA applications have been carried out in four (4) countries. This paper provides an update of the industry experience gained during these applications, including results demonstrating the ability of ASCA processes to meet the goals outlined above. Experience at multiple units, including several repeat ASCA applications, has demonstrated significant heat-transfer benefits (i.e., steam pressure increases of up to 1-2 bar (15-30 psi)). ASCA applications also regularly achieve significant reductions in TSP blockage (i.e., up to 30% absolute increases in available flow area in broached flow holes) and have been successful in eliminating level oscillations caused by excessive broached-hole blockage. (authors)

  18. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology membership experience with allergen immunotherapy safety in patients with specific medical conditions.

    Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée E S; Hauswirth, David W; Calabria, Christopher W; Sher, Lawrence D; Rank, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Little data in the literature exist concerning patients with certain underlying medical conditions who receive allergen subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). To survey allergists' experience with SCIT in patients with medical conditions considered to impose an elevated risk for untoward outcomes. A Web-based survey was conducted among members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology to query about their experience with SCIT in patients with certain medical conditions. There were 1085 replies (21% response), of whom, 86% were U.S. based, 51% were suburban, 31% were academic, 42% were medium-sized practices, and 54% had >15 years' experience. In responders' opinion, SCIT was "contraindicated" in patients with the following: acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (48%), cancer (and still receiving active treatment) (33%), severe asthma (32%), and a history of transplantation (30%). Even so, survey responders collectively gave SCIT to >2400 patients for each of these conditions: severe asthma, coronary artery disease, cancer in remission, and autoimmune disorders; and to ≥5400 patients with hypertension and ≥4100 women who became pregnant. The experience of colleagues with these patients rarely resulted in major problems (i.e., activation of underlying disease, systemic reactions to SCIT, or SCIT discontinuation), with the exception of severe asthma (12.5%), initiation of SCIT during pregnancy (5.4%), and AIDS (4.2%). For most other conditions, it was ≤1.5% (e.g., continue during pregnancy, cancer in remission, history of transplantation, positive human immunodeficiency virus and no AIDS). According to the experience of a large group of practicing allergists, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology members, few medical conditions seemed to pose an elevated risk for untoward outcomes from SCIT. Because these are survey results, prospective research might yield even more solid data.

  19. Reported emergency department avoidance, use, and experiences of transgender persons in Ontario, Canada: results from a respondent-driven sampling survey.

    Bauer, Greta R; Scheim, Ayden I; Deutsch, Madeline B; Massarella, Carys

    2014-06-01

    Transgender, transsexual, or transitioned (trans) people have reported avoiding medical care because of negative experiences or fear of such experiences. The extent of trans-specific negative emergency department (ED) experiences, and of ED avoidance, has not been documented. The Trans PULSE Project conducted a survey of trans people in Ontario, Canada (n=433) in 2009 to 2010, using respondent-driven sampling, a tracked network-based method for studying hidden populations. Weighted frequencies and bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for the trans population in Ontario and for the subgroup (n=167) reporting ED use in their felt gender. Four hundred eight participants completed the ED experience items. Trans people were young (34% aged 16 to 24 years and only 10% >55 years); approximately half were female-to-male and half male-to-female. Medically supervised hormones were used by 37% (95% CI 30% to 46%), and 27% (95% CI 20% to 35%) had at least 1 transition-related surgery. Past-year ED need was reported by 33% (95% CI 26% to 40%) of trans Ontarians, though only 71% (95% CI 40% to 91%) of those with self-reported need indicated that they were able to obtain care. An estimated 21% (95% CI 14% to 25%) reported ever avoiding ED care because of a perception that their trans status would negatively affect such an encounter. Trans-specific negative ED experiences were reported by 52% (95% CI 34% to 72%) of users presenting in their felt gender. This first exploratory analysis of ED avoidance, utilization, and experiences by trans persons documented ED avoidance and possible unmet need for emergency care among trans Ontarians. Additional research, including validation of measures, is needed. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. First experience in operating the population of the condition databases for the CMS experiment

    De Gruttola, Michele; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Di Guida, Salvatore; Glege, Frank; Innocente, Vincenzo; Schlatter, Dieter; Futyan, David; Govi, Giacomo; Pierro, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Reliable population of the condition databases is critical for the correct operation of the online selection as well as of the offline reconstruction and analysis of data. We will describe here the system put in place in the CMS experiment to populate the database and make condition data promptly available both online for the high-level trigger and offline for reconstruction. The system, designed for high flexibility to cope with very different data sources, uses POOL-ORA technology in order to store data in an object format that best matches the object oriented paradigm for C++ programming language used in the CMS offline software. In order to ensure consistency among the various subdetectors, a dedicated package, PopCon (Populator of Condition Objects), is used to store data online. The data are then automatically streamed to the offline database hence immediately accessible offline worldwide. This mechanism was intensively used during 2008 in the test-runs with cosmic rays. The experience of this first months of operation will be discussed in detail.

  1. Night sky luminance under clear sky conditions: Theory vs. experiment

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Sky glow is caused by both natural phenomena and factors of anthropogenic origin, and of the latter ground-based light sources are the most important contributors for they emit the spatially linked spectral radiant intensity distribution of artificial light sources, which are further modulated by local atmospheric optics and perceived as the diffuse light of a night sky. In other words, sky glow is closely related to a city's shape and pattern of luminaire distribution, in practical effect an almost arbitrary deployment of random orientation of heterogeneous electrical light sources. Thus the luminance gradation function measured in a suburban zone or near the edges of a city is linked to the City Pattern or vice versa. It is shown that clear sky luminance/radiance data recorded in an urban area can be used to retrieve the bulk luminous/radiant intensity distribution if some a-priori information on atmospheric aerosols is available. For instance, the single scattering albedo of aerosol particles is required under low turbidity conditions, as demonstrated on a targeted experiment in the city of Frýdek-Mistek. One of the main advantages of the retrieval method presented in this paper is that the single scattering approximation is satisfactorily accurate in characterizing the light field near the ground because the dominant contribution to the sky glow has originated from beams propagated along short optical paths. - Highlights: • Urban sky glow is interpreted in terms of city emission function. • Luminance function in a suburban zone is linked to the City Pattern. • Single scattering approximation is applicable in modeling urban sky glow. • Information on aerosols represents valuable inputs to the retrieval procedure. • Sky glow patterns vary with light source distribution and spectral emission

  2. Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility

    Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be

  3. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Heating, Refrigeration, & Air Conditioning.

    Carey, John

    This Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning course is comprised of eleven individualized units: (1) Refrigeration Tools, Materials, and Refrigerant; (2) Basic Heating and Air Conditioning; (3) Sealed System Repairs; (4) Basic Refrigeration Systems; (5) Compression Systems and Compressors; (6) Refrigeration Controls; (7) Electric Circuit…

  4. Ebola exposure, illness experience, and Ebola antibody prevalence in international responders to the West African Ebola epidemic 2014-2016: A cross-sectional study.

    Catherine F Houlihan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare and other front-line workers are at particular risk of infection with Ebola virus (EBOV. Despite the large-scale deployment of international responders, few cases of Ebola virus disease have been diagnosed in this group. Since asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic infection has been described, it is plausible that infections have occurred in healthcare workers but have escaped being diagnosed. We aimed to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic infection, and of exposure events, among returned responders to the West African Ebola epidemic 2014-2016.We used snowball sampling to identify responders who had returned to the UK or Ireland, and used an online consent and questionnaire to determine their exposure to EBOV and their experience of illness. Oral fluid collection devices were sent and returned by post, and samples were tested using an EBOV IgG capture assay that detects IgG to Ebola glycoprotein. Blood was collected from returnees with reactive samples for further testing. Unexposed UK controls were also recruited. In all, 300 individuals consented, of whom 268 (89.3% returned an oral fluid sample (OFS. The majority had worked in Sierra Leone in clinical, laboratory, research, and other roles. Fifty-three UK controls consented and provided samples using the same method. Of the returnees, 47 (17.5% reported that they had had a possible EBOV exposure. Based on their free-text descriptions, using a published risk assessment method, we classified 43 (16% as having had incidents with risk of Ebola transmission, including five intermediate-risk and one high-risk exposure. Of the returnees, 57 (21% reported a febrile or diarrhoeal illness in West Africa or within 1 mo of return, of whom 40 (70% were not tested at the time for EBOV infection. Of the 268 OFSs, 266 were unreactive. Two returnees, who did not experience an illness in West Africa or on return, had OFSs that were reactive on the EBOV IgG capture assay, with

  5. Responding to Mechanical Antigravity

    Millis, Marc G.; Thomas, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experiences of the NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project, suggestions are offered for constructively responding to proposals that purport breakthrough propulsion using mechanical devices. Because of the relatively large number of unsolicited submissions received (about 1 per workday) and because many of these involve similar concepts, this report is offered to help the would-be submitters make genuine progress as well as to help reviewers respond to such submissions. Devices that use oscillating masses or gyroscope falsely appear to create net thrust through differential friction or by misinterpreting torques as linear forces. To cover both the possibility of an errant claim and a genuine discovery, reviews should require that submitters meet minimal thresholds of proof before engaging in further correspondence; such as achieving sustained deflection of a level-platform pendulum in the case of mechanical thrusters.

  6. Conflicting goals of wilderness management: natural conditions vs. natural experiences

    Alan E. Watson; Michael J. Niccolucci

    1995-01-01

    Beliefs and attitudes underlying wilderness visitors’ support for use restrictions were studied. Some evidence shows that in overused places visitors cite both protection of the resource and the wilderness experience as reasons for supporting restrictions. The research reported here provides the opportunity to assess the relative contribution of each of these reasons,...

  7. Progesterone protects normative anxiety-like responding among ovariectomized female mice that conditionally express the HIV-1 regulatory protein, Tat, in the CNS.

    Paris, Jason J; Fenwick, Jason; McLaughlin, Jay P

    2014-05-01

    Increased anxiety is co-morbid with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Actions of the neurotoxic HIV-1 regulatory protein, Tat, may contribute to affective dysfunction. We hypothesized that Tat expression would increase anxiety-like behavior of female GT-tg bigenic mice that express HIV-1 Tat protein in the brain in a doxycycline-dependent manner. Furthermore, given reports that HIV-induced anxiety may occur at lower rates among women, and that the neurotoxic effects of Tat are ameliorated by sex steroids in vitro, we hypothesized that 17β-estradiol and/or progesterone would ameliorate Tat-induced anxiety-like effects. Among naturally-cycling proestrous and diestrous mice, Tat-induction via 7days of doxycycline treatment significantly increased anxiety-like responding in an open field, elevated plus maze and a marble-burying task, compared to treatment with saline. Proestrous mice demonstrated less anxiety-like behavior than diestrous mice in the open field and elevated plus maze, but these effects did not significantly interact with Tat-induction. Among ovariectomized mice, doxycycline-induced Tat protein significantly increased anxiety-like behavior in an elevated plus maze and a marble burying task compared to saline-treated mice, but not an open field (where anxiety-like responding was already maximal). Co-administration of progesterone (4mg/kg), but not 17β-estradiol (0.09mg/kg), with doxycycline significantly ameliorated anxiety-like responding in the elevated plus maze and marble burying tasks. When administered together, 17β-estradiol partially antagonized the protective effects of progesterone on Tat-induced anxiety-like behavior. These findings support evidence of steroid-protection over HIV-1 proteins, and extend them by demonstrating the protective capacity of progesterone on Tat-induced anxiety-like behavior of ovariectomized female mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hess, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 10 12 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm 3 . In these experiments, up to 5 × 10 10 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm 2 , this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 10 10 . An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source

  9. Superconducting cyclotron deflector conditioning status - an experience with high voltage

    Ghosh, Subhash; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; De, Anirban; Paul, Santanu; Pal, Gautam; Saha, Subimal; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report about the status of the electrostatic deflector which will be used in K500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata. For extraction of beams from superconducting cyclotron we have to achieve 130 kV/cm. Titanium and tungsten are used for anode and septum respectively. The deflector fits within the median plane of the superconducting magnet. We report here the voltage limit, sparking rates, dark current levels and the effects observed on conditioning. For commissioning of the superconducting cyclotron, the plan is to accelerate Neon beam of 50 MeV/n for which the required extraction voltage is 81 kV/cm and we reached up to 110 kV/cm. The conditioning test chamber is maintained at a pressure of 8.0 x 10 -7 mbar. (author)

  10. Limb anomaly and associated conditions: our clinical experience

    Ragavan M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Munisamy Ragavan1, Uppalu Haripriya1, Janarthanam Sarvavinothini2, Nagaraja Rao3, Ramamoorthy Gokulkrishnan31Department of Pediatric Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesia, 3Department of Pediatrics, Narayana Medical College and Superspeciality Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: Limb anomalies are a common clinical problem with a various spectrum of involvement. There are many conditions associated with these anomalies. There is a variable extent of involvement in the form of agenesis, overgrowth, and duplication, and there is no standard classification to describe all these lesions. Studying limb anomalies provides insights into limb development which may be useful for etiologic studies and public health monitoring. We pooled our data for 12 limb anomaly cases presenting from January 2008 to May 2009 and investigated their associated conditions. A descriptive system for the nomenclature and classification of congenital limb malformations suitable for clinical, epidemiological, and experimental use is discussed.Keywords: limb anomaly, phocomelia, amelia 

  11. Solid radwaste processing and conditioning. The SGN experience

    Tucoulat, D.; Tchemitcheff, E.

    1993-01-01

    Solid wastes are generated in the operation of the installations in France. These solid wastes display different levels of radioactivity. Some of them arising from research centres or reprocessing plants even contain relatively significant quantities of alpha-bearing radionuclides. In order to produce an ultimate waste package that satisfies the requirements set by safety authorities and the organizations in charge of final waste disposal in the concerned countries, solid waste conditioning takes place in a number of successive steps

  12. Relationship between multiple forms of childhood maltreatment and adult mental health in community respondents: results from the adverse childhood experiences study.

    Edwards, Valerie J; Holden, George W; Felitti, Vincent J; Anda, Robert F

    2003-08-01

    This study examined the prevalence of a history of various combinations of childhood maltreatment types (physical abuse, sexual abuse, and witnessing of maternal battering) among adult members of a health maintenance organization (HMO) and explored the relationship with adult mental health of the combinations of types of childhood maltreatment and emotional abuse in the childhood family environment. A total of 8,667 adult members of an HMO completed measures of childhood exposure to family dysfunction, which included items on physical and sexual abuse, witnessing of maternal battering, and emotional abuse in the childhood family environment. The adults' current mental health was assessed by using the mental health scale of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey. The prevalences of sexual abuse, physical abuse, and witnessing of maternal violence were 21.6%, 20.6%, and 14.0%, respectively, when the maltreatment types were considered separately. Among respondents reporting any of the maltreatment types, 34.6% reported more than one type of maltreatment. Lower mean mental health scores were associated with higher numbers of abuse categories (mean=78.5, 75.5, 72.8, and 69.9 for respondents with no, one, two, and three abuse types, respectively). Both an emotionally abusive family environment and the interaction of an emotionally abusive family environment with the various maltreatment types had a significant effect on mental health scores. Childhood physical and sexual abuse, as well as witnessing of maternal battering, were common among the adult members of an HMO in this study. Among those reporting any maltreatment, more than one-third had experienced more than one type of maltreatment. A dose-response relation was found between the number of types of maltreatment reported and mental health scores. In addition, an emotionally abusive family environment accentuated the decrements in mental health scores. Future research examining the effects of

  13. Conditioning radium needles for long term storage : Sri Lankan experience

    Ranjith, H.L.A.; Shantha, T.H.S.; Gunaratne, M.G.J.; De Silva, U.W.K.H.; Perera, H.P.H.

    2000-01-01

    Radium the first radioisotope invented by Madame Curie was used for cancer therapy for the intracavitory treatment of cervical cancers and as oral implants etc. Radium needles and other geometries were made in standard strengths and Radium therapy enjoyed a heyday during the 1st half of the 20th century. Radium-226 is a long-lived radioactive material with a half-life of 1600 years. The use of radium was abandoned in the world in 1980s with the invention of short lived radioactive materials offering remote after loading systems which minimise radiation protection and waste disposal problems associated with long lived radioactive materials. This paper reports the conditioning procedure of the spent radium sources for long term storage (less than 20 years) and transport to national/ international stores if needed. The dose received by those involved in this exercise is also discussed in terms of radiation protection. The Ra was contained for long term storage according to international radiation safety regulations with a surface dose of less than 2 mSv per hour in a conditioned package having 17.5 GBq activity and can be transported to national/international stores if needed. The highest dose received during the exercise is well within the recommended dose limits for occupational exposures (20 and 500 mSv per year) for whole body and extremities respectively

  14. Experiences on vacuum conditioning in the cryostat of KSTAR tokamak

    Kim, Kwang Pyo, E-mail: kpkim@nfri.er.ke [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Woo, I.S.; Chang, Y.B.; Kwag, S.W.; Song, N.H.; Bang, E.N.; Hong, J.S.; Chu, Y.; Park, K.R. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The vacuum of the cryostat has been stably maintained during the KSTAR operation. ► The detected cold leak at the PF/CS coils and CS structure. ► The present helium leak makes no issue for the cryostat operation. -- Abstract: Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device has been successfully operated for the plasma experiment from KSTAR 1st campaign to 4th campaign. The main pumping system for the cryostat has to maintain the target pressure below 1.0 × 10{sup −4} mbar at room temperature and 1.0 × 10{sup −5} mbar at extremely low temperature for the plasma experiment against the air leak coming from ports of vessel and/or the helium leak from cooling loops in the cryostat. No leak has been detected at room temperature. Unexpectedly, the cold-leak appeared in the cryostat at temperature around 50 K during the cool-down in the KSTAR 2nd campaign. We carefully analyzed the characteristics of detected cold leak because it can cause the increase of the base pressure in the cryostat. After the cool-down, the leak detection was performed to locate the position and size of the leak by the pressurizing the loops. As a result, it is found that the cold leak was located at cooling loops for PF/CS coils and CS structure. Nevertheless, the vacuum inside the cryostat was well maintained below 6.0 × 10{sup −8} mbar during the entire operation period. The impact of the He-leak in present status on the plasma operation is negligible. However, we have found that the leak rate increases as a function of time. Therefore careful monitoring on cold-leak is an important technical issue for the operation of superconducting tokamak.

  15. CO2/ brine substitution experiments at simulated reservoir conditions

    Kummerow, Juliane; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Capillary properties of rocks affect the mobility of fluids in a reservoir. Therefore, the understanding of the capillary pressure behaviour is essential to assess the long-term behaviour of CO2 reservoirs. Beyond this, a calibration of the petrophysical properties on water saturation of reservoir rocks at simulated in situ conditions is crucial for a proper interpretation of field monitoring data. We present a set-up, which allows for the combined measurements of capillary pressure, electric resistivity, and elastic wave velocities under controlled reservoir conditions (pconf = 400 bar, ppore = 180 bar, T = 65 ° C) at different brine-CO2 saturations. The capillary properties of the samples are measured using the micropore membrane technique. The sample is jacketed with a Viton tube (thickness = 4 mm) and placed between two current electrode endcaps, which as well contain pore fluid ports and ultrasonic P and S wave transducers. Between the sample and the lower endcap the hydrophilic semi-permeable micro-pore membrane (pore size = 100 nm) is integrated. It is embedded into filter papers to establish a good capillary contact and to protect the highly sensitive membrane against mechanical damage under load. Two high-precision syringe pumps are used to displace a quantified volume of brine by CO2 and determine the corresponding sample saturation. The fluid displacement induces a pressure gradient along the sample, which corresponds to the capillary pressure at a particular sample saturation. It is measured with a differential pressure sensor in the range between 0 - 0.2 MPa. Drainage and imbibition cycles are performed to provide information on the efficiency of capillary trapping and to get a calibration of the petrophysical parameters of the sample.

  16. Radiological conditions and experiences in the TMI-2 Auxiliary Building

    Ruhter, P.E.; Zurliene, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Although the radiological conditions following the TMI-2 accident were extraordinary, those that had a potential impact on personnel were largely confined to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building. The most significant pathway was the Letdown and Make-Up and Purification System. Dose rates in some locations in the Aux/Fuel Handling Buildings were in excess of 3 mSv/s (1000 R/h) during the first few days following the accident. They decreased after three to four days and stabilized after about one week. Airborne radioactivity levels were initially due to the release of noble gases, and subsequently due to resuspension of surface contamination. During the first month, the mixture of fission products in the reactor coolant change from one of largely cesium to where the strontium and cesium were about equal in radiological importance. This created some very high beta radiation levels. The significant strontium levels caused the contamination control limit to be reduced to one-half of the pre-accident limit. 5 refs., 6 figs

  17. Downscaling ocean conditions: Experiments with a quasi-geostrophic model

    Katavouta, A.; Thompson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    The predictability of small-scale ocean variability, given the time history of the associated large-scales, is investigated using a quasi-geostrophic model of two wind-driven gyres separated by an unstable, mid-ocean jet. Motivated by the recent theoretical study of Henshaw et al. (2003), we propose a straightforward method for assimilating information on the large-scale in order to recover the small-scale details of the quasi-geostrophic circulation. The similarity of this method to the spectral nudging of limited area atmospheric models is discussed. Results from the spectral nudging of the quasi-geostrophic model, and an independent multivariate regression-based approach, show that important features of the ocean circulation, including the position of the meandering mid-ocean jet and the associated pinch-off eddies, can be recovered from the time history of a small number of large-scale modes. We next propose a hybrid approach for assimilating both the large-scales and additional observed time series from a limited number of locations that alone are too sparse to recover the small scales using traditional assimilation techniques. The hybrid approach improved significantly the recovery of the small-scales. The results highlight the importance of the coupling between length scales in downscaling applications, and the value of assimilating limited point observations after the large-scales have been set correctly. The application of the hybrid and spectral nudging to practical ocean forecasting, and projecting changes in ocean conditions on climate time scales, is discussed briefly.

  18. Dishonest responding or true virtue?

    Zettler, Ingo; Hilbig, Benjamin E.; Moshagen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    but troubling proposition that high scores in impression management scales actually reflect honesty rather than dishonest responding. In line with findings indicating that respondents answer to personality questionnaires rather accurately in typical low demand situations, we herein suggest that high impression...... management scores indeed reflect true virtues rather than dishonesty under such conditions. We found support for this idea by replicating previous correlations between impression management scores and virtue-related basic personality traits (including honesty-humility), and additionally provided conclusive...

  19. Cómo responder a una epidemia de dengue: visión global y experiencia en Puerto Rico How to respond to a dengue epidemic: overview and experience in Puerto Rico

    José G. Rigau-Pérez

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue, a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes, is endemic and frequently epidemic in many tropical countries. Because low-incidence periods vary in length, it is difficult to know in advance when an epidemic will occur. Response efforts, despite being logical, have been counter-productive at times. Furthermore, experience has demonstrated that dengue epidemics last a long time, making it important that government control efforts be sustainable while they last. This article describes priority activities requiring attention in order to minimize the impact of dengue epidemics. Such activities, which in many cases can be adapted to combat other types of epidemics as well, are as follows: (1 establishment of an inter-sectoral action committee, (2 formalization of an emergency action plan, (3 epidemiologic surveillance, (4 diagnostic laboratory testing, (5 mosquito control, (6 protection of sources of employment and special populations, (7 patient care, (8 education of medical personnel, (9 research, and (10 transparency before the mass media. The best way to reduce the ravaging effects of dengue epidemics is to anticipate their emergence so that infection can be prevented and steps can be taken to protect the ill. Relying on improvisation to solve all the problems that arise in moments of crisis is inefficient and reckless.

  20. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical experience, and outcome requirements for initial approval of transplant centers. 482.80 Section... Hospitals Transplant Center Data Submission, Clinical Experience, and Outcome Requirements § 482.80 Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for initial...

  1. Pharmacological Modulation of 5-HT2C Receptor Activity Produces Bidirectional Changes in Locomotor Activity, Responding for a Conditioned Reinforcer, and Mesolimbic DA Release in C57BL/6 Mice.

    Browne, Caleb J; Ji, Xiaodong; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J; Harvey-Lewis, Colin

    2017-10-01

    Converging lines of behavioral, electrophysiological, and biochemical evidence suggest that 5-HT 2C receptor signaling may bidirectionally influence reward-related behavior through an interaction with the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system. Here we directly test this hypothesis by examining how modulating 5-HT 2C receptor activity affects DA-dependent behaviors and relate these effects to changes in nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA release. In C57BL/6 mice, locomotor activity and responding for a conditioned reinforcer (CRf), a measure of incentive motivation, were examined following treatment with three 5-HT 2C receptor ligands: the agonist CP809101 (0.25-3 mg/kg), the antagonist SB242084 (0.25-1 mg/kg), or the antagonist/inverse agonist SB206553 (1-5 mg/kg). We further tested whether doses of these compounds that changed locomotor activity and responding for a CRf (1 mg/kg CP809101, 0.5 mg/kg SB242084, or 2.5 mg/kg SB206553) also altered NAc DA release using in vivo microdialysis in anesthetized mice. CP809101 reduced locomotor activity, responding for a CRf, and NAc DA release. In contrast, both SB242084 and SB206553 enhanced locomotor activity, responding for a CRf, and NAc DA release, although higher doses of SB206553 produced opposite behavioral effects. Pretreatment with the non-selective DA receptor antagonist α-flupenthixol prevented SB242084 from enhancing responding for a CRf. Thus blocking tonic 5-HT 2C receptor signaling can release serotonergic inhibition of mesolimbic DA activity and enhance reward-related behavior. The observed bidirectional effects of 5-HT 2C receptor ligands may have important implications when considering the 5-HT 2C receptor as a therapeutic target for psychiatric disorders, particularly those presenting with motivational dysfunctions.

  2. Portraying mental illness and drug addiction as treatable health conditions: effects of a randomized experiment on stigma and discrimination.

    McGinty, Emma E; Goldman, Howard H; Pescosolido, Bernice; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-02-01

    Despite significant advances in treatment, stigma and discrimination toward persons with mental illness and drug addiction have remained constant in past decades. Prior work suggests that portraying other stigmatized health conditions (i.e., HIV/AIDS) as treatable can improve public attitudes toward those affected. Our study compared the effects of vignettes portraying persons with untreated and symptomatic versus successfully treated and asymptomatic mental illness and drug addiction on several dimensions of public attitudes about these conditions. We conducted a survey-embedded randomized experiment using a national sample (N = 3940) from an online panel. Respondents were randomly assigned to read one of ten vignettes. Vignette one was a control vignette, vignettes 2-5 portrayed individuals with untreated schizophrenia, depression, prescription pain medication addiction and heroin addiction, and vignettes 6-10 portrayed successfully treated individuals with the same conditions. After reading the randomly assigned vignette, respondents answered questions about their attitudes related to mental illness or drug addiction. Portrayals of untreated and symptomatic schizophrenia, depression, and heroin addiction heightened negative public attitudes toward persons with mental illness and drug addiction. In contrast, portrayals of successfully treated schizophrenia, prescription painkiller addiction, and heroin addiction led to less desire for social distance, greater belief in the effectiveness of treatment, and less willingness to discriminate against persons with these conditions. Portrayal of persons with successfully treated mental illness and drug addiction is a promising strategy for reducing stigma and discrimination toward persons with these conditions and improving public perceptions of treatment effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Parents' experiences of living with a child with a long-term condition: a rapid structured review of the literature.

    Smith, Joanna; Cheater, Francine; Bekker, Hilary

    2015-08-01

    Living with a child with a long-term condition can result in challenges above usual parenting because of illness-specific demands. A critical evaluation of research exploring parents' experiences of living with a child with a long-term condition is timely because international health policy advocates that patients with long-term conditions become active collaborators in care decisions. A rapid structured review was undertaken (January 1999-December 2009) in accordance with the United Kingdom Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidance. Three data bases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO) were searched and also hand searching of the Journal of Advanced Nursing and Child: Care, Health and Development. Primary research studies written in English language describing parents' experiences of living with a child with a long-term condition were included. Thematic analysis underpinned data synthesis. Quality appraisal involved assessing each study against predetermined criteria. Thirty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. The impact of living with a child with a long-term condition related to dealing with immediate concerns following the child's diagnosis and responding to the challenges of integrating the child's needs into family life. Parents' perceived they are not always supported in their quest for information and forming effective relationships with health-care professionals can be stressful. Although having ultimate responsibility for their child's health can be overwhelming, parents developed considerable expertise in managing their child's condition. Parents' accounts suggest they not always supported in their role as manager for their child's long-term condition and their expertise, and contribution to care is not always valued. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Medical privacy and the disclosure of personal medical information: the beliefs and experiences of those with genetic and other clinical conditions.

    Kass, Nancy E; Hull, Sara Chandros; Natowicz, Marvin R; Faden, Ruth R; Plantinga, Laura; Gostin, Lawrence O; Slutsman, Julia

    2004-07-30

    There has been heightened legislative attention to medical privacy and to protections from genetic discrimination, without large-scale studies to document privacy concerns or analysis of whether experiences differ by whether the condition is genetic (defined here as a single-gene disorder) or non-genetic. To determine whether experiences regarding privacy, disclosure, and consequences of disclosure differ by whether one's medical condition is genetic, we conducted a descriptive study with one-time, structured quantitative and qualitative interviews. We interviewed approximately 100 adults or parents of children with each of the following medical conditions: sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and HIV, and 200 adults with or at risk for breast cancer or colon cancer. The percentages of the total 597 respondents experiencing positive or negative consequences of disclosure and the degree to which experiences differed by whether the condition was genetic were the outcomes of interest. Seventy-four percent were glad and 13% regretted others knew about their condition; these findings did not differ significantly by genetic vs. non-genetic condition. Reports of job and health insurance discrimination were not uncommon for the overall study population (19 and 27%, respectively) but were more likely among those with genetic conditions (30 and 37%, respectively). Legislation and other policy-making should target the needs of persons with all conditions and not focus exclusively on genetic discrimination, given that experiences and concerns generally do not differ based on the genetic etiology of the condition. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Wild trout responses to a stress experience following confinement conditions during the spawning season

    Gilberto Forneris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmo (trutta marmoratus is an endemic specie in the North of Italy, subjected to hybridization with domesticated strains of trout. Native populations are managed by supportive release in the rivers. Wild breeders are captured, confined in facility for short periods and then released in the river after artificial fertilization. Premature mortality during confinement and post release mortality in river have been observed in breeders supporting the view that confinement stress could be the cause. Twenty-six adult individuals of trout were captured from a river by electrofishing and stocked in two tanks, the first one (RF provided with artificial refuges to simulate the natural environment and covered by dark panels; the second tank (TR was only partially covered by dark panels and without artificial refuges. All the other conditions were identical and animals were fed ad libitum with natural food collected in the same river. After 50 days, from a third group of 8 trout (WD captured in the same river by a 5 minute electrofishing session, blood samples were sequentially collected for the assessment of serum cortisol response to serial repeated handlings. With the same sequential method, individuals of the RF and TR experimental groups were sampled. Cortisol levels were compared between groups by ANOVA. Biomass densities decreased during the experiment due to premature mortality of the largest individuals in both the RF (7.69% and TR (30.77% groups. At the end of the experiment, data clearly demonstrated that after a stressing confinement, the TR group shown a reduced poststress response to the successive serial handlings. Vice versa the group RF, that experienced a more careful confinement, responded to the second serial acute stressing manipulation in conformity as the group WD that was not confined. Cortisol data support the hypothesis of impaired cortisol response as a consequence of oversecretion due to uneasiness during the short

  6. Does contingency in adults' responding influence 12-month-old infants' social referencing?

    Stenberg, Gunilla

    2017-11-01

    In two experiments we examined the influence of contingent versus non-contingent responding on infant social referencing behavior. EXPERIMENT 1: Forty 12-month-old infants were exposed to an ambiguous toy in a social referencing situation. In one condition an unfamiliar adult who in a previous play situation had responded contingently to the infant's looks gave the infant positive information about the toy. In the other condition an unfamiliar adult who previously had not responded contingently delivered the positive information. EXPERIMENT 2: Forty-eight 12-month-old infants participated in Experiment 2. In this experiment it was examined whether the familiarity of the adult influences infants' reactions to contingency in responding. In one condition a parent who previously had responded contingently to the infant's looks provided positive information about the ambiguous toy, and in the other condition a parent who previously had not responded contingently provided the positive information. The infants looked more at the contingent experimenter in Experimenter 1, and also played more with the toy after receiving positive information from the contingent experimenter. No differences in looking at the parent and in playing with the toy were found in Experiment 2. The results indicate that contingency in responding, as well as the familiarity of the adult, influence infants' social referencing behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conditional Responding is Impaired in Chronic Alcoholics

    Hildebrandt, H.; Brokate, B.; Hoffmann, E.; Kröger, B.; Eling, P.A.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Bechara (2003) describes a model for disturbances in executive functions related to addiction. This model involves deficits in decision-making and in suppressing pre-potent representations or response patterns. We tested this model in 29 individuals with longterm heavy alcohol dependency and

  8. Triaxial slide-hold-slide shear experiment of sedimentary rock under drain condition

    Kishida, Kiyoshi; Yano, Takao; Elsworth, Derek; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Nakashima, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    When discussing the mechanical and hydro-mechanical properties of rock masses under the long-term holding, the variation of rock structure and the change of shear band condition should be discussed in considering the effect of thermal and chemical influences. In this research, the triaxial shear experiment under drain condition was conducted through sedimentary rock, and in the residual stress state, the slide-hold-slide processes were applied to these triaxial experiments. The experiments were carried out in 3 kinds of confining conditions and 2 kinds of thermal conditions. Consequently, the healing phenomena can be observed and the shear strength recovery is also confirmed in process of the holding time. (author)

  9. Long-term durability experiments with concrete-based waste packages in simulated repository conditions

    Ipatti, A.

    1993-03-01

    Two extensive experiments on long-term durability of waste packages in simulated repository conditions are described. The first one is a 'half-scale experiment' comprising radioactive waste product and half-scale concrete containers in site specific groundwater conditions. The second one is 'full-scale experiment' including simulated inactive waste product and full-scale concrete container stored in slowly flowing fresh water. The scope of the experiments is to demonstrate long-term behaviour of the designed waste packages in contact with moderately concrete aggressive groundwater, and to evaluate the possible interactions between the waste product, concrete container and ground water. As the waste packages are made of high-quality concrete, provisions have been made to continue the experiments for several years

  10. Fathers' experiences of their child's life-limiting condition: An attachment narrative perspective.

    Bailey-Pearce, Oliver; Stedmon, Jacqui; Dallos, Rudi; Davis, George

    2017-09-01

    When a child has a life-limiting illness, parental involvement is amplified, having to respond to the increased needs of the child. Both parents are affected by the illness, yet research has largely under-represented fathers' experiences of their child's illness. Seven fathers were interviewed about their experiences with their child's life-limiting illness. In addition, fathers' attachment strategies were assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview. Narrative analysis was implemented to explore the interviews, and indicators of attachment markers employed in the Adult Attachment Interview were also identified. The dominant themes were found to be 'experience of the diagnosis', 'living with the illness', 'struggling with emotions' and 'relationship with staff'. Within each theme, there were differences which related to the father's attachment strategies. This was particularly evident in parts of their narratives recounting critical moments of threat and anxiety in the course of discovering and adjusting to their child's illness. Importantly, the findings also suggested that the experience for the fathers stressed, and in some cases disrupted, their attachment coping strategies. All fathers told stories of trying to get it right for their children and family. Their experiences of, and adjustment to, the illness were related to their attachment strategies. The clinical implications for health professionals are discussed.

  11. Handling of time-critical Conditions Data in the CMS experiment - Experience of the first year of data taking

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Data management for a wide category of non-event data plays a critical role in the operation of the CMS experiment. The processing chain (data taking-reconstruction-analysis) relies in the prompt availability of specific, time dependent data describing the state of the various detectors and their calibration parameters, which are treated separately from event data. The Condition Database system is the infrastructure established to handle these data and to make sure that they are available to both offline and online workflows. The Condition Data layout is designed such that the payload data (the Condition) is associated to an Interval Of Validity (IOV). The IOV allows accessing selectively the sets corresponding to specific intervals of time, run number or luminosity section. Both payloads and IOVs are stored in a cluster of relational database servers (Oracle) using an object-relational access approach. The strict requirements of security and isolation of the CMS online systems are imposing a redundant archit...

  12. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    Scalerandi, M; Delsanto, P P; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model

  13. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    Scalerandi, M; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model.

  14. Choosing the best meteorological conditions for atmospheric diffusion experiments at the Angra site

    Nicolli, D.; Thomas, P.

    1983-01-01

    The most appropriate meteorological conditions and time of the day advisable for carrying out diffusion experiments at the Angra site are described. Two emission points were defined, and the sampling area was determined with easy access to the complex terrain taken into consideration. The onsite meteorological measuring system is briefly described. (Author) [pt

  15. Attitudes towards the use of GMOs in food production and willingness to buy cheese produced using GMOs for respondents with and without tasting experience

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Lähteenmäki, Lisa

    European consumers are sceptical towards genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and their willingness to buy such products is low. Previous research also shows that these attitudes are quite resistant to attempts to change them by giving additional information. The aim of the s......European consumers are sceptical towards genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and their willingness to buy such products is low. Previous research also shows that these attitudes are quite resistant to attempts to change them by giving additional information. The aim...... of the study was to investigate if actual sensory experience with a (purportedly) GMO-based food product would influence consumers' attitude towards the use of GMOs in food production. An experiment was conducted in which subjects in the experimental group tasted cheeses, one of which was labelled as 'produced...... using GMOs.' The cheeses were selected in a way that ensured that the subject had a sensory preference for the GMO cheese. A control group tasted cheeses that were unlabelled. After the tasting, subjects completed a conjoint analysis task about cheese, in which the type of starter culture used (GMO...

  16. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  17. Experience with the Open Source based implementation for ATLAS Conditions Data Management System

    Amorim, A; Oliveira, C; Pedro, L; Barros, N

    2003-01-01

    Conditions Data in high energy physics experiments is frequently seen as every data needed for reconstruction besides the event data itself. This includes all sorts of slowly evolving data like detector alignment, calibration and robustness, and data from detector control system. Also, every Conditions Data Object is associated with a time interval of validity and a version. Besides that, quite often is useful to tag collections of Conditions Data Objects altogether. These issues have already been investigated and a data model has been proposed and used for different implementations based in commercial DBMSs, both at CERN and for the BaBar experiment. The special case of the ATLAS complex trigger that requires online access to calibration and alignment data poses new challenges that have to be met using a flexible and customizable solution more in the line of Open Source components. Motivated by the ATLAS challenges we have developed an alternative implementation, based in an Open Source RDBMS. Several issues...

  18. Responding to Tragedy

    Coopman, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author, a superintendent of Clark-Pleasant School Corporation in Whiteland, Indiana, relates how she and the school community responded to a car accident that killed two students. The author stresses the need to develop a comprehensive crisis plan. It is also important to be sensitive to the needs of family members who are…

  19. Responding to Misbehavior

    Telep, Valya Goodwin, 1955-

    2009-01-01

    This series of lessons was prepared for parents like you - parents who want to do a better job of disciplining their children. The lessons were especially written for parents of preschool children, ages two to six, but some of the discipline methods are appropriate for older children, too. This lesson focuses on responding to misbehavior.

  20. Keeping the secret: Insights from repeated catchment-scale tracer experiments under transient conditions

    Bogner, Christina; Hauhs, Michael; Lange, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Catchment-level tracer experiments are generally performed to identify site-specific hydrological response functions of the catchment. The existence and uniqueness of these response functions are hardly ever questioned. Here, we report on a series of replicated tracer experiments in two small first-order catchments, G1 (0.6 ha, roofed) and F4 (2.3 ha, without roof) at Gårdsjön in SW Sweden. The soils in both catchments are shallow (500 m2) the experiments were done without a roof mostly at transient conditions. The catchment F4 was equipped with a sprinkler system with a watering capacity of around 38-45 m3 day-1. Natural rainfall comes in addition. A bromide tracer solution was injected to groundwater at a single location about 40 m upstream the weir over a period of less than an hour, and was monitored using a set of groundwater tubes and the weir at the outlet over the following 4 days. In addition, discharge was measured. The experiments were repeated each summer from 2007 to 2015. While steady state conditions were guaranteed in G1, steady runoff has been achieved only four times in F4. We investigated tracer recovery rates against cumulated runoff since tracer application. Substantially different transit times and qualitatively different behaviour of the breakthrough curves were observed, even under steady state conditions. In G1, no single system response function could be identified in 5 replicates. Similarly, the catchment response functions in F4 under steady state differed between experiments. However, they remained in a similar range as in G1. Based on these results, we question the identifiability of flow paths and system properties, such as saturated water content or hydrologic transmissivity, at the catchment scale using tracer experiments. Rather, the series demonstrate the utter importance of the initial and boundary conditions which largely determine the response of the system to inert tracer pulses.

  1. Experience of primary care among homeless individuals with mental health conditions.

    Joya G Chrystal

    Full Text Available The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA, one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366 were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005, with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score. Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons' needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers.

  2. Experience of Primary Care among Homeless Individuals with Mental Health Conditions

    Chrystal, Joya G.; Glover, Dawn L.; Young, Alexander S.; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Pollio, David E.; Holt, Cheryl L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa A.; Daigle, Shanette G.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons’ needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers. PMID:25659142

  3. Experiences of patients with chronic gastrointestinal conditions: in their own words

    McCormick Jennifer B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are chronic conditions affecting millions of individuals in the United States. The symptoms are well-documented and can be debilitating. How these chronic gastrointestinal (GI conditions impact the daily lives of those afflicted is not well documented, especially from a patient's perspective. Methods Here we describe data from a series of 22 focus groups held at three different academic medical centers with individuals suffering from chronic GI conditions. All focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed. Two research team members independently analyzed transcripts from each focus group following an agreed upon coding scheme. Results One-hundred-thirty-six individuals participated in our study, all with a chronic GI related condition. They candidly discussed three broad themes that characterize their daily lives: identification of disease and personal identity, medications and therapeutics, and daily adaptations. These all tie to our participants trying to deal with symptoms on a daily basis. We find that a recurrent topic underlying these themes is the dichotomy of experiencing uncertainty and striving for control. Conclusions Study participants' open dialogue and exchange of experiences living with a chronic GI condition provide insight into how these conditions shape day-to-day activities. Our findings provide fertile ground for discussions about how clinicians might best facilitate, acknowledge, and elicit patients' stories in routine care to better address their experience of illness.

  4. The experiences of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in facing and learning about their clinical conditions.

    Fujino, Haruo; Iwata, Yuko; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Imura, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Patients experience extreme difficulty when facing an intractable genetic disease. Herein, we examine the experiences of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in facing and learning about their disease. A total of seven patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (age range: 20-48) participated. We conducted in-depth interviews with them about how they learned of their disease and how their feelings regarding the disease changed over time. Transcribed data were analysed using thematic analysis. The following themes emerged from this analysis: "experiences before receiving the diagnosis," "experiences when they learned of their condition and progression of the disease," "supports," and "desired explanations." Anxiety and worry were most pronounced when they had to transition to using wheelchairs or respirators due to disease progression; indeed, such transitions affect the patients psychological adjustment. In such times, support from significant others in their lives helped patients adjust.

  5. COOL, LCG Conditions Database for the LHC Experiments Development and Deployment Status

    Valassi, A; Clemencic, M; Pucciani, G; Schmidt, S A; Wache, M; CERN. Geneva. IT Department, DM

    2009-01-01

    The COOL project provides common software components and tools for the handling of the conditions data of the LHC experiments. It is part of the LCG Persistency Framework (PF), a broader project set up within the context of the LCG Application Area (AA) to devise common persistency solutions for the LHC experiments. COOL software development is the result of the collaboration between the CERN IT Department and ATLAS and LHCb, the two experiments that have chosen it as the basis of their conditions database infrastructure. COOL supports conditions data persistency using several relational technologies (Oracle, MySQL, SQLite and FroNTier), based on the CORAL Common Relational Abstraction Layer. For both experiments, Oracle is the backend used for the deployment of COOL database services at Tier0 and Tier1 sites of the LHC Computing Grid. While the development of new software functionalities is being frozen as LHC operations are ramping up, the main focus for the project in 2008 has shifted to performance optimi...

  6. Control of first-wall surface conditions in the 2XIIB Magnetic Mirror Plasma Confinement experiment

    Simonen, T.C.; Bulmer, R.H.; Coensgen, F.H.

    1976-01-01

    The control of first-wall surface conditions in the 2XIIB Magnetic Mirror Plasma Confinement experiment is described. Before each plasma shot, the first wall is covered with a freshly gettered titanium surface. Up to 5 MW of neutral beam power has been injected into 2XIIB, resulting in first-wall bombardment fluxes of 10 17 atoms . cm -2 . s -1 of 13-keV mean energy deuterium atoms for several ms. The background gas flux is measured with a calibrated, 11-channel, fast-atom detector. Background gas levels are found to depend on surface conditions, injected beam current, and beam pulse duration. For our best operating conditions, an efective reflex coefficient of 0.3 can be inferred from the measurements. Experiments with long-duration and high-current beam injection are limited by charge exchange; however, experiments with shorter beam duration are not limited by first-wall surface conditions. It is concluded that surface effects will be reduced further with smoother walls. (Auth.)

  7. The association between childhood adversities and subsequent first onset of psychotic experiences: a cross-national analysis of 23,998 respondents from 17 countries

    McGrath, J. J.; McLaughlin, K. A.; Saha, S.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S.; Al-Hamzawi, A.; Alonso, J.; Bruffaerts, R.; de Girolamo, G.; de Jonge, P.; Esan, O.; Florescu, S.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; Hu, C.; Karam, E. G.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Lee, S.; Lepine, J.; Lim, C. C. W.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Mneimneh, Z.; Pennell, B.; Piazza, M.; Posada-Villa, J.; Sampson, N.; Viana, M. C.; Xavier, M.; Bromet, E. J.; Kendler, K. S.; Kessler, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although there is robust evidence linking childhood adversities (CAs) and an increased risk for psychotic experiences (PEs), little is known about whether these associations vary across the life-course and whether mental disorders that emerge prior to PEs explain these associations. Methods We assessed CAs, PEs and DSM-IV mental disorders in 23,998 adults in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Discrete-time survival analysis was used to investigate the associations between CAs and PEs, and the influence of mental disorders on these associations using multivariate logistic models. Results Exposure to CAs was common, and those who experienced any CAs had increased odds of later PEs (OR =2.3, 95%CI=1.9–2.6). CAs reflecting maladaptive family functioning (MFF), including abuse, neglect, and parent maladjustment, exhibited the strongest associations with PE onset in all life-course stages. Sexual abuse exhibited a strong association with PE onset during childhood (OR= 8.5, 95%CI=3.6–20.2), whereas other CA types were associated with PE onset in adolescence. Associations of Other CAs with PEs disappeared in adolescence after adjustment for prior-onset mental disorders. The population attributable risk proportion (PARP) for PEs associated with all CAs was 31% (24% for MFF). Conclusions Exposure to CAs is associated with PE onset throughout the life-course, although sexual abuse is most strongly associated with childhood onset PEs. The presence of mental disorders prior to the onset of PEs does not fully explain these associations. The large PARPs suggest that preventing CAs could lead to a meaningful reduction in PEs in the population. PMID:28065209

  8. The association between childhood adversities and subsequent first onset of psychotic experiences: a cross-national analysis of 23 998 respondents from 17 countries.

    McGrath, J J; McLaughlin, K A; Saha, S; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Al-Hamzawi, A; Alonso, J; Bruffaerts, R; de Girolamo, G; de Jonge, P; Esan, O; Florescu, S; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Hu, C; Karam, E G; Kovess-Masfety, V; Lee, S; Lepine, J P; Lim, C C W; Medina-Mora, M E; Mneimneh, Z; Pennell, B E; Piazza, M; Posada-Villa, J; Sampson, N; Viana, M C; Xavier, M; Bromet, E J; Kendler, K S; Kessler, R C

    2017-05-01

    Although there is robust evidence linking childhood adversities (CAs) and an increased risk for psychotic experiences (PEs), little is known about whether these associations vary across the life-course and whether mental disorders that emerge prior to PEs explain these associations. We assessed CAs, PEs and DSM-IV mental disorders in 23 998 adults in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Discrete-time survival analysis was used to investigate the associations between CAs and PEs, and the influence of mental disorders on these associations using multivariate logistic models. Exposure to CAs was common, and those who experienced any CAs had increased odds of later PEs [odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-2.6]. CAs reflecting maladaptive family functioning (MFF), including abuse, neglect, and parent maladjustment, exhibited the strongest associations with PE onset in all life-course stages. Sexual abuse exhibited a strong association with PE onset during childhood (OR 8.5, 95% CI 3.6-20.2), whereas Other CA types were associated with PE onset in adolescence. Associations of other CAs with PEs disappeared in adolescence after adjustment for prior-onset mental disorders. The population attributable risk proportion (PARP) for PEs associated with all CAs was 31% (24% for MFF). Exposure to CAs is associated with PE onset throughout the life-course, although sexual abuse is most strongly associated with childhood-onset PEs. The presence of mental disorders prior to the onset of PEs does not fully explain these associations. The large PARPs suggest that preventing CAs could lead to a meaningful reduction in PEs in the population.

  9. Preliminary experiment design of graphite dust emission measurement under accident conditions for HTGR

    Peng, Wei, E-mail: pengwei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Tao; Sun, Qi; Wang, Jie [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A theoretical analysis is used to predict the total graphite dust release for an AVR LOCA. • Similarity criteria must be satisfied between the experiment and the actual HTGR system. • Model experiments should be conducted to predict the graphite dust resuspension rate. - Abstract: The graphite dust movement behavior is significant for the safety analyses of high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The graphite dust release for accident conditions is an important source term for HTGR safety analyses. Depressurization release tests are not practical in HTGR because of a radioactivity release to the environment. Thus, a theoretical analysis and similarity principles were used to design a group of modeling experiments. Modeling experiments for fan start-up and depressurization process and actual experiments of helium circulator start-up in an HTGR were used to predict the rate of graphite dust resuspension and the graphite dust concentration, which can be used to predict the graphite dust release during accidents. The modeling experiments are easy to realize and the helium circulator start-up test does not harm the reactor system or the environment, so this experiment program is easily achieved. The revised Rock’n’Roll model was then used to calculate the AVR reactor release. The calculation results indicate that the total graphite dust releases during a LOCA will be about 0.65 g in AVR.

  10. Building without a plan: the career experiences of Australian strength and conditioning coaches.

    Dawson, Andrew J; Leonard, Zane M; Wehner, Kylie A; Gastin, Paul B

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore the career experiences of Australian strength and conditioning coaches. Six Australian strength and conditioning coaches (mean age = 33.7 years, SD = 6.0 years) with a mean of 10.4 (SD = 4.9) years experience working with elite Olympic and professional athletes were interviewed about their experiences of career development. Each interview was transcribed verbatim and analyzed to produce key themes and subthemes relating to (a) work environments, (b) sport management practice, (c) career development processes, and (d) career building strategies. The work environments of Australian strength and conditioning coaches were found to be poor because of long working hours and irregular human resource policy and management practices of sport organizations. Because of the volatile and unpredictable nature of their working conditions, the coaches interviewed have only a short-term view of their career creating considerable stress in their lives. The coaches interviewed found it difficult to develop their careers because their only options were self-supported and self-funded professional development activities. The coaches in this study believed that more needed to be done at a policy and management level by sport organizations and their professional body to enhance the career development of strength and conditioning coaches because they play a key role in both athlete and sport organization performance. These results may help sport organizations develop policies and management practices that enhance the careers of strength and conditioning coaches and will have important practical implications for the education and development of sport professionals.

  11. Heterosexual experience prevents the development of conditioned same-sex partner preference in male rats.

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Tecamachaltzi-Silvaran, Miriam B; Díaz-Estrada, Victor X; Chena-Becerra, Florencia; Herrera-Covarrubias, Deissy; Paredes-Ramos, Pedro; Manzo, Jorge; Garcia, Luis I; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2017-03-01

    Sexual partner preferences can be strengthened, weakened or even drastically modified via Pavlovian conditioning. For example, conditioned same-sex partner preference develops in sexually-naïve male rats that undergo same-sex cohabitation under the effects of quinpirole (QNP, D2 agonist). Here, we assessed the effect of prior heterosexual experience on the probability to develop a conditioned same-sex preference. Naïve or Sexually-experienced males received either Saline or QNP and cohabited during 24h with a male partner that bore almond scent on the back as conditioned stimulus. This was repeated every 4days for a total of three trials and resulted in four groups (Saline-naïve, Saline-experienced, QNP-naïve, QNP-experienced). Social and sexual preference were assessed four days after the last conditioning trial in a drug-free test in which experimental males chose between the scented familiar male and a novel sexually receptive female. Results showed that Saline-naïve, Saline-experienced and QNP-experienced displayed a clear preference for the female (opposite-sex). By contrast, only QNP-naïve males displayed a same-sex preference. Accordingly, QNP-experienced males were not affected by the conditioning process and continued to prefer females. We discuss the effects of copulation and D2 agonists on the facilitation and/or disruption of conditioned partner preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Time-Critical Database Conditions Data-Handling for the CMS Experiment

    De Gruttola, M; Innocente, V; Pierro, A

    2011-01-01

    Automatic, synchronous and of course reliable population of the condition database is critical for the correct operation of the online selection as well as of the offline reconstruction and data analysis. We will describe here the system put in place in the CMS experiment to automate the processes to populate centrally the database and make condition data promptly available both online for the high-level trigger and offline for reconstruction. The data are ``dropped{''} by the users in a dedicated service which synchronizes them and takes care of writing them into the online database. Then they are automatically streamed to the offline database, hence immediately accessible offline worldwide. This mechanism was intensively used during 2008 and 2009 operation with cosmic ray challenges and first LHC collision data, and many improvements were done so far. The experience of this first years of operation will be discussed in detail.

  13. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    Jaeger, Wadim, E-mail: wadim.jaeger@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hurtado, Antonio [Technical University of Dresden, Institute of Power Engineering, DE-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. > Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. > Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. > Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  14. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    Jaeger, Wadim; Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Hurtado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. → Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. → Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. → Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  15. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Harmonic Noise Radiation: Theory and Experiment

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ambient atmospheric conditions, air temperature and density, on rotor harmonic noise radiation are characterized using theoretical models and experimental measurements of helicopter noise collected at three different test sites at elevations ranging from sea level to 7000 ft above sea level. Significant changes in the thickness, loading, and blade-vortex interaction noise levels and radiation directions are observed across the different test sites for an AS350 helicopter flying at the same indicated airspeed and gross weight. However, the radiated noise is shown to scale with ambient pressure when the flight condition of the helicopter is defined in nondimensional terms. Although the effective tip Mach number is identified as the primary governing parameter for thickness noise, the nondimensional weight coefficient also impacts lower harmonic loading noise levels, which contribute strongly to low frequency harmonic noise radiation both in and out of the plane of the horizon. Strategies for maintaining the same nondimensional rotor operating condition under different ambient conditions are developed using an analytical model of single main rotor helicopter trim and confirmed using a CAMRAD II model of the AS350 helicopter. The ability of the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique to generalize noise measurements made under one set of ambient conditions to make accurate noise predictions under other ambient conditions is also validated.

  16. Emotional benefit of cosmetic camouflage in the treatment of facial skin conditions: personal experience and review.

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies highlighting the psychological benefits of medical treatment for dermatological skin conditions have demonstrated a clear role for medical therapy in psychological health. Skin conditions, particularly those that are overtly visible, such as those located on the face, neck, and hands, often have a profound effect on the daily functioning of those affected. The literature documents significant emotional benefits using medical therapy in conditions such as acne, psoriasis, vitiligo, and rosacea, but there is little evidence documenting similar results with the use of cosmetic camouflage. Here we present a review highlighting the practical use of cosmetic camouflage makeup in patients with facial skin conditions and review its implications for psychological health. A search of the Medline and Scopus databases was performed to identify articles documenting the emotional benefit of cosmetic camouflage. Cosmetic camouflage provides a significant emotional benefit for patients with facial skin conditions, and this is substantiated by a literature review and personal experience. More clinical studies are needed to assess and validate the findings reported here. Patients with visible skin conditions have increased rates of depression, anxiety, and decreased self-esteem. It is prudent for us to consider therapies that can offer rapid and dramatic results, such as cosmetic camouflage.

  17. French analytic experiment on the high specific burnup of PWR fuels in normal conditions

    Bruet, M.; Atabek, R.; Houdaille, B.; Baron, D.

    1982-04-01

    Hydrostatic density determinations made on UO 2 pellets of different kinds irradiated in conditions representative of PWR conditions enable the internal swelling rate of the UO 2 to be ascertained. A mean value of 0.8% per 10 4 MWdt -1 (u) up to a specific burnup of 45000 MWdt -1 (u) may be deduced from this experimental basis. These results agree well with those obtained in the TANGO experiments in which UO 2 balls were irradiated in quasi isothermal conditions and without stress. Further, the open porosity of oxide closes progressively and the change in the total porosity is thus very limited (under 1% at 45000 MWdt -1 (u)). With respect to the swelling of the pellets the rise in the specific burnup would not appear therefore to be a problem. The behaviour of recrystallized zircaloy 4 claddings remains satisfactory with respect to creep and growth during irradiation [fr

  18. Association of Adverse Childhood Experiences with Co-occurring Health Conditions in Early Childhood.

    Bright, Melissa A; Thompson, Lindsay A

    2018-01-01

    To understand how adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with co-occurring physical, mental and developmental problems during early childhood. A subsample of 19,957 children aged 2-5 years were selected from the 2011-2012 National Survey for Child Health. Outcomes included 18 health conditions organized in singular condition domains (physical, mental, and developmental), and combinations of condition domains (e.g., physical plus mental, mental plus developmental, etc.). Predictors included 8 ACEs (divorce of a parent, death of a parent, exposure to domestic violence, living with someone with a drug or alcohol abuse problem, household member with a mental illness, parent incarceration, neighborhood violence, discrimination). Multivariable logistic regression was performed controlling for demographic characteristics, having a personal doctor, health insurance coverage, and seeing a health care professional in the previous year. Experiencing 3 or more ACEs before the age of 5 years was associated with increased likelihood of nearly every co-occurring condition combination across 3 domains of health. Most notably, experiencing 3 or more ACEs was also associated with a 2-fold increase in likelihood of having ≥1 physical condition and ≥1 developmental condition, a 9-fold increase in likelihood of having ≥1 mental and ≥1 developmental condition, and a 7-fold increase in likelihood of having ≥1 physical, ≥1 mental, and ≥1 developmental condition. This study demonstrates that we can identify the health effects of adversity quite early in development and that management should include communication between both health care and early childhood education providers.

  19. Numerical experiments on the atmospheric response to cold Equatorial Pacific conditions ('La Nina') during northern summer

    Storch, H. von; Schriever, D.; Arpe, K.; Branstator, G.W.; Legnani, R.; Ulbrich, U.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of cold conditions in the central and eastern Equatorial Pacific during Northern Summer is examined in a series of numerical experiments with the low resolution (T21) atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM2. Anomalous sea surface temperatures (SST) as observed in June 1988 were prescribed and the effect on the global circulation is examined. In the model atmosphere, the anomalous cold water in the Equatorial Pacific excites a strong and stable response over the tropical Central and East Pacific. From here stationary Rossby waves radiate into both hemispheres. The Northern Hemisphere wave train is weak and affects only the Northeast Pacific area; the Southern Hemisphere wave train arches from the Central Pacific over the southern tip of South America to the South Atlantic. This response is not only present in the basic anomaly experiment with the T21 GCM but also in experiments with SST anomalies confined to the tropics and with an envelope-formulation of the SST anomalies, in experiments with a linear model, and in high resolution (T42) model experiments. The model output is also compared to the actually observed atmospheric state in June 1988. (orig./KW)

  20. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units.

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses' and patients' experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Three categories emerged from the study: (1) "perceived barriers for providing spiritual care" including "lack of preparation for spiritual care," "time and space constraints," "unprofessional view," and "lack of support"; (2) "communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations" including "manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses" and "communication: Transmission of spiritual energy"; and (3) "religion-related spiritual experiences" including "life events as divine will and divine exam," "death as reincarnation," "trust in God," "prayer/recourse to Holy Imams," and "acceptance of divine providence." Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients' spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients' spiritual dimension. According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and nurses can benefit from organizational and clergymen's support to cope with spiritual distress. Researchers should

  1. State of the art on the heat transfer experiments under supercritical pressure condition

    Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Chul Hwa

    2003-07-01

    The SCWR(Super-Critical Water cooled Reactor) is one of the six reactor candidates selected in the Gen-IV project which aims at the development of new reactors with enhanced economy and safety. The SCWR is considered to be a feasible concept of new nuclear power plant if the existing technologies developed in fossil fuel fired plant and LWR technologies together with additional research on several disciplines such as materials, water chemistry and safety. As KAERI takes part in the GIF(Generation IV Forum) for the Gen-IV project, domestic concerns about the SCWR have been recently increased. In order to establish a foundation for the development of SCWR, efforts should be concentrated on the conceptual design of systems and the associated key experiments as well. Heat transfer experiments, among others, under supercritical condition are required for the proper prediction of thermal hydraulic phenomena, which are essential for the thermal hydraulic designs of reactor core. Nevertheless, the experiments have not been performed in Korea yet. This report deals with fundamental surveys on the heat transfer experiments under supercritical conditions, which are required for the understanding of heat transfer characteristics for the thermal hydraulic designs of supercritical reactor core. Investigations on the physical properties of water and CO 2 showed that the physical properties such as density, specific heat, viscosity and thermal conductivity are significantly changed near the pseudo-critical points. The state of the art on the heat transfer characteristics in relation with heat transfer deterioration and heat transfer coefficient is briefly described. In addition, previous experiments with supercritical water as well as supercritical CO 2 and Freon used for an alternating fluid are presented

  2. State of the art on the heat transfer experiments under supercritical pressure condition

    Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Chul Hwa

    2003-07-01

    The SCWR(Super-Critical Water cooled Reactor) is one of the six reactor candidates selected in the Gen-IV project which aims at the development of new reactors with enhanced economy and safety. The SCWR is considered to be a feasible concept of new nuclear power plant if the existing technologies developed in fossil fuel fired plant and LWR technologies together with additional research on several disciplines such as materials, water chemistry and safety. As KAERI takes part in the GIF(Generation IV Forum) for the Gen-IV project, domestic concerns about the SCWR have been recently increased. In order to establish a foundation for the development of SCWR, efforts should be concentrated on the conceptual design of systems and the associated key experiments as well. Heat transfer experiments, among others, under supercritical condition are required for the proper prediction of thermal hydraulic phenomena, which are essential for the thermal hydraulic designs of reactor core. Nevertheless, the experiments have not been performed in Korea yet. This report deals with fundamental surveys on the heat transfer experiments under supercritical conditions, which are required for the understanding of heat transfer characteristics for the thermal hydraulic designs of supercritical reactor core. Investigations on the physical properties of water and CO{sub 2} showed that the physical properties such as density, specific heat, viscosity and thermal conductivity are significantly changed near the pseudo-critical points. The state of the art on the heat transfer characteristics in relation with heat transfer deterioration and heat transfer coefficient is briefly described. In addition, previous experiments with supercritical water as well as supercritical CO{sub 2} and Freon used for an alternating fluid are presented.

  3. Operational experience of air washer based ventilation system for power conditioning system of Indus-2

    Pandey, R.M.; Baghel, S.L.; Parate, J.K.; Ahlawat, Sandeep; Rawlani, B.K.; Chouksey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Indus-2 Synchrotron Accelerator requires high quality conditioned uninterrupted AC mains power for their smooth and reliable operation. Three units of 1670 kVA and one unit of 1100 kVA capacity rotary uninterruptible power conditioning systems (UPS) were installed and commissioned. These UPS units require dust free and cool ambient conditions for smooth operation. In order to meet the ventilation requirements, an evaporative cooling system of 80000 cubic meter/hour capacity with filtration units was designed, installed and commissioned in February 2011 and is operational on round-the-clock basis. Evaporative cooling scheme was chosen as has various advantages over a refrigerated system like lower initial capital costs, lower energy usage, lower running costs, less greenhouse gas and it does not contribute to ozone depletion. The ventilation system filters the environment air in stages up to 5 micron level and being conditioned with an automatic controlled soft water circulating system with cooling pads. An instrumentation and control scheme is included in the system to provide the automation requirements for operating 24 x 7 through the year. All the mechanical, hydraulic and electrical devices are maintained by providing preventive maintenance work without affecting the accelerator machine operation. Availability and reliability of the system was analysed based on the failure data. In Year 2014, the ventilation system was upgraded to accommodate standby blower unit, coupling unit and improved quality of supply air with new air conditioning devices. The control panel monitors the condition of air in the UPS hall and maintainsup to 28°C air temperature and 85% maximum relative humidity in round-the clock shift with more than 98% operational reliability. In this paper, we present design philosophy, installation, instrumentation, testing, operation experience and availability of the ventilation system for Power Conditioning System, Indus complex. (author)

  4. Original article Future perspectives as a condition of positive adaptation of young adults after traumatic experience

    Marzanna Farnicka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The paper presents the results of a study on the possible role of sense of influencing one’s life and expectations towards the future as a personal condition of adaptation. In accordance with the theory of formulation of temporal perspectives, these variables were assumed to be related to construction of the psychological reality of the subjects. Participants and procedure The study involved 162 adults in two groups, with traumatic experience and without such experience, aged 18-35. The tools used in the study included: Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES, Boszkiewicz Questionnaire: Life Experience Questionnaire, events evaluation and expectations of changes in the future. Results The study revealed significant differences between people from the two groups in the scope of self-evaluation, sense of influence on events and future expectations. Conclusions The results pointed to the need for adjustment of therapeutic and preventive treatment to future expectations, evaluation of events and the current stage of development, as indicated by personal conditions of adaptation.

  5. Transient Fuel Behavior and Failure Condition in the CABRI-2 Experiments

    Sato, Ikken; Lemoine, Francette; Struwe, Dankward

    2004-01-01

    In the CABRI-2 program, 12 tests were performed under various transient conditions covering a wide range of accident scenarios using two types of preirradiated fast breeder reactor (FBR) fuel pins with different smear densities and burnups. For each fuel, a nonfailure-transient test was performed, and it provided basic information such as fuel thermal condition, fuel swelling, and gas release. From the failure tests, information on failure mode, failure time, and axial location was obtained. Based on this information, failure conditions such as fuel enthalpy and cladding temperature were evaluated. These failure conditions were compared with the CABRI-1 tests in which different fuels as well as different transient conditions were used. This comparison, together with supporting information available from existing in-pile and out-of-pile experiments, allowed an effective understanding on failure mechanisms depending on fuel and transient conditions. It is concluded that pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) due to fuel thermal expansion and fission-gas-induced swelling is playing an important role on mechanical clad loading especially with high smear density and low fuel-heating-rate conditions. At very high heating-rate conditions, there is no sufficient time to allow significant fuel swelling, so that cavity pressurization with fuel melting becomes the likely failure mechanism. Fuel smear density and fission-gas retention have a strong impact both on PCMI and cavity pressurization. Furthermore, pin failure is strongly dependent on cladding temperature, which plays an important role in the axial failure location. With the low smear-density fuel, considerable PCMI mitigation is possible leading to a high failure threshold as well as in-pin molten-fuel relocation along the central hole. However, even with the low smear density fuel, PCMI failure could take place with an elevated cladding-temperature condition. On the other hand, in case of a sufficiently long

  6. Development of a system for simultaneously generating triple extreme conditions for neutron scattering experiments

    Ichimura, Shigeju [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    We have developed new system available for controlling sample environment during the neutron scattering experiments. The system can simultaneously generate triple extreme conditions of low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure. The system consists of : (1) a liquid-helium cryostat which enables the sample temperature range of 1.7 K to 200 K, (2) a superconducting magnet providing a vertical field up to 5 Tesla with antisymmetric split-coil geometry for polarized-beam experiments, and (3) a non-magnetic clamping high-pressure cell designed with the aim of generating hydrostatic pressure up to 2.5 Gpa. In the workshop, we will report the outline of the system and some results of performance tests using the system at JRR-3M of JAERI. (author)

  7. Experience and Lessons Learned from Conditioning of Spent Sealed Sources in Singapore - 13107

    Hong, Dae-Seok; Kang, Il-Sik; Jang, Kyung-Duk; Jang, Won-Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hoo, Wee-Teck [National Environment Agency, 40 Scotts Road 228231 (Singapore)

    2013-07-01

    In 2010, IAEA requested KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to support Singapore for conditioning spent sealed sources. Those that had been used for a lightning conductor, check source, or smoke detector, various sealed sources had been collected and stored by the NEA (National Environment Agency) in Singapore. Based on experiences for the conditioning of Ra-226 sources in some Asian countries since 2000, KAERI sent an expert team to Singapore for the safe management of spent sealed sources in 2011. As a result of the conditioning, about 575.21 mCi of Am-241, Ra-226, Co-60, and Sr-90 were safely conditioned in 3 concrete lining drums with the cooperation of the KAERI expert team, the IAEA supervisor, the NEA staff and local laborers in Singapore. Some lessons were learned during the operation: (1) preparations by a local authority are very helpful for an efficient operation, (2) a preliminary inspection by an expert team is helpful for the operation, (3) brief reports before and after daily operation are useful for communication, and (4) a training opportunity is required for the sustainability of the expert team. (authors)

  8. Experiences of care planning in England: interviews with patients with long term conditions

    Newbould Jenny

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and impact of long term conditions continues to rise. Care planning for people with long term conditions has been a policy priority in England for chronic disease management. However, it is not clear how care planning is currently understood, translated and implemented in primary care. This study explores experience of care planning in patients with long term conditions in three areas in England. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 predominantly elderly patients with multiple long term conditions. The interviews were designed to explore variations in and emergent experiences of care planning. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts involved reflexively coding and re-coding data into categories and themes. Results No participants reported experiencing explicit care planning discussions or receiving written documentation setting out a negotiated care plan and they were unfamiliar with the term ‘care planning’. However, most described some components of care planning which occurred over a number of contacts with health care professionals which we term”reactive” care planning. Here, key elements of care planning including goal setting and action planning were rare. Additionally, poor continuity and coordination of care, lack of time in consultations, and patient concerns about what was legitimate to discuss with the doctor were described. Conclusions Amongst this population, elements of care planning were present in their accounts, but a structured, comprehensive process and consequent written record (as outlined in English Department of Health policy was not evident. Further research needs to explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to care planning for different patient groups.

  9. [Sleep structure instability in healthy men under conditions of 105-day isolation experiment "Mars-105"].

    Kovrov, G V; Posokhov, S I; Posokhov, S S; Zavalko, I M; Ponomareva, I P

    2013-01-01

    Night-to-night stability of falling asleep and duration of wakefulness in the sleep was studied in six healthy male subjects under conditions of 105-day isolation experiment "Mars-105". Polysomnography records were carried out in each subject during five nights taken in regular intervals within the experiment. Three subjects demonstrated high stability of falling asleep and wakefulness in sleep (group I), whereas in the remaining three subjects stability of these characteristics was low (group [I). Delta-sleep was shown to be deepened in subjects of group II (significant prevalence of stage 4 (47.3 min) over stage 3 (32.9 min)). In subjects of group I, the duration of stage 3 was 44.9 min and that of stage 4 was 26.6 min. We suggest that night-to-night instability of falling asleep and duration of wakefulness in sleep in combination with delta sleep is the special individual form of sleep adaptation to conditions of chronic isolation stress.

  10. Laboratory experiments on solute transport in bimodal porous media under cyclic precipitation-evaporation boundary conditions

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface is strongly governed by atmospheric boundary conditions. Erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles lead to alternating upward and downward flow, as well as spatially and temporally varying water contents and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing materials. Thus presenting a highly complicated, dynamic system. Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to assess e.g. the entry of, potentially hazardous, solutes to the groundwater and nutrient uptake by plant roots and can be gained in many ways. Besides field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. With the aim to gain a better understanding and to quantify solute transport in the unsaturated shallow subsurface under natural precipitation conditions in heterogeneous media, we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell that is filled with two types of sand and apply cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases at the soil surface. Pressure at the bottom of the domain is kept constant. Following recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a), heterogeneity is introduced by a sharp vertical interface between coarse and fine sand. Fluorescent tracers are used to i) qualitatively visualize transport paths within the domain and ii) quantify solute leaching at the bottom of the domain. Temporal and spatial variations in water content during the experiment are derived from x-ray radiographic images. Monitored water contents between infiltration and evaporation considerably changed in the coarse sand while the fine sand remained saturated throughout the experiments. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both directions at different depths of the investigated soil columns were observed. This depended on the flow rate applied at the soil surface and

  11. Validation of the TRACR3D code for soil water flow under saturated/unsaturated conditions in three experiments

    Perkins, B.; Travis, B.; DePoorter, G.

    1985-01-01

    Validation of the TRACR3D code in a one-dimensional form was obtained for flow of soil water in three experiments. In the first experiment, a pulse of water entered a crushed-tuff soil and initially moved under conditions of saturated flow, quickly followed by unsaturated flow. In the second experiment, steady-state unsaturated flow took place. In the final experiment, two slugs of water entered crushed tuff under field conditions. In all three experiments, experimentally measured data for volumetric water content agreed, within experimental errors, with the volumetric water content predicted by the code simulations. The experiments and simulations indicated the need for accurate knowledge of boundary and initial conditions, amount and duration of moisture input, and relevant material properties as input into the computer code. During the validation experiments, limitations on monitoring of water movement in waste burial sites were also noted. 5 references, 34 figures, 9 tables

  12. 42 CFR 482.82 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for re...

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical experience, and outcome requirements for re-approval of transplant centers. 482.82 Section 482.82... Hospitals Transplant Center Data Submission, Clinical Experience, and Outcome Requirements § 482.82 Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for re-approval...

  13. Uptake of radiocesium by three plants grown in 134Cs contaminated soil under pot experiment condition

    Zheng Jiemin; Li Hongyan; Niu Tianxin; Chen Ziyuan; Tang Shirong

    2009-01-01

    Pot experiment was conducted to investigate the accumulation dynamics of 134 Cs in shoots of Rumex acetosa, Rumex hastatus and Helianthus annuus grown in 134 Cs contaminated soil under greenhouse condition. Results showed that shoot biomass of H. annuus was significantly higher than that of R. acetosa and R. hastatus; among 3 plant species, 13 '4Cs specific activity in shoots was the highest in H. annuus after treatment for 50 days, however after treatment for 70 days, that in R. acetosa was the highest. Bioaccumulation ratio reached 1.5, 1.4 and 1.3 in R. acetosa, R. hastatus and H. annuus at the end of experiment, respectively, and the former two plants kept with trend of continuously increasing during the experiment period. Three plants were tolerant to 134 Cs contaminated slil and capable to translocate 134 Cs from soil to plants. Among them, H. annuus removed greatest 134 Cs amount in the above ground part, and R. acetosa, R. hastatus showed higher tranclocation factor of Cs than H. annuus. Three plants are promising for phytoremediation of soil contaminated with radiocesium, and also could be used for phytoremediation of radiocesium and heavy metals complex contamination, potentially. (authors)

  14. Development of wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST)

    Lee, H.Y., E-mail: brbbebbero@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, J.; Kim, Y.G.; Yang, S.M.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, K.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Y.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.J.; Na, Y.S. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y.S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The baking for partial wall heating and H{sub 2}/He GDC systems are developed in VEST. • The RGA and OES systems for monitoring impurities are constructed in VEST. • The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics. • H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms. • After H{sub 2} GDC, the discharge should be conducted within 3 h from treatment. - Abstract: Wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems are developed in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). As a wall conditioning system, a baking system covering the vacuum vessel wall partially and a glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system using two electrodes with dc and 50 kHz power supplies are installed. The GDC system operates with hydrogen and helium gases for both chemical and physical desorption. The impurity monitoring system with residual gas analyzer (RGA), operating at <10{sup −5} Torr with a differential pumping system, is installed along with the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system to monitor the hydrogen and impurity radiation lines. Effects of these wall conditioning techniques are investigated with the impurity monitoring system for ohmic discharges of VEST. The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics but sufficient H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms within 3 h from the end of treatment.

  15. Development of wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST)

    Lee, H.Y.; Yang, J.; Kim, Y.G.; Yang, S.M.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, K.H.; An, Y.H.; Chung, K.J.; Na, Y.S.; Hwang, Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The baking for partial wall heating and H_2/He GDC systems are developed in VEST. • The RGA and OES systems for monitoring impurities are constructed in VEST. • The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics. • H_2 GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms. • After H_2 GDC, the discharge should be conducted within 3 h from treatment. - Abstract: Wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems are developed in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). As a wall conditioning system, a baking system covering the vacuum vessel wall partially and a glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system using two electrodes with dc and 50 kHz power supplies are installed. The GDC system operates with hydrogen and helium gases for both chemical and physical desorption. The impurity monitoring system with residual gas analyzer (RGA), operating at <10"−"5 Torr with a differential pumping system, is installed along with the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system to monitor the hydrogen and impurity radiation lines. Effects of these wall conditioning techniques are investigated with the impurity monitoring system for ohmic discharges of VEST. The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics but sufficient H_2 GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms within 3 h from the end of treatment.

  16. Conditioning of primates for experiments; Conditionnement des primates pour l'experimentation

    Legeay, G.; Geneste, M.; Brawers, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The preparation of the monkey for experiments is one branch of zootechny applied to laboratory animals. The construction of a monkey-house at the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre has made it possible to study the hygiene rules necessary for obtaining subjects with relatively stable biological parameters. This hygiene includes: - prophylactic treatment, because the animals received lived originally in the wild state, - a balanced diet according to modern dietetic standards, - a habitat hygiene which recreates the original living conditions of the species. The possibility of reproduction has been used as a criterion of the efficiency of the methods applied. (authors) [French] La mise en condition du singe en vue de son utilisation a des fins experimentales est une branche de la zootechnie appliquee aux animaux de laboratoire. La realisation d'une singerie au CEN/SACLAY a permis d'etudier les regles d'hygiene requise pour obtenir des sujets dont les parametres biologiques soient relativement stables. L'hygiene comporte: - des soins prophylactiques car les animaux livres proviennent de capture a l'etat sauvage, - une alimentation equilibree, selon les normes modernes de la dietetique, - une hygiene de l'habitat recreant les conditions du milieu originel de l'espece. La possibilite de la reproduction a ete utilisee comme critere de l'efficacite des methodes mises en oeuvre.

  17. Genetic Counselors' Experiences Regarding Communication of Reproductive Risks with Autosomal Recessive Conditions found on Cancer Panels.

    Mets, Sarah; Tryon, Rebecca; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Zierhut, Heather A

    2016-04-01

    The development of hereditary cancer genetic testing panels has altered genetic counseling practice. Mutations within certain genes on cancer panels pose not only a cancer risk, but also a reproductive risk for autosomal recessive conditions such as Fanconi anemia, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome, and ataxia telangiectasia. This study aimed to determine if genetic counselors discuss reproductive risks for autosomal recessive conditions associated with genes included on cancer panels, and if so, under what circumstances these risks are discussed. An on-line survey was emailed through the NSGC list-serv. The survey assessed 189 cancer genetic counselors' experiences discussing reproductive risks with patients at risk to carry a mutation or variant of uncertain significance (VUS) in a gene associated with both an autosomal dominant cancer risk and an autosomal recessive syndrome. Over half (n = 82, 55 %) reported having discussed reproductive risks; the remainder (n = 66, 45 %) had not. Genetic counselors who reported discussing reproductive risks primarily did so when patients had a positive result and were of reproductive age. Reasons for not discussing these risks included when a patient had completed childbearing or when a VUS was identified. Most counselors discussed reproductive risk after obtaining results and not during the informed consent process. There is inconsistency as to if and when the discussion of reproductive risks is taking place. The wide variation in responses suggests a need to develop professional guidelines for when and how discussions of reproductive risk for autosomal recessive conditions identified through cancer panels should occur with patients.

  18. Conditioning of primates for experiments; Conditionnement des primates pour l'experimentation

    Legeay, G; Geneste, M; Brawers, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The preparation of the monkey for experiments is one branch of zootechny applied to laboratory animals. The construction of a monkey-house at the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre has made it possible to study the hygiene rules necessary for obtaining subjects with relatively stable biological parameters. This hygiene includes: - prophylactic treatment, because the animals received lived originally in the wild state, - a balanced diet according to modern dietetic standards, - a habitat hygiene which recreates the original living conditions of the species. The possibility of reproduction has been used as a criterion of the efficiency of the methods applied. (authors) [French] La mise en condition du singe en vue de son utilisation a des fins experimentales est une branche de la zootechnie appliquee aux animaux de laboratoire. La realisation d'une singerie au CEN/SACLAY a permis d'etudier les regles d'hygiene requise pour obtenir des sujets dont les parametres biologiques soient relativement stables. L'hygiene comporte: - des soins prophylactiques car les animaux livres proviennent de capture a l'etat sauvage, - une alimentation equilibree, selon les normes modernes de la dietetique, - une hygiene de l'habitat recreant les conditions du milieu originel de l'espece. La possibilite de la reproduction a ete utilisee comme critere de l'efficacite des methodes mises en oeuvre.

  19. Busted Butte report on laboratory radionuclide migration experiments in non-welded tuff under unsaturated conditions

    Vandergraaf, T.T.; Drew, D.J.; Ticknor, K.V

    2002-11-01

    Three blocks of non-welded tuff, one nominally one cubic foot (trial block) and the other two, nominally one cubic metre (1 m{sup 3}), were excavated from the Busted Butte Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site and transported to the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Whiteshell Laboratories in Pinawa, Manitoba. The trial block and one of the 1-m{sup 3} blocks were used for unsaturated flow experiments. The remaining 1-m{sup 3} block is being used for saturated flow experiments and will be reported on separately. After a vertical flow of synthetic transport solution was set up under unsaturated conditions, a suite of conservative and chemically reactive radionuclide tracers was injected at volumetric flow rates of 20 mL/hr in the trial block, and 10 mL/hr in the 1-m{sup 3} block. The duration of the migration experiment in the trial block was 87 days, while the migration experiment in the 1-m{sup 3} block was continuing after 600 days. Results obtained from the migration experiment in the trial block showed that transport of {sup 95m+99}Tc, injected as the pertechnetate (an)ion, was slightly faster than that of the transport solution, using tritiated water ({sup 3}H{sub 2}O) as a flow indicator. Retardation of {sup 237}Np was consistent with that predicted from results obtained in supporting static batch sorption studies. Post-migration analysis of the flow field in the trial block showed that the front of the {sup 22}Na had migrated about half the distance through the block, and that {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs had been retained near the inlet. This observation agrees qualitatively with that predicted from the results from static batch sorption studies. In the larger scale experiment, the transport behavior of Tc is very similar to that of the transport solution at this point in time. None of the other radionuclide tracers have been detected in water collected from this block. This observation is consistent with the observations for the smaller block. (author)

  20. Ischemic Gastric Conditioning by Preoperative Arterial Embolization Before Oncologic Esophagectomy: A Single-Center Experience

    Ghelfi, Julien, E-mail: JGhelfi@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Brichon, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: PYBrichon@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Thoracique, Vasculaire et Endocrinienne (France); Frandon, Julien, E-mail: Julien.frandon@chu-nimes.fr [CHU de Nîmes, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Boussat, Bastien, E-mail: BBoussat@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Département d’Information Médicale, Pôle de Santé Publique (France); Bricault, Ivan, E-mail: IBricault@chu-grenoble.fr; Ferretti, Gilbert, E-mail: GFerretti@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Guigard, Sébastien, E-mail: SGuigard@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Thoracique, Vasculaire et Endocrinienne (France); Sengel, Christian, E-mail: CSengel@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeSurgical esophagectomy is the gold standard treatment of early-stage esophageal cancer. The procedure is complicated with significant morbidity; the most severe complication being the anastomotic leakage. Anastomotic fistulas are reported in 5–25% of cases and are mainly due to gastric transplant ischemia. Here, we report our experience of ischemic pre-conditioning using preoperative arterial embolization (PreopAE) before esophagectomy.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of all patients who underwent oncologic esophagectomy from 2008 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: patients who received PreopAE, and a control group of patients who did not benefit from ischemic pre-conditioning. The target arteries selected for PreopAE were the splenic artery, left gastric artery, and right gastric artery. Evaluation of the results was based on anastomotic leakage, postoperative mortality, technical success of PreopAE, and complications related to the embolization procedure.ResultsForty-six patients underwent oncologic esophagectomy with PreopAE and 13 patients did not receive ischemic conditioning before surgery. Thirty-eight PreopAE were successfully performed (83%), but right gastric artery embolization failed for 8 patients. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 6 PreopAE patients (13%) and in 6 patients (46%) in the control group (p = 0.02). The mortality rate was 2% in the PreopAE group and 23% in the control group (p = 0.03). Eighteen patients suffered from partial splenic infarction after PreopAE, all treated conservatively.ConclusionPreoperative ischemic conditioning by arterial embolization before oncologic esophagectomy seems to be effective in preventing anastomotic leakage.

  1. The Potential of Online Respondent Data for Choice Modeling in Transportation Research: Evidence from Stated Preference Experiments using Web-based Samples: Evidence from Stated Preference Experiments using Web-based Samples

    Hoffer, Brice

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze the potential of online survey services for conducting stated preference experiments in the field of transportation planning. Several web-products for hosting questionnaires are evaluated considering important features required when conducting a stated preference survey. Based on this evaluation, the open-source platform LimeSurvey is the most appropriated for this kind of research. A stated preference questionnaire about pedestrians’ route choice in a Sin...

  2. Operational experience at RCD and FCD laboratories during various ventilation conditions

    Murali, S.; Ashok Kumar, P.; Thanamani, M.; Rath, D.P.; Sapkal, J.A.; Raman, Anand

    2007-01-01

    Radiochemistry and Fuel Chemistry wing of Radiological Laboratory facility has various radio-chemical operations on isotopes of plutonium and trans-plutonium elements, carried out under containment and safe operational conditions. The ventilation provided to the facility is a Once - through system. The ventilation system is designed with separate headers for laboratory and glove box exhausts. There is scheduled periodic shut down of ventilation system for maintenance during non-occupancy hours/week ends. The buildup of natural α - emitters activity due to ventilation shut down, observed to be prevailing on stack air sample filter papers after the ventilation startup, is studied. The paper describes the operational experience gained over a period during ventilation shut down and suggests the course of remedial action for reducing the internal exposure due to build up of natural α - emitters and their progenies. (author)

  3. Quadrupole beam-transport experiment for heavy ions under extreme space charge conditions

    Chupp, W.; Faltens, A.; Hartwig, E.C.

    1983-03-01

    A Cs ion-beam-transport experiment is in progress to study beam behavior under extreme space-charge conditions. A five-lens section matches the beam into a periodic electrostatic quadrupole FODO channel and its behavior is found to agree with predictions. With the available parameters (less than or equal to 200 keV, less than or equal to 20 mA, πepsilon/sub n/ greater than or equal to 10 - 7 π rad-m, up to 41 periods) the transverse (betatron) occillation frequency (nu) can be depressed down to one-tenth of its zero current value (nu/sub 0/), where nu/sup 2/ = nu/sub 0//sup 2/ -#betta#/sub p/ 2 /2, and #betta#/sub p/ is the beam plasma frequency. The current can be controlled by adjustment of the gun and the emittance can be controlled independently by means of a set of charged grids

  4. [Orthogonal experiments for optimizing the formulation and preparation conditions of temozolomide solid lipid nanoparticles].

    Dou, Mingjin; Huang, Guihua; Xi, Yanwei; Zhang, Na

    2008-10-01

    TMZ-SLN were prepared by emulsification-low temperature solidification method with stearic acid. The formulation and the preparation conditions were optimized by orthogonal experiments using entrapment efficiency as the evaluation index. The morphology was detected by transmission electron microscope. The Zeta potentials and the particle size distribution were evaluated by Laser Doppler Anemometry. The entrapment efficiencies and the drug release characteristics in vitro were assessed. The result showed that TMZ-SLN were concinnous and spherical in shape. The mean diameter (d(av) ) was 65.0 +/- 6.2 nm and the Zeta potential was -37.2 mV. The average entrapment efficiency was 58.9% +/- 1.21 %. The drug release behavior in vitro conformed to Higuchi Equation. The formation of a new material phase was testified by analysis of differential scanning calorimetry.

  5. Experience in health care organization for victims of Chernobyl accident under conditions of spatial hospitals

    Nadezhina, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Experience in organization of health care for victims of Chernobyl accidents under conditions of spatial hospitals are discussed taking into account patients with residual contamination of skin and clothe. A necessity of well-adjusted organization activites, including an inpatient clinic with well-equipped reception, dosimetric, haryological and bacteriological laboratories, an intensive care department, a surgical (burn) department, a blood transfusion laboratory and equipment for plasmopheresis and hemosorption is marked. Therapy of such patients should be developed along the following lines: 1) prevention and therapy of infectious complications; 2) blood cell substitution therapy; 3) bone marrow transplantation; 4) detoxicating therapy; 5) correction of water-electrolyte metabolism; 6) therapy of local radiation injuries

  6. A new luminometer and beam conditions monitor for the CMS experiment

    Karacheban, Olena; Hempel, Maria [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany); DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Ryjov, Vladimir; Stickland, David; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Henschel, Hans; Lange, Wolfgang [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Leonard, Jessica; Walsh, Roberval [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Levy, Itamar [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lohmann, Wolfgang [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Przyborowski, Dominik [AGH-UST University, Cracow (Poland); Schuwalow, Sergej [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The luminosity is a key quantity of any collider, which allows for the determination of the absolute cross sections from the observed rate in a detector. The Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F) was upgraded in the last LHC long technical stop (LS1) to 24 diamond sensors read out by a dedicated fast ASIC in 130 nm CMOS technology. The backend comprises a deadtime-less histogramming unit, with a 6.25 ns bin width, in VME standard. A microTCA system with better time resolution is in development. BCM1F is used for luminosity and machine induced background measurements at the CMS experiment. The performance of the detector in the first running period, as well as results on the calibration (Van-der-Meer scan) and the measurements of the luminosity are presented.

  7. Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-03-01

    An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF

  8. Isotope exchange experiments on TEXTOR and TORE SUPRA using Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning and Glow Discharge Conditioning

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Lyssoivan, A.; Philipps, V.; Bremond, S.; Freisinger, M.; Kreter, A.; Lombard, G.; Marchuk, O.; Mollard, P.; Paul, M.K.; Pegourie, B.; Reimer, H.; Sergienko, G.; Tsitrone, E.; Vervier, M.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Wuenderlich, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Van Oost, G.

    2011-01-01

    This contribution reports on isotope exchange studies with both Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) and Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) in TEXTOR and TORE SUPRA. The discharges have been carried out in H 2 , D 2 (ICWC and GDC) and He/H 2 mixtures (ICWC). The higher reionization probability in ICWC compared to GDC, following from the 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher electron density, leads to a lower pumping efficiency of wall desorbed species. GDC has in this analysis (5-10) times higher removal rates of wall desorbed species than ICWC, although the wall release rate is 10 times higher in ICWC. Also the measured high retention during ICWC can be understood as an effect of the high reionization probability. The use of short RF pulses (∼1 s) followed by a larger pumping time significantly improves the ratio of implanted over recovered particles, without severely lowering the total amount of removed particles.

  9. Experiments on Nitrogen Oxide Production of Droplet Arrays Burning under Microgravity Conditions

    Moesl, Klaus; Sattelmayer, Thomas; Kikuchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Shin; Yoda, Shinichi

    The optimization of the combustion process is top priority in current aero-engine and aircraft development, particularly from the perspectives of high efficiency, minimized fuel consumption, and a sustainable exhaust gas production. Aero-engines are exclusively liquid-fueled with a strong correlation between the combustion temperature and the emissions of nitric oxide (NOX ). Due to safety concerns, the progress in NOX reduction has been much slower than in stationary gas turbines. In the past, the mixing intensity in the primary zone of aero-engine combustors was improved and air staging implemented. An important question for future aero-engine combustors, consequently, is how partial vaporization influences the NOX emissions of spray flames? In order to address this question, the combustion of partially vaporized, linear droplet arrays was studied experimentally under microgravity conditions. The influence of fuel pre-vaporization on the NOX emissions was assessed in a wide range. The experiments were performed in a drop tower and a sounding rocket campaign. The microgravity environment provided ideal experiment conditions without the disturbing ef-fect of natural convection. This allowed the study of the interacting phenomena of multi-phase flow, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. This way the understanding of the physical and chemical processes related to droplet and spray combustion could be improved. The Bremen drop tower (ZARM) was utilized for the precursor campaign in July 2008, which was com-prised of 30 drops. The sounding rocket experiments, which totaled a microgravity duration of 6 minutes, were finally performed on the flight of TEXUS-46 in November 2009. On both campaigns the "Japanese Combustion Module" (JCM) was used. It is a cooperative experi-ment on droplet array combustion between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and ESA's (European Space Agency) research team, working on the combustion properties of partially premixed sprays

  10. High Burnup Fuel Behaviour under LOCA Conditions as Observed in Halden Reactor Experiments

    Kolstad, E.; Wiesenack, W.; Oberlander, B.; Tverberg, T.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of assessing the validity of safety criteria for loss of coolant accidents with high burnup fuel, the OECD Halden Reactor Project has implemented an integral in-pile LOCA test series. In this series, fuel fragmentation and relocation, axial gas communication in high burnup rods as affected by gap closure and fuel- clad bonding, and secondary cladding oxidation and hydriding are of major interest. In addition, the data are being used for code validation as well as model development and verification. So far, nine tests with irradiated fuel segments (burnup 40-92 MW.d.kg -1 ) from PWR, BWR and VVER commercial nuclear power plants have been carried out. The in-pile measurements and the PIE results show a good repeatability of the experiments. The paper describes the experimental setup as well as the principal features and main results of these tests. Fuel fragmentation and relocation have occurred to varying degrees in these tests. The paper compares the conditions leading to the presence or absence of fuel fragmentation, e.g., burnup and loss of constraint. Axial gas flow is an important driving force for clad ballooning, fuel relocation and fuel expulsion. The experiments have provided evidence that such gas flow can be impeded in high burnup fuel with a potential impact on the ballooning and fuel dispersal. Although the results of the Halden LOCA tests are, to some extent, amplified by conditions and features deliberately introduced into the test series, the fuel behaviour identified in the Halden tests has an impact on the safety assessment of high burnup fuel and should give rise to improvements of the predictive capabilities of LOCA modelling codes. (author)

  11. Energy crop (Sida hermaphrodita) fertilization using digestate under marginal soil conditions: A dose-response experiment

    Nabel, Moritz; Bueno Piaz Barbosa, Daniela; Horsch, David; Jablonowski, Nicolai David

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for energy security and the mitigation of climate change are the main drivers pushing energy-plant production in Germany. However, the cultivation of these plants can cause land use conflicts since agricultural soil is mostly used for plant production. A sustainable alternative to the conventional cultivation of food-based energy-crops is the cultivation of special adopted energy-plants on marginal lands. To further increase the sustainability of energy-plant cultivation systems the dependency on synthetic fertilizers needs to be reduced via closed nutrient loops. In the presented study the energy-plant Sida hermaphrodita (Malvaceae) will be used to evaluate the potential to grow this high potential energy-crop on a marginal sandy soil in combination with fertilization via digestate from biogas production. With this dose-response experiment we will further identify an optimum dose, which will be compared to equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Further, lethal doses and deficiency doses will be observed. Two weeks old Sida seedlings were transplanted to 1L pots and fertilized with six doses of digestate (equivalent to a field application of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160t/ha) and three equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Control plants were left untreated. Sida plants will grow for 45 days under greenhouse conditions. We hypothesize that the nutrient status of the marginal soil can be increased and maintained by defined digestate applications, compared to control plants suffering of nutrient deficiency due to the low nutrient status in the marginal substrate. The dose of 40t/ha is expected to give a maximum biomass yield without causing toxicity symptoms. Results shall be used as basis for further experiments on the field scale in a field trial that was set up to investigate sustainable production systems for energy crop production under marginal soil conditions.

  12. Making choices about medical interventions: the experience of disabled young people with degenerative conditions.

    Mitchell, Wendy A

    2014-04-01

    Current western policy, including the UK, advocates choice for service users and their families, taking greater control and being more involved in decision making. However, children's role in health decision making, especially from their own perspective, has received less research attention compared to doctors and parents' perspectives. To explore the perspective and experiences of disabled young people with degenerative conditions as they face significant medical interventions and engage in decision-making processes. Findings from a longitudinal qualitative study of 10 young people (13-22 years) with degenerative conditions are reported. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants over 3 years (2007-2010); the paper reports data from all three interview rounds. Interviews focused on medical intervention choices the young people identified as significant. Although the young people in this study felt involved in the medical intervention choices discussed, findings demonstrate a complex and diverse picture of decision making. Results highlighted different decisional roles adopted by the young people, the importance of information heuristics and working with other people whilst engaging in complex processes weighing up different decisional factors. Young people's experiences demonstrate the importance of moving beyond viewing health choices as technical or rational decisions. How each young person framed their decision was important. Recognizing this diversity and the importance of emerging themes, such as living a normal life, independence, fear of decisions viewed as 'irreversible' and the role of parents and peers in decision making highlights that, there are clear practice implications including, active practitioner listening, sensitivity and continued holistic family working. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Neutron radiography experiments for verification of soluble boron mixing and transport modeling under natural circulation conditions

    Morlang, M.M.; Feltus, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The use of neutron radiography for visualization of fluid flow through flow visualization modules has been very successful. Current experiments at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor serve to verify the mixing and transport of soluble boron under natural flow conditions as would be experienced in a pressurized water reactor. Different flow geometries have been modeled including holes, slots, and baffles. Flow modules are constructed of aluminum box material 1 1/2 inches by 4 inches in varying lengths. An experimental flow system was built which pumps fluid to a head tank and natural circulation flow occurs from the head tank through the flow visualization module to be radio-graphed. The entire flow system is mounted on a portable assembly to allow placement of the flow visualization module in front of the neutron beam port. A neutron-transparent fluor-inert fluid is used to simulate water at different densities. Boron is modeled by gadolinium oxide powder as a tracer element, which is placed in a mixing assembly and injected into the system a remotely operated electric valve, once the reactor is at power. The entire sequence is recorded on real-time video. Still photographs are made frame-by-frame from the video tape. Computers are used to digitally enhance the video and still photographs. The data obtained from the enhancement will be used for verification of simple geometry predictions using the TRAC and RELAP thermal-hydraulic codes. A detailed model of a reactor vessel inlet plenum, downcomer region, flow distribution area and core inlet is being constructed to model the APGOO plenum. Successive radiography experiments of each section of the model under identical conditions will provide a complete vessel / core model for comparison with the thermal-hydraulic codes

  14. Neutron radiography experiments for verification of soluble boron mixing and transport modeling under natural circulation conditions

    Feltus, M.A.; Morlang, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The use of neutron radiography for visualization of fluid flow through flow visualization modules has been very successful. Current experiments at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor serve to verify the mixing and transport of soluble boron under natural flow conditions as would be experienced in a pressurized water reactor. Different flow geometries have been modeled including holes, slots, and baffles. Flow modules are constructed of aluminum box material 1 1/2 inches by 4 inches in varying lengths. An experimental flow system was built which pumps fluid to a head tank and natural circulation flow occurs from the head tank through the flow visualization module to be radiographed. The entire flow system is mounted on a portable assembly to allow placement of the flow visualization module in front of the neutron beam port. A neutron-transparent fluorinert fluid is used to simulate water at different densities. Boron is modeled by gadolinium oxide powder as a tracer element, which is placed in a mixing assembly and injected into the system by remote operated electric valve, once the reactor is at power. The entire sequence is recorded on real-time video. Still photographs are made frame-by-frame from the video tape. Computers are used to digitally enhance the video and still photographs. The data obtained from the enhancement will be used for verification of simple geometry predictions using the TRAC and RELAP thermal-hydraulic codes. A detailed model of a reactor vessel inlet plenum, downcomer region, flow distribution area and core inlet is being constructed to model the AP600 plenum. Successive radiography experiments of each section of the model under identical conditions will provide a complete vessel/core model for comparison with the thermal-hydraulic codes

  15. Wild North Island Robins (Petroica longipes respond to Prey Animacy

    Alexis Garland

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available North Island robins of New Zealand are a food hoarding species, which is unique in that they almost exclusively cache highly perishable hunted insects for later retrieval. In order to do so, they either kill and dismember or paralyze their prey for caching, depending on the prey size and kind. The present study comprises two experiments, using a Violation of Expectancy (VoE paradigm to examine variation in search behavior response to different prey conditions. The first experiment presents three different types of prey (mealworms, earthworms and locusts in expected (present and unexpected (absent conditions. The second experiment presents prey in varying states of animacy (alive and whole, dead and whole, dead and halved, and an inanimate stick and reveals prey in expected (same state or unexpected (differing state conditions. While robins did not respond with differential search times to different types of unexpectedly missing prey in Experiment 1, in Experiment 2 robins searched longer in conditions where prey was found in a differing state of animacy than initially shown. Robins also searched longer for prey when immediately consuming retrieved prey than when caching retrieved prey. Results indicate that North Island robins may be sensitive to prey animacy upon storage and retrieval of insect prey; such information could play a role in storage, pilfering and retrieval strategies of such a perishable food source.

  16. Investigation of the uncertainty of a validation experiment due to uncertainty in its boundary conditions

    Harris, J.; Nani, D.; Jones, K.; Khodier, M.; Smith, B.L.

    2011-01-01

    Elements contributing to uncertainty in experimental repeatability are quantified for data acquisition in a bank of cylinders. The cylinder bank resembles the lower plenum of a high temperature reactor with cylinders arranged on equilateral triangles with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.7. The 3-D as-built geometry was measured by imaging reflections off the internal surfaces of the facility. This information is useful for building CFD grids for Validation studies. Time-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were acquired daily over several months along with the pressure drop between two cylinders. The atmospheric pressure was measured along with the data set. The PIV data and pressure drop were correlated with atmospheric conditions and changes in experimental setup. It was found that atmospheric conditions play little role in the channel velocity, but impact the pressure drop significantly. The adjustments made to the experiment setup did not change the results. However, in some cases, the wake behind a cylinder was shifted significantly from one day to the next. These changes did not correlate with ambient pressure, room temperature, nor tear down/rebuilds of the facility. (author)

  17. A comparative modeling study of a dual tracer experiment in a large lysimeter under atmospheric conditions

    Stumpp, C.; Nützmann, G.; Maciejewski, S.; Maloszewski, P.

    2009-09-01

    SummaryIn this paper, five model approaches with different physical and mathematical concepts varying in their model complexity and requirements were applied to identify the transport processes in the unsaturated zone. The applicability of these model approaches were compared and evaluated investigating two tracer breakthrough curves (bromide, deuterium) in a cropped, free-draining lysimeter experiment under natural atmospheric boundary conditions. The data set consisted of time series of water balance, depth resolved water contents, pressure heads and resident concentrations measured during 800 days. The tracer transport parameters were determined using a simple stochastic (stream tube model), three lumped parameter (constant water content model, multi-flow dispersion model, variable flow dispersion model) and a transient model approach. All of them were able to fit the tracer breakthrough curves. The identified transport parameters of each model approach were compared. Despite the differing physical and mathematical concepts the resulting parameters (mean water contents, mean water flux, dispersivities) of the five model approaches were all in the same range. The results indicate that the flow processes are also describable assuming steady state conditions. Homogeneous matrix flow is dominant and a small pore volume with enhanced flow velocities near saturation was identified with variable saturation flow and transport approach. The multi-flow dispersion model also identified preferential flow and additionally suggested a third less mobile flow component. Due to high fitting accuracy and parameter similarity all model approaches indicated reliable results.

  18. Forty years experience in developing and using rainfall simulators under tropical and Mediterranean conditions

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Nacci, Silvana

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall simulation has been used as a practical tool for evaluating the interaction of falling water drops on the soil surface, to measure both stability of soil aggregates to drop impact and water infiltration rates. In both cases it is tried to simulate the effects of natural rainfall, which usually occurs at very different, variable and erratic rates and intensities. One of the main arguments against the use of rainfall simulators is the difficulty to reproduce the size, final velocity and kinetic energy of the drops in natural rainfall. Since the early 70´s we have been developing and using different kinds of rainfall simulators, both at laboratory and field levels, and under tropical and Mediterranean soil and climate conditions, in flat and sloping lands. They have been mainly used to evaluate the relative effects of different land use and management, including different cropping systems, tillage practices, surface soil conditioning, surface covers, etc. on soil water infiltration, on runoff and on erosion. Our experience is that in any case it is impossible to reproduce the variable size distribution and terminal velocity of raindrops, and the variable changes in intensity of natural storms, under a particular climate condition. In spite of this, with the use of rainfall simulators it is possible to obtain very good information, which if it is properly interpreted in relation to each particular condition (land and crop management, rainfall characteristics, measurement conditions, etc.) may be used as one of the parameters for deducing and modelling soil water balance and soil moisture regime under different land use and management and variable climate conditions. Due to the possibility for a better control of the intensity of simulated rainfall and of the size of water drops, and the possibility to make more repeated measurements under very variable soil and land conditions, both in the laboratory and specially in the field, the better results have been

  19. Theoretical and numerical investigations of TAP experiments. New approaches for variable pressure conditions

    Senechal, U.; Breitkopf, C. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik

    2011-07-01

    Temporal analysis of products (TAP) is a valuable tool for characterization of porous catalytic structures. Established TAP-modeling requires a spatially constant diffusion coefficient and neglect convective flows, which is only valid in Knudsen diffusion regime. Therefore in experiments, the number of molecules per pulse must be chosen accordingly. New approaches for variable process conditions are highly required. Thus, a new theoretical model is developed for estimating the number of molecules per pulse to meet these requirements under any conditions and at any time. The void volume is calculated as the biggest sphere fitting between three pellets. The total number of pulsed molecules is assumed to fill the first void volume at the inlet immediately. Molecule numbers from these calculations can be understood as maximum possible molecules at any time in the reactor to be in Knudsen diffusion regime, i.e., above the Knudsen number of 2. Moreover, a new methodology for generating a full three-dimensional geometrical representation of beds is presented and used for numerical simulations to investigate spatial effects. Based on a freely available open-source game physics engine library (BULLET), beds of arbitrary-sized pellets can be generated and transformed to CFD-usable geometry. In CFD-software (ANSYS CFX registered) a transient diffusive transport equation with time-dependent inlet boundary conditions is solved. Three different pellet diameters were investigated with 1e18 molecules per pulse, which is higher than the limit from the theoretical calculation. Spatial and temporal distributions of transported species show regions inside the reactor, where non-Knudsen conditions exist. From this results, the distance from inlet can be calculated where the theoretical pressure limit (Knudsen number equals 2) is obtained, i.e., from this point to the end of the reactor Knudsen regime can be assumed. Due to linear dependency of pressure and concentration (assuming ideal

  20. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Garrison, L. M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov; Egle, B. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zenobia, S. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10{sup 14} ions/(cm{sup 2} s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  1. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    O. Möhler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at −5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an ice nucleation (IN active fraction of the order of 10−4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  2. A methodology to determine boundary conditions from forced convection experiments using liquid crystal thermography

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study to estimate the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient using liquid crystal thermography and Bayesian inference in a heat generating sphere, enclosed in a cubical Teflon block. The geometry considered for the experiments comprises a heater inserted in a hollow hemispherical aluminium ball, resulting in a volumetric heat generation source that is placed at the center of the Teflon block. Calibrated thermochromic liquid crystal sheets are used to capture the temperature distribution at the front face of the Teflon block. The forward model is the three dimensional conduction equation which is solved within the Teflon block to obtain steady state temperatures, using COMSOL. Match up experiments are carried out for various velocities by minimizing the residual between TLC and simulated temperatures for every assumed loss coefficient, to obtain a correlation of average Nusselt number against Reynolds number. This is used for prescribing the boundary condition for the solution to the forward model. A surrogate model obtained by artificial neural network built upon the data from COMSOL simulations is used to drive a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based Metropolis Hastings algorithm to generate the samples. Bayesian inference is adopted to solve the inverse problem for determination of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient from the measured temperature field. Point estimates of the posterior like the mean, maximum a posteriori and standard deviation of the retrieved heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient are reported. Additionally the effect of number of samples on the performance of the estimation process has been investigated.

  3. Laboratory experiments for understanding mechanical properties of fractured granite under supercritical conditions

    Kitamura, M.; Takahashi, M.; Takagi, K.; Hirano, N.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2017-12-01

    To extract geothermal energy effectively and safely from magma and/or adjacent hot rock, we need to tackle many issues which require new technology development, such as a technique to control a risk from induced-earthquakes. On a development of induced-earthquake mitigation technology, it is required to understand roles of factors on occurrences of the induced-earthquake (e.g., strength, crack density, and fluid-rock reaction) and their intercorrelations (e.g., Asanuma et al., 2012). Our purpose of this series of experiments is to clarify a relationship between the rock strength and the crack density under supercritical conditions. We conducted triaxial deformation test on intact granite rock strength under high-temperature (250 - 750°C), high-pressure (104 MPa) condition at a constant load velocity (0.1 μm/sec) using a gas-rig at AIST. We used Oshima granite, which has initially Young's modulus increased with decreasing the temperature from 32.3 GPa at 750°C to 57.4 GPa at 250°C. At 400 °C, the stress drop accelerated the deformation with 98 times faster velocity than that at load-point. In contrast, at 650°C and 750°C, the velocity during stress drop kept the same order of the load-point velocity. Therefore, the deformation mechanism may start to be changed from brittle to ductile when the temperature exceeds 650°C. Highly dense cracked granite specimens were formed by a rapid decompression test (RDT) using an autoclave settled at Tohoku University (Hirano et al., 2016JpGU), caused by a reduction of fluid pressure within 1-2 sec from vapor/supercritical state (10 - 48 MPa, 550 °C) to ambient pressure. The specimens after RDT show numerous microcracks on X-ray CT images. The RDT imposed the porosity increasing towards 3.75 % and Vp and Vs decreasing towards 1.37±0.52 km/s and 0.97±0.25 km/s. The Poisson's ratio shows the negative values in dry and 0.5 in wet. In the meeting, we will present results of triaxial deformation test on such cracked granites

  4. Cellulose Degradation at Alkaline Conditions: Long-Term Experiments at Elevated Temperatures

    Glaus, M.A.; Van Loon, L.R.

    2004-04-01

    The degradation of pure cellulose (Aldrich cellulose) and cotton cellulose at the conditions of an artificial cement pore water (pH 13.3) has been measured at 60 o and 90 o C for reaction times between 1 and 2 years. The purpose of the experiments is to establish a reliable relationship between the reaction rate constant for the alkaline hydrolysis of cellulose (mid-chain scission), which is a slow reaction, and temperature. The reaction products formed in solution are analysed for the presence of the two diastereomers of isosaccharinic acid using high performance anion exchange chromatography combined with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), other low-molecular weight aliphatic carboxylic acids using high performance ion exclusion chromatography (HPIEC) and for total organic carbon. The remaining cellulose solids are analysed for dry weight and degree of polymerisation. The degree of cellulose degradation as a function of reaction time is calculated based on total organic carbon and on the dry weight of the cellulose remaining. The degradation of cellulose observed as a function of time can be divided in three reaction phases observed in the experiments: (i) an initial fast reaction phase taking a couple of days, (ii) a slow further reaction taking - 100 days and (iii) a complete stopping of cellulose degradation levelling-off at -60 % of cellulose degraded. The experimental findings are unexpected in several respects: (i) The degree of cellulose degradation as a function of reaction time is almost identical for the experiments carried out at 60 o C and 90 o C, and (ii) the degree of cellulose degradation as a function of reaction time is almost identical for both pure cellulose and cotton cellulose. It can be concluded that the reaction behaviour of the materials tested cannot be explained within the classical frame of a combination of the fast endwise clipping of monomeric glucose units (peeling-off process) and the slow alkaline hydrolysis at the

  5. Cellulose Degradation at Alkaline Conditions: Long-Term Experiments at Elevated Temperatures

    Glaus, M.A.; Van Loon, L.R

    2004-04-01

    The degradation of pure cellulose (Aldrich cellulose) and cotton cellulose at the conditions of an artificial cement pore water (pH 13.3) has been measured at 60{sup o} and 90{sup o}C for reaction times between 1 and 2 years. The purpose of the experiments is to establish a reliable relationship between the reaction rate constant for the alkaline hydrolysis of cellulose (mid-chain scission), which is a slow reaction, and temperature. The reaction products formed in solution are analysed for the presence of the two diastereomers of isosaccharinic acid using high performance anion exchange chromatography combined with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), other low-molecular weight aliphatic carboxylic acids using high performance ion exclusion chromatography (HPIEC) and for total organic carbon. The remaining cellulose solids are analysed for dry weight and degree of polymerisation. The degree of cellulose degradation as a function of reaction time is calculated based on total organic carbon and on the dry weight of the cellulose remaining. The degradation of cellulose observed as a function of time can be divided in three reaction phases observed in the experiments: (i) an initial fast reaction phase taking a couple of days, (ii) a slow further reaction taking - 100 days and (iii) a complete stopping of cellulose degradation levelling-off at -60 % of cellulose degraded. The experimental findings are unexpected in several respects: (i) The degree of cellulose degradation as a function of reaction time is almost identical for the experiments carried out at 60 {sup o}C and 90 {sup o}C, and (ii) the degree of cellulose degradation as a function of reaction time is almost identical for both pure cellulose and cotton cellulose. It can be concluded that the reaction behaviour of the materials tested cannot be explained within the classical frame of a combination of the fast endwise clipping of monomeric glucose units (peeling-off process) and the slow alkaline

  6. Experience with fuel damage caused by abnormal conditions in handling and transporting operations

    Bailey, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to determine the expected condition of spent USA light-water reactor (LWR) fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or, if fuel is declared a waste, at disposal facilities. Initial findings were described in an earlier PNL paper at PATRAM '80 and in a report. Updated findings are described in this paper, which includes an evaluation of information obtained from the literature and a compilation of cases of known or suspected damage to fuel as a result of handling and/or transporting operations. To date, PNL has evaluated 123 actual cases (98 USA and 25 non-USA). Irradiated fuel was involved in all but 10 of the cases. From this study, it is calculated that the frequency of unusual occurrences involving fuel damage from handling and transporting operations has been low. The damage that did occur was generally minor. The current base of experience with fuel handling and transporting operations indicates that nearly all of these unusual occurrences had only a minor or negligible effect on spent fuel storage facility operations

  7. Quality of courses evaluated by 'predictions' rather than opinions: Fewer respondents needed for similar results.

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Schmidt, Henk G

    2010-01-01

    A well-known problem with student surveys is a too low response rate. Experiences with predicting electoral outcomes, which required much smaller sample sizes, inspired us to adopt a similar approach to course evaluation. We expected that having respondents estimate the average opinions of their peers required fewer respondents for comparable outcomes than giving own opinions. Two course evaluation studies were performed among successive first-year medical students (N = 380 and 450, respectively). Study 1: Half the cohort gave opinions on nine questions, while the other half predicted the average outcomes. A prize was offered for the three best predictions (motivational remedy). Study 2: Half the cohort gave opinions, a quarter made predictions without a prize and a quarter made predictions with previous year's results as prior knowledge (cognitive remedy). The numbers of respondents required for stable outcomes were determined following an iterative process. Differences between numbers of respondents required and between average scores were analysed with ANOVA. In both studies, the prediction conditions required significantly fewer respondents (p < 0.001) for comparable outcomes. The informed prediction condition required the fewest respondents (N < 20). Problems with response rates can be reduced by asking respondents to predict evaluation outcomes rather than giving opinions.

  8. Delta/mu opioid receptor interactions in operant conditioning assays of pain-depressed responding and drug-induced rate suppression: assessment of therapeutic index in male Sprague Dawley rats.

    Cone, Katherine; Lanpher, Janell; Kinens, Abigail; Richard, Philomena; Couture, Sarah; Brackin, Rebecca; Payne, Emily; Harrington, Kylee; Rice, Kenner C; Stevenson, Glenn W

    2018-05-01

    Although delta/mu receptor interactions vary as a function of behavioral endpoint, there have been no assessments of these interactions using assays of pain-depressed responding. This is the first report of delta/mu interactions using an assay of pain-depressed behavior. A mult-cycle FR10 operant schedule was utilized in the presence of (nociception) and in the absence of (rate suppression) a lactic acid inflammatory pain-like manipulation. SNC80 and methadone were used as selective/high efficacy delta and mu agonists, respectively. Both SNC80 and methadone alone produced a dose-dependent restoration of pain-depressed responding and dose-dependent response rate suppression. Three fixed ratio mixtures, based on the relative potencies of the drugs in the nociception assay, also produced dose-dependent antinociception and sedation. Isobolographic analysis indicated that all three mixtures produced supra-additive antinociceptive effects and simply additive sedation effects. The therapeutic index (TI) inversely varied as a function of amount of SNC80 in the mixture, such that lower amounts of SNC80 produced a higher TI, and larger amounts produced a lower TI. Compared to literature using standard pain-elicited assays, the orderly relationship between SNC80 and TI reported here may be a unique function of assessing pain-depressed behavior.

  9. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  10. Exceptional Responders Initial Feasibility Results

    A pilot study evaluating identification of cancer patients who respond to treatment that is ineffective in at least 90 percent of patients found that it was indeed able to confirm a majority of proposed patients as exceptional responders based on clinical

  11. Willingness to pay for flexible working conditions of people with type 2 diabetes: discrete choice experiments.

    Nexo, M A; Cleal, B; Hagelund, Lise; Willaing, I; Olesen, K

    2017-12-15

    The increasing number of people with chronic diseases challenges workforce capacity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) can have work-related consequences, such as early retirement. Laws of most high-income countries require workplaces to provide accommodations to enable people with chronic disabilities to manage their condition at work. A barrier to successful implementation of such accommodations can be lack of co-workers' willingness to support people with T2D. This study aimed to examine the willingness to pay (WTP) of people with and without T2D for five workplace initiatives that help individuals with type 2 diabetes manage their diabetes at work. Three samples with employed Danish participants were drawn from existing online panels: a general population sample (n = 600), a T2D sample (n = 693), and a matched sample of people without diabetes (n = 539). Participants completed discrete choice experiments eliciting their WTP (reduction in monthly salary, €/month) for five hypothetical workplace initiatives: part-time job, customized work, extra breaks with pay, and time off for medical consultations with and without pay. WTP was estimated by conditional logits models. Bootstrapping was used to estimate confidence intervals for WTP. There was an overall WTP for all initiatives. Average WTP for all attributes was 34 €/month (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27-43] in the general population sample, 32 €/month (95% CI: 26-38) in the T2D sample, and 55 €/month (95% CI: 43-71) in the matched sample. WTP for additional breaks with pay was considerably lower than for the other initiatives in all samples. People with T2D had significantly lower WTP than people without diabetes for part-time work, customized work, and time off without pay, but not for extra breaks or time off with pay. For people with and without T2D, WTP was present for initiatives that could improve management of diabetes at the workplace. WTP was lowest among people with T2D. Implementation of these

  12. Experience with High Voltage Tests of the W7-X Magnets in Paschen-Minimum Conditions

    Petersen-Zarling, B.M.; Risse, K.; Viebke, H.; Gustke, D.; Ehmler, H.; Baldzuhn, J.; Sborchia, C.; Scheller, H.

    2006-01-01

    The W7-X machine is a low-shear stellarator of the Wendelstein line, which is being assembled at the IPP Branch Institute of Greifswald, Germany. The machine features a superconducting magnet system with 50 non-planar and 20 planar magnets operated at about 6 T and discharged with peak voltage levels up to 6 kV. Following the factory tests, the magnets are delivered to CEA Saclay, France, for the final acceptance tests at cryogenic condition. A series of high voltage tests in air and vacuum are part of the final acceptance test. During these tests the quality of the insulation, especially the hand-wrapped ground insulation in the termination area, has proven not to be adequate. In order to improve the reliability of the insulation system and detect defects for early repair, high voltage tests in reduced pressure of air (Paschen-minimum conditions) have been added as part of the factory acceptance procedure. This has been implemented in the vacuum chambers of BNN/Ansaldo for the test of the 50 non-planar coils, while other tests have been carried out at CEA/Saclay after cold testing. IPP has also installed a vacuum tank to perform Paschen tests during the preparation of all the coils for assembly, including also the 20 planar coils which cannot be tested at the manufacturer Tesla. These tests have proven to be a powerful tool to detect hidden insulation defects and void/cavities in the primary impregnation system, which could not be detected otherwise with the standard high voltage tests. This paper will summarize the background and experience accumulated in about 2 years of Paschen tests on the W7-X coils, including a description of the equipment, main results and statistics, weak points detected and repaired on the coils, and possibilities of improvements in the development and production of the W7-X magnets. The importance and the need of Paschen tests as part of the acceptance procedure for superconducting magnets to be used in future projects will also be

  13. Conditions of deep magma chamber beneath Fuji volcano estimated from high- P experiments

    Asano, K.; Takahashi, E.; Hamada, M.; Ushioda, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Fuji volcano, the largest in volume and eruption rate in Japan, is located at the center of Honshu, where North America, Eurasia and Philippine Sea plates meets. Because of the significance of Fuji volcano both in tectonic settings and potential volcanic hazard (particularly after the M9 earthquake in 2011), precise knowledge on its magma feeding system is essentially important. Composition of magma erupted from Fuji volcano in the last 100ky is predominantly basalt (SiO2=50-52wt%, FeO/MgO=1.5-3.0). Total lack of silica-rich magma (basaltic andesite and andesite) which are always present in other nearby volcanoes (e.g., Hakone, Izu-Oshima, see Fig.1) is an important petrologic feature of Fuji volcano. Purpose of this study is to constrain the depth of magma chamber of Fuji volcano and explain its silica-nonenrichment trend. High pressure melting experiments were carried out using two IHPVs at the Magma Factory, Tokyo Institute of Technology (SMC-5000 and SMC-8600, Tomiya et al., 2010). Basalt scoria Tr-1 which represents the final ejecta of Hoei eruption in AD1707, was adopted as a starting material. At 4kbar, temperature conditions were 1050, 1100 and 1150C, and H2O contents were 1.3, 2.7 and 4.7 wt.%, respectively. At 7kbar, temperature conditions were 1075, 1100 and 1125C, and H2O contents were 1.0, 1.1, 3.6 and 6.3wt.%, respectively. The fO2 was controlled at NNO buffer. At 4kbar, crystallization sequence at 3 wt% H2O is magnetite, plagioclase, clinopyroxene and finally orthopyroxene. At 7 kbar, and ~3 wt% H2O, the three minerals (opx, cpx, pl) appears simultaneously near the liquidus. Compositional trend of melt at 4 kbar and 7 kbar are shown with arrows in Fig.1. Because of the dominant crystallization of silica-rich opx at 7 kbar, composition of melt stays in the range SiO2=50-52wt% as predicted by Fujii (2007). Absence of silica-rich rocks in Fuji volcano may be explained by the tectonic setting of the volcano. Because Fuji volcano locates on the plate

  14. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research.

    Przybylski, Andrew K

    2016-01-01

    The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group's research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding-a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires-is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (n tot = 11,908) provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area.

  15. Responder Technology Alert (February 2015)

    Upton, Jaki F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stein, Steven L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-10

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  16. CB decontamination for first responders

    Mayer, M.D.G.; Purdon, J.G.; Burczyk, A. [Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield, Ralston, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The Universal Containment System (UCS) is designed to contain, mitigate and decontaminate chemical, biological and radiological warfare agents. The UCS consists of a lightweight, tent-like enclosure filled with a water-based surface decontaminating foam (SDF). The Canadian government funded a project to advance the understanding of the behaviour of the UCS. This paper described the success of the project as well as the technological advances in the UCS formulation and equipment. Vapour desorption experiments were conducted in which SDF was applied onto 12 surfaces found in a typical office environment. Both mustard and nerve agent were studied on the test surfaces. Both scrubbing and non-scrubbing decontamination methods were tested. SDF effectively decontaminated the non-porous substances, particularly when the scrubbing procedure was used. Results were more complicated for the non-porous samples. A dye added to the agent was useful for determining the fate of the agent. Liquid phase studies were conducted in which the reaction between SDF and various agents were studied in the liquid phase in order to estimate the rate of reaction, the stoichiometry and the reaction products formed. Both SDF and the commercial decontamination agent CASCAD were found to effectively kill 100 per cent of anthrax spores. The significance of this project to first responders was considerable. Changes to the formulation and equipment of UCS will increase its usefulness and safety. Users will also have a better knowledge of the amount of decontamination needed for complete effectiveness in specific situations. Recommendations have been made for use of the product on a range of indoor surfaces. Field trials have shown the blast mitigation and agent decontamination ability of the foam under explosive situations. 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. The Bolund experiment: Overview and background; Wind conditions in complex terrain

    Bechmann, A.; Berg, J.; Courtney, M.S.; Joergensen, Hans E.; Mann, J.; Soerensen, Niels N.

    2009-07-15

    The Bolund experiment is a measuring campaign performed in 2007 and 2008. The aim of the experiment is to measure the flow field around the Bolund hill in order to provide a dataset for validating numerical flow models. The present report gives an overview of the whole experiment including a description of the orography, the instrumentation used and of the data processing. The Actual measurements are available from a database also described. (au)

  18. Determination of dissolution rates of spent fuel in carbonate solutions under different redox conditions with a flow-through experiment

    Roellin, S.; Spahiu, K.; Eklund, U.-B.

    2001-01-01

    Dissolution rates of spent UO 2 fuel have been investigated using flow-through experiments under oxidizing, anoxic and reducing conditions. For oxidizing conditions, approximately congruent dissolution rates were obtained in the pH range 3-9.3 for U, Np, Ba, Tc, Cs, Sr and Rb. For these elements, steady-state conditions were obtained in the flow rate range 0.02-0.3 ml min -1 . The dissolution rates were about 3 mg d -1 m -2 for pH>6. For pH 2 (g) saturated solutions dropped by up to four orders of magnitude as compared to oxidizing conditions. Because of the very low concentrations, only U, Pu, Am, Mo, Tc and Cs could be measured. For anoxic conditions, both the redox potential and dissolution rates increased approaching the same values as under oxidizing conditions

  19. Simulation of experiment on aerosol behaviour at severe accident conditions in the LACE experimental facility with the ASTEC CPA code

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment LACE LA4 on thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment, which was performed in the LACE experimental facility, was simulated with the ASTEC CPA module of the severe accident computer code ASTEC V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the module (code) to simulate thermal-hydraulic conditions and aerosol behavior in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions. The test was simulated with boundary conditions, described in the experiment report. Results of thermal-hydraulic conditions in the test vessel, as well as dry aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere, are compared to experimental results and analyzed. (author)

  20. Actual measurement, hygrothermal response experiment and growth prediction analysis of microbial contamination of central air conditioning system in Dalian, China.

    Lv, Yang; Hu, Guangyao; Wang, Chunyang; Yuan, Wenjie; Wei, Shanshan; Gao, Jiaoqi; Wang, Boyuan; Song, Fangchao

    2017-04-03

    The microbial contamination of central air conditioning system is one of the important factors that affect the indoor air quality. Actual measurement and analysis were carried out on microbial contamination in central air conditioning system at a venue in Dalian, China. Illumina miseq method was used and three fungal samples of two units were analysed by high throughput sequencing. Results showed that the predominant fungus in air conditioning unit A and B were Candida spp. and Cladosporium spp., and two fungus were further used in the hygrothermal response experiment. Based on the data of Cladosporium in hygrothermal response experiment, this paper used the logistic equation and the Gompertz equation to fit the growth predictive model of Cladosporium genera in different temperature and relative humidity conditions, and the square root model was fitted based on the two environmental factors. In addition, the models were carried on the analysis to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the established model equation.

  1. Simulation of KAEVER experiments on aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions with the ASTEC code

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on aerosol behaviour in saturated and non-saturated atmosphere, which were performed in the KAEVER experimental facility, were simulated with the severe accident computer code ASTEC CPA V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the code to model aerosol condensation and deposition in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions, if the atmosphere saturation conditions are simulated adequately. Five different tests were first simulated with boundary conditions, obtained from the experiments. In all five tests, a non-saturated atmosphere was simulated, although, in four tests, the atmosphere was allegedly saturated. The simulations were repeated with modified boundary conditions, to obtain a saturated atmosphere in all tests. Results of dry and wet aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere for both sets of simulations are compared to experimental results. (author)

  2. Out-of-pile UO2/Zircaloy-4 experiments under severe fuel damage conditions

    Hofmann, P.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical interactions between UO 2 fuel and Zircaloy-4 cladding up to the melting point of zircaloy (Zry) are described. Out-of-pile UO 2 /zircaloy reaction experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical interaction behavior under possible severe fuel damage conditions (very high temperatures and external overpressure). The tests have been conducted in inert gas (1 to 80 bar) with 10-cm-long zircaloy cladding specimens filled with UO 2 pellets. The annealing temperature varied between 1000 and 1700 deg. C and the annealing period between 1 and 150 min. The extent of the chemical reaction depends decisively on whether or not good contact between UO 2 and zircaloy has been established. If solid contact exists, zircaloy reduces the UO 2 to form oxygen-stabilized α-Zr(O) and uranium metal. The uranium reacts with zircaloy to form a (U,Zr) alloy rich in uranium. The (U,Zr) alloy, which is liquid above approx. 1150 deg. C, lies between two α-Zr(O) layers. The UO 2 /zircaloy reaction obeys a parabolic rate law. The degree of chemical interaction is determined by the extent of oxygen diffusion into the cladding, and hence by the time and temperature. The affinity of zirconium for oxygen, which results in an oxygen gradient across the cladding, is the driving force for the reaction. The growth of the reaction layers can be represented in an Arrhenius diagram. The UO 2 /Zry-4 reaction occurs as rapidly as the steam/Zry-4 reaction above about 1100 deg. C. The extent of the interaction is independent of external pressure above about 10 bar at 1400 deg. C and 5 bar at 1700 deg. C. The maximum measured oxygen content of the cladding is approx. 6wt.%. Up to approx. 9 volume % of the UO 2 can be chemically dissolved by the zircaloy. In an actual fuel rod, complete release of the fission products in this region of the fuel must therefore be assumed. (author)

  3. Conditions and life experiences of indigent pregnant women living in the northwest metropolitan of San José

    Mónica Granados Hernández

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the results of an investigation into the conditions and life experiences ofindigent women. Involved four indigent pregnant women. The investigation was prompted by aphenomenological, qualitative design. The data collection was carried out by applying depth interviews, usingrecording for repeated observations, then the data were analyzed and contrasted with the framework. Among themost important characteristics that form a profile of a indigent pregnant woman found common factors:alcoholism, drug addiction, prostitution, physical violence, sexual and psychological and crime. We conclude thatthe conditions of life are intertwined with the life experiences of homeless pregnant women, from the conditionwhich determines their profile.

  4. Event-based computer simulation model of aspect-type experiments strictly satisfying Einstein's locality conditions

    De Raedt, Hans; De Raedt, Koen; Michielsen, Kristel; Keimpema, Koenraad; Miyashita, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Inspired by Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohtn experiments with photons, we construct an event-based simulation model in which every essential element in the ideal experiment has a counterpart. The model satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not rely on concepts of quantum and

  5. Electrophysiological correlates of associative learning in smokers: A higher-order conditioning experiment

    M. Littel (Marianne); I.H.A. Franken (Ingmar)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Classical conditioning has been suggested to play an important role in the development, maintenance, and relapse of tobacco smoking. Several studies have shown that initially neutral stimuli that are directly paired with smoking are able to elicit conditioned responses.

  6. ``From seed-to-seed'' experiment with wheat plants under space-flight conditions

    Mashinsky, A.; Ivanova, I.; Derendyaeva, T.; Nechitailo, G.; Salisbury, F.

    1994-11-01

    An important goal with plant experiments in microgravity is to achieve a complete life cycle, the ``seed-to-seed experiment''. Some Soviet attempts to reach this goal are described, notably an experiment with the tiny mustard, Arabidopsis thaliana, in the Phyton 3 device on Salyut 7. Normal seeds were produced although yields were reduced and development was delayed. Several other experiments have shown abnormalities in plants grown in space. In recent work, plants of wheat (Triticum aestivum) were studied on the ground and then in a preliminary experiment in space. Biometric indices of vegetative space plants were 2 to 2.5 times lower than those of controls, levels of chlorophyll a and b were reduced (no change in the ratio of the two pigments), carotenoids were reduced, there was a serious imbalance in major minerals, and membrane lipids were reduced (no obvious change in lipid patterns). Following the preliminary studies, an attempt was made with the Svetoblock-M growth unit to grow a super-dwarf wheat cultivar through a life cycle. The experiment lasted 167 d on Mir. Growth halted from about day 40 to day 100, when new shoots appeared. Three heads had appeared in the boot (surrounded by leaves) when plants were returned to earth. One head was sterile, but 28 seeds matured on earth, and most of these have since produced normal plants and seeds. In principle, a seed-to-seed experiment with wheat should be successful in microgravity.

  7. [Testing of the effect of classic conditioning stimuli in human experiment by means of the transfer of control paradigm].

    Wolter, J

    1999-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning in animals is often evaluated by means of transfer of control experiments. With human subjects, however, only very few studies have been conducted and the outcomes were often not in accordance with theoretical explanations based on studies with animals. A theoretical framework is presented that tries to integrate the results of the human conditioning paradigm and the animal conditioning paradigm as well, with reference to the well-known Yerkes-Dodson law. The experimental study with human subjects (N = 24) confirmed the predictions out of this framework, when a procedure similar to animal research is applied.

  8. Responding to the Challenge of True Uncertainty

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Andersen, Torben Juul

    We construe a conceptual framework for responding effectively to true uncertainty in the business environment. We drill down to the essential micro-foundational capabilities - sensing and seizing of dynamic capabilities - and link them to classical strategic issue management theory with suggestions...... on how to operationalize these essential capabilities. By definition true uncertainty represents environmental conditions that are hard to foresee, which can catch the unprepared by surprise while presenting opportunities to the conscious organization. We demonstrate that organizations relying...

  9. The trigger supervisor: Managing triggering conditions in a high energy physics experiment

    Wadsworth, B.; Lanza, R.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.; Videbaek, F.

    1987-01-01

    A trigger supervisor, implemented in VME-bus hardware, is described, which enables the host computer to dynamically control and monitor the trigger configuration for acquiring data from multiple detector partitions in a complex experiment

  10. American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology membership experience with venom immunotherapy in chronic medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children.

    Calabria, Christopher W; Hauswirth, David W; Rank, Matthew; Sher, Lawrence; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree

    2017-03-01

    Few data exist regarding the use of venom immunotherapy (VIT) in specific high-risk chronic medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children. A Web-based survey was sent to American Academy of Asthma Allergy & Immunology members to explore their VIT experience in potential high-risk medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children. Major problems were defined as "activation of underlying disease and/or VIT not well tolerated (systemic adverse events) and/or VIT discontinued for medical reasons." Results were expressed descriptively. A total of 697 of 5123 surveys (14%) were completed: 87% of the respondents were based in the United States, and 28% worked in an academic setting. Most respondents (71%) believed that pregnancy was a contraindication for starting VIT. Most were comfortable continuing VIT (51%) if the woman became pregnant after starting therapy. Of the allergists who treated children, many would give VIT down to age 5 years (42%) or younger, ages 1-4 years (35%). The following list is of the specific medical condition, the number of allergists who used VIT in patients with this condition, and the percentage who reported major problems: severe asthma, 212 (4.2%); hypertension, 287 (1.1%); coronary artery disease, 222 (3.6%); arrhythmias, 136 (3.4%); cerebrovascular disease, 104 (5.1%); cancer in remission, 166 (0%); cancer stable but still under treatment, 44 (7.2%); a history of bone marrow transplantation, 15 (4.9%); a history of solid organ transplantation, 29 (3.6%); human immunodeficiency virus, 53 (1.4%); acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 24 (6.2%); stable autoimmune disease, 164 (2.8%); mastocytosis, 66 (18.4%); elevated serum tryptase, 101 (10.8%); immunodeficiency 59 (2.5%). Many allergists were comfortable using VIT in young children and continuing but not starting pregnant women on VIT. VIT was commonly used in patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, arrhythmias, cancer in remission, and stable autoimmune disease

  11. Maternal Experience of Lego Therapy in Families with Children with Autism Spectrum Conditions: What Is the Impact on Family Relationships?

    Peckett, Helen; MacCallum, Fiona; Knibbs, Jacky

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore mothers' experience of implementing Lego Therapy at home within the family. Following a Lego Therapy training session, mothers carried out hourly sessions with their child with an autism spectrum condition and the child's sibling, once a week, for 6 weeks. Mothers were interviewed following the intervention, and the…

  12. Parental, child, and adolescent experience of chronic skin conditions: A meta-ethnography and review of the qualitative literature.

    Ablett, Kate; Thompson, Andrew R

    2016-12-01

    Childhood skin conditions can affect the quality of life of children, adolescents, and families. As such, paediatric dermatological conditions have been the focus of a number of qualitative studies and there is now a need to integrate the findings. A meta-ethnography was carried out with the existing 12 studies, which included nine studies examining parental experiences and three studies of child experiences. Meta-ethnographic analysis of the studies identified themes focused on the child's sense of stigmatisation and the challenges for families that arose from this. Common experiences across studies were feelings of difference relating to the appearance of the skin. The results highlight that children and adolescents can experience negative social reactions and that parents may struggle with some aspects of the physical management of the condition. The studies indicate the need to examine in more detail the psychosocial aspects of childhood skin conditions and the role played by stigmatisation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Early Career Mathematics Teachers' General Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills: Do Teacher Education, Teaching Experience, and Working Conditions Make a Difference?

    König, Johannes; Blömeke, Sigrid; Kaiser, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We examined several facets of general pedagogical knowledge and skills of early career mathematics teachers, asking how they are associated with characteristics of teacher education, teaching experience, and working conditions. Declarative general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) was assessed via a paper-and-pencil test, while early career teachers'…

  14. Conditioning of cooling water in power stations. Feedback from twenty years of experience with acid feeding

    Goffin, C.; Duvivier, L.; Girasa, E. [LABORELEC, Chemistry of Water (Belgium); Brognez, J. [ELECTRABEL, TIHANGE Nuclear Power Station (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    In the late 1970's and early 1980's, with the development of the nuclear programme in many European countries, the recirculation of cooling water in power stations became an issue which required urgent attention. The concentration of several plants of 1000 MW or more on sites along inland waterways actually made simple once-through cooling impossible, owing to the risk of an unacceptable rise in the river's water temperature. The chemical composition of natural freshwater in western European waterways is such that when it becomes slightly concentrated, scale is rapidly formed. The relatively low solubility of calcium carbonate and the degassing of the carbon dioxide during close contact between the water and air in the heat exchangers of the cooling tower explain this precipitation tendency. Fairly soon, experts in the electricity power generation companies highlighted the need for on-site, pilot loop simulations, in order to foresee the physico-chemical phenomena that could arise in industrial installations. The number of financially justifiable processing possibilities could be briefly summarised by the following three solutions: to adapt the concentration factor in order to be under the calcium carbonate solubility limit and thereby avoid the need for any water conditioning; to accept concentration factors of between 1.4 and 1.9 and control the calcium carbonate precipitation through controlled acid injection in the circulation water; to raise the concentration factor over 5 and soften the makeup water through the addition of lime and flocculant. The last of these solutions was rarely ever used in Belgium and France. It was however widely used in Germany. Its application requires a greater investment and leads to higher operating costs than acid injection. Furthermore, it leads to the problem of daily drying and disposal of several dozen tonnes of sludge, which have to be recycled or dumped. In an increasingly stringent environmental context, this

  15. Conditioning of cooling water in power stations. Feedback from twenty years of experience with acid feeding

    Goffin, C.; Duvivier, L.; Girasa, E.; Brognez, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the late 1970's and early 1980's, with the development of the nuclear programme in many European countries, the recirculation of cooling water in power stations became an issue which required urgent attention. The concentration of several plants of 1000 MW or more on sites along inland waterways actually made simple once-through cooling impossible, owing to the risk of an unacceptable rise in the river's water temperature. The chemical composition of natural freshwater in western European waterways is such that when it becomes slightly concentrated, scale is rapidly formed. The relatively low solubility of calcium carbonate and the degassing of the carbon dioxide during close contact between the water and air in the heat exchangers of the cooling tower explain this precipitation tendency. Fairly soon, experts in the electricity power generation companies highlighted the need for on-site, pilot loop simulations, in order to foresee the physico-chemical phenomena that could arise in industrial installations. The number of financially justifiable processing possibilities could be briefly summarised by the following three solutions: to adapt the concentration factor in order to be under the calcium carbonate solubility limit and thereby avoid the need for any water conditioning; to accept concentration factors of between 1.4 and 1.9 and control the calcium carbonate precipitation through controlled acid injection in the circulation water; to raise the concentration factor over 5 and soften the makeup water through the addition of lime and flocculant. The last of these solutions was rarely ever used in Belgium and France. It was however widely used in Germany. Its application requires a greater investment and leads to higher operating costs than acid injection. Furthermore, it leads to the problem of daily drying and disposal of several dozen tonnes of sludge, which have to be recycled or dumped. In an increasingly stringent environmental context, this solution is no

  16. Fuel-disruption experiments under high-ramp-rate heating conditions

    Wright, S.A.; Worledge, D.H.; Cano, G.L.; Mast, P.K.; Briscoe, F.

    1983-10-01

    This topical report presents the preliminary results and analysis of the High Ramp Rate fuel-disruption experiment series. These experiments were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the timing and mode of fuel disruption during the prompt-burst phase of a loss-of-flow accident. High-speed cinematography was used to observe the timing and mode of the fuel disruption in a stack of five fuel pellets. Of the four experiments discussed, one used fresh mixed-oxide fuel, and three used irradiated mixed-oxide fuel. Analysis of the experiments indicates that in all cases, the observed disruption occurred well before fuel-vapor pressure was high enough to cause the disruption. The disruption appeared as a rapid spray-like expansion and occurred near the onset of fuel melting in the irradiated-fuel experiments and near the time of complete fuel melting in the fresh-fuel experiment. This early occurrence of fuel disruption is significant because it can potentially lower the work-energy release resulting from a prompt-burst disassembly accident

  17. Microcosm experiments to control anaerobic redox conditions when studying the fate of organic micropollutants in aquifer material.

    Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ayora, Carlos; Cama, Jordi; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Tobella Brunet, Joana; Hernández García, Marta

    2011-11-01

    The natural processes occurring in subsurface environments have proven to effectively remove a number of organic pollutants from water. The predominant redox conditions revealed to be one of the controlling factors. However, in the case of organic micropollutants the knowledge on this potential redox-dependent behavior is still limited. Motivated by managed aquifer recharge practices microcosm experiments involving aquifer material, settings potentially feasible in field applications, and organic micropollutants at environmental concentrations were carried out. Different anaerobic redox conditions were promoted and sustained in each set of microcosms by adding adequate quantities of electron donors and acceptors. Whereas denitrification and sulfate-reducing conditions are easily achieved and maintained, Fe- and Mn-reduction are strongly constrained by the slower dissolution of the solid phases commonly present in aquifers. The thorough description and numerical modeling of the evolution of the experiments, including major and trace solutes and dissolution/precipitation of solid phases, have been proven necessary to the understanding of the processes and closing the mass balance. As an example of micropollutant results, the ubiquitous beta-blocker atenolol is completely removed in the experiments, the removal occurring faster under more advanced redox conditions. This suggests that aquifers constitute a potentially efficient alternative water treatment for atenolol, especially if adequate redox conditions are promoted during recharge and long enough residence times are ensured. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbon-14 tracer studies in rat-liver perfusion experiments under conditions of gluconeogenesis from lactate and pyruvate

    Muellhofer, G.; Schwab, A.; Mueller, C.; Stetten, C. von; Gruber, E.

    1977-01-01

    The intracellular events in the metabolic pathway of gluconeogenesis from lactate and pyruvate in liver tissue were assumed to be understood. Nevertheless the results of several 14 C-tracer experiments gave rise to the postulation of still unknown intracellular interactions under this condition. A contribution was made to the solution of this problem by using different 14 C labelled tracers such as [1- 14 C]lactate or pyruvate and [2- 14 C]lactate or pyruvate. [ 14 C]bicarbonate and [1- 14 C]-octanoate in perfusion experiments with livers from rats under conditions of gluconeogenesis from lactate and pyruvate. The 14 C labelling patterns of intracellular metabolities such as malate, citrate, phosphoenolpyruvate, phosphoglycerate and newly synthesized glucose were analysed under different conditions. A comparison with values calculated by using metabolic models based on the generally accepted concepts of intracellular interactions showed some fundamental discrepancies which justify the postulation. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Rainwater propagation through snowpack during rain-on-snow sprinkling experiments under different snow conditions

    R. Juras

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of rainwater propagation and runoff generation during rain-on-snow (ROS events are still insufficiently known. Understanding storage and transport of liquid water in natural snowpacks is crucial, especially for forecasting of natural hazards such as floods and wet snow avalanches. In this study, propagation of rainwater through snow was investigated by sprinkling experiments with deuterium-enriched water and applying an alternative hydrograph separation technique on samples collected from the snowpack runoff. This allowed us to quantify the contribution of rainwater, snowmelt and initial liquid water released from the snowpack. Four field experiments were carried out during winter 2015 in the vicinity of Davos, Switzerland. Blocks of natural snow were isolated from the surrounding snowpack to inhibit lateral exchange of water and were exposed to artificial rainfall using deuterium-enriched water. The experiments were composed of four 30 min periods of sprinkling, separated by three 30 min breaks. The snowpack runoff was continuously gauged and sampled periodically for the deuterium signature. At the onset of each experiment antecedent liquid water was first pushed out by the sprinkling water. Hydrographs showed four pronounced peaks corresponding to the four sprinkling bursts. The contribution of rainwater to snowpack runoff consistently increased over the course of the experiment but never exceeded 86 %. An experiment conducted on a non-ripe snowpack suggested the development of preferential flow paths that allowed rainwater to efficiently propagate through the snowpack limiting the time for mass exchange processes to take effect. In contrast, experiments conducted on ripe isothermal snowpack showed a slower response behaviour and resulted in a total runoff volume which consisted of less than 50 % of the rain input.

  20. Can We Model Driver Perceptions? An In-Situ Experiment in Real-World Conditions

    Aly M. Tawfik, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is clear that perceptions play a significant role in traveler decisions. Consequently, traveler perceptions are a corner stone in the feasibility of traveler information systems; for traveler information systems are only valuable if the drivers are incapable of accurately acquiring the provided information on their own, and if the provided information is relevant for the drivers' decision criteria. Accuracy of traveler perceptions has been repeatedly researched in public transportation, and has been found to vary according to different reasons. However, in spite of the clear significance of traveler perceptions, minimal effort has been put into modeling it. Almost all travel behavior models are based on traveler experiences, which are assumed to reflect traveler perceptions via the addition of some random error component. This works introduces an alternative approach: instead of adding an error component to represent driver perceptions, it proposes to model driver perceptions. This work is based on a real-world route choice experiment of a sample of 20 drivers who made more than 2,000 real-world route choices. Each of the drivers' experiences, perceptions, and choices were recorded, analyzed and cross examined. The paper demonstrates that: i driver experiences are different from driver perceptions, ii driver perceptions explain driver choices better than driver experiences, iii it is possible to model and predict driver perceptions of travel distance, time and speed.

  1. Fast beam conditions monitor BCM1F for the CMS experiment

    Bell, A.; Castro, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.

    2009-10-01

    The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System, BRM, will support beam tuning, protect the CMS detector from adverse beam conditions, and measure the accumulated dose close to or inside all sub-detectors. It is composed of different sub-systems measuring either the particle flux near the beam pipe with time resolution between nano- and microseconds or the integrated dose over longer time intervals. This paper presents the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, which is designed for fast flux monitoring measuring both beam halo and collision products. BCM1F is located inside the CMS pixel detector volume close to the beam-pipe. It uses sCVD diamond sensors and radiation hard front-end electronics, along with an analog optical readout of the signals. The commissioning of the system and its successful operation during the first beams of the LHC are described. (orig.)

  2. Fast beam conditions monitor BCM1F for the CMS experiment

    Bell, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Castro, E. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany); Hall-Wilton, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (US)] (and others)

    2009-10-15

    The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System, BRM, will support beam tuning, protect the CMS detector from adverse beam conditions, and measure the accumulated dose close to or inside all sub-detectors. It is composed of different sub-systems measuring either the particle flux near the beam pipe with time resolution between nano- and microseconds or the integrated dose over longer time intervals. This paper presents the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, which is designed for fast flux monitoring measuring both beam halo and collision products. BCM1F is located inside the CMS pixel detector volume close to the beam-pipe. It uses sCVD diamond sensors and radiation hard front-end electronics, along with an analog optical readout of the signals. The commissioning of the system and its successful operation during the first beams of the LHC are described. (orig.)

  3. Task Experience as a Boundary Condition for the Negative Effects of Irrelevant Information on Learning

    Rop, Gertjan; van Wermeskerken, Margot; de Nooijer, Jacqueline A.; Verkoeijen, Peter P. J. L.; van Gog, Tamara

    2018-01-01

    Research on multimedia learning has shown that learning is hampered when a multimedia message includes extraneous information that is not relevant for the task, because processing the extraneous information uses up scarce attention and working memory resources. However, eye-tracking research suggests that task experience might be a boundary…

  4. Life Satisfaction among Ethnic Minorities in the Netherlands: Immigration Experience or Adverse Living Conditions?

    de Vroome, Thomas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323040969; Hooghe, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that immigrants' levels of life satisfaction tend to be lower than among natives. We do not know, however, whether this is due to the immigration experience as such, or rather is a result of the fact that on average this group is faced with less prosperous living

  5. The etiology of childhood dental fear: The role of dental and conditioning experiences.

    ten Berge, M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relative importance of invasive treatment experiences in the acquisition of dental fear in children. For this purpose, the complete dental history of 401 children (aged 5-10 years) was studied. The level of dental fear in these children was assessed using the Dental

  6. Medium-Range Dispersion Experiments Downwind from a Shoreline in Near Neutral Conditions

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Lyck, E.

    1980-01-01

    Five atmospheric dispersion experiments, all assigned Pasquill stability class D, were performed at Risø National Laboratory. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released at a height of 60 m from the Risø meteorological tower, situated on a peninsula in the Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, and was sampled...

  7. Experience of inundation or drought alters the responses of plants to subsequent water conditions

    Wang, Shu; Callaway, Ragan M.; Zhou, Dao-Wei

    2017-01-01

    had the strongest drought tolerance after early drought; (iii) mesic species were more likely to suffer reduced later growth after either inundation or drought experience. Invasive species benefitted more from early inundation than did native species, but native species grew better after experiencing...

  8. Consistent and Persistent, Distinctive and Evolving: Musical Experience as an Intellectual Human Condition

    Younker, Betty Anne

    2015-01-01

    Amongst the multiple key philosophers who have addressed critical issues pertaining to music education since the mid-1900s, Bennett Reimer was one voice that began a systematic examination of the nature and value of music and music education as a foundation for a philosophy of music education. With the musical experience at the center of his…

  9. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young Suk [Launcher Systems Development Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid.

  10. No evidence for general condition-dependence of structural plumage colour in blue tits: an experiment

    Peters, A.; Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Roberts, M.L.; Delhey, K.

    2011-01-01

    Condition-dependence is a central but contentious tenet of evolutionary theories on the maintenance of ornamental traits, and this is particularly true for structural plumage colour. By providing diets of different nutritional quality to moulting male and female blue tits, we experimentally

  11. Language Personality in the Conditions of Cross-Cultural Communication: Case-Study Experience

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Khyhniak, Kateryna

    2018-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of identification of a language personality's traits under conditions of cross-cultural communication. It is shown that effective cross-cultural communication is revised under globalization and increasingly intensive social interactions. The results of the authors' research prove that it is possible to develop…

  12. Initial experience with computed tomographic colonography applied for noncolorectal cancerous conditions

    Ichikawa, Tamaki; Kawada, Shuichi; Hirata, Satoru; Ikeda, Shu; Sato, Yuuki; Imai, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to asses retrospectively the performance of computed tomography colonography (CTC) for noncolorectal cancerous conditions. A total of 44 patients with non-colorectal cancerous conditions underwent CTC. We researched the indications for CTC or present illness and evaluated the CTC imaging findings. We assessed whether diagnosis by CTC reduced conventional colonoscopic examinations. A total of 47 examinations were performed in 44 patients. The indications for CTC or a present illness were as follows: 15 patients with impossible or incomplete colonoscopy, 7 with diverticular disease, 6 with malignancy (noncolorectal cancer), 6 with Crohn's disease, 4 suspected to have a submucosal tumor on colonoscopy, 2 with ischemic colitis, and 4 with various other diseases. Colonic findings were diagnosed on CTC in 36 examinations, and extracolonic findings were identified in 35 of 44 patients. In all, 17 patients had undergone colonoscopy previously, 9 (52.9%) of whom did not require further colonoscopy by CTC. Five patients underwent colonoscopy after CTC. The indications for CTC were varied for patients with noncolorectal cancerous conditions. CTC examinations could be performed safely. Unlike colonoscopy or CT without preparation, CTC revealed colonic and extracolonic findings and may reduce the indication of colonoscopy in patients with noncolorectal cancerous conditions. (author)

  13. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon; Jung, Young Suk

    2014-01-01

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid

  14. Responding to Bullying: What Works?

    Craig, Wendy; Pepler, Debra; Blais, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Children who are bullied are often told to "solve the problems themselves"; however, when bullying is repeated over time, it becomes increasingly difficult for victimized children to stop the torment because of their relative lack of power. We examine the ways in which children respond to bullying and their evaluations of the…

  15. A relational understanding of sibling experiences of children with rare life-limiting conditions: findings from a qualitative study.

    Malcolm, Cari; Gibson, Faith; Adams, Sally; Anderson, Gillian; Forbat, Liz

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) and Batten disease are rare life-limiting conditions (LLCs) characterised by progressive and permanent physical and cognitive decline. The impact of such conditions on families, and notably on siblings, has not yet been described or documented. This paper presents data from a UK-wide study that sought to understand the family experience of supporting a child with the rare degenerative LLCs of MPS and Batten disease. The aim of this paper is to report sibling experiences related to these rare degenerative and progressive conditions, in order to inform the future development of supportive interventions. Eight siblings of children with MPS (n = 7) and Batten Disease (n = 1) participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. A card sort technique was utilised to support and engage the children. Siblings are clearly impacted emotionally, pragmatically and relationally by the ill health of another child in the family. The data indicate four key themes which demonstrate impacts on siblings: perceptions of the condition and its symptoms, impact on daily life, emotional consequences and ways of coping. Siblings often had considerable knowledge of the condition and took on important roles in symptom management. However, these experiences were in the context of managing relationships within the family (often protecting parents from an awareness of how much they knew) and relationships at school (including distraction from learning and being bullied by peers). The data highlight how sibling experiences are generated through a combination of negative disability discourses and support through peers and family members. The data indicate how these features shift as a consequence of witnessing the advancement of their brother's or sister's condition and the emotional sequelae of disease progression. Exploration of siblings' experiences of living with such rare progressive and degenerative LLCs suggest the focus of interventions to support this

  16. Elements of a pragmatic approach for dealing with bias and uncertainty in experiments through predictions : experiment design and data conditioning; %22real space%22 model validation and conditioning; hierarchical modeling and extrapolative prediction.

    Romero, Vicente Jose

    2011-11-01

    This report explores some important considerations in devising a practical and consistent framework and methodology for utilizing experiments and experimental data to support modeling and prediction. A pragmatic and versatile 'Real Space' approach is outlined for confronting experimental and modeling bias and uncertainty to mitigate risk in modeling and prediction. The elements of experiment design and data analysis, data conditioning, model conditioning, model validation, hierarchical modeling, and extrapolative prediction under uncertainty are examined. An appreciation can be gained for the constraints and difficulties at play in devising a viable end-to-end methodology. Rationale is given for the various choices underlying the Real Space end-to-end approach. The approach adopts and refines some elements and constructs from the literature and adds pivotal new elements and constructs. Crucially, the approach reflects a pragmatism and versatility derived from working many industrial-scale problems involving complex physics and constitutive models, steady-state and time-varying nonlinear behavior and boundary conditions, and various types of uncertainty in experiments and models. The framework benefits from a broad exposure to integrated experimental and modeling activities in the areas of heat transfer, solid and structural mechanics, irradiated electronics, and combustion in fluids and solids.

  17. Evaluation of tetroon flights and turbulent diffusion under weak wind conditions during the field experiment SIESTA

    Hu Erbang; Vogt, S.

    1986-08-01

    During several days in November 1985 an international field experiment took place in the Swiss plateau region near the cities of Aarau, Olten. As indicated by the name of the project SIESTA (SF 6 International Experiments in Stagnant Air) its aim is to obtain knowledge of the general nature of turbulence advection and atmospheric dispersion processes in a cold pool with very low wind speed and undefined wind direction. An outline of the general concept of the project is followed by a more detailed description of a special research activity with Radar tracked tetroons. In the second part of the report it is shown how to determine the horizontal dispersion parameter from the trajectories of the tetroon flights. Two different methods are described and the results of the flights performed during SIESTA are presented. (orig.) [de

  18. Observations from borehole dilution logging experiments in fractured crystalline rock under variable hydraulic conditions

    Harte, Philip T.; Anderson, Alton; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying hydraulically active fractures in low permeability, crystalline-bedrock aquifers requires a variety of geophysical and hydrogeophysical borehole tools and approaches. One such approach is Single Borehole Dilution Tests (SBDT), which in some low flow cases have been shown to provide greater resolution of borehole flow than other logging procedures, such as vertical differential Heat Pulse Flowmeter (HPFM) logging. Because the tools used in SBDT collect continuous profiles of water quality or dye changes, they can identify horizontal flow zones and vertical flow. We used SBDT with a food grade blue dye as a tracer and dual photometer-nephelometer measurements to identify low flow zones.SBDT were conducted at seven wells with open boreholes (exceeding 300 ft). At most of the wells HPFM logs were also collected. The seven wells are set in low-permeability, fractured granite and gneiss rocks underlying a former tetrachloroeythylene (PCE) source area at the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site in Milford, NH. Time series SBDT logs were collected at each of the seven wells under three distinct hydraulic conditions: (1) ambient conditions prior to a pump test at an adjacent well, (2) mid test, after 2-3 days of the start of the pump test, and (3) at the end of the test, after 8-9 days of the pump test. None of the SBDT were conducted under pumping conditions in the logged well. For each condition, wells were initially passively spiked with blue dye once and subsequent time series measurements were made.Measurement accuracy and precision of the photometer tool is important in SBDT when attempting to detect low rates of borehole flow. Tests indicate that under ambient conditions, none of the wells had detectable flow as measured with HPFM logging. With SBDT, 4 of the 7 showed the presence of some very low flow. None of 5 (2 of the 7 wells initially logged with HPFM under ambient conditions were not re-logged) wells logged with the HPFM during the pump test had

  19. Dynamics of Plug Formation in a Circular Cylinder Under Low Bond Number Conditions: Experiment and Simulation

    Hallaby, Ghazi; Kizito, John P.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the current study is to investigate the dynamics of two phase interface under a low Bond number condition. Silicone oil is injected into a cylinder under a Bond number of about 0.47 via a side tube forming a T-junction with the former. The time evolution of the interface of silicon oil in a cylinder is captured using a high speed camera. The volume at which the plug is formed is then determined using an image processing tool to analyze the captured images. A numerical simulation is carried out where fluid is injected into a cylinder, under a less than unity Bond number condition, via a side tube. Numerical and experimental results are then compared.

  20. Pilot scale experiment with MBR operated in intermittent aeration condition: analysis of biological performance.

    Capodici, M; Di Bella, G; Di Trapani, D; Torregrossa, M

    2015-02-01

    The effect of intermittent aeration (IA) on a MBR system was investigated. The study was aimed at analyzing different working conditions and the influence of different IA cycles on the biological performance of the MBR pilot plant, in terms of organic carbon and ammonium removal as well as extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) production. The membrane modules were placed in a separate compartment, continuously aerated. This configuration allowed to disconnect from the filtration stage the biological phenomena occurring into the IA bioreactor. The observed results highlighted good efficiencies, in terms of organic carbon and ammonium removal. It was noticed a significant soluble microbial products (SMPs) release, likely related to the higher metabolic stress that anoxic conditions exerted on the biomass. However, the proposed configuration, with the membranes in a separate compartment, allowed to reduce the EPSs in the membrane tank even during the non-aerated phase, thus lowering fouling development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Natural Circulation Characteristics at Low-Pressure Conditions through PANDA Experiments and ATHLET Simulations

    Paladino, Domenico; Huggenberger, Max; Schäfer, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Natural circulation characteristics at low pressure/low power have been studied by performing experimental investigations and numerical simulations. The PANDA large-scale facility was used to provide valuable, high quality data on natural circulation characteristics as a function of several parameters and for a wide range of operating conditions. The new experimental data allow for testing and improving the capabilities of the thermal-hydraulic computer codes to be used for treating natural c...

  2. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research

    Andrew K. Przybylski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group’s research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding—a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires—is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (ntot = 11,908 provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area.

  3. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments; TOPICAL

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments[Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a basis

  4. Busted Butte : final report on laboratory radionuclide migration experiments in non-welded tuff under unsaturated and saturated conditions

    Vandergraaf, T.T.; Drew, D.J.; Ticknor, K.V.; Hamon, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Three blocks of non-welded tuff, one nominally one cubic foot (trial block) in volume and the other two, nominally one cubic meter (1 m 3 ) in volume, were excavated from the Busted Butte Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site in 1999 and transported to the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Whiteshell Laboratories in Pinawa, Manitoba. The trial block and one of the 1-m 3 blocks were used for radionuclide migration experiments under unsaturated conditions; the remaining 1-m3 block was used for similar migration experiments under saturated conditions. After a vertical flow of synthetic transport solution was set up under unsaturated conditions, a suite of conservative and chemically reactive radionuclide tracers was injected at volumetric flow rates of 20 mL/hr in the trial block, and 10 mL/hr in two locations on the upper surface of the 1-m 3 block. These flow rates correspond to infiltration rates of about 120 cm/year and about 17 cm/year, respectively. The duration of the migration experiment in the trial block was 87 days, while the migration experiment in the 1-m3 block was performed for a period of 588 days. Results obtained from the migration experiment in the trial block showed that transport of 95m+99 Tc, injected as the pertechnetate (an)ion, was slightly faster than that of the transport solution, using tritiated water ( 3 H 2 0) as a flow indicator. Retardation of 237 Np was consistent with that predicted from results obtained in supporting static batch sorption studies. Post-migration analysis of the flow field in the trial block showed that the front of the 22 Na plume had migrated about half the distance through the block, and that 60 Co and 137 Cs had been retained near the inlet. This observation agrees qualitatively with that predicted from the results obtained in static batch sorption studies. In the larger-scale experiment, the transport behavior of Tc was also very similar to that of the transport solution. None of the other radionuclide tracers

  5. Near-death-like experiences without life-threatening conditions or brain disorders: a hypothesis from a case report

    Enrico eFacco

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Near-death experiences (NDEs are profound psychic experiences commonly occurring in life-threatening conditions. They include feeling a sense of peace, of seeing a bright light, encountering deceased relatives or religious figures, and of transcending space and time. To explain them, it has been suggested that they stem from brain disorders and/or psychological reactions to approaching death, a sort of wishful thinking in response to the perceived threat.This is a report on a case with most of the features typical of NDEs except that it occurred entirely without any life-threatening conditions. This evidence is theoretically incompatible with either of the above hypotheses, suggesting that a broader interpretation of the phenomenon is needed.

  6. The effect of isolation on reproduction and growth of Pseudosuccinea columella (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae: a snail-conditioned water experiment

    Gutiérrez Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A snail-conditioned water experiment was conducted in Pseudosuccinea columella to test the possible role of a chemical interaction between snails on the diminished growth and fecundity rates found for snails raised in pairs compared to those raised in complete isolation. The results permit to discard the hypothesis of an inhibition of growth and reproduction between snails due to factors released into the water.

  7. Evaluating the influence of initial magnetization conditions on extracted exchange parameters in NMR relaxation experiments: applications to CPMG and CEST

    Yuwen, Tairan; Sekhar, Ashok; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Transient excursions of native protein states to functionally relevant higher energy conformations often occur on the μs–ms timescale. NMR spectroscopy has emerged as an important tool to probe such processes using techniques such as Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion and Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST). The extraction of kinetic and structural parameters from these measurements is predicated upon mathematical modeling of the resulting relaxation profiles, which in turn relies on knowledge of the initial magnetization conditions at the start of the CPMG/CEST relaxation elements in these experiments. Most fitting programs simply assume initial magnetization conditions that are given by equilibrium populations, which may be incorrect in certain implementations of experiments. In this study we have quantified the systematic errors in extracted parameters that are generated from analyses of CPMG and CEST experiments using incorrect initial boundary conditions. We find that the errors in exchange rates (k{sub ex}) and populations (p{sub E}) are typically small (<10 %) and thus can be safely ignored in most cases. However, errors become larger and cannot be fully neglected (20–40 %) as k{sub ex} falls near the lower limit of each method or when short CPMG/CEST relaxation elements are used in these experiments. The source of the errors can be rationalized and their magnitude given by a simple functional form. Despite the fact that errors tend to be small, it is recommended that the correct boundary conditions be implemented in fitting programs so as to obtain as robust estimates of exchange parameters as possible.

  8. Online communication in a rehabilitation setting: Experiences of patients with chronic conditions using a web portal in Denmark.

    Cerdan, Jose; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Berg, Sarah Warny

    2017-12-01

    To gain insight into the experiences of patients with long-term conditions enrolled in an online rehabilitation programme using a web portal. Danish outpatients were recruited from a rehabilitation department and were granted access to a web portal which included an online rehabilitation programme with key information, clinical advice, and self-management activities. After two weeks, patients were invited to participate in focus groups. A topic guide was used to explore this new online rehabilitation programme in relation to participants' experiences. Fourteen participants, ranging from 42 to 72 years old, were allocated into three focus groups. Participants mainly reported negative experiences by the following four themes: 'patients' experiences', 'technical aspects', 'areas for improvement', and 'digitalization added value'. Participants mainly reported negative experiences and suggested combining both face-to-face consultations with online care by user-friendly web portals. This will ensure a positive contribution from digital communication tools to rehabilitation. Patients' experiences should be considered in the design of web portals in rehabilitation which could help healthcare organizations when developing online rehabilitation programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Some remarks on the specification of seismic conditions for NPPs, based on the Romanian experience

    Sandi, H [INCERC Building Research Inst., Bucharest (Romania)

    1993-07-01

    Some introductory remarks are devoted to the importance of revising the level of earthquake protection of NPPs, given the new knowledge at hand. Some summary data on the seismicity of Romania are given, with emphasis on the implications of instrumental data obtained during the recent strong intermediate depth earthquake of 1986 and 1990. Some problems raised by the new data in connection with the Cernavoda NPP (currently under construction), from the viewpoint of ground and floor design conditions, are discussed. Some proposals are then presented in connection with the future activities related to the verification of NPPs of the region. (author)

  10. Evaluation of work capacity of laboratory animals under the conditions of toxicologic experiment

    Fedotov, V.P.; Moskalev, O.S.; Il'in, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data on the effect of different doses of X-radiation on the behaviour of mongrel male rats in an alternative labyrinth and on the heart rythnic activity are presented. It is ascertained that X-irradiation of rates leads to a change of rat behaviour stereotype, accompanies by increased values of cardiovascular activity which conditions thereduction of the number of paces per a unit of time. It is possible to perform comparative analysis of available data on the level of integral work capacity of man and animals, using unified criteria for evaluating the organism functional state

  11. Some remarks on the specification of seismic conditions for NPPs, based on the Romanian experience

    Sandi, H.

    1993-01-01

    Some introductory remarks are devoted to the importance of revising the level of earthquake protection of NPPs, given the new knowledge at hand. Some summary data on the seismicity of Romania are given, with emphasis on the implications of instrumental data obtained during the recent strong intermediate depth earthquake of 1986 and 1990. Some problems raised by the new data in connection with the Cernavoda NPP (currently under construction), from the viewpoint of ground and floor design conditions, are discussed. Some proposals are then presented in connection with the future activities related to the verification of NPPs of the region. (author)

  12. OLGA experiments with {sup 261}104 under chlorinating and brominating conditions

    Gaeggeler, H.W.; Eichler, B.; Jost, D.T.; Piguet, D.; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Buklanov, G.; Lebedev, V.; Timokhin, S.; Vedeev, M.V.; Yakushev, A.; Zvara, I. [FLNR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Huebener, S. [FZR (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    With the On-Line Gas chemistry Apparatus OLGA III the retention times of element 104 chloride and bromide was measured in a quartz column using the isotope {sup 261}104 with a half-life of 78 s. With HCl as chlorinating agent element 104 was found to quantitatively pass through the column at 150{sup o}C, whereas with HBr this temperature shifted to about 300{sup o}C. Under both halogenating conditions, the homologuous element Hf passed through the column at higher temperatures than element 104, in agreement with expectations. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  13. High-Z plasma facing components in fusion devices: boundary conditions and operational experiences

    Neu, R.

    2006-04-01

    In present day fusion devices optimization of the performance and experimental freedom motivates the use of low-Z plasma facing materials (PFMs). However, in a future fusion reactor, for economic reasons, a sufficient lifetime of the first wall components is essential. Additionally, tritium retention has to be small to meet safety requirements. Tungsten appears to be the most realistic material choice for reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because it exhibits the lowest erosion. But besides this there are a lot of criteria which have to be fulfilled simultaneously in a reactor. Results from present day devices and from laboratory experiments confirm the advantages of high-Z PFMs but also point to operational restrictions, when using them as PFCs. These are associated with the central impurity concentration, which is determined by the sputtering yield, the penetration of the impurities and their transport within the confined plasma. The restrictions could exclude successful operation of a reactor, but concomitantly there exist remedies to ameliorate their impact. Obviously some price has to be paid in terms of reduced performance but lacking of materials or concepts which could substitute high-Z PFCs, emphasis has to be put on the development and optimization of reactor-relevant scenarios which incorporate the experiences and measures.

  14. High-Z plasma facing components in fusion devices: boundary conditions and operational experiences

    Neu, R.

    2006-01-01

    In present day fusion devices optimization of the performance and experimental freedom motivates the use of low-Z plasma facing materials (PFMs). However, in a future fusion reactor, for economic reasons, a sufficient lifetime of the first wall components is essential. Additionally, tritium retention has to be small to meet safety requirements. Tungsten appears to be the most realistic material choice for reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because it exhibits the lowest erosion. But besides this there are a lot of criteria which have to be fulfilled simultaneously in a reactor. Results from present day devices and from laboratory experiments confirm the advantages of high-Z PFMs but also point to operational restrictions, when using them as PFCs. These are associated with the central impurity concentration, which is determined by the sputtering yield, the penetration of the impurities and their transport within the confined plasma. The restrictions could exclude successful operation of a reactor, but concomitantly there exist remedies to ameliorate their impact. Obviously some price has to be paid in terms of reduced performance but lacking of materials or concepts which could substitute high-Z PFCs, emphasis has to be put on the development and optimization of reactor-relevant scenarios which incorporate the experiences and measures

  15. Recent experience with testing of parallel disc gate valves under accident flow conditions

    LaPointe, P.A.; Clayton, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the nuclear valve industry's latest and most extensive valve qualification test program experience. The test program includes a variety of 25 different gate and globe valves. All the test valves are power operated using either air, electric, or gas/hydraulic operators. The valves are categorized in size and pressure class so as to form a group of appropriate parent valve assemblies. Parent valve assembly qualification is used as the basis for qualification of candidate valve assemblies. The parent and candidate valve assemblies are representative of a nuclear plant's safety-related valve applications. The test program was performed in accordance with ANSI B16.41-1983 'Functional Qualification Requirements for Power Operated Active Valve Assemblies for Nuclear Power Plants.' The focus of this paper is on functional valve qualification test experience and specifically flow interruption testing to Annex G of the aforementioned test standard. Results of the flow test are summarized, including the coefficient of friction for each of the gate type valves reported. Information on valve size, pressure class, and actuator are given for all valves in the program. Although all valves performed extremely well, only selected test data are presented. The effects of the speed of operation and the effects of different fluid flow rates as they relate to the coefficient of friction between the valve disc and seat are discussed. The variation in the coefficient of friction based on other variables in the thrust equation, namely, differential pressure area is cited

  16. Model experiments on simulation of the WWER water-chemical conditions at loop facilities of the MIR reactor

    Benderskaya, O.S.; Zotov, E.A.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The experiments on simulation of the WWER type reactors water-chemical conditions have been started at the State Scientific Center RIAR. These experiments are being conducted at the multi-loop research MIR reactor at the PVK-2 loop facility. The dosage stand was created. It allows introduction of boric acid, potassium and lithium hydroxides, ammonia solutions and gaseous hydrogen. Corrosion tests of the Russian E-635 and E-110 alloys are being conducted at the PVK-2 loop under the WWER water-chemical conditions. If necessary, fuel elements are periodically extracted from the reactor to perform visual examination, to measure their length, diameter, to remove the deposits from the claddings, to measure the burnup and to distribute the fission products over the fuel element by gamma-spectrometry. The chemical analytical 'on line' equipment produced by the ORBISPHERE Laboratory (Switzerland) will be commissioned in the nearest future to measure concentration of the dissolved hydrogen and oxygen as well as pH and specific conductivity. The objective of the report is to familiarize the participants of the IAEA Technical Committee with the capabilities of performing the model water-chemical experiments under the MIR reactor loop facility conditions. (author)

  17. Testosterone for Poor Ovarian Responders

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Davis, Susan R; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone, an androgen that directly binds to the androgen receptor, has been shown in previous small randomized controlled trials to increase the reproductive outcomes of poor ovarian responders. In most of these studies, transdermal testosterone in relatively high doses was administered before...... ovarian stimulation with a duration varying from 5 to 21 days. Nevertheless, the key question to be asked is whether, based on ovarian physiology and testosterone pharmacokinetics, a short course of testosterone administration of more than 10 mg could be expected to have any beneficial effect...... stages. In addition, extreme testosterone excess is not only likely to induce adverse events but has also the potential to be ineffective and even detrimental. Thus, evidence from clinical studies is not enough to either "reopen" or "close" the "androgen chapter" in poor responders, mainly because...

  18. Experience and projects concerning treatment, conditioning and storage of all radioactive wastes from Tokai reprocessing plant

    Fukuda, G.; Matsumoto, K.; Miyahara, K.

    1984-01-01

    The active operation of Tokai reprocessing plant started in September 1977, and about 170 t U of spent fuel were reprocessed between then and December 1982. During this period, the low-level waste processing plant reduced the amount of radioactivity discharged into the environment. For radioactive liquid waste, the treatment procedures consist mainly of evaporation to keep the discharge into the sea at a low level. For combustible low-level solid waste and the solvent waste, which is of low tributyl phosphate content, incineration has been used successfully (burned: about 150 t of combined LLSW, about 50 m 3 of solvent waste, i.e. diluent waste). Most of the past R and D work was devoted to reducing the activity discharged into the environment. Current R and D work is concerned with the treatment of solvent waste, the conditioning of solid wastes, the bituminization of low-level liquid waste and the vitrification of high-level liquid waste. The paper describes present practices, R and D work and future aspects of the treatment, conditioning and storage of all radioactive wastes from Tokai reprocessing plant. (author)

  19. Developments in the monitoring and control of Eh and pH conditions in hydrothermal experiments

    Myers, J.; Ulmer, G.C.; Grandstaff, D.E.; Brozdowski, R.; Danielson, M.J.; Koski, O.H.

    1984-01-01

    In the design of a high-level nuclear waste repository it is essential to obtain accurate groundwater Eh-pH data. Design considerations such as the choice of matrix for the waste form, type and dimensions of canister material, use of buffers, and type and amount of backfill would all benefit from an exact knowledge of oxidation potentials (Eh) and acidity levels (pH) of the groundwater. The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) has initiated a research effort to develop sensors which can be mounted in autoclaves to provide constant monitoring of the Eh-pH conditions that exist during waste form/barrier material/groundwater hydrothermal interaction tests. Sensors must withstand temperatures up to 300 0 C and pressures up to 300 bars. This report considers Teflon hydrogen diffusion membranes and zirconia pH sensors. The development of these sensors represents a significant advance in the environmental monitoring of Eh and pH conditions at elevated temperatures and pressures

  20. Online communication in a rehabilitation setting: Experiences of patients with chronic conditions using a web portal in Denmark

    Cerdan de Las Heras, Jose Manuel; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Warny, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    mainly reported negative experiences and suggested combining both face-to-face consultations with online care by user-friendly web portals. This will ensure a positive contribution from digital communication tools to rehabilitation. Practice implications Patients’ experiences should be considered......Abstract Objective To gain insight into the experiences of patients with long-term conditions enrolled in an online rehabilitation programme using a web portal. Methods Danish outpatients were recruited from a rehabilitation department and were granted access to a web portal which included...... in the design of web portals in rehabilitation which could help healthcare organizations when developing online rehabilitation programmes. Keywords CommunicationWeb portalPatient's experienceseHealthRehabilitation...

  1. Saddleworth, Responding to a Landscape

    Murray, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Matthew Murray's Landscape publication Saddleworth, Responding To A Landscape. Forward by Martin Barnes Senior Curator of Photographs at The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, Artist Richard Billingham and Maartje van den Heuvel Curator Photography and Media Culture -Leiden Institute. \\ud \\ud ‘Every trip I have taken to Saddleworth Moor over four years has encapsulated each season, weather and cloud pattern, rain, sunshine, snow, early morning clear skies and the sense of the bitter cold of ...

  2. Time-critical database condition data handling in the CMS experiment during the first data taking period

    Di Guida, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Automatic, synchronous and of course reliable population of the condition databases is critical for the correct operation of the online selection as well as of the offline reconstruction and analysis of data. In this complex infrastructure, monitoring and fast detection of errors is a very challenging task. To recover the system and to put it in a safe state requires spotting a faulty situation within strict time constraints. We will describe here the system put in place in the CMS experiment to automate the processes that populate centrally the Condition Databases and make condition data promptly available both online for the high-level trigger and offline for reconstruction. The data are automatically collected using centralized jobs or are ``dropped'' by the users in dedicate services (offline and online drop-box), which synchronize them and take care of writing them into the online database. Then they are automatically streamed to the offline database, and thus are immediately acce...

  3. Cogema experience on retrieving and conditioning solid radwaste previously stored in pits. The La Hague north west pit case

    Bodin, F.; Alexandre, D.; Fournier, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    Short lived, low and medium level waste called 'technological waste' produced by the La Hague Reprocessing Plant have been stored in the La Hague North-West concrete-lined pits until implementation at ANDRA's Centre de Stockage de la Manche (CSM). COGEMA decided to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of humid solid radwaste, stored in bulk in pits. This report describes the experience gained from February 1990 to December 1998, taking into account radwaste and integrated dose rate results conditioning such waste. The procedures and means used and improved by COGEMA to comply with ANDRA's storage standards and the ever-decreasing financial costs generated by the workers, allowed to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of old solid radwaste with competitive costs and in complete safety and protection of the environment. (authors)

  4. The effect of the atmospheric condition on the extensive air shower analysis at the Telescope Array experiment

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Kakimoto, F.; Tomida, T.

    2011-01-01

    The accuracies in determination of air shower parameters such as longitudinal profiles or primary energies with the fluorescence detection technique are strongly dependent on atmospheric conditions of the molecular and aerosol components. Moreover, air fluorescence photon yield depends on the atmospheric density, and the transparency of the air for fluorescence photons depends on the atmospheric conditions from EAS to FDs. In this paper, we describe the atmospheric monitoring system in the Telescope Array (TA experiment), and the impact of the atmospheric conditions in air shower reconstructions. The systematic uncertainties of the determination of the primary cosmic ray energies and of the measurement of depth of maximum development (X max ) of EASs due to atmospheric variance are evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  5. Meteorological conditions at the release site during the two tracer experiments

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.; Schneiter, D.

    1998-01-01

    The state of the boundary layer at the release site during the two tracer experiments is described, based on measurements of atmospheric turbulence carried our by a sonic anemometer, profiles of horizontal and vertical wind by a SODAR as well as frequent radiosonde releases. The boundary layer...... height is derived from radiosoundings, modelled and discussed. The study is meant as background for discussions of the tracer behaviour near the release site, and possible influence of the local meteorology at the release site on the long-range dispersion. The difference in the initial mese...... model development. It is concluded that the micrometeorological measurements are very important as background information for the understanding of plume behaviour on small as well as long scales. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Morphodynamics and sedimentary structures of bedforms under supercritical-flow conditions: new insights from flume experiments

    Cartigny, Matthieu; Ventra, Dario; Postma, George; Van den Berg, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    Supercritical-flow phenomena are fairly common in modern sedimentary environments, yet their recognition remains subordinate in the rock record. This is commonly ascribed to the poor preservation potential of deposits from supercritical flows. However, the number of documented flume datasets on supercritical-flow dynamics and sedimentary structures is very limited in comparison with available data from subcritical-flow experiments, and our inability to identify and interpret such deposits might also be due to insufficient knowledge. This article describes the results of systematic experiments spanning the full range of supercritical-flow bedforms (antidunes, chutes-and-pools, cyclic steps) developed over mobile sand beds of variable grain sizes. Flow character and related bedform patterns are constrained through time-series measurements of the bed configuration, flow depth, flow velocity and Froude number. The results allow the refinement and extension of current bedform stability diagrams in the supercritical-flow domain. The experimental dataset and the stability diagram clarify morphodynamic relationships between antidune and cyclic steps. The onset of antidunes is controlled by the flow passing a threshold value of the Froude parameter. The transition from antidunes to cyclic steps instead is completed at a threshold value of the mobility parameter, and this transition spans a wider range of values for the mobility parameter as grain size increases. Sedimentary structures associated with the development of supercritical bedforms under variable aggradation rates are revealed by means of a synthetic aggradation technique and compared with examples from field and flume studies. Aggradation rate bears an important influence on the geometry of supercritical structures, and it should be held in consideration for the identification and mutual distinction of supercritical-flow bedforms in the stratigraphic record.

  7. Experiments to evaluate behavior of containment piping bellows under severe accident conditions

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall. In a severe accident they may be subjected to high pressure and temperature, and a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, are being subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen tests have been conducted. The tests showed that withstanding relatively large bellows are capable of deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed

  8. Natural Circulation Characteristics at Low-Pressure Conditions through PANDA Experiments and ATHLET Simulations

    Domenico Paladino

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural circulation characteristics at low pressure/low power have been studied by performing experimental investigations and numerical simulations. The PANDA large-scale facility was used to provide valuable, high quality data on natural circulation characteristics as a function of several parameters and for a wide range of operating conditions. The new experimental data allow for testing and improving the capabilities of the thermal-hydraulic computer codes to be used for treating natural circulation loops in a range with increased attention. This paper presents a synthesis of a part of the results obtained within the EU-Project NACUSP “natural circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors.” It does so by using the experimental results produced in PANDA and by showing some examples of numerical simulations performed with the thermal-hydraulic code ATHLET.

  9. Operating experience with the 50 MeV 10kA ATA power conditioning system

    Rogers, D.; Lee, F.D.; Newton, M.; Reginato, L.L.; Smith, M.E.

    1984-06-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) has been operational for over one year and has achieved full parameters in the power conditioning system. The pulsed power system has been previously described, however, during the past year of operation a considerable amount of statistical data has been accumulated on the 211 gas blown spark gaps that perform the main switching function in the ATA. These spark gaps were designed for 250kV, 40 kA and 70ns pulse. The parameter that made this spark gap somewhat unique was the requirement that it be able to provide a burst of ten pulses at one kilohertz with an average repetition rate of 5Hz. 2 references, 7 figures

  10. Operating experience with a high capacity helium pump under supercritical conditions

    Lehmann, W.; Minges, J.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the development and testing of a high-capacity piston pump to provide forced cooling for large superconducting magnets. The pump is a three cylinder, vertically arranged single-acting piston pump equipped with a frequency controlled three-phase geared motor operating at room temperature. The pump is capable of delivering up to 150 g/s at a maximum speed of 310 rpm and under the inlet conditions of 4 bar/4.5 K. No decline was noticed in delivery head and efficiencies during more than 560 hours of operation. It is concluded that the pump satisfies all requirements for circulating large mass flows across great pressure differences as needed (e.g. in fusion magnet design)

  11. Research on Dynamic Dissolving Model and Experiment for Rock Salt under Different Flow Conditions

    Xinrong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing deep rock salt cavern is not only a widely recognized energy reserve method but also a key development direction for implementing the energy strategic reserve plan. And rock salt cavern adopts solution mining techniques to realize building cavity. In view of this, the paper, based on the dissolving properties of rock salt, being simplified and hypothesized the dynamic dissolving process of rock salt, combined conditions between dissolution effect and seepage effect in establishing dynamic dissolving models of rock salt under different flow quantities. Devices were also designed to test the dynamic dissolving process for rock salt samples under different flow quantities and then utilized the finite-difference method to find the numerical solution of the dynamic dissolving model. The artificial intelligence algorithm, Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (PSO, was finally introduced to conduct inverse analysis of parameters on the established model, whose calculation results coincide with the experimental data.

  12. An experiment to examine the mechanistic behaviour of irradiated CANDU fuel stored under dry conditions

    Oldaker, I.E.; Crosthwaite, J.L.; Keltie, R.J.; Truss, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A program has begun to use the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment dry-storage canisters to store some selected CANDU irradiated fuel bundles in an 'easily retrievable basket.' The object of the experimental program is to study the long-term stability of the Zircaloy-sheathed UO 2 and UC fuel elements when stored in air. Bundles were loaded into a canister in October 1979 following detailed examination and removal of up to three complete elements from most bundles. These elements are currently being subjected to detailed destructive examinations, including metallography and scanning electron micrography, to fully characterize their pre-storage condition. After four years, and every five years thereafter, further elements will be examined similarly to study the effects of the storage environment on the stability of the Zircaloy sheathing, and on its continued ability to contain the fuel safely in an interim storage facility. (author)

  13. Stimulus-Food Pairings Produce Stimulus-Directed Touch Screen Responding in Cynomolgus Monkeys ("Macaca Fascicularis") with or without a Positive Response Contingency

    Bullock, Christopher E.; Myers, Todd M.

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition and maintenance of touch-screen responding was examined in naive cynomolgus monkeys ("Macaca fascicularis") under automaintenance and classical conditioning arrangements. In the first condition of Experiment 1, we compared acquisition of screen touching to a randomly positioned stimulus (a gray square) that was either stationary or…

  14. Subduction factory in an ampoule: Experiments on sediment-peridotite interaction under temperature gradient conditions

    Woodland, A. B.; Bulatov, V. K.; Brey, G. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Höfer, H. E.; Gerdes, A.

    2018-02-01

    To better understand processes above subducted oceanic slabs, we have undertaken experiments with juxtaposed sediment and peridotite layers at pressures of 7.5 and 10.5 GPa at a controlled temperature gradient from ∼100 to ∼500 °C per a sample length of ∼3 mm. The sediment starting material contains H2O (6.9 wt%) and CO2 (5.9 wt%) and has a major-element composition similar to GLOSS (Plank and Langmuir, 1998) doped with trace elements at 10-100 ppm levels. Several experiments were conducted with ∼0.5 wt% Cl or F. The peridotite layer is composed of natural olivine (66 wt%), orthopyroxene (27 wt%) and garnet (7 wt%) mixed with ∼15 wt% graphite. Several experimental configurations were investigated, but the "basic" setup has the sediment layer at the bottom in the cold zone (400-1200 °C) overlain by peridotite at 900-1500 °C. The temperature distribution was determined by two thermocouples and orthopyroxene-garnet thermometry. Features common to many experiments are (1) the development of multiple layers of various lithologies and a pool of hydrous silicate or carbonate-silicate melt in the hottest part of the capsule; (2) replacement of olivine by orthopyroxene in the metaperidotite; (3) preservation and growth of garnet and local development of magnesite in the metaperidotite layer; (4) enrichment in garnet within the metasediment layer at the contact with the metaperidotite; (5) formation of a clinopyroxene-garnet assemblage at the bottom (the coldest part); (6) presence of K-bearing phases (phlogopite or phengite) and carbonates in the metasediment layer only at temperatures Ca are largely retained in the coldest part of the metasediment layer in clinopyroxene, Ca-rich garnet and aragonite. The melt is a product of interaction between partial melt or fluid from the sediment and peridotite. It has a silico-carbonatite composition with variable SiO2, MgO, FeO and CaO contents and low Al2O3. The addition of Cl has almost no effect on element

  15. Experience of a Neural Network Imitator Applied to Diagnosis of Pre-pathological Conditions in Humans

    Belyashov, D.N.; Emelyanova, I.V.; Tichshenko, A.V.; Makarenko, N.G.; Sultanova, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    The Governmental Resolution of the RK 'Program of Medical Rehabilitation for People Influenced by Nuclear Tests at STS in 1949-1990' was published in March 1997. Implementation of the program requires first of all to create the effective methods of operative diagnostics of arid zones' population. To our mind, for this aims systems analysis with elements of neural network classification is more effective. We demonstrate such an approach using the example of the modem diagnostics system creating to detect the pre-pathological states among population by express analysis and personal particulars. The following considerations were used in the base of the training set: 1) any formalism must be based oneself upon wealth of phenomenology (experience, intuition, the presence of symptoms); 2) typical attributes of disease can be divided on 2 groups - subjective and objective. The common state of patient is characterised by the first group and it can have no intercommunication with disease. The second one is obtained by laboratory inspection and it is not connected with patient sensations. Each of the objective at-tributes can be the attribute of several illnesses at once. In this case both the subjective and objective features must be used together; 3) acceptability of any scheme can be substantiated only statistically. The question about justifiability and sufficiency of training set always demands separate discussion. Personal particulars are more available for creating training set. The set must be professionally oriented in order to reduce of selection effects. For our experiment the fully-connected neural network ( computer software, imitating the work of neural computer) 'Multi Neuron' was chosen. Feature space using for the net work was created from the 206 personal particulars. The research aimed to determine pre-pathological states of the urinary system organs among industrial, office and professional workers in the mining industry connected with phosphorus

  16. LHCb: Beam and Background Monitoring and the Development of an Online Condition Analysis Tool for the LHCb Experiment at CERN

    Alessio, F

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data since more than half a year at the LHC, recording events from collisions at the highest energy ever achieved. For its physics purposes in the sector of CP violation, the experiment will record data with the best precision achievable. An online and offline beam and background monitoring became therefore essential to understand the performance of the LHC accelerator at CERN, to monitor and study the behavior of the background around the LHCb experiment and to optimize the experimental conditions. During my second year as a Doctoral Student at CERN, I have been working on the timing and readout control as well as on the online Beam, Background, and Luminosity Monitoring of the LHCb experiment in the frame of the LHCb Online group. The group is responsible for the complete data acquisition of the LHCb experiment, from the Front-End Electronics (FEE) to the storage of the data for offline analysis, including the Timing and Fast Control (TFC) system. The latter controls and...

  17. Hydrographic Conditions in the Gulf of Carpentaria During Australian Monsoon Experiment

    Inoue, M.; Steinberg, C.; Wolanski, E.; Ridd, P.

    2002-12-01

    Gulf of Carpentaria located in the northern Australia, is a shallow wide basin with the deepest bottom depths of approximately 60 m. It is connected to Arafura Sea to the north and west, and to the Torres Strait to the east. Hydrographic surveys of the Gulf of Carpentaria were carried out in January and March, 1987 as part of Australian Monsoon Experiment. During the January survey, Tropical Cyclone (TC) Irma was formed in the Gulf of Carpentaria. An east-west CTD section at 13o52'S was occupied twice, one prior to and during, and the other after the formation of TC Irma. In addition, two post-Irma east-west sections were occupied at 12o40'S and 11o30'S. The pre-cyclone section indicates a well-defined stratified two-layer system, while the post-cyclone sections show deepening of the surface warm layer due to significant mixing by TC Irma. Overall, significant cooling of near surface warm water on the order of more than 1oC was observed. Significant heat loss estimated for the water column has presumably contributed toward the development of TC Irma. In February 1987, TC Jason was formed in the gulf. During the March survey, two east-west CTD sections were occupied at 11o30'S and 13o52'S. The March survey reveals notable warming of the bottom water. Detailed discussion of the CTD data from the two cruises will be presented.

  18. Sickle cell anaemia and the experiences of young people living with the condition.

    Foster, Nicole; Ellis, Michelle

    2018-04-26

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a life-threatening haemoglobin disorder acknowledged for its unpredictability and painful episodes. The aim of this qualitative literature review was to explore the experiences of young people living with SCA and its effect on their lives. The objective was to critically review selected primary research and make recommendations for practice, education and research. After reviewing potential articles using EBSCOhost, inclusion and exclusion criteria were devised and six appropriate studies were found with most participants in the 10-25 years age range. These studies were conducted in the UK and the United States. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme qualitative research checklist was used to evaluate the articles. Thematic analysis identified three themes: acceptance, support and unpredictability, with sub-themes of spirituality and discrimination. It was clear that SCA affected multiple areas of young people's lives. Recommendations are made for practice, education and research. © 2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  19. Discriminated conditioned suppression in rats

    Ribeiro, Thais Arantes; Huziwara, Edson Massayuki; Montagnoli, Tathianna Amorim Souza; Souza, Deisy das Graças de

    2012-01-01

    This experiment evaluated the effects of superimposing the Estes-Skinner Conditioned Emotional Response (CER) procedure on one of two components of a multiple schedule. The question was whether CER conditioning occurred under contextual control. The procedure had four experimental phases: (1) baseline of operant responding under a two-component multiple schedule (mult VI 30 VI 30), one component correlated with the house light on and the other correlated with the house light off (light/dark c...

  20. Expansion dynamics and equilibrium conditions in a laser ablation plume of lithium: Modeling and experiment

    Stapleton, M.W.; McKiernan, A.P.; Mosnier, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    The gas dynamics and atomic kinetics of a laser ablation plume of lithium, expanding adiabatically in vacuum, are included in a numerical model, using isothermal and isentropic self-similar analytical solutions and steady-state collisional radiative equations, respectively. Measurements of plume expansion dynamics using ultrafast imaging for various laser wavelengths (266-1064 nm), fluences (2-6.5 J cm -2 ), and spot sizes (50-1000 μm) are performed to provide input parameters for the model and, thereby, study the influence of laser spot size, wavelength, and fluence, respectively, on both the plume expansion dynamics and atomic kinetics. Target recoil pressure, which clearly affects plume dynamics, is included in the model. The effects of laser wavelength and spot size on plume dynamics are discussed in terms of plasma absorption of laser light. A transition from isothermal to isentropic behavior for spot sizes greater than 50 μm is clearly evidenced. Equilibrium conditions are found to exist only up to 300 ns after the plume creation, while complete local thermodynamic equilibrium is found to be confined to the very early parts of the expansion

  1. Material conditions of kindergartens as producers of experiences: uses of diversity and unequal relationships

    Lucía Petrelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents preliminary results of socio-anthropological research that took place in Early Education schools of the City of Buenos Aires. It focuses on the uses of sociocultural diversity and unequal relationships and their articulation with the materiality of everyday life conditions of the institutions in which fieldwork took place. It includes the analytical description of a social situation —the visit of an officer of the Ministry of Education to one of these Initial Schools in which research was carried on. This descriptions show the ways in which the different institutional subjects —teachers, parents, school directors, the staff member— refer to and produce the spaces in which their practices take place, and simultaneously, struggle for their places and put  under strain their diverse and unequal relationships. Afterwards, taking into account the Initial Education schools of a whole Educational District of the City, we analyze the features of the “educational offer” for Initial Schooling, the incorporation of devices  as cell phones  to everyday educational work of the kindergartens, as an aide to the teacher’s work, and the beginnings of the online school enrolment. These issues permit us to highlight the recent history of Argentina´s Initial Level teaching. The article accounts  that materiality, as the ethnographic descriptions evidence, permits to understand how, nowadays, relations of diversity and inequality come together.

  2. Advanced development and operating experience with a canned motor pump under pressurized water reactor conditions

    Dittmer, H.; Reymann, A.; Seibig, B.; Reinecker, H.

    1988-01-01

    At the research reactor FRG-2, Geesthacht, an irradiation device is in operation for testing defective light-water-reactor (LWR) test fuel rods under pressurized water reactor conditions (320 0 C, 160 bar). The requirements to the canned motor pump for cooling water circulation: medium: Demineralized water, operating temperature 320 0 C, operating pressure 155 bar, radiation field of the reactor, integration in the irradiation capsule, helium leak rate -6 mbar.dm 3 .s -1 , minimum working life 3000 hours, were high and caused difficulties in the acquisition of this component. First test runs with supplied pumps showed that the desired working life could not be achieved. The results of the development steps, the test runs, and the performance in service show that for our range of applications, the best combination of materials for the radial bearings is silicon-infiltrated SiC (8% free Si) against the same material. These bearings allowed a good working life for the pump to be achieved. (orig./GL) [de

  3. Iron and Nickel spectral opacity calculations in conditions relevant for pulsating stellar envelopes and experiments

    Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Busquet, M.; Thais, F.; Loisel, G.; Piau, L.; Ducret, J. E.; Blenski, T.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, P.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Porcherot, Q.; Guzik, J. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Harris, J.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Seismology of stars is strongly developing. To address this question we have formed an international collaboration, OPAC, to perform specific experimental measurements, compare opacity calculations, and improve the opacity calculations in stellar codes [1]. We consider the following opacity codes: SCO, CASSANDRA, STA, OPAS, LEDCOP, OP, SCO-RCG. Their comparison has shown large differences for Fe and Ni in equivalent conditions of envelopes of type II supernova precursors, temperatures between 15 and 40 eV and densities of a few mg/cm 3 [2-4]. LEDCOP, OPAS, SCO-RCG structure codes and STA give similar results and differ from OP ones for the lower temperatures and for spectral interval values [3]. In this work we discuss the role of Configuration Interaction (CI) and the influence of the number of used configurations. We present and include in the opacity code comparisons new HULLAC-v9 calculations [5, 6] that include full CI. To illustrate the importance of this effect we compare different CI approximations (modes) available in HULLAC-v9 [7]. These results are compared to previous predictions and to experimental data. Differences with OP results are discussed. (authors)

  4. Experiment on Measurement of Interfacial Tension for Subsurface Conditions of Light Oil from Thailand

    Jiravivitpanya Jiramet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of enhanced oil recovery techniques to increase oil production is surfactant flooding. Surfactants are considered as effective chemical agents used in oilfield in Thailand. It is used to reduce the interfacial tension (IFT of two fluids and to make them flow easier in the reservoir. In this study, Monoethanolamide (MEA commonly used for carbon dioxide capture, is applied as a surfactant to reduce IFT between oil and brine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to investigate and measure the IFT based on the conditions of subsurface at the oilfield in Thailand. These parameters such as temperature, pressure, salinity as well as the concentration of surfactant are adjusted to investigate the effects on IFT reduction. From the results, it is reported that pressure from 1000 to 2000 psi and temperature varied from 70°C to 90°C can reduce IFT insignificantly. However, salinity and surfactant concentration are the main parameters that impact on the IFT reduction. It can greatly decrease IFT up to 87.13% for surfactant concentration and up to 74.06% for salinity. Finally, the results can be applied to use in the real field for enhanced oil production in Thailand.

  5. SHM experiences of monuments in different structural use and environmental conditions

    Modena, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the need for an effective seismic protection and vulnerability reduction of strategic structures and particularly the architectural heritage determined a growing interest in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) as measure of passive mitigation of earthquake effects. The object of monitoring is to identify, locate and classify type and severity of damage induced by external actions or degradation phenomena and to assess their effects on the structural performance. In this way it is possible to take appropriate measures to reduce the danger of collapse and, when necessary, perform straightening interventions to improve the structural and seismic capacity. Motivated by the above reasons, the paper provide a contribution to the application of integrated methodologies and techniques, based on SHM, for the assessment and protection of Cultural Heritage (CH) buildings and monuments. Selected case studies, equipped with distributed sensors and acquisition systems. allowed the definition and successive validation of SHM as a knowledge-based assessment tool, implemented to evaluate intervention needs, following an incremental approach during their execution, and to control the damage states of buildings in a post-seismic scenario. In order to maximize the benefits of SHM and optimize the entire process, dedicated software for static monitoring and automated algorithms for modal parameters identification have been developed, able to provide almost real time information on the health state of the monitored structure. Finally integrated procedures based on robust statistical and numerical models have been implemented to interpret and exploit SHM outputs to assess the structural conditions of the investigated CH buildings.

  6. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    Alizadeh, E.; Sanche, L.

    2014-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N 2 , O 2 , H 2 O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N 2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O 2 and H 2 O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O 2 and H 2 O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitization of these agents in chemo-radiation cancer therapy. (authors)

  7. STARDUST-U experiments on fluid-dynamic conditions affecting dust mobilization during LOVAs

    Poggi, L.A.; Malizia, A.; Ciparisse, J.F.; Gelfusa, M.; Papa, C. Del; Giovannangeli, I.; Gaudio, P.; Tieri, F.; Murari, A.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2006 the Quantum Electronics and Plasma Physics (QEP) Research Group together with ENEA FusTech of Frascati have been working on dust re-suspension inside tokamaks and its potential capability to jeopardize the integrity of future fusion nuclear plants (i.e. ITER or DEMO) and to be a risk for the health of the operators. Actually, this team is working with the improved version of the 'STARDUST' facility, i.e. 'STARDUST-Upgrade'. STARDUST-U facility has four new air inlet ports that allow the experimental replication of Loss of Vacuum Accidents (LOVAs). The experimental campaign to detect the different pressurization rates, local air velocity, temperature, have been carried out from all the ports in different accident conditions and the principal results will be analyzed and compared with the numerical simulations obtained through a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic) code. This preliminary thermo fluid-dynamic analysis of the accident is crucial for numerical model development and validation, and for the incoming experimental campaign of dust resuspension inside STARDUST-U due to well-defined accidents presented in this paper.

  8. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N2, O2, H2O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O2 and H2O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O2 and H2O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitisation of these agents in chemoradiation cancer therapy.

  9. A condensation experiment in the accumulated conditions of noncondensable gas in a vertical tube

    Lee, Kwon Yeong; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been well known that the presence of noncondensable gases in vapors can greatly inhibit the condensation process. Many analytical and experimental studies were conducted to investigate the effect of noncondensable gases on steam condensation for both stagnant and forced-convective situations either over a plate or outside a horizontal tube. Recently, several researches have been performed for the condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases taken place inside the vertical tube in order to give the information to design the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). Generally, the experimental results showed that the heat transfer coefficient depends on inlet noncondensable gas mass fraction, inlet saturated steam temperature related with system pressure and inlet mixture Reynolds number. This research was performed for the System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor-Pilot (SMART-P), in which the remaining heat is removed from the core passively by Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) condenser in a period of serious accident. The PRHRS is separated from working fluid loop, and pressurized by a nitrogen gas during the normal operation of SMART-P. But when the PRHRS starts operating, the nitrogen gas acts as a noncondensable gas and affects the heat transfer characteristics of the PRHRS. The experimental conditions of this study were almost similar with those of previous researches except the noncondensable gas was accumulated and remained inside the vertical tube. In the previous researches, the noncondensable gas was flowing with constant flow rate. Because of the condensate inside condenser tube, the accumulation of noncondensable gas could be developed inside the vertical tube. At steady-state condition the local temperatures and system pressure were measured to obtain heat transfer characteristics. This study also gave the information about the distribution of the

  10. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Seiner, Derrick R.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2012-10-24

    In a white powder scenario, there are a large number of field-deployable assays that can be used to determine if the suspicious substance contains biological material and warrants further investigation. This report summarizes commercially available technologies that are considered hand portable and can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor do the authors endorse any of the technologies described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use.

  11. Effects from influent boundary conditions on tracer migration and spatial variability features in intermediate-scale experiments

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Springer, E.P.

    1987-04-01

    In previous unsaturated transport studies at Los Alamos dispersion coefficients were estimated to be higher close to the tracer source than at greater distances from the source. Injection of tracers through discrete influent outlets could have accounted for those higher dispersions. Also, a lack of conservation of mass of the tracers was observed and suspected to be due to spatial variability in transport. In the present study experiments were performed under uniform influent (ponded) conditions in which breakthrough of tracers was monitored at four locations at each of four depths. All other conditions were similar to those of the unsaturated transport experiments. A comparison of results from these two sets of experiments indicates differences in the parameter estimates. Estimates were made for the dispersion coefficient and the retardation factor by the one-dimensional steady flow computer code, CFITIM. Estimates were also made for mass and for velocity and the dispersion coefficient by the method of moments. The dispersion coefficient decreased with depth under discrete influent application and increased with depth under ponded influent application. Retardation was predicted better under the discrete influent application than under ponded influent application. Differences in breakthroughs and in estimated parameters among locations at the same depth were observed under ponded influent application. Those differences indicate that there is a lack of conservation of mass as well as significant spatial variability across the experimental domain. 14 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Experiments to quantify airborne release from packages with dispersible radioactive materials under accident conditions

    Martens, R.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany); Koch, W.; Nolte, O. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin (ITEM), Nikolai-Fuchs-Str.1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    For transport or handling accidents involving packages with radioactive materials and the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the IAEA Transport Regulations, and for their possible further development reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. Within this context a research project was carried out which extends the basis for a well-founded examination of the contemporary system of requirements of 'Low Specific Activity' (LSA)-type materials and allows for its further development where appropriate. This project comprises a prior system-analytical examination and an experimental programme aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the characteristics of airborne released material for non-fixed dispersible LSA-II material upon mechanical impact. Impaction experiments applying small, medium and real sized specimens of different dispersible materials revealed that the release behaviour of dispersible powders strongly depends upon material properties, e.g. particle size distribution and cohesion forces. The highest experimentally determined release fraction of respirable mass (AED < 10 {mu}m) amounted to about 2 % and was obtained for 2 kg of un-contained easily dispersible pulverized fly ash (PFA). For larger un-contained PFA specimen the release fraction decreases. However, packaging containing powdery material substantially reduces the airborne release fraction. The measured airborne release fractions for a 200 l drum with Type A certificate containing PFA were about a factor of 50 to 100 lower than for un-contained material. For a drop height of 9 m the airborne release fraction amounted to about 4 x 10{sup -5}. This value should be applicable for most of transport and handling accidents with mechanical impact. For a metal container of Type IP-2 or better which contains powder masses of 100 kg or more this release

  13. Experiences and perceptions about cause and prevention of cardiovascular disease among people with cardiometabolic conditions: findings of in-depth interviews from a peri-urban Nepalese community

    Natalia Oli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nepal currently faces an increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Earlier studies on health literacy and the behavior dimension of cardiovascular health reported a substantial gap between knowledge and practice. Objective: This qualitative study aimed to deepen understanding of the community perspective on cardiovascular health from the patients’ viewpoint. Design: We conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs with 13 individuals with confirmed heart disease, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus. All participants provided verbal consent. We used an IDI guide to ask respondents about their perception and experiences with CVD, particularly regarding causation and preventability. We manually applied qualitative content analysis to evaluate the data and grouped similar content into categories and subcategories. Results: Respondents perceived dietary factors, particularly consumption of salty, fatty, and oily food, as the main determinants of CVD. Similarly, our respondents unanimously linked smoking, alcohol intake, and high blood pressure with cardiac ailments but reported mixed opinion regarding the causal role of body weight and physical inactivity. Although depressed and stressed at the time of diagnosis, respondents learned to handle their situation better over time. Despite good family support for health care, the financial burden of disease was a major issue. All respondents understood the importance of lifestyle modification and relied upon health professionals for information and motivation. Respondents remarked that community awareness of CVD was inadequate and that medical doctors or trained local people should help increase awareness. Conclusions: This study provided insight into the perceptions of patients regarding CVD. Respondents embraced the importance of lifestyle modification only after receiving their diagnosis. Although better health care is important in terms of aiding patients to better understand and cope with

  14. Responding book banning in indonesia

    Aji, RNB; Artono; Liana, C.

    2018-01-01

    The prohibition of books conducted by the government through its apparatus without any due process of law is unfortunate. The Constitutional Court of the Republic of Indonesia (MKRI) in 2010 was decided that book banning is contradictory to the 1945 Constitution (UUD 1945). The purpose of this paper is to know Indonesia, according to the Constitutional Court must absolutely carry out the function of due process of law that is law enforcement in a judicial system when it wants to prohibit printed material which is a book, whether it is a book that is considered criticism and books that teach radicalism. It would be wise for anyone who disagrees with a book, and then responds by writing through a book. The result of this article is to support and suggest that the government and its apparatus in the state of the law should not arbitrarily impose a book ban. Likewise, people should not take violence action to respond this issue. In historical records, the prohibition of books without due process of law is always followed by the withdrawal of books and make people unable to deal with differences, especially in knowledge. That’s why, the government and its apparatus must create a conducive situation and support the creation of various perspectives in the framework of the progress of science through a book. It would implicate that people can respect in any perspective and thought.

  15. Development and performance test of a system available for generating multiple extreme conditions for neutron scattering experiments

    Kawano, Shinji; Fukui, Susumu; Moriai, Atsushi; Ohtomo, Akitoshi; Ichimura, Shigeki; Onodera, Akifumi; Amita, F.; Katano, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    We have developed unique system available for controlling sample environment during the neutron scattering experiments. The system can simultaneously generate triple extreme conditions of low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure. The system consists of: (i) a liquid-helium cryostat variable for sample temperature from 1.7 K to 200 K, (ii) a superconducting magnet providing a vertical field up to ±5 T with an antisymmetric split-coil geometry for polarized-beam experiments, and (iii) a non-magnetic piston-cylinder high-pressure cell designed with the aim of generating hydrostatic pressure up to 2.5 GPa. In the presentation, we will report the outline of the system and some results of performance tests at KURRI and JRR-3M of JAERI. (author)

  16. Expose-R experiment on effects of open space condition on survivorship in dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates

    Alekseev, Victor; Novikova, Nataliya; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Yusoff, Fatimah; Azuraidi, Osman

    2012-07-01

    Dormancy protects animals and plants in harsh environmental conditions from months up to hundred years. This phenomenon is perspective for space researches especially for interplanetary missions. Direct experiments in open space BYORYSK supported in principle the fact of survivorship of bacteria, fungi spores, seed of plants and crustacean dormant cysts. Even though the rate of survivorship in long-term treatments was low but good enough to conclude that biological invasion even to Mars is a real danger. As soon as the BYORYSK lunch was made of metal the possibility for resting stages to survive under UV treatment in vacuum without some protection was not clear. To test it an ESA and RSA equipment titled EXPOSE-R was applied. The EXPOSE-R facility was an external facility attached to the outside of the Zvezda Service Module in ISS in the end of November 2008. It had glace windows transparent for UV-radiation and possibility to measure temperature, space- and UV-radiation. Among a number of experiments requiring exposure to the open space environment it had a biological launch containing resting stages of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. These stages included dried ephippia of cladoceran Daphnia magna differentiated on size, dormant eggs of ostracode Eucypris ornate, cysts of fair-shrimp Streptocephalus torvicornis ( all from hemi desert Caspian area) and Artemis salina from salt lake Crimean populations. All dormant stages were kept in transparent to UV plastic bags placed in three layers. After about two years of exposing in open space dormant stages of 3 species A. salina, D. magna, S. torvicornis successfully survived at different scales but in second and third layers only . The highest level of survivorship was found in A. salina cysts. In preliminary land experiments that imitated land EXPOSE imitation of outside space station UV and vacuum conditions survivorship in resting eggs of D .magna, S. torvicornis and E. ornate was tested also. The total UV dose of

  17. Time-critical Database Condition Data Handling in the CMS Experiment During the First Data Taking Period

    Cavallari, Francesca; Gruttola, Michele de; Di Guida, Salvatore; Innocente, Vincenzo; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Govi, Giacomo; Pierro, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Automatic, synchronous and reliable population of the condition databases is critical for the correct operation of the online selection as well as of the offline reconstruction and analysis of data. In this complex infrastructure, monitoring and fast detection of errors is a very challenging task. In this paper, we describe the CMS experiment system to process and populate the Condition Databases and make condition data promptly available both online for the high-level trigger and offline for reconstruction. The data are automatically collected using centralized jobs or are 'dropped' by the users in dedicated services (offline and online drop-box), which synchronize them and take care of writing them into the online database. Then they are automatically streamed to the offline database, and thus are immediately accessible offline worldwide. The condition data are managed by different users using a wide range of applications. In normal operation the database monitor is used to provide simple timing information and the history of all transactions for all database accounts, and in the case of faults it is used to return simple error messages and more complete debugging information.

  18. COGEMA experience on retrieving and conditioning solid radwaste previously stored in pits. The La Hague North-West pit case

    Bodin, F.; Alexandre, D.; Fournier, P.

    1999-01-01

    Short lived, low and medium level waste called 'technological waste' produced by the La Hague Reprocessing Plant have been stored in the La Hague North-West concrete-lined pits until implementation at ANDRA's Centre de Stockage de la Manche (CSM). COGEMA decided to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of humid solid radwaste, stored in bulk in pits. On account of the variety of radwaste kinds, retrieving and conditioning operations represented real challenge. One goal of these operations was to ensure that the work was performed in complete safety towards environment with optimum containment and with the best radiation protection for the personnel involved. COGEMA decided to split the work into two phases. The feedback from the first phase was very helpful to the second phase. This report describes the experience gained from February 1990 to December 1998, taking into account radwaste and integrated dose rate results conditioning such waste. The procedures and means used and improved by COGEMA to comply with ANDRA's storage standards and the ever-decreasing financial costs generated by the workers, allowed to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of old solid radwaste with competitive costs and in complete safety and protection of the environment. (author)

  19. The MEXICO project (Model Experiments in Controlled Conditions): The database and first results of data processing and interpretation

    Snel, H; Schepers, J G; Montgomerie, B

    2007-01-01

    The Mexico (Model experiments in Controlled Conditions) was a FP5 project, partly financed by European Commission. The main objective was to create a database of detailed aerodynamic and load measurements on a wind turbine model, in a large and high quality wind tunnel, to be used for model validation and improvement. Here model stands for both the extended BEM modelling used in state-of-the-art design and certification software, and CFD modelling of the rotor and near wake flow. For this purpose a three bladed 4.5 m diameter wind tunnel model was built and instrumented. The wind tunnel experiments were carried out in the open section (9.5*9.5 m 2 ) of the Large Scale Facility of the DNW (German-Netherlands) during a six day campaign in December 2006. The conditions for measurements cover three operational tip speed ratios, many blade pitch angles, three yaw misalignment angles and a small number of unsteady cases in the form of pitch ramps and rotor speed ramps. One of the most important feats of the measurement program was the flow field mapping, with stereo PIV techniques. Overall the measurement campaign was very successful. The paper describes the now existing database and discusses a number of highlights from early data processing and interpretation. It should be stressed that all results are first results, no tunnel correction has been performed so far, nor has the necessary checking of data quality

  20. Synchrotron in-situ deformation experiments of perovskite + (Mg,Fe)O aggregates under shallow lower mantle conditions (Invited)

    Girard, J.; Amulele, G.; Farla, R. J.; Liu, Z.; Mohiuddin, A.; Karato, S.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental studies on rheological properties of mantle's minerals are crucial to understand the dynamics of Earth's interior, but direct experimental studies under the relevant lower mantle conditions are challenging. Most of the earlier studies were performed at lower mantle pressures but low temperatures using DAC (diamond anvil cell) (e.g., Merkel et al., 2003)), and in DAC experiments strain-rate and stress are unknown. Some previous studies were carried out under high pressures and high temperatures (e.g, Cordier et al., 2004) , but quantitative results on rheological behaviour of said minerals were not obtained. Here we present the results of the first in-situ deformation experiments of perovskite + (Mg,Fe)O (Pv + fp) aggregates using RDA (rotational Drickamer apparatus). The RDA has a better support for the anvils at high pressure than the more commonly used D-DIA apparatus and hence we can reach higher pressures and temperatures than the D-DIA. We have recently made new modifications to the cell assembly to reach the lower mantle conditions with less interference in X-ray diffraction patterns by the surrounding materials. The starting material was ringwoodite synthesized using a multi-anvil. In-situ deformation experiments were then carried at pressure up to 28 GPa (calculated from thermal EOS of Pt) and estimated temperatures up to 2200 K using RDA. Under these conditions, ringwoodite transformed to Pv + fp. We subsequently deformed the sample between strain rates of 10-4 to 10-5 s-1. Stress and strain were measured in-situ using X-ray synchrotron beam. The recovered sample analyses show evidence of perovskite+(Mg,Fe)O microstructure (Fig. 1). The radial X-ray diffraction data are being analysed to determine the stress levels of two minerals. Also microstructures of deformed specimens are studied to understand the deformation mechanisms and strain partitioning. The results will contribute towards our understanding of the rheological properties of the

  1. Modelling of the UO2 dissolution mechanisms in synthetic groundwater. Experiments carried out under anaerobic and reducing conditions

    Cera, E.; Grive, M.; Bruno, J.; Ollila, K.

    2000-07-01

    The experimental data generated under anaerobic and reducing conditions within the EU R and D programme 1996-1998 entitled 'Source term for performance assessment of spent fuel as a waste form' and published as a POSIVA report (Ollila, 1999) have been modelled in the present work. The dissolution data available, mainly U in the aqueous phase as a function of time and redox potentials have been used to elucidate the redox pairs controlling the redox potential of the systems studied. Dissolution experiments carried out under anaerobic conditions have shown the important role of the uranium system on buffering the redox capacity of these systems. In the presence of carbonates in the system, the redox control has been given by the UO 2 (c)/U(VI) aqueous redox couple while in absence of carbonates in the system, the redox control has been governed by the UO 2 (c)/UO 2+x transition. In addition dissolution rates have been satisfactorily modelled by assuming an oxidative dissolution mechanism consisting in an initial oxidation of the surface of the uranium dioxide, binding of the HCO 3 or H+ at the U(VI) sites of the oxidised surface layer and detachment of these surface complexes. The redox controls in the experiments carried out under reducing conditions have been exerted by the different reducing agents added in the systems. Therefore, the addition of Fe 2+ lead to a redox control exerted by the Fe 2+ /Fe(OH) 3 (s) redox pair, while the addition of sulphide lead to a different redox control governed by the HS/SO 3 2- redox pair. (orig.)

  2. Modelling of the UO{sub 2} dissolution mechanisms in synthetic groundwater. Experiments carried out under anaerobic and reducing conditions

    Cera, E.; Grive, M.; Bruno, J. [EnvirosQuantiSci (Spain); Ollila, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    The experimental data generated under anaerobic and reducing conditions within the EU R and D programme 1996-1998 entitled 'Source term for performance assessment of spent fuel as a waste form' and published as a POSIVA report (Ollila, 1999) have been modelled in the present work. The dissolution data available, mainly U in the aqueous phase as a function of time and redox potentials have been used to elucidate the redox pairs controlling the redox potential of the systems studied. Dissolution experiments carried out under anaerobic conditions have shown the important role of the uranium system on buffering the redox capacity of these systems. In the presence of carbonates in the system, the redox control has been given by the UO{sub 2}(c)/U(VI) aqueous redox couple while in absence of carbonates in the system, the redox control has been governed by the UO{sub 2}(c)/UO{sub 2+x} transition. In addition dissolution rates have been satisfactorily modelled by assuming an oxidative dissolution mechanism consisting in an initial oxidation of the surface of the uranium dioxide, binding of the HCO{sub 3} or H+ at the U(VI) sites of the oxidised surface layer and detachment of these surface complexes. The redox controls in the experiments carried out under reducing conditions have been exerted by the different reducing agents added in the systems. Therefore, the addition of Fe{sup 2+} lead to a redox control exerted by the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe(OH){sub 3}(s) redox pair, while the addition of sulphide lead to a different redox control governed by the HS/SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} redox pair. (orig.)

  3. Basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction of boron carbide and stainless steel under sodium-cooled fast reactor conditions

    Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Kamiyama, Kenji; Kudo, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction and relocation of boron carbide (B 4 C) and stainless steel (SS) under a high temperature condition exceeding 1500degC as well as the importance of such behaviors in molten core during a core disruptive accident in a Generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (750 MWe class) designed in Japan. At first, a reactivity history was calculated using an exact perturbation calculation tool taking into account expected behaviors. This calculation indicated the importance of a relocation behavior of the B 4 C-SS eutectic because its behavior has a large uncertainty in the reactivity history. To clarify this behavior, basic experiments were carried out by visualizing the reaction of a B 4 C pellet contacted with molten SS in a high temperature-heating furnace. The experiments have shown the eutectic reaction visualization as well as freezing and relocation of the B 4 C-SS eutectic in upper part of the solidified test piece due to the density separation. (author)

  4. A modified surface-resistance approach for representing bare-soil evaporation: wind tunnel experiments under various atmospheric conditions

    Yamanaka, T.; Takeda, A.; Sugita, F.

    1997-01-01

    A physically based (i.e., nonempirical) representation of surface-moisture availability is proposed, and its applicability is investigated. This method is based on the surface-resistance approaches, and it uses the depth of evaporating surface rather than the water content of the surface soil as the determining factor of surface-moisture availability. A simple energy-balance model including this representation is developed and tested against wind tunnel experiments under various atmospheric conditions. This model can estimate not only the latent heat flux but also the depth of the evaporating surface simultaneously by solving the inverse problem of energy balance at both the soil surface and the evaporating surface. It was found that the depth of the evaporating surface and the latent heat flux estimated by the model agreed well with those observed. The agreements were commonly found out under different atmospheric conditions. The only limitation of this representation is that it is not valid under conditions of drastic change in the radiation input, owing to the influence of transient phase transition of water in the dry surface layer. The main advantage of the approach proposed is that it can determine the surface moisture availability on the basis of the basic properties of soils instead of empirical fitting, although further investigations on its practical use are needed

  5. RESEARCH: Influence of Social, Biophysical, and Managerial Conditions on Tourism Experiences Within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

    Shafer; Inglis

    2000-07-01

    / Managing protected areas involves balancing the enjoyment of visitors with the protection of a variety of cultural and biophysical resources. Tourism pressures in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) are creating concerns about how to strike this balance in a marine environment. Terrestrial-based research has led to conceptual planning and management frameworks that address issues of human use and resource protection. The limits of acceptable change (LAC) framework was used as a conceptual basis for a study of snorkeling at reef sites in the GBRWHA. The intent was to determine if different settings existed among tourism operators traveling to the reef and, if so, to identify specific conditions relating to those settings. Snorkelers (N = 1475) traveling with tourism operations of different sizes who traveled to different sites completed surveys. Results indicated that snorkelers who traveled with larger operations (more people and infrastructure) differed from those traveling with smaller operations (few people and little on-site infrastructure) on benefits received and in the way that specific conditions influenced their enjoyment. Benefits related to nature, escape, and family helped to define reef experiences. Conditions related to coral, fish, and operator staff had a positive influence on the enjoyment of most visitors but, number of people on the trip and site infrastructure may have the greatest potential as setting indicators. Data support the potential usefulness of visitor input in applying the LAC concept to a marine environment where tourism and recreational uses are rapidly changing.

  6. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses in Ulva spp. in the presence of nocturnal pulses of metals from sediment: A field transplantation experiment under eutrophic conditions

    Pereira, Patrícia M R

    2014-03-01

    In aquatic systems under eutrophic conditions, remobilization of metals from sediment to the overlying water may occur. Consequently, adaptive responses of local organisms could result from the accumulation of metals intermittently released from the sediment. In summer 2007, a field transplantation experiment was performed in the Óbidos lagoon (Portugal) with Ulva spp. comprising three short-term exposures (between 15:30-23:30; 23:30-07:30; 07:30-15:30) during a 24-h period. In each period, Ulva spp. was collected at a reference site located in the lower lagoon (LL) and transplanted to a eutrophic site located at the Barrosa branch (BB), characterized by moderate metal contamination. For comparison purposes, macroalgae samples were simultaneously exposed at LL under the same conditions. Both sites were surveyed in short-time scales (2-4 h) for the analysis of the variability of physical-chemical parameters in the water and metal levels in suspended particulate matter. The ratios to Al of particulate Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb increased during the period of lower water oxygenation at the eutrophic site, reaching 751 × 10-4, 0.67, 12 × 10-4, 9.9 × 10-4, respectively, confirming the release of metals from the sediment to water during the night. At the reference site, dissolved oxygen oscillated around 100%, Mn/Al ratios were considerably lower (81 × 10-4-301 × 10-4) compared to BB (234 × 10-4-790 × 10-4), and no increases of metal/Al ratios were found during the night. In general, algae uptake of Mn, Cu, Fe, Pb and Cd was significantly higher at the eutrophic site compared to the reference site. The results confirmed the potential of Ulva spp. as bioindicator of metal contamination and its capability to respond within short periods. An induction of SOD, an inhibition of CAT and the increase of LPO were recorded in Ulva spp. exposed at BB (between 23:30 and 7:30) probably as a response to the higher incorporation of Mn, Fe and Pb in combination with the lack of

  7. Miller-Urey Experiments to Assess the Production of Amino Acids under Impact Conditions on Early Titan

    Turse, Carol; Khan, A.; Leitner, J. J.; Firneis, M. G.; Schulze-Makuch, D.

    2012-05-01

    We performed Miller-Urey type experiments to determine the organic synthesis of amino acids under conditions that have likely occurred on Saturn's moon Titan and are also relevant to Jupiter's moon Europa. We conducted the first set of experiments under early Earth conditions, similar to the original Miller-Urey experiments (Miller, 1953). In brief, the 250ml round bottom flask was filled with approximately 200mL of filtered sterile water and the apparatus was placed under vacuum for 10 minutes to purge the water of gases. The system was then flushed with hydrogen gas and placed under vacuum three times. Gases were then added in the following order: hydrogen gas to 0.1 bar, methane gas to 0.45 bar and ammonia to 0.45 bar ( 1bar total). The water was then brought to a boil and the spark was applied using the tesla coil up to a maximum of 50,000 volts. The apparatus was run for approximately 5-7 days. Between the runs the apparatus was cleaned using a hot 10% sodium hydroxide solution followed by a dilute sulfuric acid wash and four rinses with Millipure water. In the second set of experiments we simulated conditions that could have existed on an early, warm Titan or after an asteroid strike on Titan (Schulze-Makuch and Grinspoon, 2005), particularly if the strike would have occurred in the subpolar areas that exhibit vast ethane-methane lakes. If the asteroid or comet would be of sufficient size, it would also puncture the icy crust and access a vast reservoir of the subsurface liquid ammonia-water mixture. Thompson and Sagan (1992) showed that a liquid water-ammonia body could exist for millions of years on Titan after an asteroid impact. Thus, we modified the experimental conditions as described above and report on the results. Assuming a moderate impact in the subpolar areas of Titan, we used an atmosphere of currently 1.5 bar, but increased the partial pressure of methane to 1 bar (and 0.1 bar ammonia assuming a minor amount of ammonia-water ice being evaporated

  8. Two-phase CFD PTS validation in an extended range of thermohydraulics conditions covered by the COSI experiment

    Coste, P.; Ortolan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Models for large interfaces in two-phase CFD were developed for PTS. • The COSI experiment is used for NEPTUNE C FD integral validation. • COSI is a PWR cold leg scaled 1/100 for volume. • Fifty runs are calculated, covering a large range of flow configurations. • The CFD predicting capability is analysed using global and local measurements. - Abstract: In the context of the Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) life duration safety studies, some models were developed to address the Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) from the two-phase CFD angle, dealing with interfaces much larger than cells size and with direct contact condensation. Such models were implemented in NEPTUNE C FD, a 3D transient Eulerian two-fluid model. The COSI experiment is used for its integral validation. It represents a cold leg scaled 1/100 for volume and power from a 900 MW PWR under a large range of LOCA PTS conditions. In this study, the CFD is evaluated in the whole range of parameters and flow configurations covered by the experiment. In a first step, a single choice of mesh and CFD models parameters is fixed and justified. In a second step, fifty runs are calculated. The CFD predicting capability is analysed, comparing the liquid temperature and the total condensation rate with the experiment, discussing their dependency on the inlet cold liquid rate, on the liquid level in the cold leg and on the difference between co-current and counter-current runs. It is shown that NEPTUNE C FD 1.0.8 calculates with a fair agreement a large range of flow configurations related to ECCS injection and steam condensation

  9. First responders and psychological first aid.

    Pekevski, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Emergencies and disasters are common and occur on a daily basis. Although most survivors will not experience any long-term negative mental health effects, some will. First responders tend to have first contact with the survivors and, therefore, are in a position to provide needed mental health assistance to survivors. Psychological first aid (PFA) is an evidence-informed approach to providing support to survivors following a serious crisis event, and it aims to reduce the initial distress of the traumatic event and to promote adaptive functioning and coping. PFA has gained a great deal of attention lately, likely due to the fact that it is easy to provide. This article discusses the potential negative effects of emergencies and disasters on mental health, provides a description of PFA and discusses its application, and provides an overview of the research base of PFA and a discussion on the need for future research.

  10. Responding to Indigenous Australian Sexual Assault

    Janya McCalman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous Australians experience a high prevalence of sexual assault, yet a regional sexual assault service found few Indigenous Australians accessed their services. This prompted exploration of how its services might be improved. A resultant systematic search of the literature is reported in this article. Seven electronic databases and seven websites were systematically searched for peer reviewed and gray literature documenting responses to the sexual assault of Indigenous Australians. These publications were then classified by response type and study type. Twenty-three publications met the inclusion criteria. They included studies of legal justice, media, and community-based and mainstream service responses for Indigenous survivors and perpetrators. We located program descriptions, measurement, and descriptive research, but no intervention studies. There is currently insufficient evidence to confidently prescribe what works to effectively respond to Indigenous Australian sexual assault. The study revealed an urgent need for researchers, Indigenous communities, and services to work together to develop the evidence base.

  11. The Basel experience with total body irradiation for conditioning patients with acute leukemia for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    Speck, B.; Cornu, P.; Nissen, C.; Gratwohl, A.; Sartorius, J.

    1979-01-01

    We are reporting our experience with 13 patients suffering from end stage acute leukemia that were prepared for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by combined chemotherapy followed by high dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI). Only one patient became a long term survivor. Of the evaluable 12 patients, 6 died of interstitial pneumonia, 4 of GvH and 1 of recurrent leukemia. We conclude that adding combined chemotherapy to the standard conditioning program with Cy and TBI probably increases the risk of developing fatal interstitial pneumonia without eliminating the risk of recurrent leukemia. We suggest that allogenic marrow grafts should be performed earlier in the course of refractory acute leukemias, because in patients with end stage disease its chances of being curative are small

  12. The study of morphological changes of periodontal tissue by using different groups of endosealers in conditions of experiment

    Makedonova Yu.A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the nature and duration of the violations of adaptive-compensatory reactions of the periodontium depending on the physico-chemical properties of endosealers is an important part of endodontic treatment. The aim is to reveal the conditions of the experiment peculiarities of morphological changes of periodontal tissue in direct contact with the main filling material for root canal. Material and methods. The traditional method of obturation by modern endosealers was used to seal the root canal of teeth of experimental animal. Results of the study demonstrated the bio-compatibility of new experimental material Real Seal. Conclusion. The data obtained justify a differentiated approach to the choice of the root filling material for teeth with a healthy periodontosis.

  13. Fear but not fright: re-evaluating traumatic experience attenuates anxiety-like behaviors after fear conditioning

    Marco eCostanzi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fear allows organisms to cope with dangerous situations and remembering these situations has an adaptive role preserving individuals from injury and death. However, recalling traumatic memories can induce re-experiencing the trauma, thus resulting in a maladaptive fear. A failure to properly regulate fear responses has been associated with anxiety disorders, like Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. Thus, re-establishing the capability to regulate fear has an important role for its adaptive and clinical relevance. Strategies aimed at erasing fear memories have been proposed, although there are limits about their efficiency in treating anxiety disorders. To re-establish fear regulation, here we propose a new approach, based on the re-evaluation of the aversive value of traumatic experience. Mice were submitted to a contextual-fear-conditioning paradigm in which a neutral context was paired with an intense electric footshock. Three weeks after acquisition, conditioned mice were treated with a less intense footshock (pain threshold. The effectiveness of this procedure in reducing fear expression was assessed in terms of behavioral outcomes related to PTSD (e.g. hyper-reactivity to a neutral tone, anxiety levels in a plus maze task, social avoidance, and learning deficits in a spatial water maze and of amygdala activity by evaluating c-fos expression. Furthermore, a possible role of lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC in mediating the behavioral effects induced by the re-evaluation procedure was investigated. We observed that this treatment (i significantly mitigates the abnormal behavioral outcomes induced by trauma, (ii persistently attenuates fear expression without erasing contextual memory, (iii prevents fear reinstatement, (iv reduces amygdala activity and (v requires an intact lOFC to be effective.The results suggest that an effective strategy to treat pathological anxiety should address cognitive re-evaluation of traumatic experiences

  14. Lived experiences of parents caring for a child with a life-limiting condition in Australia: A qualitative study.

    Collins, Anna; Hennessy-Anderson, Nicole; Hosking, Sarah; Hynson, Jenny; Remedios, Cheryl; Thomas, Kristina

    2016-12-01

    Experiential studies in paediatric palliative care are needed to enable an ongoing international agenda which supports the development of responsive family supports. To provide an in-depth exploration of the prevalent lived experiences of parents who are currently providing care for a child with a life-limiting condition in Australia. Cross-sectional, prospective, qualitative study guided by an advisory group and reported according to the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative studies. Transcripts were subjected to a thematic analysis, underpinned by an interpretative phenomenological framework. Purposively sampled parents (n = 14) recruited from a statewide paediatric hospice who self-identified as a 'primary caregiver' for one or more children and/or adolescents (⩽18 years) with a life-limiting condition. Four key themes represented the prevalent experiences of parents: (1) trapped inside the house, (2) the protector, (3) living with the shadow and (4) travelling a different pathway. They describe parents' physical and social isolation, exclusion from the workforce, pervasive grief and associated impacts to their health and well-being. Limited professional and diminished social supports resulted in full ownership of care responsibility. Yet, parents embraced their role as 'protector', reporting acquired meaning and purpose. This study builds upon the growing body of evidence available in paediatric palliative care internationally. The key themes highlight the substantial demand for both physical and emotional support beyond what is currently offered and call for the implementation of carefully planned support services and other societal initiatives which seek to alleviate the broad health impacts to caregivers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Drug use among complete responders, partial responders and non-responders in a longitudinal survey of nonagenarians

    Wastesson, Jonas W; Rasmussen, Lotte; Oksuzyan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In observational studies, non-response can limit representativity and introduce bias. We aimed to investigate the longitudinal changes in the number of used drugs among complete responders, partial responders, and non-responders in a whole birth cohort of Danish nonagenarians participati...

  16. Are Children the Better Placebo Analgesia Responders? An Experimental Approach.

    Wrobel, Nathalie; Fadai, Tahmine; Sprenger, Christian; Hebebrand, Johannes; Wiech, Katja; Bingel, Ulrike

    2015-10-01

    There is little information regarding changes in placebo responsiveness with age, although first predictors of placebo responders such as psychological and physiological processes have been identified. Reviews and meta-analyses indicate that placebo response rates in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are higher in children and adolescents compared with adults. As these studies cannot control for age-dependent differences in the natural course of the disease, biases might contribute to different placebo rates in RCTs. To avoid these biases, this study investigated age-related differences in placebo responsiveness between children and adults in a well-established experimental model of placebo analgesia combining classic conditioning and expectation. Our data confirm placebo analgesic responses in children, which did not differ in magnitude from those of adults. The influence of previous experience on subsequent treatment outcome was stronger in children than in adults, indicating an increased relevance of learning processes for treatment outcomes in children. Further studies are needed to understand the influence of treatment-related learning processes in children and adolescents, which might critically determine treatment responsiveness during adulthood. This study is the first to experimentally explore placebo analgesia and influences of previous experience on placebo responses in children compared with adults. We found comparable placebo responses in both groups and an increased relevance of learning processes for treatment outcomes in children. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Autoshaping in the rat: conditioned licking response to a stimulus that signals sucrose reinforcement.

    Reilly, Steve; Grutzmacher, Richard P.

    2002-07-31

    The present experiments were designed to determine if repeated presentations of an empty sipper tube (the conditioned stimulus or CS) with the response-independent delivery of a sucrose solution (the unconditioned stimulus or US) from a second spout results in the development of Pavlovian conditioned responding. In Experiment 1, rats in the experimental condition received paired CS-US presentations whereas subjects in the control condition were exposed to random presentations of CS and US. In Experiment 2, an additional control condition (CS alone) was included and, to encourage generalized responding between the US and CS, the CS tube was filled with water for all groups. The results of both experiments indicate that the CS-directed responding in the paired CS-US condition was Pavlovian in nature. Thus, the present procedure serves as an autoshaping task in which conditioned licking is generated.

  18. Long Range River Discharge Forecasting Using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite to Predict Conditions for Endemic Cholera

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of conditions of an impending disease outbreak remains a challenge but is achievable if the associated and appropriate large scale hydroclimatic process can be estimated in advance. Outbreaks of diarrheal diseases such as cholera, are related to episodic seasonal variability in river discharge in the regions where water and sanitation infrastructure are inadequate and insufficient. However, forecasting river discharge, few months in advance, remains elusive where cholera outbreaks are frequent, probably due to non-availability of geophysical data as well as transboundary water stresses. Here, we show that satellite derived water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Forecasting (GRACE) sensors can provide reliable estimates on river discharge atleast two months in advance over regional scales. Bayesian regression models predicted flooding and drought conditions, a prerequisite for cholera outbreaks, in Bengal Delta with an overall accuracy of 70% for upto 60 days in advance without using any other ancillary ground based data. Forecasting of river discharge will have significant impacts on planning and designing intervention strategies for potential cholera outbreaks in the coastal regions where the disease remain endemic and often fatal.

  19. A natural experiment on the condition-dependence of achromatic plumage reflectance in black-capped chickadees.

    D'Alba, Liliana; Van Hemert, Caroline; Handel, Colleen M; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Honest advertisement models posit that only individuals in good health can produce and/or maintain ornamental traits. Even though disease has profound effects on condition, few studies have experimentally tested its effects on trait expression and even fewer have identified a mechanistic basis for these effects. Recent evidence suggests that black and white, but not grey, plumage colors of black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) are sexually selected. We therefore hypothesized that birds afflicted with avian keratin disorder, a condition that affects the beak and other keratinized tissues, would show reduced expression of black and white, but not grey, color. UV-vis spectrometry of black-capped chickadees affected and unaffected by avian keratin disorder revealed spectral differences between them consistent with this hypothesis. To elucidate the mechanistic bases of these differences, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and a feather cleaning experiment. SEM showed extreme feather soiling in affected birds, and EDX revealed that this was most likely from external sources. Experimentally cleaning the feathers increased color expression of ornamental feathers of affected, but not unaffected, birds. These data provide strong evidence that black and white color is an honest indicator in chickadees, and that variation in feather dirtiness, likely due to differences in preening behavior is a mechanism for this association.

  20. A natural experiment on the condition-dependence of achromatic plumage reflectance in black-capped chickadees.

    Liliana D'Alba

    Full Text Available Honest advertisement models posit that only individuals in good health can produce and/or maintain ornamental traits. Even though disease has profound effects on condition, few studies have experimentally tested its effects on trait expression and even fewer have identified a mechanistic basis for these effects. Recent evidence suggests that black and white, but not grey, plumage colors of black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus are sexually selected. We therefore hypothesized that birds afflicted with avian keratin disorder, a condition that affects the beak and other keratinized tissues, would show reduced expression of black and white, but not grey, color. UV-vis spectrometry of black-capped chickadees affected and unaffected by avian keratin disorder revealed spectral differences between them consistent with this hypothesis. To elucidate the mechanistic bases of these differences, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX and a feather cleaning experiment. SEM showed extreme feather soiling in affected birds, and EDX revealed that this was most likely from external sources. Experimentally cleaning the feathers increased color expression of ornamental feathers of affected, but not unaffected, birds. These data provide strong evidence that black and white color is an honest indicator in chickadees, and that variation in feather dirtiness, likely due to differences in preening behavior is a mechanism for this association.

  1. The experience of facilitators and participants of long term condition self-management group programmes: A qualitative synthesis.

    Hughes, Stephen; Lewis, Sophie; Willis, Karen; Rogers, Anne; Wyke, Sally; Smith, Lorraine

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to systematically review the qualitative literature about the experiences of both facilitators and participants in a range of group-based programmes to support the self-management of long-term conditions. We searched 7 databases using the terms 'self-management', 'group' and 'qualitative'. Full text articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved for review. A thematic synthesis approach was used to analyse the studies. 2126 articles were identified and 24 were included for review. Group participants valued being with similar others and perceived peer support benefits. Facilitators (HCP and lay) had limited group specific training, were uncertain of purpose and prioritised education and medical conformity over supportive group processes and the promotion of self-management agency and engagement. Overall, studies prioritised positive descriptions. Group programmes' medical self-management focus may reduce their ability to contribute to patient-valued outcomes. Further research is needed to explore this disconnect. This review supports broadening the scope of group-based programmes to foreground shared learning, social support and development of agency. It is of relevance to developers and facilitators of group self-management programmes and their ability to address the burden of long-term conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of in-vitro experimental results to model in-situ experiments: bio-denitrification under geological disposal conditions.

    Masuda, Kaoru; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Yoshitaka; Kato, Osamu; Kato, Ko; Honda, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Some of the low level radioactive wastes from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels contain nitrates. Nitrates can be present in the form of soluble salts and can be reduced by various reactions. Among them, reduction by metal compounds and microorganisms seems to be important in the underground repository. Reduction by microorganism is more important in near field area than inside the repository because high pH and extremely high salt concentration would prevent microorganism activities. In the near field, pH is more moderate (pH is around 8) and salt concentration is lower. However, the electron donor may be limited there and it might be the control factor for microorganism's denitrification activities. In this study, in-vitro experiments of the nitrate reduction reaction were conducted using model organic materials purported to exist in underground conditions relevant to geological disposal. Two kinds of organic materials were selected. A super plasticizer was selected as being representative of the geological disposal system and humic acid was selected as being representative of pre-existing organic materials in the bedrock. Nitrates were reduced almost to N2 gas in the existence of super plasticizer. In the case of humic acids, although nitrates were reduced, the rate was much lower and, in this case, dead organism was used as an electron donor instead of humic acids. A reaction model was developed based on the in-vitro experiments and verified by running simulations against data obtained from in-situ experiments using actual groundwaters and microorganisms. The simulation showed a good correlation with the experimental data and contributes to the understanding of microbially mediated denitrification in geological disposal systems.

  3. PWR-related integral safety experiments in the PKL 111 test facility SBLOCA under beyond-design-basis accident conditions

    Weber, P.; Umminger, K.J.; Schoen, B. [Siemens AG Power Generation Group (KWU), Erlangen (France)

    1995-09-01

    The thermal hydraulic behavior of a PWR during beyond-design-basis accident scenarios is of vital interest for the verification and optimization of accident management procedures. Within the scope of the German reactor safety research program experiments were performed in the volumetrically scaled PKL 111 test facility by Siemens/KWU. This highly instrumented test rig simulates a KWU-design PWR (1300 MWe). In particular, the latest tests performed related to a SBLOCA with additional system failures, e.g. nitrogen entering the primary system. In the case of a SBLOCA, it is the goal of the operator to put the plant in a condition where the decay heat can be removed first using the low pressure emergency core cooling system and then the residual heat removal system. The experimental investigation presented assumed the following beyond-design-basis accident conditions: 0.5% break in a cold leg, 2 of 4 steam generators (SGs) isolated on the secondary side (feedwater- and steam line-valves closed), filled with steam on the primary side, cooldown of the primary system using the remaining two steam generators, high pressure injection system only in the two loops with intact steam generators, if possible no operator actions to reach the conditions for residual heat removal system activation. Furthermore, it was postulated that 2 of the 4 hot leg accumulators had a reduced initial water inventory (increased nitrogen inventory), allowing nitrogen to enter the primary system at a pressure of 15 bar and nearly preventing the heat transfer in the SGs ({open_quotes}passivating{close_quotes} U-tubes). Due to this the heat transfer regime in the intact steam generators changed remarkably. The primary system showed self-regulating system effects and heat transfer improved again (reflux-condenser mode in the U-tube inlet region).

  4. Como responder ao momento presente?

    Maria Filomena Molder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784X.2013v13n19p13 Foi com esta pergunta — já um efeito de um primeiro encontro entre Irene Pimentel e eu própria — que decidimos desafiar colegas, estudantes e funci­onários da nossa Faculdade, FCSH (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Huma­nas, de outras Faculdades da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, de outras Uni­versidades e todos os interessados em con­siderar e discutir em comum aquilo que se passava em Portugal e que no anúncio da Jornada de 6 de De­zembro de 2012 se descrevia como um “processo de desmantela­mento social, económico e cultural sem precedentes — pese embora tantas compara­ções, baseadas na premissa da ‘eterna repetição’ — e cujas consequências não param de exceder as previsões dos responsáveis por esse desmantelamento”. Acedendo com todo o empenho e gratidão ao convite que me foi dirigido por Humberto Brito para fazer uma resenha da Jornada a publicar no primeiro número de Forma de Vida (saúdo a revista e o título, decidi-me, no entanto, a pôr de lado a resenha, que sob a forma de “Editorial” será em breve publi­cada no blogue Responder ao Momento Presente, entre­tanto criado, conjuntamente com os textos escritos pelos nossos convidados, com as parti­cipações de pessoas que corresponderam ao nosso apelo e ainda com contri­bui­ções que se alargaram para lá da Jornada; a que se juntará uma gravação em video, também disponível no Youtube.   Texto publicado originalmente em Forma de Vida, Lisboa, n.1, fev. 2013. Agrade­cemos à autora por permitir a republicação neste número do Boletim. [N.E.

  5. Fearing shades of grey: individual differences in fear responding towards generalisation stimuli.

    Arnaudova, Inna; Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel; Beckers, Tom

    2017-09-01

    Individual differences in fear generalisation have been proposed to play a role in the aetiology and/or maintenance of anxiety disorders, but few data are available to directly support that claim. The research that is available has focused mostly on generalisation of peripheral and central physiological fear responses. Far less is known about the generalisation of avoidance, the behavioural component of fear. In two experiments, we evaluated how neuroticism, a known vulnerability factor for anxiety, modulates an array of fear responses, including avoidance tendencies, towards generalisation stimuli (GS). Participants underwent differential fear conditioning, in which one conditioned stimulus (CS+) was repeatedly paired with an aversive outcome (shock; unconditioned stimulus, US), whereas another was not (CS-). Fear generalisation was observed across measures in Experiment 1 (US expectancy and evaluative ratings) and Experiment 2 (US expectancy, evaluative ratings, skin conductance, startle responses, safety behaviours), with overall highest responding to the CS+, lowest to the CS- and intermediate responding to the GSs. Neuroticism had very little impact on fear generalisation (but did affect GS recognition rates in Experiment 1), in line with the idea that fear generalisation is largely an adaptive process.

  6. 29 CFR 98.1000 - Respondent.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Respondent. 98.1000 Section 98.1000 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.1000 Respondent. Respondent means a person against whom an agency has initiated a debarment or suspension action. ...

  7. CHF experiments of tight pitch lattice rod bundles under PWR pressure condition for development of reduced moderation water reactor

    Araya, Fumimasa; Nakatsuka, Toru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu

    2002-10-01

    In order to improve plutonium utilization, design studies of reduced moderation water reactors which have hard neutron energy spectrum have been carried out at Division of Energy System Research of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). At present, triangle, tight pitch lattice cores with about 1 mm gap width between fuel rods have been focused in the neutronic core design. Since a degradation of the heat removal from the fuel rods is worried, an evaluation of heat removal capability i.e. critical heat flux becomes one of important evaluation items in the feasibility study. However, any of published data base, which can be applicable to the evaluation on such narrow gap width cores, does not exist. Therefore, in the present study, in order to accumulate applicable data and to confirm applicability of an evaluation methodology of critical heat flux, basic experiments on the critical heat flux were performed using the test sections consisted of 7 heater rods bundles with the gap widths of 1.5, 1.0 and 0.6 mm under the PWR pressure conditions. The present report describes the experimental apparatus, experimental conditions and accumulated data. Analysis results of the data and the applicability of the evaluation methodology used for the design work are also discussed in this report. As the results of the experiment, it was found that the critical heat flux increased as the mass flux and the inlet subcooling increased. In the region of the mass flux less than about 2,000 kg/m 2 /s, the critical heat flux decreased as the gap width decreased. In the larger mass flux region, obvious trend of effects of the gap width on critical heat flux were not observed due to data scatterings. The flow-area-averaged thermal-equilibrium quality at the CHF position was in the higher ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 in the cases of gap widths of 1.0 and 0.6 mm, and 0.1 to 0.3 in the 1.5 mm case. Based on the experimental results such that the CHFs occurred in the higher quality range and

  8. The probability of reinforcement per trial affects posttrial responding and subsequent extinction but not within-trial responding.

    Harris, Justin A; Kwok, Dorothy W S

    2018-01-01

    During magazine approach conditioning, rats do not discriminate between a conditional stimulus (CS) that is consistently reinforced with food and a CS that is occasionally (partially) reinforced, as long as the CSs have the same overall reinforcement rate per second. This implies that rats are indifferent to the probability of reinforcement per trial. However, in the same rats, the per-trial reinforcement rate will affect subsequent extinction-responding extinguishes more rapidly for a CS that was consistently reinforced than for a partially reinforced CS. Here, we trained rats with consistently and partially reinforced CSs that were matched for overall reinforcement rate per second. We measured conditioned responding both during and immediately after the CSs. Differences in the per-trial probability of reinforcement did not affect the acquisition of responding during the CS but did affect subsequent extinction of that responding, and also affected the post-CS response rates during conditioning. Indeed, CSs with the same probability of reinforcement per trial evoked the same amount of post-CS responding even when they differed in overall reinforcement rate and thus evoked different amounts of responding during the CS. We conclude that reinforcement rate per second controls rats' acquisition of responding during the CS, but at the same time, rats also learn specifically about the probability of reinforcement per trial. The latter learning affects the rats' expectation of reinforcement as an outcome of the trial, which influences their ability to detect retrospectively that an opportunity for reinforcement was missed, and, in turn, drives extinction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Experiments and numerical modeling of fast flowing liquid metal thin films under spatially varying magnetic field conditions

    Narula, Manmeet Singh

    Innovative concepts using fast flowing thin films of liquid metals (like lithium) have been proposed for the protection of the divertor surface in magnetic fusion devices. However, concerns exist about the possibility of establishing the required flow of liquid metal thin films because of the presence of strong magnetic fields which can cause flow disrupting MHD effects. A plan is underway to design liquid lithium based divertor protection concepts for NSTX, a small spherical torus experiment at Princeton. Of these, a promising concept is the use of modularized fast flowing liquid lithium film zones, as the divertor (called the NSTX liquid surface module concept or NSTX LSM). The dynamic response of the liquid metal film flow in a spatially varying magnetic field configuration is still unknown and it is suspected that some unpredicted effects might be lurking. The primary goal of the research work being reported in this dissertation is to provide qualitative and quantitative information on the liquid metal film flow dynamics under spatially varying magnetic field conditions, typical of the divertor region of a magnetic fusion device. The liquid metal film flow dynamics have been studied through a synergic experimental and numerical modeling effort. The Magneto Thermofluid Omnibus Research (MTOR) facility at UCLA has been used to design several experiments to study the MHD interaction of liquid gallium films under a scaled NSTX outboard divertor magnetic field environment. A 3D multi-material, free surface MHD modeling capability is under development in collaboration with HyPerComp Inc., an SBIR vendor. This numerical code called HIMAG provides a unique capability to model the equations of incompressible MHD with a free surface. Some parts of this modeling capability have been developed in this research work, in the form of subroutines for HIMAG. Extensive code debugging and benchmarking exercise has also been carried out. Finally, HIMAG has been used to study the

  10. Energy and exergy performance analysis of a marine rotary desiccant air-conditioning system based on orthogonal experiment

    Zhu, Jun; Chen, Wu

    2014-01-01

    A novel marine rotary desiccant A/C (air-conditioning) system was developed and studied to improve energy utilization efficiency of ship A/C. The orthogonal experiment was first carried out to investigate the influence of various parameters of the marine rotary desiccant A/C system. During the orthogonal experiment the analysis of variance was used to exclude interference from the secondary influencing factor on system performance. The significant influencing factors of system were studied in great detail using the first and second laws of thermodynamics to find optimal setting parameters for best system performance. It is suggested from the analysis results that as regeneration temperature increases, the COP th (thermal coefficient of performance) and exergy efficiency of system (η e ) decreases by 46.9% and 38.8% respectively. They decrease in proportion to the increase of the temperature. η e reaches its maximum value of about 23.5% when the inlet humidity ratio of process air is 22 g/kg. Besides, the exergy loss of system concentrates on the regeneration air heater, the desiccant wheel and the regeneration air leaving the desiccant wheel, which account for 68.4%–81% of the total exergy loss. It can be concluded that applying the marine rotary desiccant A/C in high-temperature and high-humidity marine environment is advantageous. - Highlights: • Significant influencing factors of the system are found by the analysis of variance. • The change trends of the COP th and the η e are nearly proportional with the regeneration temperature. • The η e reaches its maximum value (about 23.5%) when the inlet humidity ratio of process air is 22 g/kg. • The contribution rate of the dry-bulb temperature of fresh air is up to 73.91% for the COP th . • Applying the marine rotary desiccant A/C in high-temperature and high-humidity marine environment is advantageous

  11. Exploratory laparotomy for acute intestinal conditions in children: A review of 10 years of experience with 334 cases

    Ghritlaharey Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to review 10 years of experience in the management of children with acute intestinal conditions requiring exploratory laparotomy. Patients and Methods : This retrospective study included 334 children (244 boys and 90 girls who underwent laparotomy for acute intestinal conditions between Jan 1, 2000 to Dec 31, 2009. Patients were grouped into two categories: group A (n = 44 included patients who needed laparotomy with terminal ileostomy and group B (n = 290 included patients who needed laparotomy without terminal ileostomy. We excluded neonates and patients with jejunoileal and colonic atresias, anorectal malformations, congenital pouch colon, neonatal necrotising enterocolitis, Hirschsprung′s disease, appendicitis, abdominal trauma and gastrointestinal tumours. Results : During the last 10 years, 334 laparotomies were performed in children under 12 years: 59.88% for intestinal obstruction and 40.11% for perforation peritonitis. Causes in order of frequency were: ileal perforations 34.13%; intussusceptions 26.34%; Meckel′s obstruction 10.17%; congenital bands and malrotation 6.88%; postoperative adhesions 5.98%; miscellaneous peritonitis 5.68%; miscellaneous intestinal obstructions 4.79%; abdominal tuberculosis 4.19% and roundworm intestinal obstruction 1.79%. Ileostomy closures (n = 39 was tolerated well by all except one. The mortalities were 28 (8.38% in group B and 6 (1.79% in group A. Conclusions: The need for re-exploration not only increases the morbidity but also increases mortality as well. Diverting temporary ileostomy adds little cumulative morbidity to the primary operation and is a safe option for diversion in selected cases. The best way to further reduce the mortality is to create ileostomy at first operation.

  12. “Dis-able bodied” or “dis-able minded”: stakeholders’ return-to-work experiences compared between physical and mental health conditions

    Vossen, E.E.M.; Gestel, N.M. van; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore if and why the return-to-work (RTW) experiences of various workplace stakeholders in the Netherlands and Denmark differ between physical and mental health conditions, and to understand the consequences of potentially different experiences for the RTW process in

  13. Computer simulations of a 1/5-scale experiment of a Mark I boiler water reactor pressure-suppression system under hypothetical LOCA conditions

    Edwards, L.L.

    1978-01-01

    The CHAMP computer code was employed to simulate a plane-geometry cross section of a Mark I boiling water reactor toroidal pressure suppression system air discharge experiment under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The experiments were performed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on a 1 / 5 -scale model of the Peach Bottom Nuclear Power Plant

  14. Empathic Concern and the Desire to Help as Separable Components of Compassionate Responding.

    Ministero, Lauren M; Poulin, Michael J; Buffone, Anneke E K; DeLury, Shane

    2018-04-01

    When do people experience versus regulate responses to compassion-evoking stimuli? We hypothesized that compassionate responding is composed of two factors-empathic concern and the desire to help-and that these would be differentially affected by perspective taking and self-affirmation. Exploratory (Study 1) and confirmatory (Study 2) factor analyses indicated that a compassion measure consisted of two factors corresponding to empathic concern and the desire to help. In Study 1 ( N = 237), participants with high emotion regulation ability reported less empathic concern for multiple children than for one, but perspective taking prevented this effect. In Study 2 ( N = 155), participants reported less desire to help multiple children, but only in the presence of self-affirmation. In both the studies, empathic concern predicted greater distress while the desire to help predicted greater chances of donating. Compassionate responding may consist of two separable facets that collapse under distinct conditions and that predict distinct outcomes.

  15. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  16. Contrasting Internet and Face-to-Face Focus Groups for Children with Chronic Health Conditions: Outcomes and Participant Experiences

    David B. Nicholas PhD

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the authors examined Internet-mediated qualitative data collection methods among a sample of children with chronic health conditions. Specifically, focus groups via Internet technology were contrasted to traditional face-to-face focus groups. Internet focus groups consisted of asynchronous text-based chat rooms lasting a total of one week in duration. Participants comprised 23 children with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, or cystic fibrosis, who were assigned to either an Internet or face-to-face focus group. Focus group analysis and follow-up participant interviews identified a range of content outcomes and processes as well as participant experiences and preferences. Findings yielded differences in terms of the volume and nature of online and face-to-face data, and participants' affinity to focus group modality appeared to reflect differences in participant expectations for social engagement and interaction. This study identifies both benefits and limitations of asynchronous, text-based online focus groups. Implications and recommendations are discussed.

  17. Effect of nitrate addition on the efficient use of ammonium sulfate fertilizer on corn under saline conditions . II. field experiment

    Khalifa, Kh.; Zidan, A

    2003-01-01

    two field experiments during two consecutive seasons, were conducted on corn (Zea mays L. var. Ghota-82), grown on a saline soil under flood irrigation system at ACSAD research station located at the Euphrates valley, Deir-Ez-zor district, east of Syria. The objective was to study the effect of applying different ratios of mixed NO 3 -N and NH 4 -N fertilizers on the biomass yield of corn. Five rates of nitrogen (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg N/ha) were applied either in a single or in combination of two forms of 15 N labelled nitrogen fertilizers ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and Ca( 15 NO 3 ) 2 . Total N, 15 N, nitrogen use efficiency (N recovery) and dry matter yield were the parameters investigated. The results showed that: (1) The high concentrations of NH 4 -N reduced dry matter yield; (2) NO 3 -N was more effective in increasing total N content of plant tissues than the same concentration of NH 4 -N; (3) Combination treatments always induced both higher yields and N content of plant tissues than single treatments of NH 4 -N; (4) NH 4 -N form increased the NO 3 -N uptake, and the NO 3 -N form had an effect on the absorption of NH 4 -N; (5) the recovery of NO 3 -N form was much higher than NH 4 -N form under saline soil conditions. (author)

  18. New IES scheme for power conditioning at ultra-high currents: from concept to MHD modeling and first experiments

    Chuvatin, Alexandre S.; Aranchuk, Leonid E.; Rudakov, Leonid I.; Kokshenev, Vladimir A.; Kurmaev, Nikolai E.; Fursov, Fiodor I.; Huet, Dominique; Gasilov, Vladimir A.; Krukovskii, Alexandre Yu.

    2002-01-01

    This work introduces an inductive energy storage (IES) scheme which aims pulsed-power conditioning at multi- MJ energies. The key element of the scheme represents an additional plasma volume, where a magnetically accelerated wire array is used for inductive current switching. This plasma acceleration volume is connected in parallel to a microsecond capacitor bank and to a 100-ns current ruse-time useful load. Simple estimates suggest that optimized scheme parameters could be reachable even when operating at ultra-high currents. We describe first proof-of-principle experiments carried out on GIT12 generator at the wire-array current level of 2 MA. The obtained confirmation of the concept consists in generation of a 200 kV voltage directly at an inductive load. This load voltage value can be already sufficient to transfer the available magnetic energy into kinetic energy of a liner at this current level. Two-dimensional modeling with the radiational MHD numerical tool Marple confirms the development of inductive voltage in the system. However, the average voltage increase is accompanied by short-duration voltage drops due to interception of the current by the low-density upstream plasma. Upon our viewpoint, this instability of the current distribution represents the main physical limitation to the scheme performance

  19. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling.

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Do occupation and work conditions really matter? A longitudinal analysis of psychological distress experiences among Canadian workers.

    Marchand, Alain; Demers, Andrée; Durand, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    This study analyses the relationship between occupation, work conditions and the experience of psychological distress within a model encompassing the stress promoted by constraints-resources embedded in macrosocial structures (occupational structure), structures of daily life (workplace, family, social networks outside the workplace) and agent personality (demography, physical health, psychological traits, life habits, stressful childhood events). Longitudinal data were derived from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey and comprised 6,359 workers nested in 471 occupations, followed four times between 1994-1995 and 2000-2001. Discrete time survival multilevel regressions were conducted on first and repeated episodes of psychological distress. Results showed that 42.9 per cent of workers had reported one episode of psychological distress and 18.7 per cent had done so more than once. Data supported the model and challenged the results of previous studies. The individual's position in the occupational structure plays a limited role when the structures of daily life and agent personality are accounted for. In the workplace, job insecurity and social support are important determinants, but greater decision authority increases the risk of psychological distress. Workplace constraints-resources are not moderated either by the other structures of daily life or by agent personality.

  1. Preliminary results of the BTF-104 experiment: an in-reactor test of fuel behaviour and fission-product release and transport under LOCA/LOECC conditions

    Dickson, L W; Elder, P H; Devaal, J W; Irish, J D; Yamazaki, A R [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The BTF-104 experiment is one of a series of in-reactor tests being performed to measure fuel behaviour and fission-product release from nuclear fuel subjected to accident conditions. The primary objective of the BTF-104 experiment was to measure fission-product releases from a CANDU-sized fuel element under combined Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Loss-of-Emergency-Core-Cooling (LOECC) conditions at an average fuel temperature of about 1550 deg C. The preliminary results of the BTF-104 experiment are presented in this paper. (author). 6 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Internet Based Activities (IBAs): Seniors' Experiences of the Conditions Required for the Performance of and the Influence of these Conditions on their Own Participation in Society

    Larsson, Ellinor; Larsson-Lund, Maria; Nilsson, Ingeborg

    2013-01-01

    The digital gap is a threat to the participation of senior citizens in society, as a large proportion of seniors are not involved in Internet based activities (IBAs). To be able to overcome this disadvantage for seniors, there is a need to both learn more about the conditions that make seniors start performing IBAs and to be able to provide them…

  3. Serial Killers: Academic Libraries Respond to Soaring Costs.

    McCarthy, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Discusses ways in which academic libraries are responding to rising costs of serials. Topics addressed include pricing by publishers; the effect of journal cancellations on research activities; interlibrary loans and document delivery services; coordinated cancelling; electronic journals; and experiences at the University of Arizona. (LRW)

  4. Differences in change in coping styles between good responders, moderate responders and non-responders to pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Stoilkova-Hartmann, Ana; Janssen, Daisy J A; Franssen, Frits M E; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves exercise tolerance and health status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Data on the effects of PR on coping styles are limited. Aim of the present study was to compare changes in coping styles between patients who had a good, moderate and no improvement in either exercise tolerance or health status after PR. Coping styles of 439 COPD patients undergoing PR were assessed by the Utrecht Coping List (UCL) at baseline and after PR. Patients' pulmonary function, six-minute walking distance (6MWD), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D) were recorded. Good, moderate and non-responders were defined on the basis of minimally clinically important difference (MCID) for SGRQ total score and/or 6MWD. Overall, 54.0% of the patients fulfilled the criteria for good responders, while 22.1% were moderate responders. Change in passive reaction pattern coping style differed significantly between good responders and non-responders following PR (p styles after PR occurred among the good responders, whereas the majority of moderate responders' and non-responders' coping styles were not significantly influenced by PR. Good responders decreased their passive reaction pattern coping style in contrast to non-responders after PR. In general, PR did not change the coping among moderate and non-responders. Further research is warranted to determine whether including interventions targeting coping styles may modify coping behaviour of COPD patients, as well as improvement in exercise tolerance or health status after PR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Hv1 proton channel responds to mechanical stimuli.

    Pathak, Medha M; Tran, Truc; Hong, Liang; Joós, Béla; Morris, Catherine E; Tombola, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is expressed in tissues throughout the body and plays important roles in pH homeostasis and regulation of NADPH oxidase. Hv1 operates in membrane compartments that experience strong mechanical forces under physiological or pathological conditions. In microglia, for example, Hv1 activity is potentiated by cell swelling and causes an increase in brain damage after stroke. The channel complex consists of two proton-permeable voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) linked by a cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain. Here, we report that these VSDs directly respond to mechanical stimuli. We find that membrane stretch facilitates Hv1 channel opening by increasing the rate of activation and shifting the steady-state activation curve to less depolarized potentials. In the presence of a transmembrane pH gradient, membrane stretch alone opens the channel without the need for strong depolarizations. The effect of membrane stretch persists for several minutes after the mechanical stimulus is turned off, suggesting that the channel switches to a "facilitated" mode in which opening occurs more readily and then slowly reverts to the normal mode observed in the absence of membrane stretch. Conductance simulations with a six-state model recapitulate all the features of the channel's response to mechanical stimulation. Hv1 mechanosensitivity thus provides a mechanistic link between channel activation in microglia and brain damage after stroke. © 2016 Pathak et al.

  6. Experience

    The majority of eye problems were age-related, and preventable. ... workers to recognize and treat these conditions would serve the ... A prevention strategy was thereforeidentified ... glaucoma and macular degeneration to be common in.

  7. Chemical reactivity of precursor materials during synthesis of glasses used for conditioning high-level radioactive waste: Experiments and models

    Monteiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    The glass used to store high-level radioactive waste is produced by reaction of a solid waste residue and a glassy precursor (glass frit). The waste residue is first dried and calcined (to lose water and nitrogen respectively), then mixed with the glass frit to enable vitrification at high temperature. In order to obtain a good quality glass of constant composition upon cooling, the chemical reactions between the solid precursors must be complete while in the liquid state, to enable incorporation of the radioactive elements into the glassy matrix. The physical and chemical conditions during glass synthesis (e.g. temperature, relative proportions of frit and calcine, amount of radioactive charge) are typically empirically adjusted to obtain a satisfactory final product. The aim of this work is to provide new insights into the chemical and physical interactions that take place during vitrification and to provide data for a mathematical model that has been developed to simulate the chemical reactions. The consequences of the different chemical reactions that involve solid, liquid and gaseous phases are described (thermal effects, changes in crystal morphology and composition, variations in melt properties and structure). In a first series of experiments, a simplified analogue of the calcine (NaNO 3 -Al 2 O 3 ± MoO 3 /Nd 2 O 3 ) has been studied. In a second series of experiments, the simplified calcines have been reacted with a simplified glass frit (SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) at high temperature. The results show that crystallization of the calcine may take place before interaction with the glass frit, but that the reactivity with the glass at high temperature is a function of the nature and stoichiometry of the crystalline phases which form at low temperature. The results also highlight how the mixing of the starting materials, the physical properties of the frit (viscosity, glass transition temperature) and the Na 2 O/Al 2 O 3 of the calcine but also its

  8. New Zealand Teachers Respond to the "National Writing Project" Experience

    Locke, Terry; Whitehead, David; Dix, Stephanie; Cawkwell, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on early data from a two-year project (2009-11) being undertaken in the New Zealand context by the authors entitled: "Teachers as Writers: Transforming Professional Identity and Classroom Practice". Based on the National Writing Project in the USA (and in New Zealand in the 1980s) its hypothesis is that when teachers…

  9. Defense Technology Opportunities for First Responders

    White, Rodney; Bedard, Louis; Derrah, Scott; Boucher, Robert

    2004-01-01

    For this study, the US and Canadian governments assessed the potential for technology transfer of five technologies, which were developed to meet military requirements, to civilian first responders...

  10. Interaction between U(VI) and Fe(II) in aqueous solution under anaerobic conditions. Closed system experiments

    Myllykylae, E.; Ollila, K.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these experiments is to investigate the potential reduction of U(VI) carbonate and hydroxide complexes by aqueous Fe(II). This reduction phenomenon could be important under the disposal conditions of spent fuel. If groundwater enters the copper/iron canister, alpha radiolysis of the water may locally induce oxidizing conditions on the surface of UO 2 fuel, leading to the dissolution of UO 2 as more soluble U(VI) species. A potential reducing agent in the intruding water is Fe(II)(aq) from anaerobic corrosion of the copper/iron canister. The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) would substantially decrease the solubility of U as well as co-precipitate other actinides and radionuclides. The interaction experiments were conducted in 0.01 M NaCl and 0.002 M NaHCO 3 solutions using an initial uranium concentration of either 8.4 x 10 -8 or 4.2 x 10 -7 mol/L with an initial Fe(II) concentration of 1.8 x 10 -6 in the NaCl solutions and 1.3 x 10 -6 mol/L in the NaHCO 3 solutions. Only after an equilibration period for U(VI) complexation was Fe(II) added to the solutions. The reaction times varied from 1 week to 5 months. For extra protection against O 2 , even inside a glove-box (N 2 atmosphere), the plastic reaction vessels were closed in metallic containers. The concentrations of U, Fe TOT and Fe(II) were analysed as a function of time for unfiltered, micro- and ultrafiltered samples. In addition, the precipitate on the ultrafilters was analysed with ESEM-EDS. The evolution of pH and Eh values was measured. The oxidation state of U in solution was preliminarily analysed for chosen periods. The results of the tests in 0.01 M NaCl showed an initial rapid decrease in U concentration after the addition of Fe(II) to the solution. The U found on test vessel walls at the end of the reaction periods, as well as the ESEM-EDS analyses of the filtered precipitates from the test solutions, showed that precipitation of U had occurred. The oxidation state analyses showed the presence

  11. De-identifying Swedish clinical text - refinement of a gold standard and experiments with Conditional random fields

    Dalianis Hercules

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to perform research on the information contained in Electronic Patient Records (EPRs, access to the data itself is needed. This is often very difficult due to confidentiality regulations. The data sets need to be fully de-identified before they can be distributed to researchers. De-identification is a difficult task where the definitions of annotation classes are not self-evident. Results We present work on the creation of two refined variants of a manually annotated Gold standard for de-identification, one created automatically, and one created through discussions among the annotators. The data is a subset from the Stockholm EPR Corpus, a data set available within our research group. These are used for the training and evaluation of an automatic system based on the Conditional Random Fields algorithm. Evaluating with four-fold cross-validation on sets of around 4-6 000 annotation instances, we obtained very promising results for both Gold Standards: F-score around 0.80 for a number of experiments, with higher results for certain annotation classes. Moreover, 49 false positives that were verified true positives were found by the system but missed by the annotators. Conclusions Our intention is to make this Gold standard, The Stockholm EPR PHI Corpus, available to other research groups in the future. Despite being slightly more time-consuming we believe the manual consensus gold standard is the most valuable for further research. We also propose a set of annotation classes to be used for similar de-identification tasks.

  12. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC)

  13. Species-specific response-topography of chickens' and pigeons' water-induced autoshaped responding.

    Ploog, Bertram O

    2014-07-01

    Four pigeons and eight chickens received autoshaping training where a keylight (conditioned stimulus) signaled response-independent deliveries of water (unconditioned stimulus). Pigeons drink while keeping their beaks submerged in water and moving their beaks to create suction ("mumbling"), whereas chickens drink by trapping a small amount of water in their mouths and then lifting their heads so the water trickles down. This experiment tested whether these and other species-specific differences in drinking and related behaviors of pigeons and chickens would be reflected in the form of conditioned (autoshaped) responding. Touchscreens and videotapes were used for data recording. Results showed that chickens moved their heads more than pigeons when drinking (unconditioned response). The birds also differed in conditioned responding in the presence of the keylight: Pigeons produced more keyswitch closures and mumbled at the keylight more than chickens whereas chickens scratched more than pigeons. In conclusion, with this unique comparative method that employed identical contingencies and comparable deprivation levels, species-specific differences in unconditioned responses and, more importantly, differences in their corresponding conditioned responses were observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Flow oscillations on the steam control valve in the middle opening condition. Clarification of the phenomena by steam flow experiment and CFD calculation

    Morita, Ryo; Inada, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    A steam control valve might cause vibrations of piping when the valve opening is in a middle condition. For rationalization of maintenance and management of the plant, the valve should be improved, but it is difficult to understand flow characteristics in detail by experiment because flow around the valve is complex 3D structure and becomes supersonic (M>1). Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the cause of the vibrations and to develop improvements by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology. In previous researches, we clarified a mechanism of the pressure fluctuations in the middle opening condition and suggested the way to prevent the pressure fluctuations by experiments and CFD calculations. But, as we used air as a working fluid in our previous research instead of steam that is used in the power plant, we couldn't consider effects of condensation and difference of change of the quantity of state between air and steam. In this report, we have conducted steam flow experiments by multi-purpose steam experiment apparatus 'WISSH' and CFD calculations by steam flow code 'MATIS-SC' to clarify those effects. As a result, in the middle opening condition, we have observed rotating pressure fluctuations in the experiment and valve-attached flow and local high-pressure region in the CFD result. These results show the pressure fluctuations in steam experiments and CFD is same kind of the fluctuations found in air experiment and CFD. (author)

  15. Characteristics of Energy Transport of Li-conditioned and non-Li-conditioned Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Ding, S.; Kaye, S.M.; Bell, R.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Paul, S.; Wan, B.

    2009-01-01

    The transport properties of NSTX plasmas obtained during the 2008 experimental campaign have been studied and are reported here. Transport trends and dependences have been isolated, and it is found that both electron and ion energy transport coefficients have strong dependences on local values of n(del)T, which in turn is strongly dependent on local current density profile. Without identifying this dependence, it is difficult to identify others, such as the dependence of transport coefficients on B p (or q), I p and P heat . In addition, a comparison between discharges with and without Lithium wall conditioning has been made. While the trends in the two sets of data are similar, the thermal transport loss, especially in the electron channel, is found to strongly depend on the amount of Lithium deposited, decreasing by up to 50% of its no-Lithium value.

  16. Resilience among first responders | Pietrantoni | African Health ...

    Nine hundred and sixty-one first responders filled out an on-line questionnaire, containing measure of sense of community, collective efficacy, self-efficacy and work-related mental health outcomes (compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction). Results. First responders reported high level of compassion ...

  17. Mobile-Only Web Survey Respondents

    Lugtig, P.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824658; Toepoel, V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304576034; amin, alerk

    2016-01-01

    Web surveys are no longer completed on just a desktop or laptop computer. Respondents increasingly use mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones to complete web surveys. In this article, we study how respondents in the American Life Panel complete surveys using varying devices. We show that

  18. 7 CFR 3017.1000 - Respondent.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Respondent. 3017.1000 Section 3017.1000 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 3017.1000 Respondent...

  19. Evaluation of respondent-driven sampling.

    McCreesh, Nicky; Frost, Simon D W; Seeley, Janet; Katongole, Joseph; Tarsh, Matilda N; Ndunguse, Richard; Jichi, Fatima; Lunel, Natasha L; Maher, Dermot; Johnston, Lisa G; Sonnenberg, Pam; Copas, Andrew J; Hayes, Richard J; White, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling is a novel variant of link-tracing sampling for estimating the characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as HIV prevalence in sex workers. Despite its use by leading health organizations, the performance of this method in realistic situations is still largely unknown. We evaluated respondent-driven sampling by comparing estimates from a respondent-driven sampling survey with total population data. Total population data on age, tribe, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual activity, and HIV status were available on a population of 2402 male household heads from an open cohort in rural Uganda. A respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey was carried out in this population, using current methods of sampling (RDS sample) and statistical inference (RDS estimates). Analyses were carried out for the full RDS sample and then repeated for the first 250 recruits (small sample). We recruited 927 household heads. Full and small RDS samples were largely representative of the total population, but both samples underrepresented men who were younger, of higher socioeconomic status, and with unknown sexual activity and HIV status. Respondent-driven sampling statistical inference methods failed to reduce these biases. Only 31%-37% (depending on method and sample size) of RDS estimates were closer to the true population proportions than the RDS sample proportions. Only 50%-74% of respondent-driven sampling bootstrap 95% confidence intervals included the population proportion. Respondent-driven sampling produced a generally representative sample of this well-connected nonhidden population. However, current respondent-driven sampling inference methods failed to reduce bias when it occurred. Whether the data required to remove bias and measure precision can be collected in a respondent-driven sampling survey is unresolved. Respondent-driven sampling should be regarded as a (potentially superior) form of convenience sampling method, and caution is required

  20. Evaluation of Respondent-Driven Sampling

    McCreesh, Nicky; Frost, Simon; Seeley, Janet; Katongole, Joseph; Tarsh, Matilda Ndagire; Ndunguse, Richard; Jichi, Fatima; Lunel, Natasha L; Maher, Dermot; Johnston, Lisa G; Sonnenberg, Pam; Copas, Andrew J; Hayes, Richard J; White, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Background Respondent-driven sampling is a novel variant of link-tracing sampling for estimating the characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as HIV prevalence in sex-workers. Despite its use by leading health organizations, the performance of this method in realistic situations is still largely unknown. We evaluated respondent-driven sampling by comparing estimates from a respondent-driven sampling survey with total-population data. Methods Total-population data on age, tribe, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual activity and HIV status were available on a population of 2402 male household-heads from an open cohort in rural Uganda. A respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey was carried out in this population, employing current methods of sampling (RDS sample) and statistical inference (RDS estimates). Analyses were carried out for the full RDS sample and then repeated for the first 250 recruits (small sample). Results We recruited 927 household-heads. Full and small RDS samples were largely representative of the total population, but both samples under-represented men who were younger, of higher socioeconomic status, and with unknown sexual activity and HIV status. Respondent-driven-sampling statistical-inference methods failed to reduce these biases. Only 31%-37% (depending on method and sample size) of RDS estimates were closer to the true population proportions than the RDS sample proportions. Only 50%-74% of respondent-driven-sampling bootstrap 95% confidence intervals included the population proportion. Conclusions Respondent-driven sampling produced a generally representative sample of this well-connected non-hidden population. However, current respondent-driven-sampling inference methods failed to reduce bias when it occurred. Whether the data required to remove bias and measure precision can be collected in a respondent-driven sampling survey is unresolved. Respondent-driven sampling should be regarded as a (potentially superior) form of convenience

  1. Summarizing evaluation of the results of in-pile experiments for the transient fission gas release under accidental conditions of fast breeders

    Fischer, E.A.; Vaeth, L.

    1989-04-01

    The transient fission gas behaviour and the fission gas induced fuel motion were studied in in-pile experiments in different countries, under conditions typical for hypothetical accidents. This report summarizes first the different experiment series and the main results. Then, a comparative evaluation is given, which provides a basis for the choice of the fission gas parameters in the accident code SAS3D

  2. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  3. Rearing conditions determine offspring survival independent of egg quality : A cross-foster experiment with Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus

    van de Pol, Martijn; Bakker, T; Saaltink, DJ; Verhulst, S; Saaltink, Dirk-Jan

    Variation in rearing conditions, due either to parental or to environmental quality, can result in offspring of different quality (e.g. body condition, immune function). However, evidence is accumulating that egg size and composition can also affect offspring quality. In Oystercatchers Haematopus

  4. Conditions for research in general practice: can the Dutch and British experiences be applied to other countries, for example Spain?

    Zee, J. van der; Kroneman, M.; Bolibar, B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify conditions for research as part of professional development in general practice. Based on the work of Andrew Abbott, who studied the dynamics of professional development, five conditions were identified. These are: the creation of associations among

  5. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (January 2015)

    Upton, Jaki F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stein, Steven L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  6. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (December 2014)

    Upton, Jaki F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stein, Steven L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-13

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  7. Responding to Students' Learning Preferences in Chemistry

    Lewthwaite, Brian; Wiebe, Rick

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on a teacher's and his students' responsiveness to a new tetrahedral-oriented (Mahaffy in J Chem Educ 83(1):49-55, 2006) curriculum requiring more discursive classroom practices in the teaching of chemistry. In this instrumental case study, we identify the intentions of this learner-centered curriculum and a teacher's development in response to this curriculum. We also explore the tensions this teacher experiences as students subsequently respond to his adjusted teaching. We use a Chemistry Teacher Inventory (Lewthwaite and Wiebe in Res Sci Educ 40(11):667-689, 2011; Lewthwaite and Wiebe in Can J Math Sci Technol Educ 12(1):36-61, 2012; Lewthwaite in Chem Educ Res Pract. doi:10.1039/C3RP00122A, 2014) to assist the teacher in monitoring how he teaches and how he would like to improve his teaching. We also use a student form of the instrument, the Chemistry Classroom Inventory and Classroom Observation Protocol (Lewthwaite and Wiebe 2011) to verify the teacher's teaching and perception of student preferences for his teaching especially in terms of the discursive processes the curriculum encourages. By so doing, the teacher is able to use both sets of data as a foundation for critical reflection and work towards resolution of the incongruence in data arising from students' preferred learning orientations and his teaching aspirations. Implications of this study in regards to the authority of students' voice in triggering teachers' pedagogical change and the adjustments in `teachering' and `studenting' required by such curricula are considered.

  8. The impact of arbitrarily applicable relational responding on evaluative learning about hypothetical money and shock outcomes.

    Dymond, Simon; Molet, Mikael; Davies, Lynette

    2017-08-01

    Evaluative learning comprises changes in preferences after co-occurrences between conditioned stimuli (CSs) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) of affective value. Co-occurrences may involve relational responding. Two experiments examined the impact of arbitrary relational responding on evaluative preferences for hypothetical money and shock outcomes. In Experiment 1, participants were trained to make arbitrary relational responses by placing CSs of the same size but different colours into boxes and were then instructed that these CSs represented different intensities of hypothetical USs (money or shock). Liking ratings of the CSs were altered in accordance with the underlying bigger/smaller than relations. A reversal of preference was also observed: the CS associated with the smallest hypothetical shock was rated more positively than the CS associated with the smallest amount of hypothetical money. In Experiment 2, procedures from Relational Frame Theory (RFT) established a relational network of more than/less than relations consisting of five CSs (A-B-C-D-E). Overall, evaluative preferences were altered, but not reversed, depending on (a) how stimuli had been related to one another during the learning phase and (b) whether those stimuli referred to money or shocks. The contribution of RFT to evaluative learning research is discussed.

  9. Measuring ignitability for in situ burning of oil spills weathered under Arctic conditions: From laboratory studies to large-scale field experiments

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Brandvik, Per Johan

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the ignitability of Troll B crude oil weathered under simulated Arctic conditions (0%, 50% and 90% ice cover). The experiments were performed in different scales at SINTEF’s laboratories in Trondheim, field research station on Svalbard and in broken ice (70–90% ice cover......) in the Barents Sea. Samples from the weathering experiments were tested for ignitability using the same laboratory burning cell. The measured ignitability from the experiments in these different scales showed a good agreement for samples with similar weathering. The ice conditions clearly affected the weathering...... process, and 70% ice or more reduces the weathering and allows a longer time window for in situ burning. The results from the Barents Sea revealed that weathering and ignitability can vary within an oil slick. This field use of the burning cell demonstrated that it can be used as an operational tool...

  10. Can an experience of a punishment episode in childhood period be connected with depressive or anxiety conditions in adulthood?

    Saša Poljak Lukek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Punishment, when understood as parents' response to undesirable behavior of a child and representing gradual restricting of such behavior, is an essential part of parents' role in the family. In the context of the paradigm of affective regulation, anxiety and depression states represent another unsuccessful attempt of trying to get closer and to find a connection in the relationship. This study, conducted on 197 participants, addressed the connection between punishment in upbringing and behavior disturbances in adulthood. Depressive states in adulthood were statistically significantly, although weakly connected with the experience of corporal punishment, punishment and restitution, and psychological aggression form both parents. Anxiety states were statistically significantly, although weakly connected with the experience of psychological aggression from both parents and with the experience of corporal punishment, and punishment and restitution of the mother. The participants who attained the criteria for diagnosis of depression were more exposed to corporal punishment at the age of 10 years (from both parents, punishment and restitution (from the father and psychological aggression (from the father compared to the participants without the diagnosis of depression. The paradigm of affective regulation is presented as a possible explanation of the connection between experiences of punishment as a way of upbringing in childhood and later mood disorders in adulthood. Punishment during upbringing that is not accompanied by parents' maintaining of the connection with the child can present the first experience of negative affection, which is the core of anxiety and depressive states. The mood disorders in adulthood can be understood as another failure when trying to reestablish the balance between external information and internal experiences that were primarily disturbed by the experience of punishment when growing up.

  11. Flow oscillations on the steam control valve in the middle opening condition. Clarification of the effects of valve body and valve seat by steam experiments

    Morita, Ryo; Inada, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    A steam control valve might cause vibrations of piping when the valve opening is in a middle condition. For rationalization of maintenance and management of the plant, the valve should be improved, but it is difficult to understand flow characteristics in detail by experiment because flow around the valve is complex 3D structure and becomes supersonic (M>1). Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the cause of the vibrations and to develop the countermeasures by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) technology. In previous researches, we clarified a mechanism of the pressure fluctuations in the middle opening condition and suggested the new valve shape (named 'Extended Valve') that can suppress the pressure fluctuations by air experiments and CFD calculations. Then, we also conducted steam experiments and CFD calculations to understand the differences between air and the steam, and found that the pressure fluctuations in the middle opening condition also occurred in the steam tests and the differences between the air and steam were not remarkable. In this report, to clarify the effects of valve and valve seat shape in steam flow condition, we conduct the steam experiments with various valve and seat shape. As a result, we find the change of the valve seat can decrease the amplitude of pressure fluctuations, but can not quite suppress the pressure fluctuations in the middle opening condition. Then, we apply the 'Extended Valve' to clarify the valve shape effect, and find that the extended valve suppresses the pressure fluctuations in the middle opening condition completely and decreases the pressure amplitude drastically. (author)

  12. Analysis of an out-of-pile experiment for materials redistribution under core disruptive accident condition of fast breeder reactors

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akinao

    1995-01-01

    Calculation of one of the SIMBATH experiments was performed using the SIMMER-II code. The experiments were intended to simulate the fuel pin disintegration, the molten materials relocation and following materials redistribution that could occur during core disruptive accidents assumed in fast breeder reactors. The calculation by SIMMER-II showed that the incorporated step-wise fuel pin disintegration model and the modified particle jamming model were capable of reproducing the course of materials relocation within the identified ranges of the parameters which governed the blockages formation, i.e. the characteristic radius of solid particles jamming and/or sieving out in the flow and the effective particle viscosity. In particular the final materials redistribution calculated by SIMMER-II very well reproduced the experiment. This fact made it possible to interpret theoretically the mechanisms of flow blockages formation and related materials redistribution. (author)

  13. Conditions for research in general practice. Can the Dutch and British experiences be applied to other countries, for example Spain?

    van der Zee, Jouke; Kroneman, Madelon; Bolíbar, Bonaventura

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study is to identify conditions for research as part of professional development in general practice. Based on the work of Andrew Abbott, who studied the dynamics of professional development, five conditions were identified. These are: the creation of associations among professionals; control of work; the establishment of specialised education; the development of professional knowledge; and the creation of organised structures for professional work. Two countries with a well-established research tradition in general practice (the UK and the Netherlands) and one country where GP research development is still limited (Spain) were evaluated on the basis of these conditions. The conditions identified as favourable were as follows: the existence of a scientific association; a peer-reviewed journal; a defined population resulting in a population denominator for practices; a gatekeeping system; chairs and departments of general practice at universities; the integration of education centres and research centres; GPs working in group practices or health centres; a certain degree of independence from the Ministry of Health; and financial support for practicing GPs to conduct research activities. We showed that most conditions for the successful scientific progress of general practice in Spain are present. However there is still a gap between academia and general practice and a lack of research organisation and support.

  14. Online communication in a rehabilitation setting: Experiences of patients with chronic conditions using a web portal in Denmark

    Cerdan de Las Heras, Jose Manuel; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Warny, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    an online rehabilitation programme with key information, clinical advice, and self-management activities. After two weeks, patients were invited to participate in focus groups. A topic guide was used to explore this new online rehabilitation programme in relation to participants’ experiences. Results...... Fourteen participants, ranging from 42 to 72 years old, were allocated into three focus groups. Participants mainly reported negative experiences by the following four themes: ‘patients’ experiences’, ‘technical aspects’, ‘areas for improvement’, and ‘digitalization added value’. Conclusion Participants...

  15. Modelling of the UO2 dissolution mechanisms in synthetic groundwater solutions. Dissolution experiments carried out under oxic conditions

    Cera, E.; Grive, M.; Bruno, J.; Ollila, K.

    2001-02-01

    The analytical data generated during the last three years within the 4th framework program of the European Community at VTT Chemical Technology concerning UO 2 dissolution under oxidising conditions have been modelled in the present work. The modelling work has been addressed to perform a kinetic study of the dissolution data generated by Ollila (1999) under oxidising conditions by using unirradiated uranium dioxide as solid sample. The average of the normalised UO 2 dissolution rates determined by using the initial dissolution data generated in all the experimental tests is (6.06 ± 3.64)* 10 -7 mol m -2 d -1 . This dissolution rate agrees with most of the dissolution rates reported in the literature under similar experimental conditions. The results obtained in this modelling exercise show that the same bicarbonate promoted oxidative dissolution processes operate for uranium dioxide, as a chemical analogue of the spent fuel matrix, independently of the composition of the aqueous solution used. (orig.)

  16. Simulation of the plant uptake of organophosphates and other emerging pollutants for greenhouse experiments and field conditions

    Trapp, Stefan; Eggen, Trine

    2013-01-01

    The uptake of the organophosphates tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), the insect repellant N,N-diethyl toluamide (DEET), and the plasticizer n-butyl benzenesulfonamide (NBBS) into plants was studied in greenhouse experiments...

  17. A field experiment on microwave forest radiometry: L-band signal behaviour for varying conditions of surface wetness

    Grant, J. P.; Wigneron, J. P.; Van de Grind, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    France, using a multi-angle L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer to measure from above the forest at horizontal polarization. At the same time, ground measurements were taken of soil and litter moisture content, while precipitation was also permanently monitored. This experiment was done in the context of...

  18. Survey of conditions for artificial aurora experiments by the second electron gyro-harmonic at EISCAT Tromsø using dynasonde data

    Tsuda, T. T.; Rietveld, M. T.; Kosch, M. J.; Oyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Hosokawa, K.; Nozawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Mizuno, A.

    2018-06-01

    We report a brief survey of matching conditions for artificial aurora optical experiments utilizing the second electron gyro-harmonic (2.7-MHz frequency) in F region heating with O-mode at the EISCAT Tromsø site using dynasonde data from 2000 to 2017. Our survey indicates the following: The possible conditions for successful artificial aurora experiments are concentrated on twilight hours in both evening and morning, compared with late night hours; the possible conditions appear in fall, winter, and spring, while there is no chance in summer, and the month-to-month variation among fall, winter, and spring is not so clear; the year-to-year variation is well correlated with the solar activity. These characteristics in the case of 2.7-MHz frequency are basically similar to those previously reported in the case of 4-MHz frequency. However, the number of days meeting the possible condition in the case of 2.7-MHz frequency is obviously large, compared with that in the case of 4-MHz frequency. In particular, unlike the 4-MHz frequency operation, the 2.7-MHz frequency operation can provide many chances for successful artificial aurora experiments even during the solar minimum.

  19. The Experiences of Late-Diagnosed Women with Autism Spectrum Conditions: An Investigation of the Female Autism Phenotype

    Bargiela, Sarah; Steward, Robyn; Mandy, William

    2016-01-01

    We used Framework Analysis to investigate the female autism phenotype and its impact upon the under-recognition of autism spectrum conditions (ASC) in girls and women. Fourteen women with ASC (aged 22-30 years) diagnosed in late adolescence or adulthood gave in-depth accounts of: "pretending to be normal"; of how their gender led various…

  20. Dependent Interviewing and Sub-Optimal Responding

    Johannes Eggs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With proactive dependent interviewing (PDI respondents are reminded of the answer they gave in the previous interview, before being asked about their current status. PDI is used in panel surveys to assist respondent recall and reduce spurious changes in responses over time. PDI may however provide scope for new errors if respondents falsely accept the previous information as still being an accurate description of their current situation. In this paper we use data from the German Labour Market and Social Security panel study, in which an error was made with the preload data for a PDI question about receipt of welfare benefit. The survey data were linked to individual administrative records on receipt of welfare benefit. A large proportion of respondents accepted the false preload. This behaviour seems mainly driven by the difficulty of the response task: respondents with a more complex history of receipt according to the records were more likely to confirm the false preload. Personality also seemed related to the probability of confirming. Predictors of satisficing, indicators of satisficing on other items in the survey, and characteristics of the survey and interviewer were not predictive of confirming the false preload.

  1. Dewaterability of five sewage sludges in Guangzhou conditioned with Fenton's reagent/lime and pilot-scale experiments using ultrahigh pressure filtration system.

    Liang, Jialin; Huang, Shaosong; Dai, Yongkang; Li, Lei; Sun, Shuiyu

    2015-11-01

    Sludge conditioning with Fenton's reagent and lime is a valid method for sludge dewatering. This study investigated the influence of different organic matter content sludge on sludge dewatering and discussed the main mechanism of sludge conditioning by combined Fenton's reagent and lime. The results indicated that the specific resistance to filterability (SRF) of sludge was reduced efficiently by approximately 90%, when conditioned with Fenton's reagent and lime. Through single factor experiments, the optimal conditioning combinations were found. In addition, the relationship between VSS% and consumption of the reagents was detected. Furthermore, it was also demonstrated that the SRF and filtrate TOC values had a significant correlation with VSS% of sludge (including raw and conditioned). The main mechanism of sludge dewatering was also investigated. Firstly, it revealed that the dewaterability of sludge was closely correlated to extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and bound water contents. Secondly, the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) stated that sludge particles were to be smaller and thinner after conditioning. And this structure could easily form outflow channels for releasing free water. Additionally, with the ultrahigh pressure filtration system, the water content of sludge cake conditioned with Fenton's reagent and lime could be reduced to below 50%. Moreover, the economic assessment shows that Fenton's reagent and lime combined with ultrahigh pressure filtration system can be an economical and viable technology for sewage sludge dewatering. Finally, three types of sludge were classified: (1) Fast to dewater; (2) Moderately fast to dewater; (3) Slow to dewater sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Active microwave measurements of sea ice under fall conditions: The RADARSAT/FIREX fall experiment. [in the Canadian Arctic

    Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Moore, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    A series of measurements of the active microwave properties of sea ice under fall growing conditions was conducted. Ice in the inland waters of Mould Bay, Crozier Channel, and intrepid inlet and ice in the Arctic Ocean near Hardinge Bay was investigated. Active microwave data were acquired using a helicopter borne scatterometer. Results show that multiyear ice frozen in grey or first year ice is easily detected under cold fall conditions. Multiyear ice returns were dynamic due to response to two of its scene constituents. Floe boundaries between thick and thin ice are well defined. Multiyear pressure ridge returns are similar in level to background ice returns. Backscatter from homogeneous first year ice is seen to be primarily due to surface scattering. Operation at 9.6 GHz is more sensitive to the detailed changes in scene roughness, while operation at 5.6 GHz seems to track roughness changes less ably.

  3. Experiences in sulphur capture in a 30 MWth Circulating Fluidized Bed boiler under oxy-combustion conditions

    Gómez, M.; Fernández, A.; Llavona, I.; Kuivalainen, R.

    2014-01-01

    CO 2 and SO 2 from fossil fuel combustion are contributors to greenhouse effect and acid rain respectively. Oxy-combustion technology produces a highly concentrated CO 2 stream almost ready for capture. Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler technology allows in-situ injection of calcium-based sorbents for efficient SO 2 capture. CIUDEN's 30 MWth CFB boiler, supplied by Foster Wheeler and located at the Technology Development Centre for CO 2 Capture and Transport (es.CO 2 ) in Spain, is the first of its kind for executing test runs at large pilot scale under both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions. In this work, SO 2 emissions under different scenarios have been evaluated. Variables such as limestone composition, Ca/S molar ratio and bed temperature among others have been considered along different test runs in both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions to analyse its influence on SO 2 abatement. Fly and bottom ash, together with flue gas analysis have been carried-out. Desulphurization performance tests results are presented. - Highlights: •Sulphur capture efficiency (%) was higher in oxy-combustion compared to air-combustion in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler using anthracite and limestone as sulphur sorbent. •For a Ca/S molar ratio higher than 2.6 there was barely any improvement on sulphur capture efficiency for both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler using anthracite and limestone as sulphur sorbent. •Optimum temperature for sulphur capture at a fixed Ca/S molar ratio is around 880–890 °C under oxy-combustion conditions and for anthracite coal with limestone as sorbent in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler

  4. Fuel pin behavior under slow ramp-type transient-overpower conditions in the CABRI-FAST experiments

    Fukano, Yoshitaka; Onoda, Yuichi; Sato, Ikken; Charpenel, Jean

    2009-01-01

    In the CABRI-FAST experimental program, four in-pile tests were performed with slow power-ramp-type transient-overpower conditions (called hereafter as 'slow TOP') to study transient fuel pin behavior under inadvertent control rod withdrawal events in liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors. Annular-pellet fuel pins were used in three tests, while a solid-pellet fuel pin was used in the other test. All of these pins were pre-irradiated in Phenix. The slow TOP test with a solid-pellet fuel pin was realized as a comparatory test against an existing test (E12) in the CABRI-2 program. In the CABRI-FAST test (BCF1), a power ramp rate of 3% Po/s was applied, while in the CABRI-2 test, 1% Po/s was adopted. Moreover, overpower condition was maintained for a few seconds beyond the observed pin failure in the BCF1 test. In spite of the different power ramp rates, evaluated fuel thermal conditions at the observed failure time are quite similar. The continued overpower condition in the BCF1 test resulted in gradual degradation of the pin structure providing information effective for evaluation of various accident scenarios. Three slow TOP tests with the annular fuel in the CABRI-FAST program resulted in no pin failure showing high failure threshold. Based on post-test examination data and a theoretical evaluation, it was concluded that intra-pin free spaces, such as central hole, macroscopic cracks and fuel-cladding gap effectively mitigated fuel cladding mechanical interaction. It was also clarified that cavity pressurization became effective only in case of very large amount of fuel melting. Furthermore, such cavity pressurization was effectively mitigated by a molten-fuel squirting into the upper blanket region pushing the blanket pellets upward. These CABRI FAST slow TOP tests, in combination with the existing CABRI and TREAT tests, provided an extended slow TOP test database with various fuel and transient conditions. (author)

  5. Determination of fission gas release of spent nuclear fuel in puncturing test and in leaching experiments under anoxic conditions

    González-Robles, E., E-mail: ernesto.gonzalez-robles@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Metz, V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wegen, D.H. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Herm, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Papaioannou, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bohnert, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Gretter, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Müller, N. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nasyrow, R.; Weerd, W. de; Wiss, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kienzler, B. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    During reactor operation the fission gases Kr and Xe are formed within the UO{sub 2} matrix of nuclear fuel. Their quantification is important to evaluate their impact on critical parameters regarding the fuel behaviour during irradiation and (long-term) interim storage, such as internal pressure of the fuel rod and fuel swelling. Moreover the content of Kr and Xe in the plenum of a fuel rod and their content in the UO{sub 2} fuel itself are widely used as indicators for the release properties of {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and other safety relevant radionuclides with respect to final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The present study deals with the fission gas release from spent nuclear fuel exposed to simulated groundwater in comparison with the fission gas previously released to the fuel rod plenum during irradiation in reactor. In a unique approach we determined both the Kr and Xe inventories in the plenum by means of a puncturing test and in leaching experiments with a cladded fuel pellet and fuel fragments in bicarbonate water under 3.2 bar H{sub 2} overpressure. The fractional inventory of the fission gases released during irradiation into the plenum was (8.3 ± 0.9) %. The fraction of inventory of fission gases released during the leaching experiments was (17 ± 2) % after 333 days of leaching of the cladded pellet and (25 ± 2) % after 447 days of leaching of the fuel fragments, respectively. The relatively high release of fission gases in the experiment with fuel fragments was caused by the increased accessibility of water to the Kr and Xe occluded in the fuel.

  6. Development of a health safety culture under different social and cultural conditions: lessons from the experiences of Japanese utilities

    Taniguchi, Taketoshi

    1998-01-01

    In anticipation of the steady expansion of nuclear power in Asia, all organizations involved in operating nuclear facilities are emphasizing the importance of regional cooperation in the development and enhancement of a safety culture. This paper, based on employees' attitudinal surveys, provides some lessons learned from the experiences of Japanese electric utilities in developing and enhancing a sound safety culture within the organizations which are operating nuclear power plants and related facilities, and discusses approaches for cooperation in Asia, taking into account the different socio-cultural environments. (author)

  7. Investigation of mixing enhancement in porous media under helical flow conditions: 3-D bench-scale experiments

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Ye, Yu; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2017-01-01

    us to quantify spreading and dilution of the solute plumes at the outlet cross section. Moreover, we collected direct evidence of plume spiraling and visual proof of helical flow by freezing and slicing the porous medium at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. Model...... performed steady-state conservative tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume spiraling and deformation, as well as on its dilution [4]. Helical flow was created by packing the porous medium in angled stripes of materials...

  8. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths

  9. What is wrong with non-respondents?

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Gray, Linsay

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Response rates in health surveys have diminished over the last two decades, making it difficult to obtain reliable information on health and health-related risk factors in different population groups. This study compared cause-specific mortality and morbidity among survey respondents and dif...

  10. Responding to Children Victimized by Their Peers

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Brock, Stephen E.; Chang, Yiping; O'Malley, Meagan D.

    2006-01-01

    Because victimization results from the dynamic interplay between the victim and his or her parents, peers, and teachers, responding to this problem should involve both direct and indirect interventions. This paper describes and reviews empirically supported direct interventions with victims, as well as indirect interventions with parents, peers,…

  11. Responding with Care to Students Facing Trauma

    Souers, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to trauma--which many experts view as include ongoing life stressors like poverty, parents divorcing, death of a family member, or drug abuse in the home--is prevalent among school-aged children. Teachers know that facing trauma impedes students' ability to focus and learn, but it can be challenging to keep responding caringly to a…

  12. The Forgotten Disaster Victim: Reducing Responder Injury

    2017-03-01

    Approved by: Anke Richter Thesis Advisor Michael Petrie EMS Bureau, County of Monterey Second Reader Erik Dahl Associate Chair for Instruction...RESPONDERS IN DISASTERS .............20 1. Oklahoma City Bombing .............................................................20 2. World Trade Center...Categories, 2008–2014..................................................................................................19 Figure 4. Oklahoma City Bombing

  13. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Recognize and Respond

    Kemple, Kristen Mary; Kim, Hae Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood educators spend extensive amounts of time with young children, so they are often the first adults to notice signs that a child may be abused or neglected. All educators are required by law to report suspected maltreatment, and can play an important role in preventing and responding to abuse and neglect of young children. What is…

  14. Methods for Handling Missing Secondary Respondent Data

    Young, Rebekah; Johnson, David

    2013-01-01

    Secondary respondent data are underutilized because researchers avoid using these data in the presence of substantial missing data. The authors reviewed, evaluated, and tested solutions to this problem. Five strategies of dealing with missing partner data were reviewed: (a) complete case analysis, (b) inverse probability weighting, (c) correction…

  15. Responding to Children's Fears: A Partnership Approach.

    Sorin, Reesa

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study into children's fears and suggests that forging partnerships between parents, children, and teachers is one positive step toward addressing fear in young children. Defines partnerships and asserts that they can help in better recognizing fear displays in young children and in sharing ideas about best practice in responding to…

  16. Editorial: How to respond to reviewers' comments

    Soji, Zimkhitha

    Is the content and writing satisfactory enough to make it worth reviewing? Not adequately addressing concerns raised by the reviewers and/or editors does not help the peer-review and publishing processes. Poor judgement when responding to reviewers'/editors' comments often produces a undesirable outcome. Merely ...

  17. 42 CFR 93.225 - Respondent.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respondent. 93.225 Section 93.225 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH...

  18. School Principals and Racism: Responding to Aveling

    Charles, Claire; Mahoney, Caroline; Fox, Brandi; Halse, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study responds to Nado Aveling's call in "Anti-racism in Schools: A question of leadership?" ("Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education," 2007, 28(1), 69-85) for further investigation into racism in Australian schools. Aveling's interview study concluded that an overwhelming number of school principals…

  19. Experimental investigation of pollutant dispersion within a street in low wind conditions, the experiment Nantes'99

    Vachon, G.; Rosant, J.M.; Mestayer, P.; Louka, P.; Sini, J.F.; Lorin, Y.; Violleau, M. [Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Lab. de Mecanique des Fluides UMR 6598 CNRS, 44 (France); Antoine, M.J.; Peneau, J.P. [Ecole d' Architecture de Nantes, CERMA UMR 1563 CNRS, 44 (France); Delaunay, D.; Tetard, Y. [CSTB, 44 - Nantes (France); Ducroz, F.; Molle, F. [Air Pays de la Loire, 44 - Nantes (France); Garreau, J. [Mairie de Nantes, Service Environnement Urbain, 44 - Nantes (France); Griffiths, R. [UMIST, Environmental Technology Center, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jones, Ch. [DERA Porton Down, Salisbury (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    Nantes'99 is a first experimental campaign of the URBCAP project which aims at assessing the importance of the pollutant transformation processes within the urban canopy and validating the models allowing to predict local air quality within the different quarters of a City. The objectives of Nantes'99 are the determination of wind field in a street canyon, the study of the traffic influence on turbulence, the evaluation of thermo-radiative aspects and the validation of different models. The experiment took place during the whole month of June 1999 in a section of the Rue de Strasbourg, a 3-lane, one-way, highly-trafficked, straight street of the City centre of Nantes. A first data base concerning the measurements during IOP (Intense Observation Period) days throughout Nantes'99 experiment has been built. This paper presents CO concentrations measured at different heights within the rue de Strasbourg in relation to traffic density and reference wind speed and direction. It is shown that high pollution episodes are associated with increased traffic. Furthermore wind direction perpendicular to the street leads to high concentrations at the leeward side of the street. It is also appears that the skimming flow vortex is not observed for wind speeds lover than a threshold between 0.9 and 1.2 m.s{sup -1}. Finally, it is pointed out that the background pollution levels influence the concentration of pollutants within the street canyon. (authors)

  20. Exploring representations and experiences of case-management users: towards difficulties and solutions to leading qualitative interviews with older people with complex living conditions.

    Balard, Frédéric; Corre, Stéphanie Pin Le; Trouvé, Hélène; Saint-Jean, Olivier; Somme, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    By matching needs to resource services, case management could be a useful tool for improving the care of older people with complex living conditions. Collecting and analysing the users' experiences represents a good way to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of a case-management service. However, in the literature, fieldwork is very rarely considered and the users included in qualitative research seem to be the most accessible. This study was undertaken to describe the challenges of conducting qualitative research with older people with complex living conditions in order to understand their experiences with case-management services. Reflective analysis was applied to describe the process of recruiting and interviewing older people with complex living conditions in private homes, describing the protocol with respect to fieldwork chronology. The practical difficulties inherent in this type of study are addressed, particularly in terms of defining a sample, the procedure for contacting the users and conducting the interview. The users are people who suffer from a loss of autonomy because of cognitive impairment, severe disease and/or psychiatric or social problems. Notably, most of them refuse care and assistance. Reflective analysis of our protocol showed that the methodology and difficulties encountered constituted the first phase of data analysis. Understanding the experience of users of case management to analyse the outcomes of case-management services requires a clear methodology for the fieldwork.

  1. Healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Ekberg, Stuart; Bradford, Natalie; Herbert, Anthony; Danby, Susan; Yates, Patsy

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this review is to identify and synthesize the best international qualitative evidence on healthcare users' experiences of communication with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions. For the purposes of this review, "healthcare users" will be taken to include children who have life-limiting conditions and their families. The question to be addressed is:What are healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions? The prospect of the death of a child from an incurable medical condition is harrowing, yet finding a way to discuss this prospect is crucial to maximize the quality of life for such children and their families. High-quality communication is well recognized as a core skill health care professionals need to maximize the quality of care they provide. This skill is valued by service users, who consistently rate it as one of the highest priorities for the care they receive. Evidence suggests, however, that healthcare professionals can feel ill-equipped or uncomfortable communicating with and about such children. Therefore, it is important to understand what represents high-quality communication and what is involved in accomplishing this within pediatric palliative care.In recent decades there has been an increased focus on providing palliative care for children who have life-limiting conditions. These are conditions for which no cure is available and for which the probable outcome is premature death. Palliative care may also be appropriate for children who have life-threatening conditions; these are conditions where there is not only a high probability of premature death but also a chance of long-term survival into adulthood Although pediatric palliative care is underpinned by the same philosophy as adult palliative care, children who have life-limiting conditions and their families have particular needs that distinguish them from users of

  2. Carbon turnover in topsoil and subsoil: The microbial response to root litter additions and different environmental conditions in a reciprocal soil translocation experiment

    Preusser, Sebastian; Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven; Kandeler, Ellen

    2017-04-01

    At the global scale, soil organic carbon (SOC) represents the largest active terrestrial organic carbon (OC) pool. Carbon dynamics in subsoil, however, vary from those in topsoil with much lower C concentrations in subsoil than in topsoil horizons, although more than 50 % of SOC is stored in subsoils below 30 cm soil depth. In addition, microorganisms in subsoil are less abundant, more heterogeneously distributed and the microbial communities have a lower diversity than those in topsoil. Especially in deeper soil, the impact of changes in habitat conditions on microorganisms involved in carbon cycling are largely unexplored and consequently the understanding of microbial functioning is limited. A reciprocal translocation experiment allowed us to investigate the complex interaction effects of altered environmental and substrate conditions on microbial decomposer communities in both topsoil and subsoil habitats under in situ conditions. We conducted this experiment with topsoil (5 cm soil depth) and subsoil (110 cm) samples of an acid and sandy Dystric Cambisol from a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest in Lower Saxony, Germany. In total 144 samples were buried into three depths (5 cm, 45 cm and 110 cm) and 13C-labelled root litter was added to expose the samples to different environmental conditions and to increase the substrate availability, respectively. Samples were taken in three month intervals up to a maximum exposure time of one year to follow the temporal development over the experimental period. Analyses included 13Cmic and 13C PLFA measurements to investigate the response of microbial abundance, community structure and 13C-root decomposition activity under the different treatments. Environmental conditions in the respective soil depths such as soil temperature and water content were recorded throughout the experimental period. All microbial groups (gram+ and gram- bacteria, fungi) showed highest relative 13C incorporation in 110 cm depth and samples

  3. The European tracer experiment ETEX: a real-time long range atmospheric dispersion model exercise in different weather conditions

    Graziani, G.; )

    1998-01-01

    Two long-range tracer experiments were conducted. An inert, non-depositing tracer was being released at Rennes in France for 12 hours. The 168 sampling ground stations were run by the National Meteorological Services. Twenty-four institutions took part in the real-time forecasting of the cloud evolution using 28 long-range dispersion models. The horizontal projection of the cloud evolution over Europe was combined with real-time aerial chemical analysis. The results of the comparison indicate that a limited group of models (7-8) were capable of obtaining a good reproduction of the cloud movement throughout Europe for the first release. Large differences were, however, found in the predicted tracer concentration at a particular location. For the second release, there were large differences between the measured and calculated cloud, particularly after a front passage, which indicates that some efforts have still to be spent before consensus on the model reliability is achieved. (P.A.)

  4. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron-reducing conditions

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2015-02-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron was measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454 pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We be Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  5. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Congenital Hemoglobinopathies Using a Tailored Busulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen: Single-Center Experience.

    Zaidman, Irina; Rowe, Jacob M; Khalil, Abdalla; Ben-Arush, Myriam; Elhasid, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only proven curative option for patients with hemoglobinopathies, both thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA). A busulfan-based myeloablative conditioning regimen is the standard of care for HSCT in these patients, although increased treatment-related morbidity, including veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been demonstrated. Thirty-eight pediatric patients, median age 8 years (range, 6 months to 22 years), suffering from hemoglobinopathy were treated at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, between 1998 and 2011. Thirty-four patients had thalassemia major and 4 had SCA. The 38 patients underwent 40 HSCTs, 34 of which were first transplants and 6 second transplants. Most transplants (32/40) were from matched sibling donors. Sources of stem cells were peripheral blood in 30 transplants, bone marrow in 7 transplants, and cord blood in 3 transplants. All received different customized busulfan-based conditioning regimens tailored by pharmacokinetic analysis of busulfan levels. Primary engraftment occurred in 37 of 40 transplants. Neutrophil engraftment (>.5 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 15.3 days post-transplantation (range, 10 to 45). Platelet transfusion independence (>20 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 22.3 days (range, 11 to 60). The rate of 5-year overall survival for thalassemia patients after first transplantation was 90.5% ± 5.3%. The rate of 5-year thalassemia-free survival was 81.7% ± 6.8%. Cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 17.6%. Rate of grades III to IV GVHD was 8.8%. Cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 23.5%, with 11.8% incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. One patient developed VOD. Full donor chimerism occurred in 36.4% of patients with class 1 + 2 thalassemia, compared with 78.6% in class 3 thalassemia (P = .049). Overall survival above 90% in patients undergoing their first transplant was demonstrated using busulfan

  6. Development and evaluation of first responder equipment for nuclear forensics

    Tsuchiya, Ken'ichi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kuroki, Kenro; Schwantes, Jon M.; Pierson, Richard; Piper, Roman K.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear forensics are the technical means by which nuclear and other radioactive materials used in illegal activities are characterized as to physical and chemical condition, provenance, and history. Sampling for traditional forensics evidence (e.g. fingerprints, DNA, hair, fibers, and digital evidence) contaminated by radionuclides, and categorization of nuclear and other radioactive materials by on-sight measurement are required for first responders. Portable radiological equipment and radiation protection for first responders to achieve emergency tasks safely at the incident sites have been developed and evaluated in National Research Institute of Police Science. In this report, we introduce wireless network dosimetry system and neutron protection shield with water under sampling and categorization. Described next in this report are evaluation tests of active personal dosimeters using neutron irradiation field in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We evaluated them under fast and thermal neutron field. We confirmed the large fluctuation of the response for each dosimeter caused by the energy dependence of the detectors. (author)

  7. Responding to the Needs of Aging Pupulation

    Mahshid Foroghan

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of "graying" of population which was started in 20th century will continue in the next. It confronts the world with new challenges in the realms of health economy, politics, and cultural issues which are very difficult to overwhelm. The problems arising of this phenomena must be welcome, because they are indicators of upcoming development. Aging of population has occurred in developed countries since many years ago. Therefore their experience in dealing with the resulted problems will be of great help to the developing countries, but it must be remembered that every country has its unique needs and perspectives of future. Thus, modification of existing models of service delivery to elderlies in order to match with the specific conditions in each country is a necessity and major task for policy makers. Regarding these facts, United Nations in their second General Assembly on the topic of "Aging" rendered the International Strategy for Action on Aging as general guidelines, but stressed that every country must tailor programs to fit to its individual circumstances. In this article, an overview of future demographic changes of the world, challenges of the aging population, and the world programs on aging will be rendered and then a brief glance to what is happening in Islamic Republic of Iran as a country which is going to age in next few decades will be presented.

  8. CIRUN: Climate Information Responding to User Needs

    Busalacchi, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth System will experience real climate change over the next 50 years, exceeding the scope of natural climate variability. A paramount question facing society is how to adapt to this certainty of climate variability and change. In response, OSTP and NOAA are considering how comprehensive climate services would best inform decisions about adaptation. Similarly, NASA is considering the optimal configuration of the next generation of Earth, environmental, and climate observations to be deployed over the coming 10-20 years. Moreover, much of the added-value information for specific climate-related decisions will be provided by private, academic and non-governmental organizations. In this context, over the past several years the University of Maryland has established the CIRUN (Climate Information: Responding to User Needs) initiative to identify the nature of national needs for climate information and services from a decision support perspective. To date, CIRUN has brought together decisionmakers in a number of sectors to help understand their perspectives on climate with the goal of improving the usefulness of climate information, observations and prediction products to specific user communities. CIRUN began with a major workshop in October 2007 that convened 430 participants in agriculture, parks and recreation, terrestrial ecosystems, insurance/investment, energy, national security, state/local/municipal, water, human health, commerce and manufacturing, transportation, and coastal/marine sectors. Plenary speakers such as Norman Augustine, R. James Woolsey, James Mahoney, and former Senator Joseph Tydings, breakout panel sessions, and participants provided input based on the following: - How would you characterize the exposure or vulnerability to climate variability or change impacting your organization? - Does climate variability and/or change currently factor into your organization's objectives or operations? - Are any of your existing plans being affected by

  9. Conditioned [corrected] stimulus informativeness governs conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus associability.

    Ward, Ryan D; Gallistel, C R; Jensen, Greg; Richards, Vanessa L; Fairhurst, Stephen; Balsam, Peter D

    2012-07-01

    In a conditioning protocol, the onset of the conditioned stimulus ([CS]) provides information about when to expect reinforcement (unconditioned stimulus [US]). There are two sources of information from the CS in a delay conditioning paradigm in which the CS-US interval is fixed. The first depends on the informativeness, the degree to which CS onset reduces the average expected time to onset of the next US. The second depends only on how precisely a subject can represent a fixed-duration interval (the temporal Weber fraction). In three experiments with mice, we tested the differential impact of these two sources of information on rate of acquisition of conditioned responding (CS-US associability). In Experiment 1, we showed that associability (the inverse of trials to acquisition) increased in proportion to informativeness. In Experiment 2, we showed that fixing the duration of the US-US interval or the CS-US interval or both had no effect on associability. In Experiment 3, we equated the increase in information produced by varying the C/T ratio with the increase produced by fixing the duration of the CS-US interval. Associability increased with increased informativeness, but, as in Experiment 2, fixing the CS-US duration had no effect on associability. These results are consistent with the view that CS-US associability depends on the increased rate of reward signaled by CS onset. The results also provide further evidence that conditioned responding is temporally controlled when it emerges.

  10. The effect of metals on condition and pathologies of European eel (Anguilla anguilla): in situ and laboratory experiments.

    Esteve, Consuelo; Alcaide, Elena; Ureña, Rocio

    2012-03-01

    Forty-nine wild eels (Anguilla anguilla) caught in the Albufera Lake (Spain), measuring 24.0-75.0 cm in length and 25.0-637.7 g in weight, were examined for metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn), condition (CI and HSI indices), as well as for diseases (Anguillicola infestation; bacterial infections). Total metal load significantly increased in eel liver tissue parallel to total length and body weight (log), while silvering females (W(B) > 200 g; L ≥ 500 mm) exhibited the highest amounts of Co, Cu, Hg, Se and Zn. Diverse effects may be expected in these big eels due to long-term metal exposure. In fact, IMBI (individual mean (multi-metal) bioaccumulation index) and copper load (Ln) in particular, were significantly related with a decrease in the HSI, reflecting lower eel fitness. In addition, most silvering females (75%) showed a CI below 0.2, and this size group presented the highest prevalence of chronic diseases, at significant levels, that are non-lethal in the short term, but degenerative in the long term. Amounts of hepatic iron were not correlated with eel size; however, a significant, strong negative correlation between this metal (Ln) and HSI and CI was found for wild eels suffering from diseases of any aetiology. This also included small eels (W(B) <67 g; L < 350 mm), as this size group presented a significant prevalence of acute diseases caused by single virulent bacterial pathogens (i.e. Edwardsiella tarda and Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2). To assess the effect of metals on susceptibility to disease, yellow eels were maintained and exposed to iron, copper, and pathogens, in captivity under laboratory conditions. Co-exposure of eels to iron (9 μg of Fe/g of fish) and bacterial pathogens by intraperitoneal injection (IP), yielded a hundred-fold reduction in the LD50 of all bacteria assayed (i.e. E. tarda, V. vulnificus, and motile Aeromonas), and also the time taken to cause eel death. Short-term aqueous exposure of eels to 0.4, 0.7, 1.7 and

  11. Measuring conditions and trends in ecosystem services at multiple scales: the Southern African Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (SAfMA) experience.

    van Jaarsveld, A S; Biggs, R; Scholes, R J; Bohensky, E; Reyers, B; Lynam, T; Musvoto, C; Fabricius, C

    2005-02-28

    The Southern African Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (SAfMA) evaluated the relationships between ecosystem services and human well-being at multiple scales, ranging from local through to sub-continental. Trends in ecosystem services (fresh water, food, fuel-wood, cultural and biodiversity) over the period 1990-2000 were mixed across scales. Freshwater resources appear strained across the continent with large numbers of people not securing adequate supplies, especially of good quality water. This translates to high infant mortality patterns across the region. In some areas, the use of water resources for irrigated agriculture and urban-industrial expansion is taking place at considerable cost to the quality and quantity of freshwater available to ecosystems and for domestic use. Staple cereal production across the region has increased but was outstripped by population growth while protein malnutrition is on the rise. The much-anticipated wood-fuel crisis on the subcontinent has not materialized but some areas are experiencing shortages while numerous others remain vulnerable. Cultural benefits of biodiversity are considerable, though hard to quantify or track over time. Biodiversity resources remain at reasonable levels, but are declining faster than reflected in species extinction rates and appear highly sensitive to land-use decisions. The SAfMA sub-global assessment provided an opportunity to experiment with innovative ways to assess ecosystem services including the use of supply-demand surfaces, service sources and sink areas, priority areas for service provision, service 'hotspots' and trade-off assessments.

  12. Hydrochemical investigations in crystalline bedrock in relation to existing hydraulic conditions: experiences from the SKB test-sites in Sweden

    Smellie, J.; Larsson, N.Aa.; Wikberg, P.; Carlsson, L.

    1985-11-01

    This report represents the compilation, discussion and interpretation of hydrochemical and hydraulic data resulting from the SKB test-site investigations carried out over a period of three years (1982-84). By systematically applying hydrological and geological considerations to each sampled horizon, it has been possible to differentiate between those groundwaters which are reasonably representative for the depth sampled, from those which have been subject to contamination from different sources. Groundwaters which are here considered representative are defined as those which show no evidence of mixing with other water sources, whether from drilling water, younger, near-surface water, or other deeper groundwaters. As a consequence, only a few sampled horizons can be considered with serious hydrochemical attention. The lack of representative groundwater samples, whilst often due to technical problems or sampling from non-conductive sections of the boreholes, also illustrate the extremely complex geometry of the premeable fracture systems in crystalline bedrock, and thus the difficulty of establishing the nature and depth relation of the groundwater tapped. Although the main findings of this study have revealed gross inadequacies in the hydrochemical programme, valuable experience has nevertheless been gained. Consequently, some of the improvements recommended in Section 7 of this report have been already implemented resulting in higher sampling standards and thus water samples which are much more representative for the hydrogeological environment under investigation. (author)

  13. The effect of three surface conditions, speed and running experience on vertical acceleration of the tibia during running.

    Boey, Hannelore; Aeles, Jeroen; Schütte, Kurt; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-06-01

    Research has focused on parameters that are associated with injury risk, e.g. vertical acceleration. These parameters can be influenced by running on different surfaces or at different running speeds, but the relationship between them is not completely clear. Understanding the relationship may result in training guidelines to reduce the injury risk. In this study, thirty-five participants with three different levels of running experience were recruited. Participants ran on three different surfaces (concrete, synthetic running track, and woodchip trail) at two different running speeds: a self-selected comfortable speed and a fixed speed of 3.06 m/s. Vertical acceleration of the lower leg was measured with an accelerometer. The vertical acceleration was significantly lower during running on the woodchip trail in comparison with the synthetic running track and the concrete, and significantly lower during running at lower speed in comparison with during running at higher speed on all surfaces. No significant differences in vertical acceleration were found between the three groups of runners at fixed speed. Higher self-selected speed due to higher performance level also did not result in higher vertical acceleration. These results may show that running on a woodchip trail and slowing down could reduce the injury risk at the tibia.

  14. Spectrometric analyses in comparison to the physiological condition of heavy metal stressed floodplain vegetation in a standardised experiment

    Götze, Christian; Jung, András; Merbach, Ines; Wennrich, Rainer; Gläßer, Cornelia

    2010-06-01

    Floodplain ecosystems are affected by flood dynamics, nutrient supply as well as anthropogenic activities. Heavy metal pollution poses a serious environmental challenge. Pollution transfer from the soil to vegetation is still present at the central location of Elbe River, Germany. The goal of this study was to assess and separate the current heavy metal contamination of the floodplain ecosystem, using spectrometric field and laboratory measurements. A standardized pot experiment with floodplain vegetation in differently contaminated soils provided the basis for the measurements. The dominant plant types of the floodplains are: Urtica dioica, Phalaris arundinacea and Alopecurus pratensis, these were also chemically analysed. Various vegetation indices and methods were used to estimate the red edge position, to normalise the spectral curve of the vegetation and to investigate the potential of different methods for separating plant stress in floodplain vegetation. The main task was to compare spectral bands during phenological phases to find a method to detect heavy metal stress in plants. A multi-level algorithm for the curve parameterisation was developed. Chemo-analytical and ecophysiological parameters of plants were considered in the results and correlated with spectral data. The results of this study show the influence of heavy metals on the spectral characteristics of the focal plants. The developed method (depth CR1730) showed significant relationship between the plants and the contamination.

  15. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron reducing conditions

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron were measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454-pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We believe that one of the dominant microbial species in our system (an uncultured Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  16. Pipe rupture test results; 4 inch pipe whip tests under BWR operational condition-clearance parameter experiments

    Ueda, Syuzo; Isozaki, Toshikuni; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Kato, Rokuro; Saito, Kazuo; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of pipe rupture studies in JAERI is to perform the model tests on pipe whip, restraint behavior, jet impingement and jet thrust force, and to establish the computational method for analyzing these phenomena. This report describes the experimental results of pipe whip on the pipe specimens of 4 inch in diameter under BWR condition on which the pressure is 6.77 MPa and the temperature is 285 0 C. The pipe specimens were 114.3 mm (4 inch) in diameter and 8.6 mm in thickness and 4500 mm in length. Four pipe whip restraints used in the tests were the U-bar type of 8 mm in diameter and fabricated from type 304 stainless steel. The experimental parameter was the clearance (30, 50 and 100 mm). The dynamic strain behavior of the pipe specimen and the restraints was investigated by strain gages and their residual deformation was obtained by measuring marking points provided on their surface. The Pressure-time history in the pipe specimens was also obtained by pressure gages. The maximum pipe strain is caused near the restraints and increases with increase of the clearance. The experimental results of pipe whip tests indicate the effectiveness of pipe whip restraints. The ratio of absorbed strain energy of the pipe specimen to that of the restraints is nearly constant for different clearances at the overhang length of 400 mm. (author)

  17. Simulation of the ACE L2 and ACE L5 MCCI experiment under dry surface conditions with ASTEC MEDICIS using an effective heat transfer model

    Agethen, Kathrin; Koch, Marco K. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Reactor Simulation and Safety Group

    2013-07-01

    In a postulated severe accident the loss of cooling can lead to a melting of the core and to a failure of the vessel. The molten core material discharges to the containment cavity and interacts with the concrete basemat. The heat up of the concrete leads to the release of sparing gases (H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, SiO), which stir the pool und causes chemical reactions. Especially the metals (Zr, Fe, Ni, Cr) in the corium are oxidized und the exothermic energy is released to the melt, which raises the melt temperature further. The release of combustible gases (H{sub 2}, CO) and fission products to the containment atmosphere occurs as a result. In the long time (>10 h) containment failure and basemat penetration may occur, which can lead to fission product release to the environment. For further development and validation, simulations of experiments in which molten core concrete interaction (MCCI) is investigated, are necessary. In this work the new available effective heat transfer model in MEDICIS is used to calculate experiments of the ACE program, in which generic corium material is heated up and interacts with the concrete basemat. Here, especially the ACE L2 experiment with siliceous concrete and the ACE L5 experiment with limestone common sand (LCS) concrete will be presented. These experiments enable to analyze the heat transfer from the interior of the melt to the upper surface under dry conditions. Secondary the modeling in ASTEC version 2.p2 with the effective heat transfer module in MEDICIS is described. Results of MEDICIS simulations will be discussed by means of phenomena like ablation behavior and erosions depth, layer temperature and surface heat loss. Finally the issue of an effective heat transfer coefficient for the surface under dry conditions without top flooding is figured out. (orig.)

  18. Amitriptyline Intoxication Responded to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Güldem Turan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The most severe effects in amitriptiline intoxications are related with central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Amitriptiline intoxication especially with high doses has severe cardiac effects and can result in cardiac arrest. Most favorable responses can be achieved with efficient and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We wanted to present a case ingested high dose of amitriptiline for attempt to suicide and responded to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  19. Nuclear Fallout Decision Tool for First Responders

    Archibald, E. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buddemeier, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-11

    If terrorists detonated an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an urban area, thousands of people would die from the blast, and many more would become sick or die from exposure to fallout radiation. Proper sheltering and evacuation can protect people from fallout and save lives. This project provides guidance to first responders as to when to evacuate and what route to take to protect themselves against fallout radiation.

  20. Evidence for substantial forestry canopy processing of nitrogen deposition using isotopic tracer experiments in low deposition conditions

    Ferraretto, Daniele; Heal, Kate

    2017-04-01

    Temperate forest ecosystems are significant sinks for nitrogen deposition (Ndep) yielding benefits such as protection of waterbodies from eutrophication and enhanced sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Previous studies have shown evidence of biological nitrification and Ndep processing and retention in forest canopies. However, this was reported only at sites with high environmental or experimentally enhanced rates of Ndep (˜18 kg N ha-1 y-1) and has not yet been demonstrated in low Ndep environments. We have used bulk field hydrochemical measurements and labelled isotopic experiments to assess canopy processing in a lower Ndep environment (˜7 kg N ha-1 year-1) at a Sitka spruce plantation in Perthshire, Scotland, representing the dominant tree species (24%) in woodlands in Great Britain. Analysis of 4.5 years of measured N fluxes in rainfall (RF) and fogwater onto the canopy and throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) below the canopy suggests strong transformation and uptake of Ndep in the forest canopy. Annual canopy Ndep uptake was ˜4.7 kg N ha-1 year-1, representing 60-76% of annual Ndep. To validate these plot-scale results and track N uptake within the forest canopy in different seasons, double 15N-labelled NH4NO3 (98%) solution was sprayed in summer and winter onto the canopy of three trees at the measurement site. RF, TF and SF samples have been collected and analysed for 15NH4 and 15NO3. Comparing the amount of labelled N recovered under the sample trees with the measured δ15N signal is expected to provide further evidence of the role of forest canopies in actively processing and retaining atmospheric N deposition.

  1. Development of a highway incident management operational and training guide for incident responders in Illinois.

    2011-08-01

    Each year highway traffic incidents, such as crashes, place responders on and beside roadways with : dangerous high-speed traffic. The unexpected conditions of an incident scene have the potential to surprise : unsuspecting or inattentive drivers, po...

  2. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume, Grindsted, Denmark: 2. Deduction of anaerobic (methanogenic, sulfate-, and Fe (III)-reducing) redox conditions

    Albrechtsen, Hans-JøRgen; Bjerg, Poul L.; Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Rügge, Kirsten; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1999-04-01

    Redox conditions may be environmental factors which affect the fate of the xenobiotic organic compounds. Therefore the redox conditions were characterized in an anaerobic, leachate-contaminated aquifer 15-60 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark, where an field injection experiment was carried out. Furthermore, the stability of the redox conditions spatially and over time were investigated, and different approaches to deduce the redox conditions were evaluated. The redox conditions were evaluated in a set of 20 sediment and groundwater samples taken from locations adjacent to the sediment samples. Samples were investigated with respect to groundwater chemistry, including hydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and sediment geochemistry, and bioassays were performed. The groundwater chemistry, including redox sensitive species for a large number of samples, varied over time during the experimental period of 924 days owing to variations in the leachate from the landfill. However, no indication of change in the redox environment resulting from the field injection experiment or natural variation was observed in the individual sampling points. The methane, Fe(II), hydrogen, and VFA groundwater chemistry parameters strongly indicated a Fe(III)-reducing environment. This was further supported by the bioassays, although methane production and sulfate-reduction were also observed in a few samples close to the landfill. On the basis of the calculated carbon conversion, Fe(III) was the dominant electron acceptor in the region of the aquifer, which was investigated. Because of the complexity of a landfill leachate plume, several redox processes may occur simultaneously, and an array of methods must be applied for redox characterization in such multicomponent systems.

  3. Development of Assessment Methodology of Chemical Behavior of Volatile Iodide under Severe Accident Conditions Using EPICUR Experiments

    Oh, Jae Yong; Yun, Jong Il; Kim, Do Sam; Han Chul

    2011-01-01

    Iodine is one of the most important fission products produced in nuclear power plants. Under severe accident condition, iodine exists as a variety of species in the containment such as aqueous iodide, gaseous iodide, iodide aerosol, etc. Following release of iodine from the reactor, mostly in the form of CsI aerosol, volatile iodine can be generated from the containment sump and release to the environment. Especially, volatile organic iodide can be produced from interaction between nonvolatile iodine and organic substances present in the containment. Volatile iodide could significantly influence the alienated residents surrounding the nuclear power plant. In particular, thyroid is vulnerable to radioiodine due to its high accumulation. Therefore, it is necessary for the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) to develop an evaluation model which can simulate iodine behavior in the containment following a severe accident. KINS also needs to make up its methodology for radiological consequence analysis, based on MELCOR-MACCS2 calculation, by coupling a simple iodine model which can conveniently deal with organic iodides. In the long term, such a model can contribute to develop an accident source term, which is one of urgent domestic needs. Our strategy for developing the model is as follows: 1. Review the existing methodologies, 2. Develop a simple stand-alone model, 3. Validate the model using ISTP-EPICUR (Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation) and OECD-BIP (Behavior of Iodine Project) experimental data. In this paper we present the context of development and validation of our model named RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model)

  4. Development of Assessment Methodology of Chemical Behavior of Volatile Iodide under Severe Accident Conditions Using EPICUR Experiments

    Oh, Jae Yong; Yun, Jong Il [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Sam; Han Chul [Korea Institue of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Iodine is one of the most important fission products produced in nuclear power plants. Under severe accident condition, iodine exists as a variety of species in the containment such as aqueous iodide, gaseous iodide, iodide aerosol, etc. Following release of iodine from the reactor, mostly in the form of CsI aerosol, volatile iodine can be generated from the containment sump and release to the environment. Especially, volatile organic iodide can be produced from interaction between nonvolatile iodine and organic substances present in the containment. Volatile iodide could significantly influence the alienated residents surrounding the nuclear power plant. In particular, thyroid is vulnerable to radioiodine due to its high accumulation. Therefore, it is necessary for the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) to develop an evaluation model which can simulate iodine behavior in the containment following a severe accident. KINS also needs to make up its methodology for radiological consequence analysis, based on MELCOR-MACCS2 calculation, by coupling a simple iodine model which can conveniently deal with organic iodides. In the long term, such a model can contribute to develop an accident source term, which is one of urgent domestic needs. Our strategy for developing the model is as follows: 1. Review the existing methodologies, 2. Develop a simple stand-alone model, 3. Validate the model using ISTP-EPICUR (Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation) and OECD-BIP (Behavior of Iodine Project) experimental data. In this paper we present the context of development and validation of our model named RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model)

  5. Organic vs. organic - soil arthropods as bioindicators of ecological sustainability in greenhouse system experiment under Mediterranean conditions.

    Madzaric, Suzana; Ceglie, F G; Depalo, L; Al Bitar, L; Mimiola, G; Tittarelli, F; Burgio, G

    2017-11-23

    Organic greenhouse (OGH) production is characterized by different systems and agricultural practices with diverse environmental impact. Soil arthropods are widely used as bioindicators of ecological sustainability in open field studies, while there is a lack of research on organic production for protected systems. This study assessed the soil arthropod abundance and diversity over a 2-year crop rotation in three systems of OGH production in the Mediterranean. The systems under assessment differed in soil fertility management: SUBST - a simplified system of organic production, based on an input substitution approach (use of guano and organic liquid fertilizers), AGROCOM - soil fertility mainly based on compost application and agroecological services crops (ASC) cultivation (tailored use of cover crops) as part of crop rotation, and AGROMAN - animal manure and ASC cultivation as part of crop rotation. Monitoring of soil fauna was performed by using pitfall traps and seven taxa were considered: Carabidae, Staphylinidae, Araneae, Opiliones, Isopoda, Myriapoda, and Collembola. Results demonstrated high potential of ASC cultivation as a technique for beneficial soil arthropod conservation in OGH conditions. SUBST system was dominated by Collembola in all crops, while AGROMAN and AGROCOM had more balanced relative abundance of Isopoda, Staphylinidae, and Aranea. Opiliones and Myriapoda were more affected by season, while Carabidae were poorly represented in the whole monitoring period. Despite the fact that all three production systems are in accordance with the European Union regulation on organic farming, findings of this study displayed significant differences among them and confirmed the suitability of soil arthropods as bioindicators in protected systems of organic farming.

  6. Risk, rationality, and regret: responding to the uncertainty of childhood food anaphylaxis.

    Hu, W; Kerridge, I; Kemp, A

    2005-06-01

    Risk and uncertainty are unavoidable in clinical medicine. In the case of childhood food allergy, the dysphoric experience of uncertainty is heightened by the perception of unpredictable danger to young children. Medicine has tended to respond to uncertainty with forms of rational decision making. Rationality cannot, however, resolve uncertainty and provides an insufficient account of risk. This paper compares the medical and parental accounts of two peanut allergic toddlers to highlight the value of emotions in decision making. One emotion in particular, regret, assists in explaining the actions taken to prevent allergic reactions, given the diffuse nature of responsibility for children. In this light, the assumption that doctors make rational judgments while patients have emotion led preferences is a false dichotomy. Reconciling medical and lay accounts requires acknowledgement of the interrelationship between the rational and the emotional, and may lead to more appropriate clinical decision making under conditions of uncertainty.

  7. The long-term behaviour of cemented research reactor waste under the geological disposal conditions of the Boom Clay Formation: results from leach experiments

    Sneyers, A.; Fays, J.; Iseghem, P. van

    2001-01-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has carried out a number of studies to evaluate the long-term behaviour of cemented research reactor waste under the geological disposal conditions of the Boom Clay Formation. Static leach experiments in synthetic clay water were performed on active samples of cemented research reactor waste. The leach experiments were carried out under anaerobic conditions at two testing temperatures (23 and 85 o C). Leach rates of seven radionuclides ( 60 Co, 90 Sr, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 154 Eu and 241 Am) were measured. Most investigated radionuclides are well retained within the cement matrix over a 280 days testing period. Results on the source term of radionuclides were complemented with data on the leaching behaviour of cement matrix constituents as Ca, Si, Al, Na, K, Mg and SO 4 as well as with data from performance assessment calculations and in situ tests. Despite limitations inherent to short-term experiments, combined results from these investigations indicate only limited interactions of disposed research reactor waste with the near field of a geological repository in clay. (author)

  8. Experiments on the proof of the repair of the DNA-damage in human fibroblasts in vitro, induced by PUVA-conditions and after UVC-irradiation

    Silla, R.

    1979-01-01

    Within the frame of the present study we tried to investigate in vitro the course of repair of DNA-damage which had been provoked by UV C-irradiation and by PUVA-conditions. In a preliminary test series the suppression of the semiconservative DNA-replication by hydroxyurea was investigated. It resulted that there is a four-fold suppression of the programmed DNA-synthesis. In the standard experiments 5 groups with 8-MOP plus various UV A-irradiation energies were compared with the not irradiated control groups, with the groups with 8-MOP, with UV A in two different doses, and with the UV C group. The test samples were marked with /sup 3/H-thymidine, whilst hydroxurea was added after a certain period of time (0, 1, 2, 4 hours). In each case the uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine into the DNS - as expression of repair activity - was measured after one hour by the liquid scintigraphic method. These experiments proved an obvious repair activity of the groups, which had received UV C-irradiation, and of those under PUVA-conditions with low UV A-irradiation energies. The maximum values were found after one hour or after two hours respectively. The /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake is blocked by PUVA-conditions with increasing UV A-irradiation energies. Apparently this is also valid for 8-MOP only and for high UV A-doses only.

  9. Primary student teachers’ perceptions of their prior experiences with craft-making in light of Hannah Arendt’s human condition

    Seija Karppinen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study about student teachers’ feelings toward craft-making and teaching crafts. As a teacher educator in teacher training, my interest lies first in student teachers’ prior craft experiences and in their prejudices about themselves as craft-makers in relation to the human condition as set forth by philosopher Hannah Arendt (1958/2002. Second, I am interested in how students’ experiences and their image of crafts affect their attitude to crafts and teaching crafts. The study uses qualitative content analysis (e.g. Cohen, Manion & Morrison, 2007, concept clarification (e.g. Kramer, 1993; Burkin, 2011 and thought experiments (Zalta, 2011; Cohnitz, 2006; Sorensen, 1992 to identify and categorise student teachers’ emotional experiences. The data consist of essays (craft biographies, N=144 by first-year student teachers which were written in 2008 and 2009 during a basic course in crafts as part of teacher education at the University of Helsinki. Arendt (1958/2002 labelled the elements of the human condition as labour, work and action. In this study I discuss how, for instance, Arendtian concepts could be explained in relation to crafts, craft-making and education. Arendt categorises craft, defined as things made by hand, as part of the concept of work. In this study, I consider whether crafts and craft-making could be part of other Arendtian terms as well and how these terms fit various educational situations. As a result, there is a need for additional terms alongside Arendtian terms to describe multifaceted craft-making and primary student teachers’ perceptions of themselves as craft-makers. In relation to student teachers’ memories on primary school crafts, I have labelled Arendtian concept labour as students’ credit-orientated activity, the concept of work as making-orientated activity and the concept of action as interaction-orientated activity. These three orientations of craft frame student

  10. Transcriptional changes induced by bevacizumab combination therapy in responding and non-responding recurrent glioblastoma patients

    Urup, Thomas; Staunstrup, Line Maersk; Michaelsen, Signe Regner

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy produces clinical durable response in 25-30% of recurrent glioblastoma patients. This group of patients has shown improved survival and quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in gene expression associated with response...... and resistance to bevacizumab combination therapy.Methods: Recurrent glioblastoma patients who had biomarker-accessible tumor tissue surgically removed both before bevacizumab treatment and at time of progression were included. Patients were grouped into responders (n = 7) and non-responders (n = 14). Gene...... expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was performed using RNA-sequencing.Results: By comparing pretreatment samples of responders with those of non-responders no significant difference was observed. In a paired comparison analysis of pre- and posttreatment samples of non...

  11. L-059: EPR-First responders: Radiological emergency manual for first responders

    2011-01-01

    This conference is an emergency manual review about the first responders knowledge. The IAEA safety standard manuals, the medical gestion, the security forces and the fast communications are very important in a radiological emergency

  12. Odor information transfer in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata: effect of in-hive experiences on classical conditioning of proboscis extension.

    Mc Cabe, Sofía I; Farina, Walter M

    2009-02-01

    A recent study showed that the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata could learn to discriminate odors in a classical conditioning of proboscis extension response (PER). Here we used this protocol to investigate the ability of these bees to use olfactory information obtained within the colony in an experimental context: the PER paradigm. We compared their success in solving a classical differential conditioning depending on the previous olfactory experiences received inside the nest. We found that M. quadrifasciata bees are capable of transferring the food-odor information acquired in the colony to a differential conditioning in the PER paradigm. Bees attained higher discrimination levels when they had previously encountered the rewarded odor associated to food inside the hive. The increase in the discrimination levels, however, was in some cases unspecific to the odor used indicating a certain degree of generalization. The influence of the food scent offered at a field feeder 24 h before the classical conditioning could also be seen in the discrimination attained by the foragers in the PER setup, detecting the presence of long-term memory. Moreover, the improved performance of recruited bees in the PER paradigm suggests the occurrence of social learning of nectar scents inside the stingless bees' hives.

  13. Infant differential behavioral responding to discrete emotions.

    Walle, Eric A; Reschke, Peter J; Camras, Linda A; Campos, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    Emotional communication regulates the behaviors of social partners. Research on individuals' responding to others' emotions typically compares responses to a single negative emotion compared with responses to a neutral or positive emotion. Furthermore, coding of such responses routinely measure surface level features of the behavior (e.g., approach vs. avoidance) rather than its underlying function (e.g., the goal of the approach or avoidant behavior). This investigation examined infants' responding to others' emotional displays across 5 discrete emotions: joy, sadness, fear, anger, and disgust. Specifically, 16-, 19-, and 24-month-old infants observed an adult communicate a discrete emotion toward a stimulus during a naturalistic interaction. Infants' responses were coded to capture the function of their behaviors (e.g., exploration, prosocial behavior, and security seeking). The results revealed a number of instances indicating that infants use different functional behaviors in response to discrete emotions. Differences in behaviors across emotions were clearest in the 24-month-old infants, though younger infants also demonstrated some differential use of behaviors in response to discrete emotions. This is the first comprehensive study to identify differences in how infants respond with goal-directed behaviors to discrete emotions. Additionally, the inclusion of a function-based coding scheme and interpersonal paradigms may be informative for future emotion research with children and adults. Possible developmental accounts for the observed behaviors and the benefits of coding techniques emphasizing the function of social behavior over their form are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Responding to the Housing and Financial Crises

    Scanlon, Kathleen; Lunde, Jens; Whitehead, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The long period of house price growth in markets across the world ended with the US and global financial crisis of 2007/08. The crisis and the consequent recession had profound effects on mortgage market actors – including households, institutions and governments – in most advanced economies......, whether or not they participated in this rapid house price growth. Many of the trends observed during the boom, especially the innovations in financial instruments, were reversed. This paper presents evidence on how mortgage markets and stakeholders responded in the initial period after the crash...

  15. Bats respond to very weak magnetic fields.

    Lan-Xiang Tian

    Full Text Available How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here, the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT, despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05. Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth's magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years.

  16. Bats Respond to Very Weak Magnetic Fields

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (Preversed tens of times over the past fifty million years. PMID:25922944

  17. Design studies on the engineered barrier system and on the in-situ experiments under the conditions of geological environment in Horonobe

    Kurihara, Yuji; Yui, Mikazu; Tanai, Kenji

    2004-04-01

    Following studies have been done in this papers in order to apply the technologies based on H12 report to the actual geological conditions of Horonobe underground research laboratory. 1) Reconsidering the process of repository design, the design process charts of a repository were presented. In the H12 report, the design process of the engineering barrier system was followed by the facility design process. In this paper, the both processes were placed in parallel position. 2) The relation between geological conditions and the performance of engineering barrier systems and the specifications of engineering barrier systems was arranged and the geological information needed for design of engineering barrier were selected. 3) The appropriate form of geological information as input-data for design were showed and the procedure for setting input-data was presented. 4) Based on the state of geological investigations at Horonobe, mechanical input-data were arranged for the design of the in-situ experiments on engineered barrier system at HORONOBE. 5) The stability of the hall for the in-situ experiments was studied by numerical analysis and the results indicated that there are difference in stability between the depth of 500 m and 570 m. (author)

  18. Hazardous materials responder training in the new millennium

    Turpin, R.D.; Betsinger, G.B. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States). Environmental Response Team; Merchant, S. [Environmental Tectonics Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Environmental Response Team (ERT) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was created to provide on-site professional expertise as well as health and safety guidance to Federal on-scene coordinators during accidental oil and chemical releases. ERT provides practical technical solutions to response activities based on theory as well as actual experience. Its creation in 1978 fulfilled the requirements of the U.S. National Contingency Plan. Members of the team have developed a 40-hour Hazardous Waste Responders training course and have themselves, attended a hands-on chemical and biological warfare personnel protective clothing course provided by the U.S. Army. The course demonstrated decontamination showers, moon suits, and entry procedures to a contaminated battlefield situation. ERT continues to emphasize the importance of hands-on training and exercises. Various training programs are underway where students can learn real-time monitoring techniques and respond to simulated hazardous waste incidents. They also learn how to assess environmental, public and occupational health and safety information on the Internet. The students also run air plume models and perform wet bench chemistry experiments. With the advent of more powerful computers, the current objective is to continue with these training activities using Instructor Controlled Interactive Computer Training (ICICT).

  19. Please respond ASAP: workplace telepressure and employee recovery.

    Barber, Larissa K; Santuzzi, Alecia M

    2015-04-01

    Organizations rely heavily on asynchronous message-based technologies (e.g., e-mail) for the purposes of work-related communications. These technologies are primary means of knowledge transfer and building social networks. As a by-product, workers might feel varying levels of preoccupations with and urges for responding quickly to messages from clients, coworkers, or supervisors--an experience we label as workplace telepressure. This experience can lead to fast response times and thus faster decisions and other outcomes initially. However, research from the stress and recovery literature suggests that the defining features of workplace telepressure interfere with needed work recovery time and stress-related outcomes. The present set of studies defined and validated a new scale to measure telepressure. Study 1 tested an initial pool of items and found some support for a single-factor structure after problematic items were removed. As expected, public self-consciousness, techno-overload, and response expectations were moderately associated with telepressure in Study 1. Study 2 demonstrated that workplace telepressure was distinct from other personal (job involvement, affective commitment) and work environment (general and ICT work demands) factors and also predicted burnout (physical and cognitive), absenteeism, sleep quality, and e-mail responding beyond those factors. Implications for future research and workplace practices are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. The Conscientious Responders Scale Helps Researchers Verify the Integrity of Personality Questionnaire Data.

    Marjanovic, Zdravko; Bajkov, Lisa; MacDonald, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The Conscientious Responders Scale is a five-item embeddable validity scale that differentiates between conscientious and indiscriminate responding in personality-questionnaire data (CR & IR). This investigation presents further evidence of its validity and generalizability across two experiments. Study 1 tests its sensitivity to questionnaire length, a known cause of IR, and tries to provoke IR by manipulating psychological reactance. As expected, short questionnaires produced higher Conscientious Responders Scale scores than long questionnaires, and Conscientious Responders Scale scores were unaffected by reactance manipulations. Study 2 tests concerns that the Conscientious Responders Scale's unusual item content could potentially irritate and baffle responders, ironically increasing rates of IR. We administered two nearly identical questionnaires: one with an embedded Conscientious Responders Scale and one without the Conscientious Responders Scale. Psychometric comparisons revealed no differences across questionnaires' means, variances, interitem response consistencies, and Cronbach's alphas. In sum, the Conscientious Responders Scale is highly sensitive to questionnaire length-a known correlate of IR-and can be embedded harmlessly in questionnaires without provoking IR or changing the psychometrics of other measures.

  1. Dewey and Culture: Responding to "Extreme Views"

    Heilbronn, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Dewey famously believed that we learn through experience, through which we build up habits. Education should be about developing good habits. Experience for Dewey, is not an individual possession but grows out of social interaction, which always takes place in a given culture. Dewey's views on culture are significant in relation to a current issue…

  2. "PROCESS and UVolution: photochemistry experiments in Low Earth Orbit": investigation of the photostability of organic and mineral material exposed to Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Noblet, Audrey; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Macari, Frederique; Person, Alain; Chaput, Didier; Raulin, Francois; Cottin, Hervé

    The harsh martian environment could explain the lack of organics and minerals such as car-bonates by destroying them: i) no organic molecule has been found at the two different landing sites of the Viking landers within the detection limits of the instruments onboard, ii) to date, no large deposits of carbonates have been detected and their detection is specific of local ar-eas and in very low amounts. In this context several experimental and numerical modelling studies were led to evaluate the possibility for the destruction or evolution of the organics and carbonates under the martian surface environmental conditions. The presence of UV radiation has been proposed to explain the photodecomposition of such material. This is the reason why, to investigate the nature, abundance, and stability of organic and mineral material that could survive under such environmental conditions, we exposed in low Earth orbit organic molecules and carbonates (also biominerals) with martian relevance to solar UV radiation ¿ 200 nm, in the frame of the experiment UVolution, onboard the BIOPAN ESA module which was set outside a Russian Foton automated capsule and exposed to space condition during 12 days in September 2007, and the experiment PROCESS (hervé peux tu rajouter quelques infos sur le temps exact d'exposition stp) which was set outside the International Space Station (ISS). Here, we present results with regard to the impact of solar UV radiation on the targeted molecules. Preliminary results indicate that that no organic sample seems to resist to the solar UV radiation if directly exposed to it. Conversely our results show that the exposed carbonates seem to be stable to the solar UV radiation if directly exposed to it. Moreover, the stability of the biominerals strengthens the interest to explore deeper their potential as life records at Mars. Hence they should be considered as primary targets for in situ analyses during future missions.

  3. Conditions for minimization of halo particle production during transverse compression of intense ion charge bunches in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX)

    Gilson, Erik P.; Chung, Moses; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail; Efthimion, Philip C.; Grote, David P.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.

    2007-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates propagation of a long, thin charged-particle bunch coasting through a multi-kilometer-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system by putting the physicist in the frame-of-reference of the beam. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by the same sets of equations-including all nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent quadrupolar voltages applied to the PTSX confinement electrodes correspond to the axially dependent magnetic fields applied in the AG system. This paper presents the results of experiments in which the amplitude of the applied confining voltage is changed over the course of the experiment in order to transversely compress a beam with an initial depressed tune ν/ν 0 ∼0.9. Both instantaneous and smooth changes are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on determining the conditions that minimize the emittance growth and, generally, the number of particles that are found at large radius (so-called halo particles) after the beam compression. The experimental data are also compared with the results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations performed with the WARP code

  4. Aluminium-12wt% silicon coating prepared by thermal spraying technique: Part 1 optimization of spray condition based on a design of experiment

    Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, thermal spray technology is used for maintenance parts of various machines in many industries. This technology can be used to improve the surface wear resistance. Therefore, this technology can significantly reduce cost of manufacturing. Al-12wt%Si alloy is an interesting and popular material used in the automotive industry. This research studies the suitable condition for spraying of Al-12wt%Si powder. This powder was sprayed by a flame spray technique onto low carbon steel substrates. The suitable conditions for spraying can be achieved by a design of experiment (DOE principle, which provided statistical data defined at 90% confidence. This research used control factors, which were oxygen flow rate, acetylene flow rate and spray distance. The satisfaction levels of these factors were set at 3 levels, i.e. low, medium and high, in order to determine suitable responses, which were hardness, thickness, wear rate and percentage volume fraction of porosity. It was found that the optimized condition for spraying Al-12wt%Si powder consisted of 38 ft3/hr (1.026 m3/hr of oxygen flow rate, 27 ft3/hr (0.729 m3/hr of acetylene flow rate and 58 mm of spray distance.

  5. Discriminant cognitive factors in responder and non-responder patients with schizophrenia.

    Stip, E; Lussier, I; Ngan, E; Mendrek, A; Liddle, P

    1999-12-01

    To identify which improvements in cognitive function are associated with symptom resolution in schizophrenic patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. a prospective open trial with atypical neuroleptics (risperidone, clozapine, quetiapine). Inpatient and outpatient units, Institute of Psychiatry. Thirty-nine patients with schizophrenia according to DSM-IV criteria were included. Clinical and cognitive assessment were done at baseline (T0) and again after six months of treatment (T2). Twenty-five patients completed the trial. New-generation antipsychotics during six months. Patients were considered as responders if their PANSS score decreased at least 20% (n = 15) and non-responders if it did not (n = 10). a computerized cognitive assessment comprised tests of short-term-memory (digit span), explicit long-term memory (word pair learning), divided attention, selective attention and verbal fluency (orthographic and semantic). Clinical assessment included PANSS and ESRS. A discriminant function analysis was performed to determine which changes in cognitive performance predicted symptomatic response status. Semantic fluency and orthographic fluency were significant predictors. Together they correctly predicted responder status in 88% of cases. Memory was not a significant predictor of symptomatic response. Verbal fluency discriminated the responder from the non-responder group during a pharmacological treatment.

  6. Ethanol induces impulsive-like responding in a delay-of-reward operant choice procedure: impulsivity predicts autoshaping.

    Tomie, A; Aguado, A S; Pohorecky, L A; Benjamin, D

    1998-10-01

    Autoshaping conditioned responses (CRs) are reflexive and targeted motor responses expressed as a result of experience with reward. To evaluate the hypothesis that autoshaping may be a form of impulsive responding, within-subjects correlations between performance on autoshaping and impulsivity tasks were assessed in 15 Long-Evans hooded rats. Autoshaping procedures [insertion of retractable lever conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by the response-independent delivery of food (US)] were followed by testing for impulsive-like responding in a two-choice lever-press operant delay-of-reward procedure (immediate small food reward versus delayed large food reward). Delay-of-reward functions revealed two distinct subject populations. Subjects in the Sensitive group (n=7) were more impulsive-like, increasing immediate reward choices at longer delays for large reward, while those in the Insensitive group (n=8) responded predominantly on only one lever. During the prior autoshaping phase, the Sensitive group had performed more autoshaping CRs, and correlations revealed that impulsive subjects acquired the autoshaping CR in fewer trials. In the Sensitive group, acute injections of ethanol (0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50 g/kg) given immediately before delay-of-reward sessions yielded an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve with increased impulsivity induced by the 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 g/kg doses of ethanol, while choice strategy of the Insensitive group was not influenced by ethanol dose. Ethanol induced impulsive-like responding only in rats that were flexible in their response strategy (Sensitive group), and this group also performed more autoshaping CRs. Data support the hypothesis that autoshaping and impulsivity are linked.

  7. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders: 2014 Edition

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2014-03-28

    This report summarizes commercially-available, hand-portable technologies that can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, this report is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use. Information listed in this report is primarily vendor-provided; however, where possible it has been supplemented with additional information obtained from publications, reports, and websites. Manufacturers were given the chance to review summaries of their technologies from August through November 2013 to verify the accuracy of technical specifications, available references, and pricing.

  8. How to define responders in osteoarthritis

    Cooper, Cyrus; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Bardin, Thomas; Berenbaum, Francis; Flamion, Bruno; Jonsson, Helgi; Kanis, John A.; Pelousse, Franz; Lems, Willem F.; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reiter, Susanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome of failure of the joint accompanied by varying degrees of joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life due to deterioration of articular cartilage and involvement of other joint structures. Scope Regulatory agencies require relevant clinical benefit on symptoms and structure modification for registration of a new therapy as a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). An international Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) and International Osteoporosis Foundation was convened to explore the current burden of osteoarthritis, review current regulatory guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials, and examine the concept of responder analyses for improving drug evaluation in osteoarthritis. Findings The ESCEO considers that the major challenges in DMOAD development are the absence of a precise definition of the disease, particularly in the early stages, and the lack of consensus on how to detect structural changes and link them to clinically meaningful endpoints. Responder criteria should help identify progression of disease and be clinically meaningful. The ideal criterion should be sensitive to change over time and should predict disease progression and outcomes such as joint replacement. Conclusion The ESCEO considers that, for knee osteoarthritis, clinical trial data indicate that radiographic joint space narrowing >0.5 mm over 2 or 3 years might be a reliable surrogate measure for total joint replacement. On-going research using techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical markers may allow the identification of these patients earlier in the disease process. PMID:23557069

  9. Effects of forest cover changes in European Russia on regional weather conditions: results of numerical experiments with the COSMO-CLM model

    Olchev, Alexander; Kuzmina, Ekaterina; Rozinkina, Inna; Nikitin, Mikhail; Rivin, Gdaly S.

    2017-04-01

    The forests have a significant effect on the climatic system. They capture CO2 from the atmosphere, regulate the surface evaporation and runoff, and influence the radiation and thermal conditions of the land surface. It is obvious, that their influence depends on many different factors including regional climate conditions, land use and vegetation structure, surface topography, etc. The main goal of the study is to assess the possible influence of forest cover changes (under deforestation and/or afforestation) on regional weather conditions in the central part of European Russia using the results of modeling experiments provided by the meso-scale COSMO-CLM model. The need of the study lies in a lack of the experimental and modeling data characterizing the influence of the forest and land-use changes on regional weather conditions in European part of Russia. The forest ecosystems in the study region play a very important biosphere role that is significantly increased in the last decades due to considerable strengthening of anthropogenic activity in the area of European Russia. The area selected for the study is located in the central part of European Russia between 55 and 59N and 28 and 37E. It comprises several geographical zones including dark-coniferous forests of the South-European taiga in the north, the mixed forests in the central part and the broad-leaved forests in the south. The forests within the study area are very heterogeneous. The total area covered by forests according to recent remote sensing data is about 50%. The numerical experiments were provided using the COSMO-CLM model with the spatial resolution 13.2 km. As initial and boundary conditions for the numerical experiments the global reanalysis ERA Interim (with the 6-hour resolution in time and 0.75° × 0.75° in space) were used. The weather conditions were simulated in a continuous cycle for several months for the entire area of European Russia using the results of global reanalysis on

  10. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study.

    Woolfall, Kerry; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth; Mok, Quen; Young, Bridget

    2015-09-18

    Alternatives to prospective informed consent to enable children with life-threatening conditions to be entered into trials of emergency treatments are needed. Across Europe, a process called deferred consent has been developed as an alternative. Little is known about the views and experiences of those with first-hand experience of this controversial consent process. To inform how consent is sought for future paediatric critical care trials, we explored the views and experiences of parents and practitioners involved in the CATheter infections in CHildren (CATCH) trial, which allowed for deferred consent in certain circumstances. Mixed method survey, interview and focus group study. 275 parents completed a questionnaire; 20 families participated in an interview (18 mothers, 5 fathers). 17 CATCH practitioners participated in one of four focus groups (10 nurses, 3 doctors and 4 clinical trial unit staff). 12 UK children's hospitals. Some parents were momentarily shocked or angered to discover that their child had or could have been entered into CATCH without their prior consent. Although these feelings resolved after the reasons why consent needed to be deferred were explained and that the CATCH interventions were already used in clinical care. Prior to seeking deferred consent for the first few times, CATCH practitioners were apprehensive, although their feelings abated with experience of talking to parents about CATCH. Parents reported that their decisions about their child's participation in the trial had been voluntary. However, mistiming the deferred consent discussion had caused distress for some. Practitioners and parents supported the use of deferred consent in CATCH and in future trials of interventions already used in clinical care. Our study provides evidence to support the use of deferred consent in paediatric emergency medicine; it also indicates the crucial importance of practitioner communication and appropriate timing of deferred consent discussions

  11. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study

    Woolfall, Kerry; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth; Mok, Quen; Young, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alternatives to prospective informed consent to enable children with life-threatening conditions to be entered into trials of emergency treatments are needed. Across Europe, a process called deferred consent has been developed as an alternative. Little is known about the views and experiences of those with first-hand experience of this controversial consent process. To inform how consent is sought for future paediatric critical care trials, we explored the views and experiences of parents and practitioners involved in the CATheter infections in CHildren (CATCH) trial, which allowed for deferred consent in certain circumstances. Design Mixed method survey, interview and focus group study. Participants 275 parents completed a questionnaire; 20 families participated in an interview (18 mothers, 5 fathers). 17 CATCH practitioners participated in one of four focus groups (10 nurses, 3 doctors and 4 clinical trial unit staff). Setting 12 UK children's hospitals. Results Some parents were momentarily shocked or angered to discover that their child had or could have been entered into CATCH without their prior consent. Although these feelings resolved after the reasons why consent needed to be deferred were explained and that the CATCH interventions were already used in clinical care. Prior to seeking deferred consent for the first few times, CATCH practitioners were apprehensive, although their feelings abated with experience of talking to parents about CATCH. Parents reported that their decisions about their child's participation in the trial had been voluntary. However, mistiming the deferred consent discussion had caused distress for some. Practitioners and parents supported the use of deferred consent in CATCH and in future trials of interventions already used in clinical care. Conclusions Our study provides evidence to support the use of deferred consent in paediatric emergency medicine; it also indicates the crucial importance of practitioner communication

  12. Torn between dual roles: the experiences of nurse-family members when a loved one is hospitalised in a critical condition.

    Giles, Tracey M; Williamson, Victoria

    2015-11-01

    To understand and interpret the experiences of nurse-family members when a family member or loved one is hospitalised in a critical condition. Having a family member hospitalised with a critical illness is a traumatic stressor, often with long-term sequelae. Providing holistic care for family members who are also nurses makes the provision of care more complex because of their professional expertise; yet few studies have explored this issue. In this descriptive study, qualitative data were collected using a questionnaire and analysed using van Manen's (Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy, 1990, State University of New York Press, London, ON) six-step approach. Twenty nurse-family members completed an online questionnaire in June 2013. Qualitative findings from 19 participants were included in the analysis. The phenomenological analysis approach described by van Manen (Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy, 1990, State University of New York Press, London, ON) was used to describe and interpret nurse-family member experiences. Nurse-family members experience significant dual role conflicts between their personal and professional personas due to their specialised knowledge, need for watchfulness and competing expectations. Our findings describe how dual role conflicts developed and were managed, and reveal the resultant emotional toll and psychological distress as nurse-family members struggled to resolve these conflicts. Nurse-family members require a different type of care than general public family members, yet their unique needs are often unmet, leading to increased anxiety and distress that could potentially be minimised. An increased awareness and emphasis on the nurse-family member experience can ensure health care professionals are better placed to provide appropriate and targeted care to minimise distressing dual role conflicts. There is a need for targeted and specialised

  13. When Familiar Is Not Better: 12-Month-Old Infants Respond to Talk about Absent Objects

    Osina, Maria A.; Saylor, Megan M.; Ganea, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments that demonstrate a novel constraint on infants' language skills are described. Across the experiments it is shown that as babies near their 1st birthday, their ability to respond to talk about an absent object is influenced by a referent's spatiotemporal history: familiarizing infants with an object in 1 or several nontest…

  14. Resistance to Change of Responding Maintained by Unsignaled Delays to Reinforcement: A Response-Bout Analysis

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Ward, Ryan D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2006-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that unsignaled delayed reinforcement decreases response rates and resistance to change. However, the effects of different delays to reinforcement on underlying response structure have not been investigated in conjunction with tests of resistance to change. In the present experiment, pigeons responded on a…

  15. The effects of extinction-aroused attention on context conditioning.

    Nelson, James Byron; Fabiano, Andrew M; Lamoureux, Jeffrey A

    2018-04-01

    Two experiments assessed the effects of extinguishing a conditioned cue on subsequent context conditioning. Each experiment used a different video-game method where sensors predicted attacking spaceships and participants responded to the sensor in a way that prepared them for the upcoming attack. In Experiment 1 extinction of a cue which signaled a spaceship-attack outcome facilitated subsequent learning when the attack occurred unsignaled. In Experiment 2 extinction of a cue facilitated subsequent learning, regardless of whether the spaceship outcome was the same or different as used in the earlier training. In neither experiment did the extinction context become inhibitory. Results are discussed in terms of current associative theories of attention and conditioning. © 2018 Nelson et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. CONDITION OF DECENTRALIZATION AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEGAL FORMS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONS OF UKRAINE IN THE CONTEXT OF THE GLOBAL EXPERIENCE

    Nadiia Kulchytska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the modern condition of decentralization and organizational legal forms of sustainable development of regions of Ukraine in the context of the global experience are analyzed, possible ways to overcome regional disparities are proved. A special place in scientific research article takes a significant number of modern researchers analyzed the theoretical and methodological foundations of a system of financial support of local authorities in the transition to decentralization of public administration. In this regard, particular relevance is the problem of defining the role of decentralization principles in forming the financial support of local government. The importance of decentralization in the process of local government reform is proved. The ways implementing decentralization in modern Ukraine are shown. The scientific approaches to determining the meaning and role of decentralization in a market economy are analyzed and summarized. Key words: decentralization, deconcentration of power, the territorial organization of government, local communities, dotatsiynist, sustainable development. JEL: H 70, R 58

  17. Called to respond: The potential of unveiling hiddens

    Alison L Black

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interested in exploring how personal stories and aesthetic modes of representing experiences can nudge open academic and educational spaces, this article/collection of particles seeks to document our encounters of being affected and called to respond to things the other has written and represented. As a way of engaging with questions about what research and research data might be and become, our attention has been drawn to stories and images from our lives that we have not shaken off – and to how, as we have opened these to the other, making once private moments public, our hiddens have morphed tenderly into a shared knowing and being. As we have acted on the call we have felt to respond we have found ourselves entering spaces of collaboration, communion, contemplation, and conversation – spaces illuminated by what we have not been able to – and cannot – set aside. Using visual and poetic materials we explore heartfelt and heartbroken aspects of our educational worlds and lives, to be present with each other and our (reemerging personal and professional meanings. We see the shared body (of work, of writing, of image that develops from the taking of brave steps and the risky slipping off of academic masks and language, as a manifestation of the trusted and nurturing spaces that can be generated through collaborative opportunities to gather together. These steps towards unveiling hiddens are producing in us and of us a friendship, fluency, and fluidity as we write new ways of becoming. In turn, we hope the uncovering and revealing of our dialogue in the public gathering of this journal might supports readers’ telling of their own life stories through what calls them to respond.

  18. "Dis-able bodied" or "dis-able minded": stakeholders' return-to-work experiences compared between physical and mental health conditions.

    Vossen, Emmie; Van Gestel, Nicolette; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M; Rouwette, Etiënne A J A

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to explore if and why the return-to-work (RTW) experiences of various workplace stakeholders in the Netherlands and Denmark differ between physical and mental health conditions, and to understand the consequences of potentially different experiences for the RTW process in both health conditions. We studied 21 cases of long-term sickness absence, and held a total of 61 semi-structured interviews with the various actors involved in these cases. Physical cases were seen as "easy" and mental cases as "difficult" to manage, based on the visibility and predictability of health complaints. On this ground, assessing work ability and following required RTW actions were perceived as more urgent in mental than in physical cases. Despite these perceptions, in practice, the assessment of work ability seemed to impair the RTW process in mental cases (but not in physical ones), and the (non-)uptake of RTW actions appeared to have similar results in both mental and physical cases. With these outcomes, the effectiveness of a differential approach is questioned, and the relevance of a bidirectional dialog on work ability and a phased RTW plan is highlighted, regardless of the absence cause. Our study also demonstrates how policymakers need to strike a balance between obligatory and permissive legislation to better involve workplaces in RTW issues. Implications for rehabilitation Both physically and mentally sick-listed employees could benefit from a bidirectional dialog on work ability as well as from a phased RTW plan. A greater role for employers in the RTW process should be accompanied with a support for sick-listed employees, in both physical and mental sickness absence cases. Dutch and Danish RTW legislation could be improved by carefully balancing obligatory and permissive rules and regulations to involve workplaces in RTW matters.

  19. WS-020: EPR-First Responders: Cards of response measures for first responders

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this working session is that the participants know how to use the cards of response measures for first responders. In a radiological emergency is useful to have cards which contains a list of the steps to be followed as well as the protection instructions and risk evaluation

  20. LIFE experiment: isolation of cryptoendolithic organisms from Antarctic colonized sandstone exposed to space and simulated Mars conditions on the international space station.

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE-Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  1. Severe Valproic Acid Intoxication Responding to Hemodialysis

    Ali Ertuğ Arslanköylü

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid is a commonly used antiepileptic drug which causes intoxication easily due to its narrow therapeutic window. Here, we present a child with valproic acid poisoning who responded to hemodialysis. A 14-year-old male patient with epilepsy and mental motor retardation was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to valproic acid intoxication. Plasma valproic acid level was 710 µg/mL. The patient’s vital signs were stable and a decrease was observed in the valproic acid and ammonia levels with supportive treatment at the beginning. On the third day of the admission, hemodynamic and mental status of the patient deteriorated, plasma ammonia and lactate levels elevated, thus, we decided to perform hemodialysis. After hemodialysis, the patient’s hemodynamic status and mental function improved in conjunction with the reduction in valproic acid, ammonia and lactate levels. Thus he was transferred to the pediatric ward. Hemodialysis may be considered an effective treatment choice for severe valproic acid intoxication. Here, it was shown that hemodialysis may also be effective in patients with deteriorated general status under supportive treatment in the late phase of valproic acid intoxication.

  2. Acquisition of peak responding: what is learned?

    Balci, Fuat; Gallistel, Charles R; Allen, Brian D; Frank, Krystal M; Gibson, Jacqueline M; Brunner, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how the common measures of timing performance behaved in the course of training on the peak procedure in C3H mice. Following fixed interval (FI) pre-training, mice received 16 days of training in the peak procedure. The peak time and spread were derived from the average response rates while the start and stop times and their relative variability were derived from a single-trial analysis. Temporal precision (response spread) appeared to improve in the course of training. This apparent improvement in precision was, however, an averaging artifact; it was mediated by the staggered appearance of timed stops, rather than by the delayed occurrence of start times. Trial-by-trial analysis of the stop times for individual subjects revealed that stops appeared abruptly after three to five sessions and their timing did not change as training was prolonged. Start times and the precision of start and stop times were generally stable throughout training. Our results show that subjects do not gradually learn to time their start or stop of responding. Instead, they learn the duration of the FI, with robust temporal control over the start of the response; the control over the stop of response appears abruptly later.

  3. The content of compound conditioning.

    Harris, Justin A; Andrew, Benjamin J; Livesey, Evan J

    2012-04-01

    In three experiments using Pavlovian conditioning of magazine approach, rats were trained with a compound stimulus, AB, and were concurrently trained with stimulus B on its own. The reinforcement rate of B, rB, was either 1/2, 2/3, or 2/5 of rAB. After extended training, the conditioning strength of A was assessed using probe trials in which A was presented alone. Responding during A was compared with that during AB, B, and a third stimulus, C, for which rC = rAB - rB. In each experiment, the rats' response rate during A was almost identical to that during C (and during B, when rB = 1/2rAB). This suggests that, during AB conditioning, the rats had learned about rA as being equal to [rAB - rB], and implies that the content of their learning was a linear function of r. The findings provide strong support for rate-based models of conditioning (e.g., Gallistel & Gibbon, 2000). They are also consistent with the associative account of learning defined in the Rescorla and Wagner (1972) model, but only if the learning rate during reinforcement equals that during nonreinforcement. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Anaemia with inflammation responding to lenalidomide.

    Haroun, Faysal; Mener, Andrew; Elkon, Jacob; Tabbara, Imad

    2016-10-13

    We present a case of a 73-year-old woman with transfusion-dependent anaemia thought to be secondary to an unidentifiable inflammatory condition. Anaemia evaluation including multiple bone marrow biopsies was unrevealing, with the exception of a non-specific elevation of her erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. She had no identifiable inflammatory condition and did not meet the criteria for myelodysplastic syndrome. She was empirically treated with lenalidomide and achieved a complete response, suggesting that this immunomodulatory drug could potentially have a role in treating a subgroup of patients with immune-mediated anaemia. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Effects of reinforcer magnitude on responding under differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedules of rats and pigeons.

    Doughty, Adam H; Richards, Jerry B

    2002-07-01

    Experiment I investigated the effects of reinforcer magnitude on differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) schedule performance in three phases. In Phase 1, two groups of rats (n = 6 and 5) responded under a DRI. 72-s schedule with reinforcer magnitudes of either 30 or 300 microl of water. After acquisition, the water amounts were reversed for each rat. In Phase 2, the effects of the same reinforcer magnitudes on DRL 18-s schedule performance were examined across conditions. In Phase 3, each rat responded unider a DR1. 18-s schedule in which the water amotnts alternated between 30 and 300 microl daily. Throughout each phase of Experiment 1, the larger reinforcer magnitude resulted in higher response rates and lower reinforcement rates. The peak of the interresponse-time distributions was at a lower value tinder the larger reinforcer magnitude. In Experiment 2, 3 pigeons responded under a DRL 20-s schedule in which reinforcer magnitude (1-s or 6-s access to grain) varied iron session to session. Higher response rates and lower reinforcement rates occurred tinder the longer hopper duration. These results demonstrate that larger reinforcer magnitudes engender less efficient DRL schedule performance in both rats and pigeons, and when reinforcer magnitude was held constant between sessions or was varied daily. The present results are consistent with previous research demonstrating a decrease in efficiency as a function of increased reinforcer magnituide tinder procedures that require a period of time without a specified response. These findings also support the claim that DRI. schedule performance is not governed solely by a timing process.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Transcription Machinery: Ready To Respond to Host Attacks

    Flentie, Kelly; Garner, Ashley L.

    2016-01-01

    Regulating responses to stress is critical for all bacteria, whether they are environmental, commensal, or pathogenic species. For pathogenic bacteria, successful colonization and survival in the host are dependent on adaptation to diverse conditions imposed by the host tissue architecture and the immune response. Once the bacterium senses a hostile environment, it must enact a change in physiology that contributes to the organism's survival strategy. Inappropriate responses have consequences; hence, the execution of the appropriate response is essential for survival of the bacterium in its niche. Stress responses are most often regulated at the level of gene expression and, more specifically, transcription. This minireview focuses on mechanisms of regulating transcription initiation that are required by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to respond to the arsenal of defenses imposed by the host during infection. In particular, we highlight how certain features of M. tuberculosis physiology allow this pathogen to respond swiftly and effectively to host defenses. By enacting highly integrated and coordinated gene expression changes in response to stress, M. tuberculosis is prepared for battle against the host defense and able to persist within the human population. PMID:26883824

  7. Calibration of new batches and a study of applications of nuclear track detectors under the harsh conditions of nuclear fusion experiments

    Malinowska, A., E-mail: a.malinowska@ncbj.gov.pl [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7 Str., 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Szydlowski, A.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.; Malinowski, K.; Kuk, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7 Str., 05-400 Otwock (Poland)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each new batch of PM-355 material should be carefully calibrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The detectors heated at a temperature higher than 100 Degree-Sign C demonstrate v nearly equal to 1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dependence of V{sub B} on the temperature is similar to the dependence of V{sub B} on the dose of electron and gamma radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aging effect of these materials also has a significant influence on the track diameter. - Abstract: This paper describes calibration studies of PM-355 detectors manufactured at different times in order to compare their sensitivity to the investigated ions. These studies were motivated by the application of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) in fusion experiments to measure energetic ions escaping from high-temperature plasmas. The CR-39 detector and its new versions such as PM-355, PM-500, PM-600 have been examined for several years at our institute. The PM-355 plastic appeared to be the best, especially for the detection of light ions. However, to use these detectors optimally, especially in spectroscopic measurements, each new batch of PM-355 material should be carefully calibrated. In high temperature plasma experiments the detectors operate under harsh conditions of high temperature, heat impact, intense X-ray, neutron and fast electron radiation. In order to evaluate the effect of these conditions on the crater formation process, some of the {alpha} particle- and proton-irradiated PM-355 detector samples were heated in an oven and then etched and scanned. Other alpha- and proton-irradiated samples were exposed to {gamma} and electron radiation of doses varying from 100 to 2000 kGy. The irradiated samples were then etched in steps and the bulk etching rate v{sub B} of the PM-355 material was determined. The craters induced by the projectiles in both heated and {gamma} and electron irradiated samples differ considerably from the

  8. Responding to the refusal of care in the emergency department.

    Nelson, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind; Davenport, Moira

    2014-01-01

    The emergency department (ED) serves as the primary gateway for acute care and the source of health care of last resort. Emergency physicians are commonly expected to rapidly assess and treat patients with a variety of life-threatening conditions. However, patients do refuse recommended therapy, even when the consequences are significant morbidity and even mortality. This raises the ethical dilemma of how emergency physicians and ED staff can rapidly determine whether patient refusal of treatment recommendations is based on intact decision-making capacity and how to respond in an appropriate manner when the declining of necessary care by the patient is lacking a basis in informed judgment. This article presents a case that illustrates the ethical tensions raised by the refusal of life-sustaining care in the ED and how such situations can be approached in an ethically appropriate manner.

  9. Comparison of MicroRNAs Mediated in Reactivation of the γ-Globin in β-Thalassemia Patients, Responders and Non-Responders to Hydroxyurea.

    Hojjati, Mohammad T; Azarkeivan, Azita; Pourfathollah, Ali A; Amirizadeh, Naser

    2017-03-01

    Drug induction of Hb F seems to be an ideal therapy for patients with hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, and many efforts have been made to reveal the mechanism behind it. Thus, we examined in vivo expression of some microRNAs (miRNAs) that are thought to be involved in this process. Among β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients who were undergoing hydroxyurea (HU) therapy in the past 3 months and five healthy individuals, five responders and five non-responders, were also included in the study. Erythroid progenitors were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and miRNA expression analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We showed that γ-globin, miR-210 and miR-486-3p had higher levels in the responders than the non-responders group. Moreover, miR-150 and miR-320 had higher levels in the healthy group than both non-responders and responders groups, but the expression of miR-96 did not show any significant difference between the study groups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study proposing that 'induction of cellular hypoxic condition by Hb F inducing agents' could be the milestone of possible mechanisms that explain why responders are able to reactivate γ-globin genes and subsequently, more production of Hb F, in response to these agents in comparison to non-responders. However, further investigations need to be performed to verify this hypothesis.

  10. Effects of ocean acidification on shell condition and survival of Puget Sound pteropods from laboratory experiment studies from 2012-05-10 to 2012-07-12 (NODC Accession 0125008)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains laboratory experiment data that were collected to examine the effects of ocean acidification on shell condition and survival of Puget...

  11. Long distance migratory songbirds respond to extremes in arctic seasonality

    Boelman, N.; Asmus, A.; Chmura, H.; Krause, J.; Perez, J. H.; Sweet, S. K.; Gough, L.; Wingfield, J.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic regions are warming rapidly, with extreme weather events increasing in frequency, duration and intensity, as in other regions. Many studies have focused on how shifting seasonality in environmental conditions affect the phenology and productivity of vegetation, while far fewer have examined how arctic fauna responds. We studied two species of long-distance migratory songbirds, Lapland longspurs, Calcarius lapponicus, and White-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, across seven consecutive breeding seasons in northern Alaskan tundra. We aimed to understand how spring environmental conditions affected breeding cycle phenology, food availability, body condition, stress physiology, and ultimately, reproductive success. Spring temperatures, precipitation, storm frequency, and snow-free dates differed significantly among years, with 2013 characterized by unusually late snow cover, and 2015 and 2016 characterized by unusually early snow-free dates and several late spring snowstorms. In response, we found that relative to other study years, there was a significant delay in breeding cycle phenology for both study species in 2013, while breeding cycle phenology was significantly earlier in 2015 only. For both species, we also found significant variation among years in: the seasonal patterns of arthropod availability during the nesting stage; body condition, and; stress physiology. Finally, we found significant variation in reproductive success of both species across years, and that daily survival rates were decreased by snow storm events. Our findings suggest that arctic-breeding passerine communities may be able to adjust phenology to unpredictable shifts in the timing of spring, but extreme conditions during the incubation and nestling stages are detrimental to reproductive success.

  12. First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics

    Nolan, Richard; Baker, Marie; Branson, Jake; Hammerstein, Josh; Rush, Kris; Waits, Cal; Schweinsberg, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics expands on the technical material presented in SEI handbook CMU/SEI-2005-HB-001, First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics [Nolan 05...

  13. The De-Icing Comparison Experiment (D-ICE): A campaign for improving data retention rates of radiometric measurements under icing conditions in cold regions

    Cox, C. J.; Morris, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes are fundamental quantities regularly observed globally using broadband radiometers. In cold climates, frost, rime, snow and ice (collectively, "icing") frequently builds up on sensor windows, contaminating measurements. Since icing occurs under particular meteorological conditions, associated data losses constitutes a climatological bias. Furthermore, the signal caused by ice is difficult to distinguish from that of clouds, hampering efforts to identify contaminated from real data in post-processing. Because of the sensitivity of radiometers to internal temperature instabilities, there are limitations to using heat as a de-icing method. The magnitude of this problem is indicated by the large number of research institutions and commercial vendors that have developed various de-icing strategies. The D-ICE campaign has been designed to bring together a large number of currently available systems to quantitatively evaluate and compare ice-migration strategies and also to characterize the potentially adverse effects of the techniques themselves. For D-ICE, a variety of automated approaches making use of ventilation, heating, modified housings and alcohol spray are being evaluated alongside standard units operating with only the regularly scheduled manual cleaning by human operators at the NOAA Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) station in Utqiaġvik (formerly Barrow), Alaska. Previous experience within the BSRN community suggests that aspiration of ambient air alone may be sufficient to maintain ice-free radiometers without increasing measurement uncertainty during icing conditions, forming the main guiding hypothesis of the experiment. Icing on the sensors is monitored visually using cameras recording images every 15 minutes and quantitatively using an icing probe and met station. The effects of applied heat on infrared loss in pyranometers will be analyzed and the integrated effect of icing on monthly averages will be

  14. A Canadian qualitative study exploring the diversity of the experience of family caregivers of older adults with multiple chronic conditions using a social location perspective.

    Williams, Allison; Sethi, Bharati; Duggleby, Wendy; Ploeg, Jenny; Markle-Reid, Maureen; Peacock, Shelley; Ghosh, Sunita

    2016-03-02

    A little-studied issue in the provision of care at home by informal caregivers is the increase in older adult patients with chronic illness, and more specifically, multiple chronic conditions (MCC). We know little about the caregiving experience for this population, particularly as it is affected by social location, which refers to either a group's or individual's place/location in society at a given time, based on their intersecting demographics (age, gender, education, race, immigration status, geography, etc.). We have yet to fully comprehend the combined influence of these intersecting axes on caregivers' health and wellbeing, and attempt to do this by using an intersectionality approach in answering the following research question: How does social location influence the experience of family caregivers of older adults with MCC? The data presented herein is a thematic analysis of a qualitative sub-set of a large two-province study conducted using a repeated-measures embedded mixed method design. A survey sub-set of 20 survey participants per province (n = 40 total) were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview. In the first stage of data analysis, Charmaz's (2006) Constructivist Grounded Theory Method (CGTM) was used to develop initial codes, focused codes, categories and descriptive themes. In the second and the third stages of analysis, intersectionality was used to develop final analytical themes. The following four themes describe the overall study findings: (1) Caregiving Trajectory, where three caregiving phases were identified; (2) Work, Family, and Caregiving, where the impact of caregiving was discussed on other areas of caregivers' lives; (3) Personal and Structural Determinants of Caregiving, where caregiving sustainability and coping were deliberated, and; (4) Finding Meaning/Self in Caregiving, where meaning-making was highlighted. The intersectionality approach presented a number of axes of diversity as comparatively more important

  15. Decision-making around moving on from full-time education: the roles and experiences of parents of disabled young people with degenerative conditions.

    Maddison, Jane; Beresford, Bryony

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about the decision-making processes that take place within families when a disabled young person is moving on from full-time education and, particularly, parents' roles and experiences. This paper reports the analysis of data collected from a subsample of parents (representing seventeen families) participating in the Choice and Change Project who had discussed choices associated with their child leaving full-time education. (The Choice and Change Project is a longitudinal, qualitative study of choice-making by four different groups of service users including disabled young people with degenerative conditions and their parents.) The data were collected from parents during up to three semi-structured interviews conducted over a thirty-month period. Descriptive theories of decision-making informed the analysis. Parents differed in the extent to which they were actively involved in making choices about the 'destination' of their child after leaving full-time education. To some extent, the ability of the young person to make choices themselves influenced this. Parents who were assuming responsibility for making choices stressed the importance of having relevant information and felt professionals had a key role to play in supporting access to information. Parents used a number of criteria to guide their choice-making, including distance from home, perceived quality of the environment and staff and the young person's responses to the setting. Much of the information needed to make a choice required a visit to all the possible options. Ensuring such visits were positive and useful experiences for themselves and their child could be very difficult; support to achieve these visits was highly valued but not routinely provided. The study also highlights the lack of recognition given to the significant amount of work that many parents undertake to ensure that a choice is realised, and also to the emotional journey parents take when making or assisting in such

  16. Long-term nitrogen addition affects the phylogenetic turnover of soil microbial community responding to moisture pulse.

    Liu, Chi; Yao, Minjie; Stegen, James C; Rui, Junpeng; Li, Jiabao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2017-12-13

    How press disturbance (long-term) influences the phylogenetic turnover of soil microbial communities responding to pulse disturbances (short-term) is not fully known. Understanding the complex connections between the history of environmental conditions, assembly processes and microbial community dynamics is necessary to predict microbial response to perturbation. We started by investigating phylogenetic spatial turnover (based on DNA) of soil prokaryotic communities after long-term nitrogen (N) deposition and temporal turnover (based on RNA) of communities responding to pulse by conducting short-term rewetting experiments. The results showed that moderate N addition increased ecological stochasticity and phylogenetic diversity. In contrast, high N addition slightly increased homogeneous selection and decreased phylogenetic diversity. Examining the system with higher phylogenetic resolution revealed a moderate contribution of variable selection across the whole N gradient. The moisture pulse experiment showed that high N soils had higher rates of phylogenetic turnover across short phylogenetic distances and significant changes in community compositions through time. Long-term N input history influenced spatial turnover of microbial communities, but the dominant community assembly mechanisms differed across different N deposition gradients. We further revealed an interaction between press and pulse disturbances whereby deterministic processes were particularly important following pulse disturbances in high N soils.

  17. An integrative literature review on preparing nursing students through simulation to recognize and respond to the deteriorating patient.

    Fisher, Duana; King, Lindy

    2013-11-01

    To synthesize studies that explored simulation as preparation of nursing students for recognition and response to the deteriorating patient. New graduate nurses are expected to have the skills to recognize and respond to rapidly deteriorating patient conditions. To this end, education programmes have turned increasingly to simulation to assist students to gain the necessary skills. Integrative review. CINAHL, Informit, ProQuest, Ovid MEDLINE, SAGE Journals and Web of Knowledge electronic databases, keywords and inclusion/exclusion criteria were searched. Eighteen studies published between 2004-2012 were found. Studies were appraised using recognized evaluation tools. Thematic analysis was undertaken and emergent themes were extracted with similar and divergent perspectives sought. Six themes were identified namely, 'transferability of simulation skills to clinical practice', 'exposure to broader range of experiences', 'confidence levels in relation to simulation training', 'competence/performance', 'clinical judgment' and 'student perceptions of preparedness for practice following simulation'. Simulation exposes students to a broader range of experiences whilst in a safe environment with transference of skills to clinical practice occurring. Confidence, clinical judgement, knowledge and competence, all vital in the care of a deteriorating patient, were enhanced. However, evidence of simulation used specifically to prepare nursing students to recognize and respond to the deteriorating patient appeared limited. This educational field appears rich for interprofessional collaboration and further research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Soil acidification occurs under ambient conditions but is retarded by repeated drought: Results of a field-scale climate manipulation experiment

    Kopittke, G.R.; Tietema, A., E-mail: A.Tietema@uva.nl; Verstraten, J.M.

    2012-11-15

    Acid atmospheric emissions within Europe and North America have decreased strongly since 1985 and most recent acidification studies have focused on the changes occurring within ecosystems as a result of this decreased deposition. This current study documents a soil acidification trend under ambient N deposition conditions over a 13 year period, suggesting that acidification continues to be a process of concern at this Calluna vulgaris dominated heathland with an acidic sandy soil. The annual manipulation of climatic conditions on this heathland simulated the predicted summer rainfall reduction (drought) and resulted in a long term retardation of the soil acidification trend. The pH of the soil solution significantly decreased over the course of the trial for both treatments, however, in the final 2 years the decline continued only in the Control treatment. This retardation is primarily associated with the reduction in rainfall leading to lower drainage rates, reduced loss of cations and therefore reduced lowering of the soil acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). However, a change in the underlying mechanisms also indicated that N transformations became less important in the Drought treatment. This change corresponded to an increase in groundcover of an air-pollution tolerant moss species and it is hypothesized that this increasing moss cover filtered an increasing quantity of deposited N, thus reducing the N available for transformation. A soil acidification lag time is expected to increase between the two treatments due to the cumulative disparity in cation retention and rates of proton formation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study in which such acidification trends have been demonstrated in a field-scale climate manipulation experiment. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A unique investigation of acidification on a field-scale climate manipulation trial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil acidification occurred over 13 years of ambient N

  19. Assessment of key transport parameters in a karst system under different dynamic conditions based on tracer experiments: the Jeita karst system, Lebanon

    Doummar, Joanna; Margane, Armin; Geyer, Tobias; Sauter, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Artificial tracer experiments were conducted in the mature karst system of Jeita (Lebanon) under various flow conditions using surface and subsurface tracer injection points, to determine the variation of transport parameters (attenuation of peak concentration, velocity, transit times, dispersivity, and proportion of immobile and mobile regions) along fast and slow flow pathways. Tracer breakthrough curves (TBCs) observed at the karst spring were interpreted using a two-region nonequilibrium approach (2RNEM) to account for the skewness in the TBCs' long tailings. The conduit test results revealed a discharge threshold in the system dynamics, beyond which the transport parameters vary significantly. The polynomial relationship between transport velocity and discharge can be related to the variation of the conduit's cross-sectional area. Longitudinal dispersivity in the conduit system is not a constant value (α = 7-10 m) and decreases linearly with increasing flow rate because of dilution effects. Additionally, the proportion of immobile regions (arising from conduit irregularities) increases with decreasing water level in the conduit system. From tracer tests with injection at the surface, longitudinal dispersivity values are found to be large (8-27 m). The tailing observed in some TBCs is generated in the unsaturated zone before the tracer actually arrives at the major subsurface conduit draining the system. This work allows the estimation and prediction of the key transport parameters in karst aquifers. It shows that these parameters vary with time and flow dynamics, and they reflect the geometry of the flow pathway and the origin of infiltrating (potentially contaminated) recharge.

  20. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.